WorldWideScience

Sample records for adherent cell layer

  1. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. II. Differential effect of adherent cell layers derived from various organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived adherent cell populations promoted proliferation of haemopoietic cells in vitro in a liquid culture system for at least 4 weeks. Adherent cell layers derived from other haemopoietic organs (foetal liver, adult spleen) and fibroblasts from embryonic tissues did not maintain

  2. Establishment of an adherent cell layer from human umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Zeni Z.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to bone marrow and peripheral blood, stem cells also occur in human umbilical cord blood (HUCB, and there is an increasing interest in the use of this material as an alternative source for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. In vitro hematopoiesis has been maintained for up to 16 weeks in HUCB cultures, but the establishment of an adherent, stromal layer has consistently failed. Adherent cell precursors among mononuclear cells from HUCB were sought for in long-term cultures. Mononuclear cells obtained from cord blood after full term, normal deliveries were cultivated at different concentrations in Iscove's modified Dulbecco's medium (IMDM with weekly feeding. An adherent layer was detected in 16 of 30 cultures, 12 of which were plated at cell concentrations higher than 2 x 10(6 cells/ml. In contrast to bone marrow cultures, in which the stroma is detected early, in most (10/16 positive cultures from HUCB the adherent layer was identified only after the fourth week of culture. The cells never reached confluence and detached from the plate approximately four weeks after detection. May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining of positive cultures revealed fibroblast- or endothelial-like adherent cells in an arrangement different from that of bone marrow stroma in 13 samples. In two of these, the adherent cells were organized into characteristic, delimited cords of cells. Unlike bone marrow cultures, fat cells were never observed in the adherent layers. A rapid development of large myeloid cells in the first week of culture was characteristic of negative cultures and these cells were maintained for up to 12 weeks. HUCB contains adherent cell precursors which occur in lower numbers than in bone marrow and may be at a different (possibly less mature stage of differentiation.

  3. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. I. Culture conditions and strain dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The culture system, in which a marrow-derived adherent cell population, established in vitro, exerts a long-term promoting influence on proliferation of haemopoietic cells, is reproduced. Essential parameters of the system are investigated; it is confirmed that the system is critically dependent on

  4. Inhibition of Shigella sonnei adherence to HT-29 cells by lactobacilli from Chinese fermented food and preliminary characterization of S-layer protein involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Lan-Wei; Tuo, Yan-Feng; Guo, Chun-Feng; Yi, Hua-Xi; Li, Jing-Yan; Han, Xue; Du, Ming

    2010-10-01

    In this study, seven lactobacilli with a high degree of antagonistic activity against three pathogens and good adherence to HT-29 cells were selected. The ability of these seven lactobacilli to inhibit adhesion of Shigella sonnei to intestinal mucosa was studied on cultured HT-29 cells. Lactobacilli were added simultaneously with, before or after S. sonnei to test for their effectiveness in exclusion, competition and displacement assays, respectively. Lactobacillus paracasei subp. paracasei M5-L, Lactobacillus rhamnosus J10-L and Lactobacillus casei Q8-L all exhibited significant inhibitory activity. In order to elucidate the inhibitory functions of S-layer proteins, the S-layer proteins were removed with 5 M LiCl from the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains. Under such conditions, inhibition activity was decreased in all three strains, as revealed in exclusion, competition and displacement assays. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the presence of S-layer proteins with dominant bands of approximately 45 kDa. Further analysis of S-layer proteins revealed that the hydrophobic amino acids accounted for 40.5%, 41.5% and 43.8% of the total amino acid for the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains, respectively. These findings suggest that the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains possess the ability to inhibit S. sonnei adherence to HT-29 cells, and S-layer proteins are involved in this adhesion inhibition.

  5. Characterization of a S-layer protein from Lactobacillus crispatus K313 and the domains responsible for binding to cell wall and adherence to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhilan; Kong, Jian; Hu, Shumin; Kong, Wentao; Lu, Wenwei; Liu, Wei

    2013-03-01

    It was previously shown that the surface (S)-layer proteins covering the cell surface of Lactobacillus crispatus K313 were involved in the adherence of this strain to human intestinal cell line HT-29. To further elucidate the structures and functions of S-layers, three putative S-layer protein genes (slpA, slpB, and slpC) of L. crispatus K313 were amplified by PCR, sequenced, and characterized in detail. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis reveals that slpA was silent under the tested conditions; whereas slpB and slpC, the putative amino acid sequences which exhibited minor similarities to the previously reported S-layer proteins in L. crispatus, were actively expressed. slpB, which was predominantly expressed in L. crispatus K313, was further investigated for its functional domains. Genetic truncation of the untranslated leader sequence (UTLS) of slpB results in a reduction in protein production, indicating that the UTLS contributed to the efficient S-layer protein expression. By producing a set of N- and C-terminally truncated recombinant SlpB proteins in Escherichia coli, the cell wall-binding region was mapped to the C terminus, where rSlpB(380-501) was sufficient for binding to isolated cell wall fragments. Moreover, the binding ability of the C terminus was variable among the Lactobacillus species (S-layer- and non-S-layer-producing strains), and teichoic acid may be acting as the receptor of SlpB. To determine the adhesion region of SlpB to extracellular matrix proteins, ELISA was performed. Binding to immobilized types I and IV collagen was observed with the His-SlpB(1-379) peptides, suggesting that the extracellular matrix protein-binding domain was located in the N terminus.

  6. Physics of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-07-01

    One of the most unique physical features of cell adhesion to external surfaces is the active generation of mechanical force at the cell-material interface. This includes pulling forces generated by contractile polymer bundles and networks, and pushing forces generated by the polymerization of polymer networks. These forces are transmitted to the substrate mainly by focal adhesions, which are large, yet highly dynamic adhesion clusters. Tissue cells use these forces to sense the physical properties of their environment and to communicate with each other. The effect of forces is intricately linked to the material properties of cells and their physical environment. Here a review is given of recent progress in our understanding of the role of forces in cell adhesion from the viewpoint of theoretical soft matter physics and in close relation to the relevant experiments.

  7. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tracheal cells injured by influenza infection or by endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphal, R; Small, P M; Shands, J W; Fischlschweiger, W; Small, P A

    1980-02-01

    Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to normal, injured, and regenerating tracheal mucosa was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Uninfected and influenza-infected murine tracheas were exposed to six strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from human sources and one strain of platn origin. All of the strains tested adhered to desquamating cells of the infected tracheas, but not to normal mucosa, the basal cell layer, or the regenerating epithelium. Adherence increased when the incubation time of the bacteria with the trachea was prolonged. Strains isolated from human tracheas appeared to adhere better than strains derived from the urinary tract. After endotracheal intubation of ferrets, P. aeruginosa adhered only to the injured cells and to areas of exposed basement membrane. We call this phenomenon "opportunistic adherence" and propose that alteration of the cell surfaces or cell injury facilitates the adherence of this bacterium and that adherence to injured cells may be a key to the pathogenesis of opportunistic Pseudomonas infections.

  8. ANALYSIS OF MICROBUCKLING FOR MONOMOLECULAR LAYERS ADHERING TO A SUBSTRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张田忠; 郭万林; 李国强

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional linear spring model is established to study themicrobuckling of a plane monomolecular layer adhering to a substrate. The modelis for the layer subjected to a compressive load having an arbitrary angle with thechemical bond of the layer. The effects of the load angle, the strength of adhesionand the bending stiffness and shearing stiffness (the capability of resisting transversebending and in-plane shearing) of the layer on the minimal buckling force and thecritical buckling mode are discussed. It is found that the minimal buckling forceincreases with increasing load angle and, for a given bending stiffness, increases withincreasing strength of adhesion and decreasing shearing stiffness. Furthermore, acritical condition under which the buckling of the layer can just occur is obtained,which is helpful to avoid buckling in an engineering application.

  9. Adherence of Moraxella bovis to cell cultures of bovine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuar, B O; Wilcox, G E

    1985-09-01

    The adherence of five strains of Moraxella bovis to cell cultures was investigated. M bovis adhered to cultures of bovine corneal epithelial and Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells but not to cell types of non-bovine origin. Both piliated and unpiliated strains adhered but piliated strains adhered to a greater extent than unpiliated strains. Antiserum against pili of one strain inhibited adherence of piliated strains but caused only slight inhibition of adherence to the unpiliated strains. Treatment of bacteria with magnesium chloride caused detachment of pili from the bacterial cell and markedly inhibited adherence of piliated strains but caused only slight inhibition of adherence by the unpiliated strains. The results suggested that adhesion of piliated strains to cell cultures was mediated via pili but that adhesins other than pili may be involved in the attachment of unpiliated strains of M bovis to cells.

  10. Automated microinjection system for adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youoku, Sachihiro; Suto, Yoshinori; Ando, Moritoshi; Ito, Akio

    2007-07-01

    We have developed an automated microinjection system that can handle more than 500 cells an hour. Microinjection injects foreign agents directly into cells using a micro-capillary. It can randomly introduce agents such as DNA, proteins and drugs into various types of cells. However, conventional methods require a skilled operator and suffer from low throughput. The new automated microinjection techniques we have developed consist of a Petri dish height measuring method and a capillary apex position measuring method. The dish surface height is measured by analyzing the images of cells that adhere to the dish surface. The contrast between the cell images is minimized when the focus plane of an object lens coincides with the dish surface. We have developed an optimized focus searching method with a height accuracy of +/-0.2 um. The capillary apex position detection method consists of three steps: rough, middle, and precise. These steps are employed sequentially to cover capillary displacements of up to +/-2 mm, and to ultimately accomplish an alignment accuracy of less than one micron. Experimental results using this system we developed show that it can introduce fluorescent material (Alexa488) into adherent cells, HEK293, with a success rate of 88.5%.

  11. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  12. Method of detaching adherent cells for flow cytometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2015-12-24

    In one aspect, a method for detaching adherent cells can include adding a cell lifting solution to the media including a sample of adherent cells and incubating the sample of adherent cells with the cell lifting solution. No scraping or pipetting is needed to facilitate cell detachment. The method do not require inactivation of cell lifting solution and no washing of detaching cells is required to remove cell lifting solution. Detached cells can be stained with dye in the presence of cell lifting solution and are further analyzed using flow cytometer. The method has been tested using 6 different cell lines, 4 different assays, two different plate formats (96 and 384 well plates) and two different flow cytometry instruments. The method is simple to perform, less time consuming, with no cell loss and makes high throughput flow cytometry on adherent cells a reality.

  13. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  14. Cargo delivery to adhering myoblast cells from liposome-containing poly(dopamine) composite coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Martin Elias Lynge; Mian Teo, Boon; Laursen, Marie Bækgaard;

    2013-01-01

    Designing surfaces to deliver therapeutic compounds to adhering cells is of paramount importance for both implantable devices and tissue engineering. We report the assembly of composite films consisting of liposomes as drug deposits in a poly(dopamine) matrix. We monitor the film assembly using...... a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. We assess the response of adhering myoblast cells to these films containing fluorescent lipids in terms of uptake efficiency and cell mean fluorescence using flow cytometry. The viability of adhering myoblast cells, when the hydrophobic cytotoxic compound...... thiocoraline is entrapped in the lipid membrane, is assessed for different films. Coatings with one or two liposome deposition steps are considered. Further, the effect of the polymer separation layers between the liposome layers is determined. We found that it is possible to use the different nano...

  15. A large mobility of hydrophilic molecules at the outmost layer controls the protein adsorption and adhering behavior with the actin fiber orientation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Seo, Ji-Hun; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yui, Nobuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2013-01-01

    Adhesion behaviors of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are interestingly affected by the mobility of hydrophilic chains on the material surfaces. Surfaces with different molecular mobilities were prepared using ABA-type block copolymers consisting polyrotaxane (PRX) or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) central block (A block), and amphiphilic anchoring B blocks of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB). Two different molecular mobilities of the PRX chains were designed by using normal α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) or α-CD whose hydroxyl groups were converted to methoxy groups in a given ratio to improve its molecular mobility (PRX-PMB and OMe-PRX-PMB). The surface mobility of these materials was assessed as the mobility factor (Mf), which is measured by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring system. HUVECs adhered on OMe-PRX-PMB surface much more than PRX-PMB and PMB-block-PEG-block-PMB (PEG-PMB) surfaces. These different HUVEC adhesions were correlated with the density of cell-binding site of adsorbed fibronectin. In addition, the alignment of the actin cytoskeleton of adhered HUVECs was strongly suppressed on the PEG-PMB, PRX-PMB, and OMe-PRX-PMB in response to the increased Mf value. Remarkably, the HUVECs adhered on the OMe-PRX-PMB surface with much less actin organization. We concluded that not only the cell adhesion but also the cellular function are regulated by the molecular mobility of the outmost material surfaces.

  16. Inverting adherent cells for visualizing ECM interactions at the basal cell side

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudzenko, Tetyana [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Franz, Clemens M., E-mail: clemens.franz@kit.edu [DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1a, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) govern a wide range of cellular functions, including survival, migration and invasion. However, in adherent cells these interactions occur primarily on the basal cell side, making them inaccessible to high-resolution, surface-scanning imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Here we describe a fast and reliable method for inverting adherent cells, exposing the basal cell membrane for direct analysis by AFM or SEM in combination with fluorescence microscopy. Cells including their matrix adhesion sites remain intact during the inversion process and are transferred together with the complete array of basally associated ECM proteins. Molecular features of ECM proteins, such as the characteristic 67 nm collagen D-periodicity, are well preserved after inversion. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, we compared basal interactions of fibroblasts with fibrillar collagen I and fibronectin matrices. While fibroblasts remodel the fibronectin layer exclusively from above, they actively invade even thin collagen layers by contacting individual collagen nanofibrils both basally and apically through a network of cellular extensions. Cell–matrix entanglement coincides with enhanced cell spreading and flattening, indicating that nanoscale ECM interactions govern macroscopic changes in cell morphology. The presented cell inversion technique can thus provide novel insight into nanoscale cell–matrix interactions at the basal cell side. - Highlights: ► We present a novel method for inverting adherent cells to expose the basal cell side. ► Basal cell sides can be imaged at high resolution by AFM and SEM. ► Cells can be inverted together with the underlying extracellular matrix. ► AFM images of inverted cells provide a nanoscale look at basal cell–ECM interactions.

  17. Pinpointing differences in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in adherent and non-adherent cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Holm, Jacob Bak; Poulsen, Kristian Arild

    2010-01-01

    Platinum compounds are used in the treatment of cancer. We demonstrate that cisplatin-induced (10 µM) apoptosis (caspase-3 activity) is pronounced within 18 hours in non-adherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC), whereas there is no increase in caspase-3 activity in the adherent Ehrlich Lettré...... ascites tumour cells (ELA). Loss of KCl and cell shrinkage are hallmarks in apoptosis and has been shown in EATC. However, we find no reduction in cell volume and only a minor loss of K(+) which is accompanied by net uptake of Na(+) following 18 hours cisplatin exposure in ELA. Glutathione and taurine...... have previously been demonstrated to protect cells from apoptosis. We find, however, that increase or decrease in the cellular content of glutathione and taurine has no effect on cisplatin-induced cell death in EATC and ELA. Nevertheless, knock-down of the taurine transporter TauT leads...

  18. Microfluidic bioreactors for culture of non-adherent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioreactors (μBR) are becoming increasingly popular for cell culture, sample preparation and analysis in case of routine genetic and clinical diagnostics. We present a novel μBR for non-adherent cells designed to mimic in vivo perfusion of cells based on diffusion of media through...

  19. Adherence of human basophils to cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which circulating human basophils adhere to vascular endothelium and migrate to sites of allergic reactions is unknown. Agents have been identified which stimulate the adherence of purified basophils to cultured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HuVEC). Treatment of HuVEC with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), bacterial endotoxin, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in time and dose-dependent increases of adhesiveness for basophils...

  20. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature.

  1. Detection of adherence imperfections at the inteface of substrate-coating layer by using infrared thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Murariu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents Infrared Thermography (IRT for non-destructive examination of the imperfections in the coatings layers deposited by Electric Arc Spraying (EASP, designed to assess the dimension and position of the lack of adhesion, as a typical imperfection placed at the interface between the coating layer and the base material. Metallographic analyses were used to confirm the absence or presence of imperfections, enabling establishment of the etalon for non-destructive examination and detection of adherence imperfections at the coating–substrate interface layer, together with optimum process parameters, obtained by experiments.

  2. Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palto Alto, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  3. Optimal shapes and stresses of adherent cells on patterned substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a continuum mechanical model for an adherent cell on two dimensional adhesive micropatterned substrates. The cell is modeled as an isotropic and homogeneous elastic material subject to uniform internal contractile stresses. The build-up of tension from cortical actin bundles at the cell periphery is incorporated by introducing an energy cost for bending of the cell boundary, resulting to a resistance to changes in local curvature. Integrin-based adhesions are modeled as harmonic springs, that pin the cell to adhesive patches of a predefined geometry. Using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical techniques we investigate the competing effects of bulk contractility and cortical bending rigidity in regulating cell shapes on non-adherent regions. We show that the crossover from convex to concave cell edges is controlled by the interplay between contractile stresses and boundary bending rigidity. In particular, the cell boundary becomes concave beyond a critical value of the contractile stress that ...

  4. Regulation of Cellular Tension in Adherent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Cells generate stress on their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) via myosin II motor generated forces which are transmitted through the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms in the cell which regulate the magnitude and spatial distribution of these stresses, however, remain unknown. Consistent with previous reports, we find that the total magnitude of traction force exerted on the ECM scales with cell size. Such scaling is observed across numerous cell types and reflects an inherent cellular tension determined by the level of myosin II activity. Surprisingly, while stiffness modulates the cellular spread area, we find this scaling relationship to be independent of ECM stiffness. To identify the biophysical mechanisms regulating the generation of tension, we utilize micro-patterning to isolate cell spread area from cell geometry and to spatially control the distribution of stress on the ECM. We find that traction stress magnitude is dependent on the local curvature of the cell. Changes in cell geometry result in a redistribution of local stresses, but little change in the total stress applied to the ECM. Finally, for a constant geometry, we find that both the total stress and the average stress exerted on the ECM increase with cell area. Together these data suggest that the cell can be modeled as a uniformly contracting mesh, where the magnitude of tension is regulated by the cell spread area, and the distribution of tension is regulated by local geometry.

  5. Fabrication of Patterned Thermoresponsive Microgel Strips on Cell-Adherent Background and Their Application for Cell Sheet Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yongqing; Tang, Ying; Wu, Han; Zhang, Jing; Li, Zongyi; Pan, Fang; Wang, Shengjie; Wang, Xiaojuan; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian Ren

    2017-01-18

    Interfaces between materials and cells play a critical role in cell biomedical applications. Here, a simple, robust, and cost-effective method is developed to fabricate patterned thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-styrene) microgel strips on a polyethyleneimine-precoated, non-thermoresponsive cell-adherent glass coverslip. The aim is to investigate whether cell sheets could be harvested from these cell-adherent surfaces patterned with thermoresponsive strips comprised of the microgels. We hypothesize that if the cell-to-cell interaction is strong enough to retain the whole cell sheet from disintegration, the cell segments growing on the thermoresponsive strips may drag the cell segments growing on the cell-adherent gaps to detach, ending with a whole freestanding and transferable cell sheet. Critical value concerning the width of the thermoresponsive strip and its ratio to the non-thermoresponsive gap may exist for cell sheet recovery from this type of surface pattern. To obtain this critical value, a series of strip patterns with various widths of thermoresponsive strip and non-thermoresponsive gap were prepared using negative microcontact printing technology, with COS7 fibroblast cells being used to test the growth and detachment. The results unraveled that COS7 cells preferentially attached and proliferated on the cell-adherent, non-thermoresponsive gaps to form patterned cell layers and that they subsequently proliferated to cover the microgel strips to form a confluent cell layer. Intact COS7 cell sheets could be recovered when the width of the thermoresponsive strip is no smaller than that of the non-thermoresponsive gap. Other cells such as HeLa, NIH3T3, 293E, and L929 could grow similarly; that is, they showed initial preference to the non-thermoresponsive gaps and then migrated to cover the entire patterned surface. However, it was difficult to detach them as cell sheets due to the weak interactions within the cell layers formed. In contrast

  6. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  7. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  8. Characterization of Adherent Nonhematopoietic Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安小惠; 蔡国平

    2003-01-01

    To confirm and characterize the adherent fibroblast-like progenitors in human umbilical cord blood, we isolated mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Hypaque.Two main morphologically different kinds of cells were formed by culturing the cells in collagen-coated 24-well plastic dishes and flasks.One type was the adherent fibroblast-like cells, while the other was loosely adherent clonally expanded round cells.Our experiments demonstrate that the adherent fibroblast-like cells possess multilineage potential, including the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like cells and to express the mesenchymal cell marker.

  9. High throughput RNAi assay optimization using adherent cell cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan Leena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background siRNA technology is a promising tool for gene therapy of vascular disease. Due to the multitude of reagents and cell types, RNAi experiment optimization can be time-consuming. In this study adherent cell cytometry was used to rapidly optimize siRNA transfection in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (AoSMC. Methods AoSMC were seeded at a density of 3000-8000 cells/well of a 96well plate. 24 hours later AoSMC were transfected with either non-targeting unlabeled siRNA (50 nM, or non-targeting labeled siRNA, siGLO Red (5 or 50 nM using no transfection reagent, HiPerfect or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. For counting cells, Hoechst nuclei stain or Cell Tracker green were used. For data analysis an adherent cell cytometer, Celigo® was used. Data was normalized to the transfection reagent alone group and expressed as red pixel count/cell. Results After 24 hours, none of the transfection conditions led to cell loss. Red fluorescence counts were normalized to the AoSMC count. RNAiMax was more potent compared to HiPerfect or no transfection reagent at 5 nM siGLO Red (4.12 +/-1.04 vs. 0.70 +/-0.26 vs. 0.15 +/-0.13 red pixel/cell and 50 nM siGLO Red (6.49 +/-1.81 vs. 2.52 +/-0.67 vs. 0.34 +/-0.19. Fluorescence expression results supported gene knockdown achieved by using MARCKS targeting siRNA in AoSMCs. Conclusion This study underscores that RNAi delivery depends heavily on the choice of delivery method. Adherent cell cytometry can be used as a high throughput-screening tool for the optimization of RNAi assays. This technology can accelerate in vitro cell assays and thus save costs.

  10. Endometrial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Menstrual Blood by Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To find a convenient and efficient way to isolate MSCs from human menstrual blood and to investigate their biological characteristics, proliferative capacity, and secretion levels. Methods. MSCs were isolated from menstrual blood of 3 healthy women using adherence. Cell immunological phenotype was examined by flow cytometry; the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs was examined by Oil-Red-O staining, ALP staining, and Alcian Blue staining, respectively; and the secretion of cytokines, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, was detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. MB-MSCs were successfully isolated from human menstrual blood using adherence. They were positive for CD73, CD105, CD29, and CD44, but negative for CD31 and CD45. The differentiated MB-MSCs were positive for ALP staining, Oil-Red-O staining, and Alcian Blue staining. In addition, they could secrete antiapoptotic cytokines, such as VEGF, IGF-1, and HGF. Conclusion. It is feasible to isolate MSCs from human menstrual blood, thus avoiding invasive procedures and ethical controversies. Adherence could be a promising alternative to the density gradient centrifugation for the isolation of MSCs from menstrual blood.

  11. Fetal hemoglobin accumulation in vitro. Effect of adherent mononuclear cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Javid, J; Pettis, P K

    1983-01-01

    In clonal cultures of erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) obtained from blood, the accumulation of fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb F and Hb A) was measured by radioligand immunoassay. Inclusion of adherent mononuclear cells in the culture promoted a striking increase in the relative amount of Hb F in each of 44 experiments with 14 donors. In two-thirds of the instances, this was accounted for by a selective increase in the absolute amount of Hb F. The differential effect on Hb F and Hb A ac...

  12. A fully automated system for adherent cells microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an automated robotic system to perform cell microinjections to relieve human operators from this highly difficult and tedious manual procedure. The system, which uses commercial equipment currently found on most biomanipulation laboratories, consists of a multitask software framework combining computer vision and robotic control elements. The vision part features an injection pipette tracker and an automatic cell targeting system that is responsible for defining injection points within the contours of adherent cells in culture. The main challenge is the use of bright-field microscopy only, without the need for chemical markers normally employed to highlight the cells. Here, cells are identified and segmented using a threshold-based image processing technique working on defocused images. Fast and precise microinjection pipette positioning over the automatically defined targets is performed by a two-stage robotic system which achieves an average injection rate of 7.6 cells/min with a pipette positioning precision of 0.23 μm. The consistency of these microinjections and the performance of the visual targeting framework were experimentally evaluated using two cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK) and over 500 cells. In these trials, the cells were automatically targeted and injected with a fluorescent marker, resulting in a correct cell detection rate of 87% and a successful marker delivery rate of 67.5%. These results demonstrate that the new system is capable of better performances than expert operators, highlighting its benefits and potential for large-scale application.

  13. Photosensitizer Adhered to Cell Culture Microplates Induces Phototoxicity in Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments in plastic receptacles are the basis of characterization of new photosensitizers (PSs for the photodynamic therapy. We recently reported that lipophilic PSs adhere to cell culture microplates in a kinetic-like manner (Engelhardt et al., 2011. In the current study, we examined the interaction and phototoxic effects of the microplate-adhered PS in cancer cells. Therefore, we preloaded microplates with hypericin, Foscan, PVP-hypericin, or aluminum (III phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPCS4 for 24 hours and measured the PS distribution after addition of A431 human carcinoma cells: following another 24 hours up to 68% of hypericin were detected in the cell fraction. The hydrophilic PVP-hypericin and AlPCS4 also diffused into the cells, but the quantities of PS adherence were considerably lower. Microplate-adhered Foscan appeared not to be redistributed. In contrast to the hydrophilic PSs, the cellular phototoxicity of microplate-adhered lipophilic PS was high, independent of whether the PS (i was pre-loaded onto microplates or (ii added simultaneously with the cells or (iii one day after cell seeding. Based on these results, we suggest testing lipophilic PS dyes for their adherence to microplates. Furthermore, the ability of plastic materials to (reversibly store PSs might represent a new approach for the PS delivery or the development of antimicrobial coatings.

  14. Calculations of the Acceleration of Centrifugal Loading on Adherent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Song, Yang; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Chunqiu

    2017-07-01

    Studies have shown that the morphology and function of living cells are greatly affected by the state of different high acceleration. Based on the centrifuge, we designed a centrifugal cell loading machine for the mechanical biology of cells under high acceleration loading. For the machine, the feasibility of the experiment was studied by means of constant acceleration or variable acceleration loading in the Petri dish fixture and/or culture flask. Here we analyzed the distribution of the acceleration of the cells with the change of position and size of the culturing device quantitatively. It is obtained that Petri dish fixture and/or culture flask can be used for constant acceleration loading by experiments; the centripetal acceleration of the adherent cells increases with the increase of the distance between the rotor center of the centrifuge and the fixture of the Petri dish and the size of the fixture. It achieves the idea that the general biology laboratory can conduct the study of mechanical biology at high acceleration. It also provides a basis for more accurate study of the law of high acceleration on mechanobiology of cells.

  15. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  16. Adherence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to primary cultures of porcine lung epithelial cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, B.K.H.L.; Stockhofe, N.; Smith, H.E.; Kamp, E.M.; Putten, van J.P.; Verheijden, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    To study adherence of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to porcine lower respiratory epithelium, a cell culture model was developed using primary cultures of porcine lung epithelial cells (LEC). Adherence assays were performed and results were compared with data obtained with swine kidney cells (SK6).

  17. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  18. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ratnesh K.; Mallela, Ramya K.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Reifler, Aaron N.; Chervenak, Andrew P.; West, Michael D.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Nasonkin, Igor O.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue for

  19. Investigation of Streptococcus salivarius-mediated inhibition of pneumococcal adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jayne; Dunne, Eileen M; Wescombe, Philip A; Hale, John D F; Mulholland, E Kim; Tagg, John R; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Satzke, Catherine

    2016-09-29

    Pneumococcal adherence to the nasopharyngeal epithelium is a critical step in colonisation and disease. The probiotic bacterium, Streptococcus salivarius, can inhibit pneumococcal adherence to epithelial cells in vitro. We investigated the mechanism(s) of inhibition using a human pharyngeal epithelial cell line (Detroit 562) following pre-administration of two different strains of S. salivarius. Whilst the bacteriocin-encoding megaplasmids of S. salivarius strains K12 and M18 were essential to prevent pneumococcal growth on solid media, they were not required to inhibit pneumococcal adherence. Experiments testing S. salivarius K12 and two pneumococcal isolates (serotypes 19F and 6A) showed that inhibition of 19F may involve S. salivarius-mediated blocking of pneumococcal binding sites: a negative correlation was observed between adherence of K12 and 19F, and no inhibition occurred when K12 was prevented from contacting epithelial cells. K12-mediated inhibition of adherence by 6A may involve additional mechanisms, since no correlation was observed between adherence of K12 and 6A, and K12 could inhibit 6A adherence in the absence of cell contact. These results suggest that S. salivarius employs several mechanisms, including blocking pneumococcal binding sites, to reduce pneumococcal adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells. These findings extend our understanding of how probiotics may inhibit pneumococcal adherence and could assist with the development of novel strategies to prevent pneumococcal colonisation in the future.

  20. Detachment and sonoporation of adherent HeLa-cells by shock wave-induced cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of lithotripter-generated shock waves with adherent cells is investigated using high-speed optical techniques. We show that shock waves permeabilize adherent cells in vitro through the action of cavitation bubbles. The bubbles are formed in the trailing tensile pulse of a lithotripte

  1. The StcE metalloprotease of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli reduces the inner mucus layer and promotes adherence to human colonic epithelium ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hews, Claire L; Tran, Seav-Ly; Wegmann, Udo; Brett, Bernard; Walsham, Alistair D S; Kavanaugh, Devon; Ward, Nicole J; Juge, Nathalie; Schüller, Stephanie

    2017-01-05

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a major foodborne pathogen and tightly adheres to human colonic epithelium by forming attaching/effacing lesions. To reach the epithelial surface, EHEC must penetrate the thick mucus layer protecting the colonic epithelium. In this study, we investigated how EHEC interacts with the intestinal mucus layer using mucin-producing LS174T colon carcinoma cells and human colonic mucosal biopsies. The level of EHEC binding and attaching/effacing lesion formation in LS174T cells was higher compared to mucin-deficient colon carcinoma cell lines, and initial adherence was independent of the presence of flagellin, Escherichia coli common pilus, or long polar fimbriae. Although EHEC infection did not affect gene expression of secreted mucins, it resulted in reduced MUC2 glycoprotein levels. This effect was dependent on the catalytic activity of the secreted metalloprotease StcE, which reduced the inner mucus layer and thereby promoted EHEC access and binding to the epithelium in vitro and ex vivo. Given the lack of efficient therapies against EHEC infection, StcE may represent a suitable target for future treatment and prevention strategies.

  2. Additive effect of red blood cell rigidity and adherence to endothelial cells in inducing vascular resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, D K; Koshkaryev, A; Artmann, G; Barshtein, G; Yedgar, S

    2008-10-01

    To explore the contribution of red blood cell (RBC) deformability and interaction with endothelial cells (ECs) to circulatory disorders, these RBC properties were modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and their effects on vascular resistance were monitored following their infusion into rat mesocecum vasculature. Treatment with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) increased RBC/EC adherence without significant alteration of RBC deformability. At 5.0 mM H(2)O(2), RBC deformability was considerably reduced, inducing a threefold increase in the number of undeformable cells, whereas RBC/EC adherence was not further affected by the increased H(2)O(2) concentration. This enabled the selective manipulation of RBC adherence and deformability and the testing of their differential effect on vascular resistance. Perfusion of RBCs with enhanced adherence and unchanged deformability (treatment with 0.5 mM H(2)O(2)) increased vascular resistance by about 35% compared with untreated control RBCs. Perfusion of 5.0 mM H(2)O(2)-treated RBCs, with reduced deformability (without additional increase of adherence), further increased vascular resistance by about 60% compared with untreated control RBCs. These results demonstrate the specific effects of elevated adherence and reduced deformability of oxidized RBCs on vascular resistance. These effects can be additive, depending on the oxidation conditions. The oxidation-induced changes applied in this study are moderate compared with those observed in RBCs in pathological states. Yet, they caused a considerable increase in vascular resistance, thus demonstrating the potency of RBC/EC adherence and RBC deformability in determining resistance to blood flow in vivo.

  3. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  4. THE TRANSMEMBRANE SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN HEp-2 CELLS INDUCED BY BACTERIAL ADHERENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In order to understand the role of transmembrane signal transduction of host cells in the early steps of infection,the adherence of E. coli to HEp-2 cells and the change of activity of phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) induced by the adherence were investigated.The adherence of enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC), strain E.7, induced a significant increase of inositol-triphosphat (IP-3) level in HEp-2 cells. The adherence of the bacteria and the increase of IP-3 was kinetically correlated. Whereas the increase of IP3 level induced by the adherence of the control strain EPEC (H511), a non-piliated strain, was much meager than that by E7, a piliated strain. The results highlighted an important role of transmembrane signals like IP-3 in the pathogenesis of EPEC.

  5. Is treatment adherence associated with better quality of life in children with sickle cell disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Lamia P; Lutz, Meredith; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku

    2005-03-01

    The association of treatment adherence with quality of life (QOL) and the role of sickle cell disease complications were explored in children with sickle cell disease. Primary caregivers of 43 children, ages 5 years and older, and 21 children, ages 8 years and older, completed a standardized measure of QOL during an admission for pain or fever to the hematology acute care unit. Adherence was measured through medical staff ratings, caregiver-report of sickle cell disease-related care activities, and matching of medical staff standard recommendations for treatment of pain and fever with sickle cell disease-related care activities. Sickle cell disease complications were assessed via medical file review. Pearson correlation coefficients indicated that better adherence was associated with poorer overall QOL. In follow-up analyses, although sickle cell disease complications were associated with adherence, it did not explain the negative correlation of adherence with QOL. Higher treatment adherence may interfere with activities that contribute to QOL for some children. Further research to investigate the role of sickle cell disease complications, as well as psychosocial factors, in determining both treatment adherence and QOL is suggested.

  6. Localized electroporation effect on adherent cells in modified electric cell-substrate impedance sensing circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jin; Ram Song, Ka; Kim, Hee-Dae; Park, Bum Chul; Kim, Young Keun; Kang, Chi Jung

    2016-10-01

    Electroporation is a physical transfection method for introducing foreign genes or drugs into cells. It does not require toxic reagents or transfection vectors. However, its applications have been limited because of cell damage and nonspecific transport. Here, we present an effective method for selective and localized electroporation using atomic force microscopy. This electroporation method is applied to adherent cells on substrates, instead of conventionally used suspended cells, and offers relatively effective cell transfection. Moreover, this method enables localized transfection into targeted areas at the single-cell level.

  7. Adhesion functions in cell sorting by mechanically coupling the cortices of adhering cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Berthoumieux, Hélène; Krens, Simon Frederik Gabriel; Salbreux, Guillaume; Jülicher, Frank; Paluch, Ewa; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2012-10-12

    Differential cell adhesion and cortex tension are thought to drive cell sorting by controlling cell-cell contact formation. Here, we show that cell adhesion and cortex tension have different mechanical functions in controlling progenitor cell-cell contact formation and sorting during zebrafish gastrulation. Cortex tension controls cell-cell contact expansion by modulating interfacial tension at the contact. By contrast, adhesion has little direct function in contact expansion, but instead is needed to mechanically couple the cortices of adhering cells at their contacts, allowing cortex tension to control contact expansion. The coupling function of adhesion is mediated by E-cadherin and limited by the mechanical anchoring of E-cadherin to the cortex. Thus, cell adhesion provides the mechanical scaffold for cell cortex tension to drive cell sorting during gastrulation.

  8. Cell fusion through a microslit between adhered cells and observation of their nuclear behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ken-Ichi; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Eitaro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a novel cell fusion method which induces cell fusion between adhered cells through a microslit for preventing nuclear mixing. For this purpose, a microfluidic device which had ∼ 100 cell pairing structures (CPSs) making cell pairs through microslits with 2.1 ± 0.3 µm width was fabricated. After trapping NIH3T3 cells with hydrodynamic forces at the CPSs, the cells were fused through the microslit by the Sendai virus envelope method. With following timelapse observation, we discovered that the spread cells were much less susceptible to nuclear migration passing through the microslit compared with round cells, and that cytoplasmic fraction containing mitochondria was transferred through the microslit without nuclear mixing. These findings will provide an effective method for cell fusion without nuclear mixing, and will lead to an efficient method for reprograming and transdifferentiation of target cells toward regenerative medicine.

  9. Laminin-adherent versus suspension-non-adherent cell culture conditions for the isolation of cancer stem cells in the DAOY medulloblastoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Javier; Sáenz Antoñanzas, Ander; Shahi, Mehdi H; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A; Castresana, Javier S

    2016-09-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a highly malignant tumor of childhood. MB seems to be initiated and maintained by a small group of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). The CSC hypothesis suggests that a subset of tumor cells is able to proliferate, sustain the tumor, and develop chemoresistance, all of which make of CSC an interesting target for new anticancer therapies. The MB cell line DAOY was cultured in suspension by a medullosphere traditional culturing method and in adherent conditions by laminin-pre-coated flasks and serum-free medium enriched with specific growth factors. An increase in the stem features was shown when cells were successively cultured in hypoxia conditions. By contrast, a reduction in these properties was appreciated when cells were exposed to differentiation conditions. In addition, the CD133+ and CD133- subpopulations were isolated from cells grown in laminin-pre-coated flasks, and in vitro experiments showed that the CD133+ fraction represented the stem population and it could have CSC with a higher probability than the CD133- fraction. We can conclude that the laminin culture method in adherent conditions and the medullosphere traditional culturing method in suspension are similarly good for obtaining stem-like cells in the DAOY cell line.

  10. Enhanced adherence of mouse fibroblast and vascular cells to plasma modified polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, Alena, E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyně University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rimpelova, Silvie [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Since the last decade, tissue engineering has shown a sensational promise in providing more viable alternatives to surgical procedures for harvested tissues, implants and prostheses. Biomedical polymers, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were activated by Ar plasma discharge. Degradation of polymer chains was examined by determination of the thickness of ablated layer. The amount of an ablated polymer layer was measured by gravimetry. Contact angle, measured by goniometry, was studied as a function of plasma exposure and post-exposure aging times. Chemical structure of modified polymers was characterized by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface chemistry and polarity of the samples were investigated by electrokinetic analysis. Changes in surface morphology were followed using atomic force microscopy. Cytocompatibility of plasma activated polyethylene foils was studied using two distinct model cell lines; VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) as a model for vascular graft testing and connective tissue cells L929 (mouse fibroblasts) approved for standardized material cytotoxicity testing. Specifically, the cell number, morphology, and metabolic activity of the adhered and proliferated cells on the polyethylene matrices were studied in vitro. It was found that the plasma treatment caused ablation of the polymers, resulting in dramatic changes in their surface morphology and roughness. ARXPS and electrokinetic measurements revealed oxidation of the polymer surface. It was found that plasma activation has a positive effect on the adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs and L929 cells. - Highlights: • Plasma activation of LDPE, HDPE and UHMWPE • Study of surface properties by several techniques: ARXPS, AFM, zeta-potential, and goniometry • Investigation of adhesion and spreading of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and mouse fibroblasts (L929)

  11. Generation of a patterned co-culture system composed of adherent cells and immobilized nonadherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Ichikawa, Takashi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2016-02-01

    Patterned co-culture is a promising technique used for fundamental investigation of cell-cell communication and tissue engineering approaches. However, conventional methods are inapplicable to nonadherent cells. In this study, we aimed to establish a patterned co-culture system composed of adherent and nonadherent cells. Nonadherent cells were immobilized on a substrate using a cell membrane anchoring reagent conjugated to a protein, in order to incorporate them into the co-culture system. Cross-linked albumin film, which has unique surface properties capable of regulating protein adsorption, was used to control their spatial localization. The utility of our approach was demonstrated through the fabrication of a patterned co-culture consisting of micropatterned neuroblastoma cells surrounded by immobilized myeloid cells. Furthermore, we also created a co-culture system composed of cancer cells and immobilized monocytes. We observed that monocytes enhanced the drug sensitivity of cancer cells and its influence was limited to cancer cells located near the monocytes. Therefore, the incorporation of nonadherent cells into a patterned co-culture system is useful for creating culture systems containing immune cells, as well as investigating the influence of these immune cells on cancer drug sensitivity. Various methods have been proposed for creating patterned co-culture systems, in which multiple cell types are attached to a substrate with a desired pattern. However, conventional methods, including our previous report published in Acta Biomaterialia (2010, 6, 526-533), are unsuitable for nonadherent cells. Here, we developed a novel method that incorporates nonadherent cells into the co-culture system, which allows us to precisely manipulate and study microenvironments containing nonadherent and adherent cells. Using this technique, we demonstrated that monocytes (nonadherent cells) could enhance the drug sensitivity of cancer cells and that their influence had a

  12. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  13. Adherence of clinically isolated lactobacilli to human cervical cells in competition with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielfort, Katarina; Sjölinder, Hong; Roos, Stefan; Jonsson, Hans; Aro, Helena

    2008-10-01

    Lactobacilli are normal inhabitants of our microbiota and are known to protect against pathogens. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a human specific pathogenic bacterium that colonises the urogenital tract where it causes gonorrhoea. In this study we analysed early interactions between lactobacilli and gonococci and investigated how they compete for adherence to human epithelial cervical cells. We show that lactobacilli adhere at various levels and that the number of adherent bacteria does not correlate to the level of protection against gonococcal infection. Protection against gonococcal adhesion varied between Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus reuteri were capable of reducing gonococcal adherence while Lactobacillus rhamnosus was not. Lactobacillus strains of vaginal origin had the best capacity to remain attached to the host cell during gonococcal adherence. Further, we show that gonococci and lactobacilli interact with each other with resultant lactobacilli incorporation into the gonococcal microcolony. Hence, gonococci bind to colonised lactobacilli and this complex frequently detaches from the epithelial cell surface, resulting in reduced bacterial colonisation. Also, purified gonococcal pili are capable of removing adherent lactobacilli from the cell surface. Taken together, we reveal novel data regarding gonococcal and lactobacilli competition for adherence that will benefit future gonococcal prevention and treatments.

  14. Distinct mechanical behavior of HEK293 cells in adherent and suspended states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Kihara, Takanori; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical features of individual animal cells have been regarded as indicators of cell type and state. Previously, we investigated the surface mechanics of cancer and normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states using atomic force microscopy. Cancer cells possessed specific mechanical and actin cytoskeleton features that were distinct from normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states. In this paper, we report the unique mechanical and actin cytoskeletal features of human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Unlike normal stromal and cancer cells, the surface stiffness of adherent HEK293 cells was very low, but increased after cell detachment from the culture surface. Induced actin filament depolymerization revealed that the actin cytoskeleton was the underlying source of the stiffness in suspended HEK293 cells. The exclusive mechanical response of HEK293 cells to perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton resembled that of adherent cancer cells and suspended normal stromal cells. Thus, with respect to their special cell-surface mechanical features, HEK293 cells could be categorized into a new class distinct from normal stromal and cancer cells.

  15. Adherence and invasion of mouse-adapted H pylori in different epithelial cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Jun Zhang; Fan-Liang Meng; Xiao-Yun Ji; Li-Hua He; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the adhesion and invasion abilities of different mouse adapted H pylori strains in different cell lines in vitro and investigate their effects on the virulence factors cagA and vacA.METHODS: The adherence and invasion abilities of different H pylori strains in different epithelial cell lines were examined by the gentamycin protection assay. The null mutants of cagA and vacA were processed by direct PCR mutation method. The morphologic changes of different cell lines after H pylori attachment were examined by microscopy.RESULTS: The densities of adherence to and invasion into cells in vitro were different from those in the mouse infection experiments. 88-3887 strain could invade and adhere to cells stronger than SSI and X47. All tested strains had better adhering and invasive abilities in SCG-7901 cell. CagA and vacA minus mutants had the same invasion and adherent abilities as their wild types. In all strains and cell lines tested, only AGS cell had the significant hummingbird phenotype after inoculation with the 88-3887 wild-type.CONCLUSION: Both the host cells and the bacteria play important parts in the invasion and adhesion abilities of H pylori. CagA and VacA are not related to the ability of invasion and adhesion of Hpylori in different cell lines in vitro.

  16. Tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells assessed by different cell labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Herberman, R B; Hokland, M

    1992-01-01

    Assessment of the tissue distribution of adoptively transferred adherent lymphokine-activated killer A-LAK) cells by use of 51Cr indicated that these effector cells, after an initial phase in the lungs, distributed in high numbers to liver and spleen (30% and 10% of injected dose, respectively...... staining of asialo-GM1-positive cells appear to be reliable and essentially equivalent methods for investigations of the fate of adoptively transferred A-LAK cells. Using these methods, we found that only few A-LAK cells redistribute to the liver upon i.v., i.e. systemic, injection, whereas 40......). However, when this experiment was repeated with 125IdUrd as cell label, fewer than 2% and 0.5% of the injected cells distributed into liver and spleen respectively. To analyse this discrepancy, we compared the tissue distribution of 51Cr- and 125IdUrd-labelled A-LAK cells with that indicated...

  17. Two-step protocol for preparing adherent cells for high-throughput flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Esau, Luke

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a simple, cost-effective, and labor-efficient two-step protocol for preparing adherent cells for high-throughput flow cytometry. Adherent cells were grown on microplates, detached with 2.9 mM EDTA (pH 6.14) added directly to wells containing cell culture medium, stained, and then analyzed on a flow cytometer. This protocol bypasses washing, centrifugation, and transfer between plates, reducing the cell loss that occurs in standard multistep protocols. The method has been validated using six adherent cell lines, four commercially available dyes, and two antibodies; the results have been confirmed using two different flow cytometry (FC) instruments. Our approach has been used for estimating apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, and autophagy in response to exposure to pure compounds as well as plant and bacterial extracts.

  18. Effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on the adherence of pathogenic bacteria to human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faden, H.; Hong, J.J.; Ogra, P.L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of RSV infection on the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP), Haemophilus influenzae (HI) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) to human epithelial cells was determined. RSV-infected Hep-2 cell cultures at different stages of expression of surface viral antigens and bacteria labeled with /sup 3/H-thymidine were employed to examine the kinetics of bacterial adherence to virus-infected cells. RSV infection did not alter the magnitude of adherence of HI or SA to HEp-2 cells. However, adherence of SP to HEp-2 cells was significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced by prior RSV infection. The degree of adherence was directly related to the amount of viral antigen expressed on the cell surface. The adherence was temperature dependent, with maximal adherence observed at 37/sup 0/C. Heat-inactivation of SP did not alter adherence characteristics. These data suggest that RSV infection increases adherence of SP to the surface of epithelial cells in vitro. Since attachment of bacteria to mucosal surfaces is the first step in many infections, it is suggested that viral infections of epithelial cells render them more susceptible to bacterial adherence. Thus, RSV infection in vivo may predispose children to SP infections, such as in otitis media, by increasing colonization with SP.

  19. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan NA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Natalie A Duncan,1 William G Kronenberger,2 Kisha C Hampton,1 Ellen M Bloom,1 Angeli G Rampersad,1 Christopher P Roberson,1 Amy D Shapiro11Department of Hematology, Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, 2Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine Riley and Child Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation.Methods: A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures.Results: Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89 and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales.Conclusion: The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. Keywords: penicillin prophylaxis, SCAALE, newborn screening program, Sickle SAFE Program, hemoglobinopathy, compliance

  20. Recombinant spider silk with cell binding motifs for specific adherence of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhe, Mona; Johansson, Ulrika; Hillerdahl, Carl-Olof; Hedhammar, My

    2013-11-01

    Silk matrices have previously been shown to possess general properties governing cell viability. However, many cell types also require specific adhesion sites for successful in vitro culture. Herein, we have shown that cell binding motifs can be genetically fused to a partial spider silk protein, 4RepCT, without affecting its ability to self-assemble into stable matrices directly in a physiological-like buffer. The incorporated motifs were exposed in the formed matrices, and available for binding of integrins. Four different human primary cell types; fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells and Schwann cells, were applied to the matrices and investigated under serum-free culture conditions. Silk matrices with cell binding motifs, especially RGD, were shown to promote early adherence of cells, which formed stress fibers and distinct focal adhesion points. Schwann cells acquired most spread-out morphology on silk matrices with IKVAV, where significantly more viable cells were found, also when compared to wells coated with laminin. This strategy is thus suitable for development of matrices that allow screening of various cell binding motifs and their effect on different cell types. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration.

  2. Kingella kingae expresses type IV pili that mediate adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Miller, Sara E; St Geme, Joseph W

    2008-11-01

    Kingella kingae is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the respiratory tract and is a common cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Despite the increasing frequency of K. kingae disease, little is known about the mechanism by which this organism adheres to respiratory epithelium and seeds joints and bones. Previous work showed that K. kingae expresses long surface fibers that vary in surface density. In the current study, we found that these fibers are type IV pili and are necessary for efficient adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells and that the number of pili expressed by the bacterium correlates with the level of adherence to synovial cells but not with the level of adherence to respiratory cells. In addition, we established that the major pilin subunit is encoded by a pilA homolog in a conserved region of the chromosome that also contains a second pilin gene and a type IV pilus accessory gene, both of which are dispensable for pilus assembly and pilus-mediated adherence. Upon examination of the K. kingae genome, we identified two genes in physically separate locations on the chromosome that encode homologs of the Neisseria PilC proteins and that have only a low level homology to each other. Examination of mutant strains revealed that both of the K. kingae PilC homologs are essential for a wild-type level of adherence to both respiratory epithelial and synovial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that type IV pili and the two PilC homologs play important roles in mediating K. kingae adherence.

  3. Cell surface and transcriptional characterization of human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Adam J; Tholpady, Ashok; Tholpady, Sunil S; Shang, Hulan; Ogle, Roy C

    2005-03-01

    Adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue contains cells with intriguing multilineage developmental plasticity, much like marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Putative stem or progenitor cells from fat have been given many different names in the literature, reflecting an early and evolving consensus regarding their phenotypic characterization. The study reported here used microarrays to evaluate over 170 genes relating to angiogenesis and extracellular matrix in undifferentiated, early-passage human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells isolated from three separate donors. The hADAS populations unanimously transcribed 66% of the screened genes, and 83% were transcribed by at least two of the three populations. The most highly transcribed genes relate to functional groupings such as cell adhesion, matrix proteins, growth factors and receptors, and proteases. The transcriptome of hADAS cells demonstrated by this work reveals many similarities to published profiles of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In addition, flow analysis of over 24 hADAS cell surface proteins (n = 7 donors) both confirms and expands on the existing literature and reveals strong intergroup correlation, despite an inconsistent nomenclature and the lack of standardized protocols for cell isolation and culture. Finally, based on flow analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction studies, our results suggest that hADAS cells do not express several proteins that are implicated as markers of "stemness" in other stem cell populations, including telomerase, CD133, and the membrane transporter ABCG2.

  4. Adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO GU; JIN YING CHEN; MIN HOU; JING DONG HE; JI WU CHANG

    2006-01-01

    Human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis was established to investigate the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to this cell line, in which the primary cell culture was performed by using cultivation of the normal epithelium of renal pelvis in keratinocyte serum free medium (K-SFM)with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and bovine pituitary extract (BPE). Both UPEC132 obtained from urine specimen of patients with pyelonephritis and the pilus-free representative strain E. coli K-12p678-54 were used to study the adherence of these strains on human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis.The UPEC adherence was performed with observation on the morphological changes of the adhered cells,while the adhesion rates and indices were calculated in different times of experiment. In addition, the virulence genes hly and cnf1 of UPEC132 were detected by multiplex PCR assay. In this study, the human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis was found to exhibit the character of the transitional epithelial cells. Compared with the control group, the adhesion rates and indices began to increase from 15 min of the experiment time and reached its peak in 120 min. The adhesion rate and index of UPEC132 to human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis were 74.4% and 34.0 respectively. Many microscopic changes in the primary cells adhered with UPEC132 could be detected, such as rounding or irregularity in shape,unevenness in staining and the cytoplasmic and nuclear changes. It suggests that human primary epithelial cells of renal pelvis can be used for the experiment on UPEC adhesion, thus providing a basis for the further study on the pathogenesis of UPEC.

  5. Identification of Corynebacterium diphtheriae gene involved in adherence to epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodkina, Valentina; Denisevich, Tatyana; Titov, Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae the causative pathogen of human diphtheria infects the nasopharynx or skin. Although diphtheria has been extensively studied, little is known about the two key aspects of C. diphtheriae invasiveness: colonization and invasion. The role of adhesive properties in establishing the infection of C. diphtheriae strains, independent of toxin production, still needs to be clarified. In this study, we describe a novel gene involved in adherence to epithelial cells. Transformation of C. diphtheriae 225, biotype gravis, ribotype St-Petersburg by EZ:TN(KAN-2)Tnp Transposome was undertaken. A C. diphtheriae 225 Tn5 insertion library of 2800 mutants was created. Five hundred and eighty five transformants were qualitatively screened for reduced adherence to HEp-2 cells by an adherence assay. One mutant strain consistently exhibiting 15.2% of the wild-type adherence was isolated. The DNA flanking the transposon was identified by inverse PCR and subsequent sequencing. The disrupted gene was 94% identical to the C. diphtheriae DIP1621 gene that belongs to unclassified genes. In conclusion, the disruption of the C. diphtheriae DIP1621 gene led to decreased adherence to epithelial cells; its exact function remains to be established.

  6. Apa is a trimeric autotransporter adhesin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae responsible for autoagglutination and host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Longwen; Zhou, Liang; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Du, ChongTao; Gao, Yu; Ji, Qun; Yang, Shuxin; Wang, Yu; Han, Wenyu; Langford, P R; Lei, Liancheng

    2012-10-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, and adherence to host cells is a key step in the pathogenic process. Although trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) were identified in many pathogenic bacteria in recent years, none in A. pleuropneumoniae have been characterized. In this study, we identified a TAA from A. pleuropneumoniae, Apa, and characterized the contribution of its amino acid residues to the adhesion process. Sequence analysis of the C-terminal amino acid residues of Apa revealed the presence of a putative translocator domain and six conserved HsfBD1-like or HsfBD2-like binding domains. Western blot analysis revealed that the 126 C-terminal amino acids of Apa could form trimeric molecules. By confocal laser scanning microscopy, one of these six domains (ApaBD3) was determined to mediate adherence to epithelial cells. Adherence assays and adherence inhibition assays using a recombinant E. coli- ApaBD3 strain which expressed ApaBD3 on the surface of E. coli confirmed that this domain was responsible for the adhesion activity. Moreover, cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays demonstrated that ApaBD3 mediated high-level adherence to epithelial cell lines. Intriguingly, autoagglutination was observed with the E. coli- ApaBD3 strain, and this phenomenon was dependent upon the association of the expressed ApaBD3 with the C-terminal translocator domain. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The evolution of pretransfusion testing: from agglutination to solid-phase red cell adherence tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plapp, F V; Sinor, L T; Rachel, J M

    1989-01-01

    Hospital transfusion services and blood centers still use manual hemagglutination tests for most of their serological procedures. Automation of hemagglutination reactions has proven to be difficult, primarily because hemagglutination lacks an objective endpoint which can be easily interpreted by inexpensive instruments. Alternatively, solid-phase red cell adherence assays for ABO cell and serum grouping, Rh typing, red cell and platelet antibody screening, red cell and platelet crossmatching, IgA deficiency screening, hepatitis B surface antigen, and HIV antibody screening have been developed. The performance of these assays compares favorably with current hemagglutination and enzyme immunoassay methods. All of these tests share a common objective endpoint of adherence or nonadherence of indicator red cells. This uniformity allows easy interpretation of results visually, spectrophotometrically, or by image analysis. The latter technique has the potential to revolutionize the reading and interpretation of all agglutination tests. Solid-phase red cell adherence tests in microplates are ideal for batch processing large numbers of specimens. However, adherence tests are not restricted to this format. Therefore, blood grouping dipsticks have been produced, which permit testing of individual blood samples even outside of the laboratory.

  8. Improvement in endothelial cell adhesion and retention under physiological shear stress using a laminin-apatite composite layer on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fupo; Wang, Xiupeng; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Ye, Jiandong

    2013-04-06

    Apatite (Ap), laminin-apatite composite (L5Ap, L10Ap, L20Ap and L40Ap) and albumin-apatite (AlbAp) composite layers were prepared on titanium (Ti) using a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution supplemented with laminin (0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 μg ml(-1)) or albumin (800 μg ml(-1)). With an increase in the concentrations of laminin in the supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions, the amounts of laminin immobilized on the Ti increased. The number of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) adhered to the laminin-apatite composite layers were remarkably higher than those to the untreated Ti, Ap layer and AlbAp composite layer. The number of cells adhered to the L40Ap was 4.3 times the untreated Ti. Moreover, cells adhered to the laminin-apatite composite layers showed significantly higher cell retention under the physiological shear stress for 1 h and 2 h than those to the untreated Ti, Ap layer and AlbAp composite layer. The number of cells remaining on the L40Ap under the physiological shear stress for 2 h was 9.5 times that of the untreated Ti. The laminin-apatite composite layer is a promising interfacial layer for endothelialization of blood-contacting materials.

  9. On the Interaction of Adherent Cells with Thermoresponsive Polymer Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Uhlig

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive polymer coatings allow the control of adhesion of cells on synthetic substrates. In particular, decreasing the temperature below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST of the polymer triggers the non-invasive detachment of cells from their cultivation substrate. Widening the range of applications of these coatings in cellular biotechnology requires a better understanding of their interaction with cells. By monitoring the morphological changes of cells during their detachment at various temperatures, we provide evidence that cell detachment is an active process. Analyses of cell residues that are left behind by the cells on the substrate during their detachment, further support this notion. In the second part of this work, we show that the kinetics of adhesion and the efficiency of detachment of cells can be controlled through the coadsorption of molecules bearing the peptide motif RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid with the polymers.

  10. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  11. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  12. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings.

  13. Soluble fibrin inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells: implications for cancer metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Shonak

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble fibrin (sFn is a marker for disseminated intravascular coagulation and may have prognostic significance, especially in metastasis. However, a role for sFn in the etiology of metastatic cancer growth has not been extensively studied. We have reported that sFn cross-linked platelet binding to tumor cells via the major platelet fibrin receptor αIIbβ3, and tumor cell CD54 (ICAM-1, which is the receptor for two of the leukocyte β2 integrins (αLβ2 and aMβ2. We hypothesized that sFn may also affect leukocyte adherence, recognition, and killing of tumor cells. Furthermore, in a rat experimental metastasis model sFn pre-treatment of tumor cells enhanced metastasis by over 60% compared to untreated cells. Other studies have shown that fibrin(ogen binds to the monocyte integrin αMβ2. This study therefore sought to investigate the effect of sFn on β2 integrin mediated monocyte adherence and killing of tumor cells. Methods The role of sFn in monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells was initially studied using static microplate adherence and cytotoxicity assays, and under physiologically relevant flow conditions in a microscope perfusion incubator system. Blocking studies were performed using monoclonal antibodies specific for β2 integrins and CD54, and specific peptides which inhibit sFn binding to these receptors. Results Enhancement of monocyte/tumor cell adherence was observed when only one cell type was bound to sFn, but profound inhibition was observed when sFn was bound to both monocytes and tumor cells. This effect was also reflected in the pattern of monocyte cytotoxicity. Studies using monoclonal blocking antibodies and specific blocking peptides (which did not affect normal coagulation showed that the predominant mechanism of fibrin inhibition is via its binding to αMβ2 on monocytes, and to CD54 on both leukocytes and tumor cells. Conclusion sFn inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity of

  14. Comparison of invasiveness among surface-adherent variants of Listeria monocytogenes in Caco-2 cell culture assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Kalpana; Muriana, Peter M

    2010-03-31

    The persistence of Listeria monocytogenes in meat processing plants is believed to be partly linked with their adherence properties to abiotic surfaces that may allow contamination of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. Isolates of raw meats, RTE meats and environmental samples from RTE meat processing facilities that demonstrated differences in adherence to abiotic surfaces (glass, plastic, stainless steel, and rubber) were tested for cellular adherence and invasion in the Caco-2 human cell line. Strains of L. monocytogenes were classified into strong (CW50, 99-38, CW77, SM5 and CW62) and weakly adherent (CW34, CW35, CW72, SM3, J7 and J126) based on a microplate adherence assay using the fluorescing substrate, 5,6-CFDA. These strains were tested for adherence and invasion in cell culture assays with Caco-2 cells. At long incubation time (2h) and high multiplicity of infection (MOI, 100:1) we observed equivalent cellular adherence and invasiveness. After optimizing conditions for time of infection (15-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 120-min) and MOI (100:1, 10:1, 1:1, and 0.1:1), we found that under the conditions of 15-min infection time at an MOI of 10:1 (Listeria:Caco-2 cells), we again observed equivalent cellular adherence by the two distinct surface-adherent groups, but we only recovered invading Listeria from the group that was strongly adherent to environmental surfaces. The data indicate that a surface factor that provides for strong environmental surface adherence may also be involved with internal cellular virulence and survival and implicates strongly adherent strains as possibly being of greater invasiveness than weakly adherent strains.

  15. Mediation of Staphylococcus saprophyticus adherence to uroepithelial cells by lipoteichoic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Teti, G; Chiofalo, M S; Tomasello, F.; Fava, C; Mastroeni, P.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of uroepithelial cells with lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus saprophyticus resulted in a decrease in the adherence of this organism. Similar effects were observed when bacteria were pretreated with the lipoteichoic acid ligands albumin and anti-polyglycerophosphate monoclonal antibodies. Lipoteichoic acid might behave as an adhesin of S. saprophyticus.

  16. Differential effects of tissue culture coating substrates on prostate cancer cell adherence, morphology and behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S Liberio

    Full Text Available Weak cell-surface adhesion of cell lines to tissue culture surfaces is a common problem and presents technical limitations to the design of experiments. To overcome this problem, various surface coating protocols have been developed. However, a comparative and precise real-time measurement of their impact on cell behavior has not been conducted. The prostate cancer cell line LNCaP, derived from a patient lymph node metastasis, is a commonly used model system in prostate cancer research. However, the cells' characteristically weak attachment to the surface of tissue culture vessels and cover slips has impeded their manipulation and analysis and use in high throughput screening. To improve the adherence of LNCaP cells to the culture surface, we compared different coating reagents (poly-L-lysine, poly-L-ornithine, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and laminin and culturing conditions and analyzed their impact on cell proliferation, adhesion, morphology, mobility and gene expression using real-time technologies. The results showed that fibronectin, poly-L-lysine and poly-L-ornithine improved LNCaP cells adherence and provoked cell morphology alterations, such as increase of nuclear and cellular area. These coating reagents also induced a higher expression of F-actin and reduced cell mobility. In contrast, laminin and collagen type IV did not improve adherence but promoted cell aggregation and affected cell morphology. Cells cultured in the presence of laminin displayed higher mobility than control cells. All the coating conditions significantly affected cell viability; however, they did not affect the expression of androgen receptor-regulated genes. Our comparative findings provide important insight for the selection of the ideal coating reagent and culture conditions for the cancer cell lines with respect to their effect on proliferation rate, attachment, morphology, migration, transcriptional response and cellular cytoskeleton arrangement.

  17. Differential effects of tissue culture coating substrates on prostate cancer cell adherence, morphology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberio, Michelle S; Sadowski, Martin C; Soekmadji, Carolina; Davis, Rohan A; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-01-01

    Weak cell-surface adhesion of cell lines to tissue culture surfaces is a common problem and presents technical limitations to the design of experiments. To overcome this problem, various surface coating protocols have been developed. However, a comparative and precise real-time measurement of their impact on cell behavior has not been conducted. The prostate cancer cell line LNCaP, derived from a patient lymph node metastasis, is a commonly used model system in prostate cancer research. However, the cells' characteristically weak attachment to the surface of tissue culture vessels and cover slips has impeded their manipulation and analysis and use in high throughput screening. To improve the adherence of LNCaP cells to the culture surface, we compared different coating reagents (poly-L-lysine, poly-L-ornithine, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and laminin) and culturing conditions and analyzed their impact on cell proliferation, adhesion, morphology, mobility and gene expression using real-time technologies. The results showed that fibronectin, poly-L-lysine and poly-L-ornithine improved LNCaP cells adherence and provoked cell morphology alterations, such as increase of nuclear and cellular area. These coating reagents also induced a higher expression of F-actin and reduced cell mobility. In contrast, laminin and collagen type IV did not improve adherence but promoted cell aggregation and affected cell morphology. Cells cultured in the presence of laminin displayed higher mobility than control cells. All the coating conditions significantly affected cell viability; however, they did not affect the expression of androgen receptor-regulated genes. Our comparative findings provide important insight for the selection of the ideal coating reagent and culture conditions for the cancer cell lines with respect to their effect on proliferation rate, attachment, morphology, migration, transcriptional response and cellular cytoskeleton arrangement.

  18. Adherence and viability of intestinal bacteria to differentiated Caco-2 cells quantified by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootaert, Charlotte; Boon, Nico; Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bracke, Marc; Verstraete, Willy; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2011-07-01

    Recent developments in host-microbe research give rise to a growing demand for rapid and accurate methods to quantify bacterial adhesion to epithelial cells. Here, we describe a new flow cytometric method to determine the amount and viability of gut bacteria, adhered to a monolayer of differentiated cells. The latter is a more relevant epithelium model than the suspended eukaryotic cells currently used in flow cytometric protocols. During the development of the method, we monitored the adhesion potential of six bacterial species and an intestinal microbial community to Caco-2 cells. The combination of SYBR Green I/propidium iodide was more efficient than carboxyfluorescein diacetate to stain the bacterial cells. In addition, a better separation between the Caco-2 background signal and viable and dead bacteria was obtained. A precise amount of Triton X-100 was used to detach adhered bacteria from Caco-2 cells and cell debris. Yet, a limited decrease in viability was observed for the intestinal microbial community treated with Triton X-100. The flow cytometric lower detection limit for pure bacterial cultures was 3.0-4.0log/mL, whereas a 5.0-5.5log/mL detection limit was obtained in the presence of Caco-2 cell background. The latter was sufficient to quantify adhered bacteria. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a flow cytometric protocol that quantifies adhesion of both pure and mixed gut microbial cultures to a differentiated monolayer of Caco-2 cells and that allows to distinguish between viable and dead adhered bacteria.

  19. Human IgA inhibits adherence of Acanthamoeba polyphaga to epithelial cells and contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Oliver-Aguillón, Gabriela; Vega-Pérez, Luz M; Jarillo-Luna, Adriana; Hernández-Martínez, Dolores; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Rodríguez-Monroy, Marco A; Rivera-Aguilar, Víctor; González-Robles, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Specific anti-Acanthamoeba IgA antibodies have been detected in the serum and tears of patients and healthy individuals. However, the role of human secretory IgA antibodies in inhibiting the adherence of Acanthamoeba had not been previously investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to purify secretory IgA from human colostrum and analyze its effect on the adherence of Acanthamoeba trophozoites to contact lenses and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. IgA antibodies to Acanthamoeba polyphaga in colostrum of healthy women as well as in saliva and serum of healthy subjects were analyzed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. In serum, saliva, and colostrum, we detected IgA antibodies that recognized several antigens of A. polyphaga. In addition, colostrum and IgA antibodies purified from it inhibited adherence of A. polyphaga trophozoites to contact lenses and MDCK cells. These results suggest that IgA antibodies may participate in the resistance to the amoebic infection, probably by inhibiting the adherence of the trophozoites to contact lenses and corneal epithelial cells.

  20. DMSO-Free Programmed Cryopreservation of Fully Dissociated and Adherent Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor I. Katkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Three modes for cryopreservation (CP of human iPSC cells have been compared: STD: standard CP of small clumps with 10% of CPA in cryovials, ACC: dissociation of the cells with Accutase and freezing in cryovials, and PLT: programmed freezing of adherent cells in plastic multiwell dishes in a programmable freezer using one- and multistep cooling protocols. Four CPAs were tesetd: dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, ethylene glycol (EG, propylene glycol (PG, and glycerol (GLY. The cells in ACC and PLT were frozen and recovered after thawing in the presence of a ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 (RI. EG was less toxic w/o CP cryopreservation than DMSO and allowed much better maintenance of pluripotency after CP than PG or GLY. The cells were cryopreserved very efficiently as adherent cultures (+RI in plates (5-6-fold higher than STD using EG and a 6-step freezing protocol. Recovery under these conditions is comparable or even higher than ACC+RI. Conclusions. Maintenance of cell-substratum adherence is a favorable environment that mitigates freezing and thawing stresses (ComfortFreeze® concept developed by CELLTRONIX. CP of cells directly in plates in ready-to-go after thawing format for HT/HC screening can be beneficial in many SC-related scientific and commercial applications such as drug discovery and toxicity tests.

  1. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  2. Contractile Stresses in Cohesive Cell Layers on Finite-Thickness Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2012-09-01

    Using a minimal model of cells or cohesive cell layers as continuum active elastic media, we examine the effect of substrate thickness and stiffness on traction forces exerted by strongly adhering cells. We obtain a simple expression for the length scale controlling the spatial variation of stresses in terms of cell and substrate parameters that describes the crossover between the thin and thick substrate limits. Our model is an important step towards a unified theoretical description of the dependence of traction forces on cell or colony size, acto-myosin contractility, substrate depth and stiffness, and strength of focal adhesions and makes experimentally testable predictions.

  3. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis.

  4. HYDROPHILIC NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANES WITH SELF-POLYMERIZED AND STRONGLY-ADHERED POLYDOPAMINE AS SEPARATING LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lin Li; Li-ping Zhu; Jin-hong Jiang; Zhuan Yi; Bao-ku Zhu; You-yi Xu

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the self-polymerization and strong adhesion characteristics of dopamine in aqueous conditions,a novel hydrophilic nanofiltration (NF) membrane was fabricated by simply dipping polysulfone (PSf) ultrafiltration (UF) substrate in dopamine solution.The changes in surface chemical composition and morphology of membranes were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM).The experimental results indicated that the self-polymerized dopamine formed an ultrathin and defect-free barrier layer on the PSf UF membrane.The surface hydrophilicity of membranes was evaluated through water contact angle measurements.It was found that membrane hydrophilicity was significantly improved after coating a polydopamine (pDA) layer,especially after double coating.The dyes filtration experiments showed that the double-coated membranes were able to reject completely the dyes of brilliant blue,congo red and methyl orange with a pure water flux of 83.7 L/(m2·h) under 0.6 MPa.The zeta potential determination revealed the positively-charged characteristics of PSf/pDA composite membrane in NF process.The salt rejection of the membranes was characterized by 0.01 mmol/L of salts filtration experiment.It was demonstrated that the salts rejections followed the sequence:NaCl < Na2SO4 < MgSO4 < MgCl2 < CaCl2,and the rejection to CaCl2 reached 68.7%.Moreover,the composite NF membranes showed a good stability in water-phase filtration process.

  5. The periplasmic enzyme, AnsB, of Shigella flexneri modulates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya T George

    Full Text Available S. flexneri strains, most frequently linked with endemic outbreaks of shigellosis, invade the colonic and rectal epithelium of their host and cause severe tissue damage. Here we have attempted to elucidate the contribution of the periplasmic enzyme, L-asparaginase (AnsB to the pathogenesis of S. flexneri. Using a reverse genetic approach we found that ansB mutants showed reduced adherence to epithelial cells in vitro and attenuation in two in vivo models of shigellosis, the Caenorhabditis elegans and the murine pulmonary model. To investigate how AnsB affects bacterial adherence, we compared the proteomes of the ansB mutant with its wild type parental strain using two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and identified the outer membrane protein, OmpA as up-regulated in ansB mutant cells. Bacterial OmpA, is a prominent outer membrane protein whose activity has been found to be required for bacterial pathogenesis. Overexpression of OmpA in wild type S. flexneri serotype 3b resulted in decreasing the adherence of this virulent strain, suggesting that the up-regulation of OmpA in ansB mutants contributes to the reduced adherence of this mutant strain. The data presented here is the first report that links the metabolic enzyme AnsB to S. flexneri pathogenesis.

  6. Regulating cell differentiation at different layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    Cell differentiation is a basic behavior in the developmental process of multi-cellular organisms,through which various cell types are generated from one embryonic cell for further building different tissues and organs of animals or plants.It is estimated that there are more than two hundred cell types in a human body.To understand the molecular mechanisms of cell differentiation,researchers usually focus on a question how particular genes are selectively expressed during the differentiation process.However,more and more evidence indicates that the regulation of cell differentiation is far beyond simply controlling the expression of genetic program,which is supported by the collection of four research articles in this issue that the regulation of cell differentiation involves various factors at different layers,including epigenetics,metabolism and cell-cell interaction.

  7. The effect of Taurolidine on adherent and floating subpopulations of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrayer, D P; Lukoff, H; King, T; Calabresi, P

    2003-04-01

    The annual incidence of malignant melanoma is estimated at 10-12 per 100000 inhabitants in countries of Central Europe and the US, with more recent estimates showing a dramatic upward trend. Taurolidine (Carter/Wallace, Cranberry, NJ) is a novel, potentially effective, antitumor chemotherapeutic agent. We hypothesized that Taurolidine could inhibit the growth, induce apoptosis, affect the cell cycle and change morphology of melanoma cells. We expected this process to be different in adherent and floating subpopulations that may be reflective of solid tumors and their metastases. Analysis of MNT-1 human and B16F10 murine melanoma cells showed that at 72 h the IC(50) of Taurolidine was 25.4+/-3.3 microM for MNT-1 human melanoma cells and 30.9+/-3.6 microM for B16F10 murine melanoma cells. Taurolidine induced DNA fragmentation of melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Taurolidine (75 and 100 microM) induced 52-97% Annexin-V binding (apoptosis), respectively. Evaluation of cell cycle after 72 h exposure to Taurolidine (0-100 microM) revealed that the percentage of melanoma cells in S phase increased from 27 to 40% in the adherent subpopulation and from 33 to 49% in the floating subpopulation. Phase contrast microscopy revealed a marked swelling of melanoma cells and decreasing cell numbers in adherent subpopulation starting at 24 h with 25 microM Taurolidine. Shrinkage of cells dominated at 75-100 microM Taurolidine. Using Cytospin assay in the floating population, we observed swelling of melanoma cells induced by 25-100 micro Taurolidine and appearance of giant (multinuclear) forms resulting from exposure to 75-100 micro Taurolidine. Some floating cells with normal morphology were observed with low concentrations of Taurolidine (0-25 microM). These data show that effects of Taurolidine may be different in adherent and floating subpopulations of melanoma cells. More importantly, floating subpopulations that may contain some viable melanoma cells, may be reflective

  8. Coating with luminal gut-constituents alters adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Sinnecker

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropogenic nanoparticles (NPs have found their way into many goods of everyday life. Inhalation, ingestion and skin contact are potential routes for NPs to enter the body. In particular the digestive tract with its huge absorptive surface area provides a prime gateway for NP uptake. Considering that NPs are covered by luminal gut-constituents en route through the gastrointestinal tract, we wanted to know if such modifications have an influence on the interaction between NPs and enterocytes.Results: We investigated the consequences of a treatment with various luminal gut-constituents on the adherence of nanoparticles to intestinal epithelial cells. Carboxylated polystyrene particles 20, 100 and 200 nm in size represented our anthropogenic NPs, and differentiated Caco-2 cells served as model for mature enterocytes of the small intestine. Pretreatment with the proteins BSA and casein consistently reduced the adherence of all NPs to the cultured enterocytes, while incubation of NPs with meat extract had no obvious effect on particle adherence. In contrast, contact with intestinal fluid appeared to increase the particle-cell interaction of 20 and 100 nm NPs.Conclusion: Luminal gut-constituents may both attenuate and augment the adherence of NPs to cell surfaces. These effects appear to be dependent on the particle size as well as on the type of interacting protein. While some proteins will rather passivate particles towards cell attachment, possibly by increasing colloid stability or camouflaging attachment sites, certain components of intestinal fluid are capable to modify particle surfaces in such a way that interactions with cellular surface structures result in an increased binding.

  9. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture.

  10. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Guixian [The Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and TEDA Applied Physics Institute, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Pan, Leiting, E-mail: plt@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and TEDA Applied Physics Institute, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik [The Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and TEDA Applied Physics Institute, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun [The Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, Ministry of Education, School of Physics and TEDA Applied Physics Institute, Nankai University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  11. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  12. Cell-fluid Interaction: Coupling Between the Deformation of an Adherent Leukocyte and the Shear Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionLeukocyte adhesion is a natural physiopathological phenomenon and the balance between the hemodynamic forces and adhesion forces (molecular bonds) plays a key role. According to hemodynamic theories, blood flow induces the change of the shape and the spatial arrangement of leukocytes. These changes may in turn induce the redistribution of blood flow around the cell. Therefore there exist interaction of the adherent leukocyte with blood flow, which is called as the coupling between the hemodyna...

  13. Bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cell adhesion assay for studying Escherichia coli O157 adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, I T; Dean-Nystrom, E A

    2011-11-01

    To develop a new adherence assay, using cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells, for evaluating bacterial adherence to cells of bovine origin. Proof of concept was demonstrated using the human gastrointestinal pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7, for which cattle are reservoirs. Adherence assays were conducted using both RSE and HEp-2 cells, in the presence and absence of D+Mannose. E. coli O157 specifically adhered in a type I fimbriae-independent manner to RSE cells in significantly higher numbers and also bound significantly higher numbers of RSE cells than diverse laboratory strains of nonpathogenic E. coli. The RSE cell adhesion assay output highly reproducible and interpretable results that compared very well with those obtained using the more extensively used HEp-2 cell adherence assay. The RSE cell adhesion assay provides a convenient means of directly defining and evaluating pathogen factors operating at the bovine recto-anal junction. The RSE cell adhesion assay further has the potential for extrapolation to diverse bacteria, including food-borne pathogens that colonize cattle via adherence to this particular anatomical site. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) and nuclear calcium ([Ca(2+)]n) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca(2+)]n detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca(2+)]n and [Ca(2+)]c in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A visual targeting system for the microinjection of unstained adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2013-02-01

    Automatic localization and targeting are critical steps in automating the process of microinjecting adherent cells. This process is currently performed manually by highly trained operators and is characterized as a laborious task with low success rate. Therefore, automation is desired to increase the efficiency and consistency of the operations. This research offers a contribution to this procedure through the development of a vision system for a robotic microinjection setup. Its goals are to automatically locate adherent cells in a culture dish and target them for a microinjection. Here the major concern was the achievement of an error-free targeting system to guarantee high consistency in microinjection experiments. To accomplish this, a novel visual targeting algorithm integrating different image processing techniques was proposed. This framework employed defocusing microscopy to highlight cell features and improve cell segmentation and targeting reliability. Three main image processing techniques, operating at three different focus levels in a bright field (BF) microscope, were used: an anisotropic contour completion (ACC) method, a local intensity variation background-foreground classifier, and a grayscale threshold-based segmentation. The proposed framework combined information gathered by each of these methods using a validation map and this was shown to provide reliable cell targeting results. Experiments conducted with sets of real images from two different cell lines (CHO-K1 and HEK), which contained a total of more than 650 cells, yielded flawless targeting results along with a cell detection ratio greater than 50%.

  16. Campylobacter jejuni FlpA binds fibronectin and is required for maximal host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkel, Michael E; Larson, Charles L; Flanagan, Rebecca C

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most frequent bacterial causes of food-borne gastrointestinal disease in developed countries. Previous work indicates that the binding of C. jejuni to human intestinal cells is crucial for host colonization and disease. Fibronectin (Fn), a major constituent of the extracellular matrix, is a approximately 250-kDa glycoprotein present at regions of cell-to-cell contact in the intestinal epithelium. Fn is composed of three types of repeating units: type I (approximately 45 amino acids), type II (approximately 60 amino acids), and type III (approximately 90 amino acids). The deduced amino acid sequence of C. jejuni flpA (Cj1279c) contains at least three Fn type III domains. Based on the presence of the Fn type III domains, we hypothesized that FlpA contributes to the binding of C. jejuni to human INT 407 epithelial cells and Fn. We assessed the contribution of FlpA in C. jejuni binding to host cells by in vitro adherence assays with a C. jejuni wild-type strain and a C. jejuni flpA mutant and binding of purified FlpA protein to Fn by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Adherence assays revealed the binding of the C. jejuni flpA mutant to INT 407 epithelial cells was significantly reduced compared with that for a wild-type strain. In addition, rabbit polyclonal serum generated against FlpA blocked C. jejuni adherence to INT 407 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Binding of FlpA to Fn was found to be dose dependent and saturable by ELISA, demonstrating the specificity of the interaction. Based on these data, we conclude that FlpA mediates C. jejuni attachment to host epithelial cells via Fn binding.

  17. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies on Trichomonas vaginalis adhering to and phagocytizing genitourinary epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文列; 陈金富; 钟秀容; 梁平; 林炜

    2004-01-01

    Background Trichomonas vaginalis (T. vaginalis) belongs to a common sexually transmitted disease pathogen causing genitourinary trichomoniasis in both sexes. We investigated the pathogenetic mechanism of genitourinary trichomoniasis.Methods Cultured T. vaginalis bodies were injected into the vaginas of rats, or incubated with genitourinary epithelial cells of female subjects, male subjects, and sperm. The ultrastructural and microscopic changes were observed via transmission and scanning electron microscopy and through microscopic histochemistry.Results Groups of T.vaginalis adhered to PAS positive columnar cells at the surface of stratified epithelium in the middle and upper portions of the vaginas. They also traversed under these cells. The parasites were shown to be PAS, cathepsin D, and actin positive, and they could release hydrolase into the cytoplasm of adhered epithelial cells. In the amebiform T.vaginalis, microfilaments were arranged into reticular formation. Similar phenomena were found during the interaction of T.vaginalis with host cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Usually several protozoa adhered to an epithelial cell and formed polymorphic pseudopodia or surface invaginations to surround and phagocytize the microvilli or other parts of the epithelial cytoplasm. Adhesion and phagocytosis of sperm by the protozoa occurred at 15-30 minutes of incubation. Digestion of sperm was found at 45-75 minutes and was complete at 90-105 minutes.Conclusions T.vaginalis tends to parasitize at the fornix of the vagina, because this is the site where columnar cells are rich in mucinogen granules and their microvilli are helpful for adhesion and nibbling. T.vaginalis possesses some invading and attacking abilities. Shape change, canalization, encystation, phagocytosis, digestion, the cell coat, cytoskeleton, and lysosome all play important roles in the process of adhesion. They have two methods of phagocytosis: nibbling and ingestion. Genitourinary epithelium may be

  18. Accumulation of adoptively transferred adherent, lymphokine-activated killer cells in murine metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse, P; Herberman, R B; Nannmark, U

    1991-01-01

    or tumor metastases in vivo still has to be obtained. In the present study, we report that a significant fraction of adoptively transferred A-LAK cells, labeled with fluorochromes for identification, accumulates in lung and liver metastases of the B16 melanoma, the MCA 102 sarcoma and the Lewis lung...... carcinoma lines. Thus, 5- to 10-fold higher numbers of A-LAK cells were found in the malignant lesions compared to the surrounding normal tissue. The infiltration seemed very heterogeneous after intravenous injection of moderate numbers of A-LAK cells (15 x 10(6)). However, after adoptive transfer of 45......While close contact between lymphokine-activated killer (LAK)/adherent, lymphokine-activated killer (A-LAK) cells and tumor cells is believed to be a prerequisite for initiating the events leading to tumor cell lysis, clear evidence for the ability of these effector cells to infiltrate tumors...

  19. Enhancement of adherence of Helicobacter pylori to host cells by virus: possible mechanism of development of symptoms of gastric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Nakano, Takashi; Suzuki, Youichi; Ooi, Yukimasa; Sano, Kouichi

    2017-06-01

    It remains unclear why gastric disease does not develop in all cases of Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study, we analyzed whether simian virus 5 (SV5) enhanced adherence of H. pylori to adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (AGS). H. pylori in AGS (harboring SV5) and SV5-infected Vero cells, and an agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 were observed by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherent rate of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells and treated with an anti-SV5 antibody was determined. H. pylori adhered to the surface of AGS cells near SV5 particles, as shown by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The adherence of H. pylori to SV5-infected Vero cells was significantly enhanced compared with that to Vero cells. In contrast, the adherence of H. pylori to Vero cells was decreased by treatment with the anti-SV5 antibody. Agglutination of H. pylori mixed with SV5 was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Agglutination did not occur when SV5 was treated with the anti-SV5 antibody before mixing. These findings demonstrated that SV5 enhanced the adherence of H. pylori to host cells, suggesting that a persistently infected virus may be a factor enhancing the pathogenicity of H. pylori in humans.

  20. Towards high-throughput automated targeted femtosecond laser-based transfection of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-03-01

    Femtosecond laser induced cell membrane poration has proven to be an attractive alternative to the classical methods of drug and gene delivery. It is a selective, sterile, non-contact technique that offers a highly localized operation, low toxicity and consistent performance. However, its broader application still requires the development of robust, high-throughput and user-friendly systems. We present a system capable of unassisted enhanced targeted optoinjection and phototransfection of adherent mammalian cells with a femtosecond laser. We demonstrate the advantages of a dynamic diffractive optical element, namely a spatial light modulator (SLM) for precise three dimensional positioning of the beam. It enables the implementation of a "point-and-shoot" system in which using the software interface a user simply points at the cell and a predefined sequence of precisely positioned doses can be applied. We show that irradiation in three axial positions alleviates the problem of exact beam positioning on the cell membrane and doubles the number of viably optoinjected cells when compared with a single dose. The presented system enables untargeted raster scan irradiation which provides transfection of adherent cells at the throughput of 1 cell per second.

  1. Layer-by-layer tissue microfabrication supports cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catros, S.; Guillemont, F.; Nandakumar, A.; Ziane, S.; Moroni, L.; Habibovic, P.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Rousseau, B.; Chassande, O.; Amedee, J.; Fricain, J-C.

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer biofabrication represents a novel strategy to create three-dimensional living structures with a controlled internal architecture, using cell micromanipulation technologies. Laser assisted bioprinting (LAB) is an effective printing method for patterning cells, biomolecules, and biomate

  2. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    Full Text Available Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  3. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  4. Patterns of Adherence of Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates to Epithelial Cells, and its Association with Disease and with Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Jiménez, Flor Elizabeth; Torres, Javier; Flores-Luna, Lourdes; Cerezo, Silvia Giono; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Adherence to the gastric epithelium is one of the most important steps of Helicobacter pylori to remain and cause disease. The aim of this study was to analyze whether H. pylori isolates from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases present differences in the pattern of adherence to gastric epithelial cells (AGS), in the ability to induce IL-8, and in the presence of virulence genes. We tested 75 H. pylori strains isolated from nonatrophic gastritis, gastric cancer, and duodenal ulcer patients. The adhesion pattern and IL-8 induction were determined in AGS cells, and invasion of AGS cells was studied using a gentamicin protection assay. The IL-8 levels induced were determined by ELISA. Helicobacter pylori strains presented diffuse adherence (DA) and localized (LA) adherence patterns, similar to those described for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), were observed in AGS cells. A DA pattern was observed in 57% and LA in 43% of the strains, and DA was more frequent in isolates from patients with gastric cancer (p = 0.044). Strains with a LA pattern induced higher levels of IL-8 (p = 0.042) in AGS cells. The adherence pattern was not associated with neither invasiveness nor with the presence of virulence genes. Our study shows that H. pylori strains present adherence patterns to AGS cells resembling those observed in EPEC and that these patterns may be associated with disease and with activity on AGS cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Participation of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Alvestegui, Alejandra; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key feature in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) infection. The aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs) are involved in EAEC interaction with receptors at the surface of intestinal cells. We and others have demonstrated that fibronectin is a receptor for AAF/II fimbriae. Considering that the major cellular receptor of fibronectin is integrin α5β1, in this study we evaluated the participation of this receptor in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 to intestinal cells. We found that EAEC strain 042 has the ability to bind directly and indirectly to integrin α5β1; direct binding was not mediated by AAF/II fimbriae and indirect binding was mediated by AAF/II and fibronectin. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the formation of the complex AafA/fibronectin/integrin α5β1. To evaluate EAEC adherence to intestinal cells, T84 cells were incubated with fibronectin and an antibody that blocks the interaction region of integrin α5β1 to fibronectin, the RGD site. Under these conditions, we found the number of adherent bacteria to epithelial cells significantly reduced. Additionally, fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 was abolished in HEp-2 cells transfected with integrin α5 shRNA. Altogether, our data support the involvement of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated EAEC binding to intestinal cells.

  6. Participation of Integrin α5β1 in the Fibronectin-Mediated Adherence of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to Intestinal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Izquierdo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key feature in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC infection. The aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs are involved in EAEC interaction with receptors at the surface of intestinal cells. We and others have demonstrated that fibronectin is a receptor for AAF/II fimbriae. Considering that the major cellular receptor of fibronectin is integrin α5β1, in this study we evaluated the participation of this receptor in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 to intestinal cells. We found that EAEC strain 042 has the ability to bind directly and indirectly to integrin α5β1; direct binding was not mediated by AAF/II fimbriae and indirect binding was mediated by AAF/II and fibronectin. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the formation of the complex AafA/fibronectin/integrin α5β1. To evaluate EAEC adherence to intestinal cells, T84 cells were incubated with fibronectin and an antibody that blocks the interaction region of integrin α5β1 to fibronectin, the RGD site. Under these conditions, we found the number of adherent bacteria to epithelial cells significantly reduced. Additionally, fibronectin-mediated adherence of EAEC strain 042 was abolished in HEp-2 cells transfected with integrin α5 shRNA. Altogether, our data support the involvement of integrin α5β1 in the fibronectin-mediated EAEC binding to intestinal cells.

  7. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Fry Davidson

    Full Text Available Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs.

  8. Infection with human coronavirus NL63 enhances streptococcal adherence to epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda, Anna; Malek, Natalia; Dudek, Bartosz; Zeglen, Slawomir; Wojarski, Jacek; Ochman, Marek; Kucewicz, Ewa; Zembala, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of augmented bacterial pathogenicity in post-viral infections is the first step in the development of an effective therapy. This study assessed the effect of human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) on the adherence of bacterial pathogens associated with respiratory tract illnesses. It was shown that HCoV-NL63 infection resulted in an increased adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae to virus-infected cell lines and fully differentiated primary human airway epithelium cultures. The enhanced binding of bacteria correlated with an increased expression level of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), but detailed evaluation of the bacterium–PAF-R interaction revealed a limited relevance of this process. PMID:21325482

  9. Difference of adherence, proliferation and osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on different HA/ZrO2 composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QUAN Ren-fu; TANG Yang-hua; HUANG Zhong-ming; YANG Di-sheng; LI Wei; XU Jin-wei; WU Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the adherence,proliferation and osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on different HA/ZrO2 composites.Methods: The simplex and graded HA/ZrO2 composites were prepared using dry-laid method.The surface topography of the composites was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).The MSCs were isolated from rabbits and cultured on experimental groups (simplex HA/ ZrO2 composite,graded HA/ZrO2 composite,pure HA or pure ZrO2 coatings respectively) and control group (ordinary culture plate).Then,we observed the adherence,proliferation and osteogenesis of the MSCs,detected the cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities,extracted total RNA and detected the mRNA expression of collagen Ⅰ,osteocalcin and osteopontin using the reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method.Results: The SEM images confirmed that the surfaceof the simplex HA/ZrO2 composite was coverd by discontiguous HA layer with clear visualization of the partial ZrO2 matrix,while the surface of the graded HA/ZrO2 composite was fairly rough with porosity.X-ray diffraction showed that after high temperature sintering,the ZrO2 phase still remained,while the HA phase was transformed to β-Ca3 (pO4)2,α-Ca3(PO4)2 and CaZrO3 phases on the surface of both composites.Cell culture indicated that the HA/ ZrO2 composites supported cell attachment.Neither ALP expression nor mRNA expression of collagen Ⅰ,osteocalcin or osteopontin from RT-PCR results showed significant deviation among four groups.Conclusion:Among these four composites,the graded HA/ZrO2 composite promotes the MSCs proliferation and the osteogenic differentiation to a certain extent.

  10. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay: Book Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adher...

  11. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay-Book Chapter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adhere...

  12. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay-Book Chapter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals for which there is limited toxicological information, motivating the development and application of in vitro systems to profile the biological effects of xenobiotic exposure and predict their potential developmental hazard. An adhere...

  13. Comparison of gene expression of mitogenic kinin path in adherent and non-adherent CD 34-stem cells using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Machaj

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the more interesting cells present in the umbilical cord blood - as far as their potential clinical use is concerned - are stem cells not presenting the CD34 antigen. These are the pluripotential cells with their biological properties similar to mesenchymal stem cells, with the ability to differentiate into such tissue types as bone, cartilage, nervous (to some extent, glia and muscle. The authors compared the activity of genes coding the proteins in mitogenic signal paths activated by kinin receptors using oligonucleotide microarrays in adherent and non-adherent CD 34- cells derived from umbilical cord blood. In the linear regression model with a 95% prognosis area for differentiating genes outside this area, the following genes were selected: c-jun (present in 3 isoforms and c-fos. The fos and jun genes create the AP-1 transcriptive factor which regulates the expression of genes taking part in numerous cellular processes, including the cell cycle and mitosis. The obtained results shed some light on the molecular processes behind the MSC proliferation and are a starting point for further studies on the mesenchymal stem cell biology.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adhering to Adipocytes in Canine Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Yi; Fujita, Naoki; Endo, Kentaro; Morita, Maresuke; Takeda, Tae; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2017-03-15

    The ceiling culture method has been used to isolate mature adipocytes from adipose tissue that can be dedifferentiated into fibroblastic cells, also known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that self-renew and are multipotent, with much higher homogeneity and colony-forming efficiency than those of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We cultured adipocytes from canine bone marrow using this technique, with the expectation of obtaining DFAT cells. However, contrary to our expectations, continuous monitoring of ceiling cultures by time-lapse microscopy revealed many small cells adhering to adipocytes that proliferated rapidly into cells with a fibroblastic morphology and without any dedifferentiation from adipocytes. We named these cells bone marrow peri-adipocyte cells (BM-PACs) and demonstrated the multipotent properties of BM-PACs compared to that of conventionally cultured canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). BM-PACs showed significantly greater clonogenicity and proliferation ability than BMMSCs. An in vitro trilineage differentiation assay revealed that BM-PACs possess adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic capacities superior to those of BMMSCs. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the expression of CD73, which plays an important role in cell growth and differentiation, was significantly higher in BM-PACs than in BMMSCs. These results indicate that canine BM-PACs have stem cell characteristics that are superior to those of BMMSCs, and that these mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear to be a feasible source for cell-based therapies in dogs.

  15. Interleukin-3 greatly expands non-adherent endothelial forming cells with pro-angiogenic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan M. Moldenhauer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs provide revascularisation for cardiovascular disease and the expansion of these cells opens up the possibility of their use as a cell therapy. Herein we show that interleukin-3 (IL3 strongly expands a population of human non-adherent endothelial forming cells (EXnaEFCs with low immunogenicity as well as pro-angiogenic capabilities in vivo, making their therapeutic utilisation a realistic option. Non-adherent CD133+ EFCs isolated from human umbilical cord blood and cultured under different conditions were maximally expanded by day 12 in the presence of IL3 at which time a 350-fold increase in cell number was obtained. Cell surface marker phenotyping confirmed expression of the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers CD133, CD117 and CD34, vascular cell markers VEGFR2 and CD31, dim expression of CD45 and absence of myeloid markers CD14 and CD11b. Functional experiments revealed that EXnaEFCs exhibited classical properties of endothelial cells (ECs, namely binding of Ulex europaeus lectin, up-take of acetylated-low density lipoprotein and contribution to EC tube formation in vitro. These EXnaEFCs demonstrated a pro-angiogenic phenotype within two independent in vivo rodent models. Firstly, a Matrigel plug assay showed increased vascularisation in mice. Secondly, a rat model of acute myocardial infarction demonstrated reduced heart damage as determined by lower levels of serum creatinine and a modest increase in heart functionality. Taken together, these studies show IL3 as a potent growth factor for human CD133+ cell expansion with clear pro-angiogenic properties (in vitro and in vivo and thus may provide clinical utility for humans in the future.

  16. Glucose significantly enhances enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli adherence to intestinal epithelial cells through its effects on heat-labile enterotoxin production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prageeth Wijemanne

    Full Text Available The present study tested whether exposure of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC to glucose at different concentrations in the media results in increased bacterial adherence to host cells through increased heat-labile enterotoxin (LT production, thereby suggesting the effects are physiological. Porcine-origin ETEC strains grown in Casamino acid yeast extract medium containing different concentrations of glucose were washed and inoculated onto IPEC-J2 porcine intestinal epithelial cells to test for effects on adherence and host cell cAMP concentrations. Consistent with previous studies, all LT+ strains had higher ETEC adherence to IPEC-J2 cells than did LT- strains. Adherence of the LT- but not the LT+ strains was increased by pre-incubating the IPEC-J2 cells with LT and decreased by co-incubation with GM1 ganglioside in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05. To determine whether the glucose concentration of the cell culture media has an effect on adherence, IPEC-J2 cells were inoculated with LT+ or LT- strains in cell culture media containing a final glucose concentration of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0%, and incubated for 4 h. Only media containing 0.25% glucose resulted in increased adherence and cAMP levels, and this was limited to IPEC-J2 cells inoculated with LT+ strains. This study supports the hypothesis that glucose, at a concentration optimal for LT expression, enhances bacterial adherence through the promotion of LT production. Hence, these results establish the physiological relevance of the effects of glucose on LT production and provide a basis for how glucose intake may influence the severity of ETEC infection.

  17. A three-dimensional finite element model of an adherent eukaryotic cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGarry J. G.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical stimulation is known to cause alterations in the behaviour of cells adhering to a substrate. The mechanisms by which forces are transduced into biological responses within the cell remain largely unknown. Since cellular deformation is likely involved, further understanding of the biomechanical origins of alterations in cellular response can be aided by the use of computational models in describing cellular structural behaviour and in determining cellular deformation due to imposed loads of various magnitudes. In this paper, a finite element modelling approach that can describe the biomechanical behaviour of adherent eukaryotic cells is presented. It fuses two previous modelling approaches by incorporating, in an idealised geometry, all cellular components considered structurally significant, i.e. prestressed cytoskeleton, cytoplasm, nucleus and membrane components. The aim is to determine if we can use this model to describe the non-linear structural behaviour of an adherent cell and to determine the contribution of the various cellular components to cellular stability. Results obtained by applying forces (in the picoNewton range to the model membrane nodes suggest a key role for the cytoskeleton in determining cellular stiffness. The model captures non-linear structural behaviours such as strain hardening and prestress effects (in the region of receptor sites, and variable compliance along the cell surface. The role of the cytoskeleton in stiffening a cell during the process of cell spreading is investigated by applying forces to five increasingly spread cell geometries. Parameter studies reveal that material properties of the cytoplasm (elasticity and compressibility also have a large influence on cellular stiffness. The computational model of a single cell developed here is proposed as one that is sufficiently complex to capture the non-linear behaviours of the cell response to forces whilst not being so complex that the parameters

  18. Reciprocal Interference between Lactobacillus spp. and Gardnerella vaginalis on Initial Adherence to Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Joana; Henriques, Ana; Machado, António; Henriques, Mariana; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Cerca, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common vaginal disorder in women of child-bearing age. It is widely accepted that the microbial switch from normal microflora to the flora commonly associated with BV is characterized by a decrease in vaginal colonization by specific Lactobacillus species together with an increase of G. vaginalis and other anaerobes. However, the order of events leading to the development of BV remains poorly characterized and it is unclear whether the decrease in lactobacilli is a cause or a consequence of the increase in the population density of anaerobes. Our goal was to characterize the interaction between two Gardnerella vaginalis strains, one of which was isolated from a healthy woman (strain 5-1) and the other from a woman diagnosed with BV (strain 101), and vaginal lactobacilli on the adherence to cervical epithelial cells. In order to simulate the transition from vaginal health to BV, the lactobacilli were cultured with the epithelial cells first, and then the G. vaginalis strain was introduced. We quantified the inhibition of G. vaginalis adherence by the lactobacilli and displacement of adherent lactobacilli by G. vaginalis. Our results confirmed that pathogenic G vaginalis 101 had a higher capacity for adhesion to the cervical epithelial cells than strain 5-1. Interestingly, strain 101 displaced L. crispatus but not L. iners whereas strain 5-1 had less of an effect and did not affect the two species differently. Furthermore, L. iners actually enhanced adhesion of strain 101 but not of strain 5-1. These results suggest that BV-causing G. vaginalis and L. iners do not interfere with one another, which may help to explain previous reports that women who are colonized with L. iners are more likely to develop BV. PMID:23935396

  19. Analysis of thermal protection characteristics of a rectangular cell filled with PCM/air layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.J.; Chu, C.H. [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The present paper presents a numerical analysis concerning thermal protection characteristics of a rectangular composite cell filled with a solid-liquid phase change material (PCM) and air layer. Inside the composite cell the PCM layer is separated from air layer by a solid partition of negligible thickness. The buoyancy-induced flows developed in both the air-filled layer and the molten PCM zone inside the PCM layer were modeled as two-dimensional laminar Newtonian fluid flow adhering to the Boussinesq approximation. Meanwhile, two-dimensional conduction heat transfer was accounted for the unmelted solid PCM region. Delineation is made via a parametric simulation of the effects of the pertinent parameters: Ste (Stefan number), Sc (subcooling factor), Ra (Rayleigh number), aspect ratio of composite cell, A, and relative thickness ratio A{sub p}/A{sub a}, on the transient thermal protection performance of the composite cell. Results demonstrate that by means of the latent-heat absorption inside the PCM layer, heat penetration across the composite cell can be greatly retarded over an effective duration until a critical instant until the melting front of PCM reaches the partition wall. Such an effective thermal protection duration is found to be a strong function of Ra, Ste, A{sub p}/A{sub a}, and A.

  20. An immunohistochemical detection of actin and myosin in the indigenous bacteria-adhering sites of microvillous columnar epithelial cells in Peyer's patches and intestinal villi in the rat jejunoileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Tetsurou; Namba, Makiko; Qi, Wang-Mei; Yamamoto, Kenkichi; Yokoo, Yuh; Miyata, Hidenori; Kawano, Junichi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    The mechanism of physical elimination of indigenous bacteria was ultrastructurally and immunohistochemically investigated in microvillous columnar epithelial cells of Peyer's patches and intestinal villi of the rat jejunoileum. From ultrastructural observation, the microfilaments accumulated to form several electron-dense layers beneath the bacteria adhering to the cell membrane, which was slightly invaginated in the epithelial cells of Peyer's patches and intestinal villi. As the microfilamentous layers were forming, the end portions of invaginations were deformed into a cone-shape and were finally collapsed. At the same time, the end portions of the adhered bacteria were also deformed into cone-shapes. The bacterial cells were moved back toward the invagination orifices with no morphological change in their inner structure. From immunohistochemical observation, beta-actin and nonmuscle-type myosin were detected at the thin layer just beneath the invaginated cell membrane. These findings suggest that indigenous bacteria which adhere to epithelial cells are removed by only a physical action of actin and myosin filaments, but are not killed. This bacterial cell removal system might lead to the establishment of a settlement of indigenous bacteria on host cells.

  1. Haemagglutinins and adherence properties to HeLa and intestine 407 cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, R; Heineken, P; Sonntag, H G

    1987-03-01

    The occurrence of haemagglutination (HA) and adherence properties were examined in 50 strains of K. pneumoniae and 17 K. oxytoca strains isolated from humans. All isolates except three exhibited HA activity. Mannose-sensitive haemagglutinins (MSHA) were expressed by the majority of K. pneumoniae strains, but only by one K. oxytoca isolate. Mannose-resistant haemagglutination (MRHA) to human or guinea pig erythrocytes could not be detected; haemagglutinins of the MR/K type were found in both species with similar frequencies. Adhesive properties could be demonstrated in K. pneumoniae as often as in K. oxytoca: About half of the strains adhered to two human cell lines: HeLa and Intestine 407. The incidence of HA activity was similar in adhering and nonadhering strains. A correlation between MSHA, MR/K-HA and adherence to tissue-cultured cells could not be detected.

  2. Highly doped layer for tunnel junctions in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetzer, Christopher M.

    2017-08-01

    A highly doped layer for interconnecting tunnel junctions in multijunction solar cells is presented. The highly doped layer is a delta doped layer in one or both layers of a tunnel diode junction used to connect two or more p-on-n or n-on-p solar cells in a multijunction solar cell. A delta doped layer is made by interrupting the epitaxial growth of one of the layers of the tunnel diode, depositing a delta dopant at a concentration substantially greater than the concentration used in growing the layer of the tunnel diode, and then continuing to epitaxially grow the remaining tunnel diode.

  3. Fucoidans Disrupt Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to AGS Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng-Guan Chua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucoidans are complex sulphated polysaccharides derived from abundant and edible marine algae. Helicobacter pylori is a stomach pathogen that persists in the hostile milieu of the human stomach unless treated with antibiotics. This study aims to provide preliminary data to determine, in vitro, if fucoidans can inhibit the growth of H. pylori and its ability to adhere to gastric epithelial cells (AGS. We analysed the activity of three different fucoidan preparations (Fucus A, Fucus B, and Undaria extracts. Bacterial growth was not arrested or inhibited by the fucoidan preparations supplemented into culture media. All fucoidans, when supplemented into tissue culture media at 1000 µg mL−1, were toxic to AGS cells and reduced the viable cell count significantly. Fucoidan preparations at 100 µg mL−1 were shown to significantly reduce the number of adherent H. pylori. These in vitro findings provide the basis for further studies on the clinical use of sulphated polysaccharides as complementary therapeutic agents.

  4. Adherence to and invasion of human intestinal cells by Arcobacter species and their virulence genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Alkeskas, Aldukali; Günter, Claudia; Forsythe, Stephen J; Figueras, María José

    2013-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter is composed of 17 species which have been isolated from various sources. Of particular interest are A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, and A. skirrowii, as these have been associated with human cases of diarrhea, the probable transmission routes being through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and food. To date, only limited studies of virulence traits in this genus have been undertaken. The present study used 60 Arcobacter strains isolated from different sources, representing 16 of the 17 species of the genus, to investigate their ability to adhere to and invade the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. In addition, the presence of five putative virulence genes (ciaB, cadF, cj1349, hecA, and irgA) was screened for in these strains by PCR. All Arcobacter species except A. bivalviorum and Arcobacter sp. strain W63 adhered to Caco-2 cells, and most species (10/16) were invasive. The most invasive species were A. skirrowii, A. cryaerophilus, A. butzleri, and A. defluvii. All invasive strains were positive for ciaB (encoding a putative invasion protein). Other putative virulence genes were present in other species, i.e., A. butzleri (cadF, cj1349, irgA, and hecA), A. trophiarum (cj1349), A. ellisii (cj1349), and A. defluvii (irgA). No virulence genes were detected in strains which showed little or no invasion of Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that many Arcobacter species are potential pathogens of humans and animals.

  5. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns to that of Escherichia coli O15...

  6. Chitosan nanoparticles affect acid tolerance response in adhered cells of strpetococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilands, Julia; Sutherland, Duncan S; Resin, Anton

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells...... appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD (R) technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction...

  7. Lactobacilli interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes hemolytic activity and adherence to host epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil D Saroj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus (GAS, a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of GAS. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS. Conditioned medium (CM from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289 and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  8. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Sunil D.; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics. PMID:27524981

  9. Lactobacilli Interfere with Streptococcus pyogenes Hemolytic Activity and Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroj, Sunil D; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Tavares, Raquel; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A streptococcus (GAS)], a frequent colonizer of the respiratory tract mucosal surface, causes a variety of human diseases, ranging from pharyngitis to the life-threatening streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Lactobacilli have been demonstrated to colonize the respiratory tract. In this study, we investigated the interference of lactobacilli with the virulence phenotypes of GAS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289, but not L. salivarius LMG9477, inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. pyogenes S165. The inhibition of hemolytic activity was attributed to a decrease in the production of streptolysin S (SLS). Conditioned medium (CM) from the growth of L. rhamnosus Kx151A1 and L. reuteri PTA-5289 was sufficient to down-regulate the expression of the sag operon, encoding SLS. The Lactobacillus strains L. rhamnosus Kx151A1, L. reuteri PTA-5289, and L. salivarius LMG9477 inhibited the initial adherence of GAS to host epithelial cells. Intriguingly, competition with a combination of Lactobacillus species reduced GAS adherence to host cells most efficiently. The data suggest that an effector molecule released from certain Lactobacillus strains attenuates the production of SLS at the transcriptional level and that combinations of Lactobacillus strains may protect the pharyngeal mucosa more efficiently from the initial colonization of GAS. The effector molecules released from Lactobacillus strains affecting the virulence phenotypes of pathogens hold potential in the development of a new generation of therapeutics.

  10. A practical guide to microfluidic perfusion culture of adherent mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lily; Toh, Yi-Chin; Voldman, Joel; Yu, Hanry

    2007-06-01

    Culturing cells at microscales allows control over microenvironmental cues, such as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions; the potential to scale experiments; the use of small culture volumes; and the ability to integrate with microsystem technologies for on-chip experimentation. Microfluidic perfusion culture in particular allows controlled delivery and removal of soluble biochemical molecules in the extracellular microenvironment, and controlled application of mechanical forces exerted via fluid flow. There are many challenges to designing and operating a robust microfluidic perfusion culture system for routine culture of adherent mammalian cells. The current literature on microfluidic perfusion culture treats microfluidic design, device fabrication, cell culture, and micro-assays independently. Here we systematically present and discuss important design considerations in the context of the entire microfluidic perfusion culture system. These design considerations include the choice of materials, culture configurations, microfluidic network fabrication and micro-assays. We also present technical issues such as sterilization; seeding cells in both 2D and 3D configurations; and operating the system under optimized mass transport and shear stress conditions, free of air-bubbles. The integrative and systematic treatment of the microfluidic system design and fabrication, cell culture, and micro-assays provides novices with an effective starting point to build and operate a robust microfludic perfusion culture system for various applications.

  11. The effects of copper additives on the quantity and cell viability of adherent Staphylococcus epidermidis in silicone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosau, Martin; Prantl, Lukas; Feldmann, Martina; Kokott, Andreas; Hahnel, Sebastian; Burgers, Ralf

    2010-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the antibacterial effect of copper additives in silicone implants. Specimens of a standard silicone material used in breast augmentation and modified copper-loaded silicone specimens were prepared and incubated in a Staphylococcus epidermidis suspension (2 h, 37 degrees C). After the quantification of adhering staphylococci using a biofluorescence assay (Resazurin), the viability of the adhering bacterial cells was quantified by live or dead cell labeling in combination with fluorescence microscopy. In the Resazurin fluorometric quantification, a higher amount of adhering S. epidermidis cells was detected on pure silicone (4612 [2319/7540] relative fluorescence units [rfu]) than on silicone with copper additives (2701 [2158/4153] rfu). Additionally, a significantly higher amount of adhering bacterial cells (5.07% [2.03%/8.93%]) was found for pure silicone than for silicone with copper additives (1.72% [1.26%/2.32%]); (p < 0.001). Calculations from live or dead staining showed that the percentage of dead S. epidermidis cells adhered on pure silicone (52.1%) was significantly lower than on silicone with copper additives (79.7%); (p < 0.001). In vitro, silicone material with copper additives showed antibacterial effects against S. epidermidis. Copper-loaded silicone may prevent bacterial colonization, resulting in lower infection rates of silicone implants.

  12. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  13. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  14. Flow-induced detachment of red blood cells adhering to surfaces by specific antigen-antibody bonds.

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Z; Goldsmith, H L; van de Ven, T G

    1994-01-01

    Fixed spherical swollen human red blood cells of blood type B adhering on a glass surface through antigen-antibody bonds to monoclonal mouse antihuman IgM, adsorbed or covalently linked on the surface, were detached by known hydrodynamic forces created in an impinging jet. The dynamic process of detachment of the specifically bound cells was recorded and analyzed. The fraction of adherent cells remaining on the surface decreased with increasing hydrodynamic force. For an IgM coverage of 0.26%...

  15. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girolamo Antonietta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779 encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p, a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5, and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus.

  16. Generation of Mouse Spermatogonial Stem-Cell-Colonies in A Non-Adherent Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas; Shahverdi, Abdolhossein

    2017-01-01

    The properties of self-renewal and division in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) support spermatogenesis. There is a number of reported methods for in vitro SSC culture systems. The development of a culture system that effectively supports isolation and selfrenewal of germline stem cells (GSCs) is of tremendous benefit for clinical trials, experimental research, and as potential treatment for male infertility. The current study aims to consider the cultivation and behavior of GSCs in a non-adherent culture system. In this experimental study, we cultured testicular cells from neonatal mice in agarose coated plates in the presence of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) medium (CTRL group), 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)+DMEM (10% group), and growth factor (G group) that contained 2% FBS, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Mouse spermatogonial stem-like colonies were isolated approximately 3 weeks after digestion of the testis tissue. After passages 2-3, the identity of the mouse spermatogonial stem-like cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and flow cytometry against the germ cell markers α6, β1, c-Kit, Thy-1, c-Ret, Plzf, and Oct4. The statistical significance between mean values in different groups was determined by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). We observed spermatogonial stem-like colonies in the G and 10% groups, but not the CTRL group. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR confirmed expressions of germ cell markers in these cells. In the spermatogonial stem-like cells, we observed a significant expression (Pcell markers in the G and 10% groups versus the testis cells (T). Their proliferative and apoptotic activities were examined by Ki67 and PI/annexin V-FITC. Alkaline phosphatase assay showed that mouse spermato- gonial stem-like colonies were partially positive. A non-adherent culture system could

  17. In vitro adherence patterns of Shigella serogroups to bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells are similar to those of Escherichia coli O157.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Indira T

    2012-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether Shigella species, which are human gastrointestinal pathogens, can adhere to cattle recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells using a recently standardized in vitro adherence assay, and to compare their adherence patterns with that of Escherichia coli O157. Shigella dysenteriae (serogroup A), S. flexneri (serogroup B), S. boydii (serogroup C), and S. sonnei (serogroup D) were tested in adherence assays using both RSE and HEp-2 cells, in the presence or absence of D+mannose. Escherichia coli O157, which adheres to RSE cells in a Type I fimbriae-independent manner, was used as a positive control. Shigella serogroups A, B, D, but not C adhered to RSE cells with distinct adherence patterns in the presence of D+mannose. No such distinction could be made between the four Shigella serogroups based on the HEp-2 cell adherence patterns. Thus, this study provides evidence that certain Shigella serogroups adhere to RSE cells in a manner that is similar to the adherence pattern of E. coli O157. These unexpected observations of in vitro binding of these foodborne human pathogens to cells of the bovine gastrointestinal tract warrant evaluation of Shigella carriage by cattle using both experimental and observational studies, especially for serogroups B and D. Such studies are currently underway.

  18. High current CD4+ T cell count predicts suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; de Bruin, M.; Bakker, M.; Berkhout, B.; Prins, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether

  19. The effects of disodium cromoglycate on enhanced adherence of Haemophilus influenzae to A549 cells infected with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Chie; Ishiwada, Naruhiko; Ogita, Junko; Hishiki, Haruka; Kohno, Yoichi

    2009-08-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) secondary infection often complicates respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. Previous studies have revealed that RSV infections enhance NTHi adherence to airway epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) and corticosteroids, which are frequently used for the treatment of wheezing often related to RSV infections, on the adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells. DSCG inhibited enhanced adherence of NTHi to RSV-infected A549 cells, whereas dexamethasone (Dex) and fluticasone propionate (Fp) did not. DSCG suppressed the expression of ICAM-1, which is one of the NTHi receptors. Furthermore, DSCG exhibited an inhibitory effect on RSV infections. It is suggested that DSCG exerts an anti-RSV effect, and consequently attenuates the expression of NTHi receptors.

  20. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  1. Plant thin cell layers: update and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira da Silva Jaime A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin cell layers (TCLs are small and versatile explants for the in vitro culture of plants. At face value, their morphogenic productivity may appear to be less than conventional explants, but once the plant growth correction factor and geometric factor have been applied, the true (potential productivity exceeds that of a conventional explant. It is for this reason that for almost 45 years, TCLs have been applied to the in vitro culture of almost 90 species or hybrids, mainly ornamentals and orchids, but also to field and vegetable crops and medicinal plants. Focusing on 12 new studies that have emerged in the recent past (2013-2015, this paper brings promise to other horticultural species that could benefit from the use of TCLs.

  2. Inducing Maturation of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells on Human Epithelial Cell Feeder Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delirezh N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, dendritic cells (DCs have a special place in cancer treatment strategies and they have been used for tumor immunotherapy as they can induce immune response against tumor cells. Researchers have been trying to generate efficient dendritic cells in vitro; therefore, this research was done to generate them for use in research and tumor immunotherapy. Methods: This study took place at Urmia University in 2010-2011 years. In this study plastic adherent monocytes were incubated with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 for five days. Finally, fully matured and stable DCs were generated by 48 hours of incubation in a monocyte conditioned medium (MCM containing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and epithelial cells. Phenotypic and functional analysis were carried out by using anti-CD14, anti-CD80, anti-CD86, and anti-CD83 monoclonal antibodies, and by determining their phagocytic activity, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR and cytokine production, respectively. Results: Dendritic cells were produced with high levels of surface molecule, i.e. of CD80, CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, expression and low levels of CD14 expression. Dendritic cells showed efficient phagocytosis and ability to stimulate T-lymphocytes. Moreover, dendritic cells could secrete high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12 cytokine which was depictive of their full maturation. Measurement of the produced cytokines showed the generation of type-1 dendritic cells (DC1. Conclusion: Our study showed that skin epithelial cells could induce maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs. This feeder layer led to the production of efficient dendritic cells with the ability to be used for tumor immunotherapy.

  3. Integrating Interactive Web-Based Technology to Assess Adherence and Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Crosby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that the quality of the adherence assessment is one of the best predictors for improving clinical outcomes. Newer technologies represent an opportunity for developing high quality standardized assessments to assess clinical outcomes such as patient experience of care but have not been tested systematically in pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD. The goal of the current study was to pilot an interactive web-based tool, the Take-Charge Program, to assess adherence to clinic visits and hydroxyurea (HU, barriers to adherence, solutions to overcome these barriers, and clinical outcomes in 43 patients with SCD age 6–21 years. Results indicate that the web-based tool was successfully integrated into the clinical setting while maintaining high patient satisfaction (>90%. The tool provided data consistent with the medical record, staff report, and/or clinical lab data. Participants reported that forgetting and transportation were major barriers for adherence to both clinic attendance and HU. A greater number of self-reported barriers (P<.01 and older age (P<.05 were associated with poorer clinic attendance and HU adherence. In summary, the tool represents an innovative approach to integrate newer technology to assess adherence and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients with SCD.

  4. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms regulating Acanthamoeba castellanii adherence to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Arredondo, K J; Flores-Villavicencio, L L; Serrano-Luna, J J; Shibayama, M; Sabanero-López, M

    2014-04-01

    Free-living amoebae belonging to the genus Acanthamoeba are the causative agents of infections such as amoebic keratitis (AK), granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and cutaneous lesions. The mechanisms involved in the establishment of infection are unknown. However, it is accepted that the initial phase of pathogenesis involves adherence to the host tissue. In this work, we analysed surface molecules with an affinity for epithelial and neuronal cells from the trophozoites of Acanthamoeba castellanii. We also investigated the cellular mechanisms that govern the process of trophozoite adhesion to the host cells. We first used confocal and epifluorescence microscopy to examine the distribution of the A. castellanii actin cytoskeleton during interaction with the host cells. The use of drugs, as cytochalasin B (CB) and latrunculin B (LB), revealed the participation of cytoskeletal filaments in the adhesion process. In addition, to identify the proteins and glycoproteins on the surface of A. castellanii, the trophozoites were labelled with biotin and biotinylated lectins. The results revealed bands of surface proteins, some of which were glycoproteins with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine residues. Interaction assays of biotinylated amoebae proteins with epithelial and neuronal cells showed that some surface proteins had affinity for both cell types. The results of this study provide insight into the biochemical and cellular mechanisms of the Acanthamoeba infection process.

  5. High-throughput fluorescent-based NKCC functional assay in adherent epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmosino, Monica; Rizzo, Federica; Torretta, Silvia; Procino, Giuseppe; Svelto, Maria

    2013-03-18

    The kidney-specific NKCC cotransporter isoform NKCC2 is involved in the Na(+) reabsorption in the Thich Ascending Limb (TAL) cells and in the regulation of body fluid volume. In contrast, the isoform NKCC1 represents the major pathway for Cl- entry in endothelial cells, playing a crucial role in cell volume regulation and vascular tone. Importantly, both NKCC isoforms are involved in the regulation of blood pressure and represent important potential drug targets for the treatment of hypertension. Taking advantage of an existing Thallium (Tl(+))-based kit, we set up a Tl(+) influx-based fluorescent assay, that can accurately and rapidly measure NKCC transporter activity in adherent epithelial cells using the high-throughput Flex station device. We assessed the feasibility of this assay in the renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells stably transfected with a previously characterized chimeric NKCC2 construct (c-NKCC2). We demonstrated that the assay is highly reproducible, offers high temporal resolution of NKCC-mediated ion flux profiles and, importantly, being a continuous assay, it offers improved sensitivity over previous endpoint NKCC functional assays. So far the screening of NKCC transporters activity has been done by (86)Rb(+) influx assays. Indeed, a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening method for testing NKCC inhibitors would be extremely useful in the development and characterization of new anti-hypertensive drugs.

  6. Inhibitory effect of O-glycosylation inhibition on human intestinal epithelial cells Mucin 2 expression and bacteria adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li SONG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of O-glycosylation inhibition in intestinal epithelial cells on the expression of Mucin 2 (MUC2 and bacterial adherence. Methods Intestinal epithelial cells HT-29 and differentiated HT-29 cells (HT-29-Gal were treated with an inhibitor of O-glycosylation (benzyl-α-GalNAc, and then named as HT-29-OBN and HT-29-Gal-OBN, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression of MUC2 in HT-29, HT29-Gal, HT-29-OBN and HT-29-Gal-OBN were detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then the four kinds of above cells were incubated with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC or enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 (EHEC O157:H7. The bacteria were quantified by determining the colony forming unit (CFU following the plating of serial dilutions of the bacteria to evaluate the effect of benzyl-α-GalNAc on bacteria adherence. Results The results of real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of MUC2 in HT-29-OBN and HT-29-Gal-OBN cells were significantly lower than those in the untreated cells HT-29 and HT-29-Gal (P<0.05. The bacterial adherence assay showed that the adherence of EPEC and EHEC O157:H7 to HT-29-OBN and HT-29-Gal-OBN cells significantly decreased compared with that to HT-29 and HT-29-Gal cells (P<0.05. Conclusion Inhibition of O-glycosylation in intestinal epithelial cells may reduce the bacteria adherence and MUC2 expression. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.10.009

  7. Human cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells reduce murine acute Coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapka Miteva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under conventional heart failure therapy, inflammatory cardiomyopathy typically has a progressive course, indicating a need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term outcomes. We recently isolated and identified novel cardiac-derived cells from human cardiac biopsies: cardiac-derived adherent proliferating cells (CAPs. They have similarities with mesenchymal stromal cells, which are known for their anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory properties. We explored whether CAPs application could be a novel strategy to improve acute Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-induced myocarditis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the safety of our approach, we first analyzed the expression of the coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR and the co-receptor CD55 on CAPs, which are both required for effective CVB3 infectivity. We could demonstrate that CAPs only minimally express both receptors, which translates to minimal CVB3 copy numbers, and without viral particle release after CVB3 infection. Co-culture of CAPs with CVB3-infected HL-1 cardiomyocytes resulted in a reduction of CVB3-induced HL-1 apoptosis and viral progeny release. In addition, CAPs reduced CD4 and CD8 T cell proliferation. All CAPs-mediated protective effects were nitric oxide- and interleukin-10-dependent and required interferon-γ. In an acute murine model of CVB3-induced myocarditis, application of CAPs led to a decrease of cardiac apoptosis, cardiac CVB3 viral load and improved left ventricular contractility parameters. This was associated with a decline in cardiac mononuclear cell activity, an increase in T regulatory cells and T cell apoptosis, and an increase in left ventricular interleukin-10 and interferon-γ mRNA expression. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CAPs are a unique type of cardiac-derived cells and promising tools to improve acute CVB3-induced myocarditis.

  8. Thin-Layer Fuel Cell for Teaching and Classroom Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhanzadeh, M.

    2009-01-01

    A thin-layer fuel cell is described that is simple and easy to set up and is particularly useful for teaching and classroom demonstrations. The cell is both an electrolyzer and a fuel cell and operates using a thin layer of electrolyte with a thickness of approximately 127 micrometers and a volume of approximately 40 microliters. As an…

  9. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; López-Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Erceg, Slaven

    2017-04-01

    Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal-free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal-free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217-1226.

  10. Non-invasive, label-free cell counting and quantitative analysis of adherent cells using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, A; Sebesta, M; Gustafsson, M; Gisselson, L; Wingren, A Gjörloff; Alm, K

    2008-11-01

    Manual cell counting is time consuming and requires a high degree of skill on behalf of the person performing the count. Here we use a technique that utilizes digital holography, allowing label-free and completely non-invasive cell counting directly in cell culture vessels with adherent viable cells. The images produced can provide both quantitative and qualitative phase information from a single hologram. The recently constructed microscope Holomonitor (Phase Holographic Imaging AB, Lund, Sweden) combines the commonly used phase contrast microscope with digital holography, the latter giving us the possibility of achieving quantitative information on cellular shape, area, confluence and optical thickness. This project aimed at determining the accuracy and repeatability of cell counting measurements using digital holography compared to the conventional manual cell counting method using a haemocytometer. The collected data were also used to determine cell size and cellular optical thickness. The results show that digital holography can be used for non-invasive automatic cell counting as precisely as conventional manual cell counting.

  11. Porcine intestinal epithelial cell lines as a new in vitro model for studying adherence and pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Seung Y; George, Sajan; Brözel, Volker; Moxley, Rodney; Francis, David; Kaushik, Radhey S

    2008-07-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections result in large economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. The organism causes diarrhea by adhering to and colonizing enterocytes in the small intestines. While much progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of ETEC, no homologous intestinal epithelial cultures suitable for studying porcine ETEC pathogenesis have been described prior to this report. In the current study, we investigated the adherence of various porcine ETEC strains to two porcine (IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2) and one human (INT-407) small intestinal epithelial cell lines. Each cell line was assessed for its ability to support the adherence of E. coli expressing fimbrial adhesins K88ab, K88ac, K88ad, K99, F41, 987P, and F18. Wild-type ETEC expressing K88ab, K88ac, and K88ad efficiently bound to both IPEC-1 and IPEC-J2 cells. An ETEC strain expressing both K99 and F41 bound heavily to both porcine cell lines but an E. coli strain expressing only K99 bound very poorly to these cells. E. coli expressing F18 adhesin strongly bound to IPEC-1 cells but did not adhere to IPEC-J2 cells. The E. coli strains G58-1 and 711 which express no fimbrial adhesins and those that express 987P fimbriae failed to bind to either porcine cell line. Only strains B41 and K12:K99 bound in abundance to INT-407 cells. The binding of porcine ETEC to IPEC-J2, IPEC-1 and INT-407 with varying affinities, together with lack of binding of 987P ETEC and non-fimbriated E. coli strains, suggests strain-specific E. coli binding to these cell lines. These findings suggest the potential usefulness of porcine intestinal cell lines for studying ETEC pathogenesis.

  12. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  13. Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Rikke N; Megnekou, Rosette; Lundquist, Maja;

    2006-01-01

    Placenta-sequestering Plasmodium falciparum parasites causing pregnancy-associated malaria express pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)). We report here that VSA(PAM)-expressing patient isolates adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo and that the BeWo line can...

  14. Development and optimization of a metabolomic method for analysis of adherent cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Anders P H; Moritz, Thomas; Mulder, Hindrik; Spégel, Peter

    2010-09-01

    In this investigation, a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomic protocol for adherent cell cultures was developed using statistical design of experiments. Cell disruption, metabolite extraction, and the GC/MS settings were optimized aiming at a gentle, unbiased, sensitive, and high-throughput metabolomic protocol. Due to the heterogeneity of the metabolome and the inherent selectivity of all analytical techniques, development of unbiased protocols is highly complex. Changing one parameter of the protocol may change the response of many groups of metabolites. In this investigation, statistical design of experiments and multivariate analysis also allowed such interaction effects to be taken into account. The protocol was validated with respect to linear range, precision, and limit of detection in a clonal rat insulinoma cell line (INS-1 832/13). The protocol allowed high-throughput profiling of metabolites covering the major metabolic pathways. The majority of metabolites displayed a linear range from a single well in a 96-well plate up to a 10 cm culture dish. The method allowed a total of 47 analyses to be performed in 24h.

  15. Neisseria cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by type IV pilus-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörmann, Mirka E; Horien, Corey L; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Guangyu; Aho, Ellen; Tang, Christoph M; Exley, Rachel M

    2016-03-01

    In pathogenic Neisseria species the type IV pili (Tfp) are of primary importance in host-pathogen interactions. Tfp mediate initial bacterial attachment to cell surfaces and formation of microcolonies via pilus-pilus interactions. Based on genome analysis, many non-pathogenic Neisseria species are predicted to express Tfp, but aside from studies on Neisseria elongata, relatively little is known about the formation and function of pili in these organisms. Here, we have analysed pilin expression and the role of Tfp in Neisseria cinerea. This non-pathogenic species shares a close taxonomic relationship to the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and also colonizes the human oropharyngeal cavity. Through analysis of non-pathogenic Neisseria genomes we identified two genes with homology to pilE, which encodes the major pilin of N. meningitidis. We show which of the two genes is required for Tfp expression in N. cinerea and that Tfp in this species are required for DNA competence, similar to other Neisseria. However, in contrast to the meningococcus, deletion of the pilin gene did not impact the association of N. cinerea to human epithelial cells, demonstrating that N. cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by Tfp-independent mechanisms.

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis adherence mediates differential gene expression in human vaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucknoor, Ashwini; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F

    2005-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, an ancient protist, colonizes the vaginal mucosa causing trichomonosis, a vaginitis that sometimes leads to severe health complications. Preparatory to colonization of the vagina is the adhesion to vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by trichomonads. We hypothesized that VECs alter the gene expression to form a complex signalling cascade in response to trichomonal adherence. In order to identify the genes that are upregulated, we constructed a subtraction cDNA library after contact with parasites that is enriched for differentially expressed genes from the immortalized MS-74 VECs. Sixty cDNA clones were sequenced and to our knowledge for the first time, differentially regulated genes were identified in response to early trichomonal infection. The identified genes were found to encode functional proteins with specific functions associated with cell structure maintenance and extracellular matrix components, proinflammatory molecules and apoptosis. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed expression of selected genes. Further, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expression was analysed using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Data suggest that p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and tyrosine kinases play a role in COX-2 induction. Finally, T. vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus but not Pentatrichomonas hominis induce expression of COX-2. This is a first attempt at elucidating the basis of interaction of trichomonads with host cells and the corresponding host responses triggered by the parasites.

  17. Enhanced Charge Collection with Passivation Layers in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Hui; Luo, Jingshan; Son, Min-Kyu; Gao, Peng; Cho, Kyung Taek; Seo, Jiyoun; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-05-01

    The Al2 O3 passivation layer is beneficial for mesoporous TiO2 -based perovskite solar cells when it is deposited selectively on the compact TiO2 surface. Such a passivation layer suppressing surface recombination can be formed by thermal decomposition of the perovskite layer during post-annealing.

  18. Automated method for the rapid and precise estimation of adherent cell culture characteristics from phase contrast microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Nicolas; Griffin, Lewis D; Keser, Ana; Macown, Rhys J; Super, Alexandre; Veraitch, Farlan S; Szita, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The quantitative determination of key adherent cell culture characteristics such as confluency, morphology, and cell density is necessary for the evaluation of experimental outcomes and to provide a suitable basis for the establishment of robust cell culture protocols. Automated processing of images acquired using phase contrast microscopy (PCM), an imaging modality widely used for the visual inspection of adherent cell cultures, could enable the non-invasive determination of these characteristics. We present an image-processing approach that accurately detects cellular objects in PCM images through a combination of local contrast thresholding and post hoc correction of halo artifacts. The method was thoroughly validated using a variety of cell lines, microscope models and imaging conditions, demonstrating consistently high segmentation performance in all cases and very short processing times (Source-code for MATLAB and ImageJ is freely available under a permissive open-source license.

  19. QID74 Cell wall protein of Trichoderma harzianum is involved in cell protection and adherence to hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Iván V; Rey, Manuel; Codón, Antonio C; Govantes, Javier; Moreno-Mateos, Miguel A; Benítez, Tahía

    2007-10-01

    Trichoderma is widely used as biocontrol agent against phytopathogenic fungi, and as biofertilizer because of its ability to establish mycorriza-like association with plants. The key factor to the ecological success of this genus is the combination of very active mycoparasitic mechanisms plus effective defense strategies induced in plants. This work, different from most of the studies carried out that address the attacking mechanisms, focuses on elucidating how Trichoderma is able to tolerate hostile conditions. A gene from Trichoderma harzianum CECT 2413, qid74, was strongly expressed during starvation of carbon or nitrogen sources; it encoded a cell wall protein of 74kDa that plays a significant role in mycelium protection. qid74 was originally isolated and characterized, in a previous work, by a differential hybridization approach under simulated mycoparasitism conditions. Heterologous expression of Qid74 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicated that the protein, located in the cell wall, interfered with mating and sporulation but not with cell integrity. The qid74 gene was disrupted by homologous recombination and it was overexpressed by isolating transformants selected for the amdS gene that carried several copies of qid74 gene under the control of the pki promoter. Disruptants and transformants showed similar growth rate and viability when they were cultivated in different media, temperatures and osmolarities, or were subjected to different abiotic stress conditions. However, disruptants produced about 70% mass yield under any condition and were substantially more sensitive than the wild type to cell wall degradation by different lytic preparations. Transformants had similar mass yield and were more resistant to lytic enzymes but more sensitive to copper sulfate than the wild type. When experiments of adherence to hydrophobic surfaces were carried out, the disruptants had a reduced capacity to adhere, whereas that capacity in the overproducer transformants was

  20. THE EFFECT OF PHENYLACETATE ON THE EXPANSION AND CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF ADHERENT LAK CELLS FROM PATIENTS WITH HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑宁; 叶胜龙; 孙瑞霞; 赵燕; 汤钊猷

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To improve the preparation of adherent lymphokine-activated killer (A-LAK) cells and study the synergistic anti-tumor effect of phenylacetate (PA) and A-LAK cells. Methods:\tA-LAK cells were obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by using L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PME) to deplete immunosuppressive monocytes. The proliferation of SMMC7721 cell line treated with PA was studied. A-LAK cells were treated with the supernatant of SMMC7721 cells which had been pretreated with PA and the changes of the proliferation and anti-tumor activity of A-LAK cells were investigated. Results: The expansion of A-LAK cells was significantly higher than that of non-adherent LAK (NA-LAK) cells as well as regular LAK cells. The growth of SMMC7721 cells was significantly suppressed by PA. The supernatant of cultured tumor cells intensively suppressed the proliferation and cytotoxicity of A-LAK cells, but the suppressive effect of supernatant treated with PA previously was decreased. Conclusion: A-LAK cells could be simply prepared by using PME, and showed a synergistic anti-tumor effect with the combination of PA.

  1. Curli Temper Adherence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Squamous Epithelial Cells from the Bovine Recto-Anal Junction in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Indira T; Carter, Michelle Q; Sharma, Vijay K; Stasko, Judith A; Giron, Jorge A

    2017-01-01

    Our recent studies have shown that intimin and the locus of enterocyte effacement-encoded proteins do not play a role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) adherence to the bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cells. To define factors that play a contributory role, we investigated the role of curli, fimbrial adhesins commonly implicated in adherence to various fomites and plant and human epithelial cells, in O157 adherence to RSE cells. Specifically, we examined (i) wild-type strains of O157; (ii) curli variants of O157 strains; (iii) isogenic curli deletion mutants of O157; and (iv) adherence inhibition of O157 using anti-curlin sera. Results of these experiments conducted under stringent conditions suggest that curli do not solely contribute to O157 adherence to RSE cells and in fact demonstrate a modulating effect on O157 adherence to RSE cells in contrast to HEp-2 cells (human epidermoid carcinoma of the larynx cells with HeLa contamination). The absence of curli and presence of blocking anti-curli antibodies enhanced O157-RSE cell interactions among some strains, thus alluding to a spatial, tempering effect of curli on O157 adherence to RSE cells when present. At the same time, the presence or absence of curli did not alter RSE cell adherence patterns of another O157 strain. These observations are at variance with the reported role of curli in O157 adherence to human cell lines such as HEp-2 and need to be factored in when developing anti-adherence modalities for preharvest control of O157 in cattle.

  2. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  3. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  4. The Role of Fibronectin in the Adherence and Inflammatory Response Induced by Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli on Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Yañez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC infections are still one of the most important etiologic pathogens of diarrhea in children worldwide. EAEC pathogenesis comprises three stages: adherence and colonization, production of toxins, and diarrhea followed by inflammation. Previous studies have demonstrated that EAEC strains have the ability to bind to fibronectin (FN; however, it remains unknown what role this extracellular matrix protein plays in the inflammatory response induced by EAEC. In this study, we postulated that FN-mediated adherence of EAEC strains to epithelial cells increases the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. To verify this hypothesis, we infected HEp-2 and HT-29 cells, in both the presence and absence of FN, with EAEC reference strain 042. We quantified IL-8 secretion and the relative expression of a set of genes regulated by the NF-κB pathway. Although FN increased EAEC adherence, no changes in IL-8 protein secretion or IL8 gene expression were observed. Similar observations were found in HEp-2 cells transfected with FN-siRNA and infected with EAEC. To evaluate the involvement of AAF/II fimbriae, we infected HEp-2 and HT-29 cells, in both the presence and absence of FN, with an EAEC 042aafA mutant strain transformed with a plasmid harboring the native aafA gene with a site-directed mutation in Lys72 residue (K72A and K72R strains. No changes in the IL-8 secretion were observed. Finally, SEM immunogold assay of cells incubated with FN and infected with EAEC revealed that AAF fimbriae can bind to cells either directly or mediated by FN. Our data suggest that FN participates in AAF/II fimbriae-mediated adherence of EAEC to epithelial cells, but not in the inflammatory response of cells infected by this pathogen.

  5. Exosome Adherence and Internalization by Hepatic Stellate Cells Triggers Sphingosine 1-Phosphate-dependent Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruisi; Ding, Qian; Yaqoob, Usman; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Verma, Vikas K; Hirsova, Petra; Cao, Sheng; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Huebert, Robert C; Shah, Vijay H

    2015-12-25

    Exosomes are cell-derived extracellular vesicles thought to promote intercellular communication by delivering specific content to target cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether endothelial cell (EC)-derived exosomes could regulate the phenotype of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Initial microarray studies showed that fibroblast growth factor 2 induced a 2.4-fold increase in mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1). Exosomes derived from an SK1-overexpressing EC line increased HSC migration 3.2-fold. Migration was not conferred by the dominant negative SK1 exosome. Incubation of HSCs with exosomes was also associated with an 8.3-fold increase in phosphorylation of AKT and 2.5-fold increase in migration. Exosomes were found to express the matrix protein and integrin ligand fibronectin (FN) by Western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Blockade of the FN-integrin interaction with a CD29 neutralizing antibody or the RGD peptide attenuated exosome-induced HSC AKT phosphorylation and migration. Inhibition of endocytosis with transfection of dynamin siRNA, the dominant negative dynamin GTPase construct Dyn2K44A, or the pharmacological inhibitor Dynasore significantly attenuated exosome-induced AKT phosphorylation. SK1 levels were increased in serum exosomes derived from mice with experimental liver fibrosis, and SK1 mRNA levels were up-regulated 2.5-fold in human liver cirrhosis patient samples. Finally, S1PR2 inhibition protected mice from CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. Therefore, EC-derived SK1-containing exosomes regulate HSC signaling and migration through FN-integrin-dependent exosome adherence and dynamin-dependent exosome internalization. These findings advance our understanding of EC/HSC cross-talk and identify exosomes as a potential target to attenuate pathobiology signals.

  6. The Adhesion of Lactobacillus salivarius REN to a Human Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line Requires S-layer Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Jiang, Lun; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Liang; Hao, Yanling; Guo, Huiyuan; Sang, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Ren, Fazheng

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius REN, a novel probiotic isolated from Chinese centenarians, can adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently colonize the host. We show here that the surface-layer protein choline-binding protein A (CbpA) of L. salivarius REN was involved in adherence to the human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29. Adhesion of a cbpA deletion mutant was significantly reduced compared with that of wild-type, suggesting that CbpA acts as an adhesin that mediates the interaction between the bacterium and its host. To identify the molecular mechanism of adhesion, we determined the crystal structure of a truncated form of CbpA that is likely involved in binding to its cell-surface receptor. The crystal structure identified CbpA as a peptidase of the M23 family whose members harbor a zinc-dependent catalytic site. Therefore, we propose that CbpA acts as a multifunctional surface protein that cleaves the host extracellular matrix and participates in adherence. Moreover, we identified enolase as the CbpA receptor on the surface of HT-29 cells. The present study reveals a new class of surface-layer proteins as well as the molecular mechanism that may contribute to the ability of L. salivarius REN to colonize the human gut. PMID:28281568

  7. Neuronal-like cell differentiation of non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxin Wu; Jinghan Zhang; Xiaoming Ben

    2013-01-01

    Non-adherent bone marrow cel-derived mesenchymal stem cel s from C57BL/6J mice were sepa-rated and cultured using the “pour-off” method. Non-adherent bone marrow cel-derived mesen-chymal stem cel s developed colony-forming unit-fibroblasts, and could be expanded by supple-mentation with epidermal growth factor. Immunocytochemistry showed that the non-adherent bone marrow cel-derived mesenchymal stem cel s exposed to basic fibroblast growth factor/epidermal growth factor/nerve growth factor expressed the neuron specific markers, neurofilament-200 and NeuN, in vitro. Non-adherent bone marrow cel-derived mesenchymal stem cel s fromβ-galactosidase transgenic mice were also transplanted into focal ischemic brain (right corpus striatum) of C57BL/6J mice. At 8 weeks, cel s positive for LacZ andβ-galactosidase staining were observed in the ischemic tissues, and cel s co-labeled with both β-galactosidase and NeuN were seen by double immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that the non-adherent bone marrow cel-derived mesenchymal stem cel s could differentiate into neuronal-like cel s in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Comparison of fracture site callus with iliac crest bone marrow as the source of plastic-adherent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Zaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Red marrow has been described as the main source of mesenchymal stem cells although its aspiration and isolation from bone marrow was reported to have significant donor site morbidity. Since secondary bone healing occurs through formation of callus as the result of proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, callus may become alternative source for mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we compared the number of plastic-adherent cells from fracture site callus and bone marrow of iliac crest after two and four weeks of culture.Methods: Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were fracturized at the femoral shaft. Then, these rabbits were taken care. After two weeks of fracturization, 3 mL iliac crest bone marrow aspiration and callus extraction of eight rabbits were cultured (group I. The other eight rabbits were treated equally after four weeks of fracturization (group II. Simultaneously, the cultures were observed after one and two weeks. Four weeks later, they were harvested. Cells were counted using Neubauer hemocytometer. The average number of cells between the sources and groups were statistically analyzed using the unpaired t-test. Results: In group I, there were 2.6 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in the culture of iliac crest bone marrow aspirate and 2.5 ± 0.1 x 104 cells in culture of callus extract from fracture site (p = 0.34. In group II, there were 2.7 ± 0.1 x 104 cells and 2.1 ± 0.1 x 104 cells, respectively (p < 0.001.Conclusion: Fracture site callus at the second week post-fracturization may be potential as source of plastic-adherent cells compared with iliac crest bone marrow. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:70-5Keywords: Bone marrow, fracture site callus, iliac crest, long bone, mesenchymal stem cell, plastic-adherent cells

  9. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  10. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  11. Reducing time and increasing sensitivity in sample preparation for adherent mammalian cell metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Matthew A; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert T

    2011-05-01

    A simple, fast, and reproducible sample preparation procedure was developed for relative quantification of metabolites in adherent mammalian cells using the clonal β-cell line INS-1 as a model sample. The method was developed by evaluating the effect of different sample preparation procedures on high performance liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry quantification of 27 metabolites involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle on a directed basis as well as for all detectable chromatographic features on an undirected basis. We demonstrate that a rapid water rinse step prior to quenching of metabolism reduces components that suppress electrospray ionization thereby increasing signal for 26 of 27 targeted metabolites and increasing total number of detected features from 237 to 452 with no detectable change of metabolite content. A novel quenching technique is employed which involves addition of liquid nitrogen directly to the culture dish and allows for samples to be stored at -80 °C for at least 7 d before extraction. Separation of quenching and extraction steps provides the benefit of increased experimental convenience and sample stability while maintaining metabolite content similar to techniques that employ simultaneous quenching and extraction with cold organic solvent. The extraction solvent 9:1 methanol: chloroform was found to provide superior performance over acetonitrile, ethanol, and methanol with respect to metabolite recovery and extract stability. Maximal recovery was achieved using a single rapid (∼1 min) extraction step. The utility of this rapid preparation method (∼5 min) was demonstrated through precise metabolite measurements (11% average relative standard deviation without internal standards) associated with step changes in glucose concentration that evoke insulin secretion in the clonal β-cell line INS-1.

  12. Identification of cell surface-exposed proteins involved in the fimbria-mediated adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Mariana; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nava-Acosta, Raul; Nataro, James P; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Farfan, Mauricio J

    2014-04-01

    Fimbria-mediated adherence to the intestinal epithelia is a key step in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) pathogenesis. To date, four fimbriae have been described for EAEC; aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II) is the most important adherence factor for EAEC prototype strain 042. Previously, we described results showing that extracellular matrix (ECM) components might be involved in the recognition of AAF/II fimbriae by intestinal cells. In this study, we sought to identify novel potential receptors on intestinal epithelial cells recognized by the AAF/II fimbriae. Purified AafA-dsc protein, the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae, was incubated with a monolayer of T84 cells, cross-linked to the surface-exposed T84 cell proteins, and immunoprecipitated by using anti-AafA antibodies. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of cellular proteins bound to AafA-dsc protein identified laminin (previously recognized as a potential receptor for AAF/II) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8). Involvement of the major subunit of AAF/II fimbriae (AafA protein) in the binding to recombinant CK8 was confirmed by adherence assays with purified AAF/II fimbriae, AafA-dsc protein, and strain 042. Moreover, HEp-2 cells transfected with CK8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) showed reduced 042 adherence compared with cells transfected with scrambled siRNA as a control. Adherence of 042 to HEp-2 cells preincubated with antibodies against ECM proteins or CK8 was substantially reduced. Altogether, our results supported the idea of a role of CK8 as a potential receptor for EAEC.

  13. Influence of window layer thickness on double layer antirefiection coating for triple junction solar cells*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lijuan; Zhan Feng; Yu Ying; Zhu Yan; Liu Shaoqing; Huang Shesong; Ni Haiqiao; Niu Zhichuan

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of a SiO2/TiO2, SiO2/ZnS double layer antireflection coating (ARC) on Ga0.5ln0.5P/ln0.02Ga0.98As/Ge solar cells for terrestrial application is discussed. The Al0.5In0.5P window layer thickness is also taken into consideration. It is shown that the optimal parameters of double layer ARC vary with the thickness of the window layer.

  14. Nanostructured solid-state hybrid photovoltaic cells fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniprath, Rolf; McLeskey, James T.; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Kirstein, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    We report on the fabrication of hybrid organic/inorganic photovoltaic cells utilizing layer-by-layer deposition of water-soluble polyions and nanocrystals. A bulk heterojunction structure was created consisting of alternating layers of the p-conductive polythiophene derivative poly[2-(3-thienyl)-ethoxy-4-butylsulfonate] and n-conductive TiO2 nanoparticles. We fabricated working devices with the heterostructure sandwiched between suitable charge carrier blocking layers and conducting oxide and metal electrodes, respectively. We analyzed the influence of the thickness and nanostructure of the active layer on the cell performance and characterized the devices in terms of static and transient current response with respect to illumination and voltage conditions. We observed reproducible and stable photovoltaic behavior with photovoltages of up to 0.9 V.

  15. Technology Access and Smartphone App Preferences for Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for sickle cell disease (SCD) with short- and long-term benefits for both morbidity and mortality. However, hydroxyurea underutilization and adherence remain challenges for patients with SCD. The objectives of this study were to determine access to technology among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with SCD and to identify their preferred technology-based strategies for improving medication adherence. A cross-sectional survey was administered in a variety of clinical settings from October 2014 through May 2015 to AYA (12-22 years) with SCD (all genotypes) followed in a Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. Eighty of 107 eligible participants completed the survey for a 75% response rate. Participants (51% female, 94% Black) had a mean age of 15.3 ± 2.8 years. Most participants (75%) were on a daily medication with about half on hydroxyurea. Forgetfulness (67%) was the most common barrier to medication adherence. The majority of participants (85%) owned smartphones and either owned or had access to electronic tablets (83%), laptops (72%), or desktops (70%). Of the proposed smartphone app features, daily medication reminders were ranked first most frequently, followed by education about SCD, adherence text prompts, education about SCD medications, and medication log. The majority of our AYA with SCD owned smartphones and had access to other electronic devices. Our survey results provided valuable insight into the preferred app features and optimal strategies for developing technology-based interventions, such as a multicomponent app, to increase medication adherence for AYA with SCD or other chronic conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culler, Hebert F.; Mota, Cristiane M.; Abe, Cecilia M.; Elias, Waldir P.; Sircili, Marcelo P.; Franzolin, Marcia R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV) assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4%) of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence). This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea. PMID:24883330

  17. Atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strains form Biofilm on Abiotic Surfaces Regardless of Their Adherence Pattern on Cultured Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert F. Culler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of biofilm formation of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces. Ninety-one aEPEC strains, isolated from feces of children with diarrhea, were analyzed by the crystal violet (CV assay on an abiotic surface after 24 h of incubation. aEPEC strains representing each HEp-2 cell type of adherence were analyzed after 24 h and 6, 12, and 18 days of incubation at 37°C on abiotic and cell surfaces by CFU/cm2 counting and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces occurred in 55 (60.4% of the aEPEC strains. There was no significant difference in biofilm biomass formation on an abiotic versus prefixed cell surface. The biofilms could be visualized by CLSM at various developmental stages. aEPEC strains are able to form biofilm on an abiotic surface with no association with their adherence pattern on HEp-2 cells with the exception of the strains expressing UND (undetermined adherence. This study revealed the capacity of adhesion and biofilm formation by aEPEC strains on abiotic and biotic surfaces, possibly playing a role in pathogenesis, mainly in cases of persistent diarrhea.

  18. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  19. Suppression of unprimed T and B cells in antibody responses by irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells in Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kobayashi, A.

    1983-04-01

    In the acute phase of Toxoplasma infection, the function of both helper T and B cells was suppressed in primary antibody responses to dinitrophenol (DNP)-conjugated protein antigens. During the course of infection, the suppressive effect on T cells seems to continue longer than that on B cells, since suppression in responses to sheep erythrocytes, a T-dependent antigen, persisted longer than those to DNP-Ficoll, a T-independent antigen. Plastic-adherent cells from the spleens of Toxoplasma-infected and X-irradiated (400 rads) mice had strong suppressor activity in primary anti-sheep erythrocyte antibody responses of normal mouse spleen cells in vitro. These data suggest that the activation of irradiation-resistant and plastic-adherent suppressor cells causes the suppression of both T and B cells in Toxoplasma-infected mice.

  20. Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay: a tubeless method for pretransfusion testing and other applications in transfusion science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay (SPRCA) is one of the two tubeless methods developed to improve sensitivity and specificity in blood group serology. The SPRCA (solid phase) and the column agglutination (gel) technology have gained wide acceptance following successful adaptation to fully automated platforms, The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development, principle, procedures as well as laboratory and clinical applications of the SPRCA in transfusion medicine.

  1. Development of a cell line from Echinococcus granulosus germinal layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Clara María; Cumino, Andrea Carina; Elissondo, María Celina; Denegri, Guillermo María

    2013-10-01

    In vitro culture of parasitic helminths provides an important tool to study cell regeneration and physiology, as well as for molecular biology and genetic engineering studies. In the present study, we established in vitro propagation of cells from Echinococcus granulosus germinal cyst layer. E. granulosus germinal cells grew beyond 100 passages and showed no signs of reduced proliferation capacity. Microscopic analysis revealed that cells grew both attached to the substrate and in suspension, forming three-dimensional structures like mammalian stem cell aggregates. Examination of the chromosome number of attached germinal cells showed a high degree of heteroploidy, suggesting the occurrence of transformation during culture. Monolayer cells survived cryopreservation and were able to proliferate after thawing. Based on the characteristics displayed by E. granulosus germinal cells, we establish a cell line from the E. granulosus germinal layer. Furthermore, we propose that this cell line could be useful for drug screening and for obtaining parasite material.

  2. Characterization and use of crystalline bacterial cell surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit; Pum, Dietmar; Schuster, Bernhard

    2001-10-01

    Crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) are one of the most common outermost cell envelope components of prokaryotic organisms (archaea and bacteria). S-layers are monomolecular arrays composed of a single protein or glycoprotein species and represent the simplest biological membranes developed during evolution. S-layers as the most abundant of prokaryotic cellular proteins are appealing model systems for studying the structure, synthesis, genetics, assembly and function of proteinaceous supramolecular structures. The wealth of information existing on the general principle of S-layers have revealed a broad application potential. The most relevant features exploited in applied S-layer research are: (i) pores passing through S-layers show identical size and morphology and are in the range of ultrafiltration membranes; (ii) functional groups on the surface and in the pores are aligned in well-defined positions and orientations and accessible for chemical modifications and binding functional molecules in very precise fashion; (iii) isolated S-layer subunits from a variety of organisms are capable of recrystallizing as closed monolayers onto solid supports (e.g., metals, polymers, silicon wafers) at the air-water interface, on lipid films or onto the surface of liposomes; (iv) functional domains can be incorporated in S-layer proteins by genetic engineering. Thus, S-layer technologies particularly provide new approaches for biotechnology, biomimetics, molecular nanotechnology, nanopatterning of surfaces and formation of ordered arrays of metal clusters or nanoparticles as required for nanoelectronics.

  3. Assessment of the impact of adherence and other predictors during HAART on various CD4 cell responses in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrogoua DP

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Danho Pascal Abrogoua1,2, Brou Jerome Kablan1, Boua Alexis Thierry Kamenan1,3, Gilles Aulagner4, Konan N'Guessan1, Christian Zohoré11Laboratoire de Pharmacie Clinique, Pharmacologie et Therapeutique – UFR Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, 2Laboratoire de Pharmacologie Clinique, CHU de Cocody, 3Service de Pharmacie, CHU de Cocody, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire, 4Service Pharmaceutique Hopital Louis Pradel, Lyon, FranceObjective: The aim of this study was to quantify, by modeling, the impact of significant predictors on CD4 cell response during antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting.Methods: Modeling was used to determine which antiretroviral therapy response predictors (baseline CD4 cell count, clinical state, age, and adherence significantly influence immunological response in terms of CD4 cell gain compared to a reference value at different periods of monitoring.Results: At 6 months, CD4 cell response was significantly influenced by baseline CD4 count alone. The probability of no increase in CD4 cells was 2.6 higher in patients with a baseline CD4 cell count of ≥200/mm3. At 12 months, CD4 cell response was significantly influenced by both baseline CD4 cell count and adherence. The probability of no increase in CD4 cells was three times higher in patients with a baseline CD4 cell count of ≥200/mm3 and 0.15 times lower with adherent patients. At 18 months, CD4 cell response was also significantly influenced by both baseline CD4 cell count and adherence. The probability of no increase in CD4 cells was 5.1 times higher in patients with a baseline CD4 cell count of ≥200/mm3 and 0.28 times lower with adherent patients. At 24 months, optimal CD4 cell response was significantly influenced by adherence alone. Adherence increased the probability (by 5.8 of an optimal increase in CD4 cells. Age and baseline clinical state had no significant influence on immunological response.Conclusion: The relationship between adherence and CD4

  4. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  5. Hydrodynamic determinants of cell necrosis and molecular delivery produced by pulsed laser microbeam irradiation of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan L; Hellman, Amy N; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2013-11-05

    Time-resolved imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and hydrodynamic modeling were used to examine cell lysis and molecular delivery produced by picosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser microbeam irradiation in adherent cell cultures. Pulsed laser microbeam radiation at λ = 532 nm was delivered to confluent monolayers of PtK2 cells via a 40×, 0.8 NA microscope objective. Using laser microbeam pulse durations of 180-1100 ps and pulse energies of 0.5-10.5 μJ, we examined the resulting plasma formation and cavitation bubble dynamics that lead to laser-induced cell lysis, necrosis, and molecular delivery. The cavitation bubble dynamics are imaged at times of 0.5 ns to 50 μs after the pulsed laser microbeam irradiation, and fluorescence assays assess the resulting cell viability and molecular delivery of 3 kDa dextran molecules. Reductions in both the threshold laser microbeam pulse energy for plasma formation and the cavitation bubble energy are observed with decreasing pulse duration. These energy reductions provide for increased precision of laser-based cellular manipulation including cell lysis, cell necrosis, and molecular delivery. Hydrodynamic analysis reveals critical values for the shear-stress impulse generated by the cavitation bubble dynamics governs the location and spatial extent of cell necrosis and molecular delivery independent of pulse duration and pulse energy. Specifically, cellular exposure to a shear-stress impulse J≳0.1 Pa s ensures cell lysis or necrosis, whereas exposures in the range of 0.035≲J≲0.1 Pa s preserve cell viability while also enabling molecular delivery of 3 kDa dextran. Exposure to shear-stress impulses of J≲0.035 Pa s leaves the cells unaffected. Hydrodynamic analysis of these data, combined with data from studies of 6 ns microbeam irradiation, demonstrates the primacy of shear-stress impulse in determining cellular outcome resulting from pulsed laser microbeam irradiation spanning a nearly two-orders-of-magnitude range of

  6. Factors Associated with Adherence to and Treatment Duration of Erlotinib Among Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Lisa M; Louder, Anthony; Winfree, Katherine; Zhu, Yajun E; Oton, Ana B; Nair, Radhika

    2017-06-01

    In lung cancer, there is an increasing number of oral agents available for patients; however, little is known about the factors associated with adherence to and treatment duration on oral medications in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To evaluate the clinical and demographic factors associated with adherence and treatment discontinuation, respectively, to oral oncolytics among patients with NSCLC. A retrospective, claims-based analysis of the Humana Research Database supplemented with medical chart review was conducted among patients with NSCLC who started an oral oncolytic between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2013. Patients were required to be enrolled at least 1 year before the start of oral oncolytics and have no evidence of any oral oncolytic use during this period. Logistic regression models and Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify predictors associated with medication adherence and treatment duration, respectively. Among all oral oncolytics, only the cohort starting on erlotinib had sufficient sample size (n = 1,452). A wide variety of factors were found to be associated with adherence. Low-income subsidy status, previous use of intravenous chemotherapy, and lower total baseline health care costs were significantly related to decreasing adherence (each P patient out-of-pocket cost was associated with decreasing adherence to erlotinib (P patient outcomes that may be associated with low adherence to or shorter treatment duration on oral chemotherapy. This study was supported by funding from Eli Lilly and Company to Comprehensive Health Insights, a Humana company, as a collaborative research project involving employees of both companies. Hess, Winfree, Zhu, and Oton are employees of Eli Lilly and Company. Louder and Nair are employees of Comprehensive Health Insights, which received funding to complete this research. Study concept and design were contributed by Hess, Zhu, Winfree, and Oton. Nair and Louder collected the data, and data

  7. Layer-by-layer self-assembled active electrodes for hybrid photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniprath, Rolf

    2008-11-18

    Solar cells based on thin organic/inorganic heterofilms are currently in the focus of research, since they represent promising candidates for cost-efficient photovoltaic energy conversion. In this type of cells, charges are separated at a heterointerface between dissimilar electrode materials. These materials either absorb light themselves, or they are sensitized by an additional absorber layer at the interface. The present work investigates photovoltaic cells which are composed of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} combined with conjugated polymers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The method of layer-by-layer self-assembly of oppositely charged nanoparticles and polymers is used for the fabrication of such devices. This method allows to fabricate nanoporous films with controlled thicknesses in the range of a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers. Investigations with scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveal that the surface morphology of the films depends only on the chemical structure of the polyions used in the production process, and not on their molecular weight or conformation. From dye adsorption at the internal surface of the electrodes one can estimate that the internal surface area of a 1 {mu}m thick film is up to 120 times larger than the projection plane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to demonstrate that during the layer-by-layer self-assembly at least 40% of the TiO{sub 2} surface is covered with polymers. This feature allows to incorporate polythiophene derivatives into the films and to use them as sensitizers for TiO{sub 2}. Further, electrodes containing CdSe or CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers are fabricated. For the fabrication of photovoltaic cells the layer-by-layer grown films are coated with an additional polymer layer, and Au back electrodes are evaporated on top. The cells are illuminated through transparent doped SnO{sub 2} front electrodes. The I/V curves of all fabricated cells show diode

  8. Genome Wide assessment of Early Osseointegration in Implant-Adherent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Ghadeer N.

    Objectives: To determine the molecular processes involved in osseointegration. Materials and methods: A structured literature review concerning in vitro and in vivo molecular assessment of osseointegration was performed. A rat and a human model were then used to identify the early molecular processes involved in osseointegration associated with a micro roughened and nanosurface superimposed featured implants. In the rat model, 32 titanium implants with surface topographies exhibiting a micro roughened (AT-II) and nanosurface superimposed featured implants (AT-I) were placed in the tibiae of 8 rats and subsequently harvested at 2 and 4 days after placement. Whereas in the human model, four titanium mini-implants with either a moderately roughened surface (TiOblast) or super-imposed nanoscale topography (Osseospeed) were placed in edentulous sites of eleven systemically healthy subjects and subsequently removed after 3 and 7 days. Total RNA was isolated from cells adherent to retrieved implants. A whole genome microarray using the Affymetrix 1.1 ST Array platform was used to describe the gene expression profiles that were differentially regulated by the implant surfaces. Results: The literature review provided evidence that particular topographic cues can be specifically integrated among the many extracellular signals received by the cell in its signal transduction network. In the rat model, functionally relevant categories related to ossification, skeletal system development, osteoblast differentiation, bone development and biomineral tissue development were upregulated and more prominent at AT-I compared to AT-II. In the human model, there were no significant differences when comparing the two-implant surfaces at each time point. However, the microarray identified several genes that were differentially regulated at day 7 vs. day 3 for both implant surfaces. Functionally relevant categories related to the extracellular matrix, collagen fibril organization and

  9. Display of cell surface sites for fibronectin assembly is modulated by cell adherence to (1F3 and C-terminal modules of fibronectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jielin Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibronectin-null cells assemble soluble fibronectin shortly after adherence to a substrate coated with intact fibronectin but not when adherent to the cell-binding domain of fibronectin (modules (7F3-(10F3. Interactions of adherent cells with regions of adsorbed fibronectin other than modules (7F3-(10F3, therefore, are required for early display of the cell surface sites that initiate and direct fibronectin assembly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify these regions, coatings of proteolytically derived or recombinant pieces of fibronectin containing modules in addition to (7F3-(10F3 were tested for effects on fibronectin assembly by adherent fibronectin-null fibroblasts. Pieces as large as one comprising modules (2F3-(14F3, which include the heparin-binding and cell adhesion domains, were not effective in supporting fibronectin assembly. Addition of module (1F3 or the C-terminal modules to modules (2F3-(14F3 resulted in some activity, and addition of both (1F3 and the C-terminal modules resulted in a construct, (1F3-C, that best mimicked the activity of a coating of intact fibronectin. Constructs (1F3-C V0, (1F3-C V64, and (1F3-C Delta(V(15F3(10F1 were all able to support fibronectin assembly, suggesting that (1F3 through (11F1 and/or (12F1 were important for activity. Coatings in which the active parts of (1F3-C were present in different proteins were much less active than intact (1F3-C. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that (1F3 acts together with C-terminal modules to induce display of fibronectin assembly sites on adherent cells.

  10. Determination of the elastic moduli of thin samples and adherent cells using conical atomic force microscope tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S.

    2012-12-01

    The atomic force microscope can detect the mechanical fingerprints of normal and diseased cells at the single-cell level under physiological conditions. However, atomic force microscopy studies of cell mechanics are limited by the `bottom effect' artefact that arises from the stiff substrates used to culture cells. Because cells adhered to substrates are very thin, this artefact makes cells appear stiffer than they really are. Here, we show an analytical correction that accounts for this artefact when conical tips are used for atomic force microscope measurements of thin samples. Our bottom effect cone correction (BECC) corrects the Sneddon's model, which is widely used to measure Young's modulus, E. Comparing the performance of BECC and Sneddon's model on thin polyacrylamide gels, we find that although Sneddon's model overestimates E, BECC yields E values that are thickness-independent and similar to those obtained on thick regions of the gel. The application of BECC to measurements on live adherent fibroblasts demonstrates a significant improvement on the estimation of their local mechanical properties.

  11. Comparisons of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Primary Adherent Culture of Compact Bone Fragments and Whole Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiting Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purification of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs by using the standard method of whole bone marrow adherence to plastic still remains ineffective. An increasing number of studies have indicated compact bone as an alternative source of BMSCs. We isolated BMSCs from cultured compact bone fragments and investigated the proliferative capacity, surface immunophenotypes, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations of the cells after the first trypsinization. The fragment culture was based on the fact that BMSCs were assembled in compact bones. Thus, the procedure included flushing bone marrow out of bone cavity and culturing the fragments without any collagenase digestion. The cell yield from cultured fragments was slightly less than that from cultured bone marrow using the same bone quantity. However, the trypsinized cells from cultured fragments exhibited significantly higher proliferation and were accompanied with more CD90 and CD44 expressions and less CD45 expression. The osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacity of cells from cultured fragments were better than those of cells from bone marrow. The directly adherent culture of compact bone is suitable for mouse BMSC isolation, and more BMSCs with potentially improved proliferation capacity can be obtained in the primary culture.

  12. Automated microraft platform to identify and collect non-adherent cells successfully gene-edited with CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attayek, Peter J; Waugh, Jennifer P; Hunsucker, Sally A; Grayeski, Philip J; Sims, Christopher E; Armistead, Paul M; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2017-05-15

    Microraft arrays have been used to screen and then isolate adherent and non-adherent cells with very high efficiency and excellent viability; however, manual screening and isolation limits the throughput and utility of the technology. In this work, novel hardware and software were developed to automate the microraft array platform. The developed analysis software identified microrafts on the array with greater than 99% sensitivity and cells on the microrafts with 100% sensitivity. The software enabled time-lapse imaging and the use of temporally varying characteristics as sort criteria. The automated hardware released microrafts with 98% efficiency and collected released microrafts with 100% efficiency. The automated system was used to examine the temporal variation in EGFP expression in cells transfected with CRISPR-Cas9 components for gene editing. Of 11,499 microrafts possessing a single cell, 220 microrafts were identified as possessing temporally varying EGFP-expression. Candidate cells (n=172) were released and collected from the microraft array and screened for the targeted gene mutation. Two cell colonies were successfully gene edited demonstrating the desired mutation.

  13. Local Structure Analysis of Materials for Solar Cell Absorber Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Jewell, Leila Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines solar cell absorber materials that have the potential to replace silicon in solar cells, including several copper-based sulfides and perovskites. Earth-abundant absorbers such as these become even more cost-effective when used in a nanostructured solar cell. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) deposit highly conformal films and hence are important tools for developing extremely thin absorber solar cells with scalability. Thus, the prima...

  14. Enhanced breast cancer cell adherence to the lung endothelium via PAF acetylhydrolase inhibition: a potential mechanism for enhanced metastasis in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispert, Shannon E; Marentette, John O; McHowat, Jane

    2014-11-15

    Cancer deaths are primarily caused by distant metastases, rather than by primary tumor growth; however, the role of smoking in metastasis remains unclear. We demonstrated previously that endothelial cell platelet-activating factor (PAF) production results in enhanced inflammatory cell recruitment to the lung. We propose that endothelial cell PAF accumulation plays a role in cancer cell migration to distal locations. We used cigarette smoke extract (CSE) to inhibit the activity of endothelial cell PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), which hydrolyzes and inactivates PAF, and determined whether this results in increased endothelial cell PAF accumulation and breast cancer adherence. Incubation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) with CSE resulted in a significant inhibition of PAF-AH activity that was accompanied by increased PAF production and adherence of highly invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Pretreatment of HMVEC-L with (S)-bromoenol lactone to inhibit calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β, which initiates endothelial cell PAF production) prior to CSE exposure resulted in complete inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell adherence. Similarly, pretreatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with the PAF receptor antagonist Ginkgo biloba resulted in inhibition of adherence to the endothelium. Immunoblot analysis indicated an increase in MDA-MB-231 cell PAF receptor expression with CSE exposure. Taken together, our data indicate that CSE exposure increases endothelial cell PAF production, resulting in enhanced adherence of tumor cells to the endothelium. Our in vitro data indicate that increased tumor cell adherence would lead to enhanced metastasis formation in smokers. Potential therapeutic targets include endothelial cell iPLA2β or the tumor cell PAF receptor. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Monitoring changes in proteome during stepwise adaptation of a MDCK cell line from adherence to growth in suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Sabine; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Scharfenberg, Klaus; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2015-08-20

    Adaptation of continuous cell lines to growth in suspension in a chemically defined medium has significant advantages for design and optimization in manufacturing of biologicals. In this work, changes in the protein expression level during a step-wise adaptation of an adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to suspension growth were analyzed. Therefore, three cell line adaptations were performed independently. Two adaptations were monitored closely to characterize short term changes in protein expression levels after serum deprivation. In addition, initial stages of suspension growth were analyzed for both adaptations. The third adaptation involved MDCK suspension cells (MDCKSUS2) grown over an extended time period to achieve robust growth characteristics. Here, cells of the final stage of adaptation were compared with their parental cell line (MDCKADH). A combination of two dimensional differential gel electrophoresis for relative protein quantification and tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification enabled insights into cellular physiology. The two closely monitored cell line adaptations followed different routes regarding specific changes in protein expression but resulted in similar proteome profiles at the initial stages of suspension growth analyzed. Compared to the MDCKADH cells more than 90% of all changes in the protein expression level were identified after serum deprivation and were related to cytoskeletal structure, genetic information processing and cellular metabolism. Myosin proteins, involved in cellular detachment by actin-myosin contractile mechanisms were also differentially expressed. Interestingly, for both of the two adaptations, proteins linked for tumorigenicity, like lactoylglutathione lyase and sulfotransferase 1A1 were differentially expressed. In contrast, none of these proteins were differentially expressed for the MDCKSUS2 cell line. Overall, proteomic monitoring allowed identification of key proteins involved in

  16. Layer by layer three-dimensional tissue epitaxy by cell-laden hydrogel droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, SangJun; Hasan, Syed K; Song, Young S; Xu, Feng; Keles, Hasan Onur; Manzur, Fahim; Mikkilineni, Sohan; Hong, Jong Wook; Nagatomi, Jiro; Haeggstrom, Edward; Khademhosseini, Ali; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-02-01

    The ability to bioengineer three-dimensional (3D) tissues is a potentially powerful approach to treat diverse diseases such as cancer, loss of tissue function, or organ failure. Traditional tissue engineering methods, however, face challenges in fabricating 3D tissue constructs that resemble the native tissue microvasculature and microarchitectures. We have developed a bioprinter that can be used to print 3D patches of smooth muscle cells (5 mm x 5 mm x 81 microm) encapsulated within collagen. Current inkjet printing systems suffer from loss of cell viability and clogging. To overcome these limitations, we developed a system that uses mechanical valves to print high viscosity hydrogel precursors containing cells. The bioprinting platform that we developed enables (i) printing of multilayered 3D cell-laden hydrogel structures (16.2 microm thick per layer) with controlled spatial resolution (proximal axis: 18.0 +/- 7.0 microm and distal axis: 0.5 +/- 4.9 microm), (ii) high-throughput droplet generation (1 s per layer, 160 droplets/s), (iii) cell seeding uniformity (26 +/- 2 cells/mm(2) at 1 million cells/mL, 122 +/- 20 cells/mm(2) at 5 million cells/mL, and 216 +/- 38 cells/mm(2) at 10 million cells/mL), and (iv) long-term viability in culture (>90%, 14 days). This platform to print 3D tissue constructs may be beneficial for regenerative medicine applications by enabling the fabrication of printed replacement tissues.

  17. Nanostructured Dielectric Layer for Ultrathin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusi Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary photon management properties. However, due to poor pn junction quality and high surface recombination velocity, typical nanostructured solar cells are not efficient compared with the traditional commercial solar cells. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to design, simulate, and fabricate whole-wafer nanostructures on dielectric layer on thin c-Si for solar cell light trapping. The optical simulation results show that the periodic nanostructure arrays on dielectric materials could suppress the reflection loss over a wide spectral range. In addition, by applying the nanostructured dielectric layer on 40 μm thin c-Si, the reflection loss is suppressed to below 5% over a wide spectra and angular range. Moreover, a c-Si solar cell with 2.9 μm ultrathin absorber layer demonstrates 32% improvement in short circuit current and 44% relative improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Our results suggest that nanostructured dielectric layer has the potential to significantly improve solar cell performance and avoid typical problems of defects and surface recombination for nanostructured solar cells, thus providing a new pathway towards realizing high-efficiency and low-cost c-Si solar cells.

  18. Layer-by-layer assembly of peptide based bioorganic–inorganic hybrid scaffolds and their interactions with osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanelli, Steven M. [Fordham University Department of Chemistry, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Fath, Karl R. [The City University of New York, Queens College, Department of Biology, 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, NY 10016 (United States); Phekoo, Aruna P. [The City University of New York, Queens College, Department of Biology, 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Knoll, Grant A. [Fordham University Department of Chemistry, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Banerjee, Ipsita A., E-mail: banerjee@fordham.edu [Fordham University Department of Chemistry, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In this work we have developed a new family of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by utilizing self-assembled fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl protected Valyl-cetylamide (FVC) nanoassemblies as templates. To tailor the assemblies for enhanced osteoblast attachment and proliferation, we incorporated (a) Type I collagen, (b) a hydroxyapatite binding peptide sequence (EDPHNEVDGDK) derived from dentin sialophosphoprotein and (c) the osteoinductive bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) to the templates by layer-by-layer assembly. The assemblies were then incubated with hydroxyapatite nanocrystals blended with varying mass percentages of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and coated with alginate to form three dimensional scaffolds for potential applications in bone tissue regeneration. The morphology was examined by TEM and SEM and the binding interactions were probed by FITR spectroscopy. The scaffolds were found to be non-cytotoxic, adhered to mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and promoted osteogenic differentiation as indicated by the results obtained by alkaline phosphatase assay. Furthermore, they were found to be biodegradable and possessed inherent antibacterial capability. Thus, we have developed a new family of tissue-engineered biocomposite scaffolds with potential applications in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • Fmoc-val-cetylamide assemblies were used as templates. • Collagen, a short dentin sialophosphoprotein derived sequence and BMP-4 were incorporated. • Hydroxyapatite–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite blends and alginate were incorporated. • The 3D scaffold biocomposites adhered to preosteoblasts and promoted osteoblast differentiation. • The biocomposites also displayed antimicrobial activity.

  19. A microfluidic galvanic cell on a single layer of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Krutarth H.; Emrani, Saina; Rodriguez, Sandra; Liaw, Shi-Shen; Pham, Linda; Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Gomez, Frank A.; Haan, John L.

    2016-06-01

    Paper microfluidics is used to produce single layer galvanic and hybrid cells to produce energy that could power paper-based analytical sensors. When two aqueous streams are absorbed onto paper to establish co-laminar flow, the streams stay in contact with each other with limited mixing. The interface at which mixing occurs acts as a charge-transfer region, eliminating the need for a salt bridge. We designed a Cusbnd Zn galvanic cell that powers an LED when two are placed in series. We also used more powerful redox couples (formate and silver, formate and permanganate) to produce higher power density (18 and 3.1 mW mg-1 Pd). These power densities are greater than previously reported paper microfluidic fuel cells using formate or methanol. The single layer design is much more simplified than previous reports of multi-layer galvanic cells on paper.

  20. Desmosomal Molecules In and Out of Adhering Junctions: Normal and Diseased States of Epidermal, Cardiac and Mesenchymally Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pieperhoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current cell biology textbooks mention only two kinds of cell-to-cell adhering junctions coated with the cytoplasmic plaques: the desmosomes (maculae adhaerentes, anchoring intermediate-sized filaments (IFs, and the actin microfilament-anchoring adherens junctions (AJs, including both punctate (puncta adhaerentia and elongate (fasciae adhaerentes structures. In addition, however, a series of other junction types has been identified and characterized which contain desmosomal molecules but do not fit the definition of desmosomes. Of these special cell-cell junctions containing desmosomal glycoproteins or proteins we review the composite junctions (areae compositae connecting the cardiomyocytes of mature mammalian hearts and their importance in relation to human arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies. We also emphasize the various plakophilin-2-positive plaques in AJs (coniunctiones adhaerentes connecting proliferatively active mesenchymally-derived cells, including interstitial cells of the heart and several soft tissue tumor cell types. Moreover, desmoplakin has also been recognized as a constituent of the plaques of the complexus adhaerentes connecting certain lymphatic endothelial cells. Finally, we emphasize the occurrence of the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein Dsg2, out of the context of any junction as dispersed cell surface molecules in certain types of melanoma cells and melanocytes. This broadening of our knowledge on the diversity of AJ structures indicates that it may still be too premature to close the textbook chapters on cell-cell junctions.

  1. Solar Cells Having a Nanostructured Antireflection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An solar cell having a surface in a first material is provided, the optical device having a non-periodic nanostructure formed in the surface, the nanostructure comprising a plurality of cone -haped structures wherein the cones are distributed non-periodically on the surface and have a random heig...

  2. Layer-by-layer graphene/TCNQ stacked films as conducting anodes for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chang-Lung; Lin, Cheng-Te; Huang, Jen-Hsien; Chu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2012-06-26

    Large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for transparent conducting electrode applications in flexible optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes or organic solar cells. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the polymer photovoltaic devices using a pristine CVD graphene anode is still not appealing due to its much lower conductivity than that of conventional indium tin oxide. We report a layer-by-layer molecular doping process on graphene for forming sandwiched graphene/tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ)/graphene stacked films for polymer solar cell anodes, where the TCNQ molecules (as p-dopants) were securely embedded between two graphene layers. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on these multilayered graphene/TCNQ anodes are fabricated and characterized. The P3HT/PCBM device with an anode structure composed of two TCNQ layers sandwiched by three CVD graphene layers shows optimum PCE (∼2.58%), which makes the proposed anode film quite attractive for next-generation flexible devices demanding high conductivity and transparency.

  3. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Process for the production of thin layers, preferably for a photovoltaic cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanu, M.; Meester, B.; Goossens, A.; Schoonman, J.

    2006-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the production of a thin layer, preferably for a photovoltaic cell, which cell has at least a first contact layer, a p-type semiconductor layer, an n-type semiconductor layer, or a combined p-type/n-type semiconductor layer, and a second contact layer, said

  5. Impact of release dynamics of laser-irradiated polymer micropallets on the viability of selected adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huan; Mismar, Wael; Wang, Yuli; Small, Donald W.; Ras, Mat; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sims, Christopher E.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2012-01-01

    We use time-resolved interferometry, fluorescence assays and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to examine the viability of confluent adherent cell monolayers to selection via laser microbeam release of photoresist polymer micropallets. We demonstrate the importance of laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position relative to the glass–pallet interface in governing the threshold energies for pallet release as well as the pallet release dynamics. Measurements using time-resolved interferometry show that increases in laser pulse energy result in increasing pallet release velocities that can approach 10 m s−1 through aqueous media. CFD simulations reveal that the pallet motion results in cellular exposure to transient hydrodynamic shear stress amplitudes that can exceed 100 kPa on microsecond timescales, and which produces reduced cell viability. Moreover, CFD simulation results show that the maximum shear stress on the pallet surface varies spatially, with the largest shear stresses occurring on the pallet periphery. Cell viability of confluent cell monolayers on the pallet surface confirms that the use of larger pulse energies results in increased rates of necrosis for those cells situated away from the pallet centre, while cells situated at the pallet centre remain viable. Nevertheless, experiments that examine the viability of these cell monolayers following pallet release show that proper choices for laser microbeam pulse energy and focal volume position lead to the routine achievement of cell viability in excess of 90 per cent. These laser microbeam parameters result in maximum pallet release velocities below 6 m s−1 and cellular exposure of transient hydrodynamic shear stresses below 20 kPa. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic understanding that relates pallet release dynamics and associated transient shear stresses with subsequent cellular viability. This provides a quantitative, mechanistic basis for determining

  6. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A.; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S.; Sellers, James R.; Fischer, Robert S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A “pulses” occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell–cell or cell–ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase– or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. PMID:27881665

  7. Solution-processed sintered nanocrystal solar cells via layer-by-layer assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasieniak, Jacek; MacDonald, Brandon I; Watkins, Scott E; Mulvaney, Paul

    2011-07-13

    Solar cells made by high temperature and vacuum processes from inorganic semiconductors are at a perceived cost disadvantage when compared with solution-processed systems such as organic and dye-sensitized solar cells. We demonstrate that totally solution processable solar cells can be fabricated from inorganic nanocrystal inks in air at temperature as low as 300 °C. Focusing on a CdTe/ZnO thin-film system, we report solar cells that achieve power conversion efficiencies of 6.9% with greater than 90% internal quantum efficiency. In our approach, nanocrystals are deposited from solution in a layer-by-layer process. Chemical and thermal treatments between layers induce large scale grain formation, turning the 4 nm CdTe particles into pinhole-free films with an optimized average crystallite size of ∼70 nm. Through capacitance-voltage measurements we demonstrate that the CdTe layer is fully depleted which enables the charge carrier collection to be maximized.

  8. Compact Layer Free Perovskite Solar Cells with a High-Mobility Hole-Transporting Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qianqian; Bao, Xichang; Yu, Jianhua; Zhu, Dangqiang; Qiu, Meng; Yang, Renqiang; Dong, Lifeng

    2016-02-03

    A high-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-based copolymer (P) was employed in compact layer free CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells as a hole-transporting layer (HTL). By using the P-HTL, the 6.62% device efficiency with conventional poly-3-hexylthiophene was increased to 10.80% in the simple device configuration (ITO/CH3NH3PbI3/HTL/MoO3/Ag). With improved short circuit current density, open circuit voltage, and fill factor, the higher power conversion efficiency of P-HTL device is ascribed to the higher carrier mobility, more suitable energy level, and lower interfacial charge recombination. Advantages of applying P-HTL to perovskite solar cells, such as low cost, low-temperature processing, and excellent performance with simple cell structure, exhibit a possibility for commercial applications.

  9. Electrochemical atomic layer deposition of Pt nanostructures on fuel cell gas diffusion layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available . Acta 42(10) 1587. 4. Stickney, J.L., et al., (2002) Encyclopedia of Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH: Weinheim 513 5. Mkwizu T.S., Mathe M.K., Cukrowski I., (2010) Langmuir 26 (1) 570. Electrochemical Atomic Layer Deposition of Pt nanostructures on fuel... cell gas diffusion layer Mmalewane Modibedi1, Tumaini Mkwizu1, 2, Nikiwe Kunjuzwa1,3 , Kenneth Ozoemena1 and Mkhulu Mathe1 1. Energy and Processes, Materials Science and Manufacturing, The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR...

  10. Tracking in real time the crawling dynamics of adherent living cells with a high resolution surface plasmon microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streppa, L.; Berguiga, L.; Boyer Provera, E.; Ratti, F.; Goillot, E.; Martinez Torres, C.; Schaeffer, L.; Elezgaray, Juan; Arneodo, A.; Argoul, F.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a high resolution scanning surface plasmon microscope for long term imaging of living adherent mouse myoblast cells. The coupling of a high numerical aperture objective lens with a fibered heterodyne interferometer provides both enhanced sensitivity and long term stability. This microscope takes advantage of the plasmon resonance excitation and the amplification of the electromagnetic field in near-field distance to the gold coated coverslip. This plasmon enhanced evanescent wave microscopy is particularly attractive for the study of cell adhesion and motility since it can be operated without staining of the biological sample. We show that this microscope allows very long-term imaging of living samples, and that it can capture and follow the temporal deformation of C2C12 myoblast cell protusions (lamellipodia), during their migration on a at surface.

  11. Study of buffer layer thickness on bulk heterojunction solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seunguk; Suman, C K; Lee, Donggu; Kim, Seohee; Lee, Changhee

    2010-10-01

    We studied the effect of the buffer layer (molybdenum-oxide (MoO3)) thickness on the performance of organic solar cell based on blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester fullerene derivative (PCBM). The thickness of MoO3 was varied from 1 nm to 30 nm for optimization of device performance. The photocurrent-voltage and impedance spectroscopy were measured under dark and AM1.5G solar simulated illumination of 100 mW/cm2 for exploring the role of the buffer layer thickness on carrier collection at an anode. The MoO3 thickness of the optimized device (efficiency approximately 3.7%) was found to be in the range of 5 approximately 10 nm. The short-circuit current and the shunt resistance decrease gradually for thicker MoO3 layer over 5 nm. The device can be modeled as the combination of three RC parallel circuits (each one for the active layer, buffer layer and interface between the buffer layer and the active layer) in series with contact resistance (Rs approximately 60 ohm).

  12. Tandem photovoltaic cells with a composite intermediate layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travkin, V. V., E-mail: trav@ipmras.ru; Pakhomov, G. L.; Luk’anov, A. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Stuzhin, P. A. [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    We have fabricated and tested tandem photovoltaic cells containing series-connected subcells of the “oxide–organic semiconductor–metal” type. The organic semiconductors were two phthalocyanine dyes (SubPc and PcVO); Al or Ag:Mg were used as capping metallic electrodes. A semitransparent composite metal–oxide layer formed by molybdenum oxide MoO{sub x} deposited over an ultrathin Al layer is used to join the subcells. Additionally, a MoO{sub x} layer deposited onto glass/ITO substrates serves as an anode buffer in the front subcell, and LiF deposited onto the dye layers serves as a cathode buffer in the front or rear subcells. Upon optimization of the thickness and composition of the intermediate layer, the open circuit voltage U{sub oc} amounts to 1.6 V reflecting total summation of the contributions from the each of the subcells at a wide spectral coating from 300–1000 nm. The fill factor in the tandem cell is not worse than in individually made single cells with the same scheme or in disconnected subcells.

  13. The Layer Boundary Effect on Multi-Layer Mesoporous TiO2 Film Based Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Yixin

    2016-10-01

    Multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 prepared by screen printing is widely used for fabrication of high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We compare the three types of ~10 um thick mesoporous TiO2 films, which were screen printed as 1-, 2- and 4-layers using the same TiO2 nanocrystal paste. The layer boundary of the multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 films was observed in the cross-section SEM. The existence of a layer boundary could reduce the photoelectron diffusion length with the increase of layer number. However, the photoelectron diffusion lengths of the Z907 dye sensitized solar cells based on these different layered mesoporous TiO2 films are all longer than the film thickness. Consequently, the photovoltaic performance seems to have little dependence on the layer number of the multi-layer TiO2 based DSSCs.

  14. Soluble interleukin 6 receptor (sIL-6R) mediates colonic tumor cell adherence to the vascular endothelium: a mechanism for metastatic initiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowdall, J F

    2012-02-03

    The mechanisms by which surgery increases metastatic proliferation remain poorly characterized, although endotoxin and immunocytes play a role. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial adherence of tumor cells may be important in the formation of metastases. Soluble receptors of interleukin-6 (sIL-6R) shed by activated neutrophils exert IL-6 effects on endothelial cells, which are unresponsive under normal circumstances. This study examined the hypothesis that sIL-6R released by surgical stress increases tumor cell adherence to the endothelium. Neutrophils (PMN) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Soluble IL-6R release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Colonic tumor cells transfected with green fluorescent protein and endothelial cells were exposed to sIL-6R, and tumor cell adherence and transmigration were measured by fluorescence microscopy. Basal release of sIL-6R from PMN was 44.7 +\\/- 8.2 pg\\/ml at 60 min. This was significantly increased by endotoxin and CRP (131 +\\/- 16.8 and 84.1 +\\/- 5.3, respectively; both P < 0.05). However, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not significantly alter sIL-6R release. Endothelial and tumor cell exposure to sIL-6R increased tumor cell adherence by 71.3% within 2 h but did not significantly increase transmigration, even at 6 h. Mediators of surgical stress induce neutrophil release of a soluble receptor for IL-6 that enhances colon cancer cell endothelial adherence. Since adherence to the endothelium is now considered to be a key event in metastatic genesis, these findings have important implications for colon cancer treatment strategies.

  15. Glycosaminoglycans are involved in pathogen adherence to corneal epithelial cells differently for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz García

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the cornea is continuously exposed to pathogens, and adhesion to epithelial cells is regarded as an essential first step in bacterial pathogenesis. In this article, the involvement of glycosaminoglycans in the adhesion of various pathogenic bacteria to corneal epithelial cells is analyzed. All microorganisms use glycosaminoglycans as receptors, but arranged in different patterns depending on the Gram-type of the bacterium. The heparan sulfate chains of syndecans are the main receptors, though other molecular species also seem to be involved, particularly in Gram-negative bacteria. Adherence is inhibited differentially by peptides, including heparin binding sequences, indicating the participation of various groups of Gram-positive and -negative adhesins. The length of the saccharides produces a major effect, and low molecular weight chains inhibit the binding of Gram-negative microorganisms but increase the adherence of Gram-positives. Pathogen adhesion appears to occur preferentially through sulfated domains, and is very dependent on N- and 6-O-sulfation of the glucosamine residue and, to a lesser extent, 2-O sulfation of uronic acid. These data show the differential use of corneal receptors, which could facilitate the development of new anti-infective strategies.

  16. Highly efficient single-layer gas diffusion layers for the proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, T.F.; Bai, S.H.; Lai, Y.J.; Chen-Yang, Y.W. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanotechnology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023 (China); Huang, J. [Yeu Ming Tai Chemical Industrial Co., Ltd., Taichung 40768 (China); Chuang, H.J. [Materials and Electro-Optics Research Division, Electric Energy Section, Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung-Tan 32544 (China)

    2008-09-15

    In the present study, a series of highly efficient single-layer gas diffusion layers (SL-GDLs) was successfully prepared by the addition of a vapor grown carbon nanofiber (VGCF) in the carbon black/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) composite-based SL-GDL through a simple and inexpensive process. The scanning electron micrographs of the as-prepared VGCF-containing SL-GDLs (SL-GDL-CFs) showed that the GDLs had a microporous layer (MPL)-like structure, while the wire-like VGCFs were well dispersed and crossed among the carbon black particles in the SL-GDL matrix. Utilization of the SL-GDL-CFs for MEA fabrication was also done by direct coating with the catalyst layer. Due to the presence of VGCFs, the properties of the SL-GDL-CFs, including electronic resistivity, mechanical characteristic, gas permeability, and water repellency, varied with the VGCF content, with the overall effect beneficial to the performance of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The best performances obtained from the PEMFC with VGCFs at 15 wt.% was approximately 63% higher than those without VGCFs, and about 85% as efficient as ELAT GDL, a commercial dual-layer GDL, for both the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air systems. (author)

  17. New methanofullerene as a buffer layer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biglova, Yulia N., E-mail: bn.yulya@mail.ru [Bashkir State University, Chemistry Department, Ufa (Russian Federation); Akbulatov, Azat F. [Bashkir State University, Chemistry Department, Ufa (Russian Federation); Torosyan, Seda A. [Institute of Organic Chemistry URC RAS, Ufa (Russian Federation); Susarova, Diana K. [Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Mustafin, Akhat G. [Bashkir State University, Chemistry Department, Ufa (Russian Federation); Miftakhov, Mansur S. [Institute of Organic Chemistry URC RAS, Ufa (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the first synthesized acryl-type methanofullerene C{sub 60} on the solar cell performance as a buffer layer and its forming methods on the substrate surface was investigated. The significant impact of small concentration on the basic photovoltaic characteristics of the fabricated devices with inverted configurations was shown in this work.

  18. Transparent conducting oxide layers for thin film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830585; Liu, Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831743; de Jong, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325844208; de Wild, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314641378; Schuttauf, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314118039; Brinza, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823325; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2009-01-01

    Texture etching of ZnO:1%Al layers using diluted HCl solution provides excellent TCOs with crater type surface features for the front contact of superstrate type of thin film silicon solar cells. The texture etched ZnO:Al definitely gives superior performance than Asahi SnO2:F TCO in case of nanocry

  19. Repair of defects in photoactive layer of organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, A. Jolt; Blom, Paul W.m.; Michels, Jasper J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects occurring during printing of the photoactive layer in organic solar cells lead to short-circuits due to direct contact between the PEDOT:PSS anode and metallic cathode. We provide a highly effective repair method where the defected zone with bare PEDOT:PSS is treated with aqueous sodium

  20. Repair of defects in photoactive layer of organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, A. Jolt; Blom, Paul W.m.; Michels, Jasper J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects occurring during printing of the photoactive layer in organic solar cells lead to short-circuits due to direct contact between the PEDOT:PSS anode and metallic cathode. We provide a highly effective repair method where the defected zone with bare PEDOT:PSS is treated with aqueous sodium hypo

  1. Repair of defects in photoactive layer of organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, A.J.; Blom, P.W.M.; Michels, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects occurring during printing of the photoactive layer in organic solar cells lead to short-circuits due to direct contact between the PEDOT:PSS anode and metallic cathode. We provide a highly effective repair method where the defected zone with bare PEDOT:PSS is treated with aqueous sodium hypo

  2. Se interlayer in CIGS absorption layer for solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Kyu; Sim, Jae-Kwan [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kissinger, N.J. Suthan [Department of General Studies, Physics Group, Jubail University College, Royal Commission for Jubail, Jubail 10074 (Saudi Arabia); Song, Il-Seok; Kim, Jin-Soo; Baek, Byung-Joon [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheul-Ro, E-mail: crlee7@jbnu.ac.kr [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Se interlayer is deposited between the CuGa and CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacked layer. • Both CIG precursor layers were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. • SIMS depth profile shows that Ga distribution is uniform by Se interlayer. • The efficiency was improved for the CIGS solar cell by Se interlayer. - Abstract: A CIGS absorber layer with high gallium contents in the space-charge region can reduce the carrier recombination and improve the open circuit voltage V{sub oc}. Therefore, controlling Ga grading on top of CIGS thin film solar cells is the main objective of this experiment. To reduce Selenium (Se) vacancy, it is important that the diffusion of Ga elements into Se vacancy between Mo back contact and CIGS absorption layer would be controlled. In order to reduce Se vacancy and confirm Ga inter-diffusion, two CIGS solar cells were fabricated by converting CIG precursor with and without Se interlayer. The copper-indium metallic precursors were fabricated corresponding to the sequence CuIn/In/Mo/STS on stainless steel (STS) substrates by sequential direct current magnetron sputtering while Se layer was evaporated by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system to obtain a Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. CuGa precursor layer was also fabricated on the Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. Finally, both CuGa/Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS and CuGa/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacks were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. It was clearly observed from the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) that there was a change between the fabricated CIGS absorption layers and the amount of Ga elements. Furthermore, the Ga elements gradually decreased from the top to the bottom layer of the CIGS absorption layer. We also discussed the effect of Se interlayer in the CIGS absorption layer and its influence on the solar cell’s performance.

  3. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  4. A vertically integrated dynamic RAM-cell: Buried bit line memory cell with floating transfer layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, Ton; Vertregt, Maarten

    1986-01-01

    A charge injection device has been realized in which charge can be injected on to an MOS-capacitor from a buried layer via an isolated transfer layer. The cell is positioned vertically between word and bit line. LOCOS (local oxidation) is used to isolate the cells and (deep) ion implantation to real

  5. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-07

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced by

  6. Nanoscopic Vibrations of Bacteria with Different Cell-Wall Properties Adhering to Surfaces under Flow and Static Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K.; Kaper, Hans J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of

  7. Adherence to Mediterranean diet is associated with methylation changes in inflammation-related genes in peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpón, A; Riezu-Boj, J I; Milagro, F I; Razquin, C; Martínez-González, M A; Corella, D; Estruch, R; Casas, R; Fitó, M; Ros, E; Salas-Salvadó, J; Martínez, J A

    2017-02-08

    Epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, might be modulated by environmental factors such as the diet, which in turn have been associated with the onset of several diseases such as obesity or cardiovascular events. Meanwhile, Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) has demonstrated favourable effects on cardiovascular risk, blood pressure, inflammation and other complications related to excessive adiposity. Some of these effects could be mediated by epigenetic modifications. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether the adherence to MedDiet is associated with changes in the methylation status from peripheral blood cells. A subset of 36 individuals was selected within the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED)-Navarra study, a randomised, controlled, parallel trial with three groups of intervention in high cardiovascular risk volunteers, two with a MedDiet and one low-fat control group. Changes in methylation between baseline and 5 years were studied. DNA methylation arrays were analysed by several robust statistical tests and functional classifications. Eight genes related to inflammation and immunocompetence (EEF2, COL18A1, IL4I1, LEPR, PLAGL1, IFRD1, MAPKAPK2, PPARGC1B) were finally selected as changes in their methylation levels correlated with adherence to MedDiet and because they presented sensitivity related to a high variability in methylation changes. Additionally, EEF2 methylation levels positively correlated with concentrations of TNF-α and CRP. This report is apparently the first showing that adherence to MedDiet is associated with the methylation of the reported genes related to inflammation with a potential regulatory impact.

  8. Single-colour flow cytometric assay to determine NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and viability against non-adherent human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ajit; Zaman, Abeyat; Hummel, Jeff; Jones, Kim; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2012-03-01

    A flow cytometry-based cytotoxicity (FCC) assay was developed using a single fluorophore, calcein-acetoxymethyl diacetylester (calcein-AM), to measure NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Non-adherent human K562 and U937 target cells were individually labelled with calcein-AM and co-incubated with effector NK cells to measure calcein loss, and therefore calculate target cell cytotoxicity. This FCC assay also provided a measure of sample viability. Notably, cell viability measured by traditional calcein/7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) double labelling and Trypan Blue methods were comparable to the viability calculated using calcein-loss FCC. This FCC assay may also be used with various effector and target cell types and as a multi-parameter tool to measure viability and immunophenotype cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in Paediatric Diarrhoeal Patients by Detection of bfpA gene by PCR and HeLa cell Adherence Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S; Jhora, S T; Talukder, K A; Azmi, I J

    2015-10-01

    This study has been undertaken to investigate the isolation and identification of EPEC strains from paediatric diarrhoeal patients. The study was carried out in the department of Microbiology, Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Bangladesh during January to December, 2011. Total 272 samples were studied. Samples from patients with diarrhoea were collected from two tertiary care hospital. At first Esch. coli were isolated from these specimens using standard microbiological techniques and then EPEC strains were identified on the basis of presence of bundle forming pilus (bfpA) gene. Virulence of EPEC strains were determined by detection of bfpA gene and observing localized adherence (LA) in HeLa cell adherence assay. Esch. coli was isolated and identified from all the 272 samples from patients using standard microbiological techniques. Among 272 samples 20(7.35%) isolates were identified as EPEC on the basis of presence of bfpA gene detected by polymerase chain reaction. EPEC strains were identified from those 240 samples, from which Esch. coli had been isolated only. Out of twenty EPEC strains, 17 strains (85%) showed a pattern of localized adherence in Hela cell adherence assay. EPEC strains can be identified by bfpA gene detection and by adherence assays. HeLa cell adherence assay is the most specific method for detection of EPEC strains which has bfpA gene, responsible for localized adherence (LA) in HeLa cell line. Rapid and reliable detection of EPEC is required for successful microbiological surveillance and for treatment of EPEC mediated diarrhoeal disease.

  10. Nanoscopic vibrations of bacteria with different cell-wall properties adhering to surfaces under flow and static conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lei; Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-26

    Bacteria adhering to surfaces demonstrate random, nanoscopic vibrations around their equilibrium positions. This paper compares vibrational amplitudes of bacteria adhering to glass. Spring constants of the bond are derived from vibrational amplitudes and related to the electrophoretic softness of the cell surfaces and dissipation shifts measured upon bacterial adhesion in a quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D). Experiments were conducted with six bacterial strains with pairwise differences in cell surface characteristics. Vibrational amplitudes were highest in low ionic strength suspensions. Under fluid flow, vibrational amplitudes were lower in the direction of flow than perpendicular to it because stretching of cell surface polymers in the direction of flow causes stiffening of the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium. Under static conditions (0.57 mM), vibrational amplitudes of fibrillated Streptococcus salivarius HB7 (145 nm) were higher than that of a bald mutant HB-C12 (76 nm). Amplitudes of moderately extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) producing Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC35983 (47 nm) were more than twice the amplitudes of strongly EPS producing S. epidermidis ATCC35984 (21 nm). No differences were found between Staphylococcus aureus strains differing in membrane cross-linking. High vibrational amplitudes corresponded with low dissipation shifts in QCM-D. In streptococci, the polyelectrolyte network surrounding a bacterium is formed by fibrillar surface appendages and spring constants derived from vibrational amplitudes decreased with increasing fibrillar density. In staphylococci, EPS constitutes the main network component, and larger amounts of EPS yielded higher spring constants. Spring constants increased with increasing ionic strength and strains with smaller electrophoretically derived bacterial cell surface softnesses possessed the highest spring constants.

  11. Optical stability of silicon nitride MIS inversion layer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, K.; Hezel, R.

    1985-09-01

    For MIS inversion layer solar cells with silicon nitride as an AR coating, accelerated optical stress tests were performed. Degradation of the cell characteristics occurred which was found to be caused by photons with energies equal to or greater than 3.7 eV (wavelength of 335 nm or less). Generation of interface states at the silicon-insulator interface by UV light is shown to be the mechanism responsible. The original cell data could be completely restored by heat treatment (activation energy 0.5 eV) and partially by illumination with short-wavelength light. As the most striking result, however, it is demonstrated that the UV light-induced instability can be drastically improved by incorporation of cesium ions into the silicon nitride layer. An interpretation is given for this effect.

  12. Multi-layer graphene membrane based memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahlo, Andrei I.; Popov, Andrey M.; Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Lozovik, Yurii E.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Ratkevich, Sergey V.

    2016-10-01

    The scheme and operational principles of the nanoelectromechanical memory cell based on the bending of a multi-layer graphene membrane by the electrostatic force are proposed. An analysis of the memory cell total energy as a function of the memory cell sizes is used to determine the sizes corresponding to a bistable memory cell with the conducting ON and non-conducting OFF states and to calculate the switching voltage between the OFF and ON states. It is shown that a potential barrier between the OFF and ON states is huge for practically all sizes of a bistable memory cell which excludes spontaneous switching and allows the proposed memory cell to be used for long-term archival storage.

  13. Applications of atomic layer deposition in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenbin; Li, Xianglin; Karuturi, Siva Krishna; Fam, Derrick Wenhui; Fan, Hongjin; Shrestha, Santosh; Wong, Lydia Helena; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2015-02-13

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) provides a unique tool for the growth of thin films with excellent conformity and thickness control down to atomic levels. The application of ALD in energy research has received increasing attention in recent years. In this review, the versatility of ALD in solar cells will be discussed. This is specifically focused on the fabrication of nanostructured photoelectrodes, surface passivation, surface sensitization, and band-structure engineering of solar cell materials. Challenges and future directions of ALD in the applications of solar cells are also discussed.

  14. Influence of washing and quenching in profiling the metabolome of adherent mammalian cells: a case study with the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoore, Rahul Vijay; Coyle, Rachael; Staton, Carolyn A; Brown, Nicola J; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman

    2017-06-07

    Metabolome characterisation is a powerful tool in oncology. To obtain a valid description of the intracellular metabolome, two of the preparatory steps are crucial, namely washing and quenching. Washing must effectively remove the extracellular media components and quenching should stop the metabolic activities within the cell, without altering the membrane integrity of the cell. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the efficiency of the washing and quenching solvents. In this study, we employed two previously optimised protocols for simultaneous quenching and extraction, and investigated the effects of a number of washing steps/solvents and quenching solvent additives, on metabolite leakage from the adherent metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. We explored five washing protocols and five quenching protocols (including a control for each), and assessed for effectiveness by detecting ATP in the medium and cell morphology changes through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. Furthermore, we studied the overall recovery of eleven different metabolite classes using the GC-MS technique and compared the results with those obtained from the ATP assay and SEM analysis. Our data demonstrate that a single washing step with PBS and quenching with 60% methanol supplemented with 70 mM HEPES (-50 °C) results in minimum leakage of intracellular metabolites. Little or no interference of PBS (used in washing) and methanol/HEPES (used in quenching) on the subsequent GC-MS analysis step was noted. Together, these findings provide for the first time a systematic study into the washing and quenching steps of the metabolomics workflow for studying adherent mammalian cells, which we believe will improve reliability in the application of metabolomics technology to study adherent mammalian cell metabolism.

  15. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gaberman

    Full Text Available Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×10(6 cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001, while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001. The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37 was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05. A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective "off the shelf" therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia.

  16. The Untapped Potential Of Plant Thin Cell Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira da Silva Jaime

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin cell layers (TCLs, which contain a small number of cells or tissues, are explants excised from different organs (stems, leaves, roots, inflorescences, flowers, cotyledons, hypocotyls/epicotyls, and embryos. After almost 45 years of research, this culture system has been used for several monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants of commercial importance, and for model plants. The limited amount of cells in a TCL is of paramount importance because marker molecules/genes of differentiation can be easily localized in situ in the target/responsive cells. Thus, the use of TCLs has allowed, and continues to allow, for the expansion of knowledge in plant research in a practical and applied manner into the fields of tissue culture and micropropagation, cell and organ genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, and development. Starting from a brief historical background, the actual and potential uses of the TCL system are briefly reviewed.

  17. Reconstruction of microstructure in catalyst layer of PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, F.; Huang, C.; Liu, Z.S.; Song, D.T.; Wang, Q.P. [National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation

    2007-07-01

    Different microstructures of catalyst layer (CL) have been experimentally studied to improve the performance of the proton membrane exchange (PEM) fuel cell. These experiments have revealed the microstructure in catalyst layers can be considered as one kind of random media and its changes will have significant influence on the performance of PEM fuel cell. This paper presented the results of a study that applied the filtering method and stochastic optimization to reconstruct the microstructure based on the statistical information of catalyst layers. The filtering method changes the Gauss distributed signals to three-phase microstructure reconstruction while the stochastic optimization method, refines the microstructure reconstruction to fit the statistical features of experimental images. Based on the physical properties as well as the mass ratio, the statistical feature extraction based on image process of catalyst layer and the reconstruction procedure was proposed. The paper discussed evaluation of phase statistical information, initial reconstruction based on filtering method, stochastic optimization for reconstruction, as well as a summary of the study. It was concluded that the results of the filtering method as the initial pattern of stochastic optimization could make the error (between the final result and the experimental target) less than that of the random initial value and saved the computational time simultaneously. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Monitoring of adherent live cells morphology using the undecimated wavelet transform multivariate image analysis (UWT-MIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Pierre-Marc; Garnier, Alain; Duchesne, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Cell morphology is an important macroscopic indicator of cellular physiology and is increasingly used as a mean of probing culture state in vitro. Phase contrast microscopy (PCM) is a valuable tool for observing live cells morphology over long periods of time with minimal culture artifact. Two general approaches are commonly used to analyze images: individual object segmentation and characterization by pattern recognition. Single-cell segmentation is difficult to achieve in PCM images of adherent cells since their contour is often irregular and blurry, and the cells bundle together when the culture reaches confluence. Alternatively, pattern recognition approaches such as the undecimated wavelet transform multivariate image analysis (UWT-MIA), allow extracting textural features from PCM images that are correlated with cellular morphology. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model built using textural features from a set of 200 ground truth images was shown to predict the distribution of cellular morphological features (major and minor axes length, orientation, and roundness) with good accuracy for most images. The PLS models were then applied on a large dataset of 631,136 images collected from live myoblast cell cultures acquired under different conditions and grown in two different culture media. The method was found sensitive to morphological changes due to cell growth (culture time) and those introduced by the use of different culture media, and was able to distinguish both sources of variations. The proposed approach is promising for application on large datasets of PCM live-cell images to assess cellular morphology and growth kinetics in real-time which could be beneficial for high-throughput screening as well as automated cell culture kinetics assessment and control applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 141-153. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparison The Effects of Two Monocyte Isolation Methods,Plastic Adherence and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting Methods,on Phagocytic Activity of Generated Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Asadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is believed that monocyte isolation methods and maturation factors affect the phenotypic and functional characteristics of resultant dendritic cells (DC. In the present study, we compared two monocyte isolation methods, including plastic adherence-dendritic cells (Adh-DC and magnetic activated cell sorting- dendritic cells (MACS-DC, and their effects on phagocytic activity of differentiated immature DCs (immDCs.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, immDCs were generated from plastic adherence and MACS isolated monocytes in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin 4 (IL-4 in five days. The phagocytic activity of immDCs was analyzed by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-conjugated latex bead using flow cytometry. One way ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis of differences among experimental groups, including Adh-DC and MACS-DC groups.Results: We found that phagocytic activity of Adh-DC was higher than MACS-DC, whereas the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of phagocytic cells was higher in MACS-DC (p<0.05.Conclusion: We concluded that it would be important to consider phagocytosis parameters of generated DCs before making any decision about monocyte isolation methods to have fully functional DCs.

  20. Modification of solid phase red cell adherence assay for the detection of platelet antibodies in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%.

  1. Ebola virus glycoproteins induce global surface protein down-modulation and loss of cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Graham; Wool-Lewis, Rouven J; Baribaud, Frédéric; Netter, Robert C; Bates, Paul

    2002-03-01

    The Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein (GP) derived from the pathogenic Zaire subtype mediates cell rounding and detachment from the extracellular matrix in 293T cells. In this study we provide evidence that GPs from the other pathogenic subtypes, Sudan and Côte d'Ivoire, as well as from Reston, a strain thought to be nonpathogenic in humans, also induced cell rounding, albeit at lower levels than Zaire GP. Sequential removal of regions of potential O-linked glycosylation at the C terminus of GP1 led to a step-wise reduction in cell detachment without obviously affecting GP function, suggesting that such modifications are involved in inducing the detachment phenotype. While causing cell rounding and detachment in 293T cells, Ebola virus GP did not cause an increase in cell death. Indeed, following transient expression of GP, cells were able to readhere and continue to divide. Also, the rounding effect was not limited to 293T cells. Replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing Ebola virus GP induced the loss of cell adhesion in a range of cell lines and primary cell types, including those with proposed relevance to Ebola virus infection in vivo, such as endothelial cells and macrophages. In both transfected 293T and adenovirus-infected Vero cells, a reduction in cell surface expression of adhesion molecules such as integrin beta1 concurrent with the loss of cell adhesion was observed. A number of other cell surface molecules, however, including major histocompatibility complex class I and the epidermal growth factor receptor, were also down-modulated, suggesting a global mechanism for surface molecule down-regulation.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Living Adherent Cells :Relationship with Structure and Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.; FODIL; S.; Féréol; E.; PLANUS; V.M.; LAURENT; B.; LOUIS; D.; ISABEY

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionMechanical properties of living cells are dependent on a variety of intracellular and/or extracellular factors (e.g., spatial organization of cytoskeleton (CSK) elements; internal tension; actomyosin contraction; contribution of proximal and/or more distal environment...). Because these factors are involved in biological processes as important as cell adhesion, locomotion, cell contraction, signalization, understanding the relationships between cell mechanical properties, structure and functio...

  3. Measurement of annexin V uptake and lactadherin labeling for the quantification of apoptosis in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylserine (PS exposure occurs during the cell death program and fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permits the detection of PS exposure earlier than annexin V in suspended cell lines. Adherent cell lines were studied for this apoptosis-associated phenomenon to determine if PS probing methods are reliable because specific membrane damage may occur during harvesting. Apoptosis was induced in the human tongue squamous carcinoma cell line (Tca8113 and the adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-2 by arsenic trioxide. Cells were harvested with a modified procedure and labeled with lactadherin and/or annexin V. PS exposure was localized by confocal microscopy and apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. The detachment procedure without trypsinization did not induce cell damage. In competition binding experiments, phospholipid vesicles competed for more than 95 and 90% of lactadherin but only about 75 and 70% of annexin V binding to Tca8113 and ACC-2 cells. These data indicate that PS exposure occurs in three stages during the cell death program and that fluorescein-labeled lactadherin permitted the detection of early PS exposure. A similar pattern of PS exposure has been observed in two malignant cell lines with different adherence, suggesting that this pattern of PS exposure is common in adherent cells. Both lactadherin and annexin V could be used in adherent Tca8113 and ACC-2 cell lines when an appropriate harvesting procedure was used. Lactadherin is more sensitive than annexin V for the detection of PS exposure as the physical structure of PS in these blebs and condensed apoptotic cell surface may be more conducive to binding lactadherin than annexin V.

  4. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray tomography of adherent cells at European synchrotrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Duke, Elizabeth; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a synchrotron-hosted imaging technique used to analyze the ultrastructure of intact, cryo-prepared cells. Correlation of cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-SXT can be used to localize fluorescent proteins to organelles preserved close to native state. Cryo-correlative light and X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM) is particularly useful for the study of organelles that are susceptible to chemical fixation artifacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. In our recent work, we used cryo-CLXM to characterize GFP-LC3-positive early autophagosomes in nutrient-starved HEK293A cells (Duke et al., 2013). Cup-shaped omegasomes were found to form at "hot-spots" on the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, cryo-SXT image stacks revealed the presence of large complex networks of tubulated mitochondria in the starved cells, which would be challenging to model at this scale and resolution using light or electron microscopy. In this chapter, we detail the cryo-CLXM workflow that we developed and optimized for studying adherent mammalian cells. We show examples of data collected at the three European synchrotrons that currently host cryo-SXT microscopes, and describe how raw cryo-SXT datasets are processed into tomoX stacks, modeled, and correlated with cryo-fluorescence data to identify structures of interest. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cells Prevent Bone loss, Stimulate Bone formation, and Suppress Growth of Multiple Myeloma in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Pennisi, Angela; Wang, Yuping; Khan, Sharmin; Heidaran, Mohammad; Pal, Ajai; Zhang, Xiaokui; He, Shuyang; Zeitlin, Andy; Abbot, Stewart; Faleck, Herbert; Hariri, Robert; Shaughnessy, John D.; van Rhee, Frits; Nair, Bijay; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    Human placenta has emerged as a valuable source of transplantable cells of mesenchymal and hematopoietic origin for multiple cytotherapeutic purposes, including enhanced engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells, modulation of inflammation, bone repair, and cancer. Placenta-derived adherent cells (PDACs) are mesenchymal-like stem cells isolated from postpartum human placenta. Multiple myeloma is closely associated with induction of bone disease and large lytic lesions, which are often not repaired and are usually the sites of relapses. We evaluated the antimyeloma therapeutic potential, in vivo survival, and trafficking of PDACs in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)–rab model of medullary myeloma-associated bone loss. Intrabone injection of PDACs into non-myelomatous and myelomatous implanted bone in SCID-rab mice promoted bone formation by stimulating endogenous osteoblastogenesis, and most PDACs disappeared from bone within 4 weeks. PDACs inhibitory effects on myeloma bone disease and tumor growth were dose-dependent and comparable with those of fetal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Intrabone, but not subcutaneous, engraftment of PDACs inhibited bone disease and tumor growth in SCID-rab mice. Intratumor injection of PDACs had no effect on subcutaneous growth of myeloma cells. A small number of intravenously injected PDACs trafficked into myelomatous bone. Myeloma cell growth rate in vitro was lower in coculture with PDACs than with MSCs from human fetal bone or myeloma patients. PDACs also promoted apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and inhibited their differentiation. This study suggests that altering the bone marrow microenvironment with PDAC cytotherapy attenuates growth of myeloma and that PDAC cytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach for myeloma osteolysis. PMID:21732484

  6. A spiking network model of cerebellar Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons exhibiting irregular firing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eLennon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While the anatomy of the cerebellar microcircuit is well studied, how it implements cerebellar function is not understood. A number of models have been proposed to describe this mechanism but few emphasize the role of the vast network Purkinje cells (PKJs form with the molecular layer interneurons (MLIs – the stellate and basket cells. We propose a model of the MLI-PKJ network composed of simple spiking neurons incorporating the major anatomical and physiological features. In computer simulations, the model reproduces the irregular firing patterns observed in PKJs and MLIs in vitro and a shift toward faster, more regular firing patterns when inhibitory synaptic currents are blocked. In the model, the time between PKJ spikes is shown to be proportional to the amount of feedforward inhibition from an MLI on average. The two key elements of the model are: (1 spontaneously active PKJs and MLIs due to an endogenous depolarizing current, and (2 adherence to known anatomical connectivity along a parasagittal strip of cerebellar cortex. We propose this model to extend previous spiking network models of the cerebellum and for further computational investigation into the role of irregular firing and MLIs in cerebellar learning and function.

  7. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  8. Acute Shear Stress Direction Dictates Adherent Cell Remodeling and Verifies Shear Profile of Spinning Disc Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disc chamber or “spinning disc” in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. PMID:25619322

  9. Neural stem cell transplantation in a double-layer collagen membrane with unequal pore sizes for spinal cord injur y repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Yuan; Wei Tian; Lei Sun; Runying Yuan; Jianfeng Tao; Dafu Chen

    2014-01-01

    A novel double-layer collagen membrane with unequal pore sizes in each layer was designed and tested in this study. The inner, loose layer has about 100-μm-diameter pores, while the outer, compact layer has about 10-μm-diameter pores. In a rat model of incomplete spinal cord injury, a large number of neural stem cells were seeded into the loose layer, which was then adhered to the injured side, and the compact layer was placed against the lateral side. The results showed that the transplantation of neural stem cells in a double-layer collagen membrane with unequal pore sizes promoted the differentiation of neural stem cells, attenuated the pathological lesion, and signiifcantly improved the motor function of the rats with incomplete spinal cord injuries. These experimental ifndings suggest that the transplantation of neural stem cells in a double-lay-er collagen membrane with unequal pore sizes is an effective therapeutic strategy to repair an injured spinal cord.

  10. A family of cell-adhering peptides homologous to fibrinogen C-termini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy-Beladev, Liron [Institute of Chemistry, Safra Campus, Givat Ram, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Levdansky, Lilia; Gaberman, Elena [Lab. of Biotechnology and Radiobiology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, P.O. Box 12000, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel); Friedler, Assaf [Institute of Chemistry, Safra Campus, Givat Ram, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Gorodetsky, Raphael, E-mail: Rafi@hadassah.org.il [Lab. of Biotechnology and Radiobiology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, P.O. Box 12000, Jerusalem 91120 (Israel)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cell-adhesive sequences homologous to fibrinogen C-termini exist in other proteins. {yields} The extended homologous cell-adhesive C-termini peptides family is termed Haptides. {yields} In membrane-like environment random coiled Haptides adopt a helical conformation. {yields} Replacing positively charged residues with alanine reduces Haptides activity. -- Abstract: A family of cell-adhesive peptides homologous to sequences on different chains of fibrinogen was investigated. These homologous peptides, termed Haptides, include the peptides C{beta}, preC{gamma}, and C{alpha}E, corresponding to sequences on the C-termini of fibrinogen chains {beta}, {gamma}, and {alpha}E, respectively. Haptides do not affect cell survival and rate of proliferation of the normal cell types tested. The use of new sensitive assays of cell adhesion clearly demonstrated the ability of Haptides, bound to inert matrices, to mediate attachment of different matrix-dependent cell types including normal fibroblasts, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Here we present new active Haptides bearing homologous sequences derived from the C-termini of other proteins, such as angiopoietin 1 and 2, tenascins C and X, and microfibril-associated glycoprotein-4. The cell adhesion properties of all the Haptides were found to be associated mainly with their 11 N-terminal residues. Mutated preC{gamma} peptides revealed that positively charged residues account for their attachment effect. These results suggest a mechanism of direct electrostatic interaction of Haptides with the cell membrane. The extended Haptides family may be applied in modulating adhesion of cells to scaffolds for tissue regeneration and for enhancement of nanoparticulate transfection into cells.

  11. Layer-by-Layer Nanoassembly of Copper Indium Gallium Selenium Nanoparticle Films for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of CIGS nanoparticles interdigited with polymers have been fabricated through a cost-effective nonvacuum film deposition process called layer-by-layer (LbL nanoassembly. CIGS nanoparticles synthesized by heating copper chloride, indium chloride, gallium chloride, and selenium in oleylamine were dispersed in water, and desired surface charges were obtained through pH regulation and by coating the particles with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS. Raising the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion reduced the zeta-potential from +61 mV at pH 7 to −51 mV at pH 10.5. Coating the CIGS nanoparticles with PSS (CIGS-PSS produced a stable dispersion in water with −56.9 mV zeta-potential. Thin films of oppositely charged CIGS nanoparticles (CIGS/CIGS, CIGS nanoparticles and PSS (CIGS/PSS, and PSS-coated CIGS nanoparticles and polyethylenimine (CIGS-PSS/PEI were constructed through the LbL nanoassembly. Film thickness and resistivity of each bilayer of the films were measured, and photoelectric properties of the films were studied for solar cell applications. Solar cell devices fabricated with a 219 nm CIGS film, when illuminated by 50 W light-source, produced 0.7 V open circuit voltage and 0.3 mA/cm2 short circuit current density.

  12. Impact of Interfacial Layers in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, An-Na; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2017-07-23

    Perovskite solar cell (PCSs) is composed of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite as light harvester. Since the first report on long-term durable 9.7% efficient solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, organic-inorganic halide perovskite received great attention because of its superb opto-electronic properties. As a result, a power conversion efficiency (PCE) exceeding 22% was certified. Controlling grain size and grain boundary of perovskite layer perovskite is important for attaining high efficiency. In addition, interfacial engineering is equally or more important to improve further PCE via better charge collection and reduction in charge recombination. In this article, type of interfacial layers and their impacts on photovoltaic performance are investigated for the normal and inverted architectures. Grain boundary engineering is also included because it is related to interfacial engineering and grain boundary in perovskite layer plays important role in charge conduction, recombination and carrier life time. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Adherence to Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benefit of adherence to a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in relation to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been investigated among non-Mediterranean high-risk populations. The objective of the present study was to examine the association of compliance with the Med...

  14. Intestinal Mucus Gel and Secretory Antibody are Barriers to Campylobacter jejuni Adherence to INT 407 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    An in vitro mucus assay was developed to study the role of mucus gel and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) in preventing attachment of Campylobacter ... jejuni to INT 407 cells. An overlay of rabbit small intestinal mucus was found to impede the attachment of C. jejuni to a monolayer of INT 407 cells

  15. PHA-induced cytotoxicity of human lymphocytes against adherent hela-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huges-Law, G.; de Gast, G. C.; The, T. Hauw

    1978-01-01

    The conditions for a phytohaemagglutinin(PHA)-induced cytotoxicity test of human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated. [3H]thymidine prelabelled HeLa cells were used as target cells. Stimulation with 10 μl PHA/ml during 24 h gave the best measure of lymphocyte cytotoxic capacity. Supernata

  16. Mid-trimester fetal blood-derived adherent cells share characteristics similar to mesenchymal stem cells but full-term umbilical cord blood does not

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinjunYu; ZhifengXiao; LiShen; LingsongLi

    2005-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising treatment for many conditions.Although stem cells can be isolated from many tissues, blood is the ideal source of these cells due to the ease of collection. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been paid increased attention because of their powerful proliferation and pluripotent differentiating ability. But whether MSCs reside in blood (newborn umbilical cord blood and fetal or adult peripheral blood) is also debatable. The present study showed that MSC-like cells could be isolated and expanded from 16-26 weeks fetal blood but were not acquired efficiently from full-term infants' umbilical cord blood (UCB). Adherent cells separated from postnatal UCB were heterogeneous in cell morphology. Their proliferation capacity was limited and they were mainly CD45+, which indicated their haematopoietic derivation. On the contrary, MSC-like cells shared a similar phenotype to bone marrow MSCs. They were CD34- CD45- CD44+ CD71+ CD90+ CD105+. They could be induced to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic and neural lineage cells. Single cell clones also showed similar phenotype and differentiation ability. Our results suggest that early fetal blood is rich in MSCs but term UCB is not.

  17. The coordination of ploidy and cell size differs between cell layers in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yohei; Hasegawa, Junko; Fujikura, Ushio; Hoshino, Rina; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2016-04-01

    Growth and developmental processes are occasionally accompanied by multiple rounds of DNA replication, known as endoreduplication. Coordination between endoreduplication and cell size regulation often plays a crucial role in proper organogenesis and cell differentiation. Here, we report that the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume is different in the outer and inner cell layers of leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana using a novel imaging technique. Although there is a well-known, strong correlation between ploidy and cell volume in pavement cells of the epidermis, this correlation was extremely weak in palisade mesophyll cells. Induction of epidermis cell identity based on the expression of the homeobox gene ATML1 in mesophyll cells enhanced the level of correlation between ploidy and cell volume to near that of wild-type epidermal cells. We therefore propose that the correlation between ploidy and cell volume is regulated by cell identity.

  18. Sialidases affect the host cell adherence and epsilon toxin-induced cytotoxicity of Clostridium perfringens type D strain CN3718.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihong Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type B or D isolates, which cause enterotoxemias or enteritis in livestock, produce epsilon toxin (ETX. ETX is exceptionally potent, earning it a listing as a CDC class B select toxin. Most C. perfringens strains also express up to three different sialidases, although the possible contributions of those enzymes to type B or D pathogenesis remain unclear. Type D isolate CN3718 was found to carry two genes (nanI and nanJ encoding secreted sialidases and one gene (nanH encoding a cytoplasmic sialidase. Construction in CN3718 of single nanI, nanJ and nanH null mutants, as well as a nanI/nanJ double null mutant and a triple sialidase null mutant, identified NanI as the major secreted sialidase of this strain. Pretreating MDCK cells with NanI sialidase, or with culture supernatants of BMC206 (an isogenic CN3718 etx null mutant that still produces sialidases enhanced the subsequent binding and cytotoxic effects of purified ETX. Complementation of BMC207 (an etx/nanH/nanI/nanJ null mutant showed this effect is mainly attributable to NanI production. Contact between BMC206 and certain mammalian cells (e.g., enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells resulted in more rapid sialidase production and this effect involved increased transcription of BMC206 nanI gene. BMC206 was shown to adhere to some (e.g. Caco-2 cells, but not all mammalian cells, and this effect was dependent upon sialidase, particularly NanI, expression. Finally, the sialidase activity of NanI (but not NanJ or NanH could be enhanced by trypsin. Collectively these in vitro findings suggest that, during type D disease originating in the intestines, trypsin may activate NanI, which (in turn could contribute to intestinal colonization by C. perfringens type D isolates and also increase ETX action.

  19. Redox modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent neutrophil adherence to endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Paul A. [INSERM U479 Phagocytes et Reponses Inflammatoires, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot, 16, rue Henri Huchard, 75870 Paris, Cedex 18 (France)]. E-mail: pathibodeau@hotmail.com; Gozin, Alexia [INSERM U479 Phagocytes et Reponses Inflammatoires, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot, 16, rue Henri Huchard, 75870 Paris, Cedex 18 (France); Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne [INSERM U479 Phagocytes et Reponses Inflammatoires, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot, 16, rue Henri Huchard, 75870 Paris, Cedex 18 (France); Pasquier, Catherine [INSERM U479 Phagocytes et Reponses Inflammatoires, Faculte de Medecine, Universite Paris VII-Denis Diderot, 16, rue Henri Huchard, 75870 Paris, Cedex 18 (France)

    2005-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are now well known to be involved in an increased interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells. Previously, we have shown that the increased adhesion of neutrophils to ROS-stimulated endothelial cells involves an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase, p125{sup FAK}, and several cytoskeleton proteins. This review article focuses on the involvement of adhesion molecules in the increased adhesion of neutrophils to ROS-stimulated endothelial cells, on the oxygen species responsible for this adhesion, and on the intracellular signaling pathway leading to the modification of the cytoskeleton by ROS. The evidence from our laboratory and others describing these events is summarized. Finally, the future perspectives that need to be explored in order to inhibit or reduce the ROS-mediated adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells are addressed.

  20. Chemical Stimulation of Adherent Cells by Localized Application of Acetylcholine from a Microfluidic System

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Zibek; Britta Hagmeyer; Alfred Stett; Martin Stelzle

    2010-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses.In an experimental setup micro-droplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporou...

  1. New buffer layer materials for CIGS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruhn, Thomas; Felser, Claudia [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Kieven, David [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The compound semiconductor CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub (1-x)}Se{sub 2} (CIGSE) are used as absorber material in thin-film photovoltaic cells. In conventional CIGSE based solar cells a thin CdS layer (buffer) significantly improves the photovoltaic performance and efficiencies up to 19.9% have been realized. Since Cd is a toxic heavy metal there is a demand for suitable substitute materials. The first requirements for these materials are an adequate band gap, a crystal structure compatible to that of CIGSE, and an n-type conductivity. An interesting class of materials are half-Heuslers, which are ternary compounds with a C1b MgAgAs structure. For many half-Heusler compounds the crystal structure matches well with the layer of the tetragonal CIGS unit cell. Using ab initio calculations based on B3LYP hybrid functionals, we have studied electronic properties of the most promising half-Heusler materials. Our results affirm the band gap rule for 8-electron half- Heuslers presented.

  2. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  3. Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of TiO2 compact layers for flexible mesostructured perovskite solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zardetto, V.; Di Giacomo, F.; Lucarelli, G.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Brown, T.M.; Creatore, M.

    2017-01-01

    In mesostructured perovskite solar cell devices, charge recombination processes at the interface between the transparent conductive oxide, perovskite and hole transport layer are suppressed by depositing an efficient compact TiO2 blocking layer. In this contribution we investigate the role of the

  4. Milk digesta and milk protein fractions influence the adherence of Lactobacillus gasseri R and Lactobacillus casei FMP to human cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volstatova, Tereza; Havlik, Jaroslav; Potuckova, Miroslava; Geigerova, Martina

    2016-08-10

    Adhesion to the intestinal epithelium is considered an important feature of probiotic bacteria, which may increase their persistence in the intestine, allowing them to exert their beneficial health effect or promote the colonisation process. However, this feature might be largely dependent on the host specificity or diet. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selected milks and milk protein fractions on the ability of selected lactobacilli to adhere to the cells of an intestinal model based on co-culture Caco-2/HT29-MTX cell lines. Most milk digesta did not significantly affect bacterial adhesion except for UHT-treated milk and sheep milk. The presence of UHT-treated milk digesta reduced the adhesion of Lactobacillus gasseri R by 61% but not that of Lactobacillus casei FMP. However, sheep milk significantly increased the adherence of L. casei FMP (P < 0.05) but not of L. gasseri R. Among the protein fractions, rennet casein (RCN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed reproducible patterns and strain-specific effects on bacterial adherence. While RCN reduced the adherence of L. gasseri R to <50% compared to the control, it did not have a significant effect on L. casei FMP. In contrast, BSA reduced L. casei FMP adherence to a higher extent than that of L. gasseri R. Whey protein (WH) tended to increase the adherence of both strains by 130%-180%. Recently, interactions between the host diet and its microbiota have attracted considerable interest. Our results may explain one of the aspects of the role of milk in the development of microbiota or support of probiotic supplements. Based on our data, we conclude that the persistence of probiotic strains supplemented as part of dairy food or constitutional microbiota in the gut might be affected negatively or positively by the food matrix through complex strain or concentration dependent effects.

  5. Glycolysis is governed by growth regime and simple enzyme regulation in adherent MDCK cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rehberg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its vital importance in the supply of cellular pathways with energy and precursors, glycolysis has been studied for several decades regarding its capacity and regulation. For a systems-level understanding of the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cell metabolism, we couple a segregated cell growth model published earlier with a structured model of glycolysis, which is based on relatively simple kinetics for enzymatic reactions of glycolysis, to explain the pathway dynamics under various cultivation conditions. The structured model takes into account in vitro enzyme activities, and links glycolysis with pentose phosphate pathway and glycogenesis. Using a single parameterization, metabolite pool dynamics during cell cultivation, glucose limitation and glucose pulse experiments can be consistently reproduced by considering the cultivation history of the cells. Growth phase-dependent glucose uptake together with cell-specific volume changes generate high intracellular metabolite pools and flux rates to satisfy the cellular demand during growth. Under glucose limitation, the coordinated control of glycolytic enzymes re-adjusts the glycolytic flux to prevent the depletion of glycolytic intermediates. Finally, the model's predictive power supports the design of more efficient bioprocesses.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of NiO hole-transporting layers for polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chen; Su, Heng-Wei; Hou, Cheng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-09-25

    NiO is an attractive hole-transporting material for polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to its excellent stability and electrical/optical properties. This study demonstrates, for the first time, fabrication of uniform, defect-free, and conformal NiO ultra-thin films for use as hole-transporting layers (HTLs) in PSCs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) through optimization of the ALD processing parameters. The morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ALD NiO films were determined to be favorable for their HTL application. As a result, PSCs containing an ALD NiO HTL with an optimized thickness of 4 nm achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.4%, which was comparable to that of a control device with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) HTL. The high quality and manufacturing scalability of ALD NiO films demonstrated here will facilitate the adoption of NiO HTLs in PSCs.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of NiO hole-transporting layers for polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chen; Su, Heng-Wei; Hou, Cheng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2015-09-01

    NiO is an attractive hole-transporting material for polymer solar cells (PSCs) owing to its excellent stability and electrical/optical properties. This study demonstrates, for the first time, fabrication of uniform, defect-free, and conformal NiO ultra-thin films for use as hole-transporting layers (HTLs) in PSCs by atomic layer deposition (ALD) through optimization of the ALD processing parameters. The morphological, optical, and electrical properties of ALD NiO films were determined to be favorable for their HTL application. As a result, PSCs containing an ALD NiO HTL with an optimized thickness of 4 nm achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.4%, which was comparable to that of a control device with a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy-thiophene):poly(styrene-sulfonate) HTL. The high quality and manufacturing scalability of ALD NiO films demonstrated here will facilitate the adoption of NiO HTLs in PSCs.

  8. Anti-adherence potential of Enterococcus durans cells and its cell-free supernatant on plastic and stainless steel against foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amel, Ait Meddour; Farida, Bendali; Djamila, Sadoun

    2015-07-01

    It is demonstrated that numerous bacteria are able to attach to surfaces of equipment used for food handling or processing. In this study, a strain of Enterococcus durans, originally isolated from a milking machine surface, was firstly studied for its biofilm formation potential on plastic and stainless steel supports. The strain was found to be a biofilm producer either at 25, 30 or 37 °C on polystyrene microtitre plates, with a best adherence level observed at 25 °C. En. durans showed a strong adhesion to stainless steel AISI-304. Antibacterial and anti-adherence activities of En. durans were tested against four foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Listeria innocua CLIP 74915) which were shown as biofilm producers on both plastic and stainless steel. En. durans cells and cell-free culture supernatant showed a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition potential of the pathogens either on solid media or in broth co-cultures. Characterization of the antibacterial substances indicated their proteinaceous nature which assigned them most probably to bacteriocins group.

  9. Roles for Cell Wall Glycopeptidolipid in Surface Adherence and Planktonic Dispersal of Mycobacterium avium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium is a significant inhabitant of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems. M. avium expresses on its cell surface serovar-specific glycopeptidolipids (ssGPLs). Studies have implicated the core GPL in biofilm formation by M. aviu...

  10. Plasmodium chabaudi-Infected Erythrocytes Adhere to CD36 and Bind to Microvascular Endothelial Cells in an Organ-Specific Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Maria M.; Jarra, William; Hirst, Elizabeth; Patnaik, Pradeep K.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2000-01-01

    Adherence of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum to microvascular endothelial cells (sequestration) is considered to play an important role in parasite virulence and pathogenesis. However, the real importance of sequestration for infection and disease has never been fully assessed. The absence of an appropriate in vivo model for sequestration has been a major barrier. We have examined the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS in mice as a potential model. Erythrocytes infected with this parasite adhere in vitro to purified CD36, a critical endothelium receptor for binding P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. P. c. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes adhere in vitro to endothelial cells in a gamma interferon-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of additional adhesion molecules in the binding process, as is also the case with P. falciparum-infected cells. Furthermore, plasma or sera from infected and hyperimmune mice, respectively, have the ability to block binding of infected erythrocytes to endothelial cells. In vivo, erythrocytes containing mature P. c. chabaudi parasites are sequestered from the peripheral circulation. Sequestration is organ specific, occurring primarily in the liver, although intimate contact between infected erythrocytes and endothelial cells is also observed in the spleen and brain. The results are discussed in the context of the use of this model to study (i) the relationship between endothelial cell activation and the level of sequestration and (ii) the primary function of sequestration in malaria infection. PMID:10858230

  11. Bioassay for investigation of auxin transport in single cell layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina B. Wodzicki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxin was collected from the cambial region of Pinus sylvestris by applying agar strips to the cut surfaces of stem sections which comprised a single layer of 2 to 4-mm long, mainly intact fusiform cells. Sections of the agar strips were either bioassayed immediately to determine their auxin content or stored for several months at -80oC, extracted with 80% MeOH and redissolved in hot agar prior to bioassay. Auxin concentrations were determined by Went's oat coleoptile test, as described by Funke, which was modified considerably to give highly reproducible results. The modifications proved essential for good replication of results and are described in detail together with the use of the bioassay to determine changes in cambial cell polarity during ageing and senescence in P. sylvestris.

  12. An approach for configuring space photovoltaic tandem arrays based on cell layer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flora, C. S.; Dillard, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Meeting solar array performance goals of 300 W/Kg requires use of solar cells with orbital efficiencies greater than 20 percent. Only multijunction cells and cell layers operating in tandem produce this required efficiency. An approach for defining solar array design concepts that use tandem cell layers involve the following: transforming cell layer performance at standard test conditions to on-orbit performance; optimizing circuit configuration with tandem cell layers; evaluating circuit sensitivity to cell current mismatch; developing array electrical design around selected circuit; and predicting array orbital performance including seasonal variations.

  13. Ormocomp-modified glass increases collagen binding and promotes the adherence and maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, Elli; Sorkio, Anni; Teymouri, Shokoufeh; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Valden, Mika; Skottman, Heli; Kellomäki, Minna; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati

    2014-12-09

    In in vitro live-cell imaging, it would be beneficial to grow and assess human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cells on thin, transparent, rigid surfaces such as cover glasses. In this study, we assessed how the silanization of glass with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPTMS), or polymer-ceramic material Ormocomp affects the surface properties, protein binding, and maturation of hESC-RPE cells. The surface properties were studied by contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a protein binding assay. The cell adherence and proliferation were evaluated by culturing hESCRPE cells on collagen IV-coated untreated or silanized surfaces for 42 days. The Ormocomp treatment significantly increased the hydrophobicity and roughness of glass surfaces compared to the APTES and MAPTMS treatments. The XPS results indicated that the Ormocomp treatment changes the chemical composition of the glass surface by increasing the carbon content and the number of C-O/═O bonds. The protein-binding test confirmed that the Ormocomp-treated surfaces bound more collagen IV than did APTES- or MAPTMS-treated surfaces. All of the silane treatments increased the number of cells: after 42 days of culture, Ormocomp had 0.38, APTES had 0.16, MAPTMS had 0.19, and untreated glass had only 0.062, all presented as million cells cm(-2). There were no differences in cell numbers compared to smoother to rougher Ormocomp surfaces, suggesting that the surface chemistry and, more specifically, the collagen binding in combination with Ormocomp are beneficial to hESC-RPE cell culture. This study clearly demonstrates that Ormocomp treatment combined with collagen coating significantly increases hESC-RPE cell attachment compared to commonly used silanizing agents APTES and MAPTMS. Ormocomp silanization could thus enable the use of microscopic live cell imaging methods for h

  14. Application of multiple graphene layers as catalyst support material in fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saner, Burcu; YÜRÜM, YUDA; Yurum, Yuda

    2010-01-01

    The fuel cell electrode layer is a significant part of a fuel cell. The electrode layer is composed of the catalyst and porous electrode or gas diffusion layer. Catalyst has critical importance due to the influence on the cost and durability of fuel cells. The production of novel catalyst support materials could open up new ways in order to ensure the catalytic activity by lowering the amount of catalyst loaded [1]. At this point, utilization of multiple graphene layers as catalyst support...

  15. Multifunctional MgO Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xudong; Dong, Haopeng; Li, Wenzhe; Li, Nan; Wang, Liduo

    2015-06-08

    A multifunctional magnesium oxide (MgO) layer was successfully introduced into perovskite solar cells (PSCs) to enhance their performance. MgO was coated onto the surface of mesoporous TiO(2) by the decomposition of magnesium acetate and, therefore, could block contact between the perovskite and TiO(2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy showed that the amount of H(2)O/hydroxyl absorbed on the TiO(2) decreased after MgO modification. The UV/Vis absorption spectra of the perovskite with MgO modification revealed an enhanced photoelectric performance compared with that of unmodified perovskite after UV illumination. In addition to the photocurrent, the photovoltage and fill factor also showed an enhancement after modification, which resulted in an increase in the overall efficiency of the cell from 9.6 to 13.9 %. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirmed that MgO acts as an insulating layer to reduce charge recombination.

  16. Slow-Adhering Stem Cells Derived from Injured Skeletal Muscle Have Improved Regenerative Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM); Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA] supplemented with 10% horse serum, 20% fetal bo- vine serum, 0.5% chicken embryo...also transplanted into dystrophic muscle of MDX/SCID mice to observe the progress of muscle regeneration. At 3 weeks after trans- plantation , SASCs from...fac- tor, angiogenesis, and cardiac repair after muscle stem cell trans- plantation into ischemic hearts. J Am Coll Cardiol 2007, 50:1677– 1684 13

  17. Chemical stimulation of adherent cells by localized application of acetylcholine from a microfluidic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Zibek

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemical stimulation of cells is inherently cell type selective in contrast to electro-stimulation. The availability of a system for localized application of minute amounts of chemical stimulants could be useful for dose related response studies to test new compounds. It could also bring forward the development of a novel type of neuroprostheses.In an experimental setup micro-droplets of an acetylcholine solution were ejected from a fluidic microsystem and applied to the bottom of a nanoporous membrane. The solution travelled through the pores to the top of the membrane on which TE671 cells were cultivated. Calcium imaging was used to visualize cellular response with temporal and spatial resolution. Experimental demonstration of chemical stimulation for both threshold gated stimulation as well as accumulated dose response was achieved by either employing acetylcholine as chemical stimulant or applying calcein uptake, respectively.Numerical modelling and simulation of transport mechanisms involved were employed to gain a theoretical understanding of the influence of pore size, concentration of stimulant and droplet volume on the spatial-temporal distribution of stimulant and on the cellular response. Diffusion, pressure driven flow and evaporation effects were taken into account. Fast stimulation kinetic is achieved with pores of 0.82 µm diameter, whereas sustained substance delivery is obtained with nanoporous membranes. In all cases threshold concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 0.015 µM acetylcholine independent of pore size were determined.

  18. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells on a single layer graphene transparent conductive electrode using MoOx as an interfacial layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J H; Jin, H; Zhang, Z K; Zhang, D D; Jia, S; Ma, L P; Ren, W C; Cheng, H M; Burn, P L

    2017-01-07

    The large surface roughness, low work function and high cost of transparent electrodes using multilayer graphene films can limit their application in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Here, we develop single layer graphene (SLG) films as transparent anodes for OPV cells that contain light-absorbing layers comprised of the evaporable molecular organic semiconductor materials, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc)/fullerene (C60), as well as a molybdenum oxide (MoOx) interfacial layer. In addition to an increase in the optical transmittance, the SLG anodes had a significant decrease in surface roughness compared to two and four layer graphene (TLG and FLG) anodes fabricated by multiple transfer and stacking of SLGs. Importantly, the introduction of a MoOx interfacial layer not only reduced the energy barrier between the graphene anode and the active layer, but also decreased the resistance of the SLG by nearly ten times. The OPV cells with the structure of polyethylene terephthalate/SLG/MoOx/CuI/ZnPc/C60/bathocuproine/Al were flexible, and had a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.84%, which was only 17.6% lower than the devices with an equivalent structure but prepared on commercial indium tin oxide anodes. Furthermore, the devices with the SLG anode were 50% and 86.7% higher in efficiency than the cells with the TLG and FLG anodes. These results show the potential of SLG electrodes for flexible and wearable OPV cells as well as other organic optoelectronic devices.

  19. External serial connection without layer patterning for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ying Qian; Wong, Hin Yong; Tan, Ching Seong; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel alternative to conventional internal serial connection, where precise patterning and scribing of organic layers can be eliminated. Adjacent cells can be made nearer for better space-utilization and higher voltages per unit area. Also, blade coating is proposed as the fabrication method as it has low material wastage (less than 5%), easily scalable to large area, has high film uniformity and has high throughput due to its roll-to-roll potential. This paper demonstrates 3-cells large area (12.98 cm2) external serial connection organic solar cells (OSCs) using the material poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and 2,6-Bis(trimethyltin)-4, 8-bis(5-(2-ethylhexyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo [1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene:6,6-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PBDTTT-CT:PC71BM) respectively. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of the resulting 3-cells modules are 2.0% and 4.1% respectively.

  20. Performance characteristics of two automated solid-phase red cell adherence systems for pretransfusion antibody screening: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillen, K; Caron, J; Murphy, K

    2012-01-01

    Out institution has implemented two instruments, the Galileo and the Echo, that use different solid-phase red cell adherence assays for antibody screening in pretransfusion compatibility testing.During the initial implementation of these two instruments, we noticed very different problems: falsely positive results on the Galileo, and falsely negative results and lack of reproducibility on the Echo. Comparison of falsely positive antibody screen results from approximately equivalent numbers of samples run on the Galileo and samples tested by standard manual tube technique using low-ionic-strength saline enhancement showed a false-positive rate of 1.4 percent on the Galileo (defined as a positive screen with a negative panel). Testing using the Echo identified four cases of falsely negative antibody screens, (defined as a negative screen on a patient sample subsequently shown to be positive by the same method). In addition, we note a lack of reproducibility on the Echo, which emphasizes the importance of replicate testing during validation of automated antibody screening platforms.

  1. Detection of drug-dependent platelet antibodies by use of solid-phase red cell adherence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; Aubuchon, J P

    1995-01-01

    Many drugs have been reported to cause drug-dependent thrombocytopenia, either by the immune complex or by hapten mechanisms. Testing for the presence of these platelet antibodies has not been considered feasible for transfusion services because their presence was thought to be rare, and their detection involved complex and costly methods. We have developed a new technique for detection of these antibodies that can be performed without the need for specialized and expensive instrumentation. A solid-phase red cell adherence assay was used to detect drug-dependent platelet antibodies active by either the immune complex or the hapten mechanism. Three cases were evaluated for the presence of drug-dependent platelet antibodies. Two patients presented with thrombocytopenia that could not be attributed to other causes. The third case was evaluated for the presence of drug-dependent antibodies after poor responses to platelet transfusions. In these three cases, discontinuation of the implicated drugs, i.e., porcine heparin, quinine sulfate, amoxicillin, Bactrim, and albuterol, was followed by a correction of thrombocytopenia or improved platelet transfusion response within 72 hours. This test methodology and protocol has proven very useful in avoiding transfusions with little likelihood of benefit, and in identifying drugs interfering with platelet recovery or survival. Further investigations with this technique may expand our knowledge of the capability of this technique and of the observed frequency of drug-related immunologic platelet destruction.

  2. Detection of drug-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies by solid-phase red cell adherence assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; AuBuchon, J P

    1997-06-01

    We developed a simple modification of the solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay system that can be used to identify drug-dependent platelet antibodies (DDPAs) reactive by either the hapten or immune complex reaction mechanisms. Between January 1994 and August 1996 we tested sera from 173 patients [123 (71%) with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 50 (29%) because of poor responses to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation] for DDPAs possibly associated with the receipt of 61 different drugs. We correlated positive results with patients' clinical courses. DDPAs were identified in samples from 138 (80%) of the patients tested. Antibodies reactive only by the hapten mechanism were identified in 51 (37%) of those sera exhibiting positive reactions. The clinical courses of 108 (78%) patients were evaluable. Discontinuation of the implicated drug(s) resulted in prompt (<5 d) resolution of the thrombocytopenia or improvement in response to transfusion in all of these patients. In four cases thrombocytopenia returned upon re-exposure to the implicated drug. This adaptation of SPRCA provides a simple means of investigating the possibility of DDPAs and documents a higher frequency of these antibodies than has previously been suspected.

  3. Layer-by-layer deposition of rhenium-containing hyperbranched polymers and fabrication of photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chui Wan; Man, Ka Yan Kitty; Cheng, Kai Wing; Mak, Chris S K; Chan, Wai Kin; Yip, Cho Tung; Liu, Zheng Tong; Djurisić, Aleksandra B

    2007-01-01

    Multilayer thin films were prepared by the layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method using a rhenium-containing hyperbranched polymer and poly[2-(3-thienyl)ethoxy-4-butylsulfonate] (PTEBS). The radii of gyration of the hyperbranched polymer in solutions with different salt concentrations were measured by laser light scattering. A significant decrease in molecular size was observed when sodium trifluoromethanesulfonate was used as the electrolyte. The conditions of preparing the multilayer thin films by LBL deposition were studied. The growth of the multilayer films was monitored by absorption spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the surface morphologies of the resulting films were studied by atomic force microscopy. When the pH of a PTEBS solution was kept at 6 and in the presence of salt, polymer films with maximum thickness were obtained. The multilayer films were also fabricated into photovoltaic cells and their photocurrent responses were measured upon irradiation with simulated air mass (AM) 1.5 solar light. The open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, fill factor, and power conversion efficiency of the devices were 1.2 V, 27.1 mu A cm(-2), 0.19, and 6.1x10(-3) %, respectively. The high open-circuit voltage was attributed to the difference in the HOMO level of the PTEBS donor and the LUMO level of the hyperbranched polymer acceptor. A plot of incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency versus wavelength also suggests that the PTEBS/hyperbranched polymer junction is involved in the photosensitization process, in which a maximum was observed at approximately 420 nm. The relatively high capacitance, determined from the measured photocurrent rise and decay profiles, can be attributed to the presence of large counter anions in the polymer film.

  4. New approaches for understanding the nuclear force balance in living, adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Srujana; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-02-01

    Cytoskeletal forces are transmitted to the nucleus to position and shape it. Linkages mediated by the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex transfer these forces to the nuclear envelope. Nuclear position and shape can be thought to be determined by a balance of cytoskeletal forces generated by microtubule motors that shear the nuclear surface, actomyosin forces that can pull, push and shear the nucleus, and intermediate filaments that may passively resist nuclear decentering and deformation. Parsing contributions of these different forces to nuclear mechanics is a very challenging task. Here we review new approaches that can be used in living cells to probe and understand the nuclear force balance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Peeling process of thin-film solar cells using graphene layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2017-08-01

    A novel peeling process for thin-film solar cells using graphene layers was demonstrated. We fabricated amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells as substitutes for the undeveloped nanostructured silicon solar cells on graphene layers in order to investigate the solar cell performance after peeling for the first time. The graphene layers functioned as transparent electrodes after the peeling process, even though the series resistance increased after the peeling. Next, we fabricated a silicon nanowire (SiNW) array on graphene layers by a combination of chemical etching and thermal crystallization. Finally, we successfully peeled a SiNW array using graphene layers.

  6. Surfactant protein D inhibits adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to the bladder epithelial cells and the bacterium-induced cytotoxicity: a possible function in urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimura, Yuichiro; Nishitani, Chiaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Saito, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Motoko; Hashimoto, Jiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2012-11-16

    The adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the host urothelial surface is the first step for establishing UPEC infection. Uroplakin Ia (UPIa), a glycoprotein expressed on bladder urothelium, serves as a receptor for FimH, a lectin located at bacterial pili, and their interaction initiates UPEC infection. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is known to be expressed on mucosal surfaces in various tissues besides the lung. However, the functions of SP-D in the non-pulmonary tissues are poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to investigate the possible function of SP-D expressed in the bladder urothelium and the mechanisms by which SP-D functions. SP-D was expressed in human bladder mucosa, and its mRNA was increased in the bladder of the UPEC infection model in mice. SP-D directly bound to UPEC and strongly agglutinated them in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Co-incubation of SP-D with UPEC decreased the bacterial adherence to 5637 cells, the human bladder cell line, and the UPEC-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, preincubation of SP-D with 5637 cells resulted in the decreased adherence of UPEC to the cells and in a reduced number of cells injured by UPEC. SP-D directly bound to UPIa and competed with FimH for UPIa binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, the exogenous administration of SP-D inhibited UPEC adherence to the bladder and dampened UPEC-induced inflammation in mice. These results support the conclusion that SP-D can protect the bladder urothelium against UPEC infection and suggest a possible function of SP-D in urinary tract.

  7. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  8. Preliminary study on human fibroblasts as feeder layer for human embryonic stem cells culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To avoid the direct contact with mouse cells and possible heterogeneous pathogen in future application, we need to replace mouse embryonic fibroblastswith human fibroblasts as the feeder layer to maintain human embryonic stem cells growth in the undifferentiated state. We successfully use human fibroblasts derived from aborted fetus and adult prepuce as feeder layer to maintain human embryonic stem cells growth. During the passage and growth on this feeder layer, the human embryonic stem cells can keep their undifferentiated state.

  9. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M; Ryan, Christopher M; Johnson, Patricia J; O'Keefe, Barry R; Secor, W Evan; Anderson, Deborah J; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas.

  10. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans, like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas.

  11. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A; Entrena, José M; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A

    2016-01-11

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies.

  12. Interrogating protonated/deuterated fibronectin fragment layers adsorbed to titania by neutron reflectivity and their concomitant control over cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Lisa; Whitelaw, Christine; Rekas, Agata; Holt, Stephen A.; van der Walle, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    The fibronectin fragment, 9th–10th-type III domains (FIII9–10), mediates cell attachment and spreading and is commonly investigated as a bioadhesive interface for implant materials such as titania (TiO2). How the extent of the cell attachment–spreading response is related to the nature of the adsorbed protein layer is largely unknown. Here, the layer thickness and surface fraction of two FIII9–10 mutants (both protonated and deuterated) adsorbed to TiO2 were determined over concentrations used in cell adhesion assays. Unexpectedly, the isotopic forms had different adsorption behaviours. At solution concentrations of 10 mg l−1, the surface fraction of the less conformationally stable mutant (FIII9′10) was 42% for the deuterated form and 19% for the protonated form (fitted to the same monolayer thickness). Similarly, the surface fraction of the more stable mutant (FIII9′10–H2P) was 34% and 18% for the deuterated and protonated forms, respectively. All proteins showed a transition from monolayer to bilayer between 30 and 100 mg l−1, with the protein longitudinal orientation moving away from the plane of the TiO2 surface at high concentrations. Baby hamster kidney cells adherent to TiO2 surfaces coated with the proteins (100 mg l−1) showed a strong spreading response, irrespective of protein conformational stability. After surface washing, FIII9′10 and FIII9′10–H2P bilayer surface fractions were 30/25% and 42/39% for the lower/upper layers, respectively, implying that the cell spreading response requires only a partial protein surface fraction. Thus, we can use neutron reflectivity to inform the coating process for generating bioadhesive TiO2 surfaces. PMID:25926699

  13. Novel fuel cell with nanocomposite functional layer designed by perovskite solar cell principle

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yizhong; Fan, L.; Ma, Y.; Wang, Baoyuan; Xia, Chen; Afzal, Muhammad; Zhang, B; Dong, W; Wang, H.; Lund, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel fuel-to-electricity conversion technology resembling a fuel cell has been developed based on the perovskite solar cell principle using a perovskite, e.g. La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ and an ionic nanocomposite material as a core functional layer, sandwiched between n- and p-conducting layers. The conversion process makes use of semiconductor energy bands and junctions properties. The physical properties of the junction and alignment of the semiconductor energy band allow for direct ion tr...

  14. Photoluminescence studies of CdS layers for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemain, Frederique; Robin, Ivan-Christophe; Renet, Sebastien; Bernardi, Sergio [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-08-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on polycrystalline CdS films grown by close space sublimation (CSS) or by chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to observe the evolution of emission features according to the deposition technique and post-deposition treatments. CdS is naturally n-type because of the presence of sulphur vacancies and in most of the observed samples, a donor-acceptor pair involving the sulfur vacancies could be identified at 1.65 eV. Different complexes emissions could be identified depending on the deposition technique and post-growth treatment. The best efficiencies were measured on CdTe/CdS based solar cells for which the CdS layer presents an excitonic donor bound PL peak as well as an emission corresponding to interstitial cadmium (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Electrochemically Produced Graphene for Microporous Layers in Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafabadi, Amin Taheri; Leeuwner, Magrieta J; Wilkinson, David P; Gyenge, Előd L

    2016-07-01

    The microporous layer (MPL) is a key cathodic component in proton exchange membrane fuel cells owing to its beneficial influence on two-phase mass transfer. However, its performance is highly dependent on material properties such as morphology, porous structure, and electrical resistance. To improve water management and performance, electrochemically exfoliated graphene (EGN) microsheets are considered as an alternative to the conventional carbon black (CB) MPLs. The EGN-based MPLs decrease the kinetic overpotential and the Ohmic potential loss, whereas the addition of CB to form a composite EGN+CB MPL improves the mass-transport limiting current density drastically. This is reflected by increases of approximately 30 and 70 % in peak power densities at 100 % relative humidity (RH) compared with those for CB- and EGN-only MPLs, respectively. The composite EGN+CB MPL also retains the superior performance at a cathode RH of 20 %, whereas the CB MPL shows significant performance loss.

  16. The use of a library of industrial materials to determine the nature of substrate-dependent performance of primary adherent human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Zimmermann, Philipp K; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Lai, Weizheng; Li, Yao; Leong, Meng Fatt; Wan, Andrew C A; Zink, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    We developed a library of industrial materials, which can be applied to any adherent cell type for determining cell-material interactions. Bulk and surface chemistry as well as other material properties were characterized. The library covered broad ranges of various material properties. We applied the library to primary human endothelial and epithelial cells, which play important roles in tissue engineering and biomedical applications. The results revealed that substrate stiffness was the major determinant of cell performance. The ability to grow and differentiate on stiff or more compliant materials was cell type-dependent, but cell performance was consistently best on stiff and smooth materials. These results give new insights into the nature of substrate-dependent performance of primary human cells and are potentially useful for the development of improved biomaterials. The materials of the library can be easily accessed by the scientific community to determine cell-material interactions of any adherent cell type of interest. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei, E-mail: weili.unsw@gmail.com; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Crystallisation kinetic is used to analyse seed layer surface cleanliness. • Simplified RCA cleaning for the seed layer can shorten the epitaxy annealing duration. • RTA for the seed layer can improve the quality for both seed layer and epi-layer. • Epitaxial poly-Si solar cell performance is improved by RTA treated seed layer. - Abstract: This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, V{sub oc} and J{sub sc} than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  18. Ambient Layer-by-Layer ZnO Assembly for Highly Efficient Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed Samir

    2015-02-04

    The use of metal oxide interlayers in polymer solar cells has great potential because metal oxides are abundant, thermally stable, and can be used in fl exible devices. Here, a layer-by-layer (LbL) protocol is reported as a facile, room-temperature, solution-processed method to prepare electron transport layers from commercial ZnO nanoparticles and polyacrylic acid (PAA) with a controlled and tunable porous structure, which provides large interfacial contacts with the active layer. Applying the LbL approach to bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells with an optimized ZnO layer thickness of H25 nm yields solar cell power-conversion effi ciencies (PCEs) of ≈6%, exceeding the effi ciency of amorphous ZnO interlayers formed by conventional sputtering methods. Interestingly, annealing the ZnO/PAA interlayers in nitrogen and air environments in the range of 60-300 ° C reduces the device PCEs by almost 20% to 50%, indicating the importance of conformational changes inherent to the PAA polymer in the LbL-deposited fi lms to solar cell performance. This protocol suggests a new fabrication method for solution-processed polymer solar cell devices that does not require postprocessing thermal annealing treatments and that is applicable to fl exible devices printed on plastic substrates.

  19. Towards an integrated device that utilizes adherent cells in a micro-free-flow electrophoresis chip to achieve separation and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierski, Stefan; Klein, Anke S; Benz, Christian; Schaefer, Michael; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-06-01

    We immobilized adherent human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells--which are able to trace adenosine triphosphate (ATP)--inside a microfluidic free-flow electrophoresis (μFFE) chip in order to develop an integrated device combining separation and biosensing capabilities. HEK 293 cells loaded with fluorescent calcium indicators were used as a model system to enable the spatially and temporally resolved detection of ATP. The local position of a 20 μM ATP stream was successfully visualized by these cells during free-flow electrophoresis, demonstrating the on-line detection capability of this technique towards native, unlabeled compounds.

  20. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of composite polyelectrolyte-Nafion membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S.P.; Liu, Z.; Tian, Z.Q. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-04-18

    A novel composite polyelectrolyte/Nafion membrane is demonstrated that is fabricated using the layer-by-layer self-assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. A direct methanol fuel cell based on such a membrane is shown to achieve a significant reduction in methanol crossover and an increase in power density of 42 %, in comparison to that which uses a pristine Nafion membrane. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal K. Thakur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron diffusion length (Ln is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D structures such as nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs as electron transport layers (ETLs is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs. ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs. This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  2. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. PMID:28468280

  3. Evaluation of 309 environmental chemicals using a mouse embryonic stem cell adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Chandler

    Full Text Available The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (α,β myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7 and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™ were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC₅₀ values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (∼500 revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26 that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation.

  4. From front contact to back contact in cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide solar cells: Buffer layer and interfacial layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussillon, Yann

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) polycrystalline thin film solar cells, with their near optimum direct band-gap of 1.4 eV matching almost perfectly the sun radiation spectrum, are a strong contender as a less expensive alternative, among photovoltaic materials, than the more commonly used silicon-based cells. Polycrystalline solar cells are usually deposited over large areas. Such devices often exhibit strong fluctuations (nonuniformities) in electronic properties, which originate from deposition and post-deposition processes, and are detrimental to the device performance. Therefore their effects need to be constrained. A new approach in this work was, when a CdS/CdTe solar cell is exposed to light and immersed in a proper electrolyte, fluctuations in surface potential can drive electrochemical reactions which result in a nonuniform interfacial layer that could balance the original nonuniformity. This approach improved the device efficiency for CdS/CdTe photovoltaic devices from 1--3% to 11--12%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS), used as a window layer and heterojunction partner to CdTe, is electrically inactive and absorb light energies above its band-gap of 2.4 eV. Therefore, to maximize the device efficiency, a thin US layer needs to be used. However, more defects, such as pinholes, are likely to be present in the film, leading to shunts. A resistive transparent layer, called buffer layer, is therefore deposited before CdS. A key observation was that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for cells made using a buffer layer was high, around 800 mV, similar to cells without buffer layer after Cu doping. The standard p-n junction theory cannot explain this phenomena, therefore an alternative junction mechanism, similar to metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, was developed. Furthermore, alternative Cu-free back-contacts were used in conjunction with a buffer layer. The Voc of the devices was found to be dependent of the back contact used. This change occurs as the back-contact junction

  5. Dentin Conditioning with Bioactive Molecule Releasing Nanoparticle System Enhances Adherence, Viability, and Differentiation of Stem Cells from Apical Papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suja; Torneck, Calvin D; Kishen, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Temporal-controlled bioactive molecule (BM) releasing systems allow the delivery of appropriate concentration of BM to enhance the interaction of stem cells to dentin matrix and subsequent odontogenic differentiation in regenerative endodontics. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin conditioning with 2 variants of dexamethasone (Dex) releasing chitosan nanoparticles (CSnp), (1) Dex-CSnpI (slow releasing) and (2) Dex-CSnpII (rapid releasing), on adherence, viability, and differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) on root dentin exposed to endodontic irrigants. Slab-shaped dentin specimens were prepared parallel to the root canal and treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 10 minutes and/or 17% EDTA for 2 minutes. Dentin was then conditioned accordingly by (1) no nanoparticle treatment, (2) CSnp, (3) Dex-CSnpI, and (4) Dex-CSnpII. The effect of nanoparticle conditioning on SCAP viability was determined by cell count and a circularity index. SCAP adherence and viability on dentin were assessed by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy and odontogenic differentiation by immunofluorescence. SCAP on dentin treated with NaOCl alone or NaOCl as the last irrigant showed the least adherence, minimal cytoplasmic extensions, and higher circularity. SCAP adherence and viability on Dex-CSnpI and Dex-CSnpII conditioned dentin were increased and had a well-developed cytoplasmic matrix and significantly lower circularity (P nanoparticles to improve the local environment in regenerative endodontics. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro generation of three-dimensional substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates for application in animal models of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Gunnar; Cui, Yi-Fang; Dihné, Marcel; Bernreuther, Christian; Schachner, Melitta

    2012-05-01

    In vitro-differentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells comprise a useful source for cell replacement therapy, but the efficiency and safety of a translational approach are highly dependent on optimized protocols for directed differentiation of ES cells into the desired cell types in vitro. Furthermore, the transplantation of three-dimensional ES cell-derived structures instead of a single-cell suspension may improve graft survival and function by providing a beneficial microenvironment for implanted cells. To this end, we have developed a new method to efficiently differentiate mouse ES cells into neural aggregates that consist predominantly (>90%) of postmitotic neurons, neural progenitor cells, and radial glia-like cells. When transplanted into the excitotoxically lesioned striatum of adult mice, these substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates (SENAs) showed significant advantages over transplanted single-cell suspensions of ES cell-derived neural cells, including improved survival of GABAergic neurons, increased cell migration, and significantly decreased risk of teratoma formation. Furthermore, SENAs mediated functional improvement after transplantation into animal models of Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury. This unit describes in detail how SENAs are efficiently derived from mouse ES cells in vitro and how SENAs are isolated for transplantation. Furthermore, methods are presented for successful implantation of SENAs into animal models of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury to study the effects of stem cell-derived neural aggregates in a disease context in vivo.

  7. An optimized multilayer structure of CdS layer for CdTe solar cells application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Junfeng, E-mail: pkuhjf@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Liao Cheng, E-mail: Cliao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang Tao [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Spanheimer, C.; Haindl, G.; Fu, Ganhua; Krishnakumar, V. [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Zhao Kui [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Road Yiheyuan 5, Beijing 100871 (China); Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W. [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-04-28

    Research highlights: > Two different methods to prepare CdS films for CdTe solar cells. > A new multilayer structure of window layer for the CdTe solar cell. > Thinner CdS window layer for the solar cell than the standard CdS layer. > Higher performance of solar cells based on the new multilayer structure. - Abstract: CdS layers grown by 'dry' (close space sublimation) and 'wet' (chemical bath deposition) methods are deposited and analyzed. CdS prepared with close space sublimation (CSS) has better crystal quality, electrical and optical properties than that prepared with chemical bath deposition (CBD). The performance of CdTe solar cell based on the CSS CdS layer has higher efficiency than that based on CBD CdS layer. However, the CSS CdS suffers from the pinholes. And consequently it is necessary to prepare a 150 nm thin film for CdTe/CdS solar cell. To improve the performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells, a thin multilayer structure of CdS layer ({approx}80 nm) is applied, which is composed of a bottom layer (CSS CdS) and a top layer (CBD CdS). That bi-layer film can allow more photons to pass through it and significantly improve the short circuit current of the CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  8. Regulating Cell Apoptosis on Layer-by-Layer Assembled Multilayers of Photosensitizer-Coupled Polypeptides and Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruirui; Jiao, Tifeng; Ma, Kai; Ma, Guanghui; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-05-01

    The design of advanced, nanostructured materials by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly at the molecular level is of great interest because of the broad application of these materials in the biomedical field especially in regulating cell growth, adhesion, movement, differentiation and detachment. Here, we fabricated functional hybrid multilayer films by LbL assembly of biocompatible photosensitizer-coupled polypeptides and collagen-capped gold nanoparticles. The resulting multilayer film can well accommodate cells for adhesion, growth and proliferation. Most significantly, controlled cell apoptosis (detachment) and patterning of the multilayer film is achieved by a photochemical process yielding reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, the site and shape of apoptotic cells can be controlled easily by adjusting the location and shape of the laser beam. The LbL assembled multilayer film with integration of functions provides an efficient platform for regulating cell growth and apoptosis (detachment).

  9. Efficient inverted tandem polymer solar cells with a solution-processed recombination layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouijzer, Sandra; Esiner, Serkan; Frijters, Corne H.; Wienk, Martijn M.; Janssen, Rene A.J. [Molecular Materials and Nanosystems, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Turbiez, Mathieu [BASF Schweiz AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-08-15

    Solution-processed tandem polymer solar cells with an inverted polarity configuration provide a power conversion efficiency of 5.8%. The tandem cells use an almost loss-free recombination layer and two photoactive layers, with wide and small bandgaps, to increase the power conversion efficiency beyond that of the corresponding single-layer cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Mechanical behaviour of PEM fuel cell catalyst layers during regular cell operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling, and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the mechanical behaviour of the catalyst layers during regular cell operation, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operating conditions and in real cell geometry (three-dimensional. In this work, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to investigate the behaviour of the cathode and anode catalyst layers during the cell operation. A unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of hygro and thermal stresses into actual three-dimensional fuel cell model. In addition, the temperature and humidity dependent material properties are utilize in the simulation for the membrane. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and deformation that have limited experimental data.

  11. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, Voc and Jsc than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  12. Programming power reduction in confined phase change memory cells with titanium dioxide clad layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangliang; Zhang, Zhonghua; Song, Sannian; Song, Zhitang; Zheng, Qianqian; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Wanting; Shao, Hehong; Zhu, Xiuwei; Yu, Wenlei

    2017-01-01

    A confined structure phase change memory (PCM) cell has been fabricated based on the focused-ion beam technique. Furthermore, the titanium dioxide clad layer was proposed for promoting the temperature rise in the Ge0.61Sb2Te layer that causes the reduction in the reset voltage and current compared to the phase change memory cell without clad layer. Theoretical thermal simulation and calculation for the reset process are conducted to analyze the thermal effect of the titanium dioxide heating layer. The improved performance of the PCM cell with dioxide clad layer can be attributed to the fact that the buffer layer not only acted as heating layer but also efficiently reduced the cell dissipated power.

  13. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  14. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  15. Factors associated with adherence to and biofilm formation on polystyrene by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: the role of cell surface hydrophobicity and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Arianna; Piccolomini, Raffaele; Picciani, Carla; D'Antonio, Domenico; Savini, Vincenzo; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2008-10-01

    We tested 40 clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains to investigate the possible correlation between adherence to and formation of biofilm on polystyrene, and cell surface properties such as hydrophobicity and motility. Most of the strains were able to adhere and form biofilm, although striking differences were observed. Eleven (27.5%) of the strains were hydrophobic, with hydrophobicity greatly increasing as S. maltophilia attached to the substratum. A positive correlation was observed between hydrophobicity and levels of both adhesion and biofilm formation. Most of the isolates showed swimming and twitching motility. A highly significant negative correlation was observed between swimming motility and level of hydrophobicity. Hydrophobicity is thus a significant determinant of adhesion and biofilm formation on polystyrene surfaces in S. maltophilia.

  16. Novel single-layer gas diffusion layer based on PTFE/carbon black composite for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen-Yang, Y.W.; Hung, T.F.; Yang, F.L. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanotechnology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023 (China); Huang, J. [Yeu Ming Tai Chemical Industrial Co., Ltd, Taichung 40768 (China)

    2007-11-08

    A series of poly(tetrafluoroethylene)/carbon black composite-based single-layer gas diffusion layers (PTFE/CB-GDLs) for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was successfully prepared from carbon black and un-sintered PTFE, which included powder resin and colloidal dispersion, by a simple inexpensive method. The scanning electron micrographs of PTFE/CB-GDLs indicated that the PTFE resins were homogeneously dispersed in the carbon black matrix and showed a microporous layer (MPL)-like structure. The as-prepared PTFE/CB-GDLs exhibited good mechanical property, high gas permeability, and sufficient water repellency. The best current density obtained from the PEMFC with the single-layer PTFE/CB-GDL was 1.27 and 0.42 A cm{sup -2} for H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/air system, respectively. (author)

  17. Ultrastructural study of adherence to and penetration of cultured cells by two invasive Escherichia coli strains isolated from infants with enteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    The adherence of invasive Escherichia coli strains 444-3 and 469-3 to human erythrocytes and to cultured HeLa and HEp-2 cells has been examined by electron microscopy. Bacteria elaborating type 1 fimbriae, glycocalyces , and nonfimbrial mannose-resistant hemagglutinins specific for human erythrocytes were identified in cultures of both strains, and each of these different bacterial surface components appeared to be involved in attachment of 444-3 and 469-3 to cultured epithelial cells or huma...

  18. Evaluation of 309 environmental chemicals using a mouse embryonic stem cell adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES) cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing development...

  19. Fabrication of Polymer Solar Cells Using Aqueous Processing for All Layers Including the Metal Back Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Helgesen, Martin; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of printing all layers in polymer solar cells from aqueous solution are met by design of inks for the electron-, hole-, active-, and metallic back electrode-layers. The conversion of each layer to an insoluble state after printing enables multilayer formation from the same solvent ...

  20. Nevirapine concentrations in saliva measured by thin layer chromatography and self-reported adherence in patients on antiretroviral therapy at kilimanjaro christian medical centre, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, L.; Muro, E.P.; Ndaro, A.; Dolmans, W.M.; Burger, D.M.; Kisanga, E.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thin layer chromatography (TLC) can be used to perform therapeutic drug monitoring in resource-limited settings, where more expensive analytical methods, such as high-performance liquid chromatography or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, are not feasible. OBJECTIVES: The aim of th

  1. Layer-by-Layer Nanoassembly of Copper Indium Gallium Selenium Nanoparticle Films for Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hemati, A; Shrestha, S; M. Agarwal; K. Varahramyan

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of CIGS nanoparticles interdigited with polymers have been fabricated through a cost-effective nonvacuum film deposition process called layer-by-layer (LbL) nanoassembly. CIGS nanoparticles synthesized by heating copper chloride, indium chloride, gallium chloride, and selenium in oleylamine were dispersed in water, and desired surface charges were obtained through pH regulation and by coating the particles with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS). Raising the pH of the nanoparticle disper...

  2. Somatic Embryogenesis of Lilium from Microbulb Transverse Thin Cell Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A reliable somatic embryogenesis protocol is a prerequisite for application of other plant biotechniques. Several protocols were reported for genus Lilium, with variable success. Between them, transverse Thin Cell Layers (tTCL) were used efficiently to induce indirect somatic embryogenesis of Lilium. Somatic embryogenesis potential is dependent on the genotype, explant, and culture medium composition, especially as for plant growth regulators and environmental conditions. Usually, the process comprises three phases: embryogenic callus induction, embryogenic callus proliferation and somatic embryo germination. Somatic embryo germination can be achieved in light or dark. In the first case, complete plantlets are formed, with green leaves and pseudobulb in the base. In darkness, microbulbs are formed from single somatic embryos or clusters. A last phase of microbulb enlargement allows plantlets or microbulbs to increase their biomass. These enlarged microbulbs do not need special acclimatization conditions when transferred to soil and quickly produce sturdy plants. This chapter describes a protocol for somatic embryogenesis of Lilium using tTCL from microbulbs.

  3. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bond layer for a solid oxide fuel cell, and related processes and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jian; Striker, Todd-Michael; Renou, Stephane; Gaunt, Simon William

    2017-03-21

    An electrically-conductive layer of material having a composition comprising lanthanum and strontium is described. The material is characterized by a microstructure having bimodal porosity. Another concept in this disclosure relates to a solid oxide fuel cell attached to at least one cathode interconnect by a cathode bond layer. The bond layer includes a microstructure having bimodal porosity. A fuel cell stack which incorporates at least one of the cathode bond layers is also described herein, along with related processes for forming the cathode bond layer.

  5. Forming openings to semiconductor layers of silicon solar cells by inkjet printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, Alison J.; Utama, Roland Y.; Lenio, Martha A.T.; Ho-Baillie, Anita W.Y.; Kuepper, Nicole B.; Wenham, Stuart R. [The University of New South Wales, ARC Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2008-11-15

    An inkjet printing method for forming openings to buried semiconductor layers of silicon solar cells is described. The method uses an overlying resist as a sacrificial layer onto which a plasticiser for the resist polymer is deposited in a programmed pattern using inkjet printing. At the locations where the plasticiser is printed, the resist becomes permeable to aqueous etching solutions, enabling openings to be created in underlying dielectric or silicon layer(s). The formed openings can be used to create metal contacts to the buried silicon layers of the solar cell. The permeability of the resist to aqueous etchants can be reversed, thus enabling a single resist layer to be used to create more than one set of openings in the underlying layers. The proposed method may also be applied more generally to the formation of patterns of openings in layers of semiconductor or microelectromechanical devices. (author)

  6. Copper iodide as inorganic hole conductor for perovskite solar cells with different thickness of mesoporous layer and hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Minzan; Shen, Yue; Zhu, Gongbo; Xu, Kai; Cao, Meng; Gu, Feng; Wang, Linjun

    2015-12-01

    This study is the first to report the preparation of Copper iodide (CuI) thick films by means of convenient airbrush process and their application as inorganic hole transport layers (HTL) in organo-lead halide perovskite-based solar cells. CuI thick films exhibit high conductivity, wide-band-gap and solution-processable. Organo-lead halide perovskite solar cells with different thickness of mesoporous layers and CuI hole transport layers were fabricated. Performance of the cells were mainly controlled by the thickness of TiO2 mesoporous layers. Under optimized conditions, a power conversion efficiency of 5.8% has been achieved with short-circuit current density JSC of 22.3 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage VOC of 614 mV and fill factor of 42%. However, the VOC remains low in comparison with the state of the art perovskite-based solar cells, which is attributed to the high recombination in CuI devices as determined by impedance spectroscopy.

  7. Absorbing Backside Anti-reflecting Layers for high contrast imaging in fluid cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ausserré, Dominique; Amra, Claude; Zerrad, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    The single Anti-Reflecting (AR) layer is a classical problem in optics. When all materials are pure dielectrics, the solution is the so-called lambda/4 layer. Here we examine the case of absorbing layers between non absorbing media. We find a solution for any layer absorption coefficient provided that the light goes from the higher towards the lower index medium, which characterizes backside layers. We describe these AR absorbing (ARA) layers through generalized index and thickness conditions. They are most often ultrathin, and have important applications for high contrast imaging in fluid cells.

  8. Competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli,enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Clostridium difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Shun Zhong; Zhen-Shu Zhang; Ji-De Wang; Zhuo-Sheng Lai; Qun-Ying Wang; Ling-Jia Pan; Yue-Xin Ren

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe competitive inhibition of adherence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli(ETEC), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli(EPEC) and Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile)to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1027 (B. ado 1027).METHODS: The binding of bacteria to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo was counted by adhesion assay. The inhibition of adherence of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo by purified adhesin of B. ado 1027was evaluated quantitatively by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The purified adhesin at the concentration of 10μg/mL, 20μg/mL and 30μg/mL except at 1μg/mL and 5μg/mL could inhibit significantly the adhesion of ETEC,EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo.Moreover, we observed that a reduction in bacterial adhesion was occurred with increase in the concentration of adhesin,and MFI (Mean fluorescent intensity) was decreased with increase in the concentration of adhesin.CONCLUSION: The purified adhesin of B. ado 1027 can inhibit the adhesion of ETEC, EPEC and C. difficile to intestinal epithelial cell line Lovo in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Adherence to targeted oral anticancer medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geynisman, Daniel M; Wickersham, Karen E

    2013-04-01

    The use of targeted oral anticancer medications (OAMs) is becoming increasingly prevalent in cancer care. Approximately 25-30% of the oncology drug pipeline involves oral agents and there are now over 50 OAMs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This change represents a major shift in management of patients with cancer from directly observed, intermittent intravenous therapy to self-administered, oral chronic therapy. The increased prevalence of OAMs raises the issue of adherence in oncology, including understanding the challenges of adherence to OAMs. This review focuses on studies of adherence for patients taking molecularly targeted OAMs for breast cancer, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We then discuss barriers to adherence and studies performed to date testing interventions for improving adherence. Finally, we discuss future areas of investigation needed to define and improve adherence to OAMs in targeted therapy for cancer.

  10. Production of high-titer human influenza A virus with adherent and suspension MDCK cells cultured in a single-use hollow fiber bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Felipe; Vogel, Thomas; Genzel, Yvonne; Behrendt, Ilona; Hirschel, Mark; Gangemi, J David; Reichl, Udo

    2014-02-12

    Hollow fiber bioreactors (HFBRs) have been widely described as capable of supporting the production of highly concentrated monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Only recently HFBRs have been proposed as new single-use platforms for production of high-titer influenza A virus. These bioreactors contain multiple hollow fiber capillary tubes that separate the bioreactor in an intra- and an extra-capillary space. Cells are usually cultured in the extra-capillary space and can grow to a very high cell concentration. This work describes the evaluation of the single-use hollow fiber bioreactor PRIMER HF (Biovest International Inc., USA) for production of influenza A virus. The process was setup, characterized and optimized by running a total of 15 cultivations. The HFBRs were seeded with either adherent or suspension MDCK cells, and infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), and the pandemic strain A/Mexico/4108/2009 (H1N1). High HA titers and TCID₅₀ of up to 3.87 log₁₀(HA units/100 μL) and 1.8 × 10(10)virions/mL, respectively, were obtained for A/PR/8/34 influenza strain. Influenza virus was collected by performing multiple harvests of the extra-capillary space during a virus production time of up to 12 days. Cell-specific virus yields between 2,000 and 8,000 virions/cell were estimated for adherent MDCK cells, and between 11,000 and 19,000 virions/cell for suspension MDCK.SUS2 cells. These results do not only coincide with the cell-specific virus yields obtained with cultivations in stirred tank bioreactors and other high cell density systems, but also demonstrate that HFBRs are promising and competitive single-use platforms that can be considered for commercial production of influenza virus.

  11. Analysis of Solar Cells Efficacy with Imbedded Layer of Spherical Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshetov S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scattered sunlight absorption efficacy by a solar cell with imbedded layer of spherical plasmonic nanoparticles is simulated versus the parameters of the imbedded particles, the material they are made of, their density and location in the polymeric buffer layer inclusive. It was shown that the embedded plasmonic nanoparticles cause an increase of the relative efficacy of an organic solar cell with the P3HT:PCBM photosensitive layer and the PEDOT buffer layer of up to 10-20%. This increase depends also on the angle at which the sunlight shines the solar cell, which was also studied in detail.

  12. Programming voltage reduction in phase change memory cells with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Gong, Yuefeng; Wu, Liangcai; Feng, Songlin; Chen, Bomy

    2008-11-05

    A phase change memory cell with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode is investigated. The crystalline tungsten trioxide heating layer promotes the temperature rise in the Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) layer which causes the reduction in the reset voltage compared to a conventional phase change memory cell. Theoretical thermal simulation and calculation for the reset process are applied to understand the thermal effect of the tungsten trioxide heating layer/electrode. The improvement in thermal efficiency of the PCM cell mainly originates from the low thermal conductivity of the crystalline tungsten trioxide material.

  13. Measurement of oxide adherence to PFM alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, J R; Parry, E E; Hashinger, D T; Fairhurst, C W

    1984-11-01

    A method has been reported for evaluating adherence of an oxide to its substrate metal to a maximum value of about 40 MPa. Oxidized alloy plates were cemented between two aluminum cylinders with a high-strength cyanoacrylate cement and loaded in tension until failure occurred either at the oxide/metal interface, within the oxide layer, or in the cement itself. Significant differences were found among the oxide adherence values obtained from different PFM alloys. The oxides formed on five of the alloys exhibited adherence strengths in excess of the published value for cohesive strength of dental opaque porcelain, indicating that they possess sufficient adherence to act as the transition zone between the porcelain and the alloy. In addition, a correspondence was found between the quality of porcelain bond for a given alloy and its oxide adherence strength. These results remove the principal objection to the oxide-layer theory of porcelain bonding in dental alloy systems and emphasize the importance of oxide adherence in the establishment of a bond. It is therefore suggested that future work devoted to porcelain-metal bonding should seek to elucidate the mechanism of oxide adherence to PFM alloys and explore the development of new alloys which form adherent oxides.

  14. Development of inverted organic solar cells with TiO₂ interface layer by using low-temperature atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenhua; Jiang, Changyun; Zhu, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jie

    2013-02-01

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) with inverted structure have attracted much attention in recent years because of their improved device air stability due to the use of stable materials for electrodes and interface layers. In this work, TiO(2) films, fabricated using low temperature (e.g., 130-170 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) on ITO substrates, are used as electron selective interface layers to investigate inverted OSCs. It is found that though the as-deposited TiO(2) films are high resistive due to the presence of oxygen defects, the defects can be significantly reduced by light soaking. PV cells with 15-nm-thick amorphous-TiO(2) layers fabricated at low temperature show better performance than those with poly crystal TiO(2) with same thickness deposited at 250 °C. The low temperature ALD-grown TiO(2) films are dense, stable and robust with capability of conformal coating on nanostructural surfaces, showing a promising interface layer for achieving air-stable plastic OSCs with roll-to-roll mass production potential.

  15. Hydroxy decenoic acid down regulates gtfB and gtfC expression and prevents Streptococcus mutans adherence to the cell surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi Behnam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid is the most active and unique component to the royal jelly that has antimicrobial properties. Streptococcus mutans is associated with pathogenesis of oral cavity, gingivoperiodontal diseases and bacteremia following dental manipulations. In the oral cavity, S. mutans colonize the soft tissues including tongue, palate, and buccal mucosa. When considering the role of supragingival dental plaque in caries, the proportion of acid producing bacteria (particularly S. mutans, has direct relevance to the pathogenicity of the plaque. The genes that encode glucosyltransferases (gtfs especially gtfB and gtfC are important in S. mutans colonization and pathogenesis. This study investigated the hydroxy-decenoic acid (HDA effects on gtfB and gtfC expression and S. mutans adherence to cells surfaces. Methods Streptococcus mutans was treated by different concentrations of HPLC purified HDA supplied by Iran Beekeeping and Veterinary Association. Real time RT-PCR and western blot assays were conducted to evaluate gtfB and gtfC genes transcription and translation before and after HDA treatment. The bacterial attachment to the cell surfaces was evaluated microscopically. Results 500 μg ml-1 of HDA inhibited gtfB and gtfC mRNA transcription and its expression. The same concentration of HDA decreased 60% the adherence of S. mutans to the surface of P19 cells. Conclusion Hydroxy-decenoic acid prevents gtfB and gtfC expression efficiently in the bactericide sub-concentrations and it could effectively reduce S. mutans adherence to the cell surfaces. In the future, therapeutic approaches to affecting S. mutans could be selective and it’s not necessary to put down the oral flora completely.

  16. Analysis of the cell surface layer ultrastructure of the oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekot, Gerhard; Posch, Gerald; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zayni, Sonja; Mayer, Harald F; Pum, Dietmar; Messner, Paul; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schäffer, Christina

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-negative oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia is decorated with a 2D crystalline surface (S-) layer, with two different S-layer glycoprotein species being present. Prompted by the predicted virulence potential of the S-layer, this study focused on the analysis of the arrangement of the individual S-layer glycoproteins by a combination of microscopic, genetic, and biochemical analyses. The two S-layer genes are transcribed into mRNA and expressed into protein in equal amounts. The S-layer was investigated on intact bacterial cells by transmission electron microscopy, by immune fluorescence microscopy, and by atomic force microscopy. The analyses of wild-type cells revealed a distinct square S-layer lattice with an overall lattice constant of 10.1 ± 0.7 nm. In contrast, a blurred lattice with a lattice constant of 9.0 nm was found on S-layer single-mutant cells. This together with in vitro self-assembly studies using purified (glyco)protein species indicated their increased structural flexibility after self-assembly and/or impaired self-assembly capability. In conjunction with TEM analyses of thin-sectioned cells, this study demonstrates the unusual case that two S-layer glycoproteins are co-assembled into a single S-layer. Additionally, flagella and pilus-like structures were observed on T. forsythia cells, which might impact the pathogenicity of this bacterium.

  17. Effects of feeder layer and BRL conditioned medium on mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TsungHsiaochien; christine,L.Mummery

    1990-01-01

    In vitro growth and maintenance of embryonic stem (ES) cell lines derived from ICM cells of various blastocysts of 129 strain mice,the sustenance of their pluripotency and normal karyotype depend on the feeder layer of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF).Compared with the feeder layer of MEF cells,medium conditioned by Buffalo rat liver cells (BRL-CM) is able to maintain pluripotency and karyotypic normality of ES cells only in short term cell propagation.Besides,ES cells grown in BRL-CM are also capable of aggregation with 8-cell embryos of Swiss strain and develop into germ line chimaeras.Modification to the method of aggregating ES cells with early embryos by making a hole in agar layer on the top of MEF feeder cells was shown to be more converient and efficient than the conventional microdrop method.

  18. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  19. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Momblona

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  20. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldán-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Córdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Córdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  1. Effect of the hydrophobic basal layer of thermoresponsive block co-polymer brushes on thermally-induced cell sheet harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaka, Naoki; Takahashi, Hironobu; Nakayama, Masamichi; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Okano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Thermoresponsive poly(benzyl methacrylate)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PBzMA-b-PIPAAm) block co-polymer brush surfaces were prepared by surface-initiated two-step reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer radical (RAFT) polymerization. PBzMA brushes were fabricated on azoinitiator-immobilized glass substrates in the presence of dithiobenzoate (DTB) compound as a RAFT agent. The amount of grafted polymer was regulated by initial monomer concentrations. The second thermoresponsive blocks were added to the RAFT-related DTB groups located at PBzMA termini through the propagation of PIPAAm chains, resulting in formation of PBzMA-b-PIPAAm brushes. Surface characteristics of the block co-polymer brushes and its influence on thermally regulated cellular behavior were investigated using bovine carotid artery endothelial cells (BAECs), compared with PIPAAm brush surfaces. Cell adhesion/detachment behavior on thermoresponsive polymer brush surfaces significantly depended on their individual polymer architectures and chemical compositions of grafted polymers. Low-temperature treatment at 20°C, below the phase-transition temperature of PIPAAm, induced the spontaneous detachment of adhering cells from the PBzMA-b-PIPAAm brush surfaces with a higher rate than that from PIPAAm brush surfaces. In addition, the cell-repellent effect of the hydrophobic basal layer successfully accelerated for harvesting BAEC sheets from the block co-polymer brush surfaces. Unique features of thermoresponsive block co-polymer brush architectures can be applied to control cell-adhesion strength for enhancing cell adhesion or accelerating cell detachment.

  2. Multi-bits memory cell using degenerated magnetic states in a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Akio, E-mail: akio.fukushima@aist.go.jp; Yakushiji, Kay; Konoto, Makoto; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-02-15

    We newly developed a magnetic memory cell having multi-bit function. The memory cell composed of a perpendicularly magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MB-pMTJ) and a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer. The multi-bit function is realized by combining the freedom of states of the magnetic free layer and that in the antiferromagnetically coupled reference layer. The structure of the reference layer is (FeB/Ta/[Co/Pt]{sub 3})/Ru/([Co/Pt]{sub 6}); the top and the bottom layers are coupled through Ru layer where the reference layer has two degrees of freedom of a head-to-head and a bottom-to-bottom magnetic configuration. A four-state memory cell is realized by combination of both degrees of freedom. The states in the reference layer however is hardly detected by the total resistance of MB-pMTJ, because the magnetoresistance effect in the reference layer is negligibly small. That implies that the resistance values for the different states in the reference layer are degenerated. On the other hand, the two different states in the reference layer bring different stray fields to the free layer, which generate two different minor loop with different switching fields. Therefore, the magnetic states in the reference layer can be differentiated by the two-step reading, before and after applying the appropriately pulsed magnetic field which can identify the initial state in the reference layer. This method is similar to distinguishing different magnetic states in an in-plane magnetized spin-valve element. We demonstrated that four different states in the MB-pMTJ can be distinguished by the two-step read-out. The important feature of the two-step reading is a practically large operation margins (large resistance change in reading) which is equal to that of a single MTJ. Even though the two-step reading is a destructive method by which 50% of the magnetic state is changed, this MB-pMTJ is promising for high density non-volatile memory cell with a minor cost of operation

  3. Sprayed ZnO as effective window layer for CIS/CdS solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, M. S.; Deepu, D. R.; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2014-01-01

    Thin film solar cells were fabricated using CuInS2 as absorber layer and CdS as buffer layer. CuInS2 and CdS layers are deposited using chemical spray pyrolysis and chemical bath deposition respectively. Proper movement and collection of generated carriers really affect the performance of the cell. Introduction of a very thin layer of silver doped ZnO (ZnO:Ag) window layer between the buffer layer and ITO improves performance of the cell, with open circuit voltage of 409mV, short circuit current density of 2.89 mA/cm2, fill factor of 44.3% and conversion efficiency of 0.52%.

  4. Analysis of the p+/p window layer of thin film solar cells by simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林爱国; 丁建宁; 袁宁一; 王书博; 程广贵; 卢超

    2012-01-01

    The application of a p+/p configuration in the window layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film solar cells is simulated and analyzed utilizing an AMPS-1D program.The differences between p+-p-i-n configuration solar cells and p-i-n configuration solar cells are pointed out.The effects of dopant concentration,thickness of p+-layer,contact barrier height and defect density on solar cells are analyzed.Our results indicate that solar cells with a p+-p-i-n configuration have a better performance.The open circuit voltage and short circuit current were improved by increasing the dopant concentration of the p+ layer and lowering the front contact barrier height.The defect density at the p/i interface which exceeds two orders of magnitude in the intrinsic layer will deteriorate the cell property.

  5. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irigoyen, Joseba; Politakos, Nikolaos; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Rojas, Elena; Marradi, Marco; Ledezma, Raquel; Arizmendi, Layza; Rodríguez, J Alberto; Ziolo, Ronald F; Moya, Sergio E

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO)-polyelectrolyte (PE) capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS). Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  6. Fabrication of hybrid graphene oxide/polyelectrolyte capsules by means of layer-by-layer assembly on erythrocyte cell templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Irigoyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel and facile method was developed to produce hybrid graphene oxide (GO–polyelectrolyte (PE capsules using erythrocyte cells as templates. The capsules are easily produced through the layer-by-layer technique using alternating polyelectrolyte layers and GO sheets. The amount of GO and therefore its coverage in the resulting capsules can be tuned by adjusting the concentration of the GO dispersion during the assembly. The capsules retain the approximate shape and size of the erythrocyte template after the latter is totally removed by oxidation with NaOCl in water. The PE/GO capsules maintain their integrity and can be placed or located on other surfaces such as in a device. When the capsules are dried in air, they collapse to form a film that is approximately twice the thickness of the capsule membrane. AFM images in the present study suggest a film thickness of approx. 30 nm for the capsules in the collapsed state implying a thickness of approx. 15 nm for the layers in the collapsed capsule membrane. The polyelectrolytes used in the present study were polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH and polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt (PSS. Capsules where characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman microscopy, the constituent layers by zeta potential and GO by TEM, XRD, and Raman and FTIR spectroscopies.

  7. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  8. Mathematical modelling of cell layer growth in a hollow fibre bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Lloyd A C; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Byrne, Helen M; Waters, Sarah L; Shipley, Rebecca J

    2017-04-07

    Generating autologous tissue grafts of a clinically useful volume requires efficient and controlled expansion of cell populations harvested from patients. Hollow fibre bioreactors show promise as cell expansion devices, owing to their potential for scale-up. However, further research is required to establish how to specify appropriate hollow fibre bioreactor operating conditions for expanding different cell types. In this study we develop a simple model for the growth of a cell layer seeded on the outer surface of a single fibre in a perfused hollow fibre bioreactor. Nutrient-rich culture medium is pumped through the fibre lumen and leaves the bioreactor via the lumen outlet or passes through the porous fibre walls and cell layer, and out via ports on the outer wall of the extra-capillary space. Stokes and Darcy equations for fluid flow in the fibre lumen, fibre wall, cell layer and extra-capillary space are coupled to reaction-advection-diffusion equations for oxygen and lactate transport through the bioreactor, and to a simple growth law for the evolution of the free boundary of the cell layer. Cells at the free boundary are assumed to proliferate at a rate that increases with the local oxygen concentration, and to die and detach from the layer if the local fluid shear stress or lactate concentration exceed critical thresholds. We use the model to predict operating conditions that maximise the cell layer growth for different cell types. In particular, we predict the optimal flow rate of culture medium into the fibre lumen and fluid pressure imposed at the lumen outlet for cell types with different oxygen demands and fluid shear stress tolerances, and compare the growth of the cell layer when the exit ports on the outside of the bioreactor are open with that when they are closed. Model simulations reveal that increasing the inlet flow rate and outlet fluid pressure increases oxygen delivery to the cell layer and, therefore, the growth rate of cells that are

  9. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  10. All solution processable organic photovoltaic cells using DMDCNQI as an organic N-type buffer layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eui Yeol; So, Byoung Min; Chung, Chan Moon; Oh, Se Young

    2012-01-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells consisting of ITO/PEDOT-PSS/P3HT:PCBM/TiO(x)/DMDCNQI/Al have been fabricated by using dip-coated DMDCNQI layer as a cathode buffer material. We have investigated the physical effects of charge transfer complex and wettability of DMDCNQI between TiO(x)/P3HT:PCBM layer and Al cathode electrode on the performance of organic photovoltaic cell. The photovoltaic cell fabricated with a dip-coated DMDCNQI layer exhibited almost similar performance compared to the device using conventional evaporated DMDCNQI layer. Especially, the power conversion efficiency of the prepared organic photovoltaic cell using TiO(x)/DMDCNQI layer was improved to 3.1%, which is mainly due to the decrease in the low contact resistance of organic-metal interface.

  11. Plasmodium vivax adherence to placental glycosaminoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesinee Chotivanich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax infections seldom kill directly but do cause indirect mortality by reducing birth weight and causing abortion. Cytoadherence and sequestration in the microvasculature are central to the pathogenesis of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria, but the contribution of cytoadherence to pathology in other human malarias is less clear. METHODOLOGY: The adherence properties of P. vivax infected red blood cells (PvIRBC were evaluated under static and flow conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. vivax isolates from 33 patients were studied. None adhered to immobilized CD36, ICAM-1, or thrombospondin, putative ligands for P. falciparum vascular cytoadherence, or umbilical vein endothelial cells, but all adhered to immobilized chondroitin sulphate A (CSA and hyaluronic acid (HA, the receptors for adhesion of P. falciparum in the placenta. PvIRBC also adhered to fresh placental cells (N = 5. Pre-incubation with chondroitinase prevented PvIRBC adherence to CSA, and reduced binding to HA, whereas preincubation with hyaluronidase prevented adherence to HA, but did not reduce binding to CSA significantly. Pre-incubation of PvIRBC with soluble CSA and HA reduced binding to the immobilized receptors and prevented placental binding. PvIRBC adhesion was prevented by pre-incubation with trypsin, inhibited by heparin, and reduced by EGTA. Under laminar flow conditions the mean (SD shear stress reducing maximum attachment by 50% was 0.06 (0.02 Pa but, having adhered, the PvIRBC could then resist detachment by stresses up to 5 Pa. At 37 °C adherence began approximately 16 hours after red cell invasion with maximal adherence at 30 hours. At 39 °C adherence began earlier and peaked at 24 hours. SIGNIFICANCE: Adherence of P. vivax-infected erythrocytes to glycosaminoglycans may contribute to the pathogenesis of vivax malaria and lead to intrauterine growth retardation.

  12. A multidisciplinary approach to study the functional properties of neuron-like cell models constituting a living bio-hybrid system: SH-SY5Y cells adhering to PANI substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Caponi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A living bio-hybrid system has been successfully implemented. It is constituted by neuroblastic cells, the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, adhering to a poly-anyline (PANI a semiconductor polymer with memristive properties. By a multidisciplinary approach, the biocompatibility of the substrate has been analyzed and the functionality of the adhering cells has been investigated. We found that the PANI films can support the cell adhesion. Moreover, the SH-SY5Y cells were successfully differentiated into neuron-like cells for in vitro applications demonstrating that PANI can also promote cell differentiation. In order to deeply characterize the modifications of the bio-functionality induced by the cell-substrate interaction, the functional properties of the cells have been characterized by electrophysiology and Raman spectroscopy. Our results confirm that the PANI films do not strongly affect the general properties of the cells, ensuring their viability without toxic effects on their physiology. Ascribed to the adhesion process, however, a slight increase of the markers of the cell suffering has been evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and accordingly the electrophysiology shows a reduction at positive stimulations in the cells excitability.

  13. The Adherent/Invasive Escherichia coli Strain LF82 Invades and Persists in Human Prostate Cell Line RWPE-1, Activating a Strong Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleandri, Marta; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Conte, Antonietta L.; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Nicoletti, Mauro; Zagaglia, Carlo; Gambara, Guido; Palombi, Fioretta; De Cesaris, Paola; Ziparo, Elio; Palamara, Anna T.; Riccioli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adherent/invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains have recently been receiving increased attention because they are more prevalent and persistent in the intestine of Crohn's disease (CD) patients than in healthy subjects. Since AIEC strains show a high percentage of similarity to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, here we compared AIEC strain LF82 with a UPEC isolate (strain EC73) to assess whether LF82 would be able to infect prostate cells as an extraintestinal target. The virulence phenotypes of both strains were determined by using the RWPE-1 prostate cell line. The results obtained indicated that LF82 and EC73 are able to adhere to, invade, and survive within prostate epithelial cells. Invasion was confirmed by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Moreover, cytochalasin D and colchicine strongly inhibited bacterial uptake of both strains, indicating the involvement of actin microfilaments and microtubules in host cell invasion. Moreover, both strains belong to phylogenetic group B2 and are strong biofilm producers. In silico analysis reveals that LF82 shares with UPEC strains several virulence factors: namely, type 1 pili, the group II capsule, the vacuolating autotransporter toxin, four iron uptake systems, and the pathogenic island (PAI). Furthermore, compared to EC73, LF82 induces in RWPE-1 cells a marked increase of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and of NF-κB already by 5 min postinfection, thus inducing a strong inflammatory response. Our in vitro data support the hypothesis that AIEC strains might play a role in prostatitis, and, by exploiting host-cell signaling pathways controlling the innate immune response, likely facilitate bacterial multiplication and dissemination within the male genitourinary tract. PMID:27600504

  14. pGh9:ISS1 transpositional mutations in Streptococcus uberis UT888 causes reduced bacterial adherence to and internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerro Dego, O; Prado, M E; Chen, X; Luther, D A; Almeida, R A; Oliver, S P

    2011-08-05

    Streptococcus uberis is an important mastitis pathogen that affects dairy cows worldwide. In spite of the economic impact caused by the high prevalence of S. uberis intramammary infections (IMI) in many well-managed dairy herds, pathogenic strategies and associated virulence factors of S. uberis are not well understood. It has been shown that S. uberis attaches to and internalizes into mammary epithelial cells and can survive inside cells for extended periods of time. We hypothesize that early attachment to and internalization into mammary epithelial cells is a critical step for the establishment of intramammary infection. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize chromosomally encoded virulence factors of S. uberis that allow early bacterial attachment to and internalization into mammary epithelial cells. A common approach used to identify virulence factors is by generating random insertion mutants that are defective in adherence to and internalization into mammary epithelial cells using pGh9:ISS1 mutagenesis system. A random insertion mutant library of S. uberis strain UT888 was created using a thermo-sensitive plasmid pGh9:ISS1 carrying ISS1 insertion sequence. Integration of the insertion sequence into the chromosome of these mutant clones was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot. Southern blot analysis of mutant clones also showed that insertional integration was random. Of 1000 random chromosomal insertion mutants of S. uberis strain UT888 screened, 32 had significantly reduced ability to adhere to and internalize into mammary epithelial cells. Chromosomal mapping of insertion sequence integration sites in some of these defective mutants showed integration into penicillin binding protein 2A (pbp2A), sensor histidine kinase, tetR family regulatory protein, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase catalytic subunit (purE), lactose phosphotransferase, phosphoribosylamine glycine ligase (purD), and other genes involved in metabolic activities. These

  15. Interface engineering of layer-by-Layer stacked graphene anodes for high-performance organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu; Tong, Shi Wun; Loh, Kian Ping [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Xu, Xiang Fan; Oezyilmaz, Barbaros [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-04-05

    An interface engineering process to deploy graphene film as the anode in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM)-based polymer solar cells is demonstrated. By modifying the interface between the graphene anode and the photoactive layer with MoO{sub 3} and poly(3,4-ethylenedioythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells reaches {approx}83.3% of control devices that use an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. p-Type semiconducting nickel oxide as an efficiency-enhancing anodal interfacial layer in bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael D; Buchholz, Donald B; Marks, Tobin J; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2014-11-25

    The present invention, in one aspect, relates to a solar cell. In one embodiment, the solar cell includes an anode, a p-type semiconductor layer formed on the anode, and an active organic layer formed on the p-type semiconductor layer, where the active organic layer has an electron-donating organic material and an electron-accepting organic material.

  17. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a micro porous layer (MPL) added between the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor tra

  18. Label-free electrochemical aptasensor constructed by layer-by-layer technology for sensitive and selective detection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianshu; Liu, Jiyang; Gu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Dan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-07-02

    Here, a cytosensor was constructed with ferrocene-appended poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (Fc-PAH) functionalized graphene (Fc-PAH-G), poly(sodium-p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and aptamer (AS1411) by layer-by-layer assembly technology. The hybrid nanocomposite Fc-PAH-G not only brings probes on the electrode and also promotes electron transfer between the probes and the substrate electrode. Meanwhile, LBL technology provides more effective probes to enhance amplified signal for improving the sensitivity of the detection. While AS1411 forming G-quardruplex structure and binding cancer cells, the current response of the sensing electrode decreased due to the insulating properties of cellular membrane. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was performed to investigate the electrochemical detection of HeLa cells attributing to its sensitivity of the current signal change. The as-prepared aptasensor showed a high sensitivity and good stability, a widely detection range from 10 to 10(6) cells/mL with a detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL for the detection of cancer cells.

  19. Carrier dynamics and design optimization of electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenchao; Seol, Gyungseon; Rinzler, Andrew G.; Guo, Jing

    2012-03-01

    Carrier dynamics of the electrolyte-induced inversion layer carbon nanotube-silicon Schottky junction solar cells is explored by numerical simulations. Operation mechanisms of the solar cells with and without the electrolyte-induced inversion layer are presented and compared, which clarifies the current flow mechanisms in a solar cell with an induced inversion layer. A heavily doped back contact layer can behave as a hole block layer. In addition to lowering contact resistance and surface recombination, it is particularly useful for improving carrier separation in an electrolyte-induced inversion layer solar cell or a metal-insulator-semiconductor grating solar cell.

  20. Ultraviolet-ozone-treated PEDOT:PSS as anode buffer layer for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zisheng; Wang, Lidan; Li, Yantao; Zhao, Haifeng; Chu, Bei; Li, Wenlian

    2012-08-17

    Ultraviolet-ozone-treated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)was used as the anode buffer layer in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene-based solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of the cells with appropriated UV-ozone treatment was found to increase about 20% compared to the reference cell. The improved performance is attributed to the increased work function of the PEDOT:PSS layer, which improves the contact condition between PEDOT:PSS and CuPc, hence increasing the extraction efficiency of the photogenerated holes and decreasing the recombination probability of holes and electrons in the active organic layers.

  1. Thin metal layer as transparent electrode in n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theuring Martin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, transparent electrodes, based on a thin silver film and a capping layer, are investigated. Low deposition temperature, flexibility and low material costs are the advantages of this type of electrode. Their applicability in structured n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells is demonstrated in simulation and experiment. The influence of the individual layer thicknesses on the solar cell performance is discussed and approaches for further improvements are given. For the silver film/capping layer electrode, a higher solar cell efficiency could be achieved compared to a reference ZnO:Al front contact.

  2. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  3. Genetic relatedness and virulence properties of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains of serotype O119:H6 expressing localized adherence or localized and aggregative adherence-like patterns on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Bruna G; Ooka, Tadasuke; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Vieira, Mônica A M; Yamamoto, Denise; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Girão, Dennys M; Sampaio, Suely C F; Melo, Alexis Bonfim; Irino, Kinue; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) induce attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions in enterocytes and produce the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) contributing to the localized adherence (LA) pattern formation on HeLa cells. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) produce aggregative adherence (AA) on HeLa cells and form prominent biofilms. The ability to produce LA or AA is an important hallmark to classify fecal E. coli isolates as EPEC or EAEC, respectively. E. coli strains of serotype O119:H6 exhibit an LA+ phenotype and have been considered as comprising a clonal group of EPEC strains. However, we have recently identified O119:H6 EPEC strains that produce LA and an AA-like pattern concurrently (LA/AA-like+). In this study, we evaluated the relatedness of three LA/AA-like+ and three LA+ O119:H6 strains by comparing their virulence and genotypic properties. We first found that the LA/AA-like+ strains induced actin accumulation in HeLa cells (indicative of A/E lesions formation) and formed biofilms on abiotic surfaces more efficiently than the LA+ strains. MLST analysis showed that the six strains all belong to the ST28 complex. All strains carried multiple plasmids, but as plasmid profiles were highly variable, this cannot be used to differentiate LA/AA-like+ and LA+ strains. We further obtained their draft genome sequences and the complete sequences of four plasmids harbored by one LA/AA-like+ strain. Analysis of these sequences and comparison with 37 fully sequenced E. coli genomes revealed that both O119:H6 groups belong to the E. coli phylogroup B2 and are very closely related with only 58-67 SNPs found between LA/AA-like+ and LA+ strains. Search of the draft sequences of the six strains for adhesion-related genes known in EAEC and other E. coli pathotypes detected no genes specifically present in LA/AA-like+ strains. Unexpectedly however, we found that a large plasmid distinct from pEAF is responsible for the AA-like phenotype of the LA/AA-like+ strains. Although we

  4. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Overexpression Initiates a Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition and Redifferentiation of Human Pancreatic Cells following Expansion in Long Term Adherent Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Muir

    Full Text Available A replenishable source of insulin-producing cells has the potential to cure type 1 diabetes. Attempts to culture and expand pancreatic β-cells in vitro have resulted in their transition from insulin-producing epithelial cells to mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs with high proliferative capacity but devoid of any hormone production. The aim of this study was to determine whether the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4, could induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET of the cultured cells. Islet-enriched pancreatic cells, allowed to dedifferentiate and expand in adherent cell culture, were transduced with an adenovirus containing KLF4 (Ad-Klf4. Cells were subsequently analysed for changes in cell morphology by light microscopy, and for the presence of epithelial and pancreatic markers by immunocytochemistry and quantitative RT/PCR. Infection with Ad-Klf4 resulted in morphological changes, down-regulation of mesenchymal markers, and re-expression of both epithelial and pancreatic cell markers including insulin and transcription factors specific to β-cells. This effect was further enhanced by culturing cells in suspension. However, the effects of Ad-KLf4 were transient and this was shown to be due to increased apoptosis in Klf4-expressing cells. Klf4 has been recently identified as a pioneer factor with the ability to modulate the structure of chromatin and enhance reprogramming/transdifferentiation. Our results show that Klf4 may have a role in the redifferentiation of expanded pancreatic cells in culture, but before this can be achieved the off-target effects that result in increased apoptosis would need to be overcome.

  5. A method for the densification of ceramic layers, especially ceramic layers within solid oxide cell (SOC) technology, and products obtained by the method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic layer, especially for use in solid oxide cell (SOC) technology, is densified in a method comprising (a) providing a multilayer system by depositing the porous ceramic layer, which is to be densified, onto the selected system of ceramic layers on a support, (b) pre-sintering the resulting......(s) in the porous layer surface and (e) performing a thermal treatment at a temperature T2, where T2 > ?1, to obtain densification of and grain growth in the porous layer formed in step (b). The method makes it possible to obtain dense ceramic layers at temperatures, which are compatible with the other materials...... present in a ceramic multilayer system....

  6. Establishment of human embryonic stem cell lines from frozen-thawed blastocysts using STO cell feeder layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Pill; Lee, Young Jae; Lee, Keum Sil; Ah Shin, Hyun; Cho, Hwang Yoon; Chung, Kil Saeng; Kim, Eun Young; Lim, Jin Ho

    2004-03-01

    Recently, human embryonic stem (hES) cells have become very important resources for basic research on cell replacement therapy and other medical applications. The purpose of this study was to test whether pluripotent hES cell lines could be successfully derived from frozen-thawed embryos that were destined to be discarded after 5 years in a routine human IVF-embryo transfer programme and whether an STO cell feeder layer can be used for the culture of hES cells. Donated frozen embryos (blastocysts or pronuclear) were thawed, and recovered or in vitro developed blastocysts were immunosurgically treated. All inner cell masses were cultured continuously on an STO cell feeder layer and then presumed hES cell colonies were characterized. Seven and two cell lines were established from frozen-thawed blastocysts (7/20, 35.0%) and pronuclear stage embryos (2/20, 10.0%), respectively. The doubling time of hES cells on the immortal STO cell feeder layer was approximately 36 h, similar to that of cells grown using fresh mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeder conditions. Subcultured hES cell colonies showed strong positive immunostaining for alkaline phosphatase, stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) and tumour rejection antigen 1-60 (TRA1-60) cell surface markers. Also, the hES colonies retained normal karyotypes and Oct-4 expression in prolonged subculture. When in vitro differentiation of hES cells was induced by retinoic acid, three embryonic germ layer cells were identified by RT-PCR or indirect immunocytochemistry. This study indicates that establishment of hES cells from frozen-thawed blastocysts minimizes the ethical problem associated with the use of human embryos in research and that the STO cell feeder layer can be used for the culture of hES cells.

  7. An alternative blocking layer for titanium dioxide (TiO 2) solar cell applications

    OpenAIRE

    Memesa, M.

    2008-01-01

    In hybrid organic solar cells a blocking layer between transparent electrode and nanocrystalline titania particles is essential to prevent short-circuiting and current loss through recombination at the electrode interface. Here the preparation of a uniform hybrid blocking layer which is composed of conducting titania nanoparticles embedded in an insulating polymer derived ceramic is presented. This blocking layer is prepared by sol-gel chemistry where an amphiphilic block copolymer is use...

  8. Characterization of pore network structure in catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    El Hannach, Mohamed; Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Franco, Alejandro A.; Prat, Marc; Pauchet, Joël; Holdcroft, Steven

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We model and validate the effect of ionomer content and Pt nanoparticles on nanoporous structure of catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. By employing Pore network modeling technique and analytical solutions, we analyze and reproduce experimental N2-adsorption isotherms of carbon, Pt/ carbon and catalyst layers with various ionomer contents. The porous catalyst layer structures comprise of Ketjen Black carbon, Pt and Nafion ionomer. The experimental pore s...

  9. Redox cycling for electrolysis of pure water in a thin layer cell

    OpenAIRE

    李, 春艳

    2013-01-01

    The redox cycling can achieve in thin layer cell because products of electrode reactions diffuse in opposite directions across the thin layer to the electrodes where they can react again. This redox cycling can enhance the current, and hence improve the sensitivity and selectivity. The redox cycling can make the current be under steady state in thin layer electrolysis. The aim of this thesis is to get controlling factors of redox cycling in electrolysis of water. the factors include not only ...

  10. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-18

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  11. Electrical coupling between the myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal and adjacent muscle layers in the guinea-pig gastric antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, H M; Edwards, F R; Hickey, H; Hill, C E; Hirst, G D S

    2003-08-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from short segments of the muscular wall of the guinea-pig gastric antrum. Preparations were impaled using two independent microelectrodes, one positioned in the circular layer and the other either in the longitudinal layer, in the network of myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCMY) or in the circular layer. Cells in each layer displayed characteristic patterns of rhythmical activity, with the largest signals being generated by ICCMY. Current pulses injected into the circular muscle layer produced electrotonic potentials in each cell layer, indicating that the layers are electrically interconnected. The amplitudes of these electrotonic potentials were largest in the circular layer and smallest in the longitudinal layer. An analysis of electrical coupling between the three layers suggests that although the cells in each layer are well coupled to neighbouring cells, the coupling between either muscle layer and the network of ICCMY is relatively poor. The electrical connections between ICCMY and the circular layer did not rectify. In parallel immunohistochemical studies, the distribution of the connexins Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 within the antral wall was determined. Only Cx43 was detected; it was widely distributed on ICCMY and throughout the circular smooth muscle layer, being concentrated around ICCIM, but was less abundant in the circular muscle layer immediately adjacent to ICCMY. Although the electrophysiological studies indicate that smooth muscle cells in the longitudinal muscle layer are electrically coupled to each other, none of the connexins examined were detected in this layer.

  12. Spatial atmospheric ALD of functional layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Frijters, C.; Balder, J.E.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Roozeboom, F.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial Atmosperic Atomic Layer Depositon combines the advantages of temporal ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and uniformity over large area substrates, with high growth rages (up tot nm/s). In this paper we present a short overview of our research acctivity carried out on S-ALD of f

  13. Relationship between white matter hyperintensities and retinal nerve fiber layer, choroid, and ganglion cell layer thickness in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyigundogdu, Ilkin; Derle, Eda; Asena, Leyla; Kural, Feride; Kibaroglu, Seda; Ocal, Ruhsen; Akkoyun, Imren; Can, Ufuk

    2017-01-01

    Aim To compare the relationship between white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on brain magnetic resonance imaging and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), choroid, and ganglion cell layer (GCL) thicknesses in migraine patients and healthy subjects. We also assessed the role of cerebral hypoperfusion in the formation of these WMH lesions. Methods We enrolled 35 migraine patients without WMH, 37 migraine patients with WMH, and 37 healthy control subjects examined in the Neurology outpatient clinic of our tertiary center from May to December 2015. RFNL, choroid, and GCL thicknesses were measured by optic coherence tomography. Results There were no differences in the RFNL, choroid, or GCL thicknesses between migraine patients with and without WMH ( p > 0.05). Choroid layer thicknesses were significantly lower in migraine patients compared to control subjects ( p thicknesses ( p > 0.05). Conclusions The 'only cerebral hypoperfusion' theory was insufficient to explain the pathophysiology of WMH lesions in migraine patients. In addition, the thinning of the choroid thicknesses in migraine patients suggests a potential causative role for cerebral hypoperfusion and decreased perfusion pressure of the choroid layer.

  14. The extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus acts as a proliferation and migration repressing factor that alters the cell morphology of keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbeis, Janina; Peisker, Henrik; Backes, Christian S; Bur, Stephanie; Hölters, Sebastian; Thewes, Nicolas; Greiner, Markus; Junker, Christian; Schwarz, Eva C; Hoth, Markus; Junker, Kerstin; Preissner, Klaus T; Jacobs, Karin; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Staphyloccocus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause for superficial and deep seated wound infections. The pathogen is equipped with a large arsenal of virulence factors, which facilitate attachment to various eukaryotic cell structures and modulate the host immune response. One of these factors is the extracellular adherence protein Eap, a member of the "secretable expanded repertoire adhesive molecules" (SERAM) protein family that possesses adhesive and immune modulatory properties. The secreted protein was previously shown to impair wound healing by interfering with host defense and neovascularization. However, its impact on keratinocyte proliferation and migration, two major steps in the re-epithelialization process of wounds, is not known. Here, we report that Eap affects the proliferation and migration capacities of keratinocytes by altering their morphology and adhesive properties. In particular, treatment of non-confluent HaCaT cell cultures with Eap resulted in cell morphology changes as well as a significant reduction in cell proliferation and migration. Eap-treated HaCaT cells changed their appearance from an oblong via a trapezoid to an astral-like shape, accompanied by decreases in cell volume and cell stiffness, and exhibited significantly increased cell adhesion. Eap had a similar influence on endothelial and cancer cells, indicative for a general effect of Eap on eukaryotic cell morphology and functions. Specifically, Eap was found to interfere with growth factor-stimulated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that is known to be responsible for cell shape modulation, induction of proliferation and migration of epithelial cells. Western blot analyses revealed that Eap blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)-stimulated HaCaT cells. Together, these data add another antagonistic mechanism of Eap in wound healing, whereby the

  15. Adherence Characteristics of Cement Clinker on Basic Bricks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zongqi; Michel Rigaud

    2002-01-01

    Based on the sandwich test, adherence mechanisms of cement clinker on various basic bricks were tackled by microstructural observations with help of cathodoluminescence technique. Doloma based bricks offer sufficient lime to react with clinker, forming C3 S rich layer and initializing superior adherence. However, clinker with low silica ratio leads to MgO agglomeration at the interface of doloma bricks, which reduces adherence strength. On magnesia spinel bricks, fine, crystalline spinel easily reacts with lime containing phases from clinker to form lowmelting phases and belite zone, which shows high adherence performance. Lack of fine spinel in magnesia spinel bricks results in poor adherence.

  16. Characterization and cell behavior of titanium surfaces with PLL/DNA modification via a layer-by-layer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenli; Feng, Bo; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie

    2012-08-01

    This study describes the fabrication of two types of multilayered films onto titanium by layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly, using poly-L-lysine (PLL) as the cationic polyelectrolyte and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) as the anionic polyelectrolyte. The assembling process of each component was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and quartz crystal balance (QCM). Zeta potential of the LBL-coated microparticles was measured by dynamic light scattering. Titanium substrates with or without multilayered films were used in osteoblast cell culture experiments to study cell proliferation, viability, differentiation, and morphology. Results of AFM and QCM indicated the progressive build-up of the multilayered coatings. The surface morphology of three types of multilayered films showed elevations in the nanoscale range. The data of zeta potential showed that the surface terminated with PLL displayed positive charge while the surface terminated with DNA displayed negative charge. The proliferation of osteoblasts on modified titanium films was found to be greater than that on control (p PLL/DNA-modified films have higher cell viability (p PLL/DNA were successfully used to surface engineer titanium via LBL technique, and enhanced its cell biocompatibility. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Label-free electrochemical aptasensor constructed by layer-by-layer technology for sensitive and selective detection of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tianshu [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Liu, Jiyang; Gu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Dan [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Wang, Jin, E-mail: jin.wang.1@stonybrook.edu [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China); Department of Chemistry, Physics and Applied Mathematics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Wang, Erkang, E-mail: ekwang@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022 (China)

    2015-07-02

    Highlights: • Fc-PAH was modified on the surface of graphene to prepare hybid nanocomposite (Fc-PAH-G). • A cytosensor was constructed with Fc-PAH-G, PSS and aptamer AS1411 by LBL technology. • The sensing interface introduced more redox probe and enhanced current signal on electrode. • The sensor showed a detection range of 10–10{sup 6} cells/mL with a detection limit of 10 cells/mL. - Abstract: Here, a cytosensor was constructed with ferrocene-appended poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (Fc-PAH) functionalized graphene (Fc-PAH-G), poly(sodium-p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and aptamer (AS1411) by layer-by-layer assembly technology. The hybrid nanocomposite Fc-PAH-G not only brings probes on the electrode and also promotes electron transfer between the probes and the substrate electrode. Meanwhile, LBL technology provides more effective probes to enhance amplified signal for improving the sensitivity of the detection. While AS1411 forming G-quardruplex structure and binding cancer cells, the current response of the sensing electrode decreased due to the insulating properties of cellular membrane. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was performed to investigate the electrochemical detection of HeLa cells attributing to its sensitivity of the current signal change. The as-prepared aptasensor showed a high sensitivity and good stability, a widely detection range from 10 to 10{sup 6} cells/mL with a detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL for the detection of cancer cells.

  18. Layer-by-Layer Quantum Dot Assemblies for the Enhanced Energy Transfers and Their Applications toward Efficient Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sukyung; Jin, Ho; Bang, Jiwon; Kim, Sungjee

    2012-12-06

    Two different quantum dots (QDs) with an identical optical band gap were prepared: one without the inorganic shell and short surface ligands (BQD) and the other with thick inorganic shells and long surface ligands (OQD). They were surface-derivatized to be positively or negatively charged and were used for layer-by-layer assemblies on TiO2. By sandwiching BQD between OQD and TiO2, OQD photoluminescence showed seven times faster decay, which is attributed to the combined effect of the efficient energy transfer from OQD to BQD with the FRET efficiency of 86% and fast electron transfer from BQD to TiO2 with the rate of 1.2 × 10(9) s(-1). The QD bilayer configuration was further applied to solar cells, and showed 3.6 times larger photocurrent and 3.8 times larger photoconversion efficiency than those of the device with the OQD being sandwiched by BQD and TiO2. This showcases the importance of sophisticated control of QD layer assembly for the design of efficient QD solar cells.

  19. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  20. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  1. ON Cone Bipolar Cell Axonal Synapses in the OFF Inner Plexiform Layer of the Rabbit Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, J. Scott; Anderson, James R.; Jones, Bryan W.; Watt, Carl B.; Mohammed, Shoeb; Hoang, John V.; Marc, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the rabbit retinal connectome RC1 reveals that the division between the ON and OFF inner plexiform layer (IPL) is not structurally absolute. ON cone bipolar cells make non-canonical axonal synapses onto specific targets and receive amacrine cell synapses in the nominal OFF layer, creating novel motifs, including inhibitory crossover networks. Automated transmission electron microscope (ATEM) imaging, molecular tagging, tracing, and rendering of ≈ 400 bipolar cells reveals axonal ribbons in 36% of ON cone bipolar cells, throughout the OFF IPL. The targets include GABA-positive amacrine cells (γACs), glycine-positive amacrine cells (GACs) and ganglion cells. Most ON cone bipolar cell axonal contacts target GACs driven by OFF cone bipolar cells, forming new architectures for generating ON-OFF amacrine cells. Many of these ON-OFF GACs target ON cone bipolar cell axons, ON γACs and/or ON-OFF ganglion cells, representing widespread mechanisms for OFF to ON crossover inhibition. Other targets include OFF γACs presynaptic to OFF bipolar cells, forming γAC-mediated crossover motifs. ON cone bipolar cell axonal ribbons drive bistratified ON-OFF ganglion cells in the OFF layer and provide ON drive to polarity-appropriate targets such as bistratified diving ganglion cells (bsdGCs). The targeting precision of ON cone bipolar cell axonal synapses shows that this drive incidence is necessarily a joint distribution of cone bipolar cell axonal frequency and target cell trajectories through a given volume of the OFF layer. Such joint distribution sampling is likely common when targets are sparser than sources and when sources are coupled, as are ON cone bipolar cells. PMID:23042441

  2. n +-Microcrystalline-Silicon Tunnel Layer in Tandem Si-Based Thin Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Lee, Hsin-Ying; Chen, Kuan-Hao

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the p-SiC/ i-Si/ n-Si cell and the p-SiC/ i-SiGe/ n-Si cell deposited using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were cascaded for forming the tandem Si-based thin film solar cells to absorb the wide solar spectrum. To further improve the performances of the tandem Si-based thin film solar cells, a 5-nm-thick n +-microcrystalline-Si ( n +-μc-Si) tunnel layer deposited using the laser-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was inserted between the p-SiC/ i-Si/ n-Si cell and the p-SiC/ i-SiGe/ n-Si cell. Since both the plasma and the CO2 laser were simultaneously utilized to efficiently decompose the reactant and doping gases, the carrier concentration and the carrier mobility of the n +-μc-Si tunnel layer were significantly improved. The ohmic contact formed between the p-SiC layer and the n +-μc-Si tunnel layer with low resistance was beneficial to the generated current transportation and the carrier recombination rate. Therefore, the conversion efficiency of the tandem solar cells was promoted from 8.57% and 8.82% to 9.91% compared to that without tunnel layer and with 5-nm-thick n +-amorphous-Si tunnel layer.

  3. Portrait of Candida albicans adherence regulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Finkel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell-substrate adherence is a fundamental property of microorganisms that enables them to exist in biofilms. Our study focuses on adherence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to one substrate, silicone, that is relevant to device-associated infection. We conducted a mutant screen with a quantitative flow-cell assay to identify thirty transcription factors that are required for adherence. We then combined nanoString gene expression profiling with functional analysis to elucidate relationships among these transcription factors, with two major goals: to extend our understanding of transcription factors previously known to govern adherence or biofilm formation, and to gain insight into the many transcription factors we identified that were relatively uncharacterized, particularly in the context of adherence or cell surface biogenesis. With regard to the first goal, we have discovered a role for biofilm regulator Bcr1 in adherence, and found that biofilm regulator Ace2 is a major functional target of chromatin remodeling factor Snf5. In addition, Bcr1 and Ace2 share several target genes, pointing to a new connection between them. With regard to the second goal, our findings reveal existence of a large regulatory network that connects eleven adherence regulators, the zinc-response regulator Zap1, and approximately one quarter of the predicted cell surface protein genes in this organism. This limited yet sensitive glimpse of mutant gene expression changes had thus defined one of the broadest cell surface regulatory networks in C. albicans.

  4. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayer TiO(x) for efficient electron acceptor in polymer hybrid solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyunbum; Lee, Chanwoo; Yoon, Sung Cheol; Cho, Chul-Hee; Cho, Jinhan; Kim, Bumjoon J

    2010-11-16

    We demonstrate that TiO(x) nanocomposite films fabricated using electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells compared to conventional TiO(x) films fabricated via the sol-gel process. For this study, titanium precursor/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) multilayer films were first deposited onto indium tin oxide-coated glass to produce TiO(x) nanocomposites (TiO(x)NC). The specific effect of the LbL processed TiO(x) on photovoltaic performance was investigated using the planar bilayer TiO(x)NC and highly regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) solar cells, and the P3HT/LbL TiO(x)NC solar cells showed a dramatic increase in power efficiency, particularly in terms of the short current density and fill factor. The improved efficiency of this device is mainly due to the difference in the chemical composition of the LbL TiO(x)NC films, including the much higher Ti(3+)/Ti(4+) ratio and the highly reactive facets of crystals as demonstrated by XPS and XRD measurement, thus enhancing the electron transfer between electron donors and acceptors. In addition, the grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) study revealed the presence of more highly oriented P3HT stacks parallel to the substrate on the LbL TiO(x)NC film compared to those on the sol-gel TiO(x) films, possibly influencing the hole mobility of P3HT and the energy transfer near and at the interface between the P3HT and TiO(x) layers. The results of this study demonstrate that this approach is a promising one for the design of hybrid solar cells with improved efficiency.

  5. ADAPTIVE LAYERED CARTESIAN CUT CELL METHOD FOR THE UNSTRUCTURED HEXAHEDRAL GRIDS GENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Peining; TAN Jianrong; LIU Zhenyu

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive layered Cartesian cut cell method is presented to solve the difficulty of the unstructured hexahedral anisotropic Cartesian grids generation from the complex CAD model. Vertex merging algorithm based on relaxed AVL tree is investigated to construct topological structure for stereo lithography (STL) files, and a topology-based self-adaptive layered slicing algorithm with special features control strategy is brought forward. With the help of convex hull, a new points-in-polygon method is employed to improve the Cartesian cut cell method. By integrating the self-adaptive layered slicing algorithm and the improved Cartesian cut cell method, the adaptive layered Cartesian cut cell method gains the volume data of the complex CAD model in STL file and generates the unstructured hexahedral anisotropic Cartesian grids.

  6. Improved Reliability of Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells by Double Anode Buffer Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Hsun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimized hybrid planar heterojunction (PHJ of small molecule organic solar cells (SM-OSCs based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc as donor and fullerene (C60 as acceptor was fabricated, which obviously enhanced the performance of device by sequentially using both MoO3 and pentacene as double anode buffer layers (ABL, also known as hole extraction layer (HEL. A series of the vacuum-deposited ABL, acting as an electron and exciton blocking layer, were examined for their characteristics in SM-OSCs. The performance and reliability were compared between conventional ITO/ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells and the new ITO/double ABL/CuPc/C60/BCP/Ag cells. The effect on the electrical properties of these materials was also investigated to obtain the optimal thickness of ABL. The comparison shows that the modified cell has an enhanced reliability compared to traditional cells. The improvement of lifetime was attributed to the idea of double layers to prevent humidity and oxygen from diffusing into the active layer. We demonstrated that the interfacial extraction layers are necessary to avoid degradation of device. That is to say, in normal temperature and pressure, a new avenue for the device within double buffer layers has exhibited the highest values of open circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and lifetime in this work compared to monolayer of ABL.

  7. Influence of scattering layers on efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hore, S. [Freiburg Materials Research Center, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Stefan-Meier-Strasse 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Vetter, C.; Kern, R.; Hinsch, A. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Smit, H.J.P. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    Thin titanium dioxide (TiO2) semiconductor layer with different scattering layers was investigated in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Since the cost of the photoactive dye in the DSSC is relatively high, it is reasonable to assume that the price of the dye could be one of the decisive factors in determining the price of the DSSC modules. Use of a thin layer of nanocrystalline TiO2 would imply reduction in the amount of dye coverage, however, lower amount of dye in the thin films would imply fewer electron generation upon illumination. Thus, it becomes necessary to include a light scattering layer such that the lower photon conversion due to thin layer could be compensated. In the present study up to 80% increase in current density was observed due to inclusion of scattering layers. Reflectance and transmittance measurements were employed in order to study the optical properties of these scattering layers. The scattering layers, which are considered here, are TiO2-Rutile, zirconium dioxide (ZrO2), and layers consisting of these two in various proportions. With a 4 {mu}m thin titanium dioxide semiconductor layer as photo electrode and an additional light scattering layer (consisting of TiO2-Rutile and ZrO2 in a ratio of 1:3), efficiencies of 6.8% were achieved.

  8. pH-Responsive Layer-by-Layer Nanoshells for Direct Regulation of Cell Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    spring constants of the cantilevers were determined by their thermal resonance frequency spectra. The tip radius was estimated by scanning 5 nm gold...supported by Grants FA9550-11-1-0233 and FA9550-09-1-0162 ( BIONIC Center) from Air Force Office of Scientific Research (cell encapsulation) and Project

  9. Quantification of cell-free layer thickness and cell distribution of blood by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Janne; Bykov, Alexander; Fabritius, Tapio

    2016-04-01

    A high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) with 1-μm axial resolution was applied to assess the thickness of a cell-free layer (CFL) and a spatial distribution of red blood cells (RBC) next to the microchannel wall. The experiments were performed in vitro in a plain glass microchannel with a width of 2 mm and height of 0.2 mm. RBCs were suspended in phosphate buffered saline solution at the hematocrit level of 45%. Flow rates of 0.1 to 0.5 ml/h were used to compensate gravity induced CFL. The results indicate that OCT can be efficiently used for the quantification of CFL thickness and spatial distribution of RBCs in microcirculatory blood flow.

  10. Numerical study on short-circuit current of single layer organic solar cells with Schottkey contacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the cathode work function,carriers mobilities and temperature on the short-circuit current of single layer organic solar cells with Schottkey contacts was numerically studied,and the quantitative dependences of the short-circuit current on these quantities were obtained.The results provide the theoretical foundation for experimental study of single layer organic solar cells with Schottkey contacts.

  11. Organic Solar Cells Performances Improvement Induced by Interface Buffer Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Bernède, J.C.; Godoy, A.; Cattin, L.; Diaz, F. R.; Morsli, M; Valle, M. A. del

    2010-01-01

    In the last 22 years that have elapsed since the pioneering work of Tang [Tang, Appl. Phys. Lett., 1986], significant improvement in the fundamental understanding and cells construction have led to efficiencies higher than 6%. The new concept of polymer:fullerene BHJ solar cells has allowed dramatic improvements in devices efficiency. It has induced a healthy competition with the multi-heterojunction devices base on small organic molecules, which induces significant progress in both cells fam...

  12. Characterization of a distinct population of circulating human non-adherent endothelial forming cells and their recruitment via intercellular adhesion molecule-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Appleby

    Full Text Available Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+ population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38 together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31. These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8 or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14 which distinguishes them from 'early' endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs. Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1 surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs. Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis.

  13. Characterization of a distinct population of circulating human non-adherent endothelial forming cells and their recruitment via intercellular adhesion molecule-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Sarah L; Cockshell, Michaelia P; Pippal, Jyotsna B; Thompson, Emma J; Barrett, Jeffrey M; Tooley, Katie; Sen, Shaundeep; Sun, Wai Yan; Grose, Randall; Nicholson, Ian; Levina, Vitalina; Cooke, Ira; Talbo, Gert; Lopez, Angel F; Bonder, Claudine S

    2012-01-01

    Circulating vascular progenitor cells contribute to the pathological vasculogenesis of cancer whilst on the other hand offer much promise in therapeutic revascularization in post-occlusion intervention in cardiovascular disease. However, their characterization has been hampered by the many variables to produce them as well as their described phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Herein we have isolated, enriched for and then characterized a human umbilical cord blood derived CD133(+) population of non-adherent endothelial forming cells (naEFCs) which expressed the hematopoietic progenitor cell markers (CD133, CD34, CD117, CD90 and CD38) together with mature endothelial cell markers (VEGFR2, CD144 and CD31). These cells also expressed low levels of CD45 but did not express the lymphoid markers (CD3, CD4, CD8) or myeloid markers (CD11b and CD14) which distinguishes them from 'early' endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional studies demonstrated that these naEFCs (i) bound Ulex europaeus lectin, (ii) demonstrated acetylated-low density lipoprotein uptake, (iii) increased vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) surface expression in response to tumor necrosis factor and (iv) in co-culture with mature endothelial cells increased the number of tubes, tubule branching and loops in a 3-dimensional in vitro matrix. More importantly, naEFCs placed in vivo generated new lumen containing vasculature lined by CD144 expressing human endothelial cells (ECs). Extensive genomic and proteomic analyses of the naEFCs showed that intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-3 is expressed on their cell surface but not on mature endothelial cells. Furthermore, functional analysis demonstrated that ICAM-3 mediated the rolling and adhesive events of the naEFCs under shear stress. We suggest that the distinct population of naEFCs identified and characterized here represents a new valuable therapeutic target to control aberrant vasculogenesis.

  14. SURVIVIN as a marker for quiescent-breast cancer stem cells-An intermediate, adherent, pre-requisite phase of breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharth, Sumit; Das, Sarita; Nayak, Anmada; Kundu, Chanakya Nath

    2016-10-01

    Cancer stem cells drive the metastatic cascade by undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and again mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET). Using multiple breast cancer cell lines including cigarette smoke induced breast cancer cells and tumor derived primary cells from patient sample; we developed a breast cancer metastasis model and reported the existence of an adherent, distinct pre-metastatic phase, quiescent-breast cancer stem cells (Q-BCSCs) prior to attaining an EMT. SURVIVIN was found to be expressed in Q-BCSCs. Time dependant biphasic expression of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs reveals that Q-BCSCs is a pre-metastatic phase distinct from both epithelial and mesenchymal counterparts. SURVIVIN favours metastasis and up-regulates WNT/β-CATENIN pathway in a PI3 K/AKT-dependant manner for self-renewal. Knockdown of SURVIVIN in Q-BCSCs lost the metastatic property of cells by inhibiting invasion, EMT-MET, PI3 K/AKT/WNT cascade, and induced apoptosis. Thus, our data suggest the existence of a novel pre-metastatic phase (Q-BCSCs) before EMT and SURVIVIN acts as a marker for Quiescent-BCSCs.

  15. Confirmation of positive antibody screens by solid-phase red cell adherence assay using a tube technique method with polyethylene glycol enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, R R; Lake, M; Velasquez, N; Prichard, A

    2001-01-01

    Our blood bank routinely screens donors for antibodies using a solid-phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay. Positive results are then confirmed using a tube technique with polyethylene glycol (PEG) enhancement due to reported higher specificity than with SPRCA. Over a 5-month period, 49,084 donor serum or plasma samples were tested using the SPRCA assay. Further identification of positive samples was performed using a PEG enhancement method. Testing was performed with strict adherence to the manufacturers' inserts. Of 49,084 samples, 313 (0.64%) were positive by the SPRCA assay. Of these, 99 (31.6%) samples remained positive when tested with PEG enhancement. The remaining 214 (68.4%) were negative, giving specificity for the SPRCA assay of 99.6 percent (48,985/ 49,199). We report a high specificity for antibody screening using the SPRCA assay. However, it is cost effective to perform a confirmatory tube test with PEG enhancement because 214 SPRCA assay samples were interpreted as having a negative antibody screen, thus allowing the release of valuable blood components for transfusion.

  16. Layer-by-Layer Bioprinting of Stem Cells for Retinal Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    encapsulating retinal stem cells 3) Significant results or key outcomes: a) For the synthesis of HA-GM, 200 mg of hyaluronic acid (Lifecore Biomedical , MN...hydrogel, we added another printing material, methacrylated gelatin, GleMa, into the HA-GM hydrogel. As the hydrolysis product of collagen , gelatin...Research: Nano/Femtosecond Laser Processing of Gas Impregnated Polymer for Biomedical Applications The major goals of this project are to develop a micro

  17. Layer-by-Layer Bioprinting of Stem Cells for Retinal Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Shaochen Chen CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 REPORT DATE: December 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Final...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of California SME 245B, MC 0448 9500...are mostly surrounded by collagen while the hfRPCs reside in a hyaluronic acid environment. To mimic the collagen ECM, the hRPE cells are

  18. Interaction of S-layer proteins of Lactobacillus kefir with model membranes and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Axel; Delfederico, Lucrecia; Santos, Nuno Correia; Disalvo, E Anibal; Semorile, Liliana

    2017-01-12

    In previous works, it was shown that S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus kefir were able to recrystallize and stabilize liposomes, this feature reveling a great potential for developing liposomal-based carriers. Despite previous studies on this subject are important milestones, a number of questions remain unanswered; In this context, the feasibility of S-layer proteins as a biomaterial for drug delivery was evaluated in this work. First, S-layer proteins were fully characterized by Electron microscopy, 2D-electrophoresis, and HPAEC-PAD. Afterward, interactions of S-layer proteins with model lipid membranes were evaluated, showing that proteins adsorb to the lipid surface following a non-fickean or anomalous diffusion, when positively charged lipid were employed, suggesting that electrostatic interaction is a key factor in the recrystallization process on these proteins. Finally, the interaction of S-layer coated liposomes with CACO-2 cell line was assessed, First cytotoxicity of formulations was tested showing noncytotoxic effects in S-layer coated vesicles. Second, by flow cytometry, it was observed an increased ability to transfer cargo molecules into CACO-2 cells from S-layer coated liposomes in comparison to control ones. All data put together, supporting the idea that a combination of adhesive properties of S-layer proteins concomitant with higher stability of S-layer coated liposomes represents an exciting starting point in the development of new drug carriers.

  19. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  20. Application of a self-supporting microporous layer to gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Heo, Yun; Ishida, Masayoshi; Nakano, Akihiro; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo

    2017-02-01

    The intrinsic effect of properties of a self-supporting microporous layer (MPL) on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is identified. First, a self-supporting MPL is fabricated and applied to a gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC, when the GDL is either an integrated sample composed of a gas diffusion backing (GDB, i.e., carbon paper) combined with MPL or a sample with only MPL. Cell performance tests reveal that, the same as the MPL fabricated by the coating method, the self-supporting MPL on the GDB improves the cell performance at high current density. Furthermore, the GDL composed only of the MPL (i.e., GDB-free GDL) shows better performance than does the integrated GDB/MPL GDL. These results along with literature data strongly suggest that the low thermal conductivity of MPL induces a high temperature throughout the GDL, and thus vapor diffusion is dominant in the transport of product water through the MPL.

  1. Dendritic Target Region-Specific Formation of Synapses Between Excitatory Layer 4 Neurons and Layer 6 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guanxiao; Feldmeyer, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Excitatory connections between neocortical layer 4 (L4) and L6 are part of the corticothalamic feedback microcircuitry. Here we studied the intracortical element of this feedback loop, the L4 spiny neuron-to-L6 pyramidal cell connection. We found that the distribution of synapses onto both putative corticothalamic (CT) and corticocortical (CC) L6 pyramidal cells (PCs) depends on the presynaptic L4 neuron type but is independent of the postsynaptic L6 PC type. L4 spiny stellate cells establish synapses on distal apical tuft dendrites of L6 PCs and elicit slow unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (uEPSPs) in L6 somata. In contrast, the majority of L4 star pyramidal neurons target basal and proximal apical oblique dendrites of L6 PCs and show fast uEPSPs. Compartmental modeling suggests that the slow uEPSP time course is primarily the result of dendritic filtering. This suggests that the dendritic target specificity of the 2 L4 spiny neuron types is due to their different axonal projection patterns across cortical layers. The preferential dendritic targeting by different L4 neuron types may facilitate the generation of dendritic Ca(2+) or Na(+) action potentials in L6 PCs; this could play a role in synaptic gain modulation in the corticothalamic pathway.

  2. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H.; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S. White, Matthew.; S. Sariciftci, Niyazi.; Scharber, Markus C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium–tin–oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor–acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  3. Double-layered ZnO nanostructures for efficient perovskite solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    To date, a single layer of TiO2 or ZnO has been the most successful implementations of any electron transport layer (ETL) in solution-processed perovskite solar cells. In a quest to improve the ETL, we explore a new nanostructured double-layer ZnO film for mesoscopic perovskite-based thin film photovoltaics. This approach yields a maximum power conversion efficiency of 10.35%, which we attribute to the morphology of oxide layer and to faster electron transport. The successful implementation of the low-temperature hydrothermally processed double-layer ZnO film as ETL in perovskite solar cells highlights the opportunities to further improve the efficiencies by focusing on the ETL in this rapidly developing field. This journal is

  4. Morphologically controlled fuel cell transport layers enabled via electrospun carbon nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Devin; Mérida, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and performance of carbon nanofibre substrates for PEM fuel cell transport layer applications. Electrospinning is used for fabrication; by manipulation of spinning properties, morphological control is demonstrated in the product. Our application of the technology and it's manipulability to PEMFC transport layers constitutes a novel approach to the manufacture of such layers. Ex-situ morphology, electrical resistance and water contact angles are reported in additional to in-situ hydrogen/air fuel cell performance. Electrospun transport layers are compared directly to established commercial products in a cathode PTL role. The electrospun transport layers demonstrate approximately 85% of the commercial limiting current density, swifter water transport characteristics, and markedly more stable operating points.

  5. Recombination barrier layers in solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2012-06-01

    By replacing the dye in the dye-sensitized solar cell design with semiconductor quantum dots as the light-absorbing material, solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (ss-QDSSCs) were fabricated. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Aluminum oxide recombination barrier layers were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at the TiO2/hole-conductor interface. For low numbers of ALD cycles, the Al2O3 barrier layer increased open circuit voltage, causing an increase in device efficiency. For thicker Al2O3 barrier layers, photocurrent decreased substantially, leading to a decrease in device efficiency. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. The effect of interfacial layers on charge transport in organic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbuyise, Xolani G.; Tonui, Patrick; Mola, Genene Tessema, E-mail: mola@ukzn.ac.za

    2016-09-01

    The effect of interfacial buffer layers in organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) whose active layer is composed of poly(3 hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend was studied. The electrical properties of OPV devices produced with and without interfacial layers are compared and discussed in terms of measured parameters of the cells. The charge transport properties showed significant difference on the mobility and activation factor between the two types of device structures. The life time measurements in the unprotected conditions are also presented and discussed.

  7. Comparison of different structures of niobium oxide blocking layer for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jong Sung

    2014-08-01

    In this study, four different types of Nb2O5 thin layers were prepared using sol-gel process to improve energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Nb2O5 layer was prepared on the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) layer, TiO2 electrode layer, and inside of TiO2 layer, respectively. The Nb2O5 layer was used to reduce the recombination of photo induced electrons and holes. The DSSCs were assembled with platinum (Pt) coated counter electrode, ruthenium dye, and iodine based electrolyte. The photocurrent-voltage (I-V) characteristics of DSSCs with different types of Nb2O5 were studied. The efficiency depends not only on the structure of DSSCs but also on the initial compositions for the preparation of Nb2O5.

  8. Enhancement of device performance of organic solar cells by an interfacial perylene derivative layer

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Inho

    2010-05-26

    We report that device performance of organic solar cells consisting of zinc phthalocyanine and fullerene (C60) can be enhanced by insertion of a perylene derivative interfacial layer between fullerene and bathocuproine (BCP) exciton blocking layer (EBL). The morphology of the BCP is influenced by the underlying N,N′-dihexyl-perylene-3,4,9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PTCDI-C6), which promotes migration of the cathode metal into the BCP layer. Insertion of a PTCDI-C6 layer between fullerene and BCP layers enhances the power conversion efficiency to 2.5%, an improvement of 32% over devices without PTCDI-C6 layer. The enhancement in device performance by insertion of PTCDI-C6 is attributed to a reduction in series resistance due to promoted metal migration into BCP and optimized optical interference effects in multilayered devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  10. Atomically Thin-Layered Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Eric; Kim, Ki Seok; Yeom, Geun Young; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2017-02-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are becoming significant because of their interesting semiconducting and photonic properties. In particular, TMDs such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), tungsten disulfide (WS2), tungsten diselenide (WSe2), titanium disulfide (TiS2), tantalum sulfide (TaS2), and niobium selenide (NbSe2) are increasingly attracting attention for their applications in solar cell devices. In this review, we give a brief introduction to TMDs with a focus on MoS2; and thereafter, emphasize the role of atomically thin MoS2 layers in fabricating solar cell devices, including bulk-heterojunction, organic, and perovskites-based solar cells. Layered MoS2 has been used as the hole-transport layer (HTL), electron-transport layer (ETL), interfacial layer, and protective layer in fabricating heterojunction solar cells. The trilayer graphene/MoS2/n-Si solar cell devices exhibit a power-conversion efficiency of 11.1%. The effects of plasma and chemical doping on the photovoltaic performance of MoS2 solar cells have been analyzed. After doping and electrical gating, a power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.03% has been observed for the MoS2/h-BN/GaAs heterostructure solar cells. The MoS2-containing perovskites-based solar cells show a PCE as high as 13.3%. The PCE of MoS2-based organic solar cells exceeds 8.40%. The stability of MoS2 solar cells measured under ambient conditions and light illumination has been discussed. The MoS2-based materials show a great potential for solar cell devices along with high PCE; however, in this connection, their long-term environmental stability is also of equal importance for commercial applications.

  11. Hafnium metallocene compounds used as cathode interfacial layers for enhanced electron transfer in organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keunhee; Oh, Seungsik; Jung, Donggeun; Chae, Heeyeop; Kim, Hyoungsub; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2012-01-09

    We have used hafnium metallocene compounds as cathode interfacial layers for organic solar cells [OSCs]. A metallocene compound consists of a transition metal and two cyclopentadienyl ligands coordinated in a sandwich structure. For the fabrication of the OSCs, poly[3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene]:poly(styrene sulfonate), poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) + 66-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester, bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl)hafnium(IV) dichloride, and aluminum were deposited as a hole transport layer, an active layer, a cathode interfacial layer, and a cathode, respectively. The hafnium metallocene compound cathode interfacial layer improved the performance of OSCs compared to that of OSCs without the interfacial layer. The current density-voltage characteristics of OSCs with an interfacial layer thickness of 0.7 nm and of those without an interfacial layer showed power conversion efficiency [PCE] values of 2.96% and 2.34%, respectively, under an illumination condition of 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5). It is thought that a cathode interfacial layer of an appropriate thickness enhances the electron transfer between the active layer and the cathode, and thus increases the PCE of the OSCs.

  12. Au Nanoparticles as Interfacial Layer for CdS Quantum Dot-sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells based on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO/Au/TiO2/CdS photoanode and polysulfide electrolyte are fabricated. Au nanoparticles (NPs as interfacial layer between FTO and TiO2 layer are dip-coated on FTO surface. The structure, morphology and impedance of the photoanodes and the photovoltaic performance of the cells are investigated. A power conversion efficiency of 1.62% has been obtained for FTO/Au/TiO2/CdS cell, which is about 88% higher than that for FTO/TiO2/CdS cell (0.86%. The easier transport of excited electron and the suppression of charge recombination in the photoanode due to the introduction of Au NP layer should be responsible for the performance enhancement of the cell.

  13. Dielectric relaxation behavior of nematic liquid crystal cell using β-cyclodextrin as an alignment layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Sahraoui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we report the dielectric properties of a symmetric Nematic Liquid Crystal (NLC cell using Beta Cyclodextrins (β-CD as alignment layers. These layers were deposited onto Indium Tin Oxide (ITO surface by thermal evaporation and then characterized using contact angle measurement. This revealed a hydrophilic character attributed to the presence of hydroxyl groups. Morphological study was carried out by Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM. The dynamic impedance study of the Liquid Crystal (LC cell in a wide frequency range from 1mHz to 13MHz was reported. It was found that the β-CD alignment layer had a blocking effect on the NLC cell at a high frequency range. We also report the relaxation mechanism of NLC cell which is modeled by an appropriate equivalent circuit in order to understand the electrical properties of the liquid crystal cell and to investigate the processes taking place at different interfaces. 

  14. Efficiency limit of solar cells with index-near-zero photon management layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, A.P.

    2017-05-15

    As single-junction solar cells saturate in efficiency, the topic of photon management has generated interest in the long running quest to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. While a mirror applied to the backside of a solar cell has proven its benefit as a photon management layer in record setting devices that fall within the Shockley-Queisser limit, it has been proposed that a new type of photon management layer – a transparent index-near-zero (INZ) material – applied to the top surface of a solar cell will allow it to finally exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. INZ layers – and their influence on solar cell current density, open circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency – are analyzed. By considering the principle of detailed balance, Snell's law, and the role that entropy plays, it is shown that INZ layers do not allow a solar cell to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. At best, a solar cell with an INZ layer would have the same Shockley-Queisser limiting efficiency as a conventional solar cell tracked under a direct solar spectrum (direct beam radiation only), yet would suffer diminished efficiency under a global solar spectrum (direct beam plus diffuse light) due to the presence of an external critical acceptance angle.

  15. Efficiency limit of solar cells with index-near-zero photon management layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    As single-junction solar cells saturate in efficiency, the topic of photon management has generated interest in the long running quest to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. While a mirror applied to the backside of a solar cell has proven its benefit as a photon management layer in record setting devices that fall within the Shockley-Queisser limit, it has been proposed that a new type of photon management layer - a transparent index-near-zero (INZ) material - applied to the top surface of a solar cell will allow it to finally exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. INZ layers - and their influence on solar cell current density, open circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency - are analyzed. By considering the principle of detailed balance, Snell's law, and the role that entropy plays, it is shown that INZ layers do not allow a solar cell to exceed the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. At best, a solar cell with an INZ layer would have the same Shockley-Queisser limiting efficiency as a conventional solar cell tracked under a direct solar spectrum (direct beam radiation only), yet would suffer diminished efficiency under a global solar spectrum (direct beam plus diffuse light) due to the presence of an external critical acceptance angle.

  16. Organic solar cells: an overview focusing on active layer morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Travis L; Venkataraman, D

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells constructed of organic materials are becoming increasingly efficient due to the discovery of the bulk heterojunction concept. This review provides an overview of organic solar cells. Topics covered include: a brief history of organic solar cell development; device construction, definitions, and characteristics; and heterojunction morphology and its relation to device efficiency in conjugated polymer/fullerene systems. The aim of this article is to show that researchers are developing a better understanding of how material structure relates to function and that they are applying this knowledge to build more efficient light-harvesting devices.

  17. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.

  18. A strategic buffer layer of polythiophene enhances the efficiency of bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hung-Yu; Huang, Jen-Hsien; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2010-05-01

    We have developed polymer solar cells featuring a buffer layer of polythiophene (PT) sandwiched between the active layer and the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layer. We attribute the improvement in power conversion efficiency of these polymer solar cells, relative to that of those based on poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM), to a reduction in the degree of carrier recombination at the junction interface. Because the conductivity and the energy level of PT can be tuned simply by applying a bias to it in an electrolytic solution, we also investigated the effect of the energy level on the devices' performances. The power conversion efficiency of a solar cell containing a PT buffer layer reached 4.18% under AM 1.5 G irradiation (100 mW/cm(2)).

  19. Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli strain C1845 induces neutrophil extracellular traps that kill bacteria and damage human enterocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Turbica, Isabelle; Dufour, Guillaume; Semiramoth, Nicolas; Gleizes, Aude; Gorges, Roseline; Beau, Isabelle; Servin, Alain L; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sandré, Catherine; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2012-05-01

    We recently documented the neutrophil response to enterovirulent diffusely adherent Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr fimbriae (Afa/Dr DAEC), using the human myeloid cell line PLB-985 differentiated into fully mature neutrophils. Upon activation, particularly during infections, neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), composed of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides, histones, and proteases, which entrap and kill pathogens. Here, using fluorescence microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy, we observed NET production by PLB-985 cells infected with the Afa/Dr wild-type (WT) E. coli strain C1845. We found that these NETs were able to capture, immobilize, and kill WT C1845 bacteria. We also developed a coculture model of human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cells and PLB-985 cells previously treated with WT C1845 and found, for the first time, that the F-actin cytoskeleton of enterocyte-like cells is damaged in the presence of bacterium-induced NETs and that this deleterious effect is prevented by inhibition of protease release. These findings provide new insights into the neutrophil response to bacterial infection via the production of bactericidal NETs and suggest that NETs may damage the intestinal epithelium, particularly in situations such as inflammatory bowel diseases.

  20. Comparative analysis of adherence, viability, proliferation and morphology of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells seeded on different titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollweck, Trixi; Marschmann, Michaela; Hartmann, Isabel; Akra, Bassil; Meiser, Bruno; Reichart, Bruno; Eissner, Guenther [Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich, E-mail: Guenther.Eissner@med.uni-muenchen.d [Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Umbilical cord tissue comprises an attractive new source for mesenchymal stem cells. Umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) exhibit self-renewal, multipotency and immunological naivity, and they can be obtained without medical intervention. The transfer of UCMSC to the ischemic region of the heart may have a favorable impact on tissue regeneration. Benefit from typical cell delivery by injection to the infarcted area is often limited due to poor cell retention and survival. Another route of administration is to use populated scaffolds implanted into the infarcted zone. In this paper, the seeding efficiency of UCMSC on uncoated and titanium-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) scaffolds with different surface structures was determined. Dualmesh (registered) (DM) offers a corduroy-like surface in contrast to the comparatively planar surface of cardiovascular patch (CVP). The investigation of adherence, viability and proliferation of UCMSC demonstrates that titanium-coated scaffolds are superior to uncoated scaffolds, independent of the surface structure. Microscopic images reveal spherical UCMSC seeded on uncoated scaffolds. In contrast, UCMSC on titanium-coated scaffolds display their characteristic spindle-shaped morphology and a homogeneous coverage of CVP. In summary, titanium coating of clinically approved CVP enhances the retention of UCMSC and thus offers a potential cell delivery system for the repair of the damaged myocardium.

  1. Fabrication of nanofibrous scaffold using a PLA and hagfish thread keratin composite; its effect on cell adherence, growth, and osteoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom-Su; Park, Ko Eun; Park, Won Ho; Lee, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Electrospinning is a useful method for the production of nanofibrous scaffolds in the field of tissue engineering. Keratin has been used as a biomaterial for electrospinning and can be used in a variety of biomedical applications because it is a natural protein, giving it the ability to improve cell affinity of scaffolds. In this study, keratin was extracted from hagfish slime thread (H-keratin) and blended with polylactic acid (PLA) polymer solution to construct a nanofibrous scaffold. Wool keratin (W-keratin) was used as a control for the comparison of morphological, physical, and biological properties. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of both W-keratin and H-keratin in the electrospun PLA/keratin. Observations with a scanning electron microscope revealed that PLA, PLA/W-keratin, and PLA/H-keratin had similar average diameters (~800 nm). Cell attachment experiments showed that MG-63 cells adhered more rapidly and spread better onto PLA/H-keratin than onto the pure PLA or PLA/W-keratin. Cell proliferation assay, DNA content, live/dead, and alkaline phosphatase activity assays showed that PLA/H-keratin scaffolds could accelerate the viability, proliferation, and osteogenesis of MG-63 cells relative to pure PLA or PLA/W-keratin nanofibrous scaffolds. These findings suggest that H-keratin can improve cellular attraction and has great potential to be used as a biomaterial in bone tissue engineering.

  2. Computational modeling of adherent cell growth in a hollow-fiber membrane bioreactor for large-scale 3-D bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Behzadmehr, Amin; Doillon, Charles J; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2012-09-01

    The use of hollow-fiber membrane bioreactors (HFMBs) has been proposed for three-dimensional bone tissue growth at the clinical scale. However, to achieve an efficient HFMB design, the relationship between cell growth and environmental conditions must be determined. Therefore, in this work, a dynamic double-porous media model was developed to determine nutrient-dependent cell growth for bone tissue formation in a HFMB. The whole hollow-fiber scaffold within the bioreactor was treated as a porous domain in this model. The domain consisted of two interpenetrating porous regions, including a porous lumen region available for fluid flow and a porous extracapillary space filled with a collagen gel that contained adherent cells for promoting long-term growth into tissue-like mass. The governing equations were solved numerically and the model was validated using previously published experimental results. The contributions of several bioreactor design and process parameters to the performance of the bioreactor were studied. The results demonstrated that the process and design parameters of the HFMB significantly affect nutrient transport and thus cell behavior over a long period of culture. The approach presented here can be applied to any cell type and used to develop tissue engineering hollow-fiber scaffolds.

  3. Enhanced PC12 cells proliferation with self-assembled S-layer proteins scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babolmorad, Ghazal; Emtiazi, Giti; Ghaedi, Kamran; Jodeiri, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Finding 3D biocompatible and biodegradable scaffold is important in tissue engineering which plays a critical role in transplanting methods. Several biomaterials, such as poly-L-lactide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), poly(L-lactic acid)/poly(lactide-co-glycolide), alginate, collagen gel, and so on, have been applied as scaffold to culture cells in 3D environment. The most significant problem of the synthetic materials is lack of biocompatibility and bioactivity. Herein, self assemble S-layer proteins are used as a scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. For this purpose, S-layer protein was extracted from Bacillus coagulans HN68. Then, extracted S-layer was studied by SDS page and AFM. Using MTS test and Immunochemistry staining methods, the effect of self assembled S-layer scaffold on proliferation of PC12 cells was assayed. This study provides that S-layer could be an appropriate scaffold for PC12 cells culturing. Even though poly-L-ornithine is a common scaffold in PC12 cells culturing, the results show that (PLO)/S-layer is more protective.

  4. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  5. Topographical and mechanical characterization of living eukaryotic cells on opaque substrates: development of a general procedure and its application to the study of non-adherent lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Rafael; Cruces, Julia; Arroyo-Hernández, María; Marí-Buyé, Núria; De la Fuente, Mónica; Plaza, Gustavo R; Elices, Manuel; Pérez-Rigueiro, José; Guinea, Gustavo V

    2015-03-19

    The mechanical behavior of living murine T-lymphocytes was assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A robust experimental procedure was developed to overcome some features of lymphocytes, in particular their spherical shape and non-adherent character. The procedure included the immobilization of the lymphocytes on amine-functionalized substrates, the use of hydrodynamic effects on the deflection of the AFM cantilever to monitor the approaching, and the use of the jumping mode for obtaining the images. Indentation curves were analyzed according to Hertz's model for contact mechanics. The calculated values of the elastic modulus are consistent both when considering the results obtained from a single lymphocyte and when comparing the curves recorded from cells of different specimens.

  6. Atomic Layer Deposited Catalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Anne-Charlotte Elisabeth Birgitta

    catalyst toward the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). In the work described in this PhD dissertation, two series of Pt-Ru ALD catalysts supported on nitrogen-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have been evaluated toward the CO oxidation and MOR at room temperature in a three...... for the realization of such tiny devices. It is a mature technology, suitable for mass production, where versatile structuring is available at the micro and nano regime. Carbon black supported catalysts synthesized by wet chemistry methods are not readily applicable for standard microfabrication techniques. Atomic...... layer deposition (ALD), on the other hand, is a highly suitable and still relatively unexplored approach for the synthesis of noble metal catalysts. It is a vapor phase growth method, primarily used to deposit thin lms. ALD is based on self-limiting chemical reactions of alternately injected precursors...

  7. Different characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different layers of full term placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Chul-Won; Kim, Jin A; Heo, Jin-Chul; Han, Woo-Jung; Oh, Soo-Young; Choi, Suk-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Background The placenta is a very attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine due to readily availability, non-invasive acquisition, and avoidance of ethical issues. Isolating MSCs from parts of placenta tissue has obtained growing interest because they are assumed to exhibit different proliferation and differentiation potentials due to complex structures and functions of the placenta. The objective of this study was to isolate MSCs from different parts of the placenta and compare their characteristics. Methods Placenta was divided into amniotic epithelium (AE), amniotic membrane (AM), chorionic membrane (CM), chorionic villi (CV), chorionic trophoblast without villi (CT-V), decidua (DC), and whole placenta (Pla). Cells isolated from each layer were subjected to analyses for their morphology, proliferation ability, surface markers, and multi-lineage differentiation potential. MSCs were isolated from all placental layers and their characteristics were compared. Findings Surface antigen phenotype, morphology, and differentiation characteristics of cells from all layers indicated that they exhibited properties of MSCs. MSCs from different placental layers had different proliferation rates and differentiation potentials. MSCs from CM, CT-V, CV, and DC had better population doubling time and multi-lineage differentiation potentials compared to those from other layers. Conclusions Our results indicate that MSCs with different characteristics can be isolated from all layers of term placenta. These finding suggest that it is necessary to appropriately select MSCs from different placental layers for successful and consistent outcomes in clinical applications. PMID:28225815

  8. DBD atmospheric plasma-modified, electrospun, layer-by-layer polymeric scaffolds for L929 fibroblast cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surucu, Seda; Turkoglu Sasmazel, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a study related to atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) Ar + O2 and Ar + N2 plasma modifications to alter surface properties of 3D PCL/Chitosan/PCL layer-by-layer hybrid scaffolds and to improve mouse fibroblast (L929 ATCC CCL-1) cell attachment, proliferation, and growth. The scaffolds were fabricated using electrospinning technique and each layer was electrospun sequentially on top of the other. The surface modifications were performed with an atmospheric pressure DBD plasma under different gas flow rates (50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 sccm) and for different modification times (0.5-7 min), and then the chemical and topographical characterizations of the modified samples were done by contact angle (CA) measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The samples modified with Ar + O2 plasma for 1 min under 70 cm(3)/min O2 flow rate (71.077° ± 3.578) showed a 18.83% decrease compare to unmodified samples' CA value (84.463° ± 3.864). Comparing with unmodified samples, the average fiber diameter values for plasma-modified samples by Ar + O2 (1 min 70 sccm) and Ar + N2 (40 s 70 sccm) increased 40.756 and 54.295%, respectively. Additionally, the average inter-fiber pore size values exhibited decrease of 37.699 and 48.463% for the same Ar + O2 and Ar + N2 plasma-modified samples, respectively, compare to unmodified samples. Biocompatibility performance was determined with MTT assay, fluorescence, Giemsa, and confocal imaging as well as SEM. The results showed that Ar + O2-based plasma modification increased the hydrophilicity and oxygen functionality of the surface, thus affecting the cell viability and proliferation on/within scaffolds.

  9. Flame-made ultra-porous TiO2 layers for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio Mayon, Yahuitl; Duong, The; Nasiri, Noushin; White, Thomas P.; Tricoli, Antonio; Catchpole, Kylie R.

    2016-12-01

    We report methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells with an ultra-porous TiO2 electron transport layer fabricated using sequential flame aerosol and atomic layer depositions of porous and compact TiO2 layers. Flame aerosol pyrolysis allows rapid deposition of nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 layers that could be easily scaled-up for high-throughput low-cost industrial solar cell production. An efficiency of 13.7% was achieved with a flame-made nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 electrode that was coated with a compact 2 nm TiO2 layer. This demonstrates that MAPbI3 solar cells with a flame-made porous TiO2 layer can have a comparable efficiency to that of the control MAPbI3 solar cell with the well-established spin-coated porous TiO2 layer. The combination of flame aerosol and atomic layer deposition provides precise control of the TiO2 porosity. Notably, the porosity of the as-deposited flame-made TiO2 layers was 97% which was then fine-tuned down to 87%, 56% and 35% by varying the thickness of the subsequent compact TiO2 coating step. The effects of the decrease in porosity on the device performance are discussed. It is also shown that MAPbI3 easily infiltrates into the flame-made porous TiO2 nanostructure thanks to their high porosity and large pore size.

  10. Efficient small-molecule organic solar cells incorporating a doped buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Dei-Wei [Department of aviation and Communication Electronics, Air Force Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kan-Lin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Fortune Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chien-Jung, E-mail: chien@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Yao-Jen [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Nanzih, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ray; Meen, Teen-Hang [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Formosa University, Hu-Wei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-01

    Small-molecule organic solar cells (OSCs) with an optimized structure of indium tin oxide/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) (10 nm)/CuPc: fullerene (C{sub 60}) mixed (20 nm)/C{sub 60} (20 nm)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) (5 nm)/Ag were fabricated. In this study, the cesium carbonate-doped BPhen (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen) was adopted as the buffer layer to enhance the efficiency of the OSCs. The photovoltaic parameters of the OSCs, such as the short-circuit current density and fill factor, depend on the doping concentration of Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in the BPhen layer. The cell with a Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen (1:4) cathode buffer layer exhibits a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.51%, compared to 3.37% for the device with the pristine BPhen layer. The enhancement of PCE was attributed to the energy-level alignment between the C{sub 60} layer and the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layer. In addition, the characterization measured using atomic force microscopy shows that the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}:BPhen layers have smoother surfaces. - Highlight: • Cs2CO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) cathode buffer layer. • Cs2CO3:BPhen layer with different ratios affects organic solar cells performance. • Cell with 1:4 (Cs2CO3:BPhen) ratio shows 3.51% power conversion efficiency.

  11. Flame-made ultra-porous TiO2 layers for perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayon, Yahuitl Osorio; Duong, The; Nasiri, Noushin; White, Thomas P; Tricoli, Antonio; Catchpole, Kylie R

    2016-12-16

    We report methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells with an ultra-porous TiO2 electron transport layer fabricated using sequential flame aerosol and atomic layer depositions of porous and compact TiO2 layers. Flame aerosol pyrolysis allows rapid deposition of nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 layers that could be easily scaled-up for high-throughput low-cost industrial solar cell production. An efficiency of 13.7% was achieved with a flame-made nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 electrode that was coated with a compact 2 nm TiO2 layer. This demonstrates that MAPbI3 solar cells with a flame-made porous TiO2 layer can have a comparable efficiency to that of the control MAPbI3 solar cell with the well-established spin-coated porous TiO2 layer. The combination of flame aerosol and atomic layer deposition provides precise control of the TiO2 porosity. Notably, the porosity of the as-deposited flame-made TiO2 layers was 97% which was then fine-tuned down to 87%, 56% and 35% by varying the thickness of the subsequent compact TiO2 coating step. The effects of the decrease in porosity on the device performance are discussed. It is also shown that MAPbI3 easily infiltrates into the flame-made porous TiO2 nanostructure thanks to their high porosity and large pore size.

  12. Efficient Compact-Layer-Free, Hole-Conductor-Free, Fully Printable Mesoscopic Perovskite Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xixi; Xiong, Yuli; Mei, Anyi; Rong, Yaoguang; Hu, Yue; Hong, Li; Jin, Yingxia; Liu, Qingju; Han, Hongwei

    2016-10-05

    A compact-layer-free, hole-conductor-free, fully printable mesoscopic perovskite solar cell presents a power conversion efficiency of over 13%, which is comparable to that of the device with a TiO2 compact layer. The different wettability of the perovskite precursor solution on the surface of FTO and TiO2 possesses a significant effect on realizing efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cell. This result shows a promising future in printable solar cells by further simplifying the fabrication process and lowering the preparation costs.

  13. Characterization of macrophage-like cells in the external layers of human small and large intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    -DR-positive (expressing the MHC class-II antigen), in contrast to macrophage-like cells in the subserosa and submucosa. Macrophage-like cells in the external muscle layer were mostly acid phosphatase-negative, and at the electron-microscopic level they were found to have features of macrophages: primary lysosomes, coated...... vesicles and pits. However, very few secondary lysosomes were present. Birbeck granules were not observed. It is concluded that in the external muscle layer of human small and large intestine numerous macrophages of a special type are present. It is discussed whether this cell type plays a role...

  14. Efficient Light Harvester Layer Prepared by Solid/Mist Interface Reaction for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiang; Li, Hongcui; Wu, Wenyi; Li, Yanhua; Fei, Dehou; Gao, Chunxiao; Liu, Xizhe

    2015-08-12

    A solid/mist reaction method is developed to produce well-crystallized light harvester layers without pinhole defects for perovskite solar cells. The reaction based on mist precursor can be facilely operated with low process temperature. And it can effectively control the volume of CH3NH3I solution and the reaction temperature, which affect the quality of perovskite harvester layers and the performance of perovskite solar cells remarkably. Under optimized condition, the efficiencies of devices reach 16.2% with the average efficiency of 14.9%. The solid/mist reaction is also used to fabricate planar junction solar cells and a PCE of 14.9% is obtained.

  15. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  16. High efficiency CIGS and CIS cells with CVD ZnO buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, L.C.; Lei, W.; Addis, F.W. [Washington State Univ./Tri-Cities, Richland, WA (United States); Shafarman, W.N. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion; Contreras, M.A.; Ramanathan, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes investigations of CIS and CIGS solar cells with ZnO buffer layers. These studies are a result of a team effort between investigators at Washington State University (WSU), the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Cells with ZnO buffer layers were fabricated with both Siemens CIS and NREL CIGS substrates. An active area efficiency of 13.95% was achieved for a ZnO/CIGS cell. ZnO buffer layers are grown by reacting a zinc adduct with tetrahydrofuran using a two-step approach: growth of approximately 100 {angstrom} of ZnO at 250 C; and then growth of 500 to 700 {angstrom} of ZnO at 100 C. The high temperature step is necessary to achieve good cell performance. It appears that exposure of CIGS to hydrogen at 250 C may remove contaminants and/or passivate recombination centers on the surface and subsurface regions.

  17. Efficient InGaP/GaAs DJ solar cell with double back surface field layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Mishra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An effective and optimised BSF layer is an important layer in both single junction and multijunction solar cells. In this work the use of the double layer BSF for top cell with their varied thicknesses is investigated on GaInP/GaAs DJ solar cell using the computational numerical modelling TCAD tool Silvaco ATLAS. The detail photo-generation rates are determined. The major modelling stages are described and the simulation results are validated with published experimental data in order to describe the accuracy of our results produced. For this optimized cell structure, the maximum Jsc = 17.33 mA/cm2, Voc = 2.66 V, and fill factor (FF = 88.67% are obtained under AM1.5G illumination, exhibiting a maximum conversion efficiency of 34.52% (1 sun and 39.15% (1000 suns.

  18. Nanoparticle accumulation and transcytosis in brain endothelial cell layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dong; Raghnaill, Michelle Nic; Bramini, Mattia; Mahon, Eugene; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight juncti

  19. Homogeneous PCBM layers fabricated by horizontal-dip coating for efficient bilayer heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yoon Ho; Bae, In-Gon; Jeon, Hong Goo; Park, Byoungchoo

    2016-10-31

    We herein report a homogeneous [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer, produced by a solution process of horizontal-dipping (H-dipping) to improve the photovoltaic (PV) effects of bilayer heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) based on a bi-stacked poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) electron donor layer and a PCBM electron acceptor layer (P3HT/PCBM). It was shown that a homogeneous and uniform coating of PCBM layers in the P3HT/PCBM bilayer OPVs resulted in reliable and reproducible device performance. We recorded a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.89%, which is higher than that (2.00%) of bilayer OPVs with a spin-coated PCBM layer. Moreover, introducing surfactant additives of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) (PTE) into the homogeneous P3HT/PCBM PV layers resulted in the bilayer OPVs showing a PCE value of 3.95%, which is comparable to those of conventional bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) OPVs (3.57-4.13%) fabricated by conventional spin-coating. This improved device performance may be attributed to the selective collection of charge carriers at the interfaces among the active layers and electrodes due to the PTE additives as well as the homogeneous formation of the functional PCBM layer on the P3HT layer. Furthermore, H-dip-coated PCBM layers were deposited onto aligned P3HT layers by a rubbing technique, and the rubbed bilayer OPV exhibited improved in-plane anisotropic PV effects with PCE anisotropy as high as 1.81, which is also higher than that (1.54) of conventional rubbed BHJ OPVs. Our results suggest that the use of the H-dip-coating process in the fabrication of PCBM layers with the PTE interface-engineering additive could be of considerable interest to those seeking to improve PCBM-based opto-electrical organic thin-film devices.

  20. Human amniotic epithelial cells as feeder layer to derive and maintain human embryonic stem cells from poor-quality embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-González, Daniela; Vega-Hernández, Eva; Regalado-Hernández, Juan Carlos; De la Jara-Díaz, Julio Francisco; García-Castro, Irma Lydia; Molina-Hernández, Anayansi; Moreno-Verduzco, Elsa Romelia; Razo-Aguilera, Guadalupe; Flores-Herrera, Héctor; Portillo, Wendy; Díaz-Martínez, Néstor Emmanuel; García-López, Guadalupe; Díaz, Néstor Fabián

    2015-09-01

    Data from the literature suggest that human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines used in research do not genetically represent all human populations. The derivation of hESC through conventional methods involve the destruction of viable human embryos, as well the use of mouse embryonic fibroblasts as a feeder layer, which has several drawbacks. We obtained the hESC line (Amicqui-1) from poor-quality (PQ) embryos derived and maintained on human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC). This line displays a battery of markers of pluripotency and we demonstrated the capacity of these cells to produce derivates of the three germ layers.

  1. Human amniotic epithelial cells as feeder layer to derive and maintain human embryonic stem cells from poor-quality embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ávila-González

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature suggest that human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines used in research do not genetically represent all human populations. The derivation of hESC through conventional methods involve the destruction of viable human embryos, as well the use of mouse embryonic fibroblasts as a feeder layer, which has several drawbacks. We obtained the hESC line (Amicqui-1 from poor-quality (PQ embryos derived and maintained on human amniotic epithelial cells (hAEC. This line displays a battery of markers of pluripotency and we demonstrated the capacity of these cells to produce derivates of the three germ layers.

  2. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazek El-Atab

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO2 layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD steps. A threshold voltage (Vt shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V Vt shift, the memory with CrO2 layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO2 layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  3. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Nayfeh, Ammar [Institute Center for Microsystems – iMicro, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Masdar Institute of Science and Technology Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Okyay, Ali K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center and Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-11-15

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO{sub 2} layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V V{sub t} shift, the memory with CrO{sub 2} layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO{sub 2} layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  4. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Okyay, Ali K.; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2013-11-01

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO2 layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (Vt) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V Vt shift, the memory with CrO2 layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO2 layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  5. Internal transmission coefficient in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Internal transmission profile in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been explored theoretically. Photovoltaic device was constructed from graphene/Si heterojunction forming a multilayer stuck with Si as generation layer. The graphene/Si sheet was layered on ITO/glass wafer then coated by Al forming Ohmic contact with Si. Photon incident propagate from glass substrate to metal electrode and assumed that there is no transmission in Al layer. The wavelength range spectra used in this calculation was 200 – 1000 nm. It found that transmission intensity in the generation layer show non-linear behavior and partitioned by few areas which related with excitation process. According to this information, it may to optimize the photons absorption to create more excitation process by inserting appropriate material to enhance optical properties in certain wavelength spectra because of the exciton generation is strongly influenced by photon absorption.

  6. Design, fabrication and characterization of a double layer solid oxide fuel cell (DLFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiangying; Cai, Yixiao; Ji, Yuan; Yaqub, Azra; Zhu, Bin

    2016-11-01

    A double layer solid oxide fuel cell (DLSOFC) without using the electrolyte (layer) has been designed by integrating advantages of positive electrode material of lithium ion battery(LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2) and oxygen-permeable membranes material (trace amount cobalt incorporated terbium doped ceria, TDC + Co) based on the semiconductor physics principle. Instead of using an electrolyte layer, the depletion layer between the anode and cathode served as an electronic insulator to block the electrons but to maintain the electrolyte function for ionic transport. Thus the device with two layers can realize the function of SOFC and at the same time avoids the electronic short circuiting problem. Such novel DLFC showed good performance at low temperatures, for instance, a maximum power density of 230 mWcm-2 was achieved at 500 °C. The working principle of the new device is presented.

  7. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  8. Modeling Low-Platinum-Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-01-20

    The cathode catalyst layer within a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is the most complex and critical, yet least understood, layer within the cell. The exact method and equations for modeling this layer are still being revised and will be discussed in this paper, including a 0.8 reaction order, existence of Pt oxides, possible non-isopotential agglomerates, and the impact of a film resistance towards oxygen transport. While the former assumptions are relatively straightforward to understand and implement, the latter film resistance is shown to be critically important in explaining increased mass-transport limitations with low Pt-loading catalyst layers. Model results demonstrate agreement with experimental data that the increased oxygen flux and/or diffusion pathway through the film can substantially decrease performance. Also, some scale-up concepts from the agglomerate scale to the more macroscopic porous-electrode scale are discussed and the resulting optimization scenarios investigated.

  9. Heterogeneous carbon nano-tube window layer with higher sheet resistance improve the solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolson Singh, Khomdram; Jayenta Singh, Thokchom; Chettri, Dhanu; Sarkar, Subir kumar

    2017-06-01

    The heterogeneous Carbon Nano-Tube (CNT) layers deposited on the window surface of solar cells that allow better charge carrier collection was numerically analyzed and studied in modern TCAD tools. The quantum efficiency(EQE) as well as power conversion efficiency (η) were found to be improved significantly based on the light transmission capabilities of the CNT layer. Two CNT network models using experimental sheet resistance values of 75 Ω/□ and 128 Ω/□ as a top conducting layer in a GaAs solar cell were compared. It is found that the CNT networks allow for a greater area of charge collection as well as serve as a lower resistance path for charge carriers with minimum voltage loss to travel to the top contact. This model thus significantly improve the η up to 30% under AM0 with more than 90% EQE. The effect of cell width varying starting from 200 μm to 4000 μm with CNT top layer on Jsc, Voc and Pmax parameters were studied and found that these parameters remain almost constant irrespective of cell width. This work thus shown that a thin CNT top layers of lower sheet resistance with a higher light transmission can greatly improve the efficiency of solar cells.

  10. Graphene Quantum Dot Layers with Energy-Down-Shift Effect on Crystalline-Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung D; Park, Myung J; Kim, Do-Yeon; Kim, Soo M; Kang, Byungjun; Kim, Seongtak; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kang, Yoonmook; Yoon, Sam S; Hong, Byung H; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-09-02

    Graphene quantum dot (GQD) layers were deposited as an energy-down-shift layer on crystalline-silicon solar cell surfaces by kinetic spraying of GQD suspensions. A supersonic air jet was used to accelerate the GQDs onto the surfaces. Here, we report the coating results on a silicon substrate and the GQDs' application as an energy-down-shift layer in crystalline-silicon solar cells, which enhanced the power conversion efficiency (PCE). GQD layers deposited at nozzle scan speeds of 40, 30, 20, and 10 mm/s were evaluated after they were used to fabricate crystalline-silicon solar cells; the results indicate that GQDs play an important role in increasing the optical absorptivity of the cells. The short-circuit current density was enhanced by about 2.94% (0.9 mA/cm(2)) at 30 mm/s. Compared to a reference device without a GQD energy-down-shift layer, the PCE of p-type silicon solar cells was improved by 2.7% (0.4 percentage points).

  11. Simulating performance of solar cells with spectral downshifting layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: w.g.j.h.m.vansark@chem.uu.nl

    2008-08-30

    In order to estimate the performance of solar cells with downshifters under realistic irradiation conditions we used spectral distributions as they may be found outdoors. The spectral distributions were generated on a minutely basis by means of the spectrum simulation model SEDES2, using minutely measured data for global, direct, and diffuse irradiation from a Dutch meteorological station. Hourly aggregated spectra for a number of typical days (clear summer day, cloudy summer day, clear winter day, cloudy winter day) were used in modelling the output of the solar cell with and without downshifter. It was found that the simulated short current enhancement, which varies between about 7 and 23%, is linearly related with the average photon energy of the spectra.

  12. Towards lightweight and flexible high performance nanocrystalline silicon solar cells through light trapping and transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Zachary R.

    This thesis investigates ways to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells through the application of both novel nano-element array light trapping architectures and nickel oxide hole transport/electron blocking layers. Experimental results independently demonstrate a 22% enhancement in short circuit current density (JSC) resulting from a nano-element array light trapping architecture and a ˜23% enhancement in fill factor (FF) and ˜16% enhancement in open circuit voltage (VOC) resulting from a nickel oxide transport layer. In each case, the overall efficiency of the device employing the light trapping or transport layer was superior to that of the corresponding control device. Since the efficiency of a solar cell scales with the product of JSC, FF, and VOC, it follows that the results of this thesis suggest high performance thin film solar cells can be realized in the event light trapping architectures and transport layers can be simultaneously optimized. The realizations of these performance enhancements stem from extensive process optimization for numerous light trapping and transport layer fabrication approaches. These approaches were guided by numerical modeling techniques which will also be discussed. Key developments in this thesis include (1) the fabrication of nano-element topographies conducive to light trapping using various fabrication approaches, (2) the deposition of defect free nc-Si:H onto structured topographies by switching from SiH4 to SiF 4 PECVD gas chemistry, and (3) the development of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) growth conditions for NiO. Keywords: light trapping, nano-element array, hole transport layer, electron blocking layer, nickel oxide, nanocrystalline silicon, aluminum doped zinc oxide, atomic layer deposition, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, electron beam lithography, ANSYS HFSS.

  13. Drug effects on platelet adherence to collagen and damaged vessel walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packham, M A; Cazenave, J P; Kinlough-Rathbone, R L; Mustard, J F

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of platelets with damaged vessel walls leads to the formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi and may also contribute to the development of atherosclerotic lesions because platelets adherent to exposed collagen release a mitogen that stimulates smooth muscle cell proliferation. The first step in thrombus formation, platelet adherence to an injured vessel wall, can be studied quantitatively by the use of platelets labeled with 51chromium. In these investigations, rabbit aortas were damaged by passage of a balloon catheter and segments of the aortas were everted on probes that were rotated in platelet suspensions. Collagen-coated glass cylinders were also used. Adherence was measured in a medium containing approximately physiologic concentrations of calcium, magnesium, protein and red blood cells. Conditions of testing influence the effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sulfinpyrazone, and dipyridamole on platelet adherence. Aspirin and sulfinpyrazone were not inhibitory when tested in a medium with a 40% hematocrit; this indicates that products formed by platelets from arachidonate probably do not play a major part in the adherence of the first layer of platelets to the surface, although they may be involved in thrombus formation. Indomethacin, dipyridamole, prostaglandin E1, methylprednisolone and penicillin G and related antibiotics did inhibit platelet adherence although the concentrations required were higher than would likely be achieved in vivo upon administration to human patients. None of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited the release of granule contents from adherent platelets. Pretreatment of the damaged vessel wall with aspirin increased platelet adherence, presumably because it prevented the formation of PGI2 by the vessel wall. Platelet adherence to undamaged or damaged vessel walls was enhanced by prior exposure of the wall to thrombin. Platelet reactions with aggregating agents and platelet survival can be

  14. More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2014-05-26

    We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

  15. An Adherence Semigroup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By a dynamical system we mean a pair of (X,T), where X is compact Hausdorff space. In this paper we define an adherence semigroup A(X,T)∈XX, which is the set of all pointwise limit of subnets of (Tn)n∈N. We will prove some commonness between adherence semigroup and Ellis semigroup.

  16. Oxide-Based Solar Cell: Impact of Layer Thicknesses on the Device Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Nunes, Daniela; Calmeiro, Tomás; Kardarian, Kasra; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2017-02-13

    A ZnO/Cu2O-based combinatorial heterojunction device library was successfully fabricated by a simple spray pyrolysis technique using ITO-coated glass as the substrate. The combinatorial approach was introduced to analyze the impact of the ZnO and Cu2O layer thicknesses on the performance of the solar cells. The thickness of the ZnO layer was varied from ∼50 to 320 nm, and the Cu2O layer was deposited orthogonal to the ZnO thickness gradient. In the case of Cu2O, the thickness varied from ∼200 to 800 nm. The photovoltaic performance of the cells is strongly dependent on the absorber layer thickness for a particular window layer thickness and reaches a maximum short-circuit current density of 3.9 mA/cm(2) when the absorber layer thickness just crosses ∼700 nm. Reducing the thicknesses of the active layers leads to a sharp decrease in the device performance. It is shown that the entire built-in bias of the heterojunction is created in the absorber layer due to low carrier density. The poor performance of the devices having lower thicknesses is attributed to different interfacial phenomena such as optical losses due to the thin Cu2O layer, back-contact recombination of the carriers due to the low layer thickness because a minimum heterojunction thickness is required for the formation of the full built-in bias that slows down the recombination of the carriers, and other factors.

  17. Cobalt containing crystallizing glass seals for solid oxide fuel cells - A new strategy for strong adherence to metals and high thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Powdered glasses based on the systems BaO/CoO/SiO2 and BaO/ZnO/CoO/SiO2 with small additions of ZrO2, La2O3 and B2O3 were investigated with respect to their sintering and crystallization behavior. They could be fully densified by viscous flow and during subsequent crystallization BaSi2O5 and Ba(ZnxCo2-x)Si2O7 or BaCo2Si2O7 were formed. The CTEs (100-800 °C) of crystallized samples were 14.0-14.6 × 10-6 K-1. Sealing experiments with Nicrofer© alloy showed strong adherence of the crystallized glass. Aluminum from the alloy is oxidized and forms an alumina layer or interconnected structures inside the metal. Cobalt oxide as a component of the glass is reduced to the metal and occurs as approximately spherical particles near the Nicrofer© alloy. The number of cobalt particles increases with increasing sealing temperature. During fracture of sealed Nicrofer© plates, the crack runs through the glass and not through the interface metal/crystallized glass.

  18. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  19. Mechanical Interactions between Gas Diffusion Layers and Bipolar Plates in low Temperature Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Knöri, Torsten; Schulze, Mathias; Gülzow, Erich

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to stiff backing materials (e.g. carbon paper) softer ones like carbon cloth are compressed over the ribs of the gas distributors or impressed into the channels when the PEFC is assembled. During fuel cell optimisation the interactions between the gas diffusion layer and the flow field are frequently neglected; hence flow fields as well as gas diffusion layers are commonly optimized independently. The DLR has investigated these interactions with a two-stage approach: At firs...

  20. Multi-chamber and multi-layer thiol-ene microchip for cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, H. Y.; Hemmingsen, Mette; Lafleur, Josiane P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-layer and multi-chamber microfluidic chip fabricated using two different thiol-ene mixtures. Sandwiched between the thiol-ene chip layers is a commercially available membrane whose morphology has been altered with coatings of thiol-ene mixtures. Experiments have been conducted ...... with the microchip and shown that the fabricated microchip is suitable for long term cell culture....

  1. High refractive index silicone gels for simultaneous total internal reflection fluorescence and traction force microscopy of adherent cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Substrate rigidity profoundly impacts cellular behaviors such as migration, gene expression, and cell fate. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF microscopy enables selective visualization of the dynamics of substrate adhesions, vesicle trafficking, and biochemical signaling at the cell-substrate interface. Here we apply high-refractive-index silicone gels to perform TIRF microscopy on substrates with a wide range of physiological elastic moduli and simultaneously measure traction forces exerted by cells on the substrate.

  2. Atmospheric spatial atomic layer deposition of Zn(O,S) buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Poodt, P.; Illeberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxysulfide has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) and successfully applied as buffer layer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. S-ALD combines high deposition rates (up to nm/s) with the advantages of conventional ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and superior u

  3. Efficient definitive endoderm induction from mouse embryonic stem cell adherent cultures: A rapid screening model for differentiation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué Kunjom Mfopou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitive endoderm (DE differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC monolayer cultures has been limited by poor cell survival or low efficiency. Recently, a combination of TGFβ and Wnt activation with BMP inhibition improved DE induction in embryoid bodies cultured in suspension. Based on these observations we developed a protocol to efficiently induce DE cells in monolayer cultures of mESCs. We obtained a good cell yield with 54.92% DE induction as shown by Foxa2, Sox17, Cxcr4 and E-Cadherin expression. These DE-cells could be further differentiated into posterior foregut and pancreatic phenotypes using a culture protocol initially developed for human embryonic stem cell (hESC differentiation. In addition, this mESC-derived DE gave rise to hepatocyte-like cells after exposure to BMP and FGF ligands. Our data therefore indicate a substantial improvement of monolayer DE induction from mESCs and support the concept that differentiation conditions for mESC-derived DE are similar to those for hESCs. As mESCs are easier to maintain and manipulate in culture compared to hESCs, and considering the shorter duration of embryonic development in the mouse, this method of efficient DE induction on monolayer will promote the development of new differentiation protocols to obtain DE-derivatives, like pancreatic beta-cells, for future use in cell replacement therapies.

  4. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, Robert E.; Downie, Craig M.; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George H.; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin A.; Eaglesham, David

    2016-01-19

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  5. Organic photosensitive cells having a reciprocal-carrier exciton blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Barry P.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2007-06-12

    A photosensitive cell includes an anode and a cathode; a donor-type organic material and an acceptor-type organic material forming a donor-acceptor junction connected between the anode and the cathode; and an exciton blocking layer connected between the acceptor-type organic material of the donor-acceptor junction and the cathode, the blocking layer consisting essentially of a material that has a hole mobility of at least 10.sup.-7 cm.sup.2/V-sec or higher, where a HOMO of the blocking layer is higher than or equal to a HOMO of the acceptor-type material.

  6. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  7. Layered materials with improved magnesium intercalation for rechargeable magnesium ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, Robert Ellis; Downie, Craig Michael; Fischer, Christopher; Lane, George Hamilton; Morgan, Dane; Nevin, Josh; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin Aslaug; Eaglesham, David

    2016-07-26

    Electrochemical devices which incorporate cathode materials that include layered crystalline compounds for which a structural modification has been achieved which increases the diffusion rate of multi-valent ions into and out of the cathode materials. Examples in which the layer spacing of the layered electrode materials is modified to have a specific spacing range such that the spacing is optimal for diffusion of magnesium ions are presented. An electrochemical cell comprised of a positive intercalation electrode, a negative metal electrode, and a separator impregnated with a nonaqueous electrolyte solution containing multi-valent ions and arranged between the positive electrode and the negative electrode active material is described.

  8. Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using a Dual-Layer Integrated Cell Line-Drug Network Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiqian Zhang

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to personalized treatment. Existing approaches to predicting drug sensitivity rely primarily on profiling of cancer cell line panels that have been treated with different drugs and selecting genomic or functional genomic features to regress or classify the drug response. Here, we propose a dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model, which uses both cell line similarity network (CSN data and drug similarity network (DSN data to predict the drug response of a given cell line using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Cancer Genome Project (CGP studies as benchmark datasets, our single-layer model with CSN or DSN and only a single parameter achieved a prediction performance comparable to the previously generated elastic net model. When using the dual-layer model integrating both CSN and DSN, our predicted response reached a 0.6 Pearson correlation coefficient with observed responses for most drugs, which is significantly better than the previous results using the elastic net model. We have also applied the dual-layer cell line-drug integrated network model to fill in the missing drug response values in the CGP dataset. Even though the dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model does not specifically model mutation information, it correctly predicted that BRAF mutant cell lines would be more sensitive than BRAF wild-type cell lines to three MEK1/2 inhibitors tested.

  9. Role of ultrathin metal fluoride layer in organic photovoltaic cells: mechanism of efficiency and lifetime enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyung-Geun; Choi, Mi-Ri; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Dong Hun; Jung, Gwan Ho; Park, Yongsup; Lee, Jong-Lam; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Although rapid progress has been made recently in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, systematic studies on an ultrathin interfacial layer at the electron extraction contact have not been conducted in detail, which is important to improve both the device efficiency and the lifetime. We find that an ultrathin BaF2 layer at the electron extraction contact strongly influences the open-circuit voltage (Voc ) as the nanomorphology evolves with increasing BaF2 thickness. A vacuum-deposited ultrathin BaF2 layer grows by island growth, so BaF2 layers with a nominal thickness less than that of single-coverage layer (≈3 nm) partially cover the polymeric photoactive layer. As the nominal thickness of the BaF2 layer increased to that of a single-coverage layer, the Voc and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) increased but the short-circuit current remained almost constant. The fill factor and the PCE decreased abruptly as the thickness of the BaF2 layer exceeded that of a single-coverage layer, which was ascribed to the insulating nature of BaF2 . We find the major cause of the increased Voc observed in these devices is the lowered work function of the cathode caused by the reaction and release of Ba from thin BaF2 films upon deposition of Al. The OPV device with the BaF2 layer showed a slightly improved maximum PCE (4.0 %) and a greatly (approximately nine times) increased device half-life under continuous simulated solar irradiation at 100 mW cm(-2) as compared with the OPV without an interfacial layer (PCE=2.1 %). We found that the photodegradation of the photoactive layer was not a major cause of the OPV degradation. The hugely improved lifetime with cathode interface modification suggests a significant role of the cathode interfacial layer that can help to prolong device lifetimes.

  10. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through double feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of the neuron. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and extension of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research.

  11. Dye-sensitized solar cells with a tri-layer ZnO photo-electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Bai, Jiafan; Feng, Bo; Lu, Xiong; Weng, Jie; Jiang, Chongxi; Wang, Jianxin, E-mail: j.wang63@gmail.com

    2013-11-25

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram for the energy-level, the paths of charge transfer, the model of light scattering in the top layer and the assembly of the DSSC. Highlights: •We successfully fabricated ZnO photo-anodes with a tri-layer ZnO structure. •The ZnO seed layer decreased the transfer resistance at the ZnO/FTO interface. •The ZnO light scattering layer could increase the number of photoelectrons. •J{sub sc} and V{sub oc} were greatly enhanced via the use of the tri-layer ZnO structure. •The efficiency of the DSSCs for a tri-layer ZnO structure was the highest. -- Abstract: In this paper, a tri-layer ZnO structure was designed to fabricate the photo-anodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). The results showed that an overall energy-conversion efficiency of 1.18% was achieved for DSSC with the tri-layer photo-anode, which was 14% higher than that obtained from a bilayer ZnO photo-anode (with an efficiency of 1.04%) and 76% higher than that fabricated with a single layer photo-anode (with an efficiency of 0.67%). The photo-current density and the open circuit voltage have greatly increased via the use of the tri-layer ZnO structure. Thus, the tri-layer ZnO structure might provide a new route for the improvement of the overall energy-conversion efficiency for the DSSC of ZnO.

  12. Ovine carotid artery-derived cells as an optimized supportive cell layer in 2-D capillary network assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Weinandy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial cell co-culture assays are differentiation assays which simulate the formation of capillary-like tubules with the aid of a supportive cell layer. Different cell types have been employed as a supportive cell layer, including human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and human mammary fibroblasts. However, these sources of human tissue-derived cells are limited, and more readily accessible human or animal tissue-derived cell sources would simplify the endothelial cell co-culture assay. In the present study, we investigated the potential use of alternative, accessible supportive