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Sample records for adenoviral oncoprotein e1b55k

  1. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, S.J.; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-01-01

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells

  2. An early function of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein is required for the nuclear relocalization of the cellular p53 protein in adenovirus-infected normal human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, F.M.; Kato, Sayuri E.M.; Huang Wenying; Flint, S. Jane; Gonzalez, Ramon A.

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that the human subgroup C adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1B 55 kDa protein can regulate the activity and concentration of the cellular tumor suppressor, p53. However, the contribution(s) of these functions of the E1B protein to viral reproduction remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we examined properties of p53 in normal human cells infected by E1B mutant viruses that display defective entry into the late phase or viral late mRNA export. The steady-state concentrations of p53 were significantly higher in cells infected by the E1B 55 kDa null mutant Hr6 or three mutants carrying small insertions in the E1B 55 kDa protein coding sequence than in Ad5-infected cells. Nevertheless, none of the mutants induced apoptosis in infected cells. Rather, the localization of p53 to E1B containing nuclear sites observed during infection by Ad5 was prevented by mutations that impair interaction of the E1B protein with p53 and/or with the E4 Orf6 protein. These results indicate that the E1B protein fulfills an early function that correlates efficient entry into the late phase with the localization of E1B and p53 in the nucleus of Ad5-infected normal human cells

  3. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia; Kieweg, Lisa; Müncheberg, Sarah; Dobner, Thomas; Schreiner, Sabrina

    2016-01-15

    Once transported to the replication sites, human adenoviruses (HAdVs) need to ensure decondensation and transcriptional activation of their viral genomes to synthesize viral proteins and initiate steps to reprogram the host cell for viral replication. These early stages during adenoviral infection are poorly characterized but represent a decisive moment in the establishment of a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin-associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of the host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks and chromatin compaction. In response to DNA damage, KAP1 is phosphorylated and functionally inactive, resulting in chromatin relaxation. We discovered that KAP1 posttranslational modification is dramatically altered during HAdV infection to limit the antiviral capacity of this host restriction factor, which represents an essential step required for efficient viral replication. Conversely, we also observed during infection an HAdV-mediated decrease of KAP1 SUMO moieties, known to promote chromatin decondensation events. Based on our findings, we provide evidence that HAdV induces KAP1 deSUMOylation to minimize epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for human adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation and cellular SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling play key roles in HAdV transcriptional regulation. We observed that the cellular chromatin-associated factor and epigenetic reader SPOC1 represses HAdV infection and gene expression. Here, we illustrate the role of the SPOC1-interacting factor KAP1 during productive HAdV growth. KAP1 binds to the viral E1B-55K protein, promoting its SUMO modification, therefore illustrating a crucial step for efficient viral

  4. Comparison of protein expression during wild-type, and E1B-55k-deletion, adenovirus infection using quantitative time-course proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yen Rong; Turnell, Andrew S; Davis, Simon; Heesom, Kate J; Evans, Vanessa C; Matthews, David A

    2017-06-01

    Adenovirus has evolved strategies to usurp host-cell factors and machinery to facilitate its life cycle, including cell entry, replication, assembly and egress. Adenovirus continues, therefore, to be an important model system for investigating fundamental cellular processes. The role of adenovirus E1B-55k in targeting host-cell proteins that possess antiviral activity for proteasomal degradation is now well established. To expand our understanding of E1B-55k in regulating the levels of host-cell proteins, we performed comparative proteome analysis of wild-type, and E1B-55k-deletion, adenovirus-infected cancer cells. As such we performed quantitative MS/MS analysis to monitor protein expression changes affected by viral E1B-55k. We identified 5937 proteins, and of these, 69 and 58 proteins were down-regulated during wild-type and E1B-55k (dl1520) adenovirus infection, respectively. This analysis revealed that there are many, previously unidentified, cellular proteins subjected to degradation by adenovirus utilizing pathways independent of E1B-55k expression. Moreover, we found that ALCAM, EPHA2 and PTPRF, three cellular proteins that function in the regulation of cell-cell contacts, appeared to be degraded by E1B-55k/E4orf3 and/or E1B-55k/E4orf6 complexes. These molecules, like integrin α3 (a known substrate of E1B-55k/E4orf6), are critical regulators of cell signalling, cell adhesion and cell surface modulation, and their degradation during infection is, potentially, pertinent to adenovirus propagation. The data presented in this study illustrate the broad nature of protein down-regulation mediated by adenovirus.

  5. KAP1 Is a Host Restriction Factor That Promotes Human Adenovirus E1B-55K SUMO Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bürck, Carolin; Mund, Andreas; Berscheminski, Julia

    2016-01-01

    and chromatin compaction. In response to DNA damage, KAP1 is phosphorylated and functionally inactive, resulting in chromatin relaxation. We discovered that KAP1 posttranslational modification is dramatically altered during HAdV infection to limit the antiviral capacity of this host restriction factor, which...... epigenetic gene silencing and to promote SUMO modification of E1B-55K by a so far unknown mechanism. IMPORTANCE: Here we describe a novel cellular restriction factor for Human Adenovirus (HAdV) that sheds light on very early modulation processes in viral infection. We reported that chromatin formation...... characterized, but represent a decisive moment in establishing a productive infection. Here, we identify a novel host viral restriction factor, KAP1. This heterochromatin associated transcription factor regulates the dynamic organization of host chromatin structure via its ability to influence epigenetic marks...

  6. The human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55 kDa protein obstructs inhibition of viral replication by type I interferon in normal human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdave S Chahal

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from human adenovirus type 5, which typically lack the E1A and E1B genes, induce robust innate immune responses that limit their therapeutic efficacy. We reported previously that the E1B 55 kDa protein inhibits expression of a set of cellular genes that is highly enriched for those associated with anti-viral defense and immune responses, and includes many interferon-sensitive genes. The sensitivity of replication of E1B 55 kDa null-mutants to exogenous interferon (IFN was therefore examined in normal human fibroblasts and respiratory epithelial cells. Yields of the mutants were reduced at least 500-fold, compared to only 5-fold, for wild-type (WT virus replication. To investigate the mechanistic basis of such inhibition, the accumulation of viral early proteins and genomes was compared by immunoblotting and qPCR, respectively, in WT- and mutant-infected cells in the absence or presence of exogenous IFN. Both the concentration of viral genomes detected during the late phase and the numbers of viral replication centers formed were strongly reduced in IFN-treated cells in the absence of the E1B protein, despite production of similar quantities of viral replication proteins. These defects could not be attributed to degradation of entering viral genomes, induction of apoptosis, or failure to reorganize components of PML nuclear bodies. Nor was assembly of the E1B- and E4 Orf6 protein- E3 ubiquitin ligase required to prevent inhibition of viral replication by IFN. However, by using RT-PCR, the E1B 55 kDa protein was demonstrated to be a potent repressor of expression of IFN-inducible genes in IFN-treated cells. We propose that a primary function of the previously described transcriptional repression activity of the E1B 55 kDa protein is to block expression of IFN- inducible genes, and hence to facilitate formation of viral replication centers and genome replication.

  7. Adenovirus type 12 E1B 55-kilodalton oncoprotein promotes p53-mediated apoptotic response of ovarian cancer to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junnai; Gao, Qinglei; Li, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    The tumor suppressor p53-mediated apoptotic response plays an important role in cisplatin resistant in ovarian cancer. The adenovirus (Ad) type 12 E1B 55-kDa protein binds to p53 and inactivates its transcriptional transactivation function. In this study, we test the hypothesis that Ad12 E1B 55-kDa oncoprotein promotes p53-mediated apoptotic response of ovarian cancer to cisplatin. First, we observed the upregulation protein level of p53 target genes in cisplatin-resistant or cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer by Western blotting. Second, after transfection of Ad12 E1b 55-kDa expression plasmid, the expressions of p53 target genes in A2780 cells were further enhanced. Co-IP experiment demonstrated Ad12 E1b 55 kDa associated with p53. MTT assay confirmed that the cell proliferation was enhanced after transfection, as well as the enhanced cell inhibitory rate in the presence of cisplatin. Using flow cytometry, transfection of Ad12 E1B 55-kDa protein induced apoptosis and promoted S-phase transition in proliferation. Finally, results showed that all these changes promoted by Ad12 E1b 55 kDa were attenuated by the exposure of specific inhibitor of p53 signaling, pifithrin-α. Taken together, we concluded that Ad E1B 55-kDa oncoprotein promotes p53-mediated apoptotic response of ovarian cancer to cisplatin.

  8. E1B and E4 oncoproteins of adenovirus antagonize the effect of apoptosis inducing factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Roberta L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Wilkinson, John C., E-mail: john.wilkinson@ndsu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Ornelles, David A., E-mail: ornelles@wakehealth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Adenovirus inundates the productively infected cell with linear, double-stranded DNA and an abundance of single-stranded DNA. The cellular response to this stimulus is antagonized by the adenoviral E1B and E4 early genes. A mutant group C adenovirus that fails to express the E1B-55K and E4ORF3 genes is unable to suppress the DNA-damage response. Cells infected with this double-mutant virus display significant morphological heterogeneity at late times of infection and frequently contain fragmented nuclei. Nuclear fragmentation was due to the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria into the nucleus. The release of AIF was dependent on active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), which appeared to be activated by viral DNA replication. Nuclear fragmentation did not occur in AIF-deficient cells or in cells treated with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The E1B-55K or E4ORF3 proteins independently prevented nuclear fragmentation subsequent to PARP-1 activation, possibly by altering the intracellular distribution of PAR-modified proteins. - Highlights: • E1B-55K or E4orf3 prevents nuclear fragmentation. • Nuclear fragmentation requires AIF and PARP-1 activity. • Adenovirus DNA replication activates PARP-1. • E1B-55K or E4orf3 proteins alter the distribution of PAR.

  9. Ocular flora in adenoviral conjunctivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Eliane Mayumi; Freitas, Denise de; Yu, Maria Cecília Zorat; Alvarenga, Lênio Souza; Hofling- Lima, Ana Luisa

    2002-01-01

    Objetivos: Estudar a microbiota aeróbica conjuntival em pacientes com quadro clínico de conjuntivite viral aguda. Método: Trinta pacientes entre 18 e 40 anos portadores de conjuntivite adenoviral e 30 pacientes sem a doença foram submetidos à colheita de material da conjuntiva para cultura. Os portadores de conjuntivite adenoviral foram submetidos ao exame até 3 dias após o início dos sintomas. As culturas foram realizadas utilizando-se os meios de ágar-sangue e ágar-chocolate. Pacientes em u...

  10. Presumed Acute Adenoviral Dacryoadenitis Associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of serum adenoviral antibodies IgM and presence of inclusion bodies in conjunctival smear. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is caused by adenovirus serovars. 8, 19, and 37.[7] Serological typing and polymerase chain reaction for adenoviral were not available in smear in both eyes. A computerized tomography scan of.

  11. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  12. PREVENTION OF ADENOVIRAL EYE INFECTION - REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Mirjane Janicijevic

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Epidemic viral conjunctivitis caused by adenovirus is the most common infectious conjunctivitis. The exact incidence of adenoviral conjunctivitis is still poorly known, but there are two well-defined adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis clinical syndromes: epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC and pharyngoconjunctival fever (PCF. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis is also the most severe form and presents with watery discharge, hyperemia, chemosis and ipsilateral lymphadenopathy. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, but its etiology can be confirmed using cell cultures, antigen detection, polymerase chain reaction or immune-chromatography. Multiple treatments have been tried for this disease, but none of them seem to be completely effective. Viruses are resistant to desiccation and certain common surface disinfectants. Prevention is the most reliable and recommended strategy to control this epidemic infection. Global epidemic surveillance system definitely needs to be established to monitor and analyze the epidemic conjunctivitis in the future. There is clearly a need for the national and the military public health institutions to work together on guidelines to handle future challenges.

  13. Modulation of TIP60 by Human Papilloma Virus in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Gifford DK and Young RA . (2004) Global position and recritmnet of HATs and HDACs in the yeast genome. Molecular cell.; 16: 199- 209. 8) Doyon Y and...Nature 2002; 418: 348-352. 6. Baker A, Rohleder KJ, Hanakahi LA, Ketner G. Adenovirus E4 34K and E1b55K oncoproteins target host DNA ligase IV

  14. Adenoviral vectors as novel vaccines for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda; Mullarkey, Caitlin; Gilbert, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Influenza is a viral respiratory disease causing seasonal epidemics, with significant annual illness and mortality. Emerging viruses can pose a major pandemic threat if they acquire the capacity for sustained human-to-human transmission. Vaccination reduces influenza-associated mortality and is critical in minimising the burden on the healthcare system. However, current vaccines are not always effective in at-risk populations and fail to induce long-lasting protective immunity against a range of viruses. The development of 'universal' influenza vaccines, which induce heterosubtypic immunity capable of reducing disease severity, limiting viral shedding or protecting against influenza subtypes with pandemic potential, has gained interest in the research community. To date, approaches have focused on inducing immune responses to conserved epitopes within the stem of haemagglutinin, targeting the ectodomain of influenza M2e or by stimulating cellular immunity to conserved internal antigens, nucleoprotein or matrix protein 1. Adenoviral vectors are potent inducers of T-cell and antibody responses and have demonstrated safety in clinical applications, making them an excellent choice of vector for delivery of vaccine antigens. In order to circumvent pre-existing immunity in humans, serotypes from non-human primates have recently been investigated. We will discuss the pre-clinical development of these novel vectors and their advancement to clinical trials. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer

  16. Oncoprotein metastasis and its suppression revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulescu Razvan T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The past two decades have witnessed an increasing appreciation of the role of the tumor microenvironment, of genetic and epigenetic alterations in normal cells adjacent to tumors and of the migration of normal cells with aberrant intrinsic properties in cancer pathophysiology. Aside from these insights, a novel concept termed "oncoprotein metastasis" (OPM has recently been advanced and proposed to reflect protein-based neoplastic phenomena that might occur even before any modifications relating to the morphology, location or (epigenetic outfit of cells during the malignant process. Here, evidence is presented that supports the OPM perception and thus should contribute not only to further rethink the definition of a normal cell, but also the treatment of cancer disease in the years to come.

  17. Modulating the activity of the c-Myc oncoprotein

    OpenAIRE

    Hydbring, Per

    2009-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein regulates numerous cellular processes and is frequently deregulated in cancer due to genetic lesions. However, in addition to its tumor promoting activity, Myc and other oncoproteins induce intrinsic safe-guard mechanisms against tumorigenesis like apoptosis and cellular senescence, which have to be overcome by additional genetic lesions for cellular transformation. In this work, we identify ways of reactivating these anti-tumorigenic pathways in cells with deregulated Myc...

  18. Reactivation of presumed adenoviral keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Nilgün; Bilgihan, Kamil; Gürelik, Gökhan; Ozdek, Sengül; Hasanreisoğlu, Berati

    2002-04-01

    We report a patient with reactivation of presumed adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to correct high myopia. The preoperative refraction was -13.00 diopters (D) in the right eye and -14.00 D in the left eye, and the best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes. On the first postoperative day, mild conjunctival hyperemia and multiple subepithelial infiltrations localized in the flap zone consistent with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis were seen. After prompt treatment, the lesions resolved. As a consequence, LASIK successfully corrected the high myopia. Adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis can be reactivated after LASIK, unlike after photorefractive keratectomy, despite the absence of symptomatic and clinical findings before the procedure.

  19. Adenoviral gene therapy for pancreatic cancer: Where do we stand?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Koert F. D.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Wesseling, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. This is mainly caused by the late diagnosis, the aggressive biology and the lack of effective treatment modalities. Adenoviral gene therapy has the potential to selectively treat both primary tumor and (micro) metastatic tissue.

  20. Adenoviral vectors as genome editing tools : repairing defective DMD alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdVs) constitute powerful gene delivery vehicles. However, so far, their potential for genome editing has not been extensively investigated. By tailoring AdVs as carriers of designer nucleases and donor DNA sequences, the research presented in this thesis expands the utility of

  1. Molecular epidemiology of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Omar, Nazri; Hammouda, Ehab; Akanuma, Masataka; Ohguchi, Takeshi; Ariga, Toshihide; Tagawa, Yoshitsugu; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Ishida, Susumu; Aoki, Koki; Ishiko, Hiroaki; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2010-10-24

    Adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis is a major cause of ocular morbidity and may lead to visual loss. Adenovirus types 8, 19, and 37 may cause epidemic keratoconjunctivitis. The main objective of this study was to determine the types of adenoviruses causing keratoconjunctivitis in Saudi Arabia. We conducted a non-interventional observational clinical study. Seventy three eyes from 65 patients who presented to The Eye Center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia with clinical features of acute adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis were included. Each patient underwent complete clinical examination and features such as membranous reaction, conjunctival hemorrhage, subepithelial corneal infiltrates, and preauricular lymph node enlargement were recorded. Conjunctival swabs were obtained from patients with presumed acute viral conjunctivitis. Immunochromatography (IC) and restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (PCR-RFLP) were performed on the conjunctival swabs obtained from each eye. Serotype identification was performed using direct sequencing technique. Forty-nine (67.1%) were adenovirus type 8, 8 (11.0%) were adenovirus type 3, 6 (8.2%) type 37, 5 (6.8%) were adenovirus type 4, and 2 (2.3%) type 19. The remaining 5 were types 14, 19, and 22. The prevalence of membranous conjunctivitis was highest (83%) among eyes with adenovirus type 37 while subepithelial corneal opacities were most commonly seen among eyes with adenovirus type 8 (47%). Immunochromatography tests were positive for adenovirus in 48 (65.7%) out of 73 eyes. This study determined the types of adenoviruses causing keratoconjunctivitis at one center in Saudi Arabia. Direct sequencing techniques is an efficient, accurate, and rapid means of diagnosing adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. The most common causes of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis in Saudi Arabia were adenovirus types 8, 3, and 37. Membranous conjunctivitis and subepithelial opacities had the highest frequency of adenovirus types 37 and 8

  2. Chimpanzee adenoviral vectors as vaccines for outbreak pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ewer, Katie; Sebastian, Sarah; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Gilbert, Sarah; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Lambe, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 2014–15 Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted the potential for large disease outbreaks caused by emerging pathogens and has generated considerable focus on preparedness for future epidemics. Here we discuss drivers, strategies and practical considerations for developing vaccines against outbreak pathogens. Chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd) vectors have been developed as vaccine candidates for multiple infectious diseases and prostate cancer. ChAd vectors are safe and induce antig...

  3. ETS-1 oncoprotein expression is decreased in aggressive papillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    So far, there is no reliable prognostic marker has been proved for detection of the tumor progression and recurrence. Objectives: To analyze the correlation between ETS-1 oncoprotein immunohistochemical expression and the different stages and grades of the primary papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary ...

  4. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  5. Extended tropism of an adenoviral vector does not circumvent the maturation-dependent transducibility of mouse skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deutekom, JCT; Cao, BH; Pruchnic, R; Wickham, TJ; Kovesdi, [No Value; Huard, J

    1999-01-01

    Background Efficient adenoviral gene delivery to mature skeletal muscle has been hindered by different factors. The low levels of adenoviral attachment receptor (CAR) that have been reported in this tissue may be a limiting factor. Therefore, adenoviral transduction of mature muscle may be improved

  6. Utilization of oncoprotein-pulsed dendritic cells as tumor vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 8 (2001), s. 463-466 ISSN 0171-5216 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526; GA MZd NC45011; GA ČR GA312/98/0826; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA301/00/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : dendritic cells * tumor vaccines * oncoproteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2001

  7. ERG oncoprotein expression in prostate carcinoma patients of different ethnicities

    OpenAIRE

    KELLY, GREGORY M.; KONG, YINK HEAY; DOBI, ALBERT; SRIVASTAVA, SHIV; SESTERHENN, ISABELL A.; PATHMANATHAN, RAJADURAI; TAN, HUI MENG; TAN, SHYH-HAN; CHEONG, SOK CHING

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene (ERG) oncoprotein due to transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-ERG fusion, the most prevalent genomic alteration in prostate cancer (CaP), is more frequently observed among Caucasian patients compared to patients of African or Asian descent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the prevalence of ERG alterations in a multiethnic cohort of CaP patients. A total of 191 formalin-fixed para...

  8. Establishment of a mouse melanoma model system for the efficient infection and replication of human adenovirus type 5-based oncolytic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sujin; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kim, So Young; Kang, Dongxu; Je, Suyeon; Song, Jae J

    2014-10-24

    Due to poor adenoviral infectivity and replication in mouse tumor cell types compared with human tumor cell types, use of human-type adenoviral vectors in mouse animal model systems was limited. Here, we demonstrate enhanced infectivity and productive replication of adenovirus in mouse melanoma cells following introduction of both the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and E1B-55K genes. Introduction of CAR into B16BL6 or B16F10 cells increased the infectivity of GFP-expressing adenovirus; however, viral replication was unaffected. We demonstrated a dramatic increase of adenoviral replication (up to 100-fold) in mouse cells via E1B-55K expression and subsequent viral spreading in mouse tissue. These results reveal for the first time that human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5)-based oncolytic virus can be applied to immunocompetent mouse with the introduction of CAR and E1B-55K to syngenic mouse cell line. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Purification of adenoviral vectors using expanded bed chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, C; Ferreira, T B; Carrondo, M J T; Cruz, P E; Alves, P M

    2006-03-01

    The increasing numbers of pre-clinical and clinical trials where recombinant adenoviral vectors are used for gene therapy and vaccination require the development of cost-effective and reproducible large scale purification strategies of the biologically active particles. Alternatives to the traditional laboratory scale CsCl density gradient ultracentrifugation method, such as fixed bed chromatography strategies, have been developed, but the yields of final recovery remain too low due mainly to the capture and concentration steps taking place before and between the chromatographic stages. In this study, a rapid and efficient scale-able purification protocol allowing to obtain concentrated, pure and bioactive adenoviral vectors was developed. This allows efficient levels of binding to the column media and vector purification without centrifugation or filtration steps. Expanded bed chromatography followed by hollow fiber concentration allows the capture of viral particles directly from cellular extracts with high efficiency and vector purification is achieved in less than one working day with a minimal amount of sample handling, thus presenting an improvement over existing processes. The overall process yield reached 32%, representing an eight-fold improvement over results reported previously, while the purity is comparable to that obtained with the CsCl method.

  10. Chimpanzee adenoviral vectors as vaccines for outbreak pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, Katie; Sebastian, Sarah; Spencer, Alexandra J; Gilbert, Sarah; Hill, Adrian V S; Lambe, Teresa

    2017-12-02

    The 2014-15 Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted the potential for large disease outbreaks caused by emerging pathogens and has generated considerable focus on preparedness for future epidemics. Here we discuss drivers, strategies and practical considerations for developing vaccines against outbreak pathogens. Chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd) vectors have been developed as vaccine candidates for multiple infectious diseases and prostate cancer. ChAd vectors are safe and induce antigen-specific cellular and humoral immunity in all age groups, as well as circumventing the problem of pre-existing immunity encountered with human Ad vectors. For these reasons, such viral vectors provide an attractive platform for stockpiling vaccines for emergency deployment in response to a threatened outbreak of an emerging pathogen. Work is already underway to develop vaccines against a number of other outbreak pathogens and we will also review progress on these approaches here, particularly for Lassa fever, Nipah and MERS.

  11. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giles

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals.

  12. Adenoviral vector immunity: its implications and circumvention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Yadvinder S; Bangari, Dinesh S; Mittal, Suresh K

    2011-08-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors have emerged as a promising gene delivery platform for a variety of therapeutic and vaccine purposes during last two decades. However, the presence of preexisting Ad immunity and the rapid development of Ad vector immunity still pose significant challenges to the clinical use of these vectors. Innate inflammatory response following Ad vector administration may lead to systemic toxicity, drastically limit vector transduction efficiency and significantly abbreviate the duration of transgene expression. Currently, a number of approaches are being extensively pursued to overcome these drawbacks by strategies that target either the host or the Ad vector. In addition, significant progress has been made in the development of novel Ad vectors based on less prevalent human Ad serotypes and nonhuman Ad. This review provides an update on our current understanding of immune responses to Ad vectors and delineates various approaches for eluding Ad vector immunity. Approaches targeting the host and those targeting the vector are discussed in light of their promises and limitations.

  13. Adenoviral protein V promotes a process of viral assembly through nucleophosmin 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugai, Hideyo; Dobbins, George C.; Wang, Minghui [Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pathology, and Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Le, Long P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Pathology Service, 55 Fruit St.-GRJ 249, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Matthews, David A. [School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Medical Sciences Building, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD (United Kingdom); Curiel, David T., E-mail: dcuriel@radonc.wustl.edu [Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pathology, and Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); The Gene Therapy Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-10-25

    Adenoviral infection induces nucleoplasmic redistribution of a nucleolar nucleophosmin 1/NPM1/B23.1. NPM1 is preferentially localized in the nucleoli of normal cells, whereas it is also present at the nuclear matrix in cancer cells. However, the biological roles of NPM1 during infection are unknown. Here, by analyzing a pV-deletion mutant, Ad5-dV/TSB, we demonstrate that pV promotes the NPM1 translocation from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm in normal cells, and the NPM1 translocation is correlated with adenoviral replication. Lack of pV causes a dramatic reduction of adenoviral replication in normal cells, but not cancer cells, and Ad5-dV/TSB was defective in viral assembly in normal cells. NPM1 knockdown inhibits adenoviral replication, suggesting an involvement of NPM1 in adenoviral biology. Further, we show that NPM1 interacts with empty adenovirus particles which are an intermediate during virion maturation by immunoelectron microscopy. Collectively, these data implicate that pV participates in a process of viral assembly through NPM1.

  14. Adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer and neurotransplantation : possibilities and limitations in grafting of the fetal rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esseveldt, K E; Liu, R.; Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Verhaagen, J; Boer, G J

    Several studies have reported on the use of primary neural cells transduced by adenoviral vectors as donor cells in neurotransplantation. In the present investigation, we examined whether adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer could be used to introduce and express a foreign gene in solid neural

  15. Efficient adenoviral vector directed expression of a foreign gene to neurons and sustentacular cells in the mouse olfactory neuroepithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Holtmaat, A.J.G.D.; Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Oestreicher, A.B.; Kaplitt, M.G.; Verhaagen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vectors are efficient gene transfer agents for postmitotic cells, including neurons and glial cells. In this paper we have examined the effectiveness of adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer to the olfactory epithelium of adult mice. We show that

  16. Suppression of inflammation by dexamethasone prolongs adenoviral vector-mediated transgene expression in the facial nucleus of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Verhaagen, J

    1998-01-01

    Adenoviral vector directed gene transfer to rat facial motoneurons occurs efficiently following intra-parenchymal injection of relatively high dosages (> or =10(7) pfu per injection) of a prototype first generation adenoviral vector. However, high level of transgene expression, as observed during

  17. Efficient adenoviral vector-directed expression of a foreign gene to neurons and sustentacular cells in the mouse olfactory neuroepithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtmaat, Anthony J D G; Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Oestreicher, A B; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Kaplitt, M G; Verhaagen, J

    1996-01-01

    Replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vectors are efficient gene transfer agents for postmitotic cells, including neurons and glial cells. In this paper we have examined the effectiveness of adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer to the olfactory epithelium of adult mice. We show that

  18. Tissue-specific consequences of the anti-adenoviral immune response: implications for cardiac transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S Y; Li, K; Piccotti, J R; Louie, M C; Judge, T A; Turka, L A; Eichwald, E J; Bishop, D K

    1999-10-01

    The immune response to adenoviral vectors can induce inflammation and loss of transgene expression in transfected tissues. This would limit the use of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in disease states in which long-term gene expression is required. While studying the effect of the anti-adenoviral immune response in transplantation, we found that transgene expression persisted in cardiac isografts transfected with an adenovirus encoding beta-galactosidase. Transfected grafts remained free of inflammation, despite the presence of an immune response to the vector. Thus, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer may have therapeutic value in cardiac transplantation and heart diseases. Furthermore, immunological limitations of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy are not universal for all tissue types.

  19. Functional diversity and mutational analysis of Agrobacterium 6B oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, A; Pien, S; Otten, L

    2002-07-01

    Many Agrobacterium T-DNA genes belong to a diverse family of T-DNA genes, the rolB family. These genes cause various growth abnormalities but their modes of action remain largely unknown. So far, none of the RolB-like proteins has been subjected to mutational analysis. The RolB-like oncoprotein 6B, which induces tumours on species such as Nicotiana glauca and Kalanchoe tubiflora, was chosen to investigate the role of the most conserved amino acid residues within the RolB family. We first determined which of the natural 6B variants had the strongest oncogenic activity; to this end, six 6b coding sequences (A- 6b, AB- 6b, C- 6b, CG- 6b, S- 6b and T- 6b) were placed under the control of the strong constitutive 2x35S promoter and compared for tumour induction on N. glauca, N. tabacum and K. daigremontiana. Oncogenicity increased in the order C- 6b/CG- 6b, A- 6b/AB- 6b, and S- 6b/T- 6b. The most conserved amino acid residues in the strongly oncogenic T-6B protein were mutated and shown to be required for oncogenicity and accumulation of the T-6B protein in planta but not in bacteria. Hybrids between T-6B and the weakly oncogenic A-6B protein revealed an additional oncogenic determinant required for the formation of large tumours.

  20. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is among the most attractive of cancer targets given that is deregulated in the majority of tumors and that its inhibition profoundly affects their growth and/or survival. However, its role as a seldom-mutated transcription factor, its lack of enzymatic activity for which suitable pharmaceutical inhibitors could be crafted and its expression by normal cells have largely been responsible for its being viewed as “undruggable”. Work over the past several years, however, has begun to reverse this idea by allowing us to view Myc within the larger context of global gene regulatory control. Thus, Myc and its obligate heterodimeric partner, Max, are integral to the coordinated recruitment and post-translational modification of components of the core transcriptional machinery. Moreover, Myc over-expression re-programs numerous critical cellular functions and alters the cell’s susceptibility to their inhibition. This new knowledge has therefore served as a framework upon which to develop new pharmaceutical approaches. These include the continuing development of small molecules which act directly to inhibit the critical Myc-Max interaction, those which act indirectly to prevent Myc-directed post-translational modifications necessary to initiate productive transcription and those which inhibit vital pathways upon which the Myc-transformed cell is particularly reliant. PMID:24657798

  1. Ovarian cancer targeted adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahasreshti, PJ; Kataram, M; Wu, HJ; Yalavarthy, LP; Carey, D; Dent, P; Chada, S; Alvarez, RD; Haisma, HJ; Fisher, PB; Curiel, DT

    Objective. We have previously shown that adenoviral-mediated melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (Ad.mda-7) therapy induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. However, the apoptosis induction was low and directly correlated with infectivity of Ad.mda-7. The objective of this study was to

  2. Adenoviral DNA replication: DNA sequences and enzymes required for initiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stillman, B.W.; Tamanoi, F.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper evidence is provided that the 140,000-dalton DNA polymerase is encoded by the adenoviral genome and is required for the initiation of DNA replication in vitro. The DNA sequences in the template DNA that are required for the initiation of replication have also been identified, using both plasmid DNAs and synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides. 48 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  3. Targeting of adenoviral vectors through a bispecific single-chain antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, HJ; Grill, J; Curiel, DT; Hoogeland, S; van Beusechem, VW; Pinedo, HM; Gerritsen, WR

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are attractive in the context of cancer gene therapy because they are capable of delivering genes to a wide variety of tissues. The utility of adenoviruses is limited by their lack of specificity and by the absence of the receptor(s) for these viruses on many tumor

  4. Quantification of residual host cell DNA in adenoviral vectors produced on PER.C6 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Linda; Koel, Björn; Weggeman, Miranda; Goudsmit, Jaap; Havenga, Menzo; Marzio, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors for gene therapy and vaccination are routinely prepared on cultures of immortalized cells, allowing the production of vector batches of high titer and consistent quality. Quantification of residual DNA from the producing cell line is part of the purity tests for

  5. A flow cytometric protocol for titering recombinant adenoviral vectors containing the green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, D C; Booth, J L; Dandapani, V; Pennington, L R; Gimble, J M; Metcalf, J

    2000-03-01

    As the use of adenoviral vectors in gene therapy protocols increases, there is a corresponding need for rapid, accurate, and reproducible titer methods. Multiple methods currently exist for determining titers of recombinant adenoviral vector, including optical absorbance, electron microscopy, fluorescent focus assay, and the "gold standard" plaque assay. This paper introduces a novel flow cytometric method for direct titer determination that relies on the expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), a tracking marker incorporated into several adenoviral vectors. This approach was compared to the plaque assay using 10(-4)- to 10(-6)-fold dilutions of a cesium-chloride-purified, GFP expressing adenovirus (AdEasy + GFP + GAL). The two approaches yielded similar titers: 3.25 +/- 1.85 x 10(9) PFU/mL versus 3.46 +/- 0.76 x 10(9) green fluorescent units/(gfu/mL). The flow cytometric method is complete within 24 h in contrast to the 7 x 10 days required by the plaque assay. These results indicate that the GFU/mL is an alternative functional titer method for fluorescent-tagged adenoviral vectors.

  6. NUP98 fusion oncoproteins promote aneuploidy by attenuating the mitotic spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsi, Valentina; Ferrari, Silvia; Gorello, Paolo; Fantini, Sebastian; Chiavolelli, Francesca; Mecucci, Cristina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    2014-02-15

    NUP98 is a recurrent fusion partner in chromosome translocations that cause acute myelogenous leukemia. NUP98, a nucleoporin, and its interaction partner Rae1, have been implicated in the control of chromosome segregation, but their mechanistic contributions to tumorigenesis have been unclear. Here, we show that expression of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins causes mitotic spindle defects and chromosome missegregation, correlating with the capability of NUP98 fusions to cause premature securin degradation and slippage from an unsatisfied spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). NUP98 fusions, unlike wild-type NUP98, were found to physically interact with the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)(Cdc20) and to displace the BubR1 SAC component, suggesting a possible mechanistic basis for their interference with SAC function. In addition, NUP98 oncoproteins displayed a prolonged half-life in cells. We found that NUP98 stability is controlled by a PEST sequence, absent in NUP98 oncoproteins, whose deletion reproduced the aberrant SAC-interfering activity of NUP98 oncoproteins. Together, our findings suggest that NUP98 oncoproteins predispose myeloid cells to oncogenic transformation or malignant progression by promoting whole chromosome instability. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  8. ERG oncoprotein expression in prostate carcinoma patients of different ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gregory M; Kong, Yink Heay; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Tan, Hui Meng; Tan, Shyh-Han; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the erythroblast transformation-specific-related gene (ERG) oncoprotein due to transmembrane protease, serine 2 ( TMPRSS2 ) -ERG fusion, the most prevalent genomic alteration in prostate cancer (CaP), is more frequently observed among Caucasian patients compared to patients of African or Asian descent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the prevalence of ERG alterations in a multiethnic cohort of CaP patients. A total of 191 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy specimens, collected from 120 patients treated at the Sime Darby Medical Centre, Subang Jaya, Malaysia, were analyzed for ERG protein expression by immunohistochemistry using the anti-ERG monoclonal antibody 9FY as a surrogate for the detection of ERG fusion events. The overall frequency of ERG protein expression in the population evaluated in this study was 39.2%. Although seemingly similar to rates reported in other Asian communities, the expression of ERG was distinct amongst different ethnic groups (P=0.004). Malaysian Indian (MI) patients exhibited exceedingly high expression of ERG in their tumors, almost doubling that of Malaysian Chinese (MC) patients, whereas ERG expression was very low amongst Malay patients (12.5%). When collectively analyzing data, we observed a significant correlation between younger patients and higher ERG expression (P=0.04). The prevalence of ERG expression was significantly different amongst CaP patients of different ethnicities. The higher number of ERG-expressing tumors among MI patients suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of CaP amongst this group of patients. Furthermore, the more frequent expression of ERG among the younger patients analyzed suggested an involvement of ERG in the early onset of CaP. The results of this study underline the value of using ERG status to better understand the differences in the

  9. Radiation-induced upregulation of gene expression from adenoviral vectors mediated by DNA damage repair and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Soliymani, Rabah [Protein Chemistry Unit, Department of Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Radiation and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Ahtiainen, Laura [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Hemminki, Akseli, E-mail: akseli.hemminki@helsinki.fi [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program, Transplantation Laboratory, Haartman Institute, and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  11. Gene Therapy with Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors: Current Advances and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Ng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant Adenoviral vectors represent one of the best gene transfer platforms due to their ability to efficiently transduce a wide range of quiescent and proliferating cell types from various tissues and species. The activation of an adaptive immune response against the transduced cells is one of the major drawbacks of first generation Adenovirus vectors and has been overcome by the latest generation of recombinant Adenovirus, the Helper-Dependent Adenoviral (HDAd vectors. HDAds have innovative features including the complete absence of viral coding sequences and the ability to mediate high level transgene expression with negligible chronic toxicity. This review summarizes the many aspects of HDAd biology and structure with a major focus on in vivo gene therapy application and with an emphasis on the unsolved issues that these vectors still presents toward clinical application.

  12. Microbiota aeróbia conjuntival nas conjuntivites adenovirais Ocular flora in adenoviral conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mayumi Nakano

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Estudar a microbiota aeróbica conjuntival em pacientes com quadro clínico de conjuntivite viral aguda. Método: Trinta pacientes entre 18 e 40 anos portadores de conjuntivite adenoviral e 30 pacientes sem a doença foram submetidos à colheita de material da conjuntiva para cultura. Os portadores de conjuntivite adenoviral foram submetidos ao exame até 3 dias após o início dos sintomas. As culturas foram realizadas utilizando-se os meios de ágar-sangue e ágar-chocolate. Pacientes em uso de medicação tópica ou sistêmica, usuários de lentes de contato e aqueles com doença ocular prévia ou doença sistêmica foram excluídos. Resultados: Houve positividade significantemente maior das culturas de conjuntiva nos pacientes com conjuntivite adenoviral (33,3%, sendo Haemophylus influenzae em 50% e Streptococcus pneumoniae em 50% quando comparados ao grupo controle (6,6% - Staphylococcus coagulase negativo. O grupo de pacientes com conjuntivite e que apresentaram culturas positivas, não diferiu em nenhum dos critérios clínicos analisados do grupo com culturas negativas. Conclusão: Pacientes com conjuntivite adenoviral apresentaram maior freqüência de exames de cultura de amostra de conjuntiva positivas quando comparados aos controles normais. Os pacientes com conjuntivite adenoviral com cultura positiva apresentaram evolução clínica semelhante aos pacientes com cultura negativa. Os agentes isolados na microbiota conjuntival no grupo com conjuntivite foram diferentes do observado no grupo normal. Porém o resultado das culturas não apresentou correlação com a evolução clínica.Purpose: To study the aerobic bacterial conjunctival flora in patients with clinical diagnosis of acute viral conjunctivitis. Method: Thirty patients between 18 and 30 years with acute adenoviral conjunctivitis and 30 normal subjects underwent conjunctival culture examination. Material from the conjunc-tiva of patients with conjunctivitis was

  13. Post-adenoviral parasympathetic dysautonomia in a child: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Adalaida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This is the first reported case of adenoviral meningoencephalitis that was complicated by persistent parasympathetic dysautonomia, which clinically either stimulated or inhibited its activity. Case presentation A 7-year-old Caucasian girl presented to our hospital in March 2008 with a three day history of upper respiratory infection. Her condition worsened and she was placed on ventilator support for two weeks. Her recovery was complicated by a persistent selective parasympathetic dysautonomia. Her past medical history was unremarkable. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of an adenoviral infection in a child which was complicated after recovery from an acute meningoencephalitis and peripheral neuropathy.

  14. Challenges and Prospects for Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vector-Mediated Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Piccolo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd vectors that are devoid of all viral coding sequences are promising non-integrating vectors for gene therapy because they efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vivo, have a large cloning capacity, and drive long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. The main obstacle preventing clinical applications of HDAd vectors is the host innate inflammatory response against the vector capsid proteins that occurs shortly after intravascular vector administration and result in acute toxicity, the severity of which is dose dependent. Intense efforts have been focused on elucidating adenoviral vector–host interactions and the factors involved in the acute toxicity. This review focuses on the recent acquisition of data on such interactions and on strategies investigated to improve the therapeutic index of HDAd vectors.

  15. Modulation of DNA methylation by human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Prakriti; Ganguly, Pooja; Ganguly, Niladri

    2018-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are double stranded circular DNA viruses that infect cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Almost 99% of cervical cancer has a HPV infection. The early oncoproteins E6 and E7 are important in this cellular transformation process. Epigenetic mechanisms have long been known to result in decisive alterations in DNA, leading to alterations in DNA-protein interactions, alterations in chromatin structure and compaction and significant alterations in gene expression. The enzymes responsible for these epigenetic modifications are DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs), histone acetylases and deacetylases. Epigenetics has an important role in cancer development by modifying the cellular micro environment. In this review, the authors discuss the role of HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 in modulating the epigenetic mechanisms inside the host cell. The oncoproteins induce the expression of DNMTs which lead to aberrant DNA methylations and disruption of the normal epigenetic processes. The E7 oncoprotein may additionally directly bind and induce methyl transferase activity of the enzyme. These modulations lead to altered gene expression levels, particularly the genes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle and cell adhesion. In addition, the present review discusses how epigenetic mechanisms may be targeted for possible therapeutic interventions for HPV mediated cervical cancer. PMID:29285184

  16. Oncoprotein over-expression in breast cancer and its relationship to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects: Seventy two breast cancer patients who were among the 174 entered in survival study had their paraffin breast tissue blocks retrieved from archives of Pathology Department and had their c-erbB-2 determined by peroxidase-labeled streptavidin-biotin immunohistochemical method. Results: c-erbB-2 oncoprotein ...

  17. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deregulated overexpression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins can cause several changes in cellular pathways and functions leading to malignant transformation of cells and tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on several cellular mechanisms and pathways that are altered in the presence of E6 and E7, the target proteins of E6 ...

  18. Peptide-DNA conjugates as tailored bivalent binders of the oncoprotein c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Portela, Cecilia; Penas, Cristina; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2015-05-21

    We describe a ds-oligonucleotide-peptide conjugate that is able to efficiently dismount preformed DNA complexes of the bZIP regions of oncoproteins c-Fos and c-Jun (AP-1), and therefore might be useful as disrupters of AP-1-mediated gene expression pathways.

  19. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  20. The oncoprotein HBXIP suppresses gluconeogenesis through modulating PCK1 to enhance the growth of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hui; Fang, Runping; Li, Yinghui; Li, Leilei; Zhang, Weiying; Wang, Huawei; Chen, Fuquan; Zhang, Shuqin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2016-11-28

    Hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) as an oncoprotein plays crucial roles in the development of cancer, involving glucose metabolism reprogramming. In this study, we are interested in whether the oncoprotein HBXIP is involved in the modulation of gluconeogenesis in liver cancer. Here, we showed that the expression level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1), a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis, was lower in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues than that in normal tissues. Mechanistically, HBXIP inhibited the expression of PCK1 through down-regulating transcription factor FOXO1 in hepatoma cells, and up-regulated miR-135a targeting the 3'UTR of FOXO1 mRNA in the cells. In addition, HBXIP increased the phosphorylation levels of FOXO1 protein by activating PI3K/Akt pathway, leading to the export of FOXO1 from nucleus to cytoplasm. Strikingly, over-expression of PCK1 could abolish the HBXIP-promoted growth of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we conclude that the oncoprotein HBXIP is able to depress the gluconeogenesis through suppressing PCK1 to promote hepatocarcinogenesis, involving miR-135a/FOXO1 axis and PI3K/Akt/p-FOXO1 pathway. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which oncoprotein HBXIP modulates glucose metabolism reprogramming in HCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Positive selection on a bacterial oncoprotein associated with gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado-Rosado Gisela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Helicobacter pylori is a vertically inherited gut commensal that is carcinogenic if it possesses the cag pathogenicity island (cag PaI; infection with H.pylori is the major risk factor for gastric cancer, the second leading cause of death from cancer worldwide (WHO. The cag PaI locus encodes the cagA gene, whose protein product is injected into stomach epithelial cells via a Type IV secretion system, also encoded by the cag PaI. Once there, the cagA protein binds to various cellular proteins, resulting in dysregulation of cell division and carcinogenesis. For this reason, cagA may be described as an oncoprotein. A clear understanding of the mechanism of action of cagA and its benefit to the bacteria is lacking. Results Here, we reveal that the cagA gene displays strong signatures of positive selection in bacteria isolated from amerindian populations, using the Ka/Ks ratio. Weaker signatures are also detected in the gene from bacteria isolated from asian populations, using the Ka/Ks ratio and the more sensitive branches-sites model of the PAML package. When the cagA gene isolated from amerindian populations was examined in more detail it was found that the region under positive selection contains the EPIYA domains, which are known to modulate the carcinogenicity of the gene. This means that the carcinogenicity modulating region of the gene is undergoing adaptation. The results are discussed in relation to the high incidences of stomach cancer in some latin american and asian populations. Conclusion Positive selection on cagA indicates antagonistic coevolution between host and bacteria, which appears paradoxical given that cagA is detrimental to the human host upon which the bacteria depends. This suggests several non-exclusive possibilities; that gastric cancer has not been a major selective pressure on human populations, that cagA has an undetermined benefit to the human host, or that horizontal transmission of H.pylori between hosts

  2. When should adenoviral non-gonococcal urethritis be suspected? Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avolio, Manuela; De Rosa, Rita; Modolo, Maria Luisa; Stano, Paola; Camporese, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The impact of Adenovirus as agent of non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is still poorly documented in the literature. We describe two cases showing that adenoviral infection should be reasonably hypothesized in men with dysuria and scant urethral discharge in addition to meatus inflammation and/or edema (meatitis) or conjunctivitis. Case 1: a 55-year-old man came to our observation in July 2012 referring a 5-day-history of intense dysuria and scant mucoid urethral discharge. Physical examination revealed the urethral discharge referred, but also modest meatitis and an intense conjunctival hyperemia on his right eye. Adenoviral infection was investigated and Adenovirus DNA (type 37) was detected in both the urethral and conjunctival swabs. Case 2: a 43-year-old man with intense dysuria, started 4-5 days earlier, came to our attention with his wife in August 2012. Scant urethral mucoid secretions, severe meatal inflammation of the male patient were revealed during physical examination. His wife instead complained of a 2-day history of intense burning eyes. Adenoviral infection was investigated and Adenovirus DNA (type 37) was positive both in the male urethral swab and in his wife's conjunctival swab. Adenovirus seems to cause a distinct and recognisable clinical syndrome in men presenting with urethritis. Studies on the prevalence and role of Adenovirus as a causative agent of urethritis are limited. Moreover, as rapid advanced molecular microbiology is now available, we believe that extending the search to Adenovirus in sexually active men with dysuria, scant discharge in addition to meatitis or conjunctivitis, should be a useful approach improving our understanding about adenoviral NGU, and especially avoiding or stopping unnecessary empirical antibiotic therapy.

  3. Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity in an Infant with Adenoviral Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Gunay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP has been a major problematic disorder during childhood. Laser photocoagulation (LPC has been proven to be effective in most of the ROP cases. Adenoviral conjunctivitis (AVC is responsible for epidemics among adult and pediatric population. It has also been reported to be a cause of outbreaks in neonatal intensive care units (NICU several times. We herein demonstrate a case with AVC who underwent LPC for ROP. And we discuss the treatment methodology in such cases.

  4. NUP98 fusion oncoproteins interact with the APC/CCdc20 as a pseudosubstrate and prevent mitotic checkpoint complex binding

    OpenAIRE

    Salsi, Valentina; Fantini, Sebastian; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    NUP98 is a recurrent partner gene in translocations causing acute myeloid leukemias and myelodisplastic syndrome. The expression of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins has been shown to induce mitotic spindle defects and chromosome missegregation, which correlate with the capability of NUP98 fusions to cause mitotic checkpoint attenuation. We show that NUP98 oncoproteins physically interact with the APC/CCdc20 in the absence of the NUP98 partner protein RAE1, and prevent the binding of the mitotic chec...

  5. The drug-induced degradation of oncoproteins: an unexpected Achilles' heel of cancer cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; Nasr, Rihab; Bazarbachi, Ali; de Thé, Hugues

    2011-07-01

    Many targeted therapies against cancer are aimed at inhibiting the enzymatic activity of kinases. Thus far, this approach has undoubtedly yielded significant clinical improvements, but has only rarely achieved cures. Other drugs, which selectively elicit proteasome-dependent degradation of oncoproteins, induce the loss of cancer cell self-renewal and promote cell differentiation and/or apoptosis. In acute promyelocytic leukemia, the cooperative degradation of PML/RARA by arsenic and retinoic acid cures most patients. In this condition and others, drug-induced proteolysis of oncoproteins is feasible and underlies improved clinical outcome. Several transcription factors, nuclear receptors, or fusion proteins driving cancer growth could be candidates for proteolysis-based drug-discovery programs.

  6. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Massimi, Paola [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Lizano, Marcela, E-mail: lizanosoberon@gmail.com [Unidad de Investigación Biomédica en Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, México/Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Sección XVI, Tlalpan 14080 (Mexico); Banks, Lawrence, E-mail: banks@icgeb.org [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Padriciano 99, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  7. Adenoviral vector-mediated gene expression in the nervous system of immunocompetent Wistar and T cell-deficient nude rats : preferential survival of transduced astroglial cells in nude rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Verhaagen, J

    1997-01-01

    In the present paper, we examined the effect of the adenoviral vector dosage, the role of T cells, and the influence of the presence of replication-competent adenovirus (RCA) in adenoviral vector stocks, on the efficacy of adenoviral vector-directed transgene expression in the facial nucleus of

  8. Co-expression of tumor antigen and interleukin-2 from an adenoviral vector augments the efficiency of therapeutic tumor vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nørgaard Nielsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that for the majority of antigens, adenoviral vaccines expressing the target antigen fused to the MHC associated invariant chain (Ii) induce an accelerated, augmented, and prolonged transgene-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Here we describe a new adenoviral vaccine vector...... prolonged tumor control in vaccinated wild type (WT) mice. The improved tumor control required antigen-specific cells, since no tumor control was observed, unless the melanoma cells expressed the vaccine targeted antigen. We also tested our new vaccine in immunodeficient (CD80/86 deficient) mice. Following...... approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly...

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of the AdenoPlus test for diagnosing adenoviral conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambursky, Robert; Trattler, William; Tauber, Shachar; Starr, Christopher; Friedberg, Murray; Boland, Thomas; McDonald, Marguerite; DellaVecchia, Michael; Luchs, Jodi

    2013-01-01

    To compare the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the AdenoPlus test with those of both viral cell culture (CC) with confirmatory immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at detecting the presence of adenovirus in tear fluid. A prospective, sequential, masked, multicenter clinical trial enrolled 128 patients presenting with a clinical diagnosis of acute viral conjunctivitis from a combination of 8 private ophthalmology practices and academic centers. Patients were tested with AdenoPlus, CC-IFA, and PCR to detect the presence of adenovirus. The sensitivity and specificity of AdenoPlus were assessed for identifying cases of adenoviral conjunctivitis. Of the 128 patients enrolled, 36 patients' results were found to be positive by either CC-IFA or PCR and 29 patients' results were found to be positive by both CC-IFA and PCR. When compared only with CC-IFA, AdenoPlus showed a sensitivity of 90% (28/31) and specificity of 96% (93/97). When compared only with PCR, AdenoPlus showed a sensitivity of 85% (29/34) and specificity of 98% (89/91). When compared with both CC-IFA and PCR, AdenoPlus showed a sensitivity of 93% (27/29) and specificity of 98% (88/90). When compared with PCR, CC-IFA showed a sensitivity of 85% (29/34) and specificity of 99% (90/91). AdenoPlus is sensitive and specific at detecting adenoviral conjunctivitis. An accurate and rapid in-office test can prevent the misdiagnosis of adenoviral conjunctivitis that leads to the spread of disease, unnecessary antibiotic use, and increased health care costs. Additionally, AdenoPlus may help a clinician make a more informed treatment decision regarding the use of novel therapeutics. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00921895.

  10. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein mediates CCNA1 promoter methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chalertpet, Kanwalat; Pakdeechaidan, Watcharapong; Patel, Vyomesh; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins drive distinctive promoter methylation patterns in cancer. However, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Cyclin A1 (CCNA1) promoter methylation is strongly associated with HPV-associated cancer. CCNA1 methylation is found in HPV-associated cervical cancers, as well as in head and neck squamous cell cancer. Numerous pieces of evidence suggest that E7 may drive CCNA1 methylation. First, the CCNA1 promoter is methylated in HPV-positive epithe...

  11. Progress and prospects: gene therapy for genetic diseases with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, P

    2008-04-01

    Preclinical studies in small and large animal models using helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAds) have generated promising results for the treatment of genetic diseases. However, clinical translation is complicated by the dose-dependent, capsid-mediated acute toxic response following systemic vector injection. With the advancements in vectorology, a better understanding of vector-mediated toxicity, and improved delivery methods, HDAds may emerge as an important vector for gene therapy of genetic diseases and this report highlights recent progress and prospects in this field.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of adenoviral catalase gene transfer in cortical neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáspár, Tamás; Domoki, Ferenc; Lenti, Laura; Institoris, Adám; Snipes, James A; Bari, Ferenc; Busija, David W

    2009-05-13

    Reduced availability of reactive oxygen species is a key component of neuroprotection against various toxic stimuli. Recently we showed that the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase plays a central role in delayed preconditioning induced by the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener BMS-191095. The purpose of the experiments discussed here was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of catalase in vitro using a recombinant adenoviral catalase gene transfer protocol. To induce catalase overexpression, cultured rat cortical neurons were infected with the adenoviral vector Ad5CMVcatalase and control cells were incubated with Ad5CMVntLacZ for 24 h. Gene transfer effectively increased catalase protein levels and activity, but did not influence other antioxidants tested. Ad5CMVcatalase, with up to 10 plaque forming units (pfu) per neuron, did not affect cell viability under control conditions and did not protect against glutamate excitotoxicity or oxygen-glucose deprivation. In contrast, catalase overexpression conferred a dose-dependent protection against exposure to hydrogen peroxide (viability: control, 33.02+/-1.09%; LacZ 10 pfu/cell, 32.85+/-1.51%; catalase 1 pfu/cell, 62.09+/-4.17%*; catalase 2 pfu/cell, 98.71+/-3.35%*; catalase 10 pfu/cell, 99.68+/-1.99%*; *pcatalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole. Our results support the view that enhancing cellular antioxidant capacity may play a crucial role in neuroprotective strategies.

  13. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J.; Carvalho, R. F.; Ruiz, R. M.; Melo, T. C.; Araldi, R. P.; Carvalho, E.; Thompson, C. E.; Sircili, M. P.; Beçak, W.; Stocco, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins. PMID:23878806

  14. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors and Their Use for Neuroscience Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Mónica S; Satterfield, Rachel; Young, Samuel M

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience research has been revolutionized by the use of recombinant viral vector technology from the basic, preclinical and clinical levels. Currently, multiple recombinant viral vector types are employed with each having its strengths and weaknesses depending on the proposed application. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HdAd) are emerging as ideal viral vectors that solve a major need in the neuroscience field: (1) expression of transgenes that are too large to be packaged by other viral vectors and (2) rapid onset of transgene expression in the absence of cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the methods for large-scale production of HdAd viral vectors for in vivo use with neurospecific transgene expression.

  15. Tetracycline-regulated transgene expression in hippocampal neurones following transfection with adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, T C; Geddes, B J; Noel, J D; Murphy, D; Uney, J B

    1997-12-01

    A transfer system that enabled the efficient introduction of transgenes into neurones and the quantitative control of the expressed transgene would greatly facilitate studies into neuronal gene function. To develop such a system we incorporated the tetracycline (Tet)-responsive On/Off regulatory elements into type-5 adenoviral (Ad) vectors. Regulation of transgene expression following transfection was measured by placing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene upstream of the Tet regulatory element. The results showed that cultures of primary hippocampal cells could be transfected with very high efficiency (<70%) by the AdTet-On and AdTet-Off systems. Following transfection with the AdTet-On system no EGFP-fluorescent cells could be detected until doxycycline was added. The AdTet-Off system showed the reverse transcriptional regulation, in that the addition of Tet caused EGFP fluorescence to be abolished.

  16. Isolation, culture and adenoviral transduction of parietal cells from mouse gastric mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gliddon, Briony L; Nguyen, Nhung V; Gunn, Priscilla A; Gleeson, Paul A; Driel, Ian R van [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, 30 Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: i.vandriel@unimelb.edu.au

    2008-09-01

    Here we describe a method for the isolation of intact gastric glands from mice and primary culture and transfection of mouse gastric epithelial cells. Collagenase digestion of PBS-perfused mouse stomachs released large intact gastric glands that were plated on a basement membrane matrix. The heterogeneous gland cell cultures typically contain {approx}60% parietal cells. Isolated mouse parietal cells remain viable in culture for up to 5 days and react strongly with an antibody specific to the gastric H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase. Isolated intact mouse gastric glands and primary cultures of mouse parietal cells respond to the secretagogue, histamine. Typical morphological changes from a resting to an acid-secreting active parietal cell were observed. In resting cultures of mouse parietal cells, the H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase displayed a cytoplasmic punctate staining pattern consistent with tubulovesicle element structures. Following histamine stimulation, an expansion of internal apical vacuole structures was observed together with a pronounced redistribution of the H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase from the cytoplasm to the apical vacuoles. A reproducible procedure to express genes of interest exogenously in these cultures of mouse parietal cells was also established. This method combines recombinant adenoviral transduction with magnetic field-assisted transfection resulting in {approx}30% transduced parietal cells. Adenoviral-transduced parietal cells maintain their ability to undergo agonist-induced activation. This protocol will be useful for the isolation, culture and expression of genes in parietal cells from genetically modified mice and as such will be an invaluable tool for studying the complex exocytic and endocytic trafficking events of the H{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase which underpin the regulation of acid secretion.

  17. Isolation, culture and adenoviral transduction of parietal cells from mouse gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliddon, Briony L; Nguyen, Nhung V; Gunn, Priscilla A; Gleeson, Paul A; Driel, Ian R van

    2008-01-01

    Here we describe a method for the isolation of intact gastric glands from mice and primary culture and transfection of mouse gastric epithelial cells. Collagenase digestion of PBS-perfused mouse stomachs released large intact gastric glands that were plated on a basement membrane matrix. The heterogeneous gland cell cultures typically contain ∼60% parietal cells. Isolated mouse parietal cells remain viable in culture for up to 5 days and react strongly with an antibody specific to the gastric H + /K + ATPase. Isolated intact mouse gastric glands and primary cultures of mouse parietal cells respond to the secretagogue, histamine. Typical morphological changes from a resting to an acid-secreting active parietal cell were observed. In resting cultures of mouse parietal cells, the H + /K + ATPase displayed a cytoplasmic punctate staining pattern consistent with tubulovesicle element structures. Following histamine stimulation, an expansion of internal apical vacuole structures was observed together with a pronounced redistribution of the H + /K + ATPase from the cytoplasm to the apical vacuoles. A reproducible procedure to express genes of interest exogenously in these cultures of mouse parietal cells was also established. This method combines recombinant adenoviral transduction with magnetic field-assisted transfection resulting in ∼30% transduced parietal cells. Adenoviral-transduced parietal cells maintain their ability to undergo agonist-induced activation. This protocol will be useful for the isolation, culture and expression of genes in parietal cells from genetically modified mice and as such will be an invaluable tool for studying the complex exocytic and endocytic trafficking events of the H + /K + ATPase which underpin the regulation of acid secretion

  18. Wavelength-Dependent Damage to Adenoviral Proteins Across the Germicidal UV Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sara E; Hull, Natalie M; Poepping, Christopher; Linden, Karl G

    2018-01-02

    Adenovirus, a waterborne pathogen responsible for causing bronchitis, pneumonia, and gastrointestinal infections, is highly resistant to UV disinfection and therefore drives the virus disinfection regulations set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Polychromatic UV irradiation has been shown to be more effective at inactivating adenovirus and other viruses than traditional monochromatic irradiation emitted at 254 nm; the enhanced efficacy has been attributed to UV-induced damage to viral proteins. This research shows UV-induced damage to adenoviral proteins across the germicidal UV spectrum at wavelength intervals between 200 and 300 nm. A deuterium lamp with bandpass filters and UV light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) isolated wavelengths in approximate 10 nm intervals. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and image densitometry were used to detect signatures for the hexon, penton, fiber, minor capsid, and core proteins. The greatest loss of protein signature, indicating damage to viral proteins, occurred below 240 nm. Hexon and penton proteins exposed to a dose of 28 mJ/cm 2 emitted at 214 nm were approximately 4 times as sensitive and fiber proteins approximately 3 times as sensitive as those exposed to a dose of 50 mJ/cm 2 emitted at 254 nm. At 220 nm, a dose of 38 mJ/cm 2 reduced the hexon and penton protein quantities to approximately 33% and 31% of the original amounts, respectively. In contrast, a much higher dose of 400 mJ/cm 2 emitted at 261 and 278 nm reduced the original protein quantity to between 66-89% and 80-93%, respectively. No significant damage was seen with a dose of 400 mJ/cm 2 at 254 nm. This research directly correlates enhanced inactivation at low wavelengths with adenoviral protein damage at those wavelengths, adding fundamental insight into the mechanisms of inactivation of polychromatic germicidal UV irradiation for improving UV water disinfection.

  19. Sidestream smoke exposure increases the susceptibility of airway epithelia to adenoviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    Full Text Available Although significant epidemiological evidence indicates that cigarette smoke exposure increases the incidence and severity of viral infection, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility of the respiratory tract to viral pathogens are unclear. Adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses and important causative agents of acute respiratory disease. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR is the primary receptor for many adenoviruses. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure increases epithelial susceptibility to adenovirus infection by increasing the abundance of apical CAR.Cultured human airway epithelial cells (CaLu-3 were used as a model to investigate the effect of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSS, mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS, or control air exposure on the susceptibility of polarized respiratory epithelia to adenoviral infection. Using a Cultex air-liquid interface exposure system, we have discovered novel differences in epithelial susceptibility between SSS and MSS exposures. SSS exposure upregulates an eight-exon isoform of CAR and increases adenoviral entry from the apical surface whilst MSS exposure is similar to control air exposure. Additionally, the level of cellular glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β is downregulated by SSS exposure and treatment with a specific GSK3β inhibitor recapitulates the effects of SSS exposure on CAR expression and viral infection.This is the first time that SSS exposure has been shown to directly enhance the susceptibility of a polarized epithelium to infection by a common respiratory viral pathogen. This work provides a novel understanding of the impact of SSS on the burden of respiratory viral infections and may lead to new strategies to alter viral infections. Moreover, since GSK3β inhibitors are under intense clinical investigation as therapeutics for a diverse range of diseases, studies such as these might provide insight to extend the use of clinically relevant

  20. Sidestream smoke exposure increases the susceptibility of airway epithelia to adenoviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Core, Susan B; Kajon, Adriana E; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2012-01-01

    Although significant epidemiological evidence indicates that cigarette smoke exposure increases the incidence and severity of viral infection, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility of the respiratory tract to viral pathogens are unclear. Adenoviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses and important causative agents of acute respiratory disease. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is the primary receptor for many adenoviruses. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure increases epithelial susceptibility to adenovirus infection by increasing the abundance of apical CAR. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (CaLu-3) were used as a model to investigate the effect of sidestream cigarette smoke (SSS), mainstream cigarette smoke (MSS), or control air exposure on the susceptibility of polarized respiratory epithelia to adenoviral infection. Using a Cultex air-liquid interface exposure system, we have discovered novel differences in epithelial susceptibility between SSS and MSS exposures. SSS exposure upregulates an eight-exon isoform of CAR and increases adenoviral entry from the apical surface whilst MSS exposure is similar to control air exposure. Additionally, the level of cellular glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is downregulated by SSS exposure and treatment with a specific GSK3β inhibitor recapitulates the effects of SSS exposure on CAR expression and viral infection. This is the first time that SSS exposure has been shown to directly enhance the susceptibility of a polarized epithelium to infection by a common respiratory viral pathogen. This work provides a novel understanding of the impact of SSS on the burden of respiratory viral infections and may lead to new strategies to alter viral infections. Moreover, since GSK3β inhibitors are under intense clinical investigation as therapeutics for a diverse range of diseases, studies such as these might provide insight to extend the use of clinically relevant therapeutics and

  1. Degenerate cysteine patterns mediate two redox sensing mechanisms in the papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Gabriela; Lorenzo, Juan R; Thomas, Maria G; Salvatierra, Edgardo; Borkosky, Silvia S; Risso, Marikena G; Sánchez, Ignacio E; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo; Alonso, Leonardo G

    2017-04-01

    Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus induces deregulation of cellular redox homeostasis. Virus replication and papillomavirus-induced cell transformation require persistent expression of viral oncoproteins E7 and E6 that must retain their functionality in a persistent oxidative environment. Here, we dissected the molecular mechanisms by which E7 oncoprotein can sense and manage the potentially harmful oxidative environment of the papillomavirus-infected cell. The carboxy terminal domain of E7 protein from most of the 79 papillomavirus viral types of alpha genus, which encloses all the tumorigenic viral types, is a cysteine rich domain that contains two classes of cysteines: strictly conserved low reactive Zn +2 binding and degenerate reactive cysteine residues that can sense reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on experimental data obtained from E7 proteins from the prototypical viral types 16, 18 and 11, we identified a couple of low pKa nucleophilic cysteines that can form a disulfide bridge upon the exposure to ROS and regulate the cytoplasm to nucleus transport. From sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction of redox sensing states we propose that reactive cysteine acquisition through evolution leads to three separate E7s protein families that differ in the ROS sensing mechanism: non ROS-sensitive E7s; ROS-sensitive E7s using only a single or multiple reactive cysteine sensing mechanisms and ROS-sensitive E7s using a reactive-resolutive cysteine couple sensing mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway by Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 Oncoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Omar Muñoz Bello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling pathways are the mechanisms by which cells transduce external stimuli, which control the transcription of genes, to regulate diverse biological effects. In cancer, distinct signaling pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, have been implicated in the deregulation of critical molecular processes that affect cell proliferation and differentiation. For example, changes in β-catenin localization have been identified in Human Papillomavirus (HPV-related cancers as the lesion progresses. Specifically, β-catenin relocates from the membrane/cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that this transcription regulator participates in cervical carcinogenesis. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins are responsible for the transforming activity of HPV, and some studies have implicated these viral oncoproteins in the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Nevertheless, new interactions of HPV oncoproteins with cellular proteins are emerging, and the study of the biological effects of such interactions will help to understand HPV-related carcinogenesis. Viruses 2015, 7 4735 This review addresses the accumulated evidence of the involvement of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  3. Construction and characterization of recombinant fowlpox viruses expressing human papilloma virus E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Eleana; Basavecchia, Valeria; Zanotto, Carlo; Pacchioni, Sole; Morghen, Carlo De Giuli; Radaelli, Antonia

    2009-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-16 is the most prevalent high-risk mucosal genotype and the expression of the E6 and E7 proteins, which can bind to the p53 and p105Rb host cell-cycle regulatory proteins, is related to its tumorigenicity. Virus-like-particle (VLP)-based immunogens developed recently are successful as prophylactic HPV vaccines. However, given the high number of individuals infected already with HPV and the absence of expression of the L1 structural protein in HPV-infected or HPV-transformed cells, an efficient therapeutic vaccine targeting the non-structural E6 and E7 oncoproteins is required. In this study, two new fowlpox virus (FPV) recombinants encoding the HPV-16 E6 and E7 proteins were engineered and evaluated for their correct expression in vitro, with the final aim of developing a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-related cervical tumors. Although vaccinia viruses expressing the HPV-16 and HPV-18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins have already been studied, due to their natural host-range restriction to avian species and their ability to elicit a complete immune response, FPV recombinants may represent efficient and safer vectors also for immunocompromised hosts. The results indicate that FPV recombinants can express correctly the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, and they should represent appropriate vectors for the expression of these oncoproteins in human cells.

  4. Effects of an adenoviral vector containing a suicide gene fusion on growth characteristics of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Heng; Liu, Chunli; Zhu, Ting; Huang, Zonghai; Yang, Liucheng; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV‑TK/GCV) and the cytosine deaminase/5‑fluorocytosine (CD/5‑FC) systems have been widely applied in suicide gene therapy for cancer. Although suicide gene therapy has been successfully used in vitro and in vivo studies, the number of studies on the effects of recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) containing suicide genes on target cancer cells is limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether recombinant Ads containing the CD/TK fusion gene affect cell proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we explored the use of a recombinant adenoviral vector to deliver the CD/TK fusion gene to the breast cancer cell line MCF‑7. We found that the recombinant adenoviral vector efficiently infected MCF‑7 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that CD and TK proteins are expressed in the infected cells. The infected breast cancer cells did not show any significant changes in morphology, ultrastructure, cell growth, and cell‑cycle distribution compared to the uninfected cells. This study revealed that the Ad‑vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGFp)‑CD/TK vector is non‑toxic to MCF‑7 cells at the appropriate titer. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the CD/TK fusion gene in suicide gene therapy to target breast cancer cells.

  5. A Comparative Study of Replication-Incompetent and -Competent Adenoviral Therapy-Mediated Immune Response in a Murine Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Young, Jacob S; Rashidi, Aida; Kane, J Robert; Panek, Wojciech K; Kanojia, Deepak; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment approach with increasing clinical relevance, as indicated by the marked survival benefit seen in animal models and its current exploration in human patients with cancer. The use of an adenovirus vector for this therapeutic modality is common, has significant clinical benefit in animals, and its efficacy has recently been linked to an anti-tumor immune response that occurs following tumor antigen presentation. Here, we analyzed the adaptive immune system's response following viral infection by comparing replication-incompetent and replication-competent adenoviral vectors. Our findings suggest that cell death caused by replication-competent adenoviral vectors is required to induce a significant anti-tumor immune response and survival benefits in immunocompetent mice bearing intracranial glioma. We observed significant changes in the repertoire of immune cells in the brain and draining lymph nodes and significant recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) in response to oncolytic adenoviral therapy, suggesting the active role of the immune system in anti-tumor response. Our data suggest that the response to oncolytic virotherapy is accompanied by local and systemic immune responses and should be taken in consideration in the future design of the clinical studies evaluating oncolytic virotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

  6. Adenoviral gene therapy of the Tay-Sachs disease in hexosaminidase A-deficient knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, J E; Mignon, A; Haase, G; Caillaud, C; McDonell, N; Kahn, A; Poenaru, L

    1999-05-01

    The severe neurodegenerative disorder, Tays-Sachs disease, is caused by a beta-hexosaminidase alpha-subunit deficiency which prevents the formation of lysosomal heterodimeric alpha-beta enzyme, hexosaminidase A (HexA). No treatment is available for this fatal disease; however, gene therapy could represent a therapeutic approach. We previously have constructed and characterized, in vitro, adenoviral and retroviral vectors coding for alpha- and beta-subunits of the human beta-hexosaminidases. Here, we have determined the in vivo strategy which leads to the highest HexA activity in the maximum number of tissues in hexA -deficient knock-out mice. We demonstrated that intravenous co-administration of adenoviral vectors coding for both alpha- and beta-subunits, resulting in preferential liver transduction, was essential to obtain the most successful results. Only the supply of both subunits allowed for HexA overexpression leading to massive secretion of the enzyme in serum, and full or partial enzymatic activity restoration in all peripheral tissues tested. The enzymatic correction was likely to be due to direct cellular transduction by adenoviral vectors and/or uptake of secreted HexA by different organs. These results confirmed that the liver was the preferential target organ to deliver a large amount of secreted proteins. In addition, the need to overexpress both subunits of heterodimeric proteins in order to obtain a high level of secretion in animals defective in only one subunit is emphasized. The endogenous non-defective subunit is otherwise limiting.

  7. A Comparative Study of Replication-Incompetent and -Competent Adenoviral Therapy-Mediated Immune Response in a Murine Glioma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment approach with increasing clinical relevance, as indicated by the marked survival benefit seen in animal models and its current exploration in human patients with cancer. The use of an adenovirus vector for this therapeutic modality is common, has significant clinical benefit in animals, and its efficacy has recently been linked to an anti-tumor immune response that occurs following tumor antigen presentation. Here, we analyzed the adaptive immune system’s response following viral infection by comparing replication-incompetent and replication-competent adenoviral vectors. Our findings suggest that cell death caused by replication-competent adenoviral vectors is required to induce a significant anti-tumor immune response and survival benefits in immunocompetent mice bearing intracranial glioma. We observed significant changes in the repertoire of immune cells in the brain and draining lymph nodes and significant recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs in response to oncolytic adenoviral therapy, suggesting the active role of the immune system in anti-tumor response. Our data suggest that the response to oncolytic virotherapy is accompanied by local and systemic immune responses and should be taken in consideration in the future design of the clinical studies evaluating oncolytic virotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM.

  8. Identification of GPC2 as an Oncoprotein and Candidate Immunotherapeutic Target in High-Risk Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Kristopher R; Raman, Pichai; Zhu, Zhongyu; Lane, Maria; Martinez, Daniel; Heitzeneder, Sabine; Rathi, Komal S; Kendsersky, Nathan M; Randall, Michael; Donovan, Laura; Morrissy, Sorana; Sussman, Robyn T; Zhelev, Doncho V; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Hwang, Jennifer; Lopez, Gonzalo; Harenza, Jo Lynne; Wei, Jun S; Pawel, Bruce; Bhatti, Tricia; Santi, Mariarita; Ganguly, Arupa; Khan, Javed; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Mackall, Crystal L; Maris, John M

    2017-09-11

    We developed an RNA-sequencing-based pipeline to discover differentially expressed cell-surface molecules in neuroblastoma that meet criteria for optimal immunotherapeutic target safety and efficacy. Here, we show that GPC2 is a strong candidate immunotherapeutic target in this childhood cancer. We demonstrate high GPC2 expression in neuroblastoma due to MYCN transcriptional activation and/or somatic gain of the GPC2 locus. We confirm GPC2 to be highly expressed on most neuroblastomas, but not detectable at appreciable levels in normal childhood tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that GPC2 is required for neuroblastoma proliferation. Finally, we develop a GPC2-directed antibody-drug conjugate that is potently cytotoxic to GPC2-expressing neuroblastoma cells. Collectively, these findings validate GPC2 as a non-mutated neuroblastoma oncoprotein and candidate immunotherapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oncoprotein MDM2 Overexpression is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Distinct Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    altered p53. In univariate analysis MDM2 overexpression associated with short survival in follicle center lymphomas (P = .0256), extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (P lymphomas (P = .0047). The relation to poor prognosis was maintained in a Cox regression analysis including known......MDM2 is an oncoprotein involved in the regulation of p53. MDM2 exerts its tumorigenic potential through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. It is frequently overexpressed in various malignancies. Little is known about the prognostic value of MDM2 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL...... overexpression was present in 42 (22%) of 188 cases. The frequency was highest in aggressive/very aggressive NHL (P lymphomas, MDM2 overexpression was associated with higher-grade disease (P = .008). MDM2 overexpression was not related to a phenotype indicating...

  10. Karyopherin β3: A new cellular target for the HPV-16 E5 oncoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, Ewa; Hanover, John A.; Schlegel, Richard; Suprynowicz, Frank A.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer worldwide, and that HPV-16 is associated with more than half of these cases. In addition to the well-characterized E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV-16, recent evidence increasingly has implicated the HPV-16 E5 protein (16E5) as an important mediator of oncogenic transformation. Since 16E5 has no known intrinsic enzymatic activity, its effects on infected cells are most likely mediated by interactions with various cellular proteins and/or its documented association with lipid rafts. In the present study, we describe a new cellular target that binds to 16E5 in COS cells and in stable human ectocervical cell lines. This target is karyopherin β3, a member of the nuclear import receptor family with critical roles in the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins and in the secretory pathway

  11. Oncoprotein MDM2 Overexpression is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Distinct Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Entities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    1999-01-01

    MDM2 is an oncoprotein involved in the regulation of p53. MDM2 exerts its tumorigenic potential through p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms. It is frequently overexpressed in various malignancies. Little is known about the prognostic value of MDM2 expression in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL......). We analyzed MDM2 expression immunohistochemically in 188 NHL cases from a prospective population-based NHL registry. The aim was to identify MDM2 expression profiles in various histological NHL subtypes and analyze whether MDM2 expression correlated with clinical variables and p53 status. MDM2...... overexpression was present in 42 (22%) of 188 cases. The frequency was highest in aggressive/very aggressive NHL (P MDM2 overexpression was associated with higher-grade disease (P = .008). MDM2 overexpression was not related to a phenotype indicating...

  12. hrHPV E5 oncoprotein: immune evasion and related immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; de Oliveira, Talita Helena Araújo; Barros, Marconi Rego; Venuti, Aldo

    2017-05-25

    The immune response is a key factor in the fight against HPV infection and related cancers, and thus, HPV is able to promote immune evasion through the expression of oncogenes. In particular, the E5 oncogene is responsible for modulation of several immune mechanisms, including antigen presentation and inflammatory pathways. Moreover, E5 was suggested as a promising therapeutic target, since there is still no effective medical therapy for the treatment of HPV-related pre-neoplasia and cancer. Indeed, several studies have shown good prospective for E5 immunotherapy, suggesting that it could be applied for the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions. Thus, insofar as the majority of cervical, oropharyngeal and anal cancers are caused by high-risk HPV (hrHPV), mainly by HPV16, the aim of this review is to discuss the immune pathways interfered by E5 oncoprotein of hrHPV highlighting the various aspects of the potential immunotherapeutic approaches.

  13. The splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and is an oncoprotein in lung and colon cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen-Eliav, Michal; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Siegfried, Zahava

    2013-01-01

    to be tumorigenic in mice. In contrast, knockdown of SRSF6 in lung and colon cancer cell lines inhibited their tumorigenic abilities. SRSF6 up- or down regulation altered the splicing of several tumor suppressors and oncogenes to generate the oncogenic isoforms and reduce the tumor suppressive isoforms. Our data...... and lung tumors and found that the gene encoding for the splicing factor SRSF6 is amplified and overexpressed in these cancers. Moreover, overexpression of SRSF6 in immortal lung epithelial cells enhanced proliferation, protected them from chemotherapy-induced cell death and converted them...... suggests that the splicing factor SRSF6 is an oncoprotein which regulates proliferation and survival of lung and colon cancer cells....

  14. CRISPR/Cas9 delivery with one single adenoviral vector devoid of all viral genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Schiwon, Maren; Leitner, Theo; Dávid, Stephan; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2017-12-07

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system revolutionized the field of gene editing but viral delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has not been fully explored. Here we adapted clinically relevant high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) devoid of all viral genes for the delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery using a single viral vector. We present a platform enabling fast transfer of the Cas9 gene and gRNA expression units into the HCAdV genome including the option to choose between constitutive or inducible Cas9 expression and gRNA multiplexing. Efficacy and versatility of this pipeline was exemplified by producing different CRISPR/Cas9-HCAdV targeting the human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 oncogene E6, the dystrophin gene causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the HIV co-receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5). All CRISPR/Cas9-HCAdV proved to be efficient to deliver the respective CRISPR/Cas9 expression units and to introduce the desired DNA double strand breaks at their intended target sites in immortalized and primary cells.

  15. Combinatorial treatment with oncolytic adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus augments adenoviral cancer gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviruses (Onc.Ads produce significant antitumor effects but as single agents they rarely eliminate tumors. Investigators have therefore incorporated sequences into these vectors that encode immunomodulatory molecules to enhance antitumor immunity. Successful implementation of this strategy requires multiple tumor immune inhibitory mechanisms to be overcome, and insertion of the corresponding multiple functional genes reduces the titer and replication of Onc.Ads, compromising their direct ant-tumor effects. By contrast, helper-dependent (HD Ads are devoid of viral coding sequences, allowing inclusion of multiple transgenes. HDAds, however, lack replicative capacity. Since HDAds encode the adenoviral packaging signal, we hypothesized that the coadministration of Onc.Ad with HDAd would allow to be amplified and packaged during replication of Onc.Ad in transduced cancer cells. This combination could provide immunostimulation without losing oncolytic activity. We now show that coinfection of Onc.Ad with HDAd subsequently replicates HDAd vector DNA in trans in human cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo, amplifying the transgenes the HDAd encode. This combinatorial treatment significantly suppresses the tumor growth compared to treatment with a single agent in an immunocompetent mouse model. Hence, combinatorial treatment of Onc.Ad with HDAd should overcome the inherent limitations of each agent and provide a highly immunogenic oncolytic therapy.

  16. Efficient Gene Delivery to Pig Airway Epithelia and Submucosal Glands Using Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibi Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat patients with life-threatening lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF. However, this strategy has to be evaluated in large animal preclinical studies in order to translate it to human applications. Because of anatomic and physiological similarities between the human and pig lungs, we utilized pig as a large animal model to examine the safety and efficiency of airway gene delivery with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors. Helper-dependent vectors carrying human CFTR or reporter gene LacZ were aerosolized intratracheally into pigs under bronchoscopic guidance. We found that the LacZ reporter and hCFTR transgene products were efficiently expressed in lung airway epithelial cells. The transgene vectors with this delivery can also reach to submucosal glands. Moreover, the hCFTR transgene protein localized to the apical membrane of both ciliated and nonciliated epithelial cells, mirroring the location of wild-type CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Aerosol delivery procedure was well tolerated by pigs without showing systemic toxicity based on the limited number of pigs tested. These results provide important insights into developing clinical strategies for human CF lung gene therapy.

  17. Gene targeting in human-induced pluripotent stem cells with adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2014-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAdV), which is also called gutless AdV, has been used to deliver donor DNA for gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells. Surprisingly, the targeting efficacies, both per chromosomal integration (drug-resistant colony) and per treated cells, are much higher than those by standard electroporation and equivalent to those by utilizing artificial nucleases, such as TAL effector nucleases (Aizawa et al., Mol Ther 20:424-431, 2012; Suzuki, Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:13781-13786, 2008). Importantly, gene targeting with HDAdVs was equally efficient in transcriptionally inactive loci in human ES/iPS cells. Therefore, multiple gene-targeted clones can be obtained from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) cultured in one 100-mm dish. For virus-mediated gene targeting, it is not required to introduce artificial double-strand breaks. By using electroporation for gene targeting, target cells should be expanded to 10⁶-10⁷ cells. In contrast, as an advantage of virus-mediated method, DNA delivery efficiency is high even in a smaller number of cells, resulting in minimizing the number of passages/cell divisions before performing gene targeting. The characteristics suggest that HDAdV-mediated gene targeting has potential advantages for manipulation of chromosomes of pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  18. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merry ZC Ruan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs. Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab. We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4 into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting.

  19. Lipofectamine and related cationic lipids strongly improve adenoviral infection efficiency of primitive human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, T; Haddada, H; Vainchenker, W; Louache, F

    1998-11-20

    Adenoviral vectors have the potential to infect a large number of cell types including quiescent cells. Their use in hematopoietic cells is limited by the episomal form of their DNA, leading to transgene loss in the progeny cells. However, the use of this vector may be interesting for short-term in vitro modifications of primitive human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we have investigated the ability of adenovirus to transduce cord blood CD34+ cells. Several promoters were tested using the lacZ reporter gene. The PGK and CMV promoters induced transgene expression in 18-25% of the cells, whereas the HTLV-I and especially the RSV promoter were almost inactive. To improve infection efficiency, adenovirus was complexed with cationic lipids. Lipofectamine, Cellfectin, and RPR120535b, but not Lipofectin, Lipofectace, or DOTAP, markedly improved transgene expression in CD34+ cells (from 19 to 35%). Lipofectamine strongly enhanced infection efficiency of the poorly infectable primitive CD34+CD38low cells (from 11 to 28%) whereas the more mature CD34+CD38+ cells were only slightly affected (from 24 to 31%). Lipofectamine tripled the infection of CFU-GMs and LTC-ICs derived from the CD34+CD38low cell fraction (from 4 to 12% and from 5 to 16%, respectively) and doubled that of BFU-Es (from 13 to 26%). We conclude that cationic lipids can markedly increase the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primitive hematopoietic cells.

  20. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gen...

  1. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  2. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Dharmin; Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter; Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo; Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees; Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard; Smitt, Peter Sillevis

    2002-01-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123 I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123 I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123 I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123 I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123 I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1

  3. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H. Baker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX, which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon, pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX, or alternatively, through the use of polymer

  4. [The virological and epidemiological aspects of human adenoviral conjunctivitis in Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedaoui, N; Ben Ayed, N; Ben Yahia, A; Matri, L; Nacef, L; Triki, H

    2017-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are the main cause of viral conjunctivitis. In Tunisia and North Africa more generally, there is no regular nationwide surveillance program that monitors viruses causing conjunctivitis and keratoconjunctivitis. In this study, we report the results of HAdV screening in conjunctival samples collected for over 14 years in Tunisia. A total of 282 conjunctival samples received between 2000 and 2013 were investigated. Detection and identification of genotype were performed by PCR-sequencing at the hexon gene; 64.5% of samples (n=182) revealed positive by PCR detection without correlation noted between infection, age, sex, social class or clinical manifestations of viral conjunctivitis. HAdV-D8 was the largely predominant genotype in Tunisia, representing 81.3% of all isolates, and was detected continuously from 2000 to 2013. Minor co-circulating genotypes were also identified - HAdV-E4, HAdV-B3, B55 and HAdV-B7 - accounting for 10.7%, 4.9%, 1.9% and 0.9% of isolates, respectively. In conclusion, this work reports epidemiological data on adenoviral conjunctivitis from a region where such information is very scarce and contributes to a better knowledge of the worldwide distribution of causative genotypes. It also presents an approach for the identification of circulating HAdV in the country and demonstrates the importance of molecular tools for both detection and identification of genotypes, which allow rapid virological investigation, especially during epidemics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  6. Radiosensitization effect of recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene on pancreatic carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Dongming; Zhang Kejun; Li Dechun; Zhu Xuefeng; Yang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of PUMA gene mediated by recombinant adenovirus vector combined with radiation on the pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: The PANC-1 cells were infected with Ad- PUMA (MOI=10, 50 and 100, respectively) for 48 h. The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. PANC-1 cells were divided into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. The cell growth inhibition rate and apoptotic rate of PANC-1 cells were assessed by MTT assay and flow cytometry. Human pancreatic carcinomas were transplanted subcutaneously in nude mice, which were randomized into 4 groups: control group, transfection group, irradiation group and combined treatment group. Tumor growth rate and apoptotic index at different time points were recorded in 35 days. Results: The expression of PUMA mRNA and protein was increased with the increase of MOI of Ad-PUMA, which was does-dependant (MOI=10, mRNA=0.46± 0.02, protein=0.75± 0.09; MOI=50, mRNA=1.12±0.09, protein=1.01±0.18; MOI=100, mRNA=1.50±0.08, protein= 1.80±0.15; P 3 , (39.5±9.23)mm 3 , (33.6±10.3)mm 3 and (52.0±11.43)mm 3 , respectively, P<0.05]. And the apoptotic index was increased in the same manner (AI=0.43±0.05, 0.29±0.10, 0.24±0.05 and 0.00±0.00, respectively, P<0.05). Conclusions: Recombinant adenoviral-mediated PUMA gene combined with irradiation could increase the cell-killing effect on pancreatic carcinoma. It is better than that of either one kind of therapy. (authors)

  7. Fetal muscle gene transfer is not enhanced by an RGD capsid modification to high-capacity adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, R; Reay, D P; Hughes, T; Biermann, V; Volpers, C; Goldberg, L; Bergelson, J; Kochanek, S; Clemens, P R

    2003-10-01

    High levels of alpha(v) integrin expression by fetal muscle suggested that vector re-targeting to integrins could enhance adenoviral vector-mediated transduction, thereby increasing safety and efficacy of muscle gene transfer in utero. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors modified by an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide motif in the HI loop of the adenoviral fiber (RGD-HC-Ad) have demonstrated efficient gene transfer through binding to alpha(v) integrins. To test integrin targeting of HC-Ad vectors for fetal muscle gene transfer, we compared unmodified and RGD-modified HC-Ad vectors. In vivo, unmodified HC-Ad vector transduced fetal mouse muscle with four-fold higher efficiency compared to RGD-HC-Ad vector. Confirming that the difference was due to muscle cell autonomous factors and not mechanical barriers, transduction of primary myogenic cells isolated from murine fetal muscle in vitro demonstrated a three-fold better transduction by HC-Ad vector than by RGD-HC-Ad vector. We hypothesized that the high expression level of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), demonstrated in fetal muscle cells both in vitro and in vivo, was the crucial variable influencing the relative transduction efficiencies of HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors. To explore this further, we studied transduction by HC-Ad and RGD-HC-Ad vectors in paired cell lines that expressed alpha(v) integrins and differed only by the presence or absence of CAR expression. The results increase our understanding of factors that will be important for retargeting HC-Ad vectors to enhance gene transfer to fetal muscle.

  8. The HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax is modified by the ubiquitin related modifier 1 (Urm1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hleihel, Rita; Khoshnood, Behzad; Dacklin, Ingrid; Omran, Hayssam; Mouawad, Carine; Dassouki, Zeina; El-Sabban, Marwan; Shirinian, Margret; Grabbe, Caroline; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2018-04-17

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive malignancy secondary to chronic human T-cell lymphotropic virus 1 infection, triggered by the virally encoded oncoprotein Tax. The transforming activity and subcellular localization of Tax is strongly influenced by posttranslational modifications, among which ubiquitylation and SUMOylation have been identified as key regulators of the nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling of Tax, as well as its ability to activate NF-κB signaling. Adding to the complex posttranslational modification landscape of Tax, we here demonstrate that Tax also interacts with the ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (Urm1). Conjugation of Urm1 to Tax results in a redistribution of Tax to the cytoplasm and major increase in the transcription of the NF-ĸB targets Rantes and interleukin-6. Utilizing a tax-transgenic Drosophila model, we show that the Urm1-dependent subcellular targeting of Tax is evolutionary conserved, and that the presence of Urm1 is strongly correlated with the transcriptional output of Diptericin, an antimicrobial peptide and established downstream target of NF-κB in flies. These data put forward Urm1 as a novel Tax modifier that modulates its oncogenic activity and hence represents a potential novel target for developing new strategies for treating ATL.

  9. Functional and Structural Mimicry of Cellular Protein Kinase A Anchoring Proteins by a Viral Oncoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cason R King

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The oncoproteins of the small DNA tumor viruses interact with a plethora of cellular regulators to commandeer control of the infected cell. During infection, adenovirus E1A deregulates cAMP signalling and repurposes it for activation of viral gene expression. We show that E1A structurally and functionally mimics a cellular A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP. E1A interacts with and relocalizes protein kinase A (PKA to the nucleus, likely to virus replication centres, via an interaction with the regulatory subunits of PKA. Binding to PKA requires the N-terminus of E1A, which bears striking similarity to the amphipathic α-helical domain present in cellular AKAPs. E1A also targets the same docking-dimerization domain of PKA normally bound by cellular AKAPs. In addition, the AKAP like motif within E1A could restore PKA interaction to a cellular AKAP in which its normal interaction motif was deleted. During infection, E1A successfully competes with endogenous cellular AKAPs for PKA interaction. E1A's role as a viral AKAP contributes to viral transcription, protein expression and progeny production. These data establish HAdV E1A as the first known viral AKAP. This represents a unique example of viral subversion of a crucial cellular regulatory pathway via structural mimicry of the PKA interaction domain of cellular AKAPs.

  10. The identification of ganglion cells in Hirschsprung disease by the immunohistochemical detection of ret oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sadiqa; Hession, Colleen; Marconi, Sharon; Gang, David L; Otis, Christopher N

    2006-07-01

    The absence of ganglion cells (GCs) is the primary anatomic abnormality in Hirschsprung disease. Light microscopy is the mainstay in establishing this diagnosis. However, establishing a condition of aganglionosis may be challenging on routine H&E-stained sections of colonic biopsies and resections. We studied the identification of GCs by retinoblastoma oncoprotein (ret) immunoreactivity and routine H&E light microscopy by evaluating 53 blocks from 34 patients demonstrating GCs on original H&E-stained sections and 55 blocks from 38 patients lacking GCs on original H&E-stained sections. All blocks demonstrating GCs on H&E-stained sections also were positive for GCs on ret staining (100%). In 3 blocks that were negative for GCs by H&E staining (5%), GCs were shown on ret-stained sections. Immunoreactivity for ret has comparable specificity but slightly higher sensitivity to routine light microscopic evaluation in identifying GCs. GCs are identified more readily by ret immunoreactivity than by routine morphologic examination.

  11. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Estruch

    Full Text Available Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1 functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1, a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9, a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  12. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Sara B; Buzón, Víctor; Carbó, Laia R; Schorova, Lenka; Lüders, Jens; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1) functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs) of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1), a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9), a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  13. Role of the YAP Oncoprotein in Priming Ras-Driven Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine K Slemmons

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, a cancer characterized by features of skeletal muscle histogenesis, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Survival for high-risk groups is less than 30% at 5 years. RMS also occurs during adulthood, with a lower incidence but higher mortality. Recently, mutational profiling has revealed a correlation between activating Ras mutations in the embryonal (eRMS and pleomorphic (pRMS histologic variants of RMS, and a poorer outcome for those patients. Independently, the YAP transcriptional coactivator, an oncoprotein kept in check by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, is upregulated in eRMS. Here we show that YAP promotes cell proliferation and antagonizes apoptosis and myogenic differentiation of human RMS cells bearing oncogenic Ras mutations in cell culture studies in vitro and in murine xenografts in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of YAP by the benzoporphyrin derivative verteporfin decreased cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. To interrogate the temporal contribution of YAP in eRMS tumorigenesis, we used a primary human cell-based genetic model of Ras-driven RMS. Constitutively active YAP functioned as an early genetic lesion, permitting bypass of senescence and priming myoblasts to tolerate subsequent expression of hTERT and oncogenic Ras, which were necessary and sufficient to generate murine xenograft tumors mimicking RMS in vivo. This work provides evidence for cooperation between YAP and oncogenic Ras in RMS tumorigenesis, laying the foundation for preclinical co-targeting of these pathways.

  14. The viral oncoprotein LMP1 exploits TRADD for signaling by masking its apoptotic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Schneider

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF-receptor 1-associated death domain protein (TRADD mediates induction of apoptosis as well as activation of NF-kappaB by cellular TNF-receptor 1 (TNFR1. TRADD is also recruited by the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus, but its role in LMP1 signaling has remained enigmatic. In human B lymphocytes, we have generated, to our knowledge, the first genetic knockout of TRADD to investigate TRADD's role in LMP1 signal transduction. Our data from TRADD-deficient cells demonstrate that TRADD is a critical signaling mediator of LMP1 that is required for LMP1 to recruit and activate I-kappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta. However, in contrast to TNFR1, LMP1-induced TRADD signaling does not induce apoptosis. Searching for the molecular basis for this observation, we characterized the 16 C-terminal amino acids of LMP1 as an autonomous and unique virus-derived TRADD-binding domain. Replacing the death domain of TNFR1 by LMP1's TRADD-binding domain converts TNFR1 into a nonapoptotic receptor that activates NF-kappaB through a TRAF6-dependent pathway, like LMP1 but unlike wild-type TNFR1. Thus, the unique interaction of LMP1 with TRADD encodes the transforming phenotype of viral TRADD signaling and masks TRADD's pro-apoptotic function.

  15. The viral oncoprotein LMP1 exploits TRADD for signaling by masking its apoptotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Frank; Neugebauer, Julia; Griese, Janine; Liefold, Nicola; Kutz, Helmut; Briseño, Cinthia; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor 1-associated death domain protein (TRADD) mediates induction of apoptosis as well as activation of NF-kappaB by cellular TNF-receptor 1 (TNFR1). TRADD is also recruited by the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus, but its role in LMP1 signaling has remained enigmatic. In human B lymphocytes, we have generated, to our knowledge, the first genetic knockout of TRADD to investigate TRADD's role in LMP1 signal transduction. Our data from TRADD-deficient cells demonstrate that TRADD is a critical signaling mediator of LMP1 that is required for LMP1 to recruit and activate I-kappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta). However, in contrast to TNFR1, LMP1-induced TRADD signaling does not induce apoptosis. Searching for the molecular basis for this observation, we characterized the 16 C-terminal amino acids of LMP1 as an autonomous and unique virus-derived TRADD-binding domain. Replacing the death domain of TNFR1 by LMP1's TRADD-binding domain converts TNFR1 into a nonapoptotic receptor that activates NF-kappaB through a TRAF6-dependent pathway, like LMP1 but unlike wild-type TNFR1. Thus, the unique interaction of LMP1 with TRADD encodes the transforming phenotype of viral TRADD signaling and masks TRADD's pro-apoptotic function.

  16. The S100A4 Oncoprotein Promotes Prostate Tumorigenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siddique, Hifzur R; Adhami, Vaqar M; Parray, Aijaz

    2013-01-01

    S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is known for its role in the metastatic spread of tumor cells, a late event of cancer disease. This is the first report showing that S100A4 is not merely a metastatic protein but also an oncoprotein that plays a critical role in the development of tumors. We...... earlier showed that S100A4 expression progressively increases in prostatic tissues with the advancement of prostate cancer (CaP) in TRAMP, an autochthonous mouse model. To study the functional significance of S100A4 in CaP, we generated a heterozygously deleted S100A4 (TRAMP/S100A4(+/-)) genotype...... weights (P cells and tested their potential. S100A4-positive tumors grew at a faster rate than S100A4-negative tumors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. The S100A4 protein exhibited growth factor-like properties in multimode...

  17. Actin-dependent activation of serum response factor in T cells by the viral oncoprotein tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsch Kristin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF acts as a multifunctional transcription factor regulated by mutually exclusive interactions with ternary complex factors (TCFs or myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs. Binding of Rho- and actin-regulated MRTF:SRF complexes to target gene promoters requires an SRF-binding site only, whereas MAPK-regulated TCF:SRF complexes in addition rely on flanking sequences present in the serum response element (SRE. Here, we report on the activation of an SRE luciferase reporter by Tip, the viral oncoprotein essentially contributing to human T-cell transformation by Herpesvirus saimiri. SRE activation in Tip-expressing Jurkat T cells could not be attributed to triggering of the MAPK pathway. Therefore, we further analyzed the contribution of MRTF complexes. Indeed, Tip also activated a reporter construct responsive to MRTF:SRF. Activation of this reporter was abrogated by overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of the MRTF-family member MAL. Moreover, enrichment of monomeric actin suppressed the Tip-induced reporter activity. Further upstream, the Rho-family GTPase Rac, was found to be required for MRTF:SRF reporter activation by Tip. Initiation of this pathway was strictly dependent on Tip's ability to interact with Lck and on the activity of this Src-family kinase. Independent of Tip, T-cell stimulation orchestrates Src-family kinase, MAPK and actin pathways to induce SRF. These findings establish actin-regulated transcription in human T cells and suggest its role in viral oncogenesis.

  18. Expression of myc family oncoproteins in small-cell lung-cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    A number of genes have altered activity in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), but especially genes of the myc family (c-myc, L-myc and N-myc) are expressed at high levels in SCLC. Most studies have explored expression at the mRNA level, whereas studies of myc family oncoprotein expression are sparse....... WE examined the expression of myc proto-oncogenes at the mRNA and protein level in 23 cell lines or xenografts. In the cell lines, the doubling time and the cell-cycle distribution, as determined by flow-cytometric DNA analysis, were examined to establish whether the level of myc......-myc. In general, the level of expression of c-myc and N-myc was similar at the mRNA and the protein level. Expression of c-myc was positively correlated with the proliferative index (sum of S and G2+M phases) of cell lines, but not with the population doubling time. In general, L-myc-expressing cell lines had...

  19. Chapter five--The development of transcription-regulated adenoviral vectors with high cancer-selective imaging capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziyue Karen; Sato, Makoto; Wu, Lily

    2012-01-01

    A clear benefit of molecular imaging is to enable noninvasive, repetitive monitoring of intrinsic signals within tumor cells as a means to identify the lesions as malignant or to assess the ability of treatment to perturb key pathways within the tumor cells. Due to the promising utility of molecular imaging in oncology, preclinical research to refine molecular imaging techniques in small animals is a blossoming field. We will first discuss the several imaging modalities such as fluorescent imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and positron emission tomography that are now commonly used in small animal settings. The indirect imaging approach, which can be adapted to a wide range of imaging reporter genes, is a useful platform to develop molecular imaging. In particular, reporter gene-based imaging is well suited for transcriptional-targeted imaging that can be delivered by recombinant adenoviral vectors. In this review, we will summarize transcription-regulated strategies used in adenoviral-mediated molecular imaging to visualize metastasis and monitor oncolytic therapy in preclinical models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Vascular administration of adenoviral vector soaked in absorbable gelatin sponge particles (GSP) prolongs the transgene expression in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeong-Ho; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Jeong, Jin-Sook; Rha, Seo-Hee; Kim, Seung-Eun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jeong-Man; Hwang, Tae-Ho

    2005-02-01

    Transcatheter hepatic arterial chemoembolization using emulsions composed of anticancer agents and gelatin sponges (GS) has been an efficient and safe palliative treatment for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We employed catheter-mediated left hepatic arterial embolization (CHAE) to increase transduction efficiency of adenoviral vector in canine hepatocytes. The emulsion was prepared by mixing pieces of GSP and adenoviral vectors expressing recombinant beta-galactosidase (Ad.LacZ) or human hepatocyte growth factor (Ad.hHGF). After the left hepatic artery was catheterized under angiography, CHAE with Ad.LacZ or Ad.hHGF was performed. Livers were removed and stained for LacZ activity on day 7. The expression pattern of LacZ staining was either scarce or patchy around the central hilum of the hepatic artery, or was homogeneously distributed in whole lobes, depending on whether large or small pieces of GSP were used. Hematological and serum biochemical changes during CHAE exhibited only a few effects. The chronological measurement of serum HGF concentration showed that the duration of transgene expression was greater after CHAE with Ad.hHGF. A similar pattern of transgene expression was observed in a rat model after hepatic arterial embolization with differential doses of Ad.hHGF soaked in GSP. These results suggest that hepatic arterial embolization by transcatheter mediated infusion with a mixture of adenovirus-GSP could be used for human HCC.

  1. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan L

    2016-12-01

    coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, adenovirus vectors, spermine-pullulan, polymer, gene transduction

  2. Adenoviral gene transfer of a u-PA receptor-binding plasmin inhibitor and green fluorescent protein: inhibition of migration and visualization of expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamfers, M. L.; Wijnberg, M. J.; Grimbergen, J. M.; Huisman, L. G.; Aalders, M. C.; Cohen, F. N.; Verheijen, J. H.; van Hinsbergh, V. W.; Quax, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell migration plays a role in the development of intimal hyperplasia. Given the established role of the plasminogen activation system in cell migration, an approach to therapy is to overexpress an inhibitor of plasmin. Therefore, an adenoviral vector was constructed encoding the

  3. Adenoviral vector-mediated expression of B-50/GAP-43 induces alterations in the membrane organization of olfactory axon terminals in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtmaat, Anthony J D G; Hermens, W.T.J.M.C.; Sonnemans, M.A.F.; Giger, Roman J; Van Leeuwen, F W; Kaplitt, M G; Oestreicher, A B; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Verhaagen, J

    1997-01-01

    B-50/GAP-43 is an intraneuronal membrane-associated growth cone protein with an important role in axonal growth and regeneration. By using adenoviral vector-directed expression of B-50/GAP-43 we studied the morphogenic action of B-50/GAP-43 in mature primary olfactory neurons that have established

  4. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, Declan J., E-mail: dj.mckenna@ulster.ac.uk [Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, University of Ulster, Coleraine, Co. Derry BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Patel, Daksha, E-mail: d.patel@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); McCance, Dennis J., E-mail: d.mccance@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-05

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes.

  5. miR-24 and miR-205 expression is dependent on HPV onco-protein expression in keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, Declan J.; Patel, Daksha; McCance, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    A screen of microRNA (miRNA) expression following differentiation in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) identified changes in several miRNAs, including miR-24 and miR-205. We investigated how expression of Human Papilloma Virus Type-16 (HPV16) onco-proteins E6 and E7 affected expression of miR-24 and miR-205 during proliferation and differentiation of HFKs. We show that the induction of both miR-24 and miR-205 observed during differentiation of HFKs is lost in HFKs expressing E6 and E7. We demonstrate that the effect on miR-205 is due to E7 activity, as miR-205 expression is dependent on pRb expression. Finally, we provide evidence that miR-24 effects in the cell may be due to targeting of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p27. In summary, these results indicate that expression of both miR-24 and miR-205 are impacted by E6 and/or E7 expression, which may be one mechanism by which HPV onco-proteins can disrupt the balance between proliferation and differentiation in keratinocytes. - Highlights: • miR-24 and miR-205 are induced during keratinocyte differentiation. • This induction is lost in keratinocytes expressing HPV onco-proteins E6 and E7. • miR-205 is dependent upon pRb expression. • miR-24 targets p27 in cycling keratinocytes

  6. The HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein induces centriole multiplication through deregulation of Polo-like kinase 4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duensing Stefan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs such as HPV-16 is intimately associated with squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs of the anogenital tract and a subset of oropharyngeal carcinomas. Such lesions, including pre-invasive precursors, frequently show multipolar mitoses and aneuploidy. The high-risk HPV-16-encoded E7 oncoprotein has been shown to rapidly induce centrosome abnormalities thereby causing the formation of supernumerary mitotic spindle poles and increasing the risk for chromosome missegregation. HPV-16 E7 has been found to rapidly induce centriole overduplication, in part, through the simultaneous formation of more than one daughter centriole at single maternal centrioles (centriole multiplication. The precise molecular mechanism that underlies HPV-16 E7-induced centriole multiplication, however, remains poorly understood. Findings Here, we show that human keratinocytes engineered to stably express the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein exhibit aberrant Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4 protein expression at maternal centrioles. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT-PCR analysis of these cells revealed an increase of PLK4 mRNA levels compared to control cells. Importantly, the ability of the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein to induce centriole multiplication was found to correlate with its ability to activate the PLK4 promoter and to up-regulate PLK4 mRNA. Conclusions These results highlight the critical role of PLK4 transcriptional deregulation in centriole multiplication in HPV-16 E7-expressing cells. Our findings encourage further experiments to test transcriptional inhibitors or small molecules targeting PLK4 to prevent centriole abnormalities, mitotic infidelity and malignant progression in HPV-associated neoplasms and other tumors in which PLK4 regulation is disrupted.

  7. The Hox cooperativity motif of the chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is necessary and sufficient for oncogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C P; de Vivo, I; Cleary, M L

    1997-01-01

    E2a-Pbx1 chimeric oncoproteins result from fusion of the E2A and PBX1 genes at the sites of t(1;19) chromosomal translocations in a subset acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Experimentally, E2a-Pbx1 transforms a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts, myeloid progenitors, and lymphoblasts. Structure-function studies have shown that contributions from both E2a and Pbx1 are necessary for oncogenesis, but the Pbx1 homeodomain is dispensable and the required portion of Pbx1 has not been delinea...

  8. The Oncoprotein E2A-Pbx1a Collaborates with Hoxa9 To Acutely Transform Primary Bone Marrow Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Krosl, Jana; Kroon, Evert; Haman, André; Hoang, Trang; Sauvageau, Guy

    1999-01-01

    A recurrent translocation between chromosome 1 (Pbx1) and 19 (E2A) leading to the expression of the E2A-Pbx1 fusion oncoprotein occurs in ∼5 to 10% of acute leukemias in humans. It has been proposed that some of the oncogenic potential of E2A-Pbx1 could be mediated through heterocomplex formation with Hox proteins, which are also involved in human and mouse leukemias. To directly test this possibility, mouse bone marrow cells were engineered by retroviral gene transfer to overexpress E2A-Pbx1...

  9. A novel basolateral type IV secretion model for the CagA oncoprotein of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Wessler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular junctions are crucial structural elements for the formation and maintenance of epithelial barrier functions to control homeostasis or protect against intruding pathogens in humans. Alterations in these complexes represent key events in the development and progression of numerous cancers as well as multiple infectious diseases. Many bacterial pathogens harbor type IV secretion systems (T4SSs, which translocate virulence factors into host cells to hijack cellular processes. The pathology of the gastric pathogen and type-I carcinogen Helicobacter pylori strongly depends on a T4SS encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI. This T4SS forms a needle-like pilus and its activity is accomplished by the pilus-associated factors CagL, CagI and CagY which target the host integrin-β1 receptor followed by injection of the CagA oncoprotein into non-polarized AGS gastric epithelial cells. The finding of a T4SS receptor, however, suggested the presence of a sophisticated control mechanism for the injection of CagA. In fact, integrins constitute a group of basolateral receptors, which are normally absent at apical surfaces of the polarized epithelium in vivo. Our new results demonstrate that T4SS-pilus formation during H. pylori infection of polarized epithelial cells occurs preferentially at basolateral sites, and not at apical membranes (Tegtmeyer et al., 2017. We propose a stepwise process how H. pylori interacts with components of intercellular tight junctions (TJs and adherens junctions (AJs, followed by contacting integrin-based focal adhesions to disrupt and transform the epithelial cell layer in the human stomach. The possible impact of this novel signaling cascade on pathogenesis during infection is reviewed.

  10. Protease activity of the API2-MALT1 fusion oncoprotein in MALT lymphoma development and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebeck, Shaun; Lucas, Peter C; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M

    2011-05-01

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a prototypical cancer that occurs in the setting of chronic inflammation and an important model for understanding how deregulated NF-κB transcriptional activity contributes to malignancy. Most gastric MALT lymphomas require ongoing antigenic stimulation for continued tumor growth, and Stage I disease is usually cured by eradicating the causative microorganism, Helicobacter pylori, with antibiotics. However, in a subset of MALT lymphomas, chromosomal translocations are acquired that render the lymphoma antigen-independent. The recurrent translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) is associated with failure to respond to antibiotic therapy and increased rate of dissemination. This translocation creates the API2-MALT1 fusion oncoprotein, which comprises the amino terminus of inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (API2 or cIAP2) fused to the carboxy terminus of MALT1. A common characteristic of chromosomal translocations in MALT lymphoma, including t(11;18), is that genes involved in the regulation of the NF-κB transcription factor are targeted by the translocations, and these genetic perturbations thereby result in deregulated, constitutive NF-κB stimulation. In the last decade, great insights into the roles of API2 and MALT1 in NF-κB signaling have been made. For example, recent pivotal studies have uncovered the long sought-after proteolytic activity of MALT1 and have demonstrated its critical involvement in the survival of certain lymphomas. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of MALT1 in normal lymphocyte function and lymphomagenesis. We then highlight our recent work that has revealed an intriguing link between the proteolytic activity of the API2-MALT1 fusion and its ability to influence lymphomagenesis by cleaving a key NF-κB regulatory protein, NF-κB-inducing kinase.

  11. Multistage modeling of protein dynamics with monomeric Myc oncoprotein as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaojiao; Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.; Ilieva, Nevena

    2017-03-01

    We propose to combine a mean-field approach with all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) into a multistage algorithm that can model protein folding and dynamics over very long time periods yet with atomic-level precision. As an example, we investigate an isolated monomeric Myc oncoprotein that has been implicated in carcinomas including those in colon, breast, and lungs. Under physiological conditions a monomeric Myc is presumed to be an example of intrinsically disordered proteins that pose a serious challenge to existing modeling techniques. We argue that a room-temperature monomeric Myc is in a dynamical state, it oscillates between different conformations that we identify. For this we adopt the C α backbone of Myc in a crystallographic heteromer as an initial ansatz for the monomeric structure. We construct a multisoliton of the pertinent Landau free energy to describe the C α profile with ultrahigh precision. We use Glauber dynamics to resolve how the multisoliton responds to repeated increases and decreases in ambient temperature. We confirm that the initial structure is unstable in isolation. We reveal a highly degenerate ground-state landscape, an attractive set towards which Glauber dynamics converges in the limit of vanishing ambient temperature. We analyze the thermal stability of this Glauber attractor using room-temperature molecular dynamics. We identify and scrutinize a particularly stable subset in which the two helical segments of the original multisoliton align in parallel next to each other. During the MD time evolution of a representative structure from this subset, we observe intermittent quasiparticle oscillations along the C-terminal α helix, some of which resemble a translating Davydov's Amide-I soliton. We propose that the presence of oscillatory motion is in line with the expected intrinsically disordered character of Myc.

  12. Uso de ganciclovir 0,15% gel para tratamento de ceratoconjuntivite adenoviral

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    Simone Tiemi Yabiku

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar a efetividade e a toxicidade do ganciclovir 0,15% gel no tratamento de ceratoconjuntivites adenovirais e na prevenção de complicações tais como infiltrados corneanos, membranas ou pseudomembranas conjuntivais. MÉTODOS: Ensaio clínico duplo-cego, intervencionista, randomizado. Os 33 pacientes com diagnóstico clínico de ceratoconjuntivite adenoviral com início dos sintomas há menos de cinco dias foram randomizados em dois grupos: Grupo 1 (tratamento com 19 pacientes que usaram ganciclovir e Grupo 2 (controle com 14 pacientes que usaram lágrima artificial sem conservante. Todos pacientes responderam a um questionário de sinais e sintomas e foram submetidos a um exame oftalmológico. No 6º dia de tratamento responderam ao mesmo questionário por telefone e no 10º dia foram reavaliados pelo mesmo examinador e responderam novamente ao questionário. Os sinais e sintomas foram comparados. Para análise estatística foi utilizado os testes T de Student, Mann-Whitney e Wilcoxon, com significância estatística p<0,05. RESULTADOS: Tendência de melhor resposta no grupo tratamento em relação à percepção pelos pacientes, além da melhora mais rápida desse grupo em relação ao grupo controle (p=0,26. Houve menor transmissão para o olho adelfo (p=0,86 e para pessoas do convívio (p=0,16 no grupo tratamento. Comparando os dois grupos não houve diferença estatística em relação aos sintomas e sinais da conjuntivite. Comparando isoladamente cada grupo entre o pré-tratamento e no decorrer do tratamento, observou-se melhora estatisticamente significativa da dor, prurido e fotofobia apenas no grupo tratamento. Ganciclovir não mostrou toxicidade e teve maior tolerância pelos pacientes. Não houve diferença significativa no aparecimento de complicações da conjuntivite entre os dois grupos. CONCLUSÕES: O estudo evidenciou uma tendência à melhora mais rápida dos sinais e sintomas dos pacientes tratados com

  13. Loss of Endothelial Barrier in Marfan Mice (mgR/mgR Results in Severe Inflammation after Adenoviral Gene Therapy.

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    Philipp Christian Seppelt

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder of connective tissue. The vascular complications of Marfan syndrome have the biggest impact on life expectancy. The aorta of Marfan patients reveals degradation of elastin layers caused by increased proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. In this study we performed adenoviral gene transfer of human tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (hTIMP-1 in aortic grafts of fibrillin-1 deficient Marfan mice (mgR/mgR in order to reduce elastolysis.We performed heterotopic infrarenal transplantation of the thoracic aorta in female mice (n = 7 per group. Before implantation, mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas (WT, C57BL/6 were transduced ex vivo with an adenoviral vector coding for human TIMP-1 (Ad.hTIMP-1 or β-galactosidase (Ad.β-Gal. As control mgR/mgR and wild-type aortas received no gene therapy. Thirty days after surgery, overexpression of the transgene was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC and collagen in situ zymography. Histologic staining was performed to investigate inflammation, the neointimal index (NI, and elastin breaks. Endothelial barrier function of native not virus-exposed aortas was evaluated by perfusion of fluorescent albumin and examinations of virus-exposed tissue were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM.IHC and ISZ revealed sufficient expression of the transgene. Severe cellular inflammation and intima hyperplasia were seen only in adenovirus treated mgR/mgR aortas (Ad.β-Gal, Ad.hTIMP-1 NI: 0.23; 0.43, but not in native and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT (NI: 0.01; 0.00. Compared to native mgR/mgR and Ad.hTIMP-1 treated WT aorta, the NI is highly significant greater in Ad.hTIMP-1 transduced mgR/mgR aorta (p = 0.001; p = 0.001. As expected, untreated Marfan grafts showed significant more elastolysis compared to WT (p = 0.001. However, elastolysis in Marfan aortas was not reduced by adenoviral overexpression of hTIMP-1 (compared to untreated

  14. Adenoviral-mediated correction of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficiency in murine fibroblasts and human hepatocytes

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    Korson Mark

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, a common organic aciduria, is caused by deficiency of the mitochondrial localized, 5'deoxyadenosylcobalamin dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT. Liver transplantation in the absence of gross hepatic dysfunction provides supportive therapy and metabolic stability in severely affected patients, which invites the concept of using cell and gene delivery as future treatments for this condition. Methods To assess the effectiveness of gene delivery to restore the defective metabolism in this disorder, adenoviral correction experiments were performed using murine Mut embryonic fibroblasts and primary human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes derived from a patient who harbored two early truncating mutations, E224X and R228X, in the MUT gene. Enzymatic and expression studies were used to assess the extent of functional correction. Results Primary hepatocytes, isolated from the native liver after removal subsequent to a combined liver-kidney transplantation procedure, or Mut murine fibroblasts were infected with a second generation recombinant adenoviral vector that expressed the murine methylmalonyl-CoA mutase as well as eGFP from distinct promoters. After transduction, [1-14C] propionate macromolecular incorporation studies and Western analysis demonstrated complete correction of the enzymatic defect in both cell types. Viral reconstitution of enzymatic expression in the human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase deficient hepatocytes exceeded that seen in fibroblasts or control hepatocytes. Conclusion These experiments provide proof of principle for viral correction in methylmalonic acidemia and suggest that hepatocyte-directed gene delivery will be an effective therapeutic treatment strategy in both murine models and in human patients. Primary hepatocytes from a liver that was unsuitable for transplantation provided an important resource for these studies.

  15. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, Inna; Kazanov, Dina; Lisiansky, Victoria; Starr, Alex; Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah; Arber, Nadir

    2012-01-01

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35–40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our “gene therapy” approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce ∼ 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by ∼ 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  16. Novel approach to abuse the hyperactive K-Ras pathway for adenoviral gene therapy of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Inna [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Kazanov, Dina [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Lisiansky, Victoria [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Starr, Alex [Lung and Allergy Institute, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aroch, Ilan; Shapira, Shiran; Kraus, Sarah [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Arber, Nadir, E-mail: narber@post.tau.ac.il [Integrated Cancer Prevention Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Department of Gastroenterology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-01-15

    Background: Functional activation of oncogenic K-Ras signaling pathway plays an important role in the early events of colorectal carcinogenesis (CRC). K-Ras proto-oncogene is involved in 35-40% of CRC cases. Mutations in the Ras gene trigger the transduction of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signals, even in the absence of extra cellular stimuli. The objective of the current study was to use a gene-targeting approach to kill human CRC cells selectively harboring mutated K-Ras. Results: A recombinant adenovirus that carries a lethal gene, PUMA, under the control of a Ras responsive promoter (Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA) was used selectively to target CRC cells (HCT116, SW480, DLD1 and RIE-Ras) that possess a hyperactive Ras pathway while using HT29 and RIE cells as a control that harbors wild type Ras and exhibit very low Ras activity. Control vector, without the Ras responsive promoter elements was used to assess the specificity of our 'gene therapy' approach. Both adenoviral vectors were assed in vitro and in xenograft model in vivo. Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA showed high potency to induce {approx} 50% apoptosis in vitro, to abolish completely tumor formation by infecting cells with the Ad-Py4-SV40-PUMA prior xenografting them in nude mice and high ability to suppress by {approx} 35% tumor progression in vivo in already established tumors. Conclusions: Selective targeting of CRC cells with the activated Ras pathway may be a novel and effective therapy in CRC. The high potency of this adenoviral vector may help to overcome an undetectable micro metastasis that is the major hurdle in challenging with CRC.

  17. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  18. The Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 regulates the localization and function of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Guo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The Really Interesting New Gene (RING) Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) represents a class of ubiquitin ligases that target Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)–modified proteins for ubiquitin modification. To date, the regulatory function of RNF4 appears to be ubiquitin-mediated degradation of sumoylated cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is a substrate for RNF4 both in vivo and in vitro. We mapped the RNF4-binding site to a region adjacent to the Tax ubiquitin/SUMO modification sites K280/K284. Interestingly, RNF4 modification of Tax protein results in relocalization of the oncoprotein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of RNF4, but not the RNF4 RING mutant, resulted in cytoplasmic enrichment of Tax. The RNF4-induced nucleus-to-cytoplasm relocalization was associated with increased NF-κB–mediated and decreased cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB)–mediated Tax activity. Finally, depletion of RNF4 by RNAi prevented the DNA damage–induced nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of Tax. These results provide important new insight into STUbL-mediated pathways that regulate the subcellular localization and functional dynamics of viral oncogenes. PMID:22106342

  19. Resveratrol and Pterostilbene Exhibit Anticancer Properties Involving the Downregulation of HPV Oncoprotein E6 in Cervical Cancer Cells

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    Kaushiki Chatterjee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women living in developing countries. Due to a lack of affordable effective therapy, research into alternative anticancer compounds with low toxicity such as dietary polyphenols has continued. Our aim is to determine whether two structurally similar plant polyphenols, resveratrol and pterostilbene, exhibit anticancer and anti-HPV (Human papillomavirus activity against cervical cancer cells. To determine anticancer activity, extensive in vitro analyses were performed. Anti-HPV activity, through measuring E6 protein levels, subsequent downstream p53 effects, and caspase-3 activation, were studied to understand a possible mechanism of action. Both polyphenols are effective agents in targeting cervical cancer cells, having low IC50 values in the µM range. They decrease clonogenic survival, reduce cell migration, arrest cells at the S-phase, and reduce the number of mitotic cells. These findings were significant, with pterostilbene often being more effective than resveratrol. Resveratrol and to a greater extent pterostilbene downregulates the HPV oncoprotein E6, induces caspase-3 activation, and upregulates p53 protein levels. Results point to a mechanism that may involve the downregulation of the HPV E6 oncoprotein, activation of apoptotic pathways, and re-establishment of functional p53 protein, with pterostilbene showing greater efficacy than resveratrol.

  20. Differential gene expression between skin and cervix induced by the E7 oncoprotein in a transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra Sierra, E; Díaz Chávez, J; Cortés-Malagón, EM; Uribe-Figueroa, L; Hidalgo-Miranda, A; Lambert, PF; Gariglio, P

    2013-01-01

    HPV16 E7 oncoprotein expression in K14E7 transgenic mice induces cervical cancer after 6 months of treatment with the co-carcinogen 17β-estradiol. In untreated mice, E7 also induces skin tumors late in life albeit at low penetrance. These findings indicate that E7 alters cellular functions in cervix and skin so as to predispose these organs to tumorigenesis. Using microarrays, we determined the global genes expression profile in cervical and skin tissue of young adult K14E7 transgenic mice without estrogen treatment. In these tissues, the E7 oncoprotein altered the transcriptional pattern of genes involved in several biological processes including signal transduction, transport, metabolic process, cell adhesion, apoptosis, cell differentiation, immune response and inflammatory response. Among the E7-dysregulated genes were ones not previously known to be involved in cervical neoplasia including DMBT1, GLI1 and 17βHSD2 in cervix, as well as MMP2, 12, 14, 19 and 27 in skin. PMID:22980503

  1. Enhanced suppression of adenovirus replication by triple combination of anti-adenoviral siRNAs, soluble adenovirus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and cidofovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzuto, Tanja; Röger, Carsten; Kurreck, Jens; Fechner, Henry

    2015-08-01

    Adenoviruses (Ad) generally induce mild self-limiting respiratory or intestinal infections but can also cause serious disease with fatal outcomes in immunosuppressed patients. Antiviral drug therapy is an important treatment for adenoviral infections but its efficiency is limited. Recently, we have shown that gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new approach to inhibit adenoviral infection. In the present in vitro study, we examined whether the efficiency of an RNAi-based anti-adenoviral therapy can be further increased by combination with a virus receptor trap sCAR-Fc and with the antiviral drug cidofovir. Initially, three siRNAs, siE1A_4, siIVa2_2 and Pol-si2, targeting the adenoviral E1A, IVa2 and DNA polymerase mRNAs, respectively, were used for gene silencing. Replication of the Ad was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by each siRNA, but the efficiency of inhibition differed (Pol-si2>siIVa2_2>siE1A_4). Double or triple combinations of the siRNAs compared with single siRNAs did not result in a measurably higher suppression of Ad replication. Combination of the siRNAs (alone or mixes of two or three siRNAs) with sCAR-Fc markedly increased the suppression of adenoviral replication compared to the same siRNA treatment without sCAR-Fc. Moreover, the triple combination of a mix of all three siRNAs, sCAR-Fc and cidofovir was about 23-fold more efficient than the combination of siRNAs mix/sCAR-Fc and about 95-fold more efficient than the siRNA mix alone. These data demonstrate that co-treatment of cells with sCAR-Fc and cidofovir is suitable to increase the efficiency of anti-adenoviral siRNAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. NUP98 fusion oncoproteins interact with the APC/C(Cdc20) as a pseudosubstrate and prevent mitotic checkpoint complex binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsi, Valentina; Fantini, Sebastian; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    NUP98 is a recurrent partner gene in translocations causing acute myeloid leukemias and myelodisplastic syndrome. The expression of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins has been shown to induce mitotic spindle defects and chromosome missegregation, which correlate with the capability of NUP98 fusions to cause mitotic checkpoint attenuation. We show that NUP98 oncoproteins physically interact with the APC/C(Cdc20) in the absence of the NUP98 partner protein RAE1, and prevent the binding of the mitotic checkpoint complex to the APC/C(Cdc20). NUP98 oncoproteins require the GLEBS-like domain present in their NUP98 moiety to bind the APC/C(Cdc20). We found that NUP98 wild-type is a substrate of APC/C(Cdc20) prior to mitotic entry, and that its binding to APC/C(Cdc20) is controlled via phosphorylation of a PEST sequence located within its C-terminal portion. We identify S606, within the PEST sequence, as a key target site, whose phosphorylation modulates the capability of NUP98 to interact with APC/C(Cdc20). We finally provide evidence for an involvement of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PIN1 in modulating the possible conformational changes within NUP98 that lead to its dissociation from the APC/C(Cdc20) during mitosis. Our results provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant capability of NUP98 oncoproteins to interact with APC/C(Cdc20) and to interfere with its function.

  3. Expression of Human papillomavirus 16 E7ggg oncoprotein on N- and C-terminus of Potato virus X coat protein in bacterial and plant cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plchová, Helena; Moravec, Tomáš; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Folwarczna, Jitka; Čeřovská, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 2 (2011), s. 146-152 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/1525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Bacterial expression * Human papillomavirus * Oncoprotein E7 Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.587, year: 2011

  4. Correlation of cell cycle regulatory proteins (p53 and p16ink4a and bcl-2 oncoprotein with mitotic index and thickness of primary cutaneous malignant melanoma

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    Miloš Kostov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of expression p53 and p16INK4a proteins and bcl2- oncoprotein in malignant skin melanoma and to determine their correlation with the proliferative index and tumor thickness. The study involved 53 patients: 27 (51% male and 26 (49% female. Mitotic index showed a correlation with p53 protein expression, a negative correlation with p16INK4a protein expression. Statistically significant correlations were determined between the Breslow tumor thickness, Clark invasion level and p53 protein expression, as well as Breslow tumor thickness and bcl-2 oncoprotein expression (p<0.05, whereas there was no correlation between the p16INK4a protein expression and melanoma thicknes and Clark invasion level. Overexpression p53 protein and bcl-2 oncoprotein, with the loss p16INK4a protein of expression in the nodular melanoma, confirms a frequent loss of function of these tumor suppressor gene and oncogene, and indicates a vertical tumor growth phase. The loss of tumor suppression function the p53 protein and bcl-2 oncoprotein overexpression in cutaneous melanoma correlates with larger tumor thickness, whereas the overexpression of mutated p53 protein and loss p16INK4a protein of expression indicate a higher proliferative tumour potential. Therefore, these evaluated proteins may be the aggressive biological tumour activity markers.

  5. Pathogen-induced proapoptotic phenotype and high CD95 (Fas expression accompany a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response: reversal by adenoviral vaccine.

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    José Ronnie Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available MHC class Ia-restricted CD8(+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8(+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8(+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8(+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8(+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8(+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8(+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination.

  6. Homology Requirements for Efficient, Footprintless Gene Editing at the CFTR Locus in Human iPSCs with Helper-dependent Adenoviral Vectors

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    Donna J Palmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors mediate high efficiency gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells without needing a designer nuclease thereby avoiding off-target cleavage. Because of their large cloning capacity of 37 kb, helper-dependent adenoviral vectors with long homology arms are used for gene editing. However, this makes vector construction and recombinant analysis difficult. Conversely, insufficient homology may compromise targeting efficiency. Thus, we investigated the effect of homology length on helper-dependent adenoviral vector targeting efficiency at the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus in induced pluripotent stem cells and found a positive correlation. With 23.8 and 21.4 kb of homology, the frequencies of targeted recombinants were 50–64.6% after positive selection for vector integration, and 97.4–100% after negative selection against random integrations. With 14.8 kb, the frequencies were 26.9–57.1% after positive selection and 87.5–100% after negative selection. With 9.6 kb, the frequencies were 21.4 and 75% after positive and negative selection, respectively. With only 5.6 kb, the frequencies were 5.6–16.7% after positive selection and 50% after negative selection, but these were more than high enough for efficient identification and isolation of targeted clones. Furthermore, we demonstrate helper-dependent adenoviral vector-mediated footprintless correction of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations through piggyBac excision of the selectable marker. However, low frequencies (≤ 1 × 10−3 necessitated negative selection for piggyBac-excision product isolation.

  7. 5-Fluorouracil-related enhancement of adenoviral infection is Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor independent and associated with morphological changes in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrele, Chiara; Vogel, Mandy; Piso, Pompiliu; Rentsch, Markus; Schröder, Josef; Jauch, Karl W; Schlitt, Hans J; Beham, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the mechanism underlying the effects of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on adenoviral infection. METHODS: Low and high Coxsackievirus-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) expressing human colon carcinoma cell lines were treated with 5-FU and two E1-deleted adenoviral constructs, one transferring GFP (Ad/CMV-GFP) the other bax (Ad/CEA-bax). The number of infected cells were monitored by GFP expression. To evaluate the effects of 5-FU in a receptor free system, Ad/GFP were encapsulated in liposomes and treated with 5-FU. Ad/GFP release was estimated with PCR and infection of 293 cells with the supernatant. Electron microscopy of the Ad5-GFP-liposome complex was made to investigate morphological changes of the liposomes after 5-FU. RESULTS: Infection rates of all cell lines increased from 50% to 98% with emerging 5-FU concentrations. The enhanced viral uptake was independent of the CAR expression. Additionally, 5-FU treated liposomes released 2-2.5 times more adenoviruses. Furthermore, 5-FU-treated liposomes appeared irregular and porous-like. CONCLUSION: adenoviral uptake is enhanced in the presence of 5-FU irrespective of CAR and is associated with morphological changes in membranes making the combination of both a promising option in gene therapy. PMID:16937527

  8. Versican G1 domain enhances adenoviral-mediated transgene expression and can be modulated by inhibitors of the Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT and Src family kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfenwa, Patricia Y; Bond, Wesley S; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Hurwitz, Mary Y; Hurwitz, Richard L

    2017-09-01

    To examine the biochemical influences that may contribute to the success of gene therapy for ocular disorders, the role of versican, a vitreous component, in adenoviral-mediated transgene expression was examined. Versican is a large chondroitin sulfate-containing, hyaluronic acid-binding proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and in ocular vitreous body. Y79 retinoblastoma cells and CD44-negative SK-N-DZ neuroblastoma cells transduced with adenoviral vectors in the presence of versican respond with an activation of transgene expression. Proteolysis of versican generates a hyaluronan-binding G1 domain. The addition of recombinant versican G1 to SK-N-DZ cells results in a similar activation of transgene expression, and treatment with dasatinib, an inhibitor of Src family kinases, also mimics the effects of versican. Enhancement is accompanied by an increase in signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) phosphorylation and is abrogated by treatment with C188-9, a STAT3/5 inhibitor, or with ruxolitinib, a Janus kinase 1/2 (JAK1/2) inhibitor. These data implicate versican G1 in enhancing adenoviral vector transgene expression in a hyaluronic acid-CD44 independent manner that is down-regulated by inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway and enhanced by inhibitors of the Src kinase pathway. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. MUC1-C Oncoprotein Integrates a Program of EMT, Epigenetic Reprogramming and Immune Evasion in Human Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Hasan; Kufe, Donald

    2017-08-01

    The MUC1 gene evolved in mammalian species to provide protection of epithelia. The transmembrane MUC1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) signals stress to the interior of the epithelial cell and, when overexpressed as in most carcinomas, functions as an oncoprotein. MUC1-C induces the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by activating the inflammatory NF-κB p65 pathway and, in turn, the EMT-transcriptional repressor ZEB1. Emerging evidence has indicated that MUC1-C drives a program integrating the induction of EMT with activation of stem cell traits, epigenetic reprogramming and immune evasion. This mini-review focuses on the potential importance of this MUC1-C program in cancer progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yueyang; Munger, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore–microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  11. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yueyang [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  12. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Ganti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27, an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells.

  13. Adenoviral vectors encoding CRISPR/Cas9 multiplexes rescue dystrophin synthesis in unselected populations of DMD muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-11-15

    Mutations disrupting the reading frame of the ~2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene cause a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder called Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Genome editing based on paired RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) from CRISPR/Cas9 systems has been proposed for permanently repairing faulty DMD loci. However, such multiplexing strategies require the development and testing of delivery systems capable of introducing the various gene editing tools into target cells. Here, we investigated the suitability of adenoviral vectors (AdVs) for multiplexed DMD editing by packaging in single vector particles expression units encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nuclease and sequence-specific gRNA pairs. These RGN components were customized to trigger short- and long-range intragenic DMD excisions encompassing reading frame-disrupting exons in patient-derived muscle progenitor cells. By allowing synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the various RGN components, we demonstrate that dual RGN-encoding AdVs can correct over 10% of target DMD alleles, readily leading to the detection of Becker-like dystrophin proteins in unselected muscle cell populations. Moreover, we report that AdV-based gene editing can be tailored for removing mutations located within the over 500-kb major DMD mutational hotspot. Hence, this single DMD editing strategy can in principle tackle a broad spectrum of mutations present in more than 60% of patients with DMD.

  14. Liposome-Adenoviral hTERT-siRNA Knockdown in Fibroblasts from Keloids Reduce Telomere Length and Fibroblast Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yong; Yu, Dongmei; Hao, Lijun

    2015-06-01

    Keloids, which possess invasive tumor-like behavior, have been clinically challenging to clinicians especially surgeons. Excessive extracellular matrix secreted from fibroblasts is the main histo-pathological feature of keloids. In this study, we transfected hTERT-siRNA into scar fibroblasts by liposome-adenoviral transduction in order to disrupt telomere length homeostasis and influence the cell cycle of fibroblasts. Our results showed that liposome hTERT-siRNA was able to knock down hTERT gene expression in scar fibroblasts. Moreover, the telomerase activity in hTERT-siRNA group was significantly reduced compared with the control groups. And the telomeric length of hTERT-siRNA group was significantly shortened as well. Further, flow cytometry studies and MTT assay demonstrated that apoptosis rate of fibroblasts in liposome hTERT-siRNA group significantly increased. These results indicated that the liposome-mediated hTERT gene transduction could inhibit the growth of fibroblasts in scar tissues suggesting a promising strategy of keloids treatment in the future.

  15. Adenoviral Vector Vaccination Induces a Conserved Program of CD8+ T Cell Memory Differentiation in Mouse and Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Bolinger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Following exposure to vaccines, antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses develop as long-term memory pools. Vaccine strategies based on adenoviral vectors, e.g., those developed for HCV, are able to induce and sustain substantial CD8+ T cell populations. How such populations evolve following vaccination remains to be defined at a transcriptional level. We addressed the transcriptional regulation of divergent CD8+ T cell memory pools induced by an adenovector encoding a model antigen (beta-galactosidase. We observe transcriptional profiles that mimic those following infection with persistent pathogens, murine and human cytomegalovirus (CMV. Key transcriptional hallmarks include upregulation of homing receptors and anti-apoptotic pathways, driven by conserved networks of transcription factors, including T-bet. In humans, an adenovirus vaccine induced similar CMV-like phenotypes and transcription factor regulation. These data clarify the core features of CD8+ T cell memory following vaccination with adenovectors and indicate a conserved pathway for memory development shared with persistent herpesviruses.

  16. Expression of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor in neuroendocrine lung cancers and its implications for oncolytic adenoviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunder, T; Schmid, K; Wicklein, D; Groitl, P; Dobner, T; Lange, T; Anders, M; Schumacher, U

    2013-01-01

    Coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) is the primary receptor to which oncolytic adenoviruses have to bind for internalization and viral replication. A total of 171 neuroendocrine lung tumors in form of multitissue arrays have been analyzed resulting in a positivity of 112 cases (65.5%). Immunostaining correlated statistically significant with histopathology and development of recurrence. The subtype small cell lung cancer (SCLC) showed the highest CAR expression (77.6%), moreover the CAR level was correlated to the disease-free survival. Further, high CAR expression level in SCLC cell lines was found in vitro and in vivo when cell lines had been transplanted into immunodeficient mice. A correlation between CAR expression in the primary tumors and metastases development in the tumor model underlined the clinical relevance. Cell lines with high CAR level showed a high infectivity when infected with a replication-deficient adenovirus. Low levels of CAR expression in SCLC could be upregulated with Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. As a result of the unaltered poor prognosis of SCLC and its high CAR expression it seems to be the perfect candidate for oncolytic therapy. With our clinically relevant tumor model, we show that xenograft experiments are warrant to test the efficiency of oncolytic adenoviral therapy.

  17. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2007-11-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  18. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  19. Chemical synthesis of human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein: autonomous protein domains for induction of cellular DNA synthesis and for trans activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Rawls, J A; Pusztai, R; Green, M

    1990-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein belongs to a family of nuclear oncoproteins that share amino acid sequences and functional homology. To localize biochemical activities associated with E7, we chemically synthesized the full-length 98-amino-acid polypeptide and several deletion mutant peptides. We show that the E7 polypeptide is biologically active and possesses at least two functional domains; the first induces cellular DNA synthesis in quiescent rodent cells, and the second trans ...

  20. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncoprotein promotes proliferation and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells through Toll-like receptor 3 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Huimin; Niu, Wenyi; Li, Mingying; Xi, Xiu'e; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins play vital roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pathogenesis, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) contribute to tumor progression. However, interaction between HPV oncoproteins and TLR signaling in NSCLC progression remains unclear. Thus, the aim of the study was to explore effects of HPV16 E6 oncoprotein-induced TLRs pathway on growth and invasion of NSCLC cells and to examine potential mechanisms being involved. Recombinant plasmid (pcDNA-HPV16 E6) expressing HPV16 E6 protein was constructed. The expression prolife of TLRs was measured in NSCLC cell line A549 with or without pcDNA-HPV16 E6 transfection by real-time reverse polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Cellular proliferation, invasion, cytokine productions, and downstream signaling pathways were also examined in TLR3-silencing/pcDNA-HPV16 E6 transfect A549 cells. Overexpression of HPV16 E6 increased proliferation, invasion, proliferation cytokine secretion, and TLR3 expression of A549 cells, while TLR3 silence inhibited HPV16 E6-induced tumor bioactivities of A549 cells. Down-regulation of TLR3 suppressed HPV16 E6-induced phosphorylation of Src, but did not affect TRIF expression. Moreover, inhibition of Src pathway also suppressed proliferation and invasion of A549 cells. In conclusion, HPV16 E6 oncoprotein promoted the bioactivities of NSCLC cells. TLR3-Src signaling pathway might be involved in this procession by up-regulation of cytokine production. The interaction between HPV16 E6 protein and TLR3 might contribute to the poor prognosis of NSCLC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Efficient expression of Human papillomavirus 16 E7 oncoprotein fused to C-terminus of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein using molecular chaperones in Escherichia coli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folwarczna, Jitka; Moravec, Tomáš; Plchová, Helena; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Čeřovská, Noemi

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2012), s. 152-157 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/1525; GA ČR GAP501/12/1761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Bacterial expression * Human papillomavirus * E7 oncoprotein Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.429, year: 2012

  2. Nuclear export of cutaneous HPV8 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by a leucine-rich nuclear export signal via a CRM1 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onder, Zeynep; Chang, Vivian; Moroianu, Junona

    2015-01-01

    We recently determined that the nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 oncoprotein it is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via direct hydrophobic interactions with the FG nucleoporins Nup62 and Nup153 (Onder and Moroianu, 2014). Here we investigated the nuclear export of HPV8 E7 oncoprotein using confocal microscopy after transfections of HeLa cells with EGFP–8cE7 and mutant plasmids and treatment with Ratjadone A nuclear export inhibitor. We determined that HPV8 E7 contains a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), 76 IRTFQELLF 84 , within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear export via a CRM1 pathway. We found that HPV8 E7 interacts with CRM1 and that the hydrophobic amino acid residues I76, F79 and L82 of the NES are essential for this interaction and for nuclear export of HPV8 E7 oncoprotein. - Highlights: • HPV8 E7 has a leucine-rich NES within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear export. • CRM1 nuclear export receptor interacts with HPV8 E7 and mediates its export. • Identification of the critical hydrophobic amino acids of the NES of HPV8 E7

  3. Nuclear export of cutaneous HPV8 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by a leucine-rich nuclear export signal via a CRM1 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onder, Zeynep; Chang, Vivian; Moroianu, Junona, E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2015-01-01

    We recently determined that the nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 oncoprotein it is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via direct hydrophobic interactions with the FG nucleoporins Nup62 and Nup153 (Onder and Moroianu, 2014). Here we investigated the nuclear export of HPV8 E7 oncoprotein using confocal microscopy after transfections of HeLa cells with EGFP–8cE7 and mutant plasmids and treatment with Ratjadone A nuclear export inhibitor. We determined that HPV8 E7 contains a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), {sub 76}IRTFQELLF{sub 84}, within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear export via a CRM1 pathway. We found that HPV8 E7 interacts with CRM1 and that the hydrophobic amino acid residues I76, F79 and L82 of the NES are essential for this interaction and for nuclear export of HPV8 E7 oncoprotein. - Highlights: • HPV8 E7 has a leucine-rich NES within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear export. • CRM1 nuclear export receptor interacts with HPV8 E7 and mediates its export. • Identification of the critical hydrophobic amino acids of the NES of HPV8 E7.

  4. Nuclear export of cutaneous HPV8 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by a leucine-rich nuclear export signal via a CRM1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Zeynep; Chang, Vivian; Moroianu, Junona

    2015-01-01

    We recently determined that the nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 oncoprotein it is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via direct hydrophobic interactions with the FG nucleoporins Nup62 and Nup153 (Onder and Moroianu, 2014). Here we investigated the nuclear export of HPV8 E7 oncoprotein using confocal microscopy after transfections of HeLa cells with EGFP-8cE7 and mutant plasmids and treatment with Ratjadone A nuclear export inhibitor. We determined that HPV8 E7 contains a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), 76IRTFQELLF84, within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear export via a CRM1 pathway. We found that HPV8 E7 interacts with CRM1 and that the hydrophobic amino acid residues I76, F79 and L82 of the NES are essential for this interaction and for nuclear export of HPV8 E7 oncoprotein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adenoviral vaccine induction of CD8+ T cell memory inflation: Impact of co-infection and infection order.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian N Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficacies of many new T cell vaccines rely on generating large populations of long-lived pathogen-specific effector memory CD8 T cells. However, it is now increasingly recognized that prior infection history impacts on the host immune response. Additionally, the order in which these infections are acquired could have a major effect. Exploiting the ability to generate large sustained effector memory (i.e. inflationary T cell populations from murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV and human Adenovirus-subtype (AdHu5 5-beta-galactosidase (Ad-lacZ vector, the impact of new infections on pre-existing memory and the capacity of the host's memory compartment to accommodate multiple inflationary populations from unrelated pathogens was investigated in a murine model. Simultaneous and sequential infections, first with MCMV followed by Ad-lacZ, generated inflationary populations towards both viruses with similar kinetics and magnitude to mono-infected groups. However, in Ad-lacZ immune mice, subsequent acute MCMV infection led to a rapid decline of the pre-existing Ad-LacZ-specific inflating population, associated with bystander activation of Fas-dependent apoptotic pathways. However, responses were maintained long-term and boosting with Ad-lacZ led to rapid re-expansion of the inflating population. These data indicate firstly that multiple specificities of inflating memory cells can be acquired at different times and stably co-exist. Some acute infections may also deplete pre-existing memory populations, thus revealing the importance of the order of infection acquisition. Importantly, immunization with an AdHu5 vector did not alter the size of the pre-existing memory. These phenomena are relevant to the development of adenoviral vectors as novel vaccination strategies for diverse infections and cancers. (241 words.

  6. Effects of recombinant adenoviral vector containing IRE1α gene on proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-zhu LI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant adenoviral vector containing human IRE1α (type I transmembrane protein kinase/endoribonucleasegene, and investigate its effects on proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 stem cells. Methods  By using pAdEasyTM adenovirus vector system, the recombinant shuttle vectors of IRE1α full-length gene(pAdTrack-IRE1αand RNase+Kinasedomain(pAdTrack-R+Kwere constructed, and then transferred with pAdEasy-1 to generate recombinant adenovirus plasmid pAd-IRE1α and pAd-R+K by electroporation method. Subsequently, the plasmids were transfected into HEK-293 cells to pack and amplify the recombinant adenovirus Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K. The expression of recombinant adenovirus was detected by PCR. The ATDC5 cells wereinfected in vitro by recombinant adenovirus Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K, the infection efficiency of green fluorescent protein(GFPwas observed, and the influence of Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K on the proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5 cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress(ERS or non-ERS was detected by flow cytometry(FCM. Results Restriction endonuclease digestion analysis and PCR indicated that the recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-IRE1α andAd-R+K was successfully constructed. FCM detection showed that under ERS conditions, the G1 phasedcreased and S phase increased in ATDC5 cells after transfected by Ad-IRE1α and Ad-R+K, meanwhile the apoptosis rate increased significantly(P<0.05. Conclusion Infection of recombinant adenovirus containing IRE1α gene may promote the proliferation and apoptosis of ATDC5cells.

  7. Adenoviral vaccine induction of CD8+ T cell memory inflation: Impact of co-infection and infection order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lian N; Bolinger, Beatrice; Banki, Zoltan; de Lara, Catherine; Highton, Andrew J; Colston, Julia M; Hutchings, Claire; Klenerman, Paul

    2017-12-01

    The efficacies of many new T cell vaccines rely on generating large populations of long-lived pathogen-specific effector memory CD8 T cells. However, it is now increasingly recognized that prior infection history impacts on the host immune response. Additionally, the order in which these infections are acquired could have a major effect. Exploiting the ability to generate large sustained effector memory (i.e. inflationary) T cell populations from murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and human Adenovirus-subtype (AdHu5) 5-beta-galactosidase (Ad-lacZ) vector, the impact of new infections on pre-existing memory and the capacity of the host's memory compartment to accommodate multiple inflationary populations from unrelated pathogens was investigated in a murine model. Simultaneous and sequential infections, first with MCMV followed by Ad-lacZ, generated inflationary populations towards both viruses with similar kinetics and magnitude to mono-infected groups. However, in Ad-lacZ immune mice, subsequent acute MCMV infection led to a rapid decline of the pre-existing Ad-LacZ-specific inflating population, associated with bystander activation of Fas-dependent apoptotic pathways. However, responses were maintained long-term and boosting with Ad-lacZ led to rapid re-expansion of the inflating population. These data indicate firstly that multiple specificities of inflating memory cells can be acquired at different times and stably co-exist. Some acute infections may also deplete pre-existing memory populations, thus revealing the importance of the order of infection acquisition. Importantly, immunization with an AdHu5 vector did not alter the size of the pre-existing memory. These phenomena are relevant to the development of adenoviral vectors as novel vaccination strategies for diverse infections and cancers. (241 words).

  8. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Vorobyova, Olga; Pool, Madeline; Kothary, Rashmi; Parks, Robin J.

    2011-01-01

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: → We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. → Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. → A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. → Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  9. Correction of hyperbilirubinemia in gunn rats using clinically relevant low doses of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, David; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Palmer, Donna J; Beaudet, Arthur L; Ng, Philip

    2011-04-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I is a severe inborn error of bilirubin metabolism caused by a complete deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) and results in life-threatening unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Lifelong correction of hyperbilirubinemia by liver-directed gene therapy using a helper-dependent adenoviral (HDAd) vector has been previously reported in the Gunn rat, a model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome, but was only achieved using high doses (≥ 3 × 10(12) viral particles [vp]/kg), which are likely to elicit a severe toxic response in humans. Therefore, in this study, we investigate strategies to achieve correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat using clinically relevant low HDAd doses. We have found that correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat can be achieved with a low dose of 5 × 10(11) vp/kg by using an HDAd vector bearing a more potent UGT1A1 expression cassette. Furthermore, by using hydrodynamic injection of the improved HDAd vector, correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat can be achieved using an even lower dose of 5 × 10(10) vp/kg. Although hydrodynamic injection as performed in rats is not acceptable in humans, clinically attractive, minimally invasive methods have been successfully developed to mimic hydrodynamic injection of HDAd vector in non-human primates. Therefore, using an improved expression cassette combined with a more efficient method of vector delivery permits correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat using clinically relevant low HDAd doses and may thus pave the way to clinical application of HDAd vectors for Crigler-Najjar syndrome gene therapy.

  10. Lysyl Oxidase-Like 1 Protein Deficiency Protects Mice from Adenoviral Transforming Growth Factor-β1-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaye, Pierre-Simon; Shimbori, Chiko; Upagupta, Chandak; Sato, Seidai; Shi, Wei; Gauldie, Jack; Ask, Kjetil; Kolb, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the lung parenchyma. The abnormal ECM deposition slowly overtakes normal lung tissue, disturbing gas exchange and leading to respiratory failure and death. ECM cross-linking and subsequent stiffening is thought to be a major contributor of disease progression and also promotes the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, one of the main profibrotic growth factors. Lysyl oxidase-like (LOXL) 1 belongs to the cross-linking enzyme family and has been shown to be up-regulated in active fibrotic regions of bleomycin-treated mice and patients with IPF. We demonstrate in this study that LOXL1-deficient mice are protected from experimental lung fibrosis induced by overexpression of TGF-β1 using adenoviral (Ad) gene transfer (AdTGF-β1). The lack of LOXL1 prevented accumulation of insoluble cross-linked collagen in the lungs, and therefore limited lung stiffness after AdTGF-β1. In addition, we applied mechanical stretch to lung slices from LOXL1 +/+ and LOXL1 -/- mice treated with AdTGF-β1. Lung stiffness (Young's modulus) of LOXL1 -/- lung slices was significantly lower compared with LOXL1 +/+ lung slices. Moreover, the release of activated TGF-β1 after mechanical stretch was significantly lower in LOXL1 -/- mice compared with LOXL1 +/+ mice after AdTGF-β1. These data support the concept that cross-linking enzyme inhibition represents an interesting therapeutic target for drug development in IPF.

  11. Hexon-modified recombinant E1-deleted adenoviral vectors as bivalent vaccine carriers for Coxsackievirus A16 and Enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Yang, Yong; Chi, Yudan; Yin, Jieyun; Yan, Lijun; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Huang, Zhong; Zhou, Dongming

    2015-09-22

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a major public health concern in Asia; more efficient vaccines against HFMD are urgently required. Adenoviral (Ad) capsids have been used widely for the presentation of foreign antigens to induce specific immune responses in the host. Here, we describe a novel bivalent vaccine for HFMD based on the hexon-modified, E1-deleted chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 68 (AdC68). The novel vaccine candidate was generated by incorporating the neutralising epitope of Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), PEP71, into hypervariable region 1 (HVR1), and a shortened neutralising epitope of Enterovirus 71 (EV71), sSP70, into HVR2 of the AdC68 hexon. In order to enhance the immunogenicity of EV71, VP1 of EV71 was cloned into the E1-region of the AdC68 vectors. The results demonstrated that these two epitopes were well presented on the virion surface and had high affinity towards specific antibodies, and VP1 of EV71 was also significantly expressed. In pre-clinical mouse models, the hexon-modified AdC68 elicited neutralising antibodies against both CA16 and EV71, which conferred protection to suckling mice against a lethal challenge of CA16 and EV71. In summary, this study demonstrates that the hexon-modified AdC68 may represent a promising bivalent vaccine carrier against EV71 and CA16 and an epitope-display platform for other pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptional targeting of primary and metastatic tumor neovasculature by an adenoviral type 5 roundabout4 vector in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Hong Lu

    Full Text Available New approaches targeting metastatic neovasculature are needed. Payload capacity, cellular transduction efficiency, and first-pass cellular uptake following systemic vector administration, motivates persistent interest in tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC adenoviral (Ad vector targeting. While EC transductional and transcriptional targeting has been accomplished, vector administration approaches of limited clinical utility, lack of tumor-wide EC expression quantification, and failure to address avid liver sequestration, challenged prior work. Here, we intravenously injected an Ad vector containing 3 kb of the human roundabout4 (ROBO4 enhancer/promoter transcriptionally regulating an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP reporter into immunodeficient mice bearing 786-O renal cell carcinoma subcutaneous (SC xenografts and kidney orthotopic (KO tumors. Initial experiments performed in human coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (hCAR transgenic:Rag2 knockout mice revealed multiple ECs with high-level Ad5ROBO4-EGFP expression throughout KO and SC tumors. In contrast, Ad5CMV-EGFP was sporadically expressed in a few tumor vascular ECs and stromal cells. As the hCAR transgene also facilitated Ad5ROBO4 and control Ad5CMV vector EC expression in multiple host organs, follow-on experiments engaged warfarin-mediated liver vector detargeting in hCAR non-transgenic mice. Ad5ROBO4-mediated EC expression was undetectable in most host organs, while the frequencies of vector expressing intratumoral vessels and whole tumor EGFP protein levels remained elevated. In contrast, AdCMV vector expression was only detectable in one or two stromal cells throughout the whole tumor. The Ad5ROBO4 vector, in conjunction with liver detargeting, provides tractable genetic access for in-vivo EC genetic engineering in malignancies.

  13. Presentation of a Conserved Adenoviral Epitope on HLA-C*0702 Allows Evasion of Natural Killer but Not T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keib, Anna; Günther, Patrick S; Faist, Benjamin; Halenius, Anne; Busch, Dirk H; Neuenhahn, Michael; Jahn, Gerhard; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2017-04-01

    Infection with adenovirus is a major cause of infectious mortality in children following hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. While adoptive transfer of epitope-specific T cells is a particularly effective therapeutic approach, there are few suitable adenoviral peptide epitopes described to date. Here, we describe the adenoviral peptide epitope FRKDVNMVL from hexon protein, and its variant FRKDVNMIL, that is restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C*0702. Since HLA-C*0702 can be recognized by both T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, we characterized responses by both cell types. T cells specific for FRKDVNMVL were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells expanded from eight of ten healthy HLA-typed donors by peptide-HLA multimer staining, and could also be detected by cultured interferon γ ELISpot assays. Surprisingly, HLA-C*0702 was not downregulated during infection, in contrast to the marked downregulation of HLA-A*0201, suggesting that adenovirus cannot evade T cell responses to HLA-C*0702-restricted peptide epitopes. By contrast, NK responses were inhibited following adenoviral peptide presentation. Notably, presentation of the FRKDVNMVL peptide enhanced binding of HLA-C*0702 to the inhibitory receptor KIR2DL3 and decreased NK cytotoxic responses, suggesting that adenoviruses may use this peptide to evade NK responses. Given the immunodominance of FRKDVNMVL-specific T cell responses, apparent lack of HLA-C*0702 downregulation during infection, and the high frequency of this allotype, this peptide epitope may be particularly useful for adoptive T cell transfer therapy of adenovirus infection.

  14. Engineering conditionally replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying the cytosine deaminase gene increases the infectivity and therapeutic effect for breast cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Ye, T; Maynard, J; Akbulut, H; Deisseroth, A

    2006-04-01

    We constructed a conditionally replication-competent adenoviral vector Ad.Lp-CD-IRES-E1A(control) in which the expression of both the prodrug-activating cytosine deaminase gene and the viral replication E1A gene were driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter. In order to overcome the low infectivity of the adenoviral vectors for breast cancer cells, and to increase the safety and efficacy for cancer gene therapy, this vector was further modified on a transductional level by simultaneously ablating the native tropism of the vector to the primary CAR receptor and inserting a RGD-4C peptide into the HI loop of the fiber, which allows the vector to use the alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 receptors as alternative receptors. The resulting vector was named Ad.Lp-CD-IRES-E1A(MRGD). The transduction efficiency of the vector for breast cancer cell lines which have low expression level of CAR was increased both in vitro and in vivo. The Ad.Lp-CD-IRES-E1A(MRGD) vector produces a higher vector particle yield and a greater cytotoxic effect in tumor cells which have a low expression level of CAR, than did the Ad.Lp-CD-IRES-E1A(control) vector. Intratumoral injection of the Ad.Lp-CD-IRES-E1A(MRGD) vector following the intraperitoneal injection of 5FC into xenotransplanted human breast cancer cell lines which have low expression level of CAR led to greater degree of tumor regression in vivo than did the intratumoral injection of control adenoviral vectors not so modified.

  15. A soluble CAR-SCF fusion protein improves adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer to c-Kit-positive hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Akira; Okada, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kume, Akihiro; Takatoku, Masaaki; Komatsu, Norio; Hanazono, Yutaka; Ozawa, Keiya

    2003-11-01

    Although adenoviral vectors primarily derived from the adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) are widely used for many gene transfer applications, they cannot efficiently infect hematopoietic cells, since these cells do not express the coxsackie-adenoviral receptor (CAR). We have developed a soluble fusion protein that bridges adenoviral fibers and the c-Kit receptor to alter Ad5 tropism to immature hematopoietic cells. The CAR-SCF fusion protein consists of the extracellular domains of CAR and stem cell factor (SCF). The human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell lines UT-7 and M07e, human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K-562, and erythroleukemia cell line TF-1 were used to assess CAR-SCF-assisted Ad5-mediated gene transfer. Hematopoietic cell lines were infected with an Ad5 vector (Ad5-eGFP) or a fiber-mutant Ad5/F35 (Ad5/F35-eGFP) expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene in the presence or absence of CAR-SCF. Twenty-four hours after infection, more than 80% of M07e cells infected in the presence of CAR-SCF were eGFP-positive, compared with very few eGFP-positive cells following Ad5-eGFP infection in the absence of CAR-SCF. The enhancement of Ad5-eGFP infection by CAR-SCF was greater than that caused by Ad5/F35-eGFP (50%). The ability of CAR-SCF to enhance Ad5-eGFP infectivity was highly dependent on cellular c-Kit expression levels. Furthermore, CAR-SCF also enhanced Ad5-mediated gene transfer into human primary CD34(+) cells. The CAR-SCF fusion protein assists Ad5-mediated transduction to c-Kit(+) CAR(-) hematopoietic cells. The use of this fusion protein would enhance a utility of Ad5-mediated hematopoietic cell transduction strategies. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells

  17. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genz, Berit [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Thomas, Maria [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart (Germany); Pützer, Brigitte M. [Institute of Experimental Gene Therapy and Cancer Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg [Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine and Ageing Research, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Vollmar, Brigitte [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany); Abshagen, Kerstin, E-mail: kerstin.abshagen@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  18. Structural insights into a wildtype domain of the oncoprotein E6 and its interaction with a PDZ domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mischo

    Full Text Available The high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7 interact with key cellular regulators and are etiological agents for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance in cervical cancer and other malignant conditions. E6 induces degradation of the tumor suppressor p53, activates telomerase and deregulates cell polarity. Analysis of E6 derived from a number of high risk HPV finally yielded the first structure of a wild-type HPV E6 domain (PDB 2M3L representing the second zinc-binding domain of HPV 51 E6 (termed 51Z2 determined by NMR spectroscopy. The 51Z2 structure provides clues about HPV-type specific structural differences between E6 proteins. The observed temperature sensitivity of the well-folded wild-type E6 domain implies a significant malleability of the oncoprotein in vivo. Hence, the structural differences between individual E6 and their malleability appear, together with HPV type-specific surface exposed side-chains, to provide the structural basis for the different interaction networks reported for individual E6 proteins. Furthermore, the interaction of 51Z2 with a PDZ domain of hDlg was analyzed. Human Dlg constitutes a prototypic representative of the large family of PDZ proteins regulating cell polarity, which are common targets of high-risk HPV E6. Nine C-terminal residues of 51Z2 interact with the second PDZ domain of hDlg2. Surface plasmon resonance in conjunction with the NMR spectroscopy derived complex structure (PDB 2M3M indicate that E6 residues N-terminal to the canonical PDZ-BM of E6 significantly contribute to this interaction and increase affinity. The structure of the complex reveals how residues outside of the classical PDZ-BM enhance the affinity of E6 towards PDZ domains. Such mechanism facilitates successful competition of E6 with cellular PDZ-binding proteins and may apply to PDZ-binding proteins of other viruses as well.

  19. Retinoblastoma-independent antiproliferative activity of novel intracellular antibodies against the E7 oncoprotein in HPV 16-positive cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accardi, Luisa; Tommasino, Massimo; Banks, Lawrence; Chirullo, Barbara; Giorgi, Colomba; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Mileo, Anna M; Paggi, Marco G; Federico, Antonio; Torreri, Paola; Petrucci, Tamara C; Accardi, Rosita; Pim, David

    2011-01-01

    'High risk' Human Papillomavirus strains are the causative agents of the vast majority of carcinomas of the uterine cervix. In these tumors, the physical integration of the HPV genome is a frequent, though not invariable occurrence, but the constitutive expression of the E6 and E7 viral genes is always observed, suggesting key roles for the E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the process of malignant transformation. The 'intracellular antibody' technology using recombinant antibodies in single-chain format offers the possibility of targeting a protein in its intracellular environment even at the level of definite domains thus representing a valuable strategy to 'knock out' the function of specific proteins. In this study, we investigate the in vitro activity of two single-chain antibody fragments directed against the 'high-risk' HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein, scFv 43M2 and scFv 51. These scFvs were expressed by retroviral system in different cell compartments of the HPV16-positive SiHa cells, and cell proliferation was analyzed by Colony Formation Assay and EZ4U assay. The binding of these scFvs to E7, and their possible interference with the interaction between E7 and its main target, the tumor suppressor pRb protein, were then investigated by immunoassays, PepSet™technology and Surface Plasmon Resonance. The expression of the two scFvs in the nucleus and the endoplasmic reticulum of SiHa cells resulted in the selective growth inhibition of these cells. Analysis of binding showed that both scFvs bind E7 via distinct but overlapping epitopes not corresponding to the pRb binding site. Nevertheless, the binding of scFv 43M2 to E7 was inhibited by pRb in a non-competitive manner. Based on the overall results, the observed inhibition of HPV-positive SiHa cells proliferation could be ascribed to an interaction between scFv and E7, involving non-pRb targets. The study paves the way for the employment of specific scFvs in immunotherapeutic

  20. Retinoblastoma-independent antiproliferative activity of novel intracellular antibodies against the E7 oncoprotein in HPV 16-positive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banks Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "High risk" Human Papillomavirus strains are the causative agents of the vast majority of carcinomas of the uterine cervix. In these tumors, the physical integration of the HPV genome is a frequent, though not invariable occurrence, but the constitutive expression of the E6 and E7 viral genes is always observed, suggesting key roles for the E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the process of malignant transformation. The "intracellular antibody" technology using recombinant antibodies in single-chain format offers the possibility of targeting a protein in its intracellular environment even at the level of definite domains thus representing a valuable strategy to "knock out" the function of specific proteins. Methods In this study, we investigate the in vitro activity of two single-chain antibody fragments directed against the "high-risk" HPV 16 E7 oncoprotein, scFv 43M2 and scFv 51. These scFvs were expressed by retroviral system in different cell compartments of the HPV16-positive SiHa cells, and cell proliferation was analyzed by Colony Formation Assay and EZ4U assay. The binding of these scFvs to E7, and their possible interference with the interaction between E7 and its main target, the tumor suppressor pRb protein, were then investigated by immunoassays, PepSet™technology and Surface Plasmon Resonance. Results The expression of the two scFvs in the nucleus and the endoplasmic reticulum of SiHa cells resulted in the selective growth inhibition of these cells. Analysis of binding showed that both scFvs bind E7 via distinct but overlapping epitopes not corresponding to the pRb binding site. Nevertheless, the binding of scFv 43M2 to E7 was inhibited by pRb in a non-competitive manner. Conclusions Based on the overall results, the observed inhibition of HPV-positive SiHa cells proliferation could be ascribed to an interaction between scFv and E7, involving non-pRb targets. The study paves the way for the employment of specific sc

  1. Long-Term Blockade of Cocaine Self-Administration and Locomotor Activation in Rats by an Adenoviral Vector–Delivered Cocaine Hydrolase

    OpenAIRE

    Smethells, John R.; Swalve, Natashia; Brimijoin, Stephen; Gao, Yang; Parks, Robin J.; Greer, Adam; Carroll, Marilyn E.

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach in treating cocaine abuse is to metabolize cocaine in the blood using a mutated butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that functions as a cocaine hydrolase (CocH). In rats, a helper-dependent adenoviral (hdAD) vector–mediated delivery of CocH abolished ongoing cocaine use and cocaine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking for several months. This enzyme also metabolizes ghrelin, an effect that may be beneficial in maintaining healthy weights. The effect of a single hdAD-CocH vector ...

  2. The Oncoprotein E2A-Pbx1a Collaborates with Hoxa9 To Acutely Transform Primary Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Krosl, Jana; Kroon, Evert; Haman, André; Hoang, Trang; Sauvageau, Guy

    1999-01-01

    A recurrent translocation between chromosome 1 (Pbx1) and 19 (E2A) leading to the expression of the E2A-Pbx1 fusion oncoprotein occurs in ∼5 to 10% of acute leukemias in humans. It has been proposed that some of the oncogenic potential of E2A-Pbx1 could be mediated through heterocomplex formation with Hox proteins, which are also involved in human and mouse leukemias. To directly test this possibility, mouse bone marrow cells were engineered by retroviral gene transfer to overexpress E2A-Pbx1a together with Hoxa9. The results obtained demonstrated a strong synergistic interaction between E2A-Pbx1a and Hoxa9 in inducing growth factor-independent proliferation of transduced bone marrow cells in vitro and leukemic growth in vivo in only 39 ± 2 days. The leukemic blasts which coexpress E2A-Pbx1a and Hoxa9 showed little differentiation and produced cytokines such as interleukin-3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and Steel. Together, these studies demonstrate that the Hoxa9 and E2A-Pbx1a gene products collaborate to produce a highly aggressive acute leukemic disease. PMID:10454582

  3. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. •HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-κB through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells

  4. Cigarette Smoking Promotes Infection of Cervical Cells by High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses, but not Subsequent E7 Oncoprotein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimon Chatzistamatiou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent cervical infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the development of cervical cancer. Therefore, there are other co-factors facilitating the hrHPV carcinogenic process, one of which is smoking. To assess the effect of smoking on high-risk (hr HPV DNA positivity and on the expression of HPV E7 oncoprotein, as a surrogate of persistent hrHPV infection, we used data from women recruited for the PIPAVIR project, which examined the role of E7 protein detection in cervical cancer screening. Women were tested for hrHPV DNA, using Multiplex Genotyping (MPG, and E7 protein, using a novel sandwich ELISA method, and gave information on their smoking habits. Among 1473 women, hrHPV prevalence was 19.1%. The odds ratio (OR for hrHPV positivity of smokers compared to non-smokers was 1.785 (95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.365–2.332, p < 0.001. The ORs for E7 positivity, concerning hrHPV positive women, ranged from 0.720 to 1.360 depending on the E7 detection assay used, but this was not statistically significant. Smoking increases the probability of hrHPV infection, and smoking intensity is positively associated to this increase. Smoking is not related to an increased probability of E7 protein positivity for hrHPV positive women.

  5. Interplay Between Oncoproteins and Antioxidant Enzymes in Esophageal Carcinoma Treated Without and With Chemoradiotherapy: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Tranum; Gupta, Rajesh; Vaiphei, Kim; Kapoor, Rakesh; Gupta, N.M.; Khanduja, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression changes and examine their relationship with various antioxidant enzymes in esophageal carcinoma patients. Methods and Materials: Patients in Group 1 underwent transhiatal esophagectomy and those in Group 2 were administered chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery after 4 weeks of neoadjuvant therapy. Results: The relationship analysis among the various protein markers and antioxidant enzymes showed an inverse correlation between bcl-2 and superoxide dismutase/catalase in tumor tissues, irrespective of the treatment arm followed. An important positive association was observed between bcl-2 and reduced glutathione levels in the tumor tissue of patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy. Another apoptosis-modulating marker, c-myc, in the tumor tissue of Group 2 patients showed similar pattern levels (high and low) as that of superoxide dismutase/catalase. The association of cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 with various antioxidant enzymes showed a significant positive correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 expression and catalase activity and an inverse trend between p53 expression and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the tumor tissue of patients given neoadjuvant therapy. In addition, patients with overexpressed p53 protein levels had lower glutathione peroxidase enzyme levels and vice versa in the tumor tissue of patients who had undergone surgery as their main mode of treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study broaden the insight into the relationships shared among oncoproteins and the antioxidant defense system, and this could be helpful in the clinical management of esophageal carcinoma

  6. Cigarette Smoking Promotes Infection of Cervical Cells by High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses, but not Subsequent E7 Oncoprotein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistamatiou, Kimon; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Vryzas, Dimos; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Koch, Isabel; Soutschek, Erwin; Boecher, Oliver; Tsertanidou, Athena; Maglaveras, Nikolaos; Jansen-Duerr, Pidder; Agorastos, Theodoros

    2018-01-31

    Persistent cervical infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the development of cervical cancer. Therefore, there are other co-factors facilitating the hrHPV carcinogenic process, one of which is smoking. To assess the effect of smoking on high-risk (hr) HPV DNA positivity and on the expression of HPV E7 oncoprotein, as a surrogate of persistent hrHPV infection, we used data from women recruited for the PIPAVIR project, which examined the role of E7 protein detection in cervical cancer screening. Women were tested for hrHPV DNA, using Multiplex Genotyping (MPG), and E7 protein, using a novel sandwich ELISA method, and gave information on their smoking habits. Among 1473 women, hrHPV prevalence was 19.1%. The odds ratio (OR) for hrHPV positivity of smokers compared to non-smokers was 1.785 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.365-2.332, p < 0.001). The ORs for E7 positivity, concerning hrHPV positive women, ranged from 0.720 to 1.360 depending on the E7 detection assay used, but this was not statistically significant. Smoking increases the probability of hrHPV infection, and smoking intensity is positively associated to this increase. Smoking is not related to an increased probability of E7 protein positivity for hrHPV positive women.

  7. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7 oncoprotein expression alters microRNA expression in extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles released by cancer cells are mediators of intercellular communication that have been reported to contribute to carcinogenesis. Since they are readily detected in bodily fluids, they may also be used as cancer biomarkers. The E6/E7 oncoproteins drive human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers, which account for approximately 5% of all human cancers worldwide. Here, we investigate how HPV16 E6/E7 oncogene expression in primary human epithelial cells alters miR expression in extracellular vesicles and compare these to changes in intracellular miR expression. Examining a panel of 68 cancer related miRs revealed that many miRs had similar expression patterns in cells and in extracellular vesicles, whereas some other miRs had different expression patterns and may be selectively packaged into extracellular vesicles. Interestingly, the set of miRs that may be selectively packaged in HPV16 E6/E7 extracellular vesicles is predicted to inhibit necrosis and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ex vivo adenoviral vector gene delivery results in decreased vector-associated inflammation pre- and post-lung transplantation in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Wagnetz, Dirk; Cypel, Marcelo; Rubacha, Matthew; Koike, Terumoto; Chun, Yi-Min; Hu, Jim; Waddell, Thomas K; Hwang, David M; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2012-06-01

    Acellular normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method of donor lung preservation for transplantation. As cellular metabolism is preserved during perfusion, it represents a potential platform for effective gene transduction in donor lungs. We hypothesized that vector-associated inflammation would be reduced during ex vivo delivery due to isolation from the host immune system response. We compared ex vivo with in vivo intratracheal delivery of an E1-, E3-deleted adenoviral vector encoding either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) to porcine lungs. Twelve hours after delivery, the lung was transplanted and the post-transplant function assessed. We identified significant transgene expression by 12 hours in both in vivo and ex vivo delivered groups. Lung function remained excellent in all ex vivo groups after viral vector delivery; however, as expected, lung function decreased in the in vivo delivered adenovirus vector encoding GFP (AdGFP) group with corresponding increases in IL-1β levels. Transplanted lung function was excellent in the ex vivo transduced lungs and inferior lung function was seen in the in vivo group after transplantation. In summary, ex vivo delivery of adenoviral gene therapy to the donor lung is superior to in vivo delivery in that it leads to less vector-associated inflammation and provides superior post-transplant lung function.

  9. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Priming of CD8 T Cells by Adenoviral Vectors Is Critically Dependent on B7 and Dendritic Cells but Only Partially Dependent on CD28 Ligation on CD8 T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen N; Steffensen, Maria A; Christensen, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have long been forerunners in the development of effective CD8 T cell-based vaccines; therefore, it is imperative that we understand the factors controlling the induction of robust and long-lasting transgene-specific immune responses by these vectors. In this study, we investig...

  11. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins affect the expression of cancer-related microRNAs: additional evidence in HPV-induced tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiantore, Maria Vincenza; Mangino, Giorgio; Iuliano, Marco; Zangrillo, Maria Simona; De Lillis, Ilaria; Vaccari, Gabriele; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Columba Cabezas, Sandra; Federico, Maurizio; Fiorucci, Gianna; Romeo, Giovanna

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer and are also associated with other types of cancers. HPVs can modulate microRNAs (miRNAs) expressed by infected cells. The production of extracellular vesicles is deregulated in cancer, and their cargo delivered to the microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis. The involvement of HPV oncoproteins on miRNA expression in cells and exosomes was analyzed in keratinocytes transduced with E6 and E7 from mucosal HPV-16 or cutaneous HPV-38 (K16 and K38). MiRNAs were investigated through the TaqMan Array Human MicroRNA Cards, followed by real-time RT-PCR assay for specific miRNAs. Selected miRNA targets were analyzed by Western blot and correlated to the HPV oncoproteins by specifically silencing E6 and E7 expression. Exosomes, isolated from K16 and K38 supernatants by differential centrifugations, were quantified through the vesicle-associated acetylcholinesterase activity. MiRNAs deregulated in K16 and K38 cells were identified. HPV-16 and/or HPV-38 E6 and E7 single proteins can modify the expression of selected miRNAs involved in the tumorigenesis, in particular miR-18a, -19a, -34a and -590-5p. The analysis of the content of exosomes isolated from HPV-positive cells revealed the presence of E6 and E7 mRNAs and few miRNAs. MiR-222, a key miRNA deregulated in many cancers, was identified in exosomes from K16 cells. HPV E6 and/or E7 oncoprotein expression can induce the deregulation of some miRNAs. Through the production and function of exosomes, HPV oncogenes as well as HPV-deregulated miRNAs can potentiate the virus oncogenic effects in the tumor cell microenvironment.

  12. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transac...

  13. Expression of the stress response oncoprotein LEDGF/p75 in human cancer: a study of 21 tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anamika; Rojas, Heather; Banerjee, Hiya; Cabrera, Irena B; Perez, Kayla Y; De León, Marino; Casiano, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress-modulated signaling pathways have been implicated in carcinogenesis and therapy resistance. The lens epithelium derived growth factor p75 (LEDGF/p75) is a transcription co-activator that promotes resistance to stress-induced cell death. This protein has been implicated in inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, HIV-AIDS, and cancer. Although LEDGF/p75 is emerging as a stress survival oncoprotein, there is scarce information on its expression in human tumors. The present study was performed to evaluate its expression in a comprehensive panel of human cancers. Transcript expression was examined in the Oncomine cancer gene microarray database and in a TissueScan Cancer Survey Panel quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) array. Protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in cancer tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing 1735 tissues representing single or replicate cores from 1220 individual cases (985 tumor and 235 normal tissues). A total of 21 major cancer types were analyzed. Analysis of LEDGF/p75 transcript expression in Oncomine datasets revealed significant upregulation (tumor vs. normal) in 15 out of 17 tumor types. The TissueScan Cancer Q-PCR array revealed significantly elevated LEDGF/p75 transcript expression in prostate, colon, thyroid, and breast cancers. IHC analysis of TMAs revealed significant increased levels of LEDGF/p75 protein in prostate, colon, thyroid, liver and uterine tumors, relative to corresponding normal tissues. Elevated transcript or protein expression of LEDGF/p75 was observed in several tumor types. These results further establish LEDGF/p75 as a cancer-related protein, and provide a rationale for ongoing studies aimed at understanding the clinical significance of its expression in specific human cancers.

  14. ASPL-TFE3 Oncoprotein Regulates Cell Cycle Progression and Induces Cellular Senescence by Up-Regulating p21

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    Naoko Ishiguro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar soft part sarcoma is an extremely rare soft tissue sarcoma with poor prognosis. It is characterized by the unbalanced recurrent chromosomal translocation der(17t(X;17(p11;q25, resulting in the generation of an ASPL-TFE3 fusion gene. ASPL-TFE3 oncoprotein functions as an aberrant transcriptional factor and is considered to play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of alveolar soft part sarcoma. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we identified p21 (p21WAF1/CIP1 as a direct transcriptional target of ASPL-TFE3. Ectopic ASPL-TFE3 expression in 293 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant increases in protein and mRNA levels of p21. ASPL-TFE3 activated p21 expression in a p53-independent manner through direct transcriptional interactions with the p21 promoter region. When ASPL-TFE3 was expressed in human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells in a tetracycline-inducible manner, we observed the up-regulation of p21 expression and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Suppression of p21 significantly decreased the induction of ASPL-TFE3-mediated cellular senescence. Furthermore, ASPL-TFE3 expression in mesenchymal stem cells resulted in a significant up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines associated with senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP. These results show that ASPL-TFE3 regulates cell cycle progression and induces cellular senescence by up-regulating p21 expression. In addition, our data suggest a potential mechanism by which ASPL-TFE3-induced senescence may play a role in tumorigenesis by inducing SASP, which could promote the protumorigenic microenvironment.

  15. The Hox cooperativity motif of the chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is necessary and sufficient for oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C P; de Vivo, I; Cleary, M L

    1997-01-01

    E2a-Pbx1 chimeric oncoproteins result from fusion of the E2A and PBX1 genes at the sites of t(1;19) chromosomal translocations in a subset acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Experimentally, E2a-Pbx1 transforms a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts, myeloid progenitors, and lymphoblasts. Structure-function studies have shown that contributions from both E2a and Pbx1 are necessary for oncogenesis, but the Pbx1 homeodomain is dispensable and the required portion of Pbx1 has not been delineated. In this study, we used deletional and site-directed mutagenesis to identify portions of Pbx1 necessary for oncogenic and transcriptional activities of E2a-Pbx1. These studies defined a motif (named the Hox cooperativity motif [HCM]) carboxy terminal to the Pbx homeodomain that is required for cooperative DNA binding, cellular transcriptional activity, and the oncogenic potential of E2a-Pbx1. The HCM is highly conserved throughout the Pbx/exd subfamily of divergent homeodomain proteins and functions in DNA-binding assays as a potential contact site for Hox dimerization. E2a-Pbx1 proteins with interstitial deletion or single-point mutations in the HCM could neither activate transcription in cellular assays nor transform NIH 3T3 cells. An E2a-Pbx1 mutant containing 50 amino acids of Pbx1b spanning the HCM but lacking the homeodomain was capable of inducing fibroblast transformation. Thus, the HCM is a necessary and sufficient contribution of Pbx1 for oncogenesis induced by E2a-Pbx1 and accounts for its homeodomain-independent transforming properties. Since subtle alterations of the Pbx HCM result in complete abrogation of transforming activity whereas the homeodomain is entirely dispensable, we conclude that interactions mediated by the HCM are more important for transformation by E2a-Pbx1 than interactions with cognate Pbx DNA sites.

  16. Amino-terminal enhancer of split (AES) interacts with the oncoprotein NUP98-HOXA9 and enhances its transforming ability.

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    Sarma, Nayan J; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2011-11-11

    NUP98-HOXA9 is the prototype of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins that cause acute myeloid leukemia. It consists of an N-terminal FG-rich portion of the nucleoporin NUP98 fused to the homeodomain region of the homeobox protein HOXA9, and acts as an aberrant transcription factor. To identify interacting partners of NUP98-HOXA9, we used a cytoplasmic yeast two-hybrid assay to avoid the nonspecific trans-activation that would occur with the traditional yeast two-hybrid assay due to the transactivating properties of NUP98-HOXA9. We identified amino-terminal enhancer of split (AES), a transcriptional regulator of the transducin-like enhancer/Groucho family as a novel interaction partner of NUP98-HOXA9. The interaction was confirmed by in vitro pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays and was shown to require the FG repeat region of NUP98-HOXA9. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that AES localizes primarily to the interior of the nucleus. AES also showed a strong interaction with wild-type NUP98. AES augmented the transcriptional activity of NUP98-HOXA9. In the presence of NUP98-HOXA9, AES caused an increase in long-term proliferation of primary human CD34+ cells with a marked increase in the numbers of primitive cells. These effects of AES were not observed in the absence of NUP98-HOXA9. AES knockdown diminished the transcriptional and proliferative effects of NUP98-HOXA9. AES caused a shift away from the erythroid lineage in cells expressing NUP98-HOXA9. These data establish AES as an interacting partner of NUP98-HOXA9 and show that it cooperates with NUP98-HOXA9 in transcriptional regulation and cell transformation.

  17. Crystal structure of the homolog of the oncoprotein gankyrin, an interactor of Rb and CDK4/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Adachi, Naruhiko; Kataoka, Kazuhiro; Horikoshi, Masami

    2004-01-09

    The oncoprotein gankyrin plays a central role in tumorigenesis and cell proliferation. Gankyrin interacts with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) and cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6), increases phosphorylation at specific residues of Rb by CDK4/6 in vivo, and promotes tumorigenesis. The phosphorylation of Rb by CDK4/6 leads to the deregulation of the cell cycle during G1/S transition. Although how phosphorylation occurs on Rb has been studied extensively, the mechanism of site-specific phosphorylation of Rb remains unclear due to a lack of information on the structural arrangement of Rb and CDK4/6. Here, we have determined and refined to 2.3-A resolution the crystal structure of a gankyrin homolog, the non-ATPase subunit 6 (Nas6p) of the proteasome from yeast. The crystal structure reveals that Nas6p contains seven ankyrin repeats. The number of the repeats is different from that predicted from the primary structure. Nas6p also possesses an unusual curved structure with two acidic regions at the N- and C-terminal regions separated by one basic region, suggesting that it has at least two functional surfaces. The tertiary structure of Nas6p, together with the previous biochemical studies, indicates that the CDK4/6 and Rb binding surfaces of gankyrin are located at the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively, and face the same side of gankyrin. These observations suggest that gankyrin brings Rb and CDK4/6 together through gankyrin-Rb and gankyrin-CDK4/6 interactions and determines the relative positioning of the substrate (Rb) and the enzyme (CDK4/6). Our findings provide mechanistic insight into site-specific phosphorylation of Rb caused by CDK4/6.

  18. DNA binding-independent transcriptional activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene (VEGF) by the Myb oncoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutwyche, Jodi K.; Keough, Rebecca A.; Hunter, Julie; Coles, Leeanne S.; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Myb is a key transcription factor that can regulate proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, predominantly in the haemopoietic system. Abnormal expression of Myb is associated with a number of cancers, both haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic. In order to better understand the role of Myb in normal and tumorigenic processes, we undertook a cDNA array screen to identify genes that are regulated by this factor. In this way, we identified the gene encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as being potentially regulated by the Myb oncoprotein in myeloid cells. To determine whether this was a direct effect on VEGF gene transcription, we examined the activity of the murine VEGF promoter in the presence of either wild-type (WT) or mutant forms of Myb. It was found that WT Myb was able to activate the VEGF promoter and that a minimal promoter region of 120 bp was sufficient to confer Myb responsiveness. Surprisingly, activation of the VEGF promoter was independent of DNA binding by Myb. This was shown by the use of DNA binding-defective Myb mutants and by mutagenesis of a potential Myb-binding site in the minimal promoter. Mutation of Sp1 sites within this region abolished Myb-mediated regulation of a reporter construct, suggesting that Myb DNA binding-independent activation of VEGF expression occurs via these Sp1 binding elements. Regulation of VEGF production by Myb has implications for the potential role of Myb in myeloid leukaemias and in solid tumours where VEGF may be functioning as an autocrine growth factor

  19. Transcriptomic analyses of genes differentially expressed by high-risk and low-risk human papilloma virus E6 oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Pooja; Ganguly, Niladri

    2015-09-01

    Human papilloma virus is the causative agent for cervical cancer with 99 % of cervical cancer cases containing HPV. The high risk HPV-16, 18 and 31 are the major causative agents. The low risk HPV-6, 11 have been reported to cause penile, laryngeal, bronchogenic and oesophageal cancer. Since E6 oncoprotein is frequently over expressed in cancers, we did gene expression studies to compare between the E6 genes of high-risk (HPV18) or low-risk (HPV11)stably transfected in epithelial cell line EPC-2 or mock transfected with the basic vector pCDNA3.1. Microarray studies showed a total of 697 genes showing differential expression between the samples. Genes involved in several key cellular processes such as cell adhesion, angiogenesis, transcription regulation, cell cycle regulation and cell division showed altered expression between the samples. Gene Ontology mapping of 44 genes according cellular pathways revealed 13 pathways namely angiogenesis, alzhemier's, Wnt, p53, interleukin, TGF-β, cadherin, integrin, PI3-kinase, catennin, insulin, chemokine and G protein signalling pathways. The microarray results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR for some representative genes like IFI27, CTNNA1, OSMR, CYP1B1, TNFSF13, LAMA2 and COL5A3. Analysis of differentially expressed genes by high-risk and low-risk HPV E6 proteins might help in identification of potential biomarkers for diagnosis, progression and therapy of oesophageal cancer. The understanding of mechanisms of activation of these genes as well as the function of gene products will give a further insight into their roles in oesophageal cancer.

  20. Intracellular Analysis of the Interaction between the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Oncoprotein and Inhibitory Peptides.

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    Christina Stutz

    Full Text Available Oncogenic types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs cause cervical cancer and other malignancies in humans. The HPV E6 oncoprotein is considered to be an attractive therapeutic target since its inhibition can lead to the apoptotic cell death of HPV-positive cancer cells. The HPV type 16 (HPV16 E6-binding peptide pep11, and variants thereof, induce cell death specifically in HPV16-positive cancer cells. Although they do not encompass the LxxLL binding motif found in cellular HPV16 E6 interaction partners, such as E6AP, the pep11 variants strongly bind to HPV16 E6 by contacting the recently identified E6AP binding pocket. Thus, these peptides can serve as prototype E6-inhibitory molecules which target the E6AP pocket. We here analyzed their intracellular interaction with HPV16 E6. By comprehensive intracellular binding studies and GST pull-down assays, we show that E6-binding competent pep11 variants induce the formation of a trimeric complex, consisting of pep11, HPV16 E6 and p53. These findings indicate that peptides, which do not contain the LxxLL motif, can reshape E6 to enable its interaction with p53. The formation of the trimeric HPV16 E6 / peptide / p53 complex was associated with an increase of endogenous HPV16 E6 protein amounts. Yet, total cellular p53 amounts were also increased, indicating that the E6 / E6AP-mediated degradation of p53 is blocked. These findings suggest that inhibition of oncogenic activities by targeting the E6AP pocket on HPV16 E6 could be a strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Bovine papillomavirus E5 and E7 oncoproteins in naturally occurring tumors: are two better than one?

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    Corteggio Annunziata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs are oncogenic DNA viruses, which mainly induce benign lesions of cutaneous and/or mucosal epithelia in cattle. Thirteen (BPV 1–13 different viral genotypes have been characterized so far. BPVs are usually species-specific but BPV 1/2 may also infect equids as well as buffaloes and bison and cause tumors in these species. BPV-induced benign lesions usually regress, however occasionally they develop into cancer particularly in the presence of environmental carcinogenic co-factors. The major transforming protein of BPV is E5, a very short hydrophobic, transmembrane protein with many oncogenic activities. E5 contributes to cell transformation through the activation of the cellular β receptor for the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFβ-r, it also decreases cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI causing viral escape from immunosurveillance, and plays a role in the inhibition of the intracellular communication by means of aberrant connexin expression. E7 is considered as a weak transforming gene, it synergies with E5 in cell transformation during cancer development. E7 expression correlates in vivo with the over-expression of β1-integrin, which plays a role in the regulation of keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation. Additionally, E7 is involved in cell-mediated immune responses leading to tumour rejection, in anoikis process by direct binding to p600, and in invasion process by upregulation of Matrix metalloproteinase1 (MMP-1 expression. Studies on the role of BPV E5 and E7 oncoproteins in naturally occurring tumours are of scientific value, as they may shed new light on the biological role of these two oncogenes in cell transformation.

  2. HIV-1 adenoviral vector vaccines expressing multi-trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL enhance T cell mediated anti-viral immunity.

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    Saravana Kanagavelu

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5 vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from

  3. Amelioration of carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis and portal hypertension in rat using adenoviral gene transfer of Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gang; Huang, Xiang-Jun; Luo, Hong-Wu; Huang, Fei-Zhou; Liu, Xun-Yang; Wang, Yong-Heng

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether a virus constitutively expressing active Akt is useful to prevent cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Using cre-loxp technique, we created an Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus, in which Akt is labeled by a HA tag and its expression is driven by myr promoter. Further, through measuring enzyme levels and histological structure, we determined the efficacy of this Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus in inhibiting the development of cirrhosis induced by CCl4 in rats. Lastly, using western blotting, we examined the expression levels and/or phosphorylation status of Akt, apoptotic mediators, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and markers for hepatic stellate cells activation to understand the underlying mechanisms of protective role of this virus. The Ad-myr-HA-Akt virus was confirmed using polymerase chain reaction amplification of inserted Akt gene and sequencing for full length of inserted fragment, which was consistent with the sequence reported in the GenBank. The concentrations of Ad-myr-HA-Akt and adenoviral enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) virus used in the current study were 5.5 × 10(11) vp/mL. The portal vein diameter, peak velocity of blood flow, portal blood flow and congestion index were significantly increased in untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups when compared to normal control after the virus was introduced to animal through tail veil injection. In contrast, these parameters in the Akt cirrhosis group were comparable to normal control group. Compared to the normal control, the liver function (Alanine aminotransferase, Aspartate aminotransferase and Albumin) was significantly impaired in the untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups. The Akt cirrhosis group showed significant improvement of liver function when compared to the untreated, saline and Ad-EGFP cirrhosis groups. The Hyp level and portal vein pressure in Akt cirrhosis groups were also significantly lower than other cirrhosis groups. The results of HE and

  4. An easy method for preparation of Cre-loxP regulated fluorescent adenoviral expression vectors and its application for direct reprogramming into hepatocytes

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    Chitose Kurihara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant adenoviral gene expression system is a powerful tool for gene delivery. However, it is difficult to obtain high titers of infectious virus, principally due to the toxicity of the expressed gene which affects on virus replication in the host HEK293 cells. To avoid these problems, we generated a Cre-loxP-regulated fluorescent universal vector (termed pAxCALRL. This vector produces recombinant adenoviruses that express the red fluorescent protein (RFP instead of the inserted gene during proliferation, which limits toxicity and can be used to monitor viral replication. Expression of the gene of interest is induced by co-infection with an adenovirus that expresses Cre-recombinase (AxCANCre. Recombinant adenovirus produced by this system that express Hnf4α and Foxa2 were used to reprogram mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF into induced-hepatocyte-like cells (iHep following several rounds of infection, demonstrating the efficacy of this new system.

  5. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    -68 (MHV-68) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily and represents a useful murine model for this category of infections, in which new vaccination strategies may initially be evaluated. Two attenuated variants of MHV-68 have successfully been used as vaccines, but the oncogenic potential......-based vaccines are substantially more immunogenic than DNA vaccines and can be applied to induce mucosal immunity. Here we show that a significant reduction of the late viral load in the spleens, at 60 days post-infection, was achieved when immunizing mice both intranasally and subcutaneously with adenoviral...... vectors encoding both M2 and M3. Additionally we show that M3 immunization prevented the usual development of virus-induced splenomegaly at 2-3 weeks post-infection. This is the first time that immunization with a non-replicating vaccine has lead to a significantly reduced viral load at time points beyond...

  6. Quality of the transgene-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by adenoviral vector immunization is critically influenced by virus dose and route of vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Ørskov, Cathrine; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been widely used for experimental gene therapy and vaccination, yet there is a surprising lack of knowledge connecting the route and dose of adenovirus administration to the induced transgene-specific immune response. We have recently demonstrated polyfunctional CD8(+) T...... correlated positively with dissemination, whereas the functional capacity of the generated T cells correlated inversely with vector dissemination. A comparison of the immune response to s.c. or i.v. administration at moderate doses revealed that inoculation by both routes induced a transient peak of IFN......-gamma-producing CD8(+) T cells 2 to 3 wk postinfection, but following i.v. administration, these cells were only detected in the liver. Two to four months after systemic, but not peripheral, immunization, dysfunctional transgene-specific CD8(+) T cells impaired in both cytokine production and important in vivo...

  7. Comparison of [18F]FHBG and [14C]FIAU for imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene expression: adenoviral infection vs stable transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung-Jun; Iyer, Meera; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2003-01-01

    Earlier studies involving comparison of different reporter probes have shown conflicting results between pyrimidine nucleosides [e.g., 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU)] and acycloguanosine derivatives [e.g., penciclovir (PCV), 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine (FHBG)]. We hypothesized that this reported discrepancy may be related to how the reporter gene is delivered to the cells - stably transfected vs adenoviral infection. We directly compared the uptake characteristics of [ 18 F]FHBG, [ 3 H]PCV, and [ 14 C]FIAU in cell culture and in vivo using an adenoviral mediated gene transfer model and stably transfected cells. We further compared the uptake of three reporter probes using both HSV1-tk and a mutant HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells to assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination. [ 14 C]FIAU accumulation was greater than that of [ 3 H]PCV and [ 18 F]FHBG in control cells and in HSV1-tk stably transfected cells (P 8 pfu), [ 18 F]FHBG and [ 3 H]PCV accumulation was significantly greater than that of [ 14 C]FIAU (P 18 F]FHBG and [ 3 H]PCV accumulated to a significantly greater extent than [ 14 C]FIAU in C6-stb-sr39tk+ and AdCMV-HSV1-sr39tk infected C6 cells (P 14 C]FIAU led to significantly higher %ID/g in C6-stb-tk+ xenografts than [ 18 F]FHBG (P 14 C]FIAU, [ 18 F]FHBG led to as high %ID/g in HSV1-tk expressing hepatocytes and to significantly greater %ID/g in C6-stb-sr39tk+ xenografts and HSV1-sr39tk expressing hepatocytes. Dynamic sequential images showed that [ 18 F]FHBG was well retained in HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells (C6-stb-sr39tk+) for at least 4 h after injection, while it was rapidly cleared from HSV1-tk expressing cells (MH3924A-stb-tk+). [ 14 C]FIAU accumulated in HSV1-tk stably expressing cells to a greater extent than either [ 3 H]PCV or [ 18 F]FHBG. However, the accumulation of [ 3 H]PCV and [ 18 F]FHBG in adenoviral infected C6 cells or hepatocytes was equivalent to or greater than that of [ 14 C

  8. Inhibition of rabies virus multiplication by siRNA delivered through adenoviral vector in vitro in BHK-21 cells and in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Arvind A; Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Chaturvedi, V K; Singh, R P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate antiviral potential of adenoviral vector-delivered small interfering RNA (siRNA) against rabies, recombinant, replication-defective adenoviral vectors (rAdV) encoding siRNAs targeting rabies virus (RV) polymerase (L) and nucleoprotein (N) genes were developed. The siRNAs were delivered as small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) through these vectors. Treatment of BHK-21 cells with rAdV expressing siRNA targeting L gene (rAdV-L) and N gene (rAdV-N) (100 MOI) and their subsequent infection with RV (0.001 MOI, RV PV-11), reduced RV fluorescent foci by 48.2% (mean±SEM; 48.17±0.6540, N=6) and 41.8% (mean±SEM; 41.83±0.3073, N=6), respectively, with respect to that of BHK-21 cells treated with rAdV expressing negative control siRNA (rAdV-Neg) indicating inhibition of multiplication of RV in BHK-21 cells in response to adenoviral vector mediated siRNA delivery. Also, the similar treatment of BHK-21 cells with rAdV-L and rAdV-N and similar subsequent infection of them with RV resulted in reduction in RV mRNA transcript levels for their respective targets (RV L gene for rAdV-L and N gene for rAdV-N). mRNA transcript level for RV L gene was reduced by 17.88-fold (mean±SEM; 17.88±0.06638, N=6) in cells treated with rAdV-L and that for RV N gene was reduced by 5.7-fold (mean±SEM; 5.7±0.04472, N=6), in cells treated with rAdV-N, in comparison with that in cells treated with rAdV-Neg, as analyzed by using real-time PCR. These in vitro studies showed that between these two, adenoviral vector mediated delivery of siRNA targeting RV L gene was comparatively more effective in inhibiting RV multiplication in BHK-21 cells than that of siRNA targeting RV N gene (pmultiplication in vitro in BHK-21 cells; siRNA targeting RV L gene used in this study was comparatively more efficient in doing this than that targeting RV N gene used in this study; in vivo in mice inhibited RV multiplication in mice and imparted partial protection against lethal rabies and so it may have a potential

  9. Down-regulation of viral replication by adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNA against cellular cofactors for hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iwai, Takahiro; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Shimamura, Hideo; Araki, Hiromasa; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2004-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently being evaluated not only as a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory effect of siRNA on viral replication has been demonstrated in multiple pathogenic viruses. However, because of the high sequence specificity of siRNA-mediated RNA degradation, antiviral efficacy of siRNA directed to viral genome will be largely limited by emergence of escape variants resistant to siRNA due to high mutation rates of virus, especially RNA viruses such as poliovirus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the therapeutic feasibility of siRNAs specific for the putative cellular cofactors for HCV, we constructed adenovirus vectors expressing siRNAs against La, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), subunit gamma of human eukaryotic initiation factors 2B (eIF2Bγ), and human VAMP-associated protein of 33 kDa (hVAP-33). Adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNAs markedly diminished expression of the endogenous genes, and silencing of La, PTB, and hVAP-33 by siRNAs substantially blocked HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Thus, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and potential of adenoviral-delivered siRNAs specific for cellular cofactors in combating HCV infection, which can be used either alone or in combination with siRNA against viral genome to prevent the escape of mutant variants and provide additive or synergistic anti-HCV effects

  10. Adenoviral-bone morphogenetic protein-7 and/or doxazosin therapies promote the reversion of fibrosis/cirrhosis in a cirrhotic hamster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Garcia, Daniel; Cuellar-Juarez, Adriana Guadalupe; Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Aldaba-Muruato, Liseth Rubi; Salinas, Eva; Ventura-Juarez, Javier; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin Humberto

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs in the presence of continuous insults, including toxic or biological agents. Novel treatments must focus on ceasing the progression of cellular damage, promoting the regeneration of the parenchyma and inhibition of the fibrotic process. The present study analyzed the effect of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7 gene therapy with or without co-treatment with doxazosin in a model of liver cirrhosis in hamsters. The serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and albumin levels were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Tissue hepatic samples were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin for parenchymal structure and Sirius red for collagen fiber content. BMP-7 and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive cells were detected by immunohistochemistry. BMP-7 and collagen type I content in hepatic tissue were analyzed by western blotting, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 expression levels were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The present study detected a significant reduction of collagen type I deposits in the group treated with adenoviral-transduction with BMP-7 and doxazosin. In animals with BMP-7 and doxazosin therapy, α-SMA-positive cells were 31.7 and 29% significantly decreased compared with animals with placebo, respectively. Adenoviral-BMP-7 transduction and/or doxazosin treatments actively induced decrement in type I collagen deposition via increased MMP-13 and reduced TIMP-2 expression. In conclusion, the adenovirus-BMP-7 gene therapy and the doxazosin therapy are potential candidates for the diminution of fibrosis in the liver, although combination of both therapies does not improve the individual anti-fibrotic effect once cirrhosis is established. PMID:29039539

  11. Chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 induces apoptosis of hematopoietic cells by a p53-independent mechanism that is suppressed by Bcl-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K S; Jacobs, Y; Chang, C P; Cleary, M L

    1997-06-19

    The chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 results from fusion of the E2A and PBX1 genes following t(1;19) chromosomal translocations in B cell precursor acute leukemias. Experimentally B cell progenitors do not tolerate constitutive expression of E2a-Pbx1 which contrasts with transformation of several other cell types following its stable expression both in vitro and in vivo. To further investigate the effects of E2a-Pbx1 on the B cell progenitors, we conditionally expressed E2a-Pbx1 under control of a metal response element in hematopoietic precursor cell lines in vitro. Inducible expression of E2a-Pbx1 resulted in cell death with the morphologic and molecular features of apoptosis. A structure-function analysis demonstrated that induction of apoptosis was not a dominant-negative effect of the E2a moiety but, rather, required the DNA-binding homeodomain of Pbx1. E2a-Pbx1-induced apoptosis proceeded through a BCL2-responsive checkpoint eventuating in PARP inactivation but did require p53. Constitutive expression of E2a-Pbx1 did not induce apoptosis or continued cycling of Rat-1 fibroblasts in low serum conditions. These studies demonstrate that E2a-Pbx1 initiates programmed cell death of hematopoietic precursers by a mechanism that requires its chimeric transcriptional properties, but, unlike other nuclear oncoproteins, is independent of p53.

  12. Aspirin therapy reduces the ability of platelets to promote colon and pancreatic cancer cell proliferation: Implications for the oncoprotein c-MYC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylman, Joanna L.; Ngo, Anh T. P.; Pang, Jiaqing; Sears, Rosalie C.; Williams, Craig D.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin, an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic drug, has become the focus of intense research as a potential anticancer agent owing to its ability to reduce tumor proliferation in vitro and to prevent tumorigenesis in patients. Studies have found an anticancer effect of aspirin when used in low, antiplatelet doses. However, the mechanisms through which low-dose aspirin works are poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of aspirin on the cross talk between platelets and cancer cells. For our study, we used two colon cancer cell lines isolated from the same donor but characterized by different metastatic potential, SW480 (nonmetastatic) and SW620 (metastatic) cancer cells, and a pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1 (nonmetastatic). We found that SW480 and PANC-1 cancer cell proliferation was potentiated by human platelets in a manner dependent on the upregulation and activation of the oncoprotein c-MYC. The ability of platelets to upregulate c-MYC and cancer cell proliferation was reversed by an antiplatelet concentration of aspirin. In conclusion, we show for the first time that inhibition of platelets by aspirin can affect their ability to induce cancer cell proliferation through the modulation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. PMID:27903583

  13. The HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein Disrupts Dendritic Cell Function and Induces the Systemic Expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ Cells in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Damian-Morales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein on dendritic cells (DCs and CD11b+Gr1+ cells using the K14E7 transgenic mouse model. Materials and Methods. The morphology of DCs was analyzed in male mouse skin on epidermal sheets using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentages of DCs and CD11b+Gr1+ cells in different tissues and to evaluate the migration of DCs. Results. In the K14E7 mouse model, the morphology of Langerhans cells and the migratory activity of dendritic cells were abnormal. An increase in CD11b+Gr1+ cells was observed in the blood and skin of K14E7 mice, and molecules related to CD11b+Gr1+ chemoattraction (MCP1 and S100A9 were upregulated. Conclusions. These data suggest that the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein impairs the function and morphology of DCs and induces the systemic accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells.

  14. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins alter cell cycle progression but not radiosensitivity of carcinoma cells treated with low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWeese, Theodore L.; Walsh, Jonathan C.; Dillehay, Larry E.; Kessis, Theodore D.; Hedrick, Lora; Cho, Kathleen R.; Nelson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose-rate radiation therapy has been widely used in the treatment of urogenital malignancies. When continuously exposed to low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, target cancer cells typically exhibit abnormalities in replicative cell-cycle progression. Cancer cells that arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle when irradiated may become exquisitely sensitive to killing by further low-dose-rate radiation treatment. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which play a major role in the pathogenesis of uterine cervix cancers and other urogenital cancers, encode E6 and E7 transforming proteins known to abrogate a p53-dependent G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by conventional acute-dose radiation exposure. This study examined whether expression of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins by cancer cells alters the cell-cycle redistribution patterns accompanying low-dose-rate radiation treatment, and whether such alterations in cell-cycle redistribution affect cancer cell killing. Methods and Materials: RKO carcinoma cells, which contain wild-type P53 alleles, and RKO cell sublines genetically engineered to express HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, were treated with low-dose-rate (0.25-Gy/h) radiation and then assessed for p53 and p21WAF1/CIP1 polypeptide induction by immunoblot analysis, for cell-cycle redistribution by flow cytometry, and for cytotoxicity by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Low-dose-rate radiation of RKO carcinoma cells triggered p53 polypeptide elevations, p21WAF1/CIP1 induction, and arrest in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, RKO cells expressing E6 and E7 transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs (HPV 16) arrested in G2, but failed to arrest in G1, when treated with low-dose-rate ionizing radiation. Abrogation of the G1 cell-cycle checkpoint activated by low-dose-rate radiation exposure appeared to be a characteristic feature of transforming proteins from high-risk oncogenic HPVs: RKO cells expressing E6 from a low

  15. COX-2/PGE2: molecular ambassadors of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus oncoprotein-v-FLIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Walia, N; Patel, K; Chandran, K; Marginean, A; Bottero, V; Kerur, N; Paul, A G

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) latent oncoprotein viral FLICE (FADD-like interferon converting enzyme)-like inhibitory protein (v-FLIP) or K13, a potent activator of NF-κB, has well-established roles in KSHV latency and oncogenesis. KSHV-induced COX-2 represents a novel strategy employed by KSHV to promote latency and inflammation/angiogenesis/invasion. Here, we demonstrate that v-FLIP/K13 promotes tumorigenic effects via the induction of host protein COX-2 and its inflammatory metabolite PGE2 in an NF-κB-dependent manner. In addition to our previous studies demonstrating COX-2/PGE2's role in transcriptional regulation of KSHV latency promoter and latent gene expression, the current study adds to the complexity that though LANA-1 (latency associated nuclear antigen) is utilizing COX-2/PGE2 as critical factors for its transcriptional regulation, it is the v-FLIP/K13 gene in the KSHV latency cluster that maintains continuous COX-2/PGE2 levels in the infected cells. We demonstrate that COX-2 inhibition, via its chemical inhibitors (NS-398 or celecoxib), reduced v-FLIP/K13-mediated NF-κB induction, and extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction-mediated signaling, mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) levels, and subsequently downregulated detachment-induced apoptosis (anoikis) resistance. vFLIP expression mediated the secretion of cytokines, and spindle cell differentiation activated the phosphorylation of p38, RSK, FAK, Src, Akt and Rac1-GTPase. The COX-2 inhibition in v-FLIP/K13-HMVECs reduced inflammation and invasion/metastasis-related genes, along with reduced anchorage-independent colony formation via modulating ‘extrinsic' as well as ‘intrinsic' cell death pathways. COX-2 blockade in v-FLIP/K13-HMVEC cells drastically augmented cell death induced by removal of essential growth/survival factors secreted in the microenvironment. Transformed cells obtained from anchorage-independent colonies of COX-2 inhibitor-treated v

  16. Hijacking of the O-GlcNAcZYME complex by the HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein facilitates viral transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussaud, Damien; Khair, Mostafa; Tollenaere, Armelle I; Waast, Laetitia; Kuo, Mei-Shiue; Mangeney, Marianne; Martella, Christophe; Fardini, Yann; Coste, Solène; Souidi, Mouloud; Benit, Laurence; Pique, Claudine; Issad, Tarik

    2017-07-01

    The viral Tax oncoprotein plays a key role in both Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-replication and HTLV-1-associated pathologies, notably adult T-cell leukemia. Tax governs the transcription from the viral 5'LTR, enhancing thereby its own expression, via the recruitment of dimers of phosphorylated CREB to cAMP-response elements located within the U3 region (vCRE). In addition to phosphorylation, CREB is also the target of O-GlcNAcylation, another reversible post-translational modification involved in a wide range of diseases, including cancers. O-GlcNAcylation consists in the addition of O-linked-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on Serine or Threonine residues, a process controlled by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which transfers O-GlcNAc on proteins, and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), which removes it. In this study, we investigated the status of O-GlcNAcylation enzymes in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. We found that OGA mRNA and protein expression levels are increased in HTLV-1-transformed T cells as compared to control T cell lines while OGT expression is unchanged. However, higher OGA production coincides with a reduction in OGA specific activity, showing that HTLV-1-transformed T cells produce high level of a less active form of OGA. Introducing Tax into HEK-293T cells or Tax-negative HTLV-1-transformed TL-om1 T cells is sufficient to inhibit OGA activity and increase total O-GlcNAcylation, without any change in OGT activity. Furthermore, Tax interacts with the OGT/OGA complex and inhibits the activity of OGT-bound OGA. Pharmacological inhibition of OGA increases CREB O-GlcNAcylation as well as HTLV-1-LTR transactivation by Tax and CREB recruitment to the LTR. Moreover, overexpression of wild-type CREB but not a CREB protein mutated on a previously described O-GlcNAcylation site enhances Tax-mediated LTR transactivation. Finally, both OGT and OGA are recruited to the LTR. These findings reveal the interplay between Tax and the O-GlcNAcylation pathway

  17. Functional interaction between human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins and cigarette smoke components in lung epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Muñoz

    Full Text Available The smoking habit is the most important, but not a sufficient cause for lung cancer development. Several studies have reported the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 presence and E6 and E7 transcripts expression in lung carcinoma cases from different geographical regions. The possible interaction between HPV infection and smoke carcinogens, however, remains unclear. In this study we address a potential cooperation between tobacco smoke and HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins for alterations in proliferative and tumorigenic properties of lung epithelial cells. A549 (alveolar, tumoral and BEAS-2B (bronchial, non-tumoral cell lines were stably transfected with recombinant pLXSN vectors expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins and exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC at different concentrations. HPV16 E6 and E7 expression was associated with loss of p53 stability, telomerase (hTERT and p16(INK4A overexpression in BEAS-2B cells as demonstrated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and western blotting (WB. In A549 cells we observed downregulation of p53 but not a significant increase of hTERT transcripts. In addition, the HPV16 E6/E7 transfected cell lines showed an increased proliferation rate and anchorage-independent growth in a HPV16 E6 and E7 expression-dependent manner. Moreover, both HPV16 E6/E7 and mock transfected cells showed an increased proliferation rate and anchorage-independent growth in the presence of 0.1 and 10 µg/mL CSC. However, this increase was significantly greater in HPV16 E6/E7 transfected cells (p<0.001. Data were confirmed by FCSE proliferation assay. The results obtained in this study are suggestive of a functional interaction between tobacco smoke and HPV16 E6/E7 oncoproteins for malignant transformation and tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. More studies are warranted in order to dissect the molecular mechanisms involved in this cooperation.

  18. UV Radiation Activates Toll-Like Receptor 9 Expression in Primary Human Keratinocytes, an Event Inhibited by Human Papillomavirus 38 E6 and E7 Oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Laura; Ceraolo, Maria Grazia; Venuti, Assunta; Melita, Giusi; Hasan, Uzma A; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types belonging to the beta genus of the HPV phylogenetic tree synergize with UV radiation in the development of skin cancer. Accordingly, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins from some beta HPV types are able to deregulate pathways related to immune response and cellular transformation. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), in addition to playing a role in innate immunity, has been shown to be involved in the cellular stress response. Using primary human keratinocytes as experimental models, we have shown that UV irradiation (and other cellular stresses) activates TLR9 expression. This event is closely linked to p53 activation. Silencing the expression of p53 or deleting its encoding gene affected the activation of TLR9 expression after UV irradiation. Using various strategies, we have also shown that the transcription factors p53 and c-Jun are recruited onto a specific region of the TLR9 promoter after UV irradiation. Importantly, the E6 and E7 oncoproteins from beta HPV38, by inducing the accumulation of the p53 antagonist ΔNp73α, prevent the UV-mediated recruitment of these transcription factors onto the TLR9 promoter, with subsequent impairment of TLR9 gene expression. This study provides new insight into the mechanism that mediates TLR9 upregulation in response to cellular stresses. In addition, we show that HPV38 E6 and E7 are able to interfere with this mechanism, providing another explanation for the possible cooperation of beta HPV types with UV radiation in skin carcinogenesis. IMPORTANCE Beta HPV types have been suggested to act as cofactors in UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by altering several cellular mechanisms activated by UV radiation. We show that the expression of TLR9, a sensor of damage-associated molecular patterns produced during cellular stress, is activated by UV radiation in primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). Two transcription factors known to be activated by UV radiation, p53

  19. Consideration of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 as a Functional Backup of Viral Oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1

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    Kristina M. Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-encoded noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 are highly abundant through all four latency stages of EBV infection (III-II-I-0 and have been associated with an oncogenic phenotype when expressed in cell lines cultured in vitro. In vivo, EBV-infected B cells derived from freshly isolated lymphocytes show that EBER1/2 deletion does not impair viral latency. Based on published quantitative proteomics data from BJAB cells expressing EBER1 and EBER2, we propose that the EBERs, through their activation of AKT in a B-cell-specific manner, are a functionally redundant backup of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1—an essential oncoprotein in EBV-associated malignancies, with a main role in AKT activation. Our proposed model may explain the lack of effect on viral latency establishment in EBER-minus EBV infection.

  20. Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins affect the cell microenvironment by classical secretion and extracellular vesicles delivery of inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuliano, Marco; Mangino, Giorgio; Chiantore, Maria Vincenza; Zangrillo, Maria Simona; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Fiorucci, Gianna; Romeo, Giovanna

    2017-11-11

    The connection between chronic inflammation and risk of cancer has been supported by several studies. The development of cancer might be a process driven by the presence of a specific combination of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines and enzymes, in the tumor microenvironment. Virus-induced tumors, like HPV-induced Squamous Cell Carcinomas, represent a paradigmatic example of the interplay between inflammation, as integral part of the innate antiviral response, and malignant transformation. Here, the role of inflammatory microenvironment in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis is addressed, with a specific focus on the involvement of the immune molecules as well as their delivery through the microvesicle cargo possibly correlated to the different HPV genotype. The expression of the inflammatory mediators in HPV positive cells has been analyzed in primary human foreskin keratinocytes and keratinocytes transduced by E6 and E7 from mucosal HPV-16 or cutaneous HPV-38 genotypes. HPV E6 and E7 proteins can modulate the expression of immune mediators in HPV-infected cells and can affect the levels of immune molecules, mainly chemokines, in the extracellular milieu. HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins have been silenced to confirm the specificity of the modulation of the inflammatory microenvironment. Our results suggest that the expression of HPV oncoproteins allows the modification of the tumor milieu through the synthesis and release of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, affecting the efficacy of the immune response. The microenvironment can also be conditioned by an altered mRNA cargo delivered by extracellular vesicles, thereby efficiently affecting the surrounding cells with possible implication for tumorigenesis and tumor diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transformation properties of the E2a-Pbx1 chimeric oncoprotein: fusion with E2a is essential, but the Pbx1 homeodomain is dispensable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monica, K; LeBrun, D P; Dedera, D A; Brown, R; Cleary, M L

    1994-12-01

    The t(1;19) chromosomal translocation in acute lymphoblastic leukemias creates chimeric E2a-Pbx1 oncoproteins that can act as DNA-binding activators of transcription. A structural analysis of the functional domains of E2a-Pbx1 showed that portions of both E2a and Pbx1 were essential for transformation of NIH 3T3 cells and transcriptional activation of synthetic reporter genes containing PBX1 consensus binding sites. Hyperexpression of wild-type or experimentally truncated Pbx1 proteins was insufficient for transformation, consistent with their inability to activate transcription. When fused with E2a, the Pbx-related proteins Pbx2 and Pbx3 were also transformation competent, demonstrating that all known members of this highly similar subfamily of homeodomain proteins have latent oncogenic potential. The oncogenic contributions of E2a to the chimeras were localized to transactivation motifs AD1 and AD2, as their mutation significantly impaired transformation. Either the homeodomain or Pbx1 amino acids flanking this region could mediate transformation when fused to E2a. However, the homeodomain was not essential for transformation, since a mutant E2a-Pbx1 protein (E2a-Pbx delta HD) lacking the homeodomain efficiently transformed fibroblasts and induced malignant lymphomas in transgenic mice. Thus, transformation mediated by the chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is absolutely dependent on motifs acquired from E2a but the Pbx1 homeodomain is optional. The latter finding suggests that E2a-Pbx1 may interact with cellular proteins that assist or mediate alterations in gene expression responsible for oncogenesis even in the absence of homeodomain-DNA interactions.

  2. Meis1 and pKnox1 bind DNA cooperatively with Pbx1 utilizing an interaction surface disrupted in oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoepfler, P S; Calvo, K R; Chen, H; Antonarakis, S E; Kamps, M P

    1997-12-23

    E2a-Pbx1 is a chimeric transcription factor oncoprotein produced by the t(1;19) translocation in human pre-B cell leukemia. Class I Hox proteins bind DNA cooperatively with both Pbx proteins and oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1, suggesting that leukemogenesis by E2a-Pbx1 and Hox proteins may alter transcription of cellular genes regulated by Pbx-Hox motifs. Likewise, in murine myeloid leukemia, transcriptional coactivation of Meis1 with HoxA7/A9 suggests that Meis1-HoxA7/9 heterodimers may evoke aberrant gene transcription. Here, we demonstrate that both Meis1 and its relative, pKnox1, dimerize with Pbx1 on the same TGATTGAC motif selected by dimers of Pbx proteins and unidentified partner(s) in nuclear extracts, including those from t(1;19) pre-B cells. Outside their homeodomains, Meis1 and pKnox1 were highly conserved only in two motifs required for cooperativity with Pbx1. Like the unidentified endogenous partner(s), both Meis1 and pKnox1 failed to dimerize significantly with E2a-Pbx1. The Meis1/pKnox1-interaction domain in Pbx1 resided predominantly in a conserved N-terminal Pbx domain deleted in E2a-Pbx1. Thus, the leukemic potential of E2a-Pbx1 may require abrogation of its interaction with members of the Meis and pKnox families of transcription factors, permitting selective targeting of genes regulated by Pbx-Hox complexes. In addition, because most motifs bound by Pbx-Meis1/pKnox1 were not bound by Pbx1-Hox complexes, the leukemic potential of Meis1 in myeloid leukemias may involve shifting Pbx proteins from promoters containing Pbx-Hox motifs to those containing Pbx-Meis motifs.

  3. Requirement for Ras/Rac1-Mediated p38 and c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Signaling in Stat3 Transcriptional Activity Induced by the Src Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkson, James; Bowman, Tammy; Adnane, Jalila; Zhang, Yi; Djeu, Julie Y.; Sekharam, Madhavi; Frank, David A.; Holzman, Lawrence B.; Wu, Jie; Sebti, Said; Jove, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are transcription factors that mediate normal biologic responses to cytokines and growth factors. However, abnormal activation of certain STAT family members, including Stat3, is increasingly associated with oncogenesis. In fibroblasts expressing the Src oncoprotein, activation of Stat3 induces specific gene expression and is required for cell transformation. Although the Src tyrosine kinase induces constitutive Stat3 phosphorylation on tyrosine, activation of Stat3-mediated gene regulation requires both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of Stat3. We investigated the signaling pathways underlying the constitutive Stat3 activation in Src oncogenesis. Expression of Ras or Rac1 dominant negative protein blocks Stat3-mediated gene regulation induced by Src in a manner consistent with dependence on p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Both of these serine/threonine kinases and Stat3 serine phosphorylation are constitutively induced in Src-transformed fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 and JNK activities suppresses constitutive Stat3 serine phosphorylation and Stat3-mediated gene regulation. In vitro kinase assays with purified full-length Stat3 as the substrate show that both JNK and p38 can phosphorylate Stat3 on serine. Moreover, inhibition of p38 activity and thus of Stat3 serine phosphorylation results in suppression of transformation by v-Src but not v-Ras, consistent with a requirement for Stat3 serine phosphorylation in Src transformation. Our results demonstrate that Ras- and Rac1-mediated p38 and JNK signals are required for Stat3 transcriptional activity induced by the Src oncoprotein. These findings delineate a network of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways that converge on Stat3 in the context of oncogenesis. PMID:10523640

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Ex Vivo Donor Lung Adenoviral IL-10 Gene Therapy in a Large Animal Lung Transplant Survival Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo; Bonato, Riccardo; Yeung, Jonathan C; Chun, Yi-Min; Juvet, Stephen; Guan, Zehong; Hwang, David M; Chen, Manyin; Saito, Tomohito; Harmantas, Constantine; Davidson, Beverly L; Waddell, Thomas K; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2017-09-01

    Ex vivo normothermic lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel platform and method developed to facilitate functional assessment and implementation of advanced therapies for donor lungs prior to transplantation. This study aimed to determine the safety and immunological and functional benefits of ex vivo adenoviral human interleukin-10 (AdhIL-10) gene delivery to prevent the development of primary graft dysfunction in a large animal survival model. Pig donor lungs were retrieved, preserved for 6 h at 4°C, and then randomly assigned to four groups: (1) AdhIL-10 gene therapy: 12 h EVLP + AdhIL-10 intra-bronchial delivery; (2) EVLP-control: 12 h EVLP; (3) Vector-control: 12 h EVLP + adenoviral vector intra-bronchial delivery; and (4) prolonged hypothermic preservation: additional 12 h of cold ischemia. The left lung was then transplanted and evaluated. The recipients were recovered and kept alive until day 7 post-transplant under standard triple immunosuppression. Plasma levels of hIL-10 were detected in the treatment group throughout the 7 days. Analysis of peripheral blood obtained after transplant showed no signs of hematological, renal, or hepatic toxicity in the AdhIL-10 group. The immediate post-transplant lung function was significantly better in the EVLP-control and AdhIL-10 groups. Gas exchange at day 7 was superior in allografts from the AdhIL-10 group, and the histologic inflammation score was significantly lower. Lymphocytes from AdhIL-10 group harvested from mediastinal lymph nodes at day 7 post-transplantation and co-cultured with donor lymphocytes showed significantly less interferon gamma production in an Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot assay when compared with non-treatment groups. It has been demonstrated in this preclinical large animal survival study that ex vivo treatment with AdhIL-10 is safe and improves post-transplant lung function over EVLP alone. Improved function and an immunological advantage in both the innate and adaptive immune responses

  5. Optimization and physicochemical characterization of a cationic lipid-phosphatidylcholine mixed emulsion formulated as a highly efficient vehicle that facilitates adenoviral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SY

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Yeon Kim,1,2 Sang-Jin Lee,2 Jin-Ki Kim,3 Han-Gon Choi,3 Soo-Jeong Lim1 1Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Sejong University, Seoul, Kwangjin-gu, Seoul, 2Immunotherapeutics Branch, Research Institute, National Cancer Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 3College of Pharmacy & Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Hanyang University, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Cationic lipid-based nanoparticles enhance viral gene transfer by forming electrostatic complexes with adenoviral vectors. We recently demonstrated the superior complexation capabilities of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP emulsion compared with a liposomal counterpart but the cytotoxicity of DOTAP emulsions remained a challenge. The present study is aimed at formulating an emulsion capable of acting as a highly effective viral gene transfer vehicle with reduced cytotoxicity and to physicochemically characterize the structures of virus-emulsion complexes in comparison with virus–liposome complexes when the only difference between emulsions and liposomes was the presence or absence of inner oil core. The emulsion formulation was performed by 1 reducing the content of DOTAP while increasing the content of zwitterionic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC, and 2 optimizing the oil content. The complexation capability of formulated DOTAP:DMPC mixed emulsions was similar to those of emulsions containing DOTAP alone while displaying significantly lower cytotoxicity. The complexation capabilities of the DOTAP:DMPC mixed emulsion were serum-compatible and were monitored in a variety of cell types, whereas its liposomal counterpart was totally ineffective. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering studies indicated that the optimized emulsions spontaneously surrounded the virus particles to generate emulsions that

  6. Adenoviral gene transfer of PLD1-D4 enhances insulin sensitivity in mice by disrupting phospholipase D1 interaction with PED/PEA-15.

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    Angela Cassese

    Full Text Available Over-expression of phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (PED/PEA-15 causes insulin resistance by interacting with the D4 domain of phospholipase D1 (PLD1. Indeed, the disruption of this association restores insulin sensitivity in cultured cells over-expressing PED/PEA-15. Whether the displacement of PLD1 from PED/PEA-15 improves insulin sensitivity in vivo has not been explored yet. In this work we show that treatment with a recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human D4 cDNA (Ad-D4 restores normal glucose homeostasis in transgenic mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Tg ped/pea-15 by improving both insulin sensitivity and secretion. In skeletal muscle of these mice, D4 over-expression inhibited PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction, decreased Protein Kinase C alpha activation and restored insulin induced Protein Kinase C zeta activation, leading to amelioration of insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Interestingly, Ad-D4 administration improved insulin sensitivity also in high-fat diet treated obese C57Bl/6 mice. We conclude that PED/PEA-15-PLD1 interaction may represent a novel target for interventions aiming at improving glucose tolerance.

  7. Expression of estrogen receptor alpha with a Tet-off adenoviral system induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in SKBr3 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Jordan, V Craig

    2010-02-01

    Endocrine therapies targeting estrogen action are pivotal for the prevention and treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. Previous studies sought to recreate hormone responsiveness by the stable expression of ERalpha in the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, estrogen inhibits breast cancer cell growth when an exogenous ERalpha is expressed. In this study, we have built on previous studies by developing a Tet-off adenoviral system to express ERalpha in the ER-negative SKBr3 breast cancer cells that over-express both EGFR and HER2. This system efficiently delivers ERalpha and the expression level of ERalpha is controlled by doxycycline in a concentration-dependent manner. The growth of SKBr3 was inhibited by ERalpha expression and further inhibited in the presence of 1 nM 17beta-estradiol. SKBr3 cells were arrested at G0/G1 cell cycle upon ERalpha expression, which corresponded to an increase of p21Cip1/Waf1, hypo-phosphorylation of pRb and decrease of E2F1. Estrogen also reduced EGFR and HER2 expression in SKBr3 cells after ERalpha was expressed. Given that estrogen-induced increase of p21Cip1/Waf1 and decrease of E2F1 was also observed in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with ERalpha, our results suggest that a common pathway might be shared by different breast cancer cell lines whose growth is suppressed by ectopic ERalpha and estrogen.

  8. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  9. Enhancement of protective efficacy through adenoviral vectored vaccine priming and protein boosting strategy encoding triosephosphate isomerase (SjTPI) against Schistosoma japonicum in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yang; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Xing, Yuntian; Dai, Jianrong; Jin, Xiaolin; Zhu, Yinchang

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice. Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt) and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI) were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice. The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China.

  10. Enhancement of protective efficacy through adenoviral vectored vaccine priming and protein boosting strategy encoding triosephosphate isomerase (SjTPI against Schistosoma japonicum in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dai

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonotic parasitic disease; developing transmission blocking veterinary vaccines are urgently needed for the prevention and control of schistosomiasis in China. Heterologous prime-boost strategy, a novel vaccination approach, is more effective in enhancing vaccine efficacy against multiple pathogens. In the present study, we established a novel heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy, the rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming and rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting strategy, and evaluated its protective efficacy against Schistosoma japonicum in mice.Adenoviral vectored vaccine (rAdV-SjTPI.opt and recombinant protein vaccine (rSjTPI were prepared and used in different combinations as vaccines in a mouse model. The specific immune responses and protective efficacies were evaluated. Furthermore, the longevity of protective efficacy was also determined. Results showed that the rAdV-SjTPI.opt priming-rSjTPI boosting strategy elicited higher levels of specific IgG responses and broad-spectrum specific cellular immune responses. The protective efficacy could reach up to nearly 70% and 50% of protection could be observed at 10 weeks after the last immunization in mice.The rAdV-SjTPI.opt intramuscular priming-rSjTPI subcutaneous boosting vaccination strategy is a novel, highly efficient, and stable approach to developing vaccines against Schistosoma japonicum infections in China.

  11. Genetic Passive Immunization with Adenoviral Vector Expressing Chimeric Nanobody-Fc Molecules as Therapy for Genital Infection Caused by Mycoplasma hominis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria A Burmistrova

    Full Text Available Developing pathogen-specific recombinant antibody fragments (especially nanobodies is a very promising strategy for the treatment of infectious disease. Nanobodies have great potential for gene therapy application due to their single-gene nature. Historically, Mycoplasma hominis has not been considered pathogenic bacteria due to the lack of acute infection and partially due to multiple studies demonstrating high frequency of isolation of M. hominis samples from asymptomatic patients. However, recent studies on the role of latent M. hominis infection in oncologic transformation, especially prostate cancer, and reports that M. hominis infects Trichomonas and confers antibiotic resistance to Trichomonas, have generated new interest in this field. In the present study we have generated specific nanobody against M. hominis (aMh, for which the identified target is the ABC-transporter substrate-binding protein. aMh exhibits specific antibacterial action against M. hominis. In an attempt to improve the therapeutic properties, we have developed the adenoviral vector-based gene therapy approach for passive immunization with nanobodies against M. hominis. For better penetration into the mucous layer of the genital tract, we fused aMh with the Fc-fragment of IgG. Application of this comprehensive approach with a single systemic administration of recombinant adenovirus expressing aMh-Fc demonstrated both prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a mouse model of genital M. hominis infection.

  12. Restoration of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase expression in renal cancer cells downregulates oncoproteins and affects key metabolic pathways as well as anti-oxidative system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Popławski

    Full Text Available Type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (DIO1 contributes to deiodination of 3,5,3',5'-tetraiodo-L-thyronine (thyroxine, T4 yielding of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3, a powerful regulator of cell differentiation, proliferation, and metabolism. Our previous work showed that loss of DIO1 enhances proliferation and migration of renal cancer cells. However, the global effects of DIO1 expression in various tissues affected by cancer remain unknown. Here, the effects of stable DIO1 re-expression were analyzed on the proteome of renal cancer cells, followed by quantitative real-time PCR validation in two renal cancer-derived cell lines. DIO1-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of thyroid hormones were quantified by L-MS/MS and correlations between expression of DIO1 and potential target genes were determined in tissue samples from renal cancer patients. Stable re-expression of DIO1, resulted in 26 downregulated proteins while 59 proteins were overexpressed in renal cancer cells. The 'downregulated' group consisted mainly of oncoproteins (e.g. STAT3, ANPEP, TGFBI, TGM2 that promote proliferation, migration and invasion. Furthermore, DIO1 re-expression enhanced concentrations of two subunits of thyroid hormone transporter (SLC7A5, SLC3A2, enzymes of key pathways of cellular energy metabolism (e.g. TKT, NAMPT, IDH2, sex steroid metabolism and anti-oxidative response (AKR1C2, AKR1B10. DIO1 expression resulted in elevated intracellular concentration of T4. Expression of DIO1-affected genes strongly correlated with DIO1 transcript levels in tissue samples from renal cancer patients as well as with their poor survival. This first study addressing effects of deiodinase re-expression on proteome of cancer cells demonstrates that induced DIO1 re-expression in renal cancer robustly downregulates oncoproteins, affects key metabolic pathways, and triggers proteins involved in anti-oxidative protection. This data supports the notion that suppressed DIO1 expression

  13. Post-spinal cord injury astrocyte-mediated functional recovery in rats after intraspinal injection of the recombinant adenoviral vectors Ad5-VEGF and Ad5-ANG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povysheva, Tatyana; Shmarov, Maksim; Logunov, Denis; Naroditsky, Boris; Shulman, Ilya; Ogurcov, Sergey; Kolesnikov, Pavel; Islamov, Rustem; Chelyshev, Yuri

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The most actively explored therapeutic strategy for overcoming spinal cord injury (SCI) is the delivery of genes encoding molecules that stimulate regeneration. In a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in preliminary clinical trials in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the combined administration of recombinant adenoviral vectors (Ad5-VEGF+Ad5-ANG) encoding the neurotrophic/angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) and angiogenin ( ANG) was found to slow the development of neurological deficits. These results suggest that there may be positive effects of this combination of genes in posttraumatic spinal cord regeneration. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of Ad5-VEGF+Ad5-ANG combination therapy on motor function recovery and reactivity of astrocytes in a rat model of SCI. METHODS Spinal cord injury was induced in adult Wistar rats by the weight-drop method. Rats (n = 51) were divided into 2 groups: the experimental group (Ad5-VEGF+Ad5-ANG) and the control group (Ad5-GFP [green fluorescent protein]). Recovery of motor function was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale. The duration and intensity of infectivity and gene expression from the injected vectors were assessed by immunofluorescent detection of GFP. Reactivity of glial cells was assessed by changes in the number of immunopositive cells expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100β, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4. The level of S100β mRNA expression in the spinal cord was estimated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Partial recovery of motor function was observed 30 days after surgery in both groups. However, Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores were 35.9% higher in the Ad5-VEGF+Ad5-ANG group compared with the control group. Specific GFP signal was observed at distances of up to 5 mm in the rostral and caudal

  14. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) based real-time measurement of titer dependent cytotoxicity induced by adenoviral vectors in an IPI-2I cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jakob; Thirion, Christian; Pfaffl, Michael W

    2011-01-15

    Recombinant viral vectors are widespread tools for transfer of genetic material in various modern biotechnological applications like for example RNA interference (RNAi). However, an accurate and reproducible titer assignment represents the basic step for most downstream applications regarding a precise multiplicity of infection (MOI) adjustment. As necessary scaffold for the studies described in this work we introduce a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) based approach for viral particle measurement. Still an implicated problem concerning physiological effects is that the appliance of viral vectors is often attended by toxic effects on the individual target. To determine the critical viral dose leading to cell death we developed an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) based assay. With ECIS technology the impedance change of a current flow through the cell culture medium in an array plate is measured in a non-invasive manner, visualizing effects like cell attachment, cell-cell contacts or proliferation. Here we describe the potential of this online measurement technique in an in vitro model using the porcine ileal epithelial cell line IPI-2I in combination with an adenoviral transfection vector (Ad5-derivate). This approach shows a clear dose-depending toxic effect, as the amount of applied virus highly correlates (p<0.001) with the level of cell death. Thus this assay offers the possibility to discriminate the minimal non-toxic dose of the individual transfection method. In addition this work suggests that the ECIS-device bears the feasibility to transfer this assay to multiple other cytotoxicological questions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Neumann

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase. To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs

  16. Selection-free gene repair after adenoviral vector transduction of designer nucleases: rescue of dystrophin synthesis in DMD muscle cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Ignazio; Stefanucci, Luca; Janssen, Josephine M; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Mouly, Vincent; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-02-18

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the 2.4 Mb dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. The integration of gene delivery and gene editing technologies based on viral vectors and sequence-specific designer nucleases, respectively, constitutes a potential therapeutic modality for permanently repairing defective DMD alleles in patient-derived myogenic cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the feasibility of combining adenoviral vectors (AdVs) with CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) alone or together with transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), for endogenous DMD repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The strategies tested involved; incorporating small insertions or deletions at out-of-frame sequences for reading frame resetting, splice acceptor knockout for DNA-level exon skipping, and RGN-RGN or RGN-TALEN multiplexing for targeted exon(s) removal. We demonstrate that genome editing based on the activation and recruitment of the NHEJ DNA repair pathway after AdV delivery of designer nuclease genes, is a versatile and robust approach for repairing DMD mutations in bulk populations of patient-derived muscle progenitor cells (up to 37% of corrected DMD templates). These results open up a DNA-level genetic medicine strategy in which viral vector-mediated transient designer nuclease expression leads to permanent and regulated dystrophin synthesis from corrected native DMD alleles. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Adenovirally delivered shRNA strongly inhibits Na+-Ca2+ exchanger expression but does not prevent contraction of neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Cecilia; Ander, Bradley P; Maddaford, Thane G; Lukas, Anton; Hryshko, Larry V; Pierce, Grant N

    2005-04-01

    The cardiac Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) is the main mechanism for Ca(2+) efflux in the heart and is thought to serve an essential role in cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. The demonstration that an NCX1 gene knock-out is embryonic lethal provides further support for this essential role. However, a recent report employing the Cre/loxP technique for cardiac specific knock-out of NCX1 has revealed that cardiac function is remarkably preserved in these mice, which survived to adulthood. This controversy highlights the necessity for further investigation of NCX1 function in the heart. In this study, we report on a novel approach for depletion of NCX1 in postnatal rat myocytes that utilizes RNA interference (RNAi), administered with high efficiency via adenoviral transfection. Depletion of NCX1 was confirmed by immunocytochemical detection, Western blots and radioisotopic assays of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange activity. Exchanger expression was inhibited by up to approximately 94%. Surprisingly, spontaneous beating of these cardiomyocytes was still maintained, although at a lower frequency. Electrical stimulation could elicit a normal beating rhythm, although NCX depleted cells exhibited a depressed Ca(2+) transient amplitude, a depressed rate of Ca(2+) rise and decline, elevated diastolic [Ca(2+)], and shorter action potentials. We also observed a compensatory increase in sarcolemmal Ca(2+) pump expression. Our data support an important, though non-essential, role for the NCX1 in E-C coupling in these neonatal heart cells. Furthermore, this approach provides a valuable means for assessing the role of NCX1 and could be utilized to examine other cardiac proteins in physiological and pathological studies.

  18. Inducing huntingtin inclusion formation in primary neuronal cell culture and in vivo by high-capacity adenoviral vectors expressing truncated and full-length huntingtin with polyglutamine expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Schiefer, Johannes; Sass, Christian; Kosinski, Christoph M; Kochanek, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in exon 1 of the huntingtin (htt) gene. Vector-mediated delivery of N-terminal fragments of mutant htt has been used to study htt function in vitro and to establish HD models in rats. Due to the large size of the htt cDNA vector-mediated delivery of full-length htt has not been achieved so far. High-capacity adenoviral (HC-Ad) vectors were generated expressing mutant and wild-type versions of N-terminal truncated and full-length htt either in vitro in primary neuronal cells or in the striatum of mice. In vitro these vectors were used for transduction of primary neuronal cells isolated from E17 mouse embryos. Expression of mutant htt resulted in the formation of htt inclusions, a surrogate marker of the HD pathology. Kinetics of generation and localization of htt inclusions differed between truncated and full-length htt carrying identical mutations. Following injection into the striatum vector-mediated expression of mutant truncated htt led to prominent accumulation of htt inclusions in cell nuclei, while inclusions formed upon expression of mutant full-length htt localized to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that HC-Ad vector-mediated in vitro and in vivo delivery of truncated and full-length mutant htt results in prominent inclusion formation in neuronal cells but in different cell compartments. These vectors will be useful tools for studying HD and may be used to generate large animal HD models. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Melanie C., E-mail: melanie.mann@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Strobel, Sarah, E-mail: sarah.strobel@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Fleckenstein, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.fleckenstein@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Kress, Andrea K., E-mail: andrea.kress@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-09-15

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. - Highlights: • ELL2, a transcription elongation factor, is upregulated in HTLV-1-positive T-cells. • Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 interact in vivo.

  20. Steroid receptor expression and HER-2/neu (c-erbB-2) oncoprotein in the uterus of cats with cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misirlioglu, D; Nak, D; Sevimli, A; Nak, Y; Ozyigit, M O; Akkoc, A; Cangul, I T

    2006-06-01

    The presence of oestrogen-alpha receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2/neu (c-erbB-2) oncoprotein in the uterine walls of 10 healthy cats and 20 subjects with cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra (CEH-P) were evaluated. Lesions were graded according to the severity of cystic dilation, hyperplasia and inflammation, and were classified as normal, mild uterine hyperplasia and severe uterine hyperplasia. The ER, PR and c-erbB-2 expression in the endometrium, glandular epithelium, stromal fibroblasts and myometrial smooth muscle cells was quantified by immunohistochemistry. The ER, PR and c-erbB-2 staining patterns differed between normal uteri and uteri with CEH-P. The ER expression was tended to be higher in the endometrial surface and glandular epithelium in the severe hyperplasia group (P > 0.05) and significantly lower in the mild hyperplasia cases compared with normal endometrium (P pyometra, whereas PR plays a role in the pathogenesis of both CEH and pyometra.

  1. PDZ domain-binding motif of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein augments the transforming activity in a rat fibroblast cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akira; Higuchi, Masaya; Niinuma, Akiko; Ohashi, Minako; Fukushi, Masaya; Oie, Masayasu; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Gejyo, Fumitake; Fujii, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    While human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-2 has not been reported to be associated with such malignant leukemias. HTLV-1 Tax1 oncoprotein transforms a rat fibroblast cell line (Rat-1) to form multiple large colonies in soft agar, and this activity is much greater than that of HTLV-2 Tax2. We have demonstrated here that the increased number of transformed colonies induced by Tax1 relative to Tax2 was mediated by a PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) in Tax1, which is absent in Tax2. Tax1 PBM mediated the interaction of Tax1 with the discs large (Dlg) tumor suppressor containing PDZ domains, and the interaction correlated well with the transforming activities of Tax1 and the mutants. Through this interaction, Tax1 altered the subcellular localization of Dlg from the detergent-soluble to the detergent-insoluble fraction in a fibroblast cell line as well as in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. These results suggest that the interaction of Tax1 with PDZ domain protein(s) is critically involved in the transforming activity of Tax1, the activity of which may be a crucial factor in malignant transformation of HTLV-1-infected cells in vivo

  2. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira, E-mail: zak_ana@yahoo.com.mx [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar, E-mail: odelmoralh@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Biomedicina Molecular, Unidad Académica de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Guerrero, Chilpancingo, Gro., México (Mexico); Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás, E-mail: nvillega@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Biomedicina Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo, E-mail: ahidalgo@inmegen.gob.mx [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena, E-mail: sromero_cordoba@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Genómica del Cáncer, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genómica (INMEGEN), México, D.F., México (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  3. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Melanie C; Strobel, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Kress, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 oncoprotein is mediated by hydrophobic interactions between its zinc-binding domain and FG nucleoporins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onder, Zeynep; Moroianu, Junona

    2014-01-01

    We have previously discovered and characterized the nuclear import pathways for the E7 oncoproteins of mucosal alpha genus HPVs, type 16 and 11. Here we investigated the nuclear import of cutaneous beta genus HPV8 E7 protein using confocal microscopy after transfections of HeLa cells with EGFP-8E7 and mutant plasmids and nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. We determined that HPV8 E7 contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear import. Furthermore, we discovered that a mostly hydrophobic patch 65 LRLFV 69 within the zinc-binding domain is essential for the nuclear import and localization of HPV8 E7 via hydrophobic interactions with the FG nucleoporins Nup62 and Nup153. Substitution of the hydrophobic residues within the 65 LRLFV 69 patch to alanines, and not R66A mutation, disrupt the interactions between the 8E7 zinc-binding domain and Nup62 and Nup153 and consequently inhibit nuclear import of HPV8 E7. - Highlights: • HPV8 E7 has a cNLS within its zinc-binding domain that mediates its nuclear import. • Discovery of a hydrophobic patch that is critical for the nuclear import of HPV8 E7. • HPV8 E7 nuclear import is mediated by hydrophobic interactions with FG-Nups, Nup62 and Nup153

  5. Chemical synthesis of human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein: autonomous protein domains for induction of cellular DNA synthesis and for trans activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, J A; Pusztai, R; Green, M

    1990-12-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein belongs to a family of nuclear oncoproteins that share amino acid sequences and functional homology. To localize biochemical activities associated with E7, we chemically synthesized the full-length 98-amino-acid polypeptide and several deletion mutant peptides. We show that the E7 polypeptide is biologically active and possesses at least two functional domains; the first induces cellular DNA synthesis in quiescent rodent cells, and the second trans activates the adenovirus E1A-inducible early E2 promoter and binds zinc. Further, each domain is autonomous and can function on separate peptides. DNA synthesis induction activity maps within the N-terminal portion of the molecule, which contains sequences related to adenovirus E1A conserved domains 1 and 2 required for cell transformation and binding of the retinoblastoma gene product. trans-Activation and Zn-binding activities map within the C-terminal portion of the molecule, a region which contains Cys-X-X-Cys motifs. trans Activation does not require protein synthesis, implying a mechanism that involves interaction with a preexisting cellular factor(s). E7 trans activates the adenovirus E2 promoter but not other E1A-inducible viral promoters, suggesting the possibility that E7 trans activation involves interaction, directly or indirectly, with cellular transcription factor E2F.

  6. Changes in global gene expression profiles induced by HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants in cervical carcinoma C33-A cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacapala-Gómez, Ana Elvira; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra Lorena

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of the expression of HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein variants (AA-a, AA-c, E-A176/G350, E-C188/G350, E-G350), and the E-Prototype in global gene expression profiles in an in vitro model. E6 gene was cloned into an expression vector fused to GFP and was transfected in C33-A cells. Affymetrix GeneChip Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 platform was used to analyze the expression of over 245,000 coding transcripts. We found that HPV16 E6 variants altered the expression of 387 different genes in comparison with E-Prototype. The altered genes are involved in cellular processes related to the development of cervical carcinoma, such as adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, transcription and protein translation. Our results show that polymorphic changes in HPV16 E6 natural variants are sufficient to alter the overall gene expression profile in C33-A cells, explaining in part the observed differences in oncogenic potential of HPV16 variants. - Highlights: • Amino acid changes in HPV16 E6 variants modulate the transciption of specific genes. • This is the first comparison of global gene expression profile of HPV 16 E6 variants. • Each HPV 16 E6 variant appears to have its own molecular signature.

  7. The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeline, Michael; Merle, Eric; Moroianu, Junona

    2003-01-01

    E7, the major transforming protein of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), type 16, binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), and the Rb-related proteins p107 and p130. HPV16 E7 is a nuclear protein lacking a classical basic nuclear localization signal. In this study we investigated the nuclear import of HPV16 E7 oncoprotein in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells. HPV16 E7 nuclear import was independent of pRb, as an E7 ΔDLYC variant defective in pRb binding was imported into the nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells as efficiently as wild-type E7 in the presence of exogenous cytosol. Interestingly, we discovered that HPV16 E7 is imported into the nuclei via a novel pathway different from those mediated by Kap α2β1 heterodimers, Kap β1, or Kap β2. Nuclear accumulation of E7 required Ran and was not inhibited by the RanG19V-GTP variant, an inhibitor of Kap β mediated import pathways. Together the data suggest that HPV16 E7 translocates through the nuclear pores via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway, independent of the main cytosolic Kap β import receptors

  8. Identification of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 tax amino acid signals and cellular factors involved in secretion of the viral oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pooja; Mostoller, Kate; Flaig, Katherine E; Ahuja, Jaya; Lepoutre, Veronique; Alefantis, Timothy; Khan, Zafar K; Wigdahl, Brian

    2007-11-23

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of a number of pathologic abnormalities, including adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The viral oncoprotein Tax has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Recently, cell-free Tax was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients, implying that extracellular Tax may be relevant to neurologic disease. Additionally, the presence of a nuclear export signal within Tax and its active secretion has been demonstrated in vitro. However, the mechanism of Tax secretion remains to be established. Studies reported herein elucidate the process of Tax secretion and identify domains of Tax critical to its subcellular localization and secretion. Tax was shown to interact with a number of cellular secretory pathway proteins in both the model cell line BHK (baby hamster kidney)-21 and an HTLV-1-infected T cell line, C8166, physiologically relevant to HTLV-1-induced disease. Silencing of selected components of the secretory pathway affected Tax secretion, further confirming regulated secretion of Tax. Additionally, mutations in two putative secretory signals within Tax DHE and YTNI resulted in aberrant subcellular localization of Tax and significantly altered protein secretion. Together, these studies demonstrate that Tax secretion is a regulated event facilitated by its interactions with proteins of the cellular secretory pathway and the presence of secretory signals within the carboxyl-terminal domain of the protein.

  9. The HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B virus deregulates the cell cycle by promoting the intracellular accumulation and re-compartmentalization of the cellular deubiquitinase USP37.

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    Nehul Saxena

    Full Text Available The HBx oncoprotein of hepatitis B Virus has been accredited as one of the protagonists in driving hepatocarcinogenesis. HBx exerts its influence over the cell cycle progression by potentiating the activity of cyclin A/E-CDK2 complex, the Cyclin A partner of which is a well-known target of cellular deubiquitinase USP37. In the present study, we observed the intracellular accumulation of cyclin A and USP37 proteins under the HBx microenvironment. Flow cytometry analysis of the HBx-expressing cells showed deregulation of cell cycle apparently due to the enhanced gene expression and stabilization of USP37 protein and deubiquitination of Cyclin A by USP37. Our co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopic studies suggested a direct interaction between USP37 and HBx. This interaction promoted the translocation of USP37 outside the nucleus and prevented its association and ubiquitination by E3 ubiquitin ligases - APC/CDH1 and SCF/β-TrCP. Thus, HBx seems to control the cell cycle progression via the cyclin A-CDK2 complex by regulating the intracellular distribution and stability of deubiquitinase USP37.

  10. The hTERT and hTERC Telomerase Gene Promoters Are Activated by the Second Exon of the Adenoviral Protein, E1 A, Identifying the Transcriptional Corepressor CtBP as a Potential Rearessor of Both Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind M. Glasspool

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase plays a role in the unlimited replicative capacity of the majority of cancer cells and provides a potential anticancer target. The regulation of telomerase is complex but transcriptional control of its two essential components, hTERC (RNA component and hTERT (reverse transcriptase component, is of major importance. To investigate this further, we have used the adenoviral protein, E1A, as a tool to probe potential pathways involved in the control of telomerase transcription. The second exon of the adenoviral protein E1A activates both telomerase gene promoters in transient transfections. The corepressor, C terminal binding protein, is one of only two proteins known to bind to this region, and we propose that E1A activates both promoters by sequestering CtBP, thereby relieving repression. Activation by exon 2 of E1A involves the SP1 sites in both promoters, and consistent with this, SP1 and CtBP interact in coimmunoprecipitation studies. Modulation of the chromatin environment has been implicated in the regulation of hTERT transcription and appears to involve the SP1 sites. CtBP can be found within a histone-modifying complex and it is possible that a CtBP complex, associating with the SP1 sites, represses transcription from the telomerase promoters by modifying chromatin structure.

  11. The chimeric oncoproteins E2A-PBX1 and E2A-HLF are concentrated within spherical nuclear domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBrun, D P; Matthews, B P; Feldman, B J; Cleary, M L

    1997-10-23

    Oncogenic mutation of nuclear transcription factors often is associated with altered patterns of subcellular localization that may be of functional importance. The leukemogenic transcription factor gene E2A-PBX1 is created through fusion of the genes E2A and PBX1 as a result of t(1;19) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We evaluated subcellular localization patterns of E2A-PBX1 protein in transfected cells using immunofluorescence. Full-length E2A-PBX1 was exclusively nuclear and was concentrated in spherical domains denoted chimeric-E2A oncoprotein domains (CODs). In contrast, nuclear fluorescence for wild-type E2A or PBX1 proteins was diffuse. Enhanced concentrations of RNA polymerase II within many CODs and the requirement for an E2A-encoded activation domain suggested transcriptional relevance. However, in situ co-detection of nascent transcripts labeled with bromouridine failed to confirm altered transcriptional activity in relation to CODs. CODs also failed to co-localize with other proteins known to occupy functional nuclear compartments, including the transcription factor PML, the spliceosome-associated protein SC-35 and the adenovirus replication factor DBP, or with foci of DNA replication. Co-transfection of Hoxb7, a homeodomain protein capable of enhancing DNA binding by PBX1, impaired COD formation, suggesting that CODs contain E2A-PBX1 protein not associated with DNA. We conclude that, as a 'gain of function' phenomenon requiring protein elements from both E2A and PBX1, COD formation may be relevant to the biology of E2A-PBX1 in leukemogenesis.

  12. Evaluation of tumor markers (HER-2/neu oncoprotein, CEA, and CA 15.3) in patients with locoregional breast cancer: prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Rafael; Augé, Jose M; Escudero, Jose M; Filella, Xavier; Zanon, Gabriel; Pahisa, Jaume; Farrus, Blanca; Muñoz, Montserrat; Velasco, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Tumor markers were studied in the sera of 883 untreated patients with primary breast cancer diagnosed between 1989 and 2007. Abnormal human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)/neu levels (>15 ng/mL) were found in 9.5%, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in 15.9%, and cancer antigen (CA) 15.3 in 19.7% of the patients. One or more tumor markers were abnormal in 305 (34.5%) of the 883 studied patients. Significantly higher serum HER-2/neu levels were found in patients with tissue overexpression of this oncoprotein (p CEA, CA 15.3, and HER-2/neu (only in those patients with tissue overexpression) serum levels were related with tumor stage (tumor size and nodal involvement) and steroid receptors (higher values in estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) tumors). Univariate analysis showed that HER-2/neu serum levels were prognostic factors in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) only in patients with tissue overexpression. Multivariate analysis in 834 patients show that nodal involvement, tumor size, ER, CEA, and adjuvant treatment were independent prognostic factors in DFS and OS. When only patients with HER-2/neu overexpression in tissue were studied, tumor size, nodal involvement, and tumor markers (one or another positive) were independent prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. HER-2/neu serum levels were also an independent prognostic factor, with CEA, ER, and nodes in 106 patients treated with neoadjuvant treatment. In summary, serum HER-2/neu, CEA, and CA 15.3 are useful tools in the prognostic evaluation of patients with primary breast cancer.

  13. Mitotic control of human papillomavirus genome-containing cells is regulated by the function of the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elizabeth K.; Delury, Craig P.; Davies, Nicholas J.; Weston, Christopher J.; Miah, Mohammed A.L.; Banks, Lawrence; Parish, Joanna L.

    2017-01-01

    The function of a conserved PDS95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) binding motif (E6 PBM) at the C-termini of E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types contributes to the development of HPV-associated malignancies. Here, using a primary human keratinocyte-based model of the high-risk HPV18 life cycle, we identify a novel link between the E6 PBM and mitotic stability. In cultures containing a mutant genome in which the E6 PBM was deleted there was an increase in the frequency of abnormal mitoses, including multinucleation, compared to cells harboring the wild type HPV18 genome. The loss of the E6 PBM was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of mitotic spindle defects associated with anaphase and telophase. Furthermore, cells carrying this mutant genome had increased chromosome segregation defects and they also exhibited greater levels of genomic instability, as shown by an elevated level of centromere-positive micronuclei. In wild type HPV18 genome-containing organotypic cultures, the majority of mitotic cells reside in the suprabasal layers, in keeping with the hyperplastic morphology of the structures. However, in mutant genome-containing structures a greater proportion of mitotic cells were retained in the basal layer, which were often of undefined polarity, thus correlating with their reduced thickness. We conclude that the ability of E6 to target cellular PDZ proteins plays a critical role in maintaining mitotic stability of HPV infected cells, ensuring stable episome persistence and vegetative amplification. PMID:28061478

  14. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonance assignment, secondary structure and dynamic behaviour of the C-terminal domain of human papillomavirus oncoprotein E6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomine, Yves; Charbonnier, Sebastian [Laboratoire d' Immunotechnologie, CNRS UMR 7100, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France); Miguet, Laurent; Potier, Noelle; Dorsselaer, Alain Van [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse Bio-Organique, CNRS UMR 7509, Faculte de Chimie (France); Atkinson, R. Andrew [Laboratoire de RMN, CNRS UMR 7104, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France); Trave, Gilles [Laboratoire d' Immunotechnologie, CNRS UMR 7100, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: trave@esbs.u-strasbg.fr; Kieffer, Bruno [Laboratoire de RMN, CNRS UMR 7104, Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg (France)], E-mail: kieffer@esbs.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-02-15

    E6 is a viral oncoprotein implicated in cervical cancers, produced by human papillomaviruses (HPVs). E6 contains two putative zinc-binding domains of about 75 residues each. The difficulty in producing recombinant E6 has long hindered the obtention of structural data. Recently, we described the expression and purification of E6-C 4C/4S, a stable, folded mutant of the C-terminal domain of HPV16 E6. Here, we have produced {sup 15}N-labelled samples of E6-C 4C/4S for structural studies by NMR. We have assigned most {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances and identified the elements of secondary structure of the domain. The domain displays an original {alpha}/{beta} topology with roughly equal proportions of {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The PDZ-binding region of E6, located at the extreme C-terminus of the domain, is in a random conformation. Mass spectrometry demonstrated the presence of one zinc ion per protein molecule. Kinetics of replacement of zinc by cadmium followed by {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC experiments revealed specific frequency changes for the zinc-binding cysteines and their immediate neighbours. NMR spectra were affected by severe line-broadening effects which seriously hindered the assignment work. Investigation of these effects by {sup 15}N relaxation experiments showed that they are due to heterogeneous dynamic behaviour with {mu}s-ms time scale motions occurring in localised regions of the monomeric domain.

  15. The HPV16 E6 oncoprotein and UVB irradiation inhibit the tumor suppressor TGFβ pathway in the epidermis of the K14E6 transgenic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoca-Cuaya, Marco; Diaz-Chavez, Jose; Hernandez-Monge, Jesus; Alvarez-Rios, Elizabeth; Lambert, Paul F; Gariglio, Patricio

    2015-06-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical cancer, and they are also associated with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. In addition, HPVs have also been postulated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). In these cancers, the oncogene E6 is best known for its ability to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 protein. Interestingly, in transgenic mice for HPV16 E6 (K14E6), it was reported that E6 alone induced epithelial hyperplasia and delay in differentiation in skin epidermis independently of p53 inactivation. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is an important regulator of cell growth/differentiation and apoptosis, and this pathway is often lost during tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) exposure activates diverse cellular responses, including DNA damage and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated whether the E6 oncogene alone or in combination with UVB dysregulate some components of the TGFβ pathway in the epidermis of K14E6 mice. We used 8-day-old K14E6 and non-transgenic mice irradiated and unirradiated with a single dose of UVB. We found that the E6 oncogene and UVB irradiation impair the TGFβ pathway in epidermis of K14E6 mice by downregulation of the TGFβ type II receptor (TβRII). This loss of TβRII prevents downstream activation of Smad2 and target genes as p15, an important regulator of cell cycle progression. In summary, the TGFβ signalling in cells of the epidermis is downregulated in our mouse model by both the E6 oncoprotein and the UVB irradiation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Mitotic control of human papillomavirus genome-containing cells is regulated by the function of the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elizabeth K; Delury, Craig P; Davies, Nicholas J; Weston, Christopher J; Miah, Mohammed A L; Banks, Lawrence; Parish, Joanna L; Higgs, Martin R; Roberts, Sally

    2017-03-21

    The function of a conserved PDS95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) binding motif (E6 PBM) at the C-termini of E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types contributes to the development of HPV-associated malignancies. Here, using a primary human keratinocyte-based model of the high-risk HPV18 life cycle, we identify a novel link between the E6 PBM and mitotic stability. In cultures containing a mutant genome in which the E6 PBM was deleted there was an increase in the frequency of abnormal mitoses, including multinucleation, compared to cells harboring the wild type HPV18 genome. The loss of the E6 PBM was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of mitotic spindle defects associated with anaphase and telophase. Furthermore, cells carrying this mutant genome had increased chromosome segregation defects and they also exhibited greater levels of genomic instability, as shown by an elevated level of centromere-positive micronuclei. In wild type HPV18 genome-containing organotypic cultures, the majority of mitotic cells reside in the suprabasal layers, in keeping with the hyperplastic morphology of the structures. However, in mutant genome-containing structures a greater proportion of mitotic cells were retained in the basal layer, which were often of undefined polarity, thus correlating with their reduced thickness. We conclude that the ability of E6 to target cellular PDZ proteins plays a critical role in maintaining mitotic stability of HPV infected cells, ensuring stable episome persistence and vegetative amplification.

  17. Epstein - Barr virus transforming protein LMP-1 alters B cells gene expression by promoting accumulation of the oncoprotein ΔNp73α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Accardi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have proved that oncogenic viruses develop redundant mechanisms to alter the functions of the tumor suppressor p53. Here we show that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, via the oncoprotein LMP-1, induces the expression of ΔNp73α, a strong antagonist of p53. This phenomenon is mediated by the LMP-1 dependent activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1 (JNK-1 which in turn favours the recruitment of p73 to ΔNp73α promoter. A specific chemical inhibitor of JNK-1 or silencing JNK-1 expression strongly down-regulated ΔNp73α mRNA levels in LMP-1-containing cells. Accordingly, LMP-1 mutants deficient to activate JNK-1 did not induce ΔNp73α accumulation. The recruitment of p73 to the ΔNp73α promoter correlated with the displacement of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 which is part of the transcriptional repressive polycomb 2 complex. Inhibition of ΔNp73α expression in lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs led to the stimulation of apoptosis and up-regulation of a large number of cellular genes as determined by whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq. In particular, the expression of genes encoding products known to play anti-proliferative/pro-apoptotic functions, as well as genes known to be deregulated in different B cells malignancy, was altered by ΔNp73α down-regulation. Together, these findings reveal a novel EBV mechanism that appears to play an important role in the transformation of primary B cells.

  18. Roles of PI3K/Akt and c-Jun signaling pathways in human papillomavirus type 16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erying Zhang

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV-16 infection may be related to non-smoking associated lung cancer. Our previous studies have found that HPV-16 oncoproteins promoted angiogenesis via enhancing hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and interleukin-8 (IL-8 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. In this study, we further investigated the roles of PI3K/Akt and c-Jun signaling pathways in it.Human NSCLC cell lines, A549 and NCI-H460, were stably transfected with pEGFP-16 E6 or E7 plasmids. Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression of HIF-1α, p-Akt, p-P70S6K, p-P85S6K, p-mTOR, p-JNK, and p-c-Jun proteins. VEGF and IL-8 protein secretion and mRNA levels were determined by ELISA and Real-time PCR, respectively. The in vitro angiogenesis was observed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs tube formation assay. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analyze the interaction between c-Jun and HIF-1α.HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins promoted the activation of Akt, P70S6K, P85S6K, mTOR, JNK, and c-Jun. LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced activation of Akt, P70S6K, and P85S6K, expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8, and in vitro angiogenesis. c-Jun knockdown by specific siRNA abolished HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis. Additionally, HPV-16 oncoproteins promoted HIF-1α protein stability via blocking proteasome degradation pathway, but c-Jun knockdown abrogated this effect. Furthermore, HPV-16 oncoproteins increased the quantity of c-Jun binding to HIF-1α.PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and c-Jun are involved in HPV-16 oncoprotein-induced HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8 expression and in vitro angiogenesis. Moreover, HPV-16 oncoproteins promoted HIF-1α protein stability possibly through enhancing the interaction between c-Jun and HIF-1α, thus making a contribution to angiogenesis in NSCLC cells.

  19. Transcriptional profiling during the early differentiation of granulocyte and monocyte progenitors controlled by conditional versions of the E2a-Pbx1 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, David B; Scheele, Jurgen; Pasillas, Martina; Kamps, Mark P

    2003-07-01

    The E2a-Pbx1 oncoprotein of human pre-B cell leukemia prevents differentiation and maintains continued cell division in cultured myeloid progenitors. Previously, estrogen-dependent forms of E2a-Pbx1 were generated that immortalized neutrophil (ECoM-G cells) or monocyte (ECoM-M cells) progenitors and that permitted their terminal differentiation upon estrogen withdrawal. Here, representational difference analysis (RDA) and Affymetrix array analysis are used to identify changes in gene expression that accompany the early differentiation of these cells. The promoters of these genes, whose expression changes upon E2a-Pbx1 inactivation, integrate the biochemical mechanism through which E2a-Pbx1 arrests differentiation and maintains cell division. Inactivation of E2a-Pbx1 caused the 10- to 80-fold up regulation of a small subset of myeloid differentiation genes (MRP8, Cnlp, NB1, Bactenecin, YM1, Stefin 1, Lipocortin, Lactoferrin, gp91 phox and Ly6-G) and a 10-fold down regulation of the TLE1 corepressor gene, as well as of a group of genes expressed in dividing cells (c-Myc, Nucleophosmin, Spermidine synthase, NOP56, Hnrpa1). Transcription of 97% of cellular genes, including 300 other transcription factor genes (21 Hox genes) and other myeloid genes, varied less than 3-fold, with most varying less than 50%. Therefore, E2a-Pbx1 prevents transcription and maintains the cell cycle by a specific rather than a global transcriptional mechanism. Monocyte progenitors were distinguished by persistent expression of IRF8 and of a category of other genes characterized as "interferon-stimulated" (ISG15, ISG20, Ifit1, Ifi202a, Ifi203, IfiS204, Ifi204-related, IRF7 and Ly6-E.1), as well as by the upregulation of the Lrg21 bZip transcription factor gene during late differentiation. The synchronous expression of stage-specific and cell cycle genes regulated by E2a-Pbx1 in these cell lines comprises a model system in which analysis of their promoters can be used as a starting point to

  20. Differential expression of galectin-3, CK19, HBME1, and Ret oncoprotein in the diagnosis of thyroid neoplasms by fine needle aspiration biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Husain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB is a common and excellent procedure for the evaluation of thyroid lesions that require surgical resection. At times, the FNAB diagnosis can be difficult, particularly of follicular-patterned lesions. Previous studies have shown that some immunohistochemical (IHC markers may be helpful in establishing more accurate diagnosis. In this study, our goal was to evaluate four of the recently investigated markers in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules on FNABs. Materials and Methods: We performed IHC staining of galectin-3, Ret oncoprotein (Ret, HBME-1, and cytokeratin 19 (CK19, on cell block sections of thyroid FNAB cases that had corresponding surgical resections. They included 44 benign lesions (37 hyperplastic or cellular nodules, HN; and 7 follicular adenomas, FA and 27 malignant tumors (6 follicular carcinoma, FC; 19 classic papillary carcinoma, PTC; and 2 follicular variant of papillary carcinoma, FVPC. The stains were done according to the standard avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. Results: Statistical analysis showed that immunoexpression was significantly higher in the malignant group for all four markers. The sensitivity for positive expression for all benign lesions versus malignant tumors was as follows: 10/44 (22.7% versus 25/27 (92.6% for galectin-3; 14/44 (31.8% versus 23/27 (85% for Ret; 12/44 (27.3% versus 24/27 (88.8% for HBME-1; and 13/44 (29.5% versus 23/27 (85% for CK19. The sensitivity and specificity was highest for galectin-3 (92.6% and 77.3%, respectively followed by HMBE-1 (88.9% and 72.7%, respectively. When combining the markers′ expressions, the panel of galectin-3 + HBME-1 showed the highest sensitivity and specificity (90.7% and 75%, respectively, but this was, however, lower than galectin-3 alone (92.3% and 77.3%, respectively. Conclusion: We conclude that galectin-3 is the best single marker in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid lesions with

  1. Characterization of antibodies in single-chain format against the E7 oncoprotein of the Human papillomavirus type 16 and their improvement by mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accardi Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomaviruses (HPV are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. The viral E7 protein plays a crucial role in viral oncogenesis. Many strategies have been explored to block the E7 oncoprotein activity. The single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFvs are valuable tools in cancer immunotherapy and can be used as "intracellular antibodies" to knock out specific protein functions. For both in vivo and in vitro employment, the scFv intrinsic solubility and stability are important to achieve long-lasting effects. Here we report the characterization in terms of reactivity, solubility and thermal stability of three anti-HPV16 E7 scFvs. We have also analysed the scFv43 sequence with the aim of improving stability and then activity of the antibody, previously shown to have antiproliferative activity when expressed in HPV16-positive cells. Methods The three anti-HPV16 E7 scFv 32, 43 51 were selected from the ETH-2 "phage-display" library. Thermal stability was evaluated with ELISA by determining the residual activity of each purified scFv against the recombinant HPV16 E7, after incubation in the presence of human seroalbumine for different time-intervals at different temperatures. Sequence analysis of the scFvs was performed with BLAST and CLUSTALL programs. The scFv43 aminoacid changes were reverted back to the consensus sequence from the immunoglobuline database by site-directed mutagenesis. ScFv solubility was evaluated with Western blotting by determining their relative amounts in the soluble and insoluble fractions of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Results ScFv51 was the most thermally stable scFv considered. Sequence analysis of the most reactive scFv43 has evidenced 2 amino acid changes possibly involved in molecule stability, in the VH and VL CDR3 regions respectively. By mutagenesis, two novel scFv43-derived scFvs were obtained, scFv43 M1 and M2. ScFv43 M2 showed to have improved thermal stability and

  2. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30{sup II} accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Department of Biological Sciences, and The Dedman College Center for Drug Discovery, Design, and Delivery, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0376 (United States); Ratner, Lee [Departments of Medicine and Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Lairmore, Michael D. [University of California-Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95618 (United States); Martinez, Ernest [Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Lüscher, Bernhard [Institute of Biochemistry, Klinikum, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Robson, Craig N. [Northern Institute for Cancer Research, Newcastle University, The Medical School, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Henriksson, Marie [Department of Microbiology, Cell and Tumor Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Harrod, Robert, E-mail: rharrod@smu.edu [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Department of Biological Sciences, and The Dedman College Center for Drug Discovery, Design, and Delivery, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275-0376 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30{sup II} protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30{sup II} interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30{sup II} and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30{sup II} induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30{sup II} in c-myc{sup −/−} HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30{sup II}/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30{sup II} protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells.

  3. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30II accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30II/c-MYC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Martinez, Ernest; Lüscher, Bernhard; Robson, Craig N.; Henriksson, Marie; Harrod, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30 II protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30 II interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30 II and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30 II induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30 II in c-myc −/− HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30 II is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30 II inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30 II /c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30 II /c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30 II /c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30 II protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30 II is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30 II inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells

  4. Hypoxia- and radiation-induced overexpression of Smac by an adenoviral vector and its effects on cell cycle and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Wu; Liu, Yang; Liang, Shuo; Wu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Zhi-Cheng; Gong, Shou-Liang

    2013-12-01

    A conditionally replicative adenoviral (CRAd) vector, designated as CRAd.pEgr-1-Smac, that promotes the overexpression of second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) when stimulated by hypoxia and radiation was constructed. MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with CRAd.pEgr-1-Smac and treated with 4-Gy X-rays. The hypoxic status in cancer cells was mimicked with the chemical reagent CoCl 2 . Smac protein expression was measured by a western blotting assay and cell proliferation was detected with the MTT assay. The cell cycle progression and apoptotic percentage were measured by flow cytometry with PI and Annexin V-FITC staining kits, respectively, following the irradiation of the transfected cells with 4-Gy X-rays. The results showed that CRAd.pEgr-1-Smac was able to increase the Smac protein expression induced by hypoxia and radiation, inhibit cell proliferation and promote apoptosis. Therefore, this method of gene-radiotherapy is indicated to be an ideal strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Post-translational control of IL-1β via the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncoprotein: a novel mechanism of innate immune escape mediated by the E3-ubiquitin ligase E6-AP and p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Niebler

    Full Text Available Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causally involved in the development of anogenital cancer. HPVs apparently evade the innate immune response of their host cells by dysregulating immunomodulatory factors such as cytokines and chemokines, thereby creating a microenvironment that favors malignancy. One central key player in the immune surveillance interactome is interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β which not only mediates inflammation, but also links innate and adaptive immunity. Because of its pleiotropic physiological effects, IL-1β production is tightly controlled on transcriptional, post-translational and secretory levels. Here, we describe a novel mechanism how the high-risk HPV16 E6 oncoprotein abrogates IL-1β processing and secretion in a NALP3 inflammasome-independent manner. We analyzed IL-1β regulation in immortalized keratinocytes that harbor the HPV16 E6 and/or E7 oncogenes as well as HPV-positive cervical tumor cells. While in primary and in E7-immortalized human keratinocytes the secretion of IL-1β was highly inducible upon inflammasome activation, E6-positive cells did not respond. Western blot analyses revealed a strong reduction of basal intracellular levels of pro-IL-1β that was independent of dysregulation of the NALP3 inflammasome, autophagy or lysosomal activity. Instead, we demonstrate that pro-IL-1β is degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner in E6-positive cells which is mediated via the ubiquitin ligase E6-AP and p53. Conversely, in E6- and E6/E7-immortalized cells pro-IL-1β levels were restored by siRNA knock-down of E6-AP and simultaneous recovery of functional p53. In the context of HPV-induced carcinogenesis, these data suggest a novel post-translational mechanism of pro-IL-1β regulation which ultimately inhibits the secretion of IL-1β in virus-infected keratinocytes. The clinical relevance of our results was further confirmed in HPV-positive tissue samples, where a gradual decrease of IL-1

  6. Combinatorial therapy with adenoviral-mediated PTEN and a PI3K inhibitor suppresses malignant glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo by regulating the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yang; Guo, Liyun; Song, Yunpeng; Wang, Le; Yu, Kai; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly invasive and challenging tumor of the central nervous system. The mutation/deletion of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is the main genetic change identified in glioblastomas. PTEN plays a critical role in tumorigenesis and has been shown to be an important therapeutic target. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 is commonly used to inhibit glioma cell growth via regulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effects of a combinatorial therapy of adenoviral-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) and LY294002 on LN229 and U251 glioma cells in vitro and on tumor xenografts in vivo. In vitro, LN229 and U251 glioma cells were treated by combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002. The growth ability was determined by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell invasive ability was analyzed by transwell invasion assay and cell apoptosis analysis via FITC-Annexin V analysis. In vivo, U251 subcutaneous glioblastoma xenograft was used to assay anti-tumor effect of combinatorial therapy with Ad-PTEN and LY294002 by mean volume of tumors, immunohistochemistry and TUNEL method. The combinatorial treatment clearly suppressed cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, reduced cell invasion and promoted cell apoptosis compared with the Ad-PTEN or LY294002 treatment alone. The treatment worked by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT pathway. In addition, the growth of U251 glioma xenografts treated with the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 was significantly inhibited compared with those treated with Ad-PTEN or LY294002 alone. Our data indicated that the combination of Ad-PTEN and LY294002 effectively suppressed the malignant growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts, suggesting a promising new approach for glioma gene therapy that warrants further investigation.

  7. Regulation of the tumor marker Fascin by the viral oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) depends on promoter activation and on a promoter-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Caroline F; Gross, Christine; Bros, Matthias; Reske-Kunz, Angelika B; Biesinger, Brigitte; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2015-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a highly infiltrative neoplasia of CD4(+) T-lymphocytes that occurs in about 5% of carriers infected with the deltaretrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral oncoprotein Tax perturbs cellular signaling pathways leading to upregulation of host cell factors, amongst them the actin-bundling protein Fascin, an invasion marker of several types of cancer. However, transcriptional regulation of Fascin by Tax is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a triple mode of transcriptional induction of Fascin by Tax, which requires (1) NF-κB-dependent promoter activation, (2) a Tax-responsive region in the Fascin promoter, and (3) a promoter-independent mechanism sensitive to the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2. Thus, Tax regulates Fascin by a multitude of signals. Beyond, using Tax-expressing and virus-transformed lymphocytes as a model system, our study is the first to identify the invasion marker Fascin as a novel target of PP2, an inhibitor of metastasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Relación histopatológica de la displasia epitelial con la oncoproteína p53 en la leucoplasia bucal Histopathological relation of epithelial dysplasia to p53 oncoprotein in oral leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Batista Castro

    2012-03-01

    dysplasia degrees, biological markers have been used among them the AcM.antip53 Thus, authors assessed the expression of AcM antip53 in the different degrees of epithelial dysplasia in the oral leukoplasia. Biopsies from 46 patients diagnosed with oral leukoplasia were used from the Oral Pathology Department of the Stomatology Faculty of La Habana. Samples were processed by the paraffin-inclusion technique and stained with immunohistochemical technique of the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex for the AcM p53. The correlation between the immunoassay pattern for p53 and the degree of epithelial dysplasia was studied. It was demonstrated that there is a significant association between the immunostain of basal and supra-basal cells of epithelium with the p53 oncoprotein in the different degrees of severity of the epithelial dysplasia, which could be related to the progressive increase of the observed cellular atypia. We concluded that in the study samples there was a coincident relation of the increase in the degree of severity of the epithelial dysplasia, with the marking of the p53 oncoprotein. These evidences suggested that the immunohistochemical analysis of p53 overall with the histological parameters mainly those related to the degree of severity of the epithelial dysplasia could be used to made a more accurate diagnosis and to contribute to prevention of oral cancer.

  9. TRAIL induces pro-apoptotic crosstalk between the TRAIL-receptor signaling pathway and TrkAIII in SH-SY5Y cells, unveiling a potential therapeutic "Achilles heel" for the TrkAIII oncoprotein in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gneo, Luciana; Ruggeri, Pierdomenico; Cappabianca, Lucia; Farina, Antonietta Rosella; Di Ianni, Natalia; Mackay, Andrew Reay

    2016-12-06

    TrkAIII expression in neuroblastoma (NB) associates with advanced stage disease, worse prognosis, post therapeutic relapse, and in NB models TrkAIII exhibits oncogenic activity and promotes chemotherapeutic-resistance. Here, we report a potential therapeutic "Achilles heel" for the TrkAIII oncoprotein in a SH-SY5Y NB model that is characterised by one-way TRAIL-induced, pro-apoptotic crosstalk between the TRAIL receptor signaling pathway and TrkAIII that results in the delayed induction of apoptosis. In TrkAIII SH-SY5Y cells, blocked in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by elevated constitutive Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 expression, TRAIL induced delayed caspase-dependent apoptosis via the extrinsic pathway and completely abrogated tumourigenic capacity in vitro. This effect was initiated by TRAIL-induced SHP-dependent c-Src activation, the induction of TrkAIII/SHP-1/c-Src complexing leading to SHP-mediated TrkAIII de-phosphorylation, subsequent induction of complexing between de-phosphorylated TrkAIII and cFLIP associated with a time-dependent increase the caspase-8 to cFLIP ratio at activated death receptors, resulting in delayed caspase cleavage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. We also confirm rate-limiting roles for c-FLIP and Mcl-1 in regulating the sensitivity of TrkAIII SH-SY5Y cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively. Our study unveils a novel mechanism for the TRAIL-induced apoptosis of TrkAIII expressing NB cells that depends upon SHP/Src-mediated crosstalk between the TRAIL-receptor signaling pathway and TrkAIII, and supports a novel potential pro-apoptotic therapeutic use for TRAIL in TrkAIII expressing NB.

  10. A Fusion Protein of the p53 Transaction Domain and the p53-Binding Domain of the Oncoprotein MdmX as an Efficient System for High-Throughput Screening of MdmX Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Zhou, Jingjing; Qin, Lingyun; Chen, Yao; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Huili; Su, Zhengding

    2017-06-27

    In nearly half of cancers, the anticancer activity of p53 protein is often impaired by the overexpressed oncoprotein Mdm2 and its homologue, MdmX, demanding efficient therapeutics to disrupt the aberrant p53-MdmX/Mdm2 interactions to restore the p53 activity. While many potent Mdm2-specific inhibitors have already undergone clinical investigations, searching for MdmX-specific inhibitors has become very attractive, requiring a more efficient screening strategy for evaluating potential scaffolds or leads. In this work, considering that the intrinsic fluorescence residue Trp23 in the p53 transaction domain (p53p) plays an important role in determining the p53-MdmX/Mdm2 interactions, we constructed a fusion protein to utilize this intrinsic fluorescence signal to monitor high-throughput screening of a compound library. The fusion protein was composed of the p53p followed by the N-terminal domain of MdmX (N-MdmX) through a flexible amino acid linker, while the whole fusion protein contained a sole intrinsic fluorescence probe. The fusion protein was then evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy against model compounds. Our results revealed that the variation of the fluorescence signal was highly correlated with the concentration of the ligand within 65 μM. The fusion protein was further evaluated with respect to its feasibility for use in high-throughput screening using a model compound library, including controls. We found that the imidazo-indole scaffold was a bona fide scaffold for template-based design of MdmX inhibitors. Thus, the p53p-N-MdmX fusion protein we designed provides a convenient and efficient tool for high-throughput screening of new MdmX inhibitors. The strategy described in this work should be applicable for other protein targets to accelerate drug discovery.

  11. EB-1, a tyrosine kinase signal transduction gene, is transcriptionally activated in the t(1;19) subset of pre-B ALL, which express oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; McGrath, S; Pasillas, M; Nakazawa, S; Kamps, M P

    1999-09-02

    The t(1;19) translocation of pre-B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) produces E2a-Pbx1, a chimeric oncoprotein containing the transactivation domains of E2a joined to the homeodomain protein, Pbx1. E2a-Pbx1 causes T cell and myeloid leukemia in mice, blocks differentiation of cultured myeloid progenitors, and transforms fibroblasts through a mechanism accompanied by aberrant expression of tissue-specific and developmentally-regulated genes. Here we investigate whether aberrant gene expression also occurs specifically in the t(1;19)-containing subset of pre-B cell ALL in man. Two new genes, EB-1 and EB-2, as well as Caldesmon were transcriptionally activated in each of seven t(1;19) cell lines. EB-1 expression was extremely low in marrow from patients having pre-B ALL not associated with the t(1;19), and elevated more than 100-fold in marrow from patients with pre-B ALL associated with the t(1;19). Normal EB-1 expression was strong in brain and testis, the same tissues exhibiting the highest levels of PBX1 expression. EB-1 encodes a signaling protein containing a phosphotyrosine binding domain homologous to that of dNumb developmental regulators and two SAM domains homologous to those in the C-terminal tail of Eph receptor tyrosine kinases. We conclude that aberrant expression of tissue-specific genes is a characteristic of t(1;19) pre-B ALL, as was previously found in fibroblasts transformed by E2a-Pbx1. Potentially, EB-1 overexpression could interfere with normal signaling controlling proliferation or differentiation.

  12. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schenk, E.; Essand, M.; Bangma, Ch. H.; Barber, Ch.; Behr, J.-P.; Briggs, S.; Carlisle, R.; Cheng, W.-S.; Danielsson, A.; Dautzenberg, I. J. C.; Dzojic, H.; Erbacher, P.; Fisher, K.; Frazier, A.; Georgopoulos, L. J.; Hoeben, R.; Kochanek, S.; Koppers-Lalic, D.; Kraaij, R.; Kreppel, F.; Lindholm, L.; Magnusson, M.; Maitland, N.; Neuberg, P.; Nilsson, B.; Ogris, M.; Remy, J.-S.; Scaife, M.; Schooten, E.; Seymour, L.; Totterman, T.; Uil, T. G.; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, J. L. M.; de Vrij, J.; van Weerden, W.; Wagner, E.; Willemsen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2010), s. 807-813 ISSN 1043-0342 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Keywords : adenovirus * gene delivery * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2010

  13. Heterodimerization of Hox proteins with Pbx1 and oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 generates unique DNA-binding specifities at nucleotides predicted to contact the N-terminal arm of the Hox homeodomain--demonstration of Hox-dependent targeting of E2a-Pbx1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Q; Kamps, M P

    1997-01-09

    Hox proteins control genetic programs that orchestrate development, and a large subset of Hox proteins can bind DNA elements as heterodimers with the Pbx family of homeodomain proteins. A transcriptionally activated version of Pbx1, E2a-Pbx1, is an oncoprotein in human pre-B cell leukemia that strongly suppresses differentiation and retains its ability to heterodimerize with Hox proteins. Because monomeric Hox proteins bind very similar DNA motifs, it is unclear how they activate diverse developmental programs. Here we demonstrate that heterodimers containing different Hox proteins and a common Pbx1 or E2a-Pbx1 partner bind different DNA motifs. Structural models suggest that the specificity of the Hox protein is altered by a conformation change involving residues in the N-terminal arm of the Hox homeodomain. Mutational analysis also supported the hypothesis that unique sequences in the N-terminal arm of the Hox homeodomain are at least partially responsible for mediating this specificity. In vivo, Hox proteins directed E2a-Pbx1-mediated transactivation with moderate specificity to cognate Hox-Pbx motifs. Thus, the development specificity of individual Hox proteins may be mediated, in part, by differential targeting of cellular genes by Pbx1-Hox complexes. Likewise, through its function as a common heterodimer partner, oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 may be able to interfere with multiple programs of development that are induced by the sequential or simultaneous expression of Hox proteins during hematopoiesis.

  14. The E6AP binding pocket of the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein provides a docking site for a small inhibitory peptide unrelated to E6AP, indicating druggability of E6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Zanier

    Full Text Available The HPV E6 oncoprotein maintains the malignant phenotype of HPV-positive cancer cells and represents an attractive therapeutic target. E6 forms a complex with the cellular E6AP ubiquitin ligase, ultimately leading to p53 degradation. The recently elucidated x-ray structure of a HPV16 E6/E6AP complex showed that HPV16 E6 forms a distinct binding pocket for E6AP. This discovery raises the question whether the E6AP binding pocket is druggable, i. e. whether it provides a docking site for functional E6 inhibitors. To address these issues, we performed a detailed analysis of the HPV16 E6 interactions with two small peptides: (i E6APpep, corresponding to the E6 binding domain of E6AP, and (ii pep11**, a peptide that binds to HPV16 E6 and, in contrast to E6APpep, induces apoptosis, specifically in HPV16-positive cancer cells. Surface plasmon resonance, NMR chemical shift perturbation, and mammalian two-hybrid analyses coupled to mutagenesis indicate that E6APpep contacts HPV16 E6 amino acid residues within the E6AP pocket, both in vitro and intracellularly. Many of these amino acids were also important for binding to pep11**, suggesting that the binding sites for the two peptides on HPV16 E6 overlap. Yet, few E6 amino acids were differentially involved which may contribute to the higher binding affinity of pep11**. Data from the HPV16 E6/pep11** interaction allowed the rational design of single amino acid exchanges in HPV18 and HPV31 E6 that enabled their binding to pep11**. Taken together, these results suggest that E6 molecular surfaces mediating E6APpep binding can also accommodate pro-apoptotic peptides that belong to different sequence families. As proof of concept, this study provides the first experimental evidence that the E6AP binding pocket is druggable, opening new possibilities for rational, structure-based drug design.

  15. Characterisation of the Equine adenovirus 2 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Carla; Vanniasinkam, Thiru; Barton, Mary; Mahony, Timothy J

    2015-09-30

    Equine adenovirus 2 (EAdV-2) is one of two serotypes of adenoviruses known to infect equines. Initial studies did not associate EAdV-2 infections with any specific clinical syndromes, although more recent evidence suggests that EAdV-2 may be associated with clinical and subclinical gastrointestinal infections of foals and adults respectively. In contrast, Equine adenovirus 1 is well recognised as a pathogen associated with upper respiratory tract infections of horses. In this study the complete genome sequence of EAdV-2 is reported. As expected, genes common to the adenoviruses were identified. Phylogenetic reconstructions using selected EAdV-2 genes confirmed the classification of this virus within the Mastadenovirus genus, and supported the hypothesis that EAdV-2 and EAdV-1 have evolved from separate lineages within the adenoviruses. One spliced open reading frame was identified that encoded for a polypeptide with high similarity to the pIX and E1b_55K adenovirus homologues and was designated pIX_E1b_55K. In addition to this fused version of E1b_55K, a separate E1b_55K encoding gene was also identified. These polypeptides do not appear to have evolved from a gene duplication event as the fused and unfused E1b_55K were most similar to E1b_55K homologues from the Atadenovirus and Mastadenovirus genera respectively. The results of this study suggest that EAdV-2 has an unusual evolutionary history that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  17. Potentiation of radiation therapy by the oncolytic adenovirus dl1520 (ONYX-015) in human malignant glioma xenografts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geoerger, B; Grill, J; Opolon, P; Morizet, J; Aubert, G; Lecluse, Y; Beusechem-Kaptein, van V.W.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Kirn, DH; Vassal, G

    2003-01-01

    In spite of aggressive surgery, irradiation and/or chemotherapy, treatment of malignant gliomas remains a major challenge in adults and children due to high treatment failure. We have demonstrated significant cell lysis and antitumour activity of the E1B-55 kDa-gene-deleted adenovirus ONYX-015

  18. Rational and random approaches to adenoviral vector engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil, Taco Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis is to contribute to the engineering of more selective and effective oncolytic Adenovirus (Ad) vectors. Two general approaches are taken for this purpose: (i) genetic capsid modification to achieve Ad retargeting (Chapters 2 to 4), and (ii) directed evolution to improve

  19. Endothelial Cell-Targeted Adenoviral Vector for Suppressing Breast Tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Shuang

    2003-01-01

    .... We incorporated five previously published endothelial cell-specific peptide sequences into adenovirus capsid fiber sequence and the modified fibers were added to Beta-galactosidase- containing...

  20. Combined distemper-adenoviral pneumonia in a dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Tovar, Luis E.; Ramírez-Romero, Rafael; Valdez-Nava, Yazel; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M.; Zárate-Ramos, Juan J.; López, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    A 3 1/2-month-old pug with oculonasal discharge and seizures was submitted for postmortem examination. Grossly, the lungs had cranioventral consolidation, and microscopically, 2 distinct types of inclusion bodies compatible with Canine distemper virus and Canine adenovirus type 2. Presence of both viruses was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. PMID:17616064

  1. Novel recombinant alphaviral and adenoviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2012-06-01

    Although cellular immunotherapy based on autolgous dendritic cells (DCs) targeting antigens expressed by metastatic cancer has demonstrated clinical efficacy, the logistical challenges in generating an individualized cell product create an imperative to develop alternatives to DC-based cancer vaccines. Particularly attractive alternatives include in situ delivery of antigen and activation signals to resident antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which can be achieved by novel fusion molecules targeting the mannose receptor and by recombinant viral vectors expressing the antigen of interest and capable of infecting DCs. A particular challenge in the use of viral vectors is the well-appreciated clinical obstacles to their efficacy, specifically vector-specific neutralizing immune responses. Because heterologous prime and boost strategies have been demonstrated to be particularly potent, we developed two novel recombinant vectors based on alphaviral replicon particles and a next-generation adenovirus encoding an antigen commonly overexpressed in many human cancers, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The rationale for developing these vectors, their unique characteristics, the preclinical studies and early clinical experience with each, and opportunities to enhance their effectiveness will be reviewed. The potential of each of these potent recombinant vectors to efficiently generate clinically active anti-tumor immune response alone, or in combination, will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel adenoviral vector induces T-cell responses despite anti-adenoviral neutralizing antibodies in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Chaudhry, Arvind; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M; Amalfitano, Andrea; Burnett, Bruce K; Devi, Gayathri R; Hsu, David S; Xu, Younong; Balcaitis, Stephanie; Dua, Rajesh; Nguyen, Susan; Balint, Joseph P; Jones, Frank R; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-08-01

    First-generation, E1-deleted adenovirus subtype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors, although promising platforms for use as cancer vaccines, are impeded in activity by naturally occurring or induced Ad-specific neutralizing antibodies. Ad5-based vectors with deletions of the E1 and the E2b regions (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]), the latter encoding the DNA polymerase and the pre-terminal protein, by virtue of diminished late phase viral protein expression, were hypothesized to avoid immunological clearance and induce more potent immune responses against the encoded tumor antigen transgene in Ad-immune hosts. Indeed, multiple homologous immunizations with Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D), encoding the tumor antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), induced CEA-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses with antitumor activity in mice despite the presence of preexisting or induced Ad5-neutralizing antibody. In the present phase I/II study, cohorts of patients with advanced colorectal cancer were immunized with escalating doses of Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D). CEA-specific CMI responses were observed despite the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity in a majority (61.3 %) of patients. Importantly, there was minimal toxicity, and overall patient survival (48 % at 12 months) was similar regardless of preexisting Ad5 neutralizing antibody titers. The results demonstrate that, in cancer patients, the novel Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] gene delivery platform generates significant CMI responses to the tumor antigen CEA in the setting of both naturally acquired and immunization-induced Ad5-specific immunity.

  3. Infection with E1B-mutant adenovirus stabilizes p53 but blocks p53 acetylation and activity through E1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyeva, I.; Dobbelstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    accumulation of p53, without obvious defects in p53 localization, phosphorylation, conformation and oligomerization. Nonetheless, p53 completely failed to induce its target genes in this scenario, for example, p21/CDKN1A, Mdm2 and PUMA. Two regions of the E1A gene products independently contributed......Wild-type adenovirus type 5 eliminates p53 through the E1B-55 kDa and E4-34 kDa gene products. Deletion or mutation of E1B-55 kDa has long been thought to confer p53-selective replication of oncolytic viruses. We show here that infection with E1B-defective adenovirus mutants induces massive...

  4. human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncoproteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the second most prevalent cancer in women worldwide. The HPVs can be divided into two groups, the 'low risk' ..... The physiological implications of such an inter- action are still under investigation (Gao et al 1999, .... genital human papillomavirus infection as a risk factor for persistent cervical dysplasia; J. Natl. Cancer Inst.

  5. ETS-1 oncoprotein expression is decreased in aggressive papillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.A. Ibrahim

    2016-10-19

    Oct 19, 2016 ... Patients and methods: This is a retrospective cross sectional study that included archival material from 150 cancer ... immunohistochemical results and using ROC (receiver operating characteristics) curve, cut-off values were found, that ... bladder cancer), stages II and III (invasive bladder cancer) and stage.

  6. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate CTL

  7. Nanoscale Proteomic Analysis of Oncoproteins in Hematopoietic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Proliferation assay Cells were seeded in 24-well plates (5,000 cells/well) and incubated overnight. Next, cells were treated with PBS, AT (0.5, 1.0, 2.5...1 overexpressing tumors exhibited a delay in the inetics (mean latency 80 versus 102 days) and a decreased fre- uency of tumor recurrence (40% versus...anism of tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation. Other host immune effectors are likely to contribute, and we recognize that other innate and

  8. Evaluation of Molecular Inhibitors of the c-Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prochownik, Edward V

    2005-01-01

    .... All of these functions require that C-Myc physically associate with another protein. Max. Example of diseases in which c-Myc deregulation occurs include breast cancer (approx. 30% of cases), colon cancer (>85...

  9. Control of human adenovirus type 5 gene expression by cellular Daxx/ATRX chromatin-associated complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Bürck, Carolin; Glass, Mandy

    2013-01-01

    is the targeting factor, leading to histone deacetylase recruitment, H3.3 deposition and transcriptional repression of cellular promoters. Despite recent findings on the fundamental importance of chromatin modification in host-cell gene regulation, it remains unclear whether adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) transcription...... to interact with ATRX. To ensure efficient viral replication, Ad5 E1B-55K protein inhibits Daxx and targets ATRX for proteasomal degradation in cooperation with early region 4 open reading frame protein 6 and cellular components of a cullin-dependent E3-ubiquitin ligase. Our studies illustrate the importance...

  10. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-Il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. "adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein", "adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein" and "adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein". Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and effective gene therapy in the kidney tubule diseases.

  11. Infectivity enhanced adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy for ovarian carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leath, CA; Kataram, M; Bhagavatula, P; Gopalkrishnan, RV; Dent, P; Fisher, PB; Pereboev, A; Carey, D; Lebedeva, [No Value; Haisma, HJ; Alvarez, RD; Curiel, DT; Mahasreshti, PJ

    Objective. Melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 [mda-7/interleukin (IL)-24] has been identified as a novel anti-cancer agent, which specifically induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal epithelial, endothelial and fibroblast cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the

  12. Efficacy of Recombinant Adenoviral Human p53 Gene in Treatment of Malignant Pleural or Peritoneal Effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin ZHANG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Once the malignant pleural or peritoneal effusion is developed it is difficult to control. This report presents a new method for controlling the malignant effusions. 
Methods Forty-eight patients, 29 males and 19 females with an average age of 61.2 years old, who were satisfied with the study inclusion criteria, were recruited in this study. Twenty-seven and 21 patients had a malignant pleural and peritoneal effusion, respectively. After draining most of fluids, these patients received intra-cavity infusion of rAd-p53 once per week for 4 weeks, at dose of 2×1012 viral particles (VP diluted into 200 mL of saline solution for pleural effusions, and 4×1012 VP diluted into 500 mL of saline solution for peritoneal effusions. 
Results Participants were followed up for a median time of 13.6 month. A total of 11 cases, 7 with pleural effusions and 4 with peritoneal effusions achieved a complete response (CR, and 20 cases (12 pleural effusions and 8 peritoneal effusions had a partial response (PR. The overall response rate is 64.6%. Patients’ quality of life, assessed by using Karnofsky performance scale (KPS scores, was improved by an average of 26.4. The one-year of overall survival rate was 54.2% with a median survival time of 12.5 months. There were no serious side effects observed except for self-limited fever found in 79.8% of the cases. 
Conclusions Intra-cavity infusion of rAd-p53 is an effective and safe treatment for the patients with malignant pleural or peritoneal effusions, especially for those patients who can’t tolerate the standard treatments.

  13. Treatment of experimental glioma by administration of adenoviral vectors expressing Fas ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambar, B B; Frei, K; Malipiero, U; Morelli, A E; Castro, M G; Lowenstein, P R; Fontana, A

    1999-07-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) is a cytokine, produced by activated T cells and NK cells, that triggers apoptosis of Fas-positive target cells including human glioma cells. As shown here, in vitro infection of rat F98 and human LN18 glioma cell lines with recombinant adenovirus (rAd) expressing FasL cDNA under control of the cytomegalovirus promoter (rAd-CMV-FasL) induced striking cytotoxicity in Fas-positive glioma cell lines but not in the Fas-negative F98 glioma subline F98/ZH. The extent of FasL-mediated cytotoxic effects outranged the expectations based on expression of beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) by F98 cells infected with a control virus expressing the lacZ gene (rAd-CMV-lacZ). The detection of FasL bioactivity in supernatants of infected cells provides evidence of a bystander mechanism involving the cytotoxic action of FasL on uninfected cells. In F98 tumor-bearing rats, infection with rAd-CMV-FasL increased the mean survival time by 50% compared with infection with rAd-CMV-lacZ or untreated controls. These data suggest that viral vector transduction of the FasL gene could be part of a successful glioma gene therapy.

  14. Alterations of plasma lipids in mice via adenoviral-mediated hepatic overexpression of human ABCA1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellington, Cheryl L.; Brunham, Liam R.; Zhou, Steven; Singaraja, Roshni R.; Visscher, Henk; Gelfer, Allison; Ross, Colin; James, Erick; Liu, Guoqing; Huber, Mary T.; Yang, Yu-Zhou; Parks, Robin J.; Groen, Albert; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Hayden, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a widely expressed lipid transporter essential for the generation of HDL. ABCA1 is particularly abundant in the liver, suggesting that the liver may play a major role in HDL homeostasis. To determine how hepatic ABCA1 affects plasma HDL cholesterol

  15. p21 promotes oncolytic adenoviral activity in ovarian cancer and is a potential biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockley Michelle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 replicates selectively within and lyses cells with a dysregulated Rb pathway, a finding seen in > 90% human cancers. dl922-947 is more potent than wild type adenovirus and the E1B-deletion mutant dl1520 (Onyx-015. We wished to determine which host cell factors influence cytotoxicity. SV40 large T-transformed MRC5-VA cells are 3-logs more sensitive to dl922-947 than isogenic parental MRC5 cells, confirming that an abnormal G1/S checkpoint increases viral efficacy. The sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to dl922-947 varied widely: IC50 values ranged from 51 (SKOV3ip1 to 0.03 pfu/cell (TOV21G. Cells sensitive to dl922-947 had higher S phase populations and supported earlier E1A expression. Cytotoxicity correlated poorly with both infectivity and replication, but well with expression of p21 by microarray and western blot analyses. Matched p21+/+ and -/- Hct116 cells confirmed that p21 influences dl922-947 activity in vitro and in vivo. siRNA-mediated p21 knockdown in sensitive TOV21G cells decreases E1A expression and viral cytotoxicity, whilst expression of p21 in resistant A2780CP cells increases virus activity in vitro and in intraperitoneal xenografts. These results highlight that host cell factors beyond simple infectivity can influence the efficacy of oncolytic adenoviruses. p21 expression may be an important biomarker of response in clinical trials.

  16. Adenoviral vector-mediated overexpression of osteoprotegerin accelerates osteointegration of titanium implants in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, G; Chen, J; Wei, S; Wang, H; Chen, Q; Lin, Y; Hu, J; Luo, E

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of human osteoprotegerin (hOPG) transgene to accelerate osteointegration of titanium implant in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Bone marrow stromal cells transduced with Ad-hOPG-EGFP could sustainedly express hOPG. Osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells treated by the hOPG were examined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining and bone slice resorption assay. The results showed differentiation and function of osteoclasts were significantly suppressed by hOPG in vitro. Ad-hOPG-EGFP was locally administered to the bone defect prior to implant placement in OVX and sham rats. After 3, 7, 28 days of implantation, the femurs were harvested for molecular and histological analyses. Successful transgene expression was confirmed by western blot and cryosectioning. A significant reduction in TRAP+ numbers was detected in Ad-hOPG-EGFP group. Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR examination revealed that hOPG transgene markedly diminished the expression of cathepsin K and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κ B ligand in vivo. The transgene hOPG modification revealed a marked increasing osteointegration and restored implant stability in OVX rats (POsteoprotegerin gene therapy may be an effective strategy to osteointegration of implants under osteoporotic conditions.

  17. Characterization of infectivity of knob-modified adenoviral vectors in glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.L. Paul (C. P L); M. Everts (M.); J.N. Glasgow (J.); P. Dent (P.); P.B. Fisher (P.); I.V. Ulasov (I.); M.S. Lesniak (M.); M.A. Stoff-Khalili (M.); J.C. Roth (J.); M. Preuss (Michael); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); T. Siegal (Tali); Z.B. Zhu (Z.); R.E. Curiel (Rafael E.)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMalignant glioma continues to be a major target for gene therapy and virotherapy due to its aggressive growth and the current lack of effective treatment. However, these approaches have been hampered by inefficient infection of glioma cells by viral vectors, particularly vectors derived

  18. Gene-based neonatal immune priming potentiates a mucosal adenoviral vaccine encoding mycobacterial Ag85B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guixiang; Rady, Hamada F; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-12-07

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health hazard worldwide, with neonates and young infants potentially more susceptible to infection than adults. BCG, the only vaccine currently available, provides some protection against tuberculous meningitis in children but variable efficacy in adults, and is not safe to use in immune compromised individuals. A safe and effective vaccine that could be given early in life, and that could also potentiate subsequent booster immunization, would represent a significant advance. To test this proposition, we have generated gene-based vaccine vectors expressing Ag85B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and designed experiments to test their immunogenicity and protective efficacy particularly when given in heterologous prime-boost combination, with the initial DNA vaccine component given soon after birth. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines elicited Th1-based immune responses against Ag85B in neonatal mice but did not protect them from subsequent aerosol challenge with virulent Mtb H37Rv. Recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding Ag85B, given via the intranasal route at six weeks of age, generated moderate immune responses and were poorly protective. However, neonatal DNA priming following by mucosal boosting with recombinant adenovirus generated strong immune responses, as evidenced by strong Ag85B-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, both in the lung-associated lymph nodes and the spleen, by the quality of these responding cells (assessed by their capacity to secrete multiple antimicrobial factors), and by improved protection, as indicated by reduced bacterial burden in the lungs following pulmonary TB challenge. These results suggest that neonatal immunization with gene-based vaccines may create a favorable immunological environment that potentiates the pulmonary mucosal boosting effects of a subsequent heterologous vector vaccine encoding the same antigen. Our data indicate that immunization early in life with mycobacterial antigens in an appropriate vaccine setting can prime for protective immunity against Mtb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer by an Armed Replicating Adenoviral Vector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Douglas, Joanne T

    2005-01-01

    ...) gene would be able to eradicate a primary breast cancer tumor by oncolysis, and that secretion of OPG from the infected and lysed cells into the systemic circulation would inhibit osteolytic bone...

  20. The roles of adenoviral vectors and donor DNA structures on genome editing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holkers, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and efficient genome editing is primarily dependent on the generation of a sequence-specific, genomic double-stranded DNA break (DSB) combined with the introduction of an exogenous DNA template into target cells. The exogenous template, called donor DNA, normally contains the foreign

  1. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. ZEB1 limits adenoviral infectability by transcriptionally repressing the coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacher, Markus D; Shiina, Marisa; Chang, Peter; Keller, Debora; Tiirikainen, Maarit I; Korn, W Michael

    2011-07-27

    We have previously reported that RAS-MEK (Cancer Res. 2003 May 1;63(9):2088-95) and TGF-β (Cancer Res. 2006 Feb 1;66(3):1648-57) signaling negatively regulate coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) cell-surface expression and adenovirus uptake. In the case of TGF-β, down-regulation of CAR occurred in context of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process associated with transcriptional repression of E-cadherin by, for instance, the E2 box-binding factors Snail, Slug, SIP1 or ZEB1. While EMT is crucial in embryonic development, it has been proposed to contribute to the formation of invasive and metastatic carcinomas by reducing cell-cell contacts and increasing cell migration. Here, we show that ZEB1 represses CAR expression in both PANC-1 (pancreatic) and MDA-MB-231 (breast) human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ZEB1 physically associates with at least one of two closely spaced and conserved E2 boxes within the minimal CAR promoter here defined as genomic region -291 to -1 relative to the translational start ATG. In agreement with ZEB1's established role as a negative regulator of the epithelial phenotype, silencing its expression in MDA-MB-231 cells induced a partial Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition (MET) characterized by increased levels of E-cadherin and CAR, and decreased expression of fibronectin. Conversely, knockdown of ZEB1 in PANC-1 cells antagonized both the TGF-β-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and CAR and the reduction of adenovirus uptake. Interestingly, even though ZEB1 clearly contributes to the TGF-β-induced mesenchymal phenotype of PANC-1 cells, TGF-β did not seem to affect ZEB1's protein levels or subcellular localization. These findings suggest that TGF-β may inhibit CAR expression by regulating factor(s) that cooperate with ZEB1 to repress the CAR promoter, rather than by regulating ZEB1 expression levels. In addition to the negative E2 box-mediated regulation the minimal CAR promoter is positively regulated through conserved ETS and CRE elements. This report provides evidence that inhibition of ZEB1 may improve adenovirus uptake of cancer cells that have undergone EMT and for which ZEB1 is necessary to maintain the mesenchymal phenotype. Targeting of ZEB1 may reverse some aspects of EMT including the down-regulation of CAR.

  3. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is small, double-stranded DNA virus that infects mucosal and cutaneous epithelial tissue. HPV is sexually transmitted and the viral DNA replicates extrachromosomally. The virus is non-enveloped and has an icosahedral capsid. There are approximately 118 types of HPV, which are ...

  4. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT–SSX, and more than half of SYT–SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT–SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue.

  5. Quantitative immunodetection of viral oncoprotein levels in human papillomavirus-transformed human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J A; Gangemi, J D

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) comprise a genus in the species Papovaviridae, which consist of small, naked icosahedral viruses containing circular dsDNA. HPV types 16 and 18 infect squamous epithelium of the genitalia and may infect as many as 45% of the female population in developed countries (1).

  6. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT-SSX. Although precise function of SYT-SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT-SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT-SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT-SSX2 gene. SYT-SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT-SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT-SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT-SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT-SSX, and more than half of SYT-SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT-SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lysine-52 stabilizes the MYC oncoprotein through an SCFFbxw7-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Melo, J; Kim, S S; Lourenco, C; Penn, L Z

    2017-12-07

    The oncogenic transcription factor c-MYC (MYC) is deregulated and often overexpressed in more than 50% of cancers. MYC deregulation is associated with poor prognosis and aggressive disease, suggesting that the development of therapeutic inhibitors targeting MYC would markedly impact patient outcome. MYC is highly regulated, with a protein and mRNA half-life of ~30 min. The most extensively studied pathway regulating MYC protein stability involves ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation mediated by the E3-ligase, SCF Fbxw7 . Here we provide evidence for an SCF Fbxw7 -independent regulatory mechanism centred on the highly conserved lysine-52 (K52) within MYC Box I. This residue has been shown to be post-translationally modified by both ubiquitylation and SUMOylation, hinting at the interplay of post-translational modifications at this site and the importance of this residue. We demonstrate that mutation of K52 to arginine (R) renders the MYC protein more labile. Mechanistically, we show that the degradation pathway regulated by K52 is independent of the Cullin-RING ligase family of E3-ligases, which includes not only the canonical SCF Fbxw7 but also other known MYC-targeting E3-ligases, such as SCF Skp2 , SCF βTCRP , SCF Fbxo28 and DCX TRUSS . Taken together, our data identify a novel regulatory pathway centred on K52 that may be exploited for the development of anti-MYC therapeutics.

  8. Overexpression of SKI Oncoprotein Leads to p53 Degradation through Regulation of MDM2 Protein Sumoylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-01-01

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer. PMID:22411991

  9. Overexpression of SKI oncoprotein leads to p53 degradation through regulation of MDM2 protein sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Boxiao; Sun, Yin; Huang, Jiaoti

    2012-04-27

    Protooncogene Ski was identified based on its ability to transform avian fibroblasts in vitro. In support of its oncogenic activity, SKI was found to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, although the exact molecular mechanism(s) responsible for its oncogenic activity is not fully understood. We found that SKI can negatively regulate p53 by decreasing its level through up-regulation of MDM2 activity, which is mediated by the ability of SKI to enhance sumoylation of MDM2. This stimulation of MDM2 sumoylation is accomplished through a direct interaction of SKI with SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2, Ubc9, resulting in enhanced thioester bond formation and mono-sumoylation of Ubc9. A mutant SKI defective in transformation fails to increase p53 ubiquitination and is unable to increase MDM2 levels and to increase mono-sumoylation of Ubc9, suggesting that the ability of SKI to enhance Ubc9 activity is essential for its transforming function. These results established a detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the ability of SKI to cause cellular transformation while unraveling a novel connection between sumoylation and tumorigenesis, providing potential new therapeutic targets for cancer.

  10. Modulation of microRNA-mRNA Target Pairs by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory E. Harden

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The E6 and E7 proteins are the major oncogenic drivers encoded by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs. While many aspects of the transforming activities of these proteins have been extensively studied, there are fewer studies that have investigated how HPV E6/E7 expression affects the expression of cellular noncoding RNAs. The goal of our study was to investigate HPV16 E6/E7 modulation of cellular microRNA (miR levels and to determine the potential consequences for cellular gene expression. We performed deep sequencing of small and large cellular RNAs in primary undifferentiated cultures of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs with stable expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or a control vector. After integration of the two data sets, we identified 51 differentially expressed cellular miRs associated with the modulation of 1,456 potential target mRNAs in HPV16 E6/E7-expressing HFKs. We discovered that the degree of differential miR expression in HFKs expressing HPV16 E6/E7 was not necessarily predictive of the number of corresponding mRNA targets or the potential impact on gene expression. Additional analyses of the identified miR-mRNA pairs suggest modulation of specific biological activities and biochemical pathways. Overall, our study supports the model that perturbation of cellular miR expression by HPV16 E6/E7 importantly contributes to the rewiring of cellular regulatory circuits by the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins that contribute to oncogenic transformation.

  11. Biological and Genomic Differences of ERG Oncoprotein-Stratified Prostate Cancers from African and Caucasian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    LOC100505474. Currently further fine-mapping of the genetic associations by genotype imputation analysis of genome-wide Oncoarray (500,000 SNP) data...likelihood estimation of individual ancestries relying on multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms. It was evaluated by comparing the proportion of...es tr y pr op or ti on red = CEU, green = YRI) Fusion Positive Fusion Negatives Index T ERG Any Tumor Foci ERG queried to identify patients with

  12. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Travé, Gilles [UMR 7242 CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie, Boulevard Sébastien Brant, Illkirch 67412 (France); Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J., E-mail: n.j.stonehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-24

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  13. KIF5B-RET Oncoprotein Signals through a Multi-kinase Signaling Hub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirtha Kamal Das

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene fusions are increasingly recognized as important cancer drivers. The KIF5B-RET gene has been identified as a primary driver in a subset of lung adenocarcinomas. Targeting human KIF5B-RET to epithelia in Drosophila directed multiple aspects of transformation, including hyperproliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and extension of striking invadopodia-like processes. The KIF5B-RET-transformed human bronchial cell line showed similar aspects of transformation, including invadopodia-like processes. Through a combination of genetic and biochemical studies, we demonstrate that the kinesin and kinase domains of KIF5B-RET act together to establish an emergent microtubule and RAB-vesicle-dependent RET-SRC-EGFR-FGFR signaling hub. We demonstrate that drugs designed to inhibit RET alone work poorly in KIF5B-RET-transformed cells. However, combining the RET inhibitor sorafenib with drugs that target EGFR, microtubules, or FGFR led to strong efficacy in both Drosophila and human cell line KIF5B-RET models. This work demonstrates the utility of exploring the full biology of fusions to identify rational therapeutic strategies.

  14. KIF5B-RET Oncoprotein Signals through a Multi-kinase Signaling Hub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tirtha Kamal; Cagan, Ross Leigh

    2017-09-05

    Gene fusions are increasingly recognized as important cancer drivers. The KIF5B-RET gene has been identified as a primary driver in a subset of lung adenocarcinomas. Targeting human KIF5B-RET to epithelia in Drosophila directed multiple aspects of transformation, including hyperproliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, invasion, and extension of striking invadopodia-like processes. The KIF5B-RET-transformed human bronchial cell line showed similar aspects of transformation, including invadopodia-like processes. Through a combination of genetic and biochemical studies, we demonstrate that the kinesin and kinase domains of KIF5B-RET act together to establish an emergent microtubule and RAB-vesicle-dependent RET-SRC-EGFR-FGFR signaling hub. We demonstrate that drugs designed to inhibit RET alone work poorly in KIF5B-RET-transformed cells. However, combining the RET inhibitor sorafenib with drugs that target EGFR, microtubules, or FGFR led to strong efficacy in both Drosophila and human cell line KIF5B-RET models. This work demonstrates the utility of exploring the full biology of fusions to identify rational therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein causes a delay in repair of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Wook; Nickel, Kwangok P.; Torres, Alexandra D.; Lee, Denis; Lambert, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with human papillomavirus related (HPV+) head and neck cancers (HNCs) demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to traditional HPV negative (HPV−) HNC patients. We have recently shown that HPV+ HNC cells are more sensitive to radiation than HPV− HNC cells. However, roles of HPV oncogenes in regulating the response of DNA damage repair remain unknown. Material and methods: Using immortalized normal oral epithelial cell lines, HPV+ HNC derived cell lines, and HPV16 E7-transgenic mice we assessed the repair of DNA damage using γ-H2AX foci, single and split dose clonogenic survival assays, and immunoblot. The ability of E7 to modulate expression of proteins associated with DNA repair pathways was assessed by immunoblot. Results: HPV16 E7 increased retention of γ-H2AX nuclear foci and significantly decreased sublethal DNA damage repair. While phospho-ATM, phospho-ATR, Ku70, and Ku80 expressions were not altered by E7, Rad51 was induced by E7. Correspondingly, HPV+ HNC cell lines showed retention of Rad51 after γ-radiation. Conclusions: Our findings provide further understanding as to how HPV16 E7 manipulates cellular DNA damage responses that may underlie its oncogenic potential and influence the altered sensitivity to radiation seen in HPV+ HNC as compared to HPV− HNC

  16. The HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein: hyper-tasking at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wycuff, Diane R; Marriott, Susan J

    2005-01-01

    HTLV-I is a complex retrovirus that encodes a transcriptional activator, Tax, which regulates expression of the viral promoter. Tax has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient to effect immortalization and transformation of cells in culture and tumorigenesis in animal models. Tax exerts its influence through protein-protein interactions with a variety of molecular targets, including transcription factors and cofactors, histone modifying enzymes and post-translational modifying enzymes. Through these interactions, Tax disrupts cellular regulatory cascades and checkpoints designed to control a variety of systems. The result is untimely activation or repression of gene expression, inappropriate protein modifications, incorrect cell cycling, loss of adequate DNA repair capacity, and potential release of the cell from tumor suppression. Whereas for the virus these functions of Tax provide a means for successful completion of its life cycle, for the cell, they result at best in anarchy, and at worst in death of both the cell and the organism of which that cell is a part.

  17. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Tamara A; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Ozlem; Travé, Gilles; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2014-07-24

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  18. Localization and Expression of the Proto-Oncoprotein BRX in the Mouse Brain and Pituitary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eddington, David

    2003-01-01

    .... Results indicated that Brx is expressed in specific regions of the brain and pituitary. Furthermore, the results indicate that differences exist in both brain and pituitary tissue of male and female mice with greater expression in the female...

  19. Oncoprotein DEK as a tissue and urinary biomarker for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, Antara; Adelson, Martin E; Mogilevkin, Yakov; Mordechai, Eli; Sidi, Abraham A; Trama, Jason P

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a significant healthcare problem in the United States of America with a high recurrence rate. Early detection of bladder cancer is essential for removing the tumor with preservation of the bladder, avoiding metastasis and hence improving prognosis and long-term survival. The objective of this study was to analyze the presence of DEK protein in voided urine of bladder cancer patients as a urine-based bladder cancer diagnostic test. We examined the expression of DEK protein by western blot in 38 paired transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) bladder tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissue. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine was analyzed by western blot in 42 urine samples collected from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals. The DEK protein is expressed in 33 of 38 bladder tumor tissues with no expression in adjacent normal tissue. Based on our sample size, DEK protein is expressed in 100% of tumors of low malignant potential, 92% of tumors of low grade and in 71% of tumors of high grade. Next, we analyzed 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals for DEK protein expression by western blot analysis. We are the first to show that the DEK protein is present in the urine of bladder cancer patients. Approximately 84% of TCC patient urine specimens were positive for urine DEK. Based on our pilot study of 38 bladder tumor tissue and 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals; DEK protein is expressed in bladder tumor tissue and voided urine of bladder cancer patients. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine is potentially a suitable biomarker for bladder cancer and that the screening for the presence of DEK protein in urine can be explored as a noninvasive diagnostic test for bladder cancer

  20. The leucine zipper region of Myb oncoprotein regulates the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karafiát, Vít; Dvořáková, Marta; Pajer, Petr; Králová, Jarmila; Hořejší, Václav; Čermák, Vladimír; Bartůněk, Petr; Zenke, M.; Dvořák, Michal

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 2001, č. 98 (2001), s. 3668-3676 ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IPP2052002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : BLOOD-CELL DIFFERENTIATION * TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR * V-MYB Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.273, year: 2001

  1. The histone methyltransferase and putative oncoprotein MMSET is overexpressed in a large variety of human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudlebusch, Heidi Rye; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Simon, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma SET (Suppressor of variegation, Enhancer of zeste, and Trithorax) domain (MMSET) is a histone lysine methyltransferase deregulated in a subgroup of multiple myelomas with the t(4;14)(p16;q32) translocation and poor prognosis. With the aim of understanding, if MMSET can be involved...

  2. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    protein 1; CAL, cystic fibrosis receptor-associated ligand; CDK, cyclin-dependent kinase; CDKI, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor; CBP,. CREB-binding protein; Dlg, disc large; E6AP, E6-associated protein; E6TP1, E6 targeted protein 1; ERBB3, epidermal growth factor receptor-related protein tyrosine kinase B3; EZH2, ...

  3. Exploiting the Novel Repressed Transactivator Assay to Identify Protein Peptide Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda Z

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental research clearly shows that the product of the c-myc oncogene is often expressed at elevated levels in a large number of breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis, high-risk disease...

  4. Exploiting the Novel Repressed Transactivator Assay to Identify Protein Peptide Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental research clearly shows that the product of the c-myc oncogene is often expressed at elevated levels in a large number of breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis, high-risk disease...

  5. The v-ErbA oncoprotein quenches the activity of an erythroid-specific enhancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braliou, G.G.; Ciana, P; Klaassen, W.; Gandrillon, O.; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    2001-01-01

    v-ErbA is a mutated variant of thyroid hormone receptor (TRalpha/NR1A1) borne by the Avian Erythroblastosis virus causing erythroleukemia. TRalpha is known to activate transcription of specific genes in the presence of its cognate ligand, T3 hormone, while in its absence it represses it. v-ErbA is

  6. Phylogenetic conservation of the regulatory and functional properties of the Vav oncoprotein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couceiro, Jose R.; Martin-Bermudo, Maria D.; Bustelo, Xose R.

    2005-01-01

    Vav proteins are phosphorylation-dependent GDP/GTP exchange factors for Rho/Rac GTPases. Despite intense characterization of mammalian Vav proteins both biochemically and genetically, there is little information regarding the conservation of their biological properties in lower organisms. To approach this issue, we have performed a characterization of the regulatory, catalytic, and functional properties of the single Vav family member of Drosophila melanogaster. These analyses have shown that the intramolecular mechanisms controlling the enzyme activity of mammalian Vav proteins are already present in Drosophila, suggesting that such properties have been set up before the divergence between protostomes and deuterostomes during evolution. We also show that Drosophila and mammalian Vav proteins have similar catalytic specificities. As a consequence, Drosophila Vav can trigger oncogenic transformation, morphological change, and enhanced cell motility in mammalian cells. Gain-of-function studies using transgenic flies support the implication of this protein in cytoskeletal-dependent processes such as embryonic dorsal closure, myoblast fusion, tracheal development, and the migration/guidance of different cell types. These results highlight the important roles of Vav proteins in the signal transduction pathways regulating cytoskeletal dynamics. Moreover, they indicate that the foundations for the regulatory and enzymatic activities of this protein family have been set up very early during evolution

  7. Bag3-induced autophagy is associated with degradation of JCV oncoprotein, T-Ag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available JC virus, JCV, is a human neurotropic polyomavirus whose replication in glial cells causes the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition, JCV possesses oncogenic activity and expression of its transforming protein, large T-antigen (T-Ag, in several experimental animals induces tumors of neural origin. Further, the presence of JCV DNA and T-Ag have been repeatedly observed in several human malignant tissues including primitive neuroectodermal tumors and glioblastomas. Earlier studies have demonstrated that Bag3, a member of the Bcl-2-associated athanogene (Bag family of proteins, which is implicated in autophagy and apoptosis, is downregulated upon JCV infection of glial cells and that JCV T-Ag is responsible for suppressing the activity of the BAG3 promoter. Here, we investigated the possible impact of Bag3 on T-Ag expression in JCV-infected human primary glial cells as well as in cells derived from T-Ag-induced medulloblastoma in transgenic animals. Results from these studies revealed that overexpression of Bag3 drastically decreases the level of T-Ag expression by inducing the autophagic degradation of the viral protein. Interestingly, this event leads to the inhibition of JCV infection of glial cells, suggesting that the reduced levels of T-antigen seen upon the overexpression of Bag3 has a biological impact on the viral lytic cycle. Results from protein-protein interaction studies showed that T-Ag and Bag3 physically interact with each other through the zinc-finger of T-Ag and the proline rich domains of Bag3, and this interaction is important for the autophagic degradation of T-Ag. Our observations open a new avenue of research for better understanding of virus-host interaction by investigating the interplay between T-Ag and Bag3, and their impact on the development of JCV-associated diseases.

  8. SET oncoprotein accumulation regulates transcription through DNA demethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana O; Neto, Marinaldo P C; Sousa, Lucas O; Tannous, Maryna A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andreia M

    2017-04-18

    Epigenetic modifications are essential in the control of normal cellular processes and cancer development. DNA methylation and histone acetylation are major epigenetic modifications involved in gene transcription and abnormal events driving the oncogenic process. SET protein accumulates in many cancer types, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); SET is a member of the INHAT complex that inhibits gene transcription associating with histones and preventing their acetylation. We explored how SET protein accumulation impacts on the regulation of gene expression, focusing on DNA methylation and histone acetylation. DNA methylation profile of 24 tumour suppressors evidenced that SET accumulation decreased DNA methylation in association with loss of 5-methylcytidine, formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and increased TET1 levels, indicating an active DNA demethylation mechanism. However, the expression of some suppressor genes was lowered in cells with high SET levels, suggesting that loss of methylation is not the main mechanism modulating gene expression. SET accumulation also downregulated the expression of 32 genes of a panel of 84 transcription factors, and SET directly interacted with chromatin at the promoter of the downregulated genes, decreasing histone acetylation. Gene expression analysis after cell treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) and Trichostatin A (TSA) revealed that histone acetylation reversed transcription repression promoted by SET. These results suggest a new function for SET in the regulation of chromatin dynamics. In addition, TSA diminished both SET protein levels and SET capability to bind to gene promoter, suggesting that administration of epigenetic modifier agents could be efficient to reverse SET phenotype in cancer.

  9. The c-myc oncoprotein forms a specific complex with the product of the retinoblastoma gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Rustgi, A.K.; Dyson, N.; Hill, D.

    1991-01-01

    Myc proteins are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Deregulated expression of myc family genes has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of cancers. Myc proteins share significant sequence homology in the carboxyl terminus with a number of

  10. Homologous recombination control by the anti-apoptotic onco-protein Bcl-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumay, A.

    2003-12-01

    This research thesis deals with the different biological mechanisms, notably the repair and apoptosis mechanisms induced by irradiation in cells. After a presentation of the genotoxic stress and DNA repair mechanisms, the author discusses the cellular response to a DNA double-strand break, and the regulation of these response mechanisms (how a cellular response emerges: life or death). The next part deals with the apoptosis (cell death by necrosis or apoptosis), and presents the BCL-2 protein family. Results are then reported on laboratory studies of the effect of this protein family

  11. Anti-viral state segregates two molecular phenotypes of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: potential relevance for adenoviral gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiorini Jay A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC remains a leading cause of cancer mortality for which novel gene therapy approaches relying on tumor-tropic adenoviruses are being tested. Methods We obtained the global transcriptional profiling of primary PDAC using RNA from eight xenografted primary PDAC, three primary PDAC bulk tissues, three chronic pancreatitis and three normal pancreatic tissues. The Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133A was used. The results of the expression profiles were validated applying immunohistochemical and western blot analysis on a set of 34 primary PDAC and 10 established PDAC cell lines. Permissivity to viral vectors used for gene therapy, Adenovirus 5 and Adeno-Associated Viruses 5 and 6, was assessed on PDAC cell lines. Results The analysis of the expression profiles allowed the identification of two clearly distinguishable phenotypes according to the expression of interferon-stimulated genes. The two phenotypes could be readily recognized by immunohistochemical detection of the Myxovirus-resistance A protein, whose expression reflects the activation of interferon dependent pathways. The two molecular phenotypes discovered in primary carcinomas were also observed among established pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, suggesting that these phenotypes are an intrinsic characteristic of cancer cells independent of their interaction with the host's microenvironment. The two pancreatic cancer phenotypes are characterized by different permissivity to viral vectors used for gene therapy, as cell lines expressing interferon stimulated genes resisted to Adenovirus 5 mediated lysis in vitro. Similar results were observed when cells were transduced with Adeno-Associated Viruses 5 and 6. Conclusion Our study identified two molecular phenotypes of pancreatic cancer, characterized by a differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes and easily recognized by the expression of the Myxovirus-resistance A protein. We suggest that the detection of these two phenotypes might help the selection of patients enrolled in virally-mediated gene therapy trials.

  12. Adenoviral-mediated placental gene transfer of IGF-1 corrects placental insufficiency via enhanced placental glucose transport mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen N Jones

    Full Text Available Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that over-expression of human insulin-like growth factor -1 (hIGF-1 in the placenta corrects fetal weight deficits in mouse, rat, and rabbit models of intrauterine growth restriction without changes in placental weight. The underlying mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. To investigate the effect of intra-placental IGF-1 over-expression on placental function we examined glucose transporter expression and localization in both a mouse model of IUGR and a model of human trophoblast, the BeWo Choriocarcinoma cell line.At gestational day 18, animals were divided into four groups; sham-operated controls, uterine artery branch ligation (UABL, UABL+Ad-hIGF-1 (10(8 PFU, UABL+Ad-LacZ (10(8 PFU. At gestational day 20, pups and placentas were harvested by C-section. For human studies, BeWo choriocarcinoma cells were grown in F12 complete medium +10%FBS. Cells were incubated in serum-free control media ± Ad-IGF-1 or Ad-LacZ for 48 hours. MOIs of 10∶1 and 100∶1 were utilized. The RNA, protein expression and localization of glucose transporters GLUT1, 3, 8, and 9 were analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry.In both the mouse placenta and BeWo, GLUT1 regulation was linked to altered protein localization. GLUT3, localized to the mouse fetal endothelial cells, was reduced in placental insufficiency but maintained with Ad-I GF-1 treatment. Interestingly, GLUT8 expression was reduced in the UABL placenta but up-regulated following Ad-IGF-1 in both mouse and human systems. GLUT9 expression in the mouse was increased by Ad-IGF-1 but this was not reflected in the BeWo, where Ad-IGF-1 caused moderate membrane relocalization.Enhanced GLUT isoform transporter expression and relocalization to the membrane may be an important mechanism in Ad-hIGF-1mediated correction of placental insufficiency.

  13. Molecular and macromolecular alterations of recombinant adenoviral vectors do not resolve changes in hepatic drug metabolism during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croyle Maria A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this report we test the hypothesis that long-term virus-induced alterations in CYP occur from changes initiated by the virus that may not be related to the immune response. Enzyme activity, protein expression and mRNA of CYP3A2, a correlate of human CYP3A4, and CYP2C11, responsive to inflammatory mediators, were assessed 0.25, 1, 4, and 14 days after administration of several different recombinant adenoviruses at a dose of 5.7 × 1012 virus particles (vp/kg to male Sprague Dawley rats. Wild type adenovirus, containing all viral genes, suppressed CYP3A2 and 2C11 activity by 37% and 39%, respectively within six hours. Levels fell to 67% (CYP3A2 and 79% (CYP2C11 of control by 14 days (p ≤ 0.01. Helper-dependent adenovirus, with all viral genes removed, suppressed CYP3A2 (43% and CYP2C11 (55% within six hours. CYP3A2 remained significantly suppressed (47%, 14 days, p ≤ 0.01 while CYP2C11 returned to baseline at this time. CYP3A2 and 2C11 were reduced by 45 and 42% respectively 6 hours after treatment with PEGylated adenovirus, which has a low immunological profile (p ≤ 0.05. CYP3A2 remained suppressed (34%, p ≤ 0.05 for 14 days while CYP2C11 recovered. Inactivated virus suppressed CYP3A2 activity by 25–50% for 14 days (p ≤ 0.05. CYP2C11 was affected similar manner but recovered by day 14. Microarray and in vitro studies suggest that changes in cellular signaling pathways initiated early in virus infection contribute to changes in CYP.

  14. Effective single chain antibody (scFv) concentrations in vivo via adenoviral vector mediated expression of secretory scFv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, WO; Gomez-Navarro, J; Buchsbaum, DJ; Xiang, J; Casado, E; Barker, SD; Mahasreshti, PJ; Haisma, HJ; Barnes, MN; Siegal, GP; Alvarez, RD; Hemminki, A; Nettelbeck, DM; Curiel, DT

    Single chain antibodies (scFv) represent powerful interventional agents for the achievement of targeted therapeutics. The practical utility of these agents have been limited, however, by difficulties related to production of recombinant scFv and the achievement of effective and sustained levels of

  15. Immunization with Hexon modified adenoviral vectors integrated with gp83 epitope provides protection against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitra L Farrow

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Chagas disease is an endemic infection that affects over 8 million people throughout Latin America and now has become a global challenge. The current pharmacological treatment of patients is unsuccessful in most cases, highly toxic, and no vaccines are available. The results of inadequate treatment could lead to heart failure resulting in death. Therefore, a vaccine that elicits neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses and protection against Chagas disease is necessary.The "antigen capsid-incorporation" strategy is based upon the display of the T. cruzi epitope as an integral component of the adenovirus' capsid rather than an encoded transgene. This strategy is predicted to induce a robust humoral immune response to the presented antigen, similar to the response provoked by native Ad capsid proteins. The antigen chosen was T. cruzi gp83, a ligand that is used by T. cruzi to attach to host cells to initiate infection. The gp83 epitope, recognized by the neutralizing MAb 4A4, along with His6 were incorporated into the Ad serotype 5 (Ad5 vector to generate the vector Ad5-HVR1-gp83-18 (Ad5-gp83. This vector was evaluated by molecular and immunological analyses. Vectors were injected to elicit immune responses against gp83 in mouse models. Our findings indicate that mice immunized with the vector Ad5-gp83 and challenged with a lethal dose of T. cruzi trypomastigotes confer strong immunoprotection with significant reduction in parasitemia levels, increased survival rate and induction of neutralizing antibodies.This data demonstrates that immunization with adenovirus containing capsid-incorporated T. cruzi antigen elicits a significant anti-gp83-specific response in two different mouse models, and protection against T. cruzi infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies mediated by cell-mediated immune responses, as evidenced by the production of several Ig isotypes. Taken together, these novel results show that the recombinant Ad5 presenting T. cruzi gp83 antigen is a useful candidate for the development of a vaccine against Chagas disease.

  16. Intratracheal Instillation of High Dose Adenoviral Vectors Is Sufficient to Induce Lung Injury and Fibrosis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiyuan; Chen, Tianji; Bozkanat, Melike; Ibe, Joyce Christina F.; Christman, John W.; Raj, J. Usha; Zhou, Guofei

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) vectors are common tools in gene therapy. Since Ad vectors are known to activate innate and adaptive immunity, we investigated whether intratracheal administration of Ad vectors alone is sufficient to induce lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. Methods We instilled Ad viruses ranging from 107 to 1.625×109 ifu/mouse as well as the same volume of PBS and bleomycin. 14 and 21 days after administration, we collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and mouse lung tissues. We measured the protein concentration, total and differential cell counts, and TGF-β1 production, performed Trichrome staining and Sircol assay, determined gene and protein levels of profibrotic cytokines, MMPs, and Wnt signaling proteins, and conducted TUNEL staining and co-immunofluorescence for GFP and α-SMA staining. Results Instillation of high dose Ad vectors (1.625×109 ifu/mouse) into mouse lungs induced high levels of protein content, inflammatory cells, and TGF-β1 in BALF, comparable to those in bleomycin-instilled lungs. The collagen content and mRNA levels of Col1a1, Col1a2, PCNA, and α-SMA were also increased in the lungs. Instillation of both bleomycin and Ad vectors increased expression levels of TNFα and IL-1β but not IL-10. Instillation of bleomycin but not Ad increased the expression of IL-1α, IL-13 and IL-16. Treatment with bleomycin or Ad vectors increased expression levels of integrin α1, α5, and αv, MMP9, whereas treatment with bleomycin but not Ad vectors induced MMP2 expression levels. Both bleomycin and Ad vectors induced mRNA levels of Wnt2, 2b, 5b, and Lrp6. Intratracheal instillation of Ad viruses also induced DNA damages and Ad viral infection-mediated fibrosis is not limited to the infection sites. Conclusions Our results suggest that administration of Ad vectors induces an inflammatory response, lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis in a dose dependent manner. PMID:25551570

  17. Effects of adenoviral delivered interferon-alpha on porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type I interferons, such as interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), contribute to innate antiviral immunity by promoting production of antiviral mediators and also play a role in the adaptive immune response. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most devastating and costly diseas...

  18. Intracerebral delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) using adenoviral vector protects mice against lethal peripheral rabies challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Praveen K; Sonwane, Arvind A; Singh, Niraj K; Meshram, Chetan D; Dahiya, Shyam S; Pawar, Sachin S; Gupta, Swatantra P; Chaturvedi, V K; Saini, Mohini

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potential of RNA interference (RNAi) as antiviral agent against rabies, two small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting rabies virus (RABV) nucleoprotein (N) and polymerase (L) genes were designed and evaluated. Both siRNAs knockdown or silenced the target RABV genes as evaluated in a plasmid based transient expression model. For efficient delivery, adenoviruses expressing the siRNAs were constructed and antiviral potential of the delivered siRNAs was investigated in BHK-21 cells. When cells treated with adenoviruses expressing siRNAs were challenged with RABV, there was 88.35±2.4% and 41.52±9.3% reduction in RABV multiplication in infected cells with siRNAs targeting RABV-N and L genes, respectively. Relative quantification of RABV transcripts using real-time PCR revealed knockdown of both RABV-N and L gene transcripts, however, significant reduction was observed only with adenovirus expressing siRNA against RABV-N. When mice treated intracerebrally with adenoviruses expressing siRNAs were challenged peripherally with lethal RABV by the intramuscular route in masseter muscle, there was 66.6% and 33.3% protection with adenoviruses expressing siRNAs against RABV-N and L genes, respectively. These results demonstrated that adenovirus expressing siRNA against RABV-N efficiently inhibited the RABV multiplication both, in vitro and in vivo and conferred significant protection against lethal RABV challenge. This supported the hypothesis that RNAi, based on siRNA targeting RABV-N gene can prevent RABV infection and holds the potential of RNAi as an approach to prevent rabies infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic interaction between TAL1 oncoprotein and LSD1 regulates TAL1 function in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Deng, Changwang; Hu, Xin; Patel, Bhavita; Fu, Xueqi; Qiu, Yi; Brand, Marjorie; Zhao, Keji; Huang, Suming

    2012-01-01

    TAL1/SCL is a hematopoietic specific oncogene and its activity is regulated by associated transcriptional coactivators and corepressors. Dysregulation of TAL1 activity has been associated with T cell leukemogenesis. However, it remains unclear how the interactions between TAL1 and corepressors versus coactivators are properly regulated. Here we reported that PKA mediated phosphorylation regulates TAL1 interaction with the lysine specific demethylase (LSD1) that removes methyl group from methylated Lys 4 on histone H3 tails. Phosphorylation of serine 172 in TAL1 specifically destabilizes the TAL1-LSD1 interaction leading to promoter H3K4 hypermethylation and activation of target genes that have been suppressed in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Knockdown of TAL1 or LSD1 led to a derepression of the TAL1 target genes in T cell acute lymphoblast leukemia (T-ALL) Jurkat cells, which is accompanied by elevating promoter H3K4 methylation. Similarly, treatment of PKA activator forskolin resulted in derepression of target genes by reducing its interaction with LSD1 while PKA inhibitor H89 represses them by suppressing H3K4 methylation levels. Consistent with the dual roles of TAL1 in transcription, TAL1 associated LSD1 is decreased while recruitment of hSET1 is increased at the TAL1 targets during erythroid differentiation. This process is accompanied by a dramatic increase in H3K4 methylation. Thus, our data revealed a novel interplay between PKA phosphorylation and TAL1 mediated epigenetic regulation that regulates hematopoietic transcription and differentiation programs during hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. PMID:22310283

  20. Viral Small T Oncoproteins Transform Cells by Alleviating Hippo-Pathway-Mediated Inhibition of the YAP Proto-oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Thanh Nguyen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary human cells can be transformed into tumor cells by a defined set of genetic alterations including telomerase, oncogenic RasV12, and the tumor suppressors p53 and pRb. SV40 small T (ST is required for anchorage-independent growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we identify the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway as a critical target of ST in cellular transformation. We report that ST uncouples YAP from the inhibitory activity of the Hippo pathway through PAK1-mediated inactivation of NF2. Membrane-tethered activated PAK is sufficient to bypass the requirement for ST in anchorage-independent growth. PAK acts via YAP to mediate the transforming effects of ST. Activation of endogenous YAP is required for ST-mediated transformation and is sufficient to bypass ST in anchorage-independent growth and xenograft tumor formation. Our findings uncover the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway as a final gatekeeper to transformation and tumorigenesis of primary cells.

  1. The small Rho GTPase Rac1 controls normal human dermal fibroblasts proliferation with phosphorylation of the oncoprotein c-myc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, Ekaterina; Mitev, Vanio; Zhelev, Nikolai; Deroanne, Christophe F.; Poumay, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Proliferation of dermal fibroblasts is crucial for the maintenance of skin. The small Rho GTPase, Rac1, has been identified as a key transducer of proliferative signals in various cell types, but in normal human dermal fibroblasts its significance to cell growth control has not been studied. In this study, we applied the method of RNA interference to suppress endogenous Rac1 expression and examined the consequences on human skin fibroblasts. Rac1 knock-down resulted in inhibition of DNA synthesis. This effect was not mediated by inhibition of the central transducer of proliferative stimuli, ERK1/2 or by activation of the pro-apoptotic p38. Rather, as a consequence of the suppressed Rac1 expression we observed a significant decrease in phosphorylation of c-myc, revealing for the first time that in human fibroblasts Rac1 exerts control on proliferation through c-myc phosphorylation. Thus Rac1 activates proliferation of normal fibroblasts through stimulation of c-myc phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 activity

  2. Prognostic Significance of c-erbB-2 (HER-2/neu) Oncoprotein in Benign and Malignant Breast Tumor Tissue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimíčková, M.; Pecen, Ladislav; Černoch, M.; Vagunda, V.; Pochmon, D.; Vermousek, I.; Lang, B.; Pačovský, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (1999), s. 13-22 ISSN 0886-3849 Grant - others:IGA MZ(CZ) IZ2924 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.326, year: 1999

  3. The Hippo/YAP pathway interacts with EGFR signaling and HPV oncoproteins to regulate cervical cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunbo; Mao, Dagan; Hua, Guohua; Lv, Xiangmin; Chen, Xingcheng; Angeletti, Peter C; Dong, Jixin; Remmenga, Steven W; Rodabaugh, Kerry J; Zhou, Jin; Lambert, Paul F; Yang, Peixin; Davis, John S; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size and tumorigenesis through a kinase cascade that inactivates Yes-associated protein (YAP). Here, we show that YAP plays a central role in controlling the progression of cervical cancer. Our results suggest that YAP expression is associated with a poor prognosis for cervical cancer. TGF-α and amphiregulin (AREG), via EGFR, inhibit the Hippo signaling pathway and activate YAP to induce cervical cancer cell proliferation and migration. Activated YAP allows for up-regulation of TGF-α, AREG, and EGFR, forming a positive signaling loop to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. HPV E6 protein, a major etiological molecule of cervical cancer, maintains high YAP protein levels in cervical cancer cells by preventing proteasome-dependent YAP degradation to drive cervical cancer cell proliferation. Results from human cervical cancer genomic databases and an accepted transgenic mouse model strongly support the clinical relevance of the discovered feed-forward signaling loop. Our study indicates that combined targeting of the Hippo and the ERBB signaling pathways represents a novel therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26417066

  4. Quantitative Measurement of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E5 Oncoprotein Levels in Epithelial Cell Lines by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahab, Ziad; Sudarshan, Sawali R.; Liu, Xuefeng; Zhang, YiYu; Kirilyuk, Alexander; Kamonjoh, Christopher M.; Simic, Vera; Dai, Yuhai; Byers, Stephen W.; Doorbar, John; Schlegel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E5 protein (16E5) induces tumors in a transgenic mouse model and may contribute to early stages of cervical carcinogenesis. Although high-risk E5 expression is generally thought to be lost during the progression to cervical carcinoma following integration of HPV DNA into the host genome, episomal viral DNA has been documented in a subset of HPV-16-positive malignant lesions. Numerous studies have shown that transcripts that could potentially encode 16E5 are present in cervical biopsy specimens and cervical cancer cell lines, but the presence of E5 protein has been demonstrated in only two reports that have not been corroborated. In the present study, we show that trypsin cleavage of 16E5 generates a unique four-amino-acid C-terminal peptide (FLIT) that serves as a marker for E5 expression in transfected cells and epithelial cell lines containing integrated and episomal HPV-16 DNA. Following trypsin cleavage, reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to detect FLIT. Immunoprecipitation assays using a newly generated anti-16E5 antibody confirmed that 16E5 was solely responsible for the FLIT signal, and deuterated FLIT peptide provided an internal standard that enabled us to quantify the number of 16E5 molecules per cell. We show that 16E5 is expressed in the Caski but not in the SiHa cervical cancer cell line, suggesting that 16E5 may contribute to the malignant phenotype of some cervical cancers, even in cells exclusively containing an integrated HPV genome. PMID:22740411

  5. Production of human papillomavirus type16 E7 oncoprotein fused with ß-glucuronidase in transgenic tomato and potato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, Jindřich; Pavingerová, Daniela; Vlasák, Josef; Ludvíková, V.; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2007), s. 268-276 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/05/2092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : transgenic plants * human papillomavirus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  6. GCN5 acetylates and regulates the stability of the oncoprotein E2A-PBX1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, T; Lindberg, M J; Grander, D; Wallberg, A E

    2013-03-01

    The t(1;19) translocation in pediatric pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) fuses the genes, which encode the transcriptional activator E2A and homeobox pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (PBX1), resulting in expression of the chimeric transcription factor E2A-PBX1. E2A-PBX1 can promote cell transformation both in vitro and in vivo; however, the mechanisms by which E2A-PBX1 contributes to malignancy merit further investigation. In the current work we report, for the first time, a physical and functional interaction between the SPT3-TAFII31-GCN5L acetylase (STAGA) complex and E2A-PBX1. STAGA, and its acetyltransferase subunit GCN5, directly interacted with the E2A portion of E2A-PBX1. GCN5 acetylated E2A-PBX1 and increased the stability of E2A-PBX1 protein in cells. Moreover, the GCN5 inhibitor α-methylene-γ-butyrolactone 3 (MB-3) decreased E2A-PBX1 acetylation and E2A-PBX1 protein levels in leukemic cells, indicating that GCN5 inhibitors have potential value as therapeutic agents for ALL. In addition, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2 potentiates the degradation of E2A-PBX1. We suggest that dynamic regulation of E2A-PBX1 protein levels in vivo has a fundamental role in ALL.

  7. An RNA Aptamer Provides a Novel Approach for the Induction of Apoptosis by Targeting the HPV16 E7 Oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Forrest, Sophie; Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Bunka, David H. J.; Blair, G. Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus, which is a major causative agent of cervical cancer. Cellular transformation is associated with deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E7 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including the cell cycle control protein pRb. In this study, RNA aptamers (small, single-stranded oligonucleotides selected for high-affinity binding) to HPV16 E7 were employed as molecular tools to further investigate these protein-protein interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is focused on one aptamer (termed A2). Transfection of this molecule into HPV16-transformed cells resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation (shown using real-time cell electronic sensing and MTT assays) due to the induction of apoptosis (as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining). GST-pull down and bead binding assays were used to demonstrate that the binding of A2 required N-terminal residues of E7 known to be involved in interaction with the cell cycle control protein, pRb. Using a similar approach, A2 was shown to disrupt the interaction between E7 and pRb in vitro. Furthermore, transfection of HPV16-transformed cells with A2 appeared to result in the loss of E7 and rise in pRb levels, as observed by immunoblotting. Conclusions/Significance This paper includes the first characterisation of the effects of an E7 RNA aptamer in a cell line derived from a cervical carcinoma. Transfection of cells with A2 was correlated with the loss of E7 and the induction of apoptosis. Aptamers specific for a number of cellular and viral proteins have been documented previously; one aptamer (Macugen) is approved for clinical use and several others are in clinical trials. In addition to its role as a molecular tool, A2 could have further applications in the future. PMID:23738000

  8. An RNA aptamer provides a novel approach for the induction of apoptosis by targeting the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Nicol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 is a high-risk DNA tumour virus, which is a major causative agent of cervical cancer. Cellular transformation is associated with deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E7 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including the cell cycle control protein pRb. In this study, RNA aptamers (small, single-stranded oligonucleotides selected for high-affinity binding to HPV16 E7 were employed as molecular tools to further investigate these protein-protein interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study is focused on one aptamer (termed A2. Transfection of this molecule into HPV16-transformed cells resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation (shown using real-time cell electronic sensing and MTT assays due to the induction of apoptosis (as demonstrated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. GST-pull down and bead binding assays were used to demonstrate that the binding of A2 required N-terminal residues of E7 known to be involved in interaction with the cell cycle control protein, pRb. Using a similar approach, A2 was shown to disrupt the interaction between E7 and pRb in vitro. Furthermore, transfection of HPV16-transformed cells with A2 appeared to result in the loss of E7 and rise in pRb levels, as observed by immunoblotting. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper includes the first characterisation of the effects of an E7 RNA aptamer in a cell line derived from a cervical carcinoma. Transfection of cells with A2 was correlated with the loss of E7 and the induction of apoptosis. Aptamers specific for a number of cellular and viral proteins have been documented previously; one aptamer (Macugen is approved for clinical use and several others are in clinical trials. In addition to its role as a molecular tool, A2 could have further applications in the future.

  9. Protease activity of the API2–MALT1 fusion oncoprotein in MALT lymphoma development and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rosebeck, Shaun; Lucas, Peter C; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M

    2011-01-01

    Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a prototypical cancer that occurs in the setting of chronic inflammation and an important model for understanding how deregulated NF-κB transcriptional activity contributes to malignancy. Most gastric MALT lymphomas require ongoing antigenic stimulation for continued tumor growth, and Stage I disease is usually cured by eradicating the causative microorganism, Helicobacter pylori, with antibiotics. However, in a subset of MALT lymph...

  10. Requirement of the coiled-coil domain of PML-RARα oncoprotein for localization, sumoylation, and inhibition of monocyte differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-Eui; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jang-Mi; Kim, Seong-Tae; Han, Tae-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Homo-oligomerization via a coiled-coil (C-C) domain has been shown to be necessary for the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (RARα) fusion protein to acquire oncogenic potential in acute promyelocytic leukemia. We show here that PML(ΔC-C)-RARα, which contains a deletion in its C-C domain, is neither localized as characteristic microspeckles nor modified by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO). The absence of sumoylation of the ΔC-C mutant was due to the lack of binding to Ubc9, a SUMO conjugation enzyme. The integrity of RING finger domain was also needed for both sumoylation and microspeckle formation. In GAL4-DNA tethering assays, the ΔC-C mutant completely lost the inhibitory effect on retinoic acid (RA)-mediated transactivation. Furthermore, the expression of CD14 in U937 cells expressing the ΔC-C mutant in response to vitamin D3 was markedly higher than in cells expressing PML-RARα. However, the RA-mediated induction of C/EBPβ in cells expressing the ΔC-C mutant was comparable to that of control cells. Thus, our results suggest that the C-C domain-associated functions of sumoylation, localization as microspeckles, and the inhibition of monocyte differentiation all contribute to the oncogenic activity of PML-RARα

  11. Molecular basis for the anchoring of proto-oncoprotein Nup98 to the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuwe, Tobias; von Borzyskowski, Lennart Schada; Davenport, Andrew M; Hoelz, André

    2012-06-22

    The cytoplasmic filament nucleoporins of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are critically involved in nuclear export and remodeling of mRNA ribonucleoprotein particles and are associated with various human malignancies. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Nup98 C-terminal autoproteolytic domain, frequently missing from leukemogenic forms of the protein, in complex with the N-terminal domain of Nup82 and the C-terminal tail fragment of Nup159. The Nup82 β propeller serves as a noncooperative binding platform for both binding partners. Interaction of Nup98 with Nup82 occurs through a reciprocal exchange of loop structures. Strikingly, the same Nup98 groove promiscuously interacts with Nup82 and Nup96 in a mutually excusive fashion. Simultaneous disruption of both Nup82 interactions in yeast causes severe defects in mRNA export, while the severing of a single interaction is tolerated. Thus, the cytoplasmic filament network of the NPC is robust, consistent with its essential function in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Autophagy collaborates with ubiquitination to downregulate oncoprotein E2A/Pbx1 in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, N; Song, L; Lin, W; Cao, Y; Xu, F; Liu, S; Zhang, A; Wang, Z; Li, X; Fang, Y; Zhang, H; Zhao, W; Hu, S; Wang, J; Zhang, S

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for the most cancer incidences in children. We present here that autophagy is downregulated in pediatric B-ALL, suggesting a possible link between autophagy failure and pediatric B-ALL leukemogenesis. With a pediatric t(1;19) B-ALL xenograft mouse model, we show here that activation of autophagy by preventive administration of rapamycin improved the survival of leukemia animals by partial restoration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, whereas treatment of the animals with rapamycin caused leukemia bone marrow cell-cycle arrest. Activation of autophagy in vitro or in vivo by rapamycin or starvation downregulated oncogenic fusion protein E2A/Pbx1. Furthermore, E2A/Pbx1 was found to be colocalized with autophagy marker LC3 in autolysosomes and with ubiquitin in response to autophagy stimuli, whereas autophagy or ubiquitination inhibitor blocked these colocalizations. Together, our data suggest a collaborative action between autophagy and ubiquitination in the degradation of E2A/Pbx1, thereby revealing a novel strategy for targeted preventive or treatment therapy on the pediatric ALL

  13. Human papillomavirus E5 oncoproteins bind the A4 endoplasmic reticulum protein to regulate proliferative ability upon differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotnik Halavaty, Katarina; Regan, Jennifer; Mehta, Kavi; Laimins, Laimonis, E-mail: l-laimins@northwestern.edu

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect stratified epithelia and link their life cycles to epithelial differentiation. The HPV E5 protein plays a role in the productive phase of the HPV life cycle but its mechanism of action is still unclear. We identify a new binding partner of E5, A4, using a membrane-associated yeast-two hybrid system. The A4 protein co-localizes with HPV 31 E5 in perinuclear regions and forms complexes with E5 and Bap31. In normal keratinocytes, A4 is found primarily in basal cells while in HPV positive cells high levels of A4 are seen in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Reduction of A4 expression by shRNAs, enhanced HPV genome amplification and increased cell proliferation ability following differentiation but this was not seen in cells lacking E5. Our studies suggest that the A4 protein is an important E5 binding partner that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation ability upon differentiation. - Highlights: • A4 associates with HPV 31 E5 proteins. • A4 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum. • HPV proteins induce A4 expression in suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. • E5 is important for proliferation ability of differentiating HPV positive cells.

  14. The human papillomavirus type 58 E7 oncoprotein modulates cell cycle regulatory proteins and abrogates cell cycle checkpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weifang; Li Jing; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Zhao Weiming; Yu Xiuping; Chen, Jason J.

    2010-01-01

    HPV type 58 (HPV-58) is the third most common HPV type in cervical cancer from Eastern Asia, yet little is known about how it promotes carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that HPV-58 E7 significantly promoted the proliferation and extended the lifespan of primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). HPV-58 E7 abrogated the G1 and the postmitotic checkpoints, although less efficiently than HPV-16 E7. Consistent with these observations, HPV-58 E7 down-regulated the cellular tumor suppressor pRb to a lesser extent than HPV-16 E7. Similar to HPV-16 E7 expressing PHKs, Cdk2 remained active in HPV-58 E7 expressing PHKs despite the presence of elevated levels of p53 and p21. Interestingly, HPV-58 E7 down-regulated p130 more efficiently than HPV-16 E7. Our study demonstrates a correlation between the ability of down-regulating pRb/p130 and abrogating cell cycle checkpoints by HPV-58 E7, which also correlates with the biological risks of cervical cancer progression associated with HPV-58 infection.

  15. The Drosophila orthologue of the INT6 onco-protein regulates mitotic microtubule growth and kinetochore structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioranna Renda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available INT6/eIF3e is a highly conserved component of the translation initiation complex that interacts with both the 26S proteasome and the COP9 signalosome, two complexes implicated in ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. The INT6 gene was originally identified as the insertion site of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, and later shown to be involved in human tumorigenesis. Here we show that depletion of the Drosophila orthologue of INT6 (Int6 results in short mitotic spindles and deformed centromeres and kinetochores with low intra-kinetochore distance. Poleward flux of microtubule subunits during metaphase is reduced, although fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP demonstrates that microtubules remain dynamic both near the kinetochores and at spindle poles. Mitotic progression is delayed during metaphase due to the activity of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Interestingly, a deubiquitinated form of the kinesin Klp67A (a putative orthologue of human Kif18A accumulates near the kinetochores in Int6-depleted cells. Consistent with this finding, Klp67A overexpression mimics the Int6 RNAi phenotype. Furthermore, simultaneous depletion of Int6 and Klp67A results in a phenotype identical to RNAi of just Klp67A, which indicates that Klp67A deficiency is epistatic over Int6 deficiency. We propose that Int6-mediated ubiquitination is required to control the activity of Klp67A. In the absence of this control, excess of Klp67A at the kinetochore suppresses microtubule plus-end polymerization, which in turn results in reduced microtubule flux, spindle shortening, and centromere/kinetochore deformation.

  16. New Insights into DNA Recognition by Zinc Fingers Revealed by Structural Analysis of the Oncoprotein ZNF217*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevenne, Marylène; Jacques, David A.; Artuz, Crisbel; Nguyen, Cuong Dinh; Kwan, Ann H. Y.; Segal, David J.; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Crossley, Merlin; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.

    2013-01-01

    Classical zinc fingers (ZFs) are one of the most abundant and best characterized DNA-binding domains. Typically, tandem arrays of three or more ZFs bind DNA target sequences with high affinity and specificity, and the mode of DNA recognition is sufficiently well understood that tailor-made ZF-based DNA-binding proteins can be engineered. We have shown previously that a two-zinc finger unit found in the transcriptional coregulator ZNF217 recognizes DNA but with an affinity and specificity that is lower than other ZF arrays. To investigate the basis for these differences, we determined the structure of a ZNF217-DNA complex. We show that although the overall position of the ZFs on the DNA closely resembles that observed for other ZFs, the side-chain interaction pattern differs substantially from the canonical model. The structure also reveals the presence of two methyl-π interactions, each featuring a tyrosine contacting a thymine methyl group. To our knowledge, interactions of this type have not previously been described in classical ZF-DNA complexes. Finally, we investigated the sequence specificity of this two-ZF unit and discuss how ZNF217 might discriminate its target DNA sites in the cell. PMID:23436653

  17. Positive and negative regulation of cell proliferation by E2F-1: influence of protein level and human papillomavirus oncoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melillo, R M; Helin, K; Lowy, D R

    1994-01-01

    E2F-1 is a member of a family of transcription factors implicated in the activation of genes required for the progression through the S phase of the cell cycle. We have examined the biological activities of E2F-1 with short-term colony-forming assays and long-term immortalization assays. High...

  18. Human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein induces KDM6A and KDM6B histone demethylase expression and causes epigenetic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E; Crum, Christopher P; Münger, Karl

    2011-02-01

    Despite the availability of vaccines, human papillomavirus (HPV) infections remain a cause of significant cancer morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that HPV16 E7 associates with and diminishes E2F6-containing polycomb repressive complexes. Here, we show that repressive trimethyl marks on lysine 27 of histone 3, which are necessary for binding of polycomb repressive complexes, are decreased in HPV16 E7-expressing cells and HPV16-positive cervical lesions. This is caused by transcriptional induction of the KDM6A and KDM6B histone 3 lysine 27-specific demethylases. HPV16 E7-mediated KDM6B induction accounts for expression of the cervical cancer biomarker, p16(INK4A). Moreover, KDM6A- and KDM6B-responsive Homeobox genes are expressed at significantly higher levels, suggesting that HPV16 E7 results in reprogramming of host epithelial cells. These effects are independent of the ability of E7 to inhibit the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein. Most importantly, these effects are reversed when E7 expression is silenced, indicating that this pathway may have prognostic and/or therapeutic significance.

  19. SIX1 Oncoprotein as a Biomarker in a Model of Hormonal Carcinogenesis and in Human Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oncofetal protein sine oculis-related homeobox 1 (SIX1) is a developmental transcription factor associated with carcinogenesis in animal models and humans. In a model of hormonal carcinogenesis, mice neonatally exposed to the soy phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN), or the synthet...

  20. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Oncoprotein LMP1 by Transcription Factors AP-2 and Early B Cell Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Chieko; Narita, Yohei; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Ashio, Keiji; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kanda, Teru; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Tsurumi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is a major oncogene essential for primary B cell transformation by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Previous studies suggested that some transcription factors, such as PU.1, RBP-Jκ, NF-κB, and STAT, are involved in this expression, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we identified binding sites for PAX5, AP-2, and EBF in the proximal LMP1 promoter (ED-L1p). We first confirmed the significance of PU.1 and POU domain transcription factor binding for activation of the promoter in latency III. We then focused on the transcription factors AP-2 and early B cell factor (EBF). Interestingly, among the three AP-2-binding sites in the LMP1 promoter, two motifs were also bound by EBF. Overexpression, knockdown, and mutagenesis in the context of the viral genome indicated that AP-2 plays an important role in LMP1 expression in latency II in epithelial cells. In latency III B cells, on the other hand, the B cell-specific transcription factor EBF binds to the ED-L1p and activates LMP1 transcription from the promoter. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is crucial for B cell transformation and oncogenesis of other EBV-related malignancies, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and T/NK lymphoma. Its expression is largely dependent on the cell type or condition, and some transcription factors have been implicated in its regulation. However, these previous reports evaluated the significance of specific factors mostly by reporter assay. In this study, we prepared point-mutated EBV at the binding sites of such transcription factors and confirmed the importance of AP-2, EBF, PU.1, and POU domain factors. Our results will provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the major oncogene LMP1. PMID:26819314

  1. Structure- and ligand-based virtual screening identifies new scaffolds for inhibitors of the oncoprotein MDM2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R Houston

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the field of ligand discovery is to identify chemically useful fragments that can be developed into inhibitors of specific protein-protein interactions. Low molecular weight fragments (with molecular weight less than 250 Da are likely to bind weakly to a protein's surface. Here we use a new virtual screening procedure which uses a combination of similarity searching and docking to identify chemically tractable scaffolds that bind to the p53-interaction site of MDM2. The binding has been verified using capillary electrophoresis which has proven to be an excellent screening method for such small, weakly binding ligands.

  2. Exploiting the Novel Repressed Transactivator Assay to Identify Protein Interactors and Peptide Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental research clearly shows that the product of the c-myc oncogene is often expressed at elevated levels in a large number of breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis, high-risk disease...

  3. Differential Mechanisms for SHP2 Binding and Activation Are Exploited by Geographically Distinct Helicobacter pylori CagA Oncoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeru Hayashi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori East Asian CagA is more closely associated with gastric cancer than Western CagA. Here we show that, upon tyrosine phosphorylation, the East Asian CagA-specific EPIYA-D segment binds to the N-SH2 domain of pro-oncogenic SHP2 phosphatase two orders of magnitude greater than Western CagA-specific EPIYA-C. This high-affinity binding is achieved via cryptic interaction between Phe at the +5 position from phosphotyrosine in EPIYA-D and a hollow on the N-SH2 phosphopeptide-binding floor. Also, duplication of EPIYA-C in Western CagA, which increases gastric cancer risk, enables divalent high-affinity binding with SHP2 via N-SH2 and C-SH2. These strong CagA bindings enforce enzymatic activation of SHP2, which endows cells with neoplastic traits. Mechanistically, N-SH2 in SHP2 is in an equilibrium between stimulatory “relaxed” and inhibitory “squeezed” states, which is fixed upon high-affinity CagA binding to the “relaxed” state that stimulates SHP2. Accordingly, East Asian CagA and Western CagA exploit distinct mechanisms for SHP2 deregulation.

  4. Comparison of human memory CD8 T cell responses to adenoviral early and late proteins in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Joshi

    Full Text Available Treatment of invasive adenovirus (Ad disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT recipients with capsid protein hexon-specific donor T cells is under investigation. We propose that cytotoxic T cells (CTLs targeted to the late protein hexon may be inefficient in vivo because the early Ad protein E3-19K downregulates HLA class I antigens in infected cells. In this study, CD8+ T cells targeted to highly conserved HLA A2-restricted epitopes from the early regulatory protein DNA polymerase (P-977 and late protein hexon (H-892 were compared in peripheral blood (PB and tonsils of naturally infected adults. In tonsils, epitope-specific pentamers detected a significantly higher frequency of P-977+CD8+ T cells compared to H-892+CD8+ T cells; this trend was reversed in PB. Tonsil epitope-specific CD8+ T cells expressed IFN-γ and IL-2 but not perforin or TNF-α, whereas PB T cells were positive for IFN-γ, TNF-α, and perforin. Tonsil epitope-specific T cells expressed lymphoid homing marker CCR7 and exhibited lower levels of the activation marker CD25 but higher proliferative potential than PB T cells. Finally, in parallel with the kinetics of mRNA expression, P-977-specific CTLs lysed targets as early as 8 hrs post infection. In contrast, H-892-specific CTLs did not kill unless infected fibroblasts were pretreated with IFN-γ to up regulate HLA class I antigens, and cytotoxicity was delayed until 16-24 hours. These data show that, in contrast to hexon CTLs, central memory type DNA polymerase CTLs dominate the lymphoid compartment and kill fibroblasts earlier after infection without requiring exogenous IFN-γ. Thus, use of CTLs targeted to both early and late Ad proteins may improve the efficacy of immunotherapy for life-threatening Ad disease in SCT recipients.

  5. A Targeted Mulifunctional Platform for Imaging and Treatment of Breast Cancer and Its Metastases Based on Adenoviral Vectors and Magnetic Nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Everts, Maaike

    2008-01-01

    ...) techniques and tumor treatment by heating after exposure to an alternating magnetic field. However, selective targeting of the nanoparticles to the tumor cells needs to be accomplished before the imaging or therapy can be successful...

  6. A Targeted Multifunctional Platform for Imaging and Treatment of Breast Cancer and Its Metastases Based on Adenoviral Vectors and Magnetic Nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Everts, Maaike; Saini, Vaibhav

    2007-01-01

    ...) techniques and tumor treatment by heating after exposure to an alternating magnetic field. However, selective targeting of the nanoparticles to the tumor cells needs to be accomplished before the imaging or therapy can be successful...

  7. Induction of Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer by Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer of the Transcription Factor E2F-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, Kelly K

    2000-01-01

    ... and evaluated our results using a two- dimensional isobologram statistical analysis. We observed marked synergistic growth inhibitory effects in breast cancer cell lines treated with a low-dose of adenovirus E2F-1 and low doses of Taxol or doxorubicin...

  8. Enhanced Differentiation of Three-Gene-Reprogrammed Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into Adipocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated PGC-1α Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Chen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells formed by the introduction of only three factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (3-gene iPSCs, may provide a safer option for stem cell-based therapy than iPSCs conventionally introduced with four-gene iPSCs. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α plays an important role during brown fat development. However, the potential roles of PGC-1α in regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and the differentiation of iPSCs are still unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated PGC-1α overexpression in 3-gene iPSCs. PGC-1α overexpression resulted in increased mitochondrial mass, reactive oxygen species production, and oxygen consumption. Microarray-based bioinformatics showed that the gene expression pattern of PGC-1α-overexpressing 3-gene iPSCs resembled the expression pattern observed in adipocytes. Furthermore, PGC-1α overexpression enhanced adipogenic differentiation and the expression of several brown fat markers, including uncoupling protein-1, cytochrome C, and nuclear respiratory factor-1, whereas it inhibited the expression of the white fat marker uncoupling protein-2. Furthermore, PGC-1α overexpression significantly suppressed osteogenic differentiation. These data demonstrate that PGC-1α directs the differentiation of 3-gene iPSCs into adipocyte-like cells with features of brown fat cells. This may provide a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders and obesity.

  9. Comparison of human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression between lentiviral and adenoviral vectors in rat mesenchymal stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, So Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Heui Ran; Kim, Hyun Joo; Chung, June Key; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of transgene expression within stem cells between lentivirus and adenovirus-mediated delivery systems has not been done. Here, we evaluated the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression in rat mesenchymal stem cell (rMSC) transduced by lentivirus or adenovirus, and compared the hNIS expression quantitatively between the two delivery systems. Lentiviral-mediated stably hNIS expressing rMSC (lenti-hNIS-rMSC) was constructed by cloning the hNIS gene into pLenti6/UbC/V5-DEST (Invitrogen) to obtain pLenti-hNIS, transducing rMSC with the pLenti-hNIS, and selecting with blasticidin for 3 weeks. Recombinant adenovirus expressing hNIS gene (Rad-hNIS) was produced by homologous recombination and Rad-hNIS transduced rMSC (adeno-hNIS-rMSC) was evaluated for the hNIS expression 48 hours post infection at MOI 1, 5, 20, 50, and 100. The hNIS expression in lenti-hNIS-rMSC or adeno-hNIS-rMSC was assessed by immunocytochemistry, western blot, and I-125 uptake. Immunocytochemistry using mono-clonal anti-hNIS antibody revealed that intensity of hNIS immunoreactivity in lenti-hNIS-rMSC was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOl 20 but lower than that at MOl 50. Western blot analysis also showed that lenti-hNIS-rMSC was intermediate between adeno-hNIS-rMSCs at MOl 20 and 50 in hNIS expression. However in vitro I-125 uptake test demonstrated that iodide uptake in lenti-hNIS-rMSC (297046659 picomole/106 cells) was greater than that in adeno-hNIS-rMSC at MOI 100 (61682134 picomole/106 cells). These results suggest that lentivirus mediated hNIS expression is greater in terms of hNIS function but lower in terms of hNIS protein amount than adenovirus mediated hNIS expression 48 hours post infection. Stem cell tracking using hNIS as a reporter gene should be conducted in consideration of relative viral efficiency of transgene expression

  10. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chunxia [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Yi, Bin, E-mail: yibin1974@163.com [Department of Anesthesia, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Bai, Li [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Xia, Yongzhi [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Feng, Hua [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  11. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  12. Recovery of radiation-induced dry eye and corneal damage by pretreatment with adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of erythropoietin to the salivary glands in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cotrim, Ana P; Zheng, Changyu; Riveros, Paola Perez; Baum, Bruce J; Chiorini, John A

    2013-04-01

    Therapeutic doses of radiation (RTx) causes dry eye syndrome (DES), dry mouth, and as in other sicca syndromes, they are incurable. The aims of this work are as follows: (a) to evaluate a mouse model of DES induced by clinically relevant doses of radiation, and (b) to evaluate the protective effect of erythropoietin (Epo) in preventing DES. C3H female mice were subjected to five sessions of RTx, with or without pre-RTx retroductal administration of the AdLTR2EF1a-hEPO (AdEpo) vector in the salivary glands (SG), and compared with naïve controls at Day 10 (10d) (8 Gy fractions) and 56 days (56d) (6 Gy fractions) after RTx treatment. Mice were tested for changes in lacrimal glands (LG), tear secretion (phenol red thread), weight, hematocrit (Hct), and markers of inflammation, as well as microvessels and oxidative damage. Tear secretion was reduced in both RTx groups, compared to controls, by 10d. This was also seen at 56d in RTx but not AdEpo+RTx group. Hct was significantly higher in all AdEpo+RTx mice at 10d and 56d. Corneal epithelium was significantly thinner at 10d in the RTx group compared with AdEpo+RTx or the control mice. There was a significant reduction at 10d in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-R2 in LG in the RTx group that was prevented in the AdEpo+RTx group. In conclusion, RTx is able to induce DES in mice. AdEpo administration protected corneal epithelia and resulted in some recovery of LG function, supporting the value of further studies using gene therapy for extraglandular diseases.

  13. Reduction of osteophyte formation and synovial thickening by adenoviral overexpression of transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein inhibitors during experimental osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharstuhl, A.; Vitters, E.L.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Berg, W.B. van den

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by osteophyte development, fibrosis, and articular cartilage damage. Effects of exogenous transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) isoforms and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) suggest a role for these growth factors in the

  14. Adenoviral vaccination combined with CD40 stimulation and CTLA-4 blockage can lead to complete tumor regression in a murine melanoma model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Maria Rathmann; Holst, Peter J; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard

    2010-01-01

    that the delay in tumor growth can be converted to complete regression and long-term survival in 30-40% of the mice by a booster vaccination plus combinational treatment with agonistic anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and anti-CTLA-4 mAb. Regarding the mechanism underlying the improved clinical effect......Therapeutic vaccination with replication deficient adenovirus expressing a viral antigen linked to invariant chain was recently found to markedly delay the growth of B16.F10 melanomas expressing the same antigen; however, complete regression of the tumors was never observed. Here we show....... These results indicate that even with a strong tumor vaccine candidate, combinatorial treatment may be required to obtain clinically relevant results....

  15. An adenoviral cancer vaccine co-encoding a tumor associated antigen together with secreted 4-1BBL leads to delayed tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2016-01-01

    with the previous reports of increased anti-cancer efficacy using systemically delivered 4-1BB agonists, we incorporated a secreted version of 4-1BBL (Fc-4-1BBL) in our vaccine and co-expressed it with the Ii linked to TAA. In tumor bearing mice, this vaccine initially delayed tumor growth and slightly increased......Previous studies have shown promising results when using an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody treatment against established tumors. While this is promising, this type of treatment can induce severe side effects. Therefore, we decided to incorporate the membrane form of 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL......) in a replicative deficient adenovirus vaccine expressing the invariant chain (Ii) adjuvant fused to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). The Ii adjuvant increases and prolongs TAA specific CD8+ T cells as previously shown and local expression of 4-1BBL was chosen to avoid the toxicity associated with systemic...

  16. STRO-1 selected rat dental pulp stem cells transfected with adenoviral-mediated human bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene show enhanced odontogenic differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Dolder, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells harbor great potential for tissue-engineering purposes. However, previous studies have shown variable results, and some have reported only limited osteogenic and odontogenic potential.Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-established agents to induce bone and

  17. A Targeted Multifunctional Platform for Imaging and Treatment of Breast Cancer and Its Metastases Based on Adenoviral Vectors and Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    purposes, including nanofabrication and development of diagnosis and detection tools. A variety of viruses, such as the phage M13 ,[19, 20] and the plant...for specific coupling of NPs to viral vector platforms would be optimal. In this regard, NPs have been coupled specifically to the bacteriophage M13 ...based on the affinity of peptides selected through phage display for binding QDs.[19, 20] However, phage can not be used for human gene therapy

  18. A Targeted Mulifunctional Platform for Imaging and Treatment of Breast Cancer and Its Metastases Based on Adenoviral Vectors and Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    coupled NPs specifically to the outer coat of bacteriophage M13 .[19,20] However, phages cannot be used for human gene therapy applications, especially...that polarize TAM into type II macro- phages , which act to suppress adaptive immunity (reviewed by Mantovani et al. (2002)). Hypoxic conditions

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitor FR901228 enhances the antitumor effect of telomerase-specific replication-selective adenoviral agent OBP-301 in human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takanori; Hioki, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Taki, Masaki; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Endo, Yoshikatsu; Urata, Yasuo; Tanaka, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2006-02-01

    Replication-competent oncolytic viruses are being developed for human cancer therapy. We previously reported that an attenuated adenovirus OBP-301 (Telomelysin), in which the human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter element drives expression of E1A and E1B genes linked with an internal ribosome entry site, could replicate in and causes selective lysis of human cancer cells. Infection efficiency in target cancer cells is the most important factor that predicts the antitumor effects of OBP-301. The objectives of this study are to examine the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor FR901228 on the level of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression and OBP-301-mediated oncolysis in human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Flow cytometric analysis revealed up-regulated CAR expression in A549 and H460 cells following treatment with 1 ng/ml of FR901228, which was associated with increased infection efficiency as confirmed by replication-deficient beta-galactosidase-expressing adenovirus vector. In contrast, neither CAR expression nor infection efficiency was affected by FR901228 in H1299 cells. To visualize and quantify viral replication in the presence of FR901228, we used OBP-401 (Telomelysin-GFP) that expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter in the E3 region. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that FR901228 increased GFP expression in A549 and H460 cells following OBP-401 infection in a dose-dependent manner, but this effect did not occur in H1299 cells. In addition, OBP-301 and FR901228 demonstrated a synergistic antitumor effect in A549 cells in vitro, as confirmed by isobologram analysis. Our data indicate that FR901228 preferentially increases adenovirus infectivity via up-regulation of CAR expression, leading to a profound oncolytic effect, which may have a significant impact on the outcome of adenovirus-based oncolytic virotherapy.

  20. Dendritic cell-mediated-immunization with xenogenic PrP and adenoviral vectors breaks tolerance and prolongs mice survival against experimental scrapie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Bruley Rosset

    Full Text Available In prion diseases, PrP(c, a widely expressed protein, is transformed into a pathogenic form called PrP(Sc, which is in itself infectious. Antibodies directed against PrP(c have been shown to inhibit PrP(c to PrP(Sc conversion in vitro and protect in vivo from disease. Other effectors with potential to eliminate PrPSc-producing cells are cytotoxic T cells directed against PrP-derived peptides but their ability to protect or to induce deleterious autoimmune reactions is not known. The natural tolerance to PrP(c makes difficult to raise efficient adaptive responses. To break tolerance, adenovirus (Ad encoding human PrP (hPrP or control Ad were administered to wild-type mice by direct injection or by transfer of Ad-transduced dendritic cells (DCs. Control Ad-transduced DCs from Tg650 mice overexpressing hPrP were also used for immunization. DC-mediated but not direct administration of AdhPrP elicited antibodies that bound to murine native PrP(c. Frequencies of PrP-specific IFNgamma-secreting T cells were low and in vivo lytic activity only targeted cells strongly expressing hPrP. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD3(+ T cell infiltration was similar in the brain of vaccinated and unvaccinated 139A-infected mice suggesting the absence of autoimmune reactions. Early splenic PrP(Sc replication was strongly inhibited ten weeks post infection and mean survival time prolonged from 209 days in untreated 139A-infected mice to 246 days in mice vaccinated with DCs expressing the hPrP. The efficacy appeared to be associated with antibody but not with cytotoxic cell-mediated PrP-specific responses.

  1. Measurement of feline cytokines interleukin-12 and interferon- g produced by heat inducible gene therapy adenoviral vector using real time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, F.; Avery, P.R.; Ullrich, R.L.; LaRue, S.M.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Li, C.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    Biologic tumor therapy using Interleukin-12 (IL-12) has shown promise as an adjuvant to radiation therapy. The goals for cancer gene immunotherapy include effective eradication of established tumors and generation of a lasting systemic immune response. Among the cytokines, IL-12 has been found to be most effective gene in eradicating experimental tumors, preventing the development of metastases, and eliciting long-term antitumor immunity. Depending on the tumor model, IL-12 can exert antitumor activities via T cells, NK cells or NKT cells. It induces the production of IFN-g and IFN-inducible protein-10. It is also postulated to have antiangiogenic effects, thus inhibiting tumor formation and metastases. However, its use in clinical trials has been restricted largely owing to its systemic hematologic and hepatotoxicity. We tested the efficacy of adenovirus mediated expression of feline IL-12 gene placed under the control of an inducible promoter, the heat shock proteins (hsp70B). This places gene expression under the control of an external physical agent (hyperthermia), thus offering an 'on-off' switch and potentially reducing systemic toxicity by restricting its expression locally to the tumor. Crandell Feline Kidney (CrFK) cells were infected using the construct and the supernatant was then used to stimulate production of interferon g (IFN-g) in feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As there is no commercially available ELISA kit currently available to detect or measure feline cytokines, we used real time-PCR to measure cytokine mRNA. These results will be used to initiate a clinical trial in cats with soft tissue sarcomas examining hyperthermia Induced gene therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy. The real time- PCR techniques developed here will be used to quantitatively measure cytokine mRNA levels in the punch biopsy samples obtained from the cats during the clinical trial. Support for this study was in part by NCI grant CA72745

  2. Immune efficacy of an adenoviral vector-based swine influenza vaccine against antigenically distinct H1N1 strains in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunpu; Yang, Dawei; Xu, Bangfeng; Liang, Wenhua; Sui, Jinyu; Chen, Yan; Yang, Huanliang; Chen, Hualan; Wei, Ping; Qiao, Chuanling

    2017-11-01

    Avian-like H1N1 swine influenza viruses are prevalent in pigs and have occasionally crossed the species barrier and infected humans, which highlights the importance of preventing swine influenza. Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) has been tested in human influenza vaccine clinical trials and has exhibited a reliable safety profile. Here, we generated a replication-defective, recombinant adenovirus (designated as rAd5-avH1HA) expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an avian-like H1N1 virus (A/swine/Zhejiang/199/2013, ZJ/199/13). Using a BALB/c mouse model, we showed that a two-dose intramuscular administration of recombinant rAd5-avH1HA induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition antibodies and prevented homologous and heterologous H1N1 virus-induced weight loss, as well as viral replication in the nasal turbinates and lungs of mice. Furthermore, a prime-boost immunization strategy trial with a recombinant plasmid (designated as pCAGGS-HA) followed by rAd5-avH1HA vaccine provided effective protection against homologous and heterologous H1N1 virus infection in mice. These results indicate that rAd5-avH1HA is an efficacious genetically engineered vaccine candidate against H1N1 swine influenza. Future studies should examine its immune efficacy in pigs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A fiber-modified adenoviral vector interacts with immunoevasion molecules of the B7 family at the surface of murine leukemia cells derived from dormant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogée Sophie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor cells can escape the immune system by overexpressing molecules of the B7 family, e.g. B7-H1 (PD-L1 or CD86, which suppresses the anti-tumor T-cell responses through binding to the PD-1 receptor, and similarly for B7.1 (CD80, through binding to CTLA-4. Moreover, direct interactions between B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules are also likely to participate in the immunoevasion mechanism. In this study, we used a mouse model of tumor dormancy, DA1-3b leukemia cells. We previously showed that a minor population of DA1-3b cells persists in equilibrium with the immune system for long periods of time, and that the levels of surface expression of B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules correlates with the dormancy time. We found that leukemia cells DA1-3b/d365 cells, which derived from long-term dormant tumors and overexpressed B7-H1 and B7.1 molecules, were highly permissive to Ad5FB4, a human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vector pseudotyped with chimeric human-bovine fibers. Both B7-H1 and B7.1 were required for Ad5FB4-cell binding and entry, since (i siRNA silencing of one or the other B7 gene transcript resulted in a net decrease in the cell binding and Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365; and (ii plasmid-directed expression of B7.1 and B7-H1 proteins conferred to Ad5FB4-refractory human cells a full permissiveness to this vector. Binding data and flow cytometry analysis suggested that B7.1 and B7-H1 molecules played different roles in Ad5FB4-mediated transduction of DA1-3b/d365, with B7.1 involved in cell attachment of Ad5FB4, and B7-H1 in Ad5FB4 internalization. BRET analysis showed that B7.1 and B7-H1 formed heterodimeric complexes at the cell surface, and that Ad5FB4 penton, the viral capsomere carrying the fiber projection, could negatively interfere with the formation of B7.1/B7-H1 heterodimers, or modify their conformation. As interactors of B7-H1/B7.1 molecules, Ad5FB4 particles and/or their penton capsomeres represent potential therapeutic agents targeting cancer cells that had developed immunoevasion mechanisms.

  4. Transduction of brain dopamine neurons by adenoviral vectors is modulated by CAR expression: rationale for tropism modified vectors in PD gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Lewis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based therapy is a new paradigm for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD and offers considerable promise for precise targeting and flexibility to impact multiple pathobiological processes for which small molecule agents are not available. Some success has been achieved utilizing adeno-associated virus for this approach, but it is likely that the characteristics of this vector system will ultimately create barriers to progress in clinical therapy. Adenovirus (Ad vector overcomes limitations in payload size and targeting. The cellular tropism of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5-based vectors is regulated by the Ad attachment protein binding to its primary cellular receptor, the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR. Many clinically relevant tissues are refractory to Ad5 infection due to negligible CAR levels but can be targeted by tropism-modified, CAR-independent forms of Ad. Our objective was to evaluate the role of CAR protein in transduction of dopamine (DA neurons in vivo.Ad5 was delivered to the substantia nigra (SN in wild type (wt and CAR transgenic animals. Cellular tropism was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in the SN and striatal terminals. CAR expression was assessed by western blot and IHC. We found in wt animals, Ad5 results in robust transgene expression in astrocytes and other non-neuronal cells but poor infection of DA neurons. In contrast, in transgenic animals, Ad5 infects SNc neurons resulting in expression of transduced protein in their striatal terminals. Western blot showed low CAR expression in the ventral midbrain of wt animals compared to transgenic animals. Interestingly, hCAR protein localizes with markers of post-synaptic structures, suggesting synapses are the point of entry into dopaminergic neurons in transgenic animals.These findings demonstrate that CAR deficiency limits infection of wild type DA neurons by Ad5 and provide a rationale for the development of tropism-modified, CAR-independent Ad-vectors for use in gene therapy of human PD.

  5. Induction of PD-L1 Expression by the EML4-ALK Oncoprotein and Downstream Signaling Pathways in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Keiichi; Azuma, Koichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Hattori, Satoshi; Iwama, Eiji; Tanizaki, Junko; Harada, Taishi; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Takayama, Koichi; Takamori, Shinzo; Kage, Masayoshi; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Okamoto, Isamu

    2015-09-01

    Therapies targeted to the immune checkpoint mediated by PD-1 and PD-L1 show antitumor activity in a subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have now examined PD-L1 expression and its regulation in NSCLC positive for the EML4-ALK fusion gene. The expression of PD-L1 at the protein and mRNA levels in NSCLC cell lines was examined by flow cytometry and by reverse transcription and real-time PCR analysis, respectively. The expression of PD-L1 in 134 surgically resected NSCLC specimens was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. The PD-L1 expression level was higher in NSCLC cell lines positive for EML4-ALK than in those negative for the fusion gene. Forced expression of EML4-ALK in Ba/F3 cells markedly increased PD-L1 expression, whereas endogenous PD-L1 expression in EML4-ALK-positive NSCLC cells was attenuated by treatment with the specific ALK inhibitor alectinib or by RNAi with ALK siRNAs. Furthermore, expression of PD-L1 was downregulated by inhibitors of the MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways in NSCLC cells positive for either EML4-ALK or activating mutations of the EGFR. Finally, the expression level of PD-L1 was positively associated with the presence of EML4-ALK in NSCLC specimens. Our findings that both EML4-ALK and mutant EGFR upregulate PD-L1 by activating PI3K-AKT and MEK-ERK signaling pathways in NSCLC reveal a direct link between oncogenic drivers and PD-L1 expression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Radioimmunotherapy with an antibody to HPV16 E6 oncoprotein is effective in experimental cervical tumor expressing low levels of E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zewei; Wang, Xing Guo; Einstein, Mark H; Goldberg, Gary L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose HPV16 is associated with ∼50% of all cervical cancers worldwide. The E6 and E7 genes of oncogenic HPV types, such as HPV16, are necessary for the HPV transforming function and tumorogenesis making them ideal targets for novel treatments. Radioimmunotherapy employs systemically administered radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to tumor-associated antigens. Previously we demonstrated in mice that radioimmunotherapy targeting viral antigens with mAb to HPV16 E6 suppressed CasKi cervical tumors expressing high levels of E6 (∼600 copies of HPV per cell). However, that study opened the question whether radioimmunotherapy can suppress the growth of cervical tumors with low E6 and E7 expression, such as may be seen in patients. Experimental Design We evaluated the expression of E6 in patients' tumors and in the SiHa cell line expressing low levels of E6 and E7 (1–2 copies of HPV per cell) and found them comparable. We initiated SiHa tumors in nude mice, radiolabeled C1P5 mAb to E6 with a beta-emitter 188-Rhenium (188Re) and treated tumor-bearing mice with: (1) 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5 alone; (2) proteasome inhibitor MG132 alone; (3) MG132 followed by 200 µCi 188Re-C1P5; (4) unlabeled C1P5; (5) 200 µCi 188Re-18B7 (isotype-matching control mAb); (6) no treatment. 188Re-C1P5 alone and in combination with MG-132 significantly retarded tumor growth compared to all control groups. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the possibility to suppress tumor growth by targeting viral antigens even in cervical tumors with low E6 expression and provide additional evidence for the potential usefulness of radioimmunotherapy targeting HPV-related antigens in the clinic. PMID:20861673

  7. Role of integrin-linked kinase in regulating the protein stability of the MUC1-C oncoprotein in pancreatic cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-L; Wu, H-Y; Chu, P-C; Lai, I-L; Huang, P-H; Kulp, S K; Pan, S-L; Teng, C-M; Chen, C-S

    2017-01-01

    MUC1-C overexpression has been associated with the progression of pancreatic tumors by promoting the aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As MUC1 is a STAT3 target gene, STAT3 plays a major role in regulating MUC1-C expression. In this study, we report an alternative mechanism by which integrin-linked kinase (ILK) post-transcriptionally modulates the expression of MUC1-C by maintaining its protein stability in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that ILK acts in concert with STAT3 to facilitate IL-6-mediated upregulation of MUC1-C; ILK depletion was equally effective as STAT3 depletion in abolishing IL-6-induced MUC1-C overexpression without disturbing the phosphorylation or cellular distribution of STAT3. Conversely, ectopic expression of constitutively active ILK increased MUC1-C expression, though this increase was not noted with kinase-dead ILK. This finding suggests the requirement of the kinase activity of ILK in regulating MUC1-C stability, which was confirmed by using the ILK kinase inhibitor T315. Furthermore, our data suggest the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC)δ in mediating the suppressive effect of ILK inhibition on MUC1-C repression. For example, co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that ILK depletion-mediated MUC1-C phosphorylation was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of PKCδ at the activation loop Thr-507 and increased binding of PKCδ to MUC1-C. Conversely, ILK overexpression resulted in decreased PKCδ phosphorylation. From a mechanistic perspective, the present finding, together with our recent report that ILK controls the expression of oncogenic KRAS through a regulatory loop, underscores the pivotal role of ILK in promoting pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:28692035

  8. Translation elongation factor eEF1A2 is a potential oncoprotein that is overexpressed in two-thirds of breast tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller William R

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue-specific translation elongation factor eEF1A2 was recently shown to be a potential oncogene that is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Although there is no direct evidence for an involvement of eEF1A2 in breast cancer, the genomic region to which EEF1A2 maps, 20q13, is frequently amplified in breast tumours. We therefore sought to establish whether eEF1A2 expression might be upregulated in breast cancer. Methods eEF1A2 is highly similar (98% to the near-ubiquitously expressed eEF1A1 (formerly known as EF1-α making analysis with commercial antibodies difficult. We have developed specific anti-eEF1A2 antibodies and used them in immunohistochemical analyses of tumour samples. We report the novel finding that although eEF1A2 is barely detectable in normal breast it is moderately to strongly expressed in two-thirds of breast tumours. This overexpression is strongly associated with estrogen receptor positivity. Conclusion eEF1A2 should be considered as a putative oncogene in breast cancer that may be a useful diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for a high proportion of breast tumours. The oncogenicity of eEF1A2 may be related to its role in protein synthesis or to its potential non-canonical functions in cytoskeletal remodelling or apoptosis.

  9. The oncoprotein v-Myb activates transcription of Gremlin 2 during in vitro differentiation of the chicken neural crest to melanoblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starostová, Michaela; Čermák, Vladimír; Dvořáková, Marta; Karafiát, Vít; Kosla, Jan; Dvořák, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 540, č. 1 (2014), s. 122-129 ISSN 0378-1119 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Melanocyte development * Tamoxifen-inducible v-Myb * v-Myb-dependent genes * PRDC * KRT19 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.138, year: 2014

  10. Andrographolide downregulates the v-Src and Bcr-Abl oncoproteins and induces Hsp90 cleavage in the ROS-dependent suppression of cancer malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Hung; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Liang, Fong-Ping; Chen, Pei-Fen; Kuo, Cheng-Deng; Alam, Mohd Mujahid; Maiti, Barnali; Hung, Shih-Kai; Chi, Chin-Wen; Sun, Chung-Ming; Fu, Shu-Ling

    2014-01-15

    Andrographolide is a diterpenoid compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata that exhibits anticancer activity. We previously reported that andrographolide suppressed v-Src-mediated cellular transformation by promoting the degradation of Src. In the present study, we demonstrated the involvement of Hsp90 in the andrographolide-mediated inhibition of Src oncogenic activity. Using a proteomics approach, a cleavage fragment of Hsp90α was identified in andrographolide-treated cells. The concentration- and time-dependent induction of Hsp90 cleavage that accompanied the reduction in Src was validated in RK3E cells transformed with either v-Src or a human truncated c-Src variant and treated with andrographolide. In cancer cells, the induction of Hsp90 cleavage by andrographolide and its structural derivatives correlated well with decreased Src levels, the suppression of transformation, and the induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the andrographolide-induced Hsp90 cleavage, Src degradation, inhibition of transformation, and induction of apoptosis were abolished by a ROS inhibitor, N-acetyl-cysteine. Notably, Hsp90 cleavage, decreased levels of Bcr-Abl (another known Hsp90 client protein), and the induction of apoptosis were also observed in human K562 leukemia cells treated with andrographolide or its active derivatives. Together, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which andrographolide suppressed cancer malignancy that involved inhibiting Hsp90 function and reducing the levels of Hsp90 client proteins. Our results broaden the molecular basis of andrographolide-mediated anticancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Translation elongation factor eEF1A2 is a potential oncoprotein that is overexpressed in two-thirds of breast tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, Victoria AL; Newbery, Helen J; Wray, Naomi R; Jackson, Juliette; Larionov, Alexey; Miller, William R; Dixon, J Michael; Abbott, Catherine M

    2005-01-01

    The tissue-specific translation elongation factor eEF1A2 was recently shown to be a potential oncogene that is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Although there is no direct evidence for an involvement of eEF1A2 in breast cancer, the genomic region to which EEF1A2 maps, 20q13, is frequently amplified in breast tumours. We therefore sought to establish whether eEF1A2 expression might be upregulated in breast cancer. eEF1A2 is highly similar (98%) to the near-ubiquitously expressed eEF1A1 (formerly known as EF1-α) making analysis with commercial antibodies difficult. We have developed specific anti-eEF1A2 antibodies and used them in immunohistochemical analyses of tumour samples. We report the novel finding that although eEF1A2 is barely detectable in normal breast it is moderately to strongly expressed in two-thirds of breast tumours. This overexpression is strongly associated with estrogen receptor positivity. eEF1A2 should be considered as a putative oncogene in breast cancer that may be a useful diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for a high proportion of breast tumours. The oncogenicity of eEF1A2 may be related to its role in protein synthesis or to its potential non-canonical functions in cytoskeletal remodelling or apoptosis

  12. DNA-binding by oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is important for blocking differentiation but dispensable for fibroblast transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, M P; Wright, D D; Lu, Q

    1996-01-04

    The t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of pediatric pre-B cell lymphoblastic leukemia produces the E2A-PBX1 oncogene, which can transform fibroblasts, induce acute myeloid leukemia and T cell lymphomas in mice, and immortalize factor-dependent myeloid progenitors in cultured marrow. The homeodomain of Pbx1 binds ATCAATCAA, and while Pbx1 does not activate transcription through this motif, E2A-Pbx1 induces constitutive transactivation. Here, we investigate whether DNA-binding by Pbx1 or transcriptional activation by E2A are essential for the transforming abilities of E2A-Pbx1. Elimination of DNA-binding in E2A-Pbx1 by point mutations in the Pbx1 homeodomain or by large deletions that removed the Pbx1 homeodomain and carboxyl terminus did not alter ability of E2A-Pbx1 to induce focus-formation in fibroblast, even though these mutations completely eliminated its ability to activate transcription through the PRS. These same DNA-binding mutations, however, severely impaired or eliminated the ability of E2A-Pbx1 to immortalize factor-dependent myeloid progenitors in marrow cultures. Elimination of the first transcriptional activation domain of E2A abolished both fibroblast and myeloid transforming activities while elimination of the second altered neither of these activities. We conclude that DNA-binding is important for the ability of E2A-Pbx1 to disrupt differentiation, as evidenced in myeloblast immortalization, but dispensable for its ability to induce focus-formation, and that the aminoterminal domain of E2A, which strongly activates transcription, is essential for both transforming activities.

  13. A novel fibroblast growth factor gene expressed in the developing nervous system is a downstream target of the chimeric homeodomain oncoprotein E2A-Pbx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, J R; Goulding, M; Weiner, J A; Chun, J; Murre, C

    1997-09-01

    Pbx1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that has the ability to form heterodimers with homeodomain proteins encoded by the homeotic selector (Hox) gene complexes and increase their DNA-binding affinity and specificity. A current hypothesis proposes that interactions with Pbx1 are necessary for Hox proteins to regulate downstream target genes that in turn control growth, differentiation and morphogenesis during development. In pre B cell leukemias containing the t(1;19) chromosome translocation, Pbx1 is converted into a strong transactivator by fusion to the activation domain of the bHLH transcription factor E2A. The E2A-Pbx1 fusion protein should therefore activate transcription of genes normally regulated by Pbx1. We have used the subtractive process of representational difference analysis to identify targets of E2A-Pbx1. We show that E2A-Pbx1 can directly activate transcription of a novel member of the fibroblast growth factor family of intercellular signalling molecules, FGF-15. The FGF-15 gene is expressed in a regionally restricted pattern in the developing nervous system, suggesting that FGF-15 may play an important role in regulating cell division and patterning within specific regions of the embryonic brain, spinal cord and sensory organs.

  14. Oncoprotein E2A-Pbx1 immortalizes a myeloid progenitor in primary marrow cultures without abrogating its factor-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, M P; Wright, D D

    1994-11-01

    E2A-PBX1 is a chimeric homeobox oncogene formed by the t(1;19) translocation of human pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In a previous study, we found that retroviral expression of E2A-Pbx1 in the marrow of reconstituted mice induced the formation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in vivo. Here, we report that E2A-Pbx1 can also immortalize myeloid progenitors in vitro, and that the outgrowth of immortalized myeloblasts is evident only in the presence of the myeloid lymphokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). When cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, responsive myeloblasts from normal marrow exhibit concurrent proliferation and differentiation, and undergo terminal differentiation into non-mitotic neutrophils and macrophages within 4 weeks. Infection of identical cultures with a retrovirus encoding E2A-Pbx1 produces a rapid outgrowth of myeloid progenitors that express high levels of E2A-Pbx1 protein. A small fraction of myeloblasts in each population exhibited limited differentiation to neutrophils, and all populations of myeloblasts retained a strict dependence on GM-CSF for both survival and proliferation. This data suggests that the function of E2A-Pbx1 in leukemias is to strongly retard differentiation without affecting growth-factor dependence.

  15. mAngiogenin-3, a target gene of oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1, encodes a new angiogenic member of the angiogenin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X; Roberts, W G; Nobile, V; Shapiro, R; Kamps, M P

    1999-01-01

    Angiogenins are proteins in the pancreatic ribonuclease superfamily that utilize their ribonuclease activity to induce formation of new blood vessels. Recently we identified a new member of the angiogenin gene family, mouse angiogenin-3, by virtue of its transcriptional activation in NIH3T3 fibroblasts coincident with transformation by the chimeric leukemia oncogene, E2a-Pbx1. Here we have isolated the cDNA encoding mouse angiogenin-3 and used it to produce the protein in E. coli. We demonstrate that mouse angiogenin-3 is a ribonuclease whose activity and specificity towards tRNA and dinucleotide substrates differ from those of mouse angiogenin or of mouse angiogenin-related protein, a non-angiogenic factor. Mouse angiogenin-3 induced angiogenesis in both the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay and the rat cremaster muscle. Electron microscopy revealed that endothelial cells within vessels induced by both mouse angiogenin-3 and mouse angiogenin contain fenestrations similar to those observed in endothelial cells from neovasculature induced by vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Mouse angiogenin-3 also induced other molecular events typical of rapidly proliferating endothelial cells, such as increases in rough endoplasmic reticulum, polysomes, and mitochondria.

  16. MHC class I+ and class I(-)HPV16-associated tumours expressing the E7 oncoprotein do not cross-react in immunization/challenge experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šímová, Jana; Mikyšková, Romana; Vonka, V.; Bieblová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan; Jandlová, Táňa

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2003, č. 49 (2003), s. 230-234 ISSN 0015-5500 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV 16 * MHC class I expression * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.527, year: 2003

  17. NUP98-PHF23 is a chromatin modifying oncoprotein that causes a wide array of leukemias sensitive to inhibition of PHD domain histone reader function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Sheryl M; Lee, Fan; Yang, Fan; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yeulin J; Pineda, Marbin; Onozawa, Masahiro; Chung, Yang Jo; Bilke, Sven; Wagner, Elise K; Denu, John M; Ning, Yi; Xu, Bowen; Wang, Gang Greg; Meltzer, Paul S; Aplan, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we show that expression of a NUP98-PHF23 (NP23) fusion, associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in humans, leads to myeloid, erythroid, T-cell, and B-cell leukemia in mice. The leukemic and pre-leukemic tissues display a stem cell-like expression signature including Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1 genes. The PHF23 PHD domain is known to bind H3K4me3 residues, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the NP23 protein bound chromatin at a specific subset of H3K4me3 sites, including Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1. Treatment of NP23 cells with disulfiram, which inhibits the binding of PHD domains to H3K4me3 residues, rapidly and selectively killed NP23 myeloblasts; cell death was preceded by decreased expression of Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1. Furthermore, AML driven by a related fusion gene, NUP98-JARID1A (NJL), was also sensitive to disulfiram. Thus, the NP23 mouse provides a platform to evaluate compounds that disrupt binding of oncogenic PHD proteins to H3K4me3. PMID:24535671

  18. NUP98-PHF23 is a chromatin-modifying oncoprotein that causes a wide array of leukemias sensitive to inhibition of PHD histone reader function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Sheryl M; Lee, Fan; Yang, Fan; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yeulin J; Pineda, Marbin; Onozawa, Masahiro; Chung, Yang Jo; Bilke, Sven; Wagner, Elise K; Denu, John M; Ning, Yi; Xu, Bowen; Wang, Gang Greg; Meltzer, Paul S; Aplan, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    In this report, we show that expression of a NUP98-PHF23 (NP23) fusion, associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in humans, leads to myeloid, erythroid, T-cell, and B-cell leukemia in mice. The leukemic and preleukemic tissues display a stem cell-like expression signature, including Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1 genes. The PHF23 plant homeodomain (PHD) motif is known to bind to H3K4me3 residues, and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the NP23 protein binds to chromatin at a specific subset of H3K4me3 sites, including at Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1. Treatment of NP23 cells with disulfiram, which inhibits the binding of PHD motifs to H3K4me3, rapidly and selectively killed NP23-expressing myeloblasts; cell death was preceded by decreased expression of Hoxa, Hoxb, and Meis1. Furthermore, AML driven by a related fusion gene, NUP98-JARID1A (NJL), was also sensitive to disulfiram. Thus, the NP23 mouse provides a platform to evaluate compounds that disrupt binding of oncogenic PHD proteins to H3K4me3.

  19. Enhancement of T cell-mediated and humoral immunity of beta-glucuronidase-based DNA vaccines against HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmahel, M.; Poláková, I.; Pokorná, D.; Ludvíková, V.; Dušková, M.; Vlasák, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 1 (2008), s. 93-102 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/05/2092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : immunogenicity * anti-E7 vaccines Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.234, year: 2008

  20. Enhancement of T cell-mediated and humoral immunity of beta-glucuronidase-based DNA vaccines against HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmahel, M.; Poláková, I.; Pokorná, D.; Ludvíková, V.; Dušková, M.; Vlasák, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2008), S60 ISSN 0022-1732. [ HPV in Human Pathology :International Conference. 01.05.2008-03.05.2008, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/05/2092; GA MZd NR9246 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : oncology * beta-glucuronidase * T cell Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  1. A promoter within the E6 ORF of human papillomavirus type 16 contributes to the expression of the E7 oncoprotein from a monocistronic mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Hansen, Christina N; Vinther, Jeppe

    2003-01-01

    is not very abundant, but we have shown that an E7-luciferase fusion protein can be expressed in SiHa cells from a monocistronic HPV-16 transcript initiated at nt 542. The monocistronic mRNA expresses E7-luciferase more efficiently than the most abundant in vivo-like mRNA E6*IE7, initiated by P97 and spliced...... that encodes E7 as the first open reading frame (ORF) has been identified. We recently identified a transcription initiation site within the E6 ORF of HPV-16 at nt 542. In the present study we have characterized the P542 promoter, which putatively controls monocistronic expression of E7. The monocistronic mRNA...... from nt 226 to 409. Furthermore, the translation initiation of E7 is most abundant from the monocistronic mRNA. We have also shown that the P542 promoter is downregulated by the transcription factor activator protein 4 (AP-4) and the differentiation-dependent factor hSkn-1a, both binding downstream...

  2. Oncoprotein AEG-1 is an Endoplasmic Reticulum RNA Binding Protein Whose Interactome is Enriched In Organelle Resident Protein-Encoding mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Hoffman, Alyson M; Sarkar, Devanand; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2018-02-07

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), an oncogene whose overexpression promotes tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, and enhanced chemoresistance, is thought to function primarily as a scaffolding protein, regulating PI3K/Akt and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Here we report that AEG-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident integral membrane RNA-binding protein (RBP). Examination of the AEG-1 RNA interactome by HITS-CLIP and PAR-CLIP methodologies revealed a high enrichment for endomembrane organelle-encoding transcripts, most prominently those encoding ER resident proteins, and within this cohort, for integral membrane protein-encoding RNAs. Cluster mapping of the AEG-1/RNA interaction sites demonstrated a normalized rank order interaction of coding sequence > 5' untranslated region, with 3' untranslated region interactions only weakly represented. Intriguingly, AEG-1/membrane protein mRNA interaction sites clustered downstream of encoded transmembrane domains, suggestive of a role in membrane protein biogenesis. Secretory and cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs were also represented in the AEG-1 RNA interactome, with the latter category notably enriched in genes functioning in mRNA localization, translational regulation, and RNA quality control. Bioinformatic analyses of RNA binding motifs and predicted secondary structure characteristics indicate that AEG-1 lacks established RNA binding sites though shares the property of high intrinsic disorder commonly seen in RBPs. These data implicate AEG-1 in the localization and regulation of secretory and membrane protein-encoding mRNAs and provide a framework for understanding AEG-1 function in health and disease. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Expression of a recombinant Human papillomavirus 16 E6GT oncoprotein fused to N- and C-termini of Potato virus X coat protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeřovská, Noemi; Moravec, Tomáš; Hoffmeisterová, Hana; Plchová, Helena; Synková, Helena; Poláková, I.; Dušková, M.; Šmahel, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2013), s. 81-90 ISSN 0167-6857 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/09/1525; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/1761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Transient expression * Molecular farming * Potato virus X Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.612, year: 2013

  4. CRM1-mediated nuclear export is required for 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation of the TRIP-Br2 proto-oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Gunaratnam, Lakshman; Hsu, Stephen I-Hong

    2008-04-25

    Overexpression of the proto-oncogene TRIP-Br2 (SERTAD2) has been shown to induce E2F activity and promote tumorigenesis, whereas ablation of TRIP-Br2 arrests cell proliferation. Timely degradation of many cell cycle regulators is fundamental to the maintenance of proper cell cycle progression. Here we report novel mechanism(s) that govern the tight regulation of TRIP-Br2 levels during cell cycle progression. TRIP-Br2 was observed to be a short-lived protein in which the expression level peaks at the G(1)/S boundary. TRIP-Br2 accumulated in cells treated with 26 S proteasome inhibitors. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TRIP-Br2 forms ubiquitin conjugates. In silico analysis identified a putative leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) motif that overlaps with the PHD-Bromo interaction domain in the acidic C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of TRIP-Br2. This NES motif is highly conserved in widely divergent species and in all TRIP-Br family members. TRIP-Br2 was shown to be stabilized in G(2)/M phase cells through nuclear entrapment, either by deletion of the acidic C-terminal TAD, which includes the NES motif, or by leptomycin B-mediated inhibition of the CRM1-dependent nuclear export machinery. Mutation of leucine residue 238 of this NES motif abolished the interaction between CRM1 and TRIP-Br2, as well as the nuclear export of TRIP-Br2 and its subsequent 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation. These data suggest that CRM1-mediated nuclear export may be required for the proper execution of ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation of TRIP-Br2.

  5. A promoter within the E6 ORF of human papillomavirus type 16 contributes to the expression of the E7 oncoprotein from a monocistronic mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Hansen, Christina N; Vinther, Jeppe

    2003-01-01

    RNA that encodes E7 as the first open reading frame (ORF) has been identified. We recently identified a transcription initiation site within the E6 ORF of HPV-16 at nt 542. In the present study we have characterized the P542 promoter, which putatively controls monocistronic expression of E7. The monocistronic m...... from nt 226 to 409. Furthermore, the translation initiation of E7 is most abundant from the monocistronic mRNA. We have also shown that the P542 promoter is downregulated by the transcription factor activator protein 4 (AP-4) and the differentiation-dependent factor hSkn-1a, both binding downstream...... of the transcription initiation site. In conclusion, we have found that P542 is a relatively weak promoter compared with P97 and may be downregulated in differentiated epithelial cells....

  6. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Surface Selection Rules for the Proteomic Liquid Biopsy in Real Samples: Efficient Detection of the Oncoprotein c-MYC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Garcia-Algar, Manuel; Penas, Cristina; Nazarenus, Moritz; Torruella, Arnau; Pazos-Perez, Nicolas; Guerrini, Luca; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Garcia-Rico, Eduardo; Mascareñas, José L; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2016-11-02

    Blood-based biomarkers (liquid biopsy) offer extremely valuable tools for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of tumors. The protein c-MYC, a transcription factor that has been shown to be deregulated in up to 70% of human cancers, can be used as a robust proteomic signature for cancer. Herein, we developed a rapid, highly specific, and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay for the quantification of c-MYC in real blood samples. The sensing scheme relies on the use of specifically designed hybrid plasmonic materials and their bioderivatization with a selective peptidic receptor modified with a SERS transducer. Peptide/c-MYC recognition events translate into measurable alterations of the SERS spectra associated with a molecular reorientation of the transducer, in agreement with the surface selection rules. The efficiency of the sensor is demonstrated in cellular lines, healthy donors and a cancer patient.

  7. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Kundu, Chanakya N. [School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar (India); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, School of Medicine, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Choudhuri, Tathagata, E-mail: tatha@ils.res.in [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati, Santiniketan, Bolpur (India)

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  8. HTLV-2B Tax oncoprotein is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation and displays intracellular localization similar to its homologue HTLV-1 Tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turci, Marco; Lodewick, Julie; Righi, Paola; Polania, Angela; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Bex, Francoise; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2B. The difference is generally attributed to the properties of their individual transactivating Tax proteins. By using internal Flag-6His tagged Tax-1 and Tax-2B, which display transcriptional activities comparable to the untagged proteins and can be recognized by a single anti-Flag antibody, we demonstrate that Tax-2B is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation. In addition, Tax2B is distributed in punctuate nuclear structures that include the RelA subunit of NF-κB, as has been previously demonstrated for Tax-1

  9. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha expression is increased in infected positive HPV16 DNA oral squamous cell carcinoma and positively associated with HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Fede Olga

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence for the role of High Risk (HR Human PapillomaVirus (HPV in the pathogenesis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC. The E6 and E7 oncogenes from HR HPVs are responsible for the deregulation of p53 and pRB proteins involved in cell cycle and apoptotic pathways. In cell lines experiments, the HPV E7 protein seems to be able to enhance Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α activity, normally involved in the response to hypoxia and able to enhance angiogenesis. Results We studied tumor specimens from 62 OSCC; a higher prevalence of tumors in TNM stage II and also in pT2 class between OSCC infected positive HPV16 DNA than non-infected ones was observed. HIF-1α positivity was detected throughout the analysed fields, not associated with areas of necrosis and also observed in cells immediately adjacent to blood vessels. A significant increase in mean values of the HIF-1α labeling indexes was observed for pT1-T2, as well for stage I-II, in the infected positive HPV16 DNA tumors than non-infected ones. HIF-1α and HPV16 E7 labeling indexes showed a significantly positive correlation which suggested a positive association between HPV16 E7 and HIF-1α expression. Conclusions In our specimens HIF-1α immunoreactivity hints for an O2-independent regulatory mechanism in infected positive HPV16 DNA tumors, especially for pT1-T2 and stage I-II tumors, suggesting a very early involvement in the development of HPV-induced OSCC. HIF-1α and HPV16 E7 labeling indexes suggest also a positive association between the two proteins in infected positive HPV16 DNA OSCC.

  10. Leukemic transformation by the v-ErbA oncoprotein entails constitutive binding to and repression of an erythroid enhancer in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciana, P.; Braliou, G. G.; Demay, F. G.; von Lindern, M.; Barettino, D.; Beug, H.; Stunnenberg, H. G.

    1998-01-01

    v-ErbA, a mutated thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRalpha), is thought to contribute to avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV)-induced leukemic transformation by constitutively repressing transcription of target genes. However, the binding of v-ErbA or any unliganded nuclear receptor to a

  11. The multifunctional FUS, EWS and TAF15 proto-oncoproteins show cell type-specific expression patterns and involvement in cell spreading and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenman Göran

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FUS, EWS and TAF15 are structurally similar multifunctional proteins that were first discovered upon characterization of fusion oncogenes in human sarcomas and leukemias. The proteins belong to the FET (previously TET family of RNA-binding proteins and are implicated in central cellular processes such as regulation of gene expression, maintenance of genomic integrity and mRNA/microRNA processing. In the present study, we investigated the expression and cellular localization of FET proteins in multiple human tissues and cell types. Results FUS, EWS and TAF15 were expressed in both distinct and overlapping patterns in human tissues. The three proteins showed almost ubiquitous nuclear expression and FUS and TAF15 were in addition present in the cytoplasm of most cell types. Cytoplasmic EWS was more rarely detected and seen mainly in secretory cell types. Furthermore, FET expression was downregulated in differentiating human embryonic stem cells, during induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and absent in terminally differentiated melanocytes and cardiac muscle cells. The FET proteins were targeted to stress granules induced by heat shock and oxidative stress and FUS required its RNA-binding domain for this translocation. Furthermore, FUS and TAF15 were detected in spreading initiation centers of adhering cells. Conclusion Our results point to cell-specific expression patterns and functions of the FET proteins rather than the housekeeping roles inferred from earlier studies. The localization of FET proteins to stress granules suggests activities in translational regulation during stress conditions. Roles in central processes such as stress response, translational control and adhesion may explain the FET proteins frequent involvement in human cancer.

  12. A TFG-TEC nuclear localization mutant forms complexes with the wild-type TFG-TEC oncoprotein and suppresses its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Bobae; Kim, Ah-young; Jun, Hee Jung; Kim, Jungho

    2013-12-15

    Human EMCs (extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas) are soft tissue tumours characterized by specific chromosomal abnormalities. Recently, a proportion of EMCs were found to harbour a characteristic translocation, t(3;9)(q11-12;q22), involving the TFG (TRK-fused gene) at 3q11-12 and the TEC (translocated in extraskeletal chondrosarcoma) gene at 9q22. The present study used both in vitro and in vivo systems to show that the TFG-TEC protein self-associates, and that this is dependent upon the CC (coiled-coil) domain (amino acids 97-124), the AF1 (activation function 1) domain (amino acids 275-562) and the DBD (DNA-binding domain) (amino acids 563-655). The TFG-TEC protein also associated with a mutant NLS-TFG-TEC (AAAA) protein, which harbours mutations in the NLS (nuclear localization signal). Subcellular localization assays showed that the NLS mutant TFG-TEC (AAAA) protein interfered with the nuclear localization of wild-type TFG-TEC. Most importantly, the mutant protein inhibited TFG-TEC-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo. Thus mutations in the TFG-TEC NLS yield a dominant-negative protein. These results show that the biological functions of the TFG-TEC oncogene can be modulated by a dominant-negative mutant.

  13. The TFG-TEC oncoprotein induces transcriptional activation of the human β-enolase gene via chromatin modification of the promoter region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-Young; Lim, Bobae; Choi, JeeHyun; Kim, Jungho

    2016-10-01

    Recurrent chromosome translocations are the hallmark of many human cancers. A proportion of human extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas (EMCs) are associated with the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(3;9)(q11-12;q22), which results in the formation of a chimeric protein in which the N-terminal domain of the TRK-fused gene (TFG) is fused to the translocated in extraskeletal chondrosarcoma (TEC; also called CHN, CSMF, MINOR, NOR1, and NR4A3) gene. The oncogenic effect of this translocation may be due to the higher transactivation ability of the TFG-TEC chimeric protein; however, downstream target genes of TFG-TEC have not yet been identified. The results presented here, demonstrate that TFG-TEC activates the human β-enolase promoter. EMSAs, ChIP assays, and luciferase reporter assays revealed that TFG-TEC upregulates β-enolase transcription by binding to two NGFI-B response element motifs located upstream of the putative transcription start site. In addition, northern blot, quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blot analyses showed that overexpression of TFG-TEC up-regulated β-enolase mRNA and protein expression in cultured cell lines. Finally, ChIP analyses revealed that TFG-TEC controls the activity of the endogenous β-enolase promoter by promoting histone H3 acetylation. Overall, the results presented here indicate that TFG-TEC triggers a regulatory gene hierarchy implicated in cancer cell metabolism. This finding may aid the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human EMCs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Construction of an infectious clone of human adenovirus type 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duo-Ling; Dong, Liu-Xin; Li, Meng; Guo, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Min; Liu, Xin-Feng; Lu, Zhuo-Zhuang; Hung, Tao

    2012-07-01

    Human adenovirus type 41 (HAdV-41) is well known for its fastidiousness in cell culture. To construct an infectious clone of HAdV-41, a DNA fragment containing the left and right ends of HAdV-41 as well as a kanamycin resistance gene and a pBR322 replication origin was excised from the previously constructed plasmid pAd41-GFP. Using homologous recombination, the plasmid pKAd41 was generated by co-transformation of the E. coli BJ5183 strain with this fragment and HAdV-41 genomic DNA. Virus was rescued from pKAd41-transfected 293TE7 cells, a HAdV-41 E1B55K-expressing cell line. The genomic integrity of the rescued virus was verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Two fibers on the virion were confirmed by western blot. Immunofluorescence showed that more expression of the hexon protein could be found in 293TE7 cells than in 293 cells after HAdV-41 infection. The feature of non-lytic replication was preserved in 293TE7 cells, since very few progeny HAdV-41 viruses were released to the culture medium. These results show that pKAd41 is an effective infectious clone and suggest that the combination of pKAd41 and 293TE7 cells is an ideal system for virological study of HAdV-41.

  15. E1A genes of adenovirus type 2 and type 5 are expressed at different levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moritz, Constanze; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    between these types, including the prototype dl1520/Onyx015. We tested the replication of the wild-type viruses WtD (a hybrid of the type 2 E1 region and type 5) and dl309 (type 5) in comparison with the mutants dl1520 (hybrid) and dl338 (type 5), the latter two lacking part of the E1B-55 kDa coding......Adenoviruses are an extensively studied system for modeling oncogenesis and for experimental cancer therapy. The most commonly analyzed virus types are 2 and 5, and little distinction has been made between them in past studies. Adenoviruses used for therapeutic purposes are frequently hybrids...... region. We found that the hybrid viruses replicated with considerably lower efficiency than their type 5 counterparts in H1299 cells (dl309:WtD = 3-4, dl338:dl1520 > 10). Moreover, adenovirus type 2 E1A expression from the hybrid viruses was strongly reduced in comparison to adenovirus type 5 E1A...

  16. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  17. BCL-2--general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, E; Stoian, I; Voinea, L; Marta, D; Popescu, L M

    1998-01-01

    BCL-2 protein is a oncoprotein considered to have an important role in the regulation of programmed cell death--apoptosis. The intracellular localization, the relation with other oncoproteins, the antioxidant function and the pathological implications are discussed.

  18. New candidate vaccines against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria: prime-boost immunization regimens incorporating human and simian adenoviral vectors and poxviral vectors expressing an optimized antigen based on merozoite surface protein 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodman, Anna L.; Epp, C.; Moss, D.; Holder, A. A.; Wilson, J. M.; Gao, G. P.; Long, C. A.; Remarque, E. J.; Thomas, A. W.; Ammendola, V.; Colloca, S.; Dicks, M. D. J.; Biswas, S.; Seibel, D.; van Duivenvoorde, L. M.; Gilbert, S. C.; Hill, A. V. S.; Draper, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Although merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) is a leading candidate vaccine antigen for blood-stage malaria, its efficacy in clinical trials has been limited in part by antigenic polymorphism and potentially by the inability of protein-in-adjuvant vaccines to induce strong cellular immunity. Here we

  19. Usefulness of intra-arterial embolization method using gelfoam particles in effective gene transduction of adenoviral vector for liver-directed gene therapy: an preliminary animal study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Park, Byeong Ho; Kim, Chan Sung

    2003-01-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy is being actively pursued and developed as a method of treating various liver diseases. A number of aspects, including gene intervention, an efficient gene delivery system, and stable transgene expression are key to the success of the chosen strategy, and to overcome problems in these areas, several tactics can be used. In this study, we assess the utility of transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in an adenovirus vector as a gene-delivery method. Using the angiographic approach, three dogs each weighing 9.5-11kg were superselectively catheterized at the left hepatic artery using a 3-F microcatheter and the coaxial method. Two of the dogs were embolized at the left hepatic artery using 3x2x2-mm and 2x1x1-mm gelfoam particles soaked in 2x10 11 particles/kg of recombinant adv. CMV.LacZ(LacZ-adv). The left hepatic artery of the remaining animal, used as a control, was infused with the same dose of lacZ-adv in the same way as before but without embolization of the left hepatic artery. Three days after embolization or the infusion of LacZ-adv, the dogs were sacrificed prior to harvest of the entire liver for the evaluation of gene transduction. X-gal staining of the liver tissue obtained was positive for hepatocytes, but the pattern and degree of gene transduction differed according to gelfoam particle size. Where this was 3x2x2 mm, gene transduction along the liver hilum varied, but where 2x1x1-mm particles were used, transduction was more even. No pathologic hepatic tissue injury or inflammation was apparent, and control liver tissue was not stained by X-gal. Serum SGOT and SGPT levels were slightly higher one day after the procedure, but had normalized by day 3. Intrahepatic transarterial embolization using gelfoam particles soaked in LacZ-adv appears to be a good method for effective liver-targed gene therapy

  20. Enhanced and sustained CD8+ T cell responses with an adenoviral vector-based hepatitis C virus vaccine encoding NS3 linked to the MHC class II chaperone protein invariant chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Marianne; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bukh, Jens

    2011-01-01

    memory. Functionally, the AdIiNS3-vaccinated mice had a significantly increased cytotoxic capacity compared with the AdNS3 group. The AdIiNS3-induced CD8(+) T cells protected mice from infection with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HCV NS3 of heterologous 1b strains, and studies in knockout mice...

  1. Serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the adenoviral L4-33K splicing enhancer protein is essential for function and reorganization of the protein to the periphery of viral replication centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestberg, Sara, E-mail: sara.ostberg@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Toermaenen Persson, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.tormanen.persson@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Akusjaervi, Goeran, E-mail: goran.akusjarvi@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-11-25

    The adenovirus L4-33K protein is a key regulator involved in the temporal shift from early to late pattern of mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit. L4-33K is a virus-encoded alternative splicing factor, which enhances processing of 3 Prime splice sites with a weak sequence context. Here we show that L4-33K expressed from a plasmid is localized at the nuclear margin of uninfected cells. During an infection L4-33K is relocalized to the periphery of E2A-72K containing viral replication centers. We also show that serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the conserved carboxy-terminus of L4-33K, which is critical for the splicing enhancer function of L4-33K, is necessary for the nuclear localization and redistribution of the protein to viral replication sites. Collectively, our results show a good correlation between the activity of L4-33K as a splicing enhancer protein and its localization to the periphery of viral replication centers.

  2. Vaccination with an adenoviral vector encoding the tumor antigen directly linked to invariant chain induces potent CD4(+) T-cell-independent CD8(+) T-cell-mediated tumor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Maria R; Holst, Peter J; Pircher, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    of the vaccine antigen to invariant chain (Ii). To evaluate this strategy we used a mouse model, in which an immunodominant epitope (GP33) of the LCMV glycoprotein (GP) represents the tumor-associated neoantigen. Prophylactic vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with a replication-deficient human adenovirus 5 vector...... vaccination with adenovirus expressing GP alone (Ad-GP), or GP and Ii unlinked (Ad-GP+Ii). Ad-Ii-GP- induced tumor control depended on an improved generation of the tumor-associated neoantigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell response and was independent of CD4(+) T cells. IFN-gamma was shown to be a key player during...

  3. Immunization with Recombinant Adenoviral Vectors Expressing HCV Core or F Proteins Leads to T Cells with Reduced Effector Molecules Granzyme B and IFN-γ: A Potential New Strategy for Immune Evasion in HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Vedi, Satish; Singh, Shakti; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Multispecific, broad, and potent T cell responses have been correlated with viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the majority of infected patients develop chronic infection, suggesting that natural infection mostly leads to development of inefficient T cell immunity. Multiple mechanisms of immune modulation and evasion have been shown in HCV infection through various investigations. This study examined the generation and modulation of T cell responses against core and frameshift (F) proteins of HCV. A single immunization of mice with replication incompetent recombinant adenovirus vectors encoding for F or core antigens induces poor T cell responses and leads to generation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with low granzyme B (GrB) expression. These T cells have impaired GrB enzyme activity and are unable to kill peptide loaded target cells. The low intracellular expression of GrB is not due to degranulation of cytotoxic granules containing cytotoxic T cells. Addition of exogenous IL-2 in in vitro cultures leads to partial recovery of GrB production, whereas immunization with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist poly I:C leads to complete restoration of GrB expression in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, a possible new strategy of T cell modulation is recognized wherein effector T cells are caused to be dysfunctional by HCV-derived antigens F or core, and strategies are also delineated to overcome this dysfunction. These studies are important in the investigation of prophylactic vaccine and immunotherapy strategies for HCV infection.

  4. A phase I study of Onyx-015, an E1B attenuated adenovirus, administered intratumorally to patients with recurrent head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganly, I; Kirn, D; Eckhardt, G; Rodriguez, G I; Soutar, D S; Otto, R; Robertson, A G; Park, O; Gulley, M L; Heise, C; Von Hoff, D D; Kaye, S B; Eckhardt, S G

    2000-03-01

    An E1B 55 kDa gene-deleted adenovirus, Onyx-015, which reportedly selectively replicates in and lyses p53-deficient cells, was administered by a single intratumoral injection to a total of 22 patients with recurrent head and neck cancer. The objectives of this Phase I study were to determine the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of this therapy and determine any correlation to p53 status. Six cohorts were investigated with a dose escalation from 10(7)-10(11) plaque-forming units. Toxicity was assessed using NCIC criteria. Tumor response was assessed by clinical and radiological measurement. Blood samples were taken to detect adenovirus DNA and neutralizing antibody to adenovirus. Tumor biopsies were taken to detect adenovirus by in situ hybridization. Treatment was well tolerated, with the main toxicity being grade 1/2 flu-like symptoms. Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached at the highest dose of 10(11) plaque-forming units. Twenty-one of the 22 patients treated showed an increase in neutralizing antibody to adenovirus. In situ hybridization showed viral replication in 4 of 22 patients treated, all of whom had mutant p53 tumors. Using conventional response criteria, no objective responses were observed. However, magnetic resonance imaging scans were suggestive of tumor necrosis at the site of viral injection in five patients, three of whom were classified using nonconventional criteria as partial responders, and two of whom were classified using nonconventional criteria as minor responders. Of these five cases, four had mutant p53 tumors. The response duration for the three partial responders was 4, 8, and 12 weeks. An additional eight patients had stable disease in the injected tumors lasting from 4-8 weeks. These preliminary results show that intratumoral administration of Onyx-015 is feasible, well tolerated, and associated with biological activity. Further investigation of Onyx-015, particularly with a more frequent injection protocol and in combination with

  5. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran-yi, E-mail: liuranyi@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zhou, Ling [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Zhang, Yan-ling [School of Biotechnology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Li, Li-xia [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command of PLA, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Huang, Wenlin, E-mail: hwenl@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tumor-Targeted Drug, Doublle Bioproducts Inc., Guangzhou 510663 (China)

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  6. Activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax increases Bcl3 expression, which is associated with enhanced growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Mineki; Taniura, Naoko; Okuwa, Takako; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2010-01-01

    Bcl3 is a member of the IκB family that regulates genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Recent reports indicated that Bcl3 is overexpressed in HTLV-1-infected T cells via Tax-mediated transactivation, and acts as a negative regulator of viral transcription. However, the role of Bcl3 in cellular signal transduction and the growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells have not been reported. In this study, we showed that the knockdown of Bcl3 by short hairpin RNA inhibited the growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells. Although phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor reduced Bcl3 expression, inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), an effector kinase of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, restored Bcl3 expression in Tax-negative but not in Tax-positive T cells. Our results indicate that the overexpression of Bcl3 in HTLV-1-infected T cells is regulated not only by transcriptional but also by post-transcriptional mechanisms, and is involved in overgrowth of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

  7. The Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Transactivator CIITA Inhibits the Persistent Activation of NF-κB by the Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax-1 Oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Abdallah, Rawan; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2016-01-20

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax-1, a key protein in HTLV-1-induced T cell transformation, deregulates diverse cell signaling pathways. Among them, the NF-κB pathway is constitutively activated by Tax-1, which binds to NF-κB proteins and activates the IκB kinase (IKK). Upon phosphorylation-dependent IκB degradation, NF-κB migrates into the nucleus, mediating Tax-1-stimulated gene expression. We show that the transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II genes CIITA (class II transactivator), endogenously or ectopically expressed in different cells, inhibits the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax-1 and map the region that mediates this effect. CIITA affects the subcellular localization of Tax-1, which is mostly retained in the cytoplasm, and this correlates with impaired migration of RelA into the nucleus. Cytoplasmic and nuclear mutant forms of CIITA reveal that CIITA exploits different strategies to suppress Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation in both subcellular compartments. CIITA interacts with Tax-1 without preventing Tax-1 binding to both IKKγ and RelA. Nevertheless, CIITA affects Tax-1-induced IKK activity, causing retention of the inactive p50/RelA/IκB complex in the cytoplasm. Nuclear CIITA associates with Tax-1/RelA in nuclear bodies, blocking Tax-1-dependent activation of NF-κB-responsive genes. Thus, CIITA inhibits cytoplasmic and nuclear steps of Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation. These results, together with our previous finding that CIITA acts as a restriction factor inhibiting Tax-1-promoted HTLV-1 gene expression and replication, indicate that CIITA is a versatile molecule that might also counteract Tax-1 transforming activity. Unveiling the molecular basis of CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-1 functions may be important in defining new strategies to control HTLV-1 spreading and oncogenic potential. HTLV-1 is the causative agent of human adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL). The viral transactivator Tax-1 plays a central role in the onset of ATLL, mostly by deregulating the NF-κB pathway. We demonstrate that CIITA, a key regulator of adaptive immunity, suppresses Tax-1-dependent activation of NF-κB by acting at several levels: it retains most of Tax-1 and RelA in the cytoplasm and inhibits their residual functional activity in the nucleus. Importantly, this inhibition occurs in cells that are targets of HTLV-1 infection. These findings are of interest in the field of virology because they expand the current knowledge of the functional relationship between viral products and cellular interactors and provide the basis for a better understanding of the molecular countermeasures adopted by the host cell to antagonize HTLV-1 spreading and transforming properties. Within this framework, our results may contribute to the establishment of novel strategies against HTLV-1 infection and virus-dependent oncogenic transformation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Similarities between the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Protein EBNA1 and the Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA: Is EBNA1 a “Bookmarking” Oncoprotein that Alters the Host Cell Epigenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2012-01-01

    EBNA1, a nuclear protein expressed in all EBV-associated neoplasms is indispensable for the maintenance of the viral episomes in latently infected cells. EBNA1 may induce genetic alterations by upregulating cellular recombinases, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and affecting p53 levels and function. All these changes may contribute to tumorigenesis. In this overview we focus, however, on the epigenetic alterations elicited by EBNA1 by drawing a parallel between EBNA1 and the FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors. Both EBNA1 and FoxA induce local DNA demethylation, nucleosome destabilization and bind to mitotic chromosomes. Local DNA demethylation and nucleosome rearrangement mark active promoters and enhancers. In addition, EBNA1 and FoxA, when associated with mitotic chromatin may “bookmark” active genes and ensure their reactivation in postmitotic cells (epigenetic memory). We speculate that DNA looping induced by EBNA1-EBNA1 interactions may reorganize the cellular genome. Such chromatin loops, sustained in mitotic chromatin similarly to the long-distance interactions mediated by the insulator protein CTCF, may also mediate the epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns. We suggest that EBNA1 has the potential to induce patho-epigenetic alterations contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:25436603

  9. The gene encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor is a target for deregulation in pre-B ALL by the t(1;19)-specific oncoprotein E2A-Pbx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lau, W B; Hurenkamp, J; Berendes, P; Touw, I P; Clevers, H C; van Dijk, M A

    1998-07-30

    Approximately 25-30% of childhood pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (pre-B ALL) is characterized by the presence of a (1;19)(q23;p13.3) translocation. The presence of this translocation is generally accompanied by a poor prognosis. The chimeric gene resulting from this chromosomal rearrangement encodes a hybrid transcription factor, E2A-Pbx1. In an attempt to delineate the genetic cascade initiated by E2A-Pbx1, we sought to identify genes that are deregulated by this transcription factor in t(1;19) pre-B ALL. We show here that the gene encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFr) is specifically upregulated in pre-B cells expressing E2A-Pbx1. G-CSFr is also expressed in cell lines established from t(1;19) pre-B cell leukemia and on primary t(1;19) tumor cells, but not on control cells. These data indicate that G-CSFr gene is a target for deregulation by E2A-Pbx1.

  10. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type I-Mediated Repression of PDZ-LIM Domain-Containing Protein 2 Involves DNA Methylation But Independent of the Viral Oncoprotein Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengrong Yan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Our recent studies have shown that one important mechanism of HTLV-I-Mediated tumorigenesis is through PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2 repression, although the involved mechanism remains unknown. Here, we further report that HTLV-I-Mediated PDLIM2 repression was a pathophysiological event and the PDLIM2 repression involved DNA methylation. Whereas DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3b but not 3a were upregulated in HTLV-I-transformed T cells, the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC restored PDLIM2 expression and induced death of these malignant cells. Notably, the PDLIM2 repression was independent of the viral regulatory protein Tax because neither short-term induction nor long-term stable expression of Tax could downregulate PDLIM2 expression. These studies provide important insights into PDLIM2 regulation, HTLV-I leukemogenicity, long latency, and cancer health disparities. Given the efficient antitumor activity with no obvious toxicity of 5-aza-dC, these studies also suggest potential therapeutic strategies for ATL.

  11. Enhanced anti-tumor effect of a gene gun-delivered DNA vaccine encoding the human papillomavirus type 16 oncoproteins genetically fused to the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Diniz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer DNA vaccines have attracted growing interest as a simple and non-invasive method for both the treatment and prevention of tumors induced by human papillomaviruses. Nonetheless, the low immunogenicity of parenterally administered vaccines, particularly regarding the activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses, suggests that further improvements in both vaccine composition and administration routes are still required. In the present study, we report the immune responses and anti-tumor effects of a DNA vaccine (pgD-E7E6E5 expressing three proteins (E7, E6, and E5 of the human papillomavirus type 16 genetically fused to the glycoprotein D of the human herpes simplex virus type 1, which was administered to mice by the intradermal (id route using a gene gun. A single id dose of pgD-E7E6E5 (2 µg/dose induced a strong activation of E7-specific interferon-γ (INF-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and full prophylactic anti-tumor effects in the vaccinated mice. Three vaccine doses inhibited tumor growth in 70% of the mice with established tumors. In addition, a single vaccine dose consisting of the co-administration of pgD-E7E6E5 and the vector encoding interleukin-12 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor further enhanced the therapeutic anti-tumor effects and conferred protection to 60 and 50% of the vaccinated mice, respectively. In conclusion, id administration of pgD-E7E6E5 significantly enhanced the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the DNA vaccine, representing a promising administration route for future clinical trials.

  12. Increased sensitivity of HPV-positive head and neck cancer cell lines to x-irradiation ± Cisplatin due to decreased expression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins and enhanced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Frank; Arenz, Andrea; Preising, Stefanie; Wittekindt, Claus; Klussmann, Jens P; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Wittig, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region (HNSCC), which is related to an infection with human papilloma virus (HPV), responds better to simultaneous radio-chemotherapy with Cisplatin based regimens than HPV-negative tumors. The underlying molecular mechanisms for this clinical observation are not fully understood. Therefore, the response of four HPV-positive (HPV+) (UM-SCC-47, UM-SCC-104, 93-VU-147T, UPCI:SCC152) and four HPV-negative (HPV-) (UD-SCC-1, UM-SCC-6, UM-SCC-11b, UT-SCC-33) HNSCC cell lines to x-irradiation ± Cisplatin incubation in terms of clonogenic survival, cell cycle progression, protein expression (cyclin A2, cyclin E2, E6, E7, p53) and induction of apoptosis, was investigated. HPV+ cells were more radio- and chemosensitive and were more effectively sensitized to x-irradiation by simultaneous Cisplatin incubation than HPV- cell lines. HPV+ cell lines revealed an increased and prolonged G2/M arrest after irradiation, whereas Cisplatin induced a blockage of cells in S phase. In comparison to irradiation only, addition of Cisplatin significantly enhanced apoptosis especially in HPV+ cell lines. While irradiation alone increased the amount of HPV E6 and E7 proteins, both were down-regulated by Cisplatin incubation either alone or in combination with x-rays, which however did not increase the expression of endogenous p53. Our results demonstrate that cell cycle deregulation together with downregulation of HPV E6 and E7 proteins facilitating apoptosis after Cisplatin incubation promote the enhanced sensitivity of HPV+ HNSCC cells to simultaneous radio-chemotherapy. Combined effects of irradiation and Cisplatin appear to be relevant in mediating the enhanced therapeutic response of HPV-related HNSCC and are indicative of the benefit of combined modality approaches in future treatment optimization strategies.

  13. Similarities between the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Protein EBNA1 and the Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA: Is EBNA1 a “Bookmarking” Oncoprotein that Alters the Host Cell Epigenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Helmut Niller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available EBNA1, a nuclear protein expressed in all EBV-associated neoplasms is indispensable for the maintenance of the viral episomes in latently infected cells. EBNA1 may induce genetic alterations by upregulating cellular recombinases, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and affecting p53 levels and function. All these changes may contribute to tumorigenesis. In this overview we focus, however, on the epigenetic alterations elicited by EBNA1 by drawing a parallel between EBNA1 and the FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors. Both EBNA1 and FoxA induce local DNA demethylation, nucleosome destabilization and bind to mitotic chromosomes. Local DNA demethylation and nucleosome rearrangement mark active promoters and enhancers. In addition, EBNA1 and FoxA, when associated with mitotic chromatin may “bookmark” active genes and ensure their reactivation in postmitotic cells (epigenetic memory. We speculate that DNA looping induced by EBNA1-EBNA1 interactions may reorganize the cellular genome. Such chromatin loops, sustained in mitotic chromatin similarly to the long-distance interactions mediated by the insulator protein CTCF, may also mediate the epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns. We suggest that EBNA1 has the potential to induce patho-epigenetic alterations contributing to tumorigenesis.

  14. Similarities between the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Protein EBNA1 and the Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA: Is EBNA1 a "Bookmarking" Oncoprotein that Alters the Host Cell Epigenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2012-09-17

    EBNA1, a nuclear protein expressed in all EBV-associated neoplasms is indispensable for the maintenance of the viral episomes in latently infected cells. EBNA1 may induce genetic alterations by upregulating cellular recombinases, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and affecting p53 levels and function. All these changes may contribute to tumorigenesis. In this overview we focus, however, on the epigenetic alterations elicited by EBNA1 by drawing a parallel between EBNA1 and the FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors. Both EBNA1 and FoxA induce local DNA demethylation, nucleosome destabilization and bind to mitotic chromosomes. Local DNA demethylation and nucleosome rearrangement mark active promoters and enhancers. In addition, EBNA1 and FoxA, when associated with mitotic chromatin may "bookmark" active genes and ensure their reactivation in postmitotic cells (epigenetic memory). We speculate that DNA looping induced by EBNA1-EBNA1 interactions may reorganize the cellular genome. Such chromatin loops, sustained in mitotic chromatin similarly to the long-distance interactions mediated by the insulator protein CTCF, may also mediate the epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns. We suggest that EBNA1 has the potential to induce patho-epigenetic alterations contributing to tumorigenesis.

  15. NKG2D is required for NK cell activation and function in response to E1-deleted adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2010-12-15

    Despite high transduction efficiency in vivo, the application of recombinant E1-deleted adenoviral vectors for in vivo gene therapy has been limited by the attendant innate and adaptive immune responses to adenoviral vectors. NK cells have been shown to play an important role in innate immune elimination of adenoviral vectors in vivo. However, the mechanisms underlying NK cell activation and function in response to adenoviral vectors remain largely undefined. In this study, we showed that NK cell activation upon adenoviral infection was dependent on accessory cells such as dendritic cells and macrophages and that cell contact-dependent signals from the accessory cells are necessary for NK cell activation. We further demonstrated that ligands of the NK activating receptor NKG2D were upregulated in accessory cells upon adenoviral infection and that blockade of NKG2D inhibited NK cell activation upon adenoviral infection, leading to a delay in adenoviral clearance in vivo. In addition, NKG2D was required for NK cell-mediated cytolysis on adenovirus-infected targets. Taken together, these results suggest that efficient NK cell activation and function in response to adenoviral infection is critically dependent on the NKG2D pathway, which understanding may assist in the design of effective strategies to improve the outcome of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy.

  16. AdEasy-based cloning system to generate tropism expanded replicating adenoviruses expressing transgenes late in the viral life cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie-A-Ling, M.; Bakker, C. T.; Wesseling, J. G.; Bosma, P. J.

    2005-01-01

    Replicating adenoviral vectors (RAds) hold great promise for the treatment of cancer. Significant therapeutic effects of these vectors do not only rely on tumor targeting but also on efficient release of viral progeny from host cells. Cytotoxic genes expressed late in the adenoviral life cycle can

  17. Replacement of native adenovirus receptor-binding sites with a new attachment moiety diminishes hepatic tropism and enhances bioavailability in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, Frederik H. E.; Graat, Harm C. A.; Carette, Jan E.; Vellinga, Jort; van Geer, Michael A.; Hoeben, Rob C.; Dermody, Terence S.; van Beusechem, Victor W.

    2008-01-01

    The in vivo efficacy of adenoviral vectors (AdVs) in gene delivery strategies is hampered by the broad tissue tropism of the virus and its efficient binding to human erythrocytes. To circumvent these limitations, we developed a prototype AdV lacking native binding sites. We replaced the adenoviral

  18. Imaging analysis of nuclear antiviral factors through direct detection of incoming adenovirus genome complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France); Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Will, Hans [Department of Tumor Biology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Nagata, Kyosuke [Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Wodrich, Harald, E-mail: harald.wodrich@u-bordeaux.fr [Microbiologie Fondamentale et Pathogénicité, MFP CNRS UMR 5234, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux 33076 (France)

    2016-04-22

    Recent studies involving several viral systems have highlighted the importance of cellular intrinsic defense mechanisms through nuclear antiviral proteins that restrict viral propagation. These factors include among others components of PML nuclear bodies, the nuclear DNA sensor IFI16, and a potential restriction factor PHF13/SPOC1. For several nuclear replicating DNA viruses, it was shown that these factors sense and target viral genomes immediately upon nuclear import. In contrast to the anticipated view, we recently found that incoming adenoviral genomes are not targeted by PML nuclear bodies. Here we further explored cellular responses against adenoviral infection by focusing on specific conditions as well as additional nuclear antiviral factors. In line with our previous findings, we show that neither interferon treatment nor the use of specific isoforms of PML nuclear body components results in co-localization between incoming adenoviral genomes and the subnuclear domains. Furthermore, our imaging analyses indicated that neither IFI16 nor PHF13/SPOC1 are likely to target incoming adenoviral genomes. Thus our findings suggest that incoming adenoviral genomes may be able to escape from a large repertoire of nuclear antiviral mechanisms, providing a rationale for the efficient initiation of lytic replication cycle. - Highlights: • Host nuclear antiviral factors were analyzed upon adenovirus genome delivery. • Interferon treatments fail to permit PML nuclear bodies to target adenoviral genomes. • Neither Sp100A nor B targets adenoviral genomes despite potentially opposite roles. • The nuclear DNA sensor IFI16 does not target incoming adenoviral genomes. • PHF13/SPOC1 targets neither incoming adenoviral genomes nor genome-bound protein VII.

  19. Construction of adenoviral vectors expressing F and G glycoproteins of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV Construção de vetores adenovirais expressando as glicoproteínas F e G de vírus respiratório sincicial humano (HRSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ithana Monteiro Kosaka

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (HRSV was first characterized in 1957 and has since been recognized as the most common viral cause of severe respiratory tract infection in young infants worldwide. Despite many years of research there is still no effective treatment or any immediate prospect of a vaccine. The HRSV genome is composed of single stranded negative sense RNA and the virion consists of a nucleocapsid packaged within a lipid envelope. The envelope contains spike-like projections, each being a homo-oligomer of one of three transmembrane viral envelope proteins: the attachment protein G, the fusion protein F involved in viral penetration and the small hydrofobic protein SH. The aim of this work was to construct two recombinant replication-defective adenoviruses carrying separately F and G genes from HRSV. This system was chosen because adenovirus delivers genes into target cells with high efficiency in a variety of cell lines and can be used in vitro and in vivo. In order to obtain the recombinant viruses, we did RT-PCR of RNA extracted from the HRSV A2 strain, the genes F and G were cloned in to pAdeno-X vectors. pAdeno-F and pAdeno-G were transfected in HEK-293 cells for the production of recombinant viruses, that expressed efficiently these two proteins and provide us the means for doing functional assays and immunization tests.O Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano (HRSV foi isolado e caracterizado pela primeira vez em 1957 e é considerado como o patógeno viral mais freqüente do trato respiratório de bebês e crianças. Apesar de muitos anos de pesquisa, não há ainda um tratamento específico ou uma vacina licenciada. Seu genoma é composto por uma fita simples de RNA polaridade negativa e o vírion consiste em um nucleocapsídeo empacotado por um envelope lipídico. O envelope contém projeções, chamadas espículas, constituídas de homoligômeros de uma das 3 glicoproteínas de membrana: a proteína de ligação G ("attachment", a proteína de fusão F ("fusion" e a proteína SH ("small hydrofobic". O objetivo deste trabalho foi construir dois adenovirus recombinantes defectivos em replicação expressando separadamente os genes F e G do HRSV. Este sistema foi escolhido porque os vetores adenovirais possuem a capacidade de inserir genes em uma grande variedade de linhagens celulares in vitro e in vivo. Para obtenção destes vetores adenovirais, um RT-PCR de RNA extraído do protótipo A2 de HRSV foi feito e os genes F e G clonados em vetores pAdeno-X. pAdeno-F e pAdeno-G foram transfectados em células HEK-293 para a produção do vírus recombinante, que expressaram corretamente essas duas proteínas constituem-se ferramentas para imunização e estudos funcionais.

  20. AKT Rescue in Cardiomyocytes but not Breast Cancer Cells after Doxorubicin and Anti-erbB2 Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabrielson, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Study Design: The proposed study will first evaluate the role of Akt, in protection against doxorubicin and anti-erbB2-cardiomyocyte toxicity, using adenoviral expression of active Akt pharmacological inhibitors...

  1. Akt Rescue in Cardiomyocytes but not Breast Cancer Cells After Doxorubicin and Anti-erB2 Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabrielson, Kathleen L

    2006-01-01

    The proposed study will first evaluate the role of Akt, in protection against doxorubicin and anti-erbB2-cardiomyocyte toxicity, using adenoviral expression of active Akt, pharmacological inhibitors...

  2. S14 as a Therapeutic Target in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinlaw, William

    2004-01-01

    .... Our aims are first to develop a model of anti-S14 breast cancer therapy in mice. Intratumoral adenoviral delivery of an S14-antisense gene into human breast cancer cell xenografts caused a significant inhibition of tumor growth...

  3. Recombinant fibromodulin has therapeutic effects on diabetic nephropathy by down-regulating transforming growth factor-β1 in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Foroutan Jazi

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion:Intraperitoneal injection of adenoviral vectors expressing fibromodulin  reduced TGF-β1 level in diabetic rat models. The molecular mechanisms involved in this process require further study.

  4. 99: A Novel Myc-Interacting Protein with Features of a Breast Tumor Suppressor Gene Product

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prendergast, George

    1997-01-01

    Bin1 is a novel tumor suppressor-like molecule we identified through its ability to interact with and inhibit the oncogenic activity of the Myc oncoprotein, which is widely deregulated in breast cancer...

  5. The TrkAIII Oncoprotein Inhibits Mitochondrial Free Radical ROS-Induced Death of SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells by Augmenting SOD2 Expression and Activity at the Mitochondria, within the Context of a Tumour Stem Cell-like Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Natalia; Cappabianca, Lucia; Ragone, Marzia; Ianni, Giulia; Gulino, Alberto; Mackay, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    The developmental and stress-regulated alternative TrkAIII splice variant of the NGF receptor TrkA is expressed by advanced stage human neuroblastomas (NBs), correlates with worse outcome in high TrkA expressing unfavourable tumours and exhibits oncogenic activity in NB models. In the present study, we report that constitutive TrkAIII expression in human SH-SY5Y NB cells inhibits Rotenone, Paraquat and LY83583-induced mitochondrial free radical reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated death by stimulating SOD2 expression, increasing mitochondrial SOD2 activity and attenuating mitochondrial free radical ROS production, in association with increased mitochondrial capacity to produce H2O2, within the context of a more tumour stem cell-like phenotype. This effect can be reversed by the specific TrkA tyrosine kinase inhibitor GW441756, by the multi-kinase TrkA inhibitors K252a, CEP-701 and Gö6976, which inhibit SOD2 expression, and by siRNA knockdown of SOD2 expression, which restores the sensitivity of TrkAIII expressing SH-SY5Y cells to Rotenone, Paraquat and LY83583-induced mitochondrial free radical ROS production and ROS-mediated death. The data implicate the novel TrkAIII/SOD2 axis in promoting NB resistance to mitochondrial free radical-mediated death and staminality, and suggest that the combined use of TrkAIII and/or SOD2 inhibitors together with agents that induce mitochondrial free radical ROS-mediated death could provide a therapeutic advantage that may also target the stem cell niche in high TrkA expressing unfavourable NB. PMID:24736663

  6. The TrkAIII oncoprotein inhibits mitochondrial free radical ROS-induced death of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by augmenting SOD2 expression and activity at the mitochondria, within the context of a tumour stem cell-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierdomenico Ruggeri

    Full Text Available The developmental and stress-regulated alternative TrkAIII splice variant of the NGF receptor TrkA is expressed by advanced stage human neuroblastomas (NBs, correlates with worse outcome in high TrkA expressing unfavourable tumours and exhibits oncogenic activity in NB models. In the present study, we report that constitutive TrkAIII expression in human SH-SY5Y NB cells inhibits Rotenone, Paraquat and LY83583-induced mitochondrial free radical reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated death by stimulating SOD2 expression, increasing mitochondrial SOD2 activity and attenuating mitochondrial free radical ROS production, in association with increased mitochondrial capacity to produce H2O2, within the context of a more tumour stem cell-like phenotype. This effect can be reversed by the specific TrkA tyrosine kinase inhibitor GW441756, by the multi-kinase TrkA inhibitors K252a, CEP-701 and Gö6976, which inhibit SOD2 expression, and by siRNA knockdown of SOD2 expression, which restores the sensitivity of TrkAIII expressing SH-SY5Y cells to Rotenone, Paraquat and LY83583-induced mitochondrial free radical ROS production and ROS-mediated death. The data implicate the novel TrkAIII/SOD2 axis in promoting NB resistance to mitochondrial free radical-mediated death and staminality, and suggest that the combined use of TrkAIII and/or SOD2 inhibitors together with agents that induce mitochondrial free radical ROS-mediated death could provide a therapeutic advantage that may also target the stem cell niche in high TrkA expressing unfavourable NB.

  7. An Immunotherapeutic Approach to the Treatment and Prevention of Breast Cancer, Based on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant, Type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    adenoviral vectors for gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy . Neuromuscul Disord 7:277-83. 201 Hitt M., Bett A.J., Addison C.L., Prevec L. and...for many of its serious and potentially life-threatening side effects, such as bone marrow suppression and gastrointestinal mucositis. Furthermore...bloody diarrhea due to gastrointestinal adenoviral infection, and hemorrhagic cystitis (bladder infection accompanied by blood in the urine) may also

  8. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery: Potential applications for gene and cell-based therapies in the new era of personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody S. Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With rapid advances in understanding molecular pathogenesis of human diseases in the era of genome sciences and systems biology, it is anticipated that increasing numbers of therapeutic genes or targets will become available for targeted therapies. Despite numerous setbacks, efficacious gene and/or cell-based therapies still hold the great promise to revolutionize the clinical management of human diseases. It is wildly recognized that poor gene delivery is the limiting factor for most in vivo gene therapies. There has been a long-lasting interest in using viral vectors, especially adenoviral vectors, to deliver therapeutic genes for the past two decades. Among all currently available viral vectors, adenovirus is the most efficient gene delivery system in a broad range of cell and tissue types. The applications of adenoviral vectors in gene delivery have greatly increased in number and efficiency since their initial development. In fact, among over 2000 gene therapy clinical trials approved worldwide since 1989, a significant portion of the trials have utilized adenoviral vectors. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of adenoviral vectors, including adenoviral biology, approaches to engineering adenoviral vectors, and their applications in clinical and preclinical studies with an emphasis in the areas of cancer treatment, vaccination and regenerative medicine. Current challenges and future directions regarding the use of adenoviral vectors are also discussed. It is expected that the continued improvements in adenoviral vectors should provide great opportunities for cell and gene therapies to live up to its enormous potential in personalized medicine.

  9. [Construction of a recombinant adenovirus vector harboring human transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor-IgG1Fc fusion gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Li; Xue, Jian-xin; Lu, You

    2008-12-01

    To construct a recombinant adenoviral vector harboring human transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor-IgG1Fc (TbetaRII-IgG1Fc) fusion gene. The cDNA fragments of human TbetaRII and IgG1Fc genes were amplified by RT-PCR and fused with overlap PCR to obtain the fusion gene TbetaRKK-IgG1Fc. The TbetaRII-IgG1Fc gene was cloned into the shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV, which was linearized and transfected into E.coli BJ 5183 strain containing the adenoviral backbone vector. The recombinant adenovirus vector was constructed by homologous recombination. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid was linearized and transfected into 293 cells, followed by amplification and purification of the virus and detection of TbetaRII-IgG1Fc mRNA expression by RT-PCR. The functional activity of the recombinant adenoviral plasmid was assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results of restriction endonuclease digestion and DNA sequencing indicated correct sequence of the target TbetaRII-IgG1Fc fusion gene. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid expressed hTbetaRII-IgG1Fc and neutralized TGF-beta1 in vitro after infection of the human lung fibroblasts (HLF), as confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid capable of neutralizing TGF-beta1 in vitro is constructed successfully.

  10. Potent anti-tumor activity of telomerase-dependent and HSV-TK armed oncolytic adenovirus for non-small cell lung cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Peng-Kang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the leading cause of cancer related mortality, any improvements in therapeutic strategies are urgently required. In this study we generated a novel 'suicide gene' armed oncolytic adenoviral vector and investigated its antitumor effect both in vitro and in vivo. Methods Since the up-regulated expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT is a hallmark of alltypes of NSCLC, we chose hTERT promoter to transcriptionally control E1A gene expression to obtain adenoviral replication in NSCLC. In order to further enhance anti-tumor effect of this oncolytic adenoviral vector, we inserted a 'suicide gene' i.e. Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase (HSV-TK into oncolytic adenoviral vector to engineer a novel armed oncolytic adenoviral vector 'Ad.hTERT-E1A-TK'. Results Ad.hTERT-E1A-TK efficiently killed different types of tumor cells including two types of NSCLC cells in vitro, causing no damage to normal primary fibroblasts. Furthermore, Ad.hTERT-E1A-TK infection combined with administration of prodrug gancyclovir (GCV resulted in more potent cytotoxicity on NSCLC cells, and synergistically suppressed human NSCLC tumor growth in nude mice. Conclusion The results from this study showed that Ad.hTERT-E1A-TK/GCV could be a potent but safe anti-tumor strategy for NSCLC biotherapy.

  11. Future prospects for the development of cost-effective Adenovirus vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fougeroux, Cyrielle; Holst, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    -vectored vaccine technology with a focus on adenoviral-based vaccines. Adenovirus (Ad) vaccines have proven to be efficient in military vaccinations against Ad4 and Ad7 and as highly efficient vectored vaccines against rabies. The question of how other adenovirus-based vaccines can become as efficient...... as the rabies vaccine is the underlying theme in this review. Here, we will first give an overview of the basic properties of vectored vaccines, followed by an introduction to the characteristics of adenoviral vectors and previously tested modifications of the vector backbone and expression cassettes...

  12. Microbiota aeróbia conjuntival nas conjuntivites adenovirais

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano Eliane Mayumi; Freitas Denise de; Yu Maria Cecília Zorat; Alvarenga Lênio Souza; Hofling- Lima Ana Luisa

    2002-01-01

    Objetivos: Estudar a microbiota aeróbica conjuntival em pacientes com quadro clínico de conjuntivite viral aguda. Método: Trinta pacientes entre 18 e 40 anos portadores de conjuntivite adenoviral e 30 pacientes sem a doença foram submetidos à colheita de material da conjuntiva para cultura. Os portadores de conjuntivite adenoviral foram submetidos ao exame até 3 dias após o início dos sintomas. As culturas foram realizadas utilizando-se os meios de ágar-sangue e ágar-chocolate. Pacientes em u...

  13. Molecular control of the cell cycle in cancer: biological and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe

    2003-01-01

    feedback loop between p16INK4A and cdk4. Cyclin D3 has yet to be established as an oncoprotein. Our finding of cyclin D3 overexpression in a significant number of DLCLs (including all thyroid lymphomas analyzed), as well as the intimate inverse relation to other RB1 pathway alterations suggest, that cyclin...... D3 is important in lymphomagenesis. However, further studies are needed to implicate cyclin D3 definitively as an oncoprotein. Our data contain several lines of evidence supporting roles of CDKN2A and MDM2 in progression of neoplastic disease. We found that loss of p16INK4A coincided...

  14. v-erbA overexpression is required to extinguish c-erbA function in erythroid cell differentiation and regulation of the erbA target gene CAII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disela, C; Glineur, C; Bugge, T

    1991-01-01

    The v-erbA oncoprotein represents a retrovirus-transduced oncogenic version of the thyroid hormone (T3/T4) receptor c-erbA (type alpha). It contributes to virus-induced erythroleukemia by efficiently arresting differentiation of red cell progenitors and by suppressing transcription of erythrocyte...... of this CAII reporter construct could only be suppressed by very high amounts of v-erbA. Our results suggest that overexpression of v-erbA is required for its function as an oncoprotein....

  15. Expression of p53 and bcl-2 and response to preoperative chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, F.; Di Loreto, C.; Panizzo, R.; Avellini, C.; Cacitti, V.; Beltrami, C.A.; Fongione, S.

    1996-01-01

    The aims were to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of p53 and bcl-2 proteins in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oesophagus and to assess whether expression of these oncoproteins can be used to stratify patients into groups with a favourable or unfavourable response to preoperative chemo/radiotherapy. This study confirms the observation that p53 protein is frequently expressed in SCCs of the oesophagus, probably as a result of a mutation of the TP53 gene. However, no significant association was found between oncoprotein expression and response to chemo/radiotherapy. Anticancer agents do not seem to modify the expression of p53 and bcl-2 proteins. (Author)

  16. Simultaneous human papilloma virus type 16 E7 and cdk inhibitor p21 expression induces apoptosis and cathepsin B activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaznelson, Dorte Wissing; Bruun, Silas; Monrad, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is the major risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The major oncoprotein E7 enhances cell growth control. However, E7 has in some reports been shown to induce apoptosis suggesting that there is a delicate balance between cell proliferation and induc......Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is the major risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The major oncoprotein E7 enhances cell growth control. However, E7 has in some reports been shown to induce apoptosis suggesting that there is a delicate balance between cell proliferation...

  17. Plasticity of adult human pancreatic duct cells by neurogenin3-mediated reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swales, Nathalie; Martens, Geert A; Bonné, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3). In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it....

  18. IL-10 gene therapy prevents TNBS-induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindsay, J.; van Montfrans, C.; Brennan, F.; van Deventer, S.; Drillenburg, P.; Hodgson, H.; te Velde, Anje; Sol Rodriguez Pena, M.

    2002-01-01

    The transfer of genes encoding immunomodulatory proteins to the intestinal mucosa is a promising new approach to the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). This study investigates the therapeutic efficacy of an adenoviral vector encoding IL-10 (AdvmuIL-10) in experimental colitis. BALB/c mice were

  19. Detection of adenovirus hexon sequence in a cat by polymerase chain reaction(short communication)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Lakatos, B.; Farkas, J.; Egberink, H.F.; Vennema, H.; Benko, M.

    1999-01-01

    Adenoviral nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in pharyngeal and rectal swab samples of a cat seropositive for adenovirus and suffering from transient hepatic failure. The samples were taken at a one-year interval, and both faecal samples as well as the second pharyngeal

  20. Effects of infection with recombinant adenovirus on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, P.H.A.; Lamfers, M.L.M.; Grimbergen, J.M.; Teeling, J.; Hoeben, R.C.; Nieuw Amerongen, G.P. van; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1996-01-01

    The plasminogen activation (PA) system is involved in vascular remodelling. Modulating its activity in vascular cells might be a way to interfere in processes such as angiogenesis and restenosis. Adenoviral vectors have become a favourable tool for direct gene transfer into vascular cells. In the

  1. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tirkey, Eva. Vol 22, No 2 (2014) - Articles Presumed Acute Adenoviral Dacryoadenitis Associated with Epidemic Keratoconjunctivitis: A Case Report Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2468-8363. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  2. Yap1 as a New Therapeutic Target in Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    context of mesothelioma. We have already established the Adenoviral injections into the thorax of animals and using reporter strains, we have...visualized by radiography . Soft Agar Assay HepG2 cell lines were suspended in DMEM with 10% FBS, 0.3% SeaPlaque agarose (Lonza, #50101), and 1,000 ng/ml Dox

  3. Fiber-chimeric adenoviruses expressing fibers from serotype 16 and 50 improve gene transfer to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, K.F.D.; Geer, M.A. van; Bakker, C.T.; Dekker, J.E.M.; Havenga, M.J.E.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Gouma, D.J.; Bosma, P.J.; Wesseling, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is poor. Adenoviral (Ad) gene therapy employing the commonly used serotype 5 reveals limited transduction efficiency due to the low amount of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor on pancreatic cancer cells. To identify fiber-chimeric adenoviruses with improved

  4. Similarity of recombinant human perlecan domain 1 by alternative expression systems bioactive heterogenous recombinant human perlecan D1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellis, April L; Pan, Wensheng; Yang, Guang

    2010-01-01

    perlecan domain 1 (HSPG2 abbreviated as rhPln.D1) synthesized in either HEK 293 cells or HUVECs by transient gene delivery using either adenoviral or expression plasmid technology. RESULTS: By SDS-PAGE analysis following anion exchange chromatography, the recombinant proteoglycans appeared to possess...

  5. Epizootiology and pathologic findings associated with a newly described adenovirus in the red squirrel, Sciurus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jiménez, David; Graham, David; Couper, David; Benkö, Maria; Schöniger, Sandra; Gurnell, John; Sainsbury, Anthony W

    2011-04-01

    An infectious disease caused by Squirrelpox virus has contributed to the decline of red squirrels, Sciurus vulgaris, in the British Isles. Because of the heightened disease surveillance activity in red squirrels, adenovirus infection with associated mortality has been detected. Adenoviral disease is described in other rodent species usually associated with stressors. Here we 1) describe the pathologic findings in red squirrels found dead with adenoviral infection and gastrointestinal disease, and 2) investigate the epizootiology of the disease through pathologic investigation, scanning surveillance, and virologic studies. Ten red squirrels involved in conservation studies were diagnosed with adenoviral infection by electron microscopy or PCR. All squirrels exhibited diarrhea and small intestinal inflammation or hemorrhage was evident in seven cases. Lesions indicative of splenic lymphocytolysis were observed in one squirrel and leukocytic hepatitis in another. No adenovirus was detected in grey squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis, inhabiting the same forest area, but previous serologic studies showed that grey squirrels cannot be discounted as a reservoir of the virus. Scanning surveillance showed that 12% of 493 red squirrels had diarrheal disease and two of 13 free-living red squirrels with diarrheal disease had adenovirus infection. Adenoviral disease in declining free-living wild red squirrel populations in the British Isles occurs at a detectable frequency and its impact on the conservation of this species deserves further attention.

  6. rBCG Induces Strong Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses in Rhesus Macaques in a Prime-Boost Setting with an Adenovirus 35 Tuberculosis Vaccine Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magalhaes, Isabelle; Sizemore, Donata R.; Ahmed, Raija K.; Mueller, Stefanie; Wehlin, Lena; Scanga, Charles; Weichold, Frank; Schirru, Giulia; Pau, Maria Grazia; Goudsmit, Jaap; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Spångberg, Mats; Andersson, Jan; Gaines, Hans; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Sadoff, Jerry; Maeurer, Markus

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: BCG vaccination, combined with adenoviral-delivered boosts, represents a reasonable strategy to augment, broaden and prolong immune protection against tuberculosis (TB). We tested BCG (SSI1331) (in 6 animals, delivered intradermally) and a recombinant (rBCG) AFRO-1 expressing

  7. Characterisation of gastroenteritis associated adenoviruses in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To analyse adenovirus (Ad) numbers and types associated with paediatric gastro-enteritis in South Africa Setting. Gauteng, 1994-1996. Methods. A total of 234 paediatric diarrhoeal stool samples were screened for Ad using commercial enzyme-linked iInmunosorbent assays (EUSAs). Adenoviral isolates were ...

  8. One step further towards real high-throughput functional genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    In a recent paper by Michiels et al. an important step was made towards genuine high throughput functional genomics. The authors produced an arrayed adenoviral library containing > 120000 cDNAs isolated from human placenta. This library can be used for arrayed transduction of cell lines in

  9. Effect of Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channel Delivered Via a Cell Platform on Cardiac Conduction and Arrhythmia Induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boink, Gerard J. J.; Lu, Jia; Driessen, Helen E.; Duan, Lian; Sosunov, Eugene A.; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Lau, David H.; Rosen, Tove S.; Danilo, Peter; Jia, Zhiheng; Ozgen, Nazira; Bobkov, Yevgeniy; Guo, Yuanjian; Brink, Peter R.; Kryukova, Yelena; Robinson, Richard B.; Entcheva, Emilia; Cohen, Ira S.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background-In depolarized myocardial infarct epicardial border zones, the cardiac sodium channel is largely inactivated, contributing to slow conduction and reentry. We have demonstrated that adenoviral delivery of the skeletal muscle Na+ channel (SkM1) to epicardial border zones normalizes

  10. [Use of polymeric suspensions as a viral sorbent to detect cattle serum antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanishevskiĭ, Ia M; Lobova, T P; Gritskova, I A; Belousova, R V; Prokopov, N I; Tret'iakova, I V; Tkalia, E E

    2006-01-01

    The paper shows it possible to use stained polymeric microspheres, 1.7 microm in diameter, that contain viruses onto the surface, in the latex agglutination test to detect antibodies to the bovine serum viruses of infective rhinotracheitis, parainfluenza-3, viral diarrhea, respiratory syncytial infection, and adenoviral infection.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of adenovirus type 5 vector-induced memory CD8 T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Holst, Peter Johannes; Steengaard, Sanne Skovvang

    2013-01-01

    adenoviral boosting and, importantly, the generated secondary memory cells cannot be qualitatively differentiated from those induced by primary infection with replicating virus. Quantitatively, DNA priming prior to Ad-vaccination will lead to even higher numbers of memory cells. In this case, the vaccination...

  12. Fatal adenovirus encephalomyeloradiculitis in an umbilical cord stem cell transplant recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Awosika, Oluwole O.; Lyons, Jennifer L.; Ciarlini, Pedro; Phillips, Richard E.; Alfson, Elizabeth D.; Johnson, Emily L.; Koo, Sophia; Marty, Francisco; Drew, Clifton; Zaki, Sherif; Folkerth, Rebecca D.; Klein, Joshua P.

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus infections frequently complicate allogeneic stem cell transplants but nervous system involvement, usually presenting as encephalitis, is atypical. Progression from encephalitis to myeloradiculitis has not been described previously.1 We present a unique case of fatal adenoviral encephalomyeloradiculitis with imaging and pathologic correlates.

  13. East African Medical Journal - Vol 83, No 8 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oncoprotein over-expression in breast cancer and its relationship to histology and grade in a Ugandan population · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. H Nalwoga, M Odida, H Wabinga, 411-415. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v83i8.9454 ...

  14. Polymeric nanoparticles for co-delivery of synthetic long peptide antigen and poly IC as therapeutic cancer vaccine formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimian, Sima; Fransen, Marieke F.; Kleinovink, Jan Willem; Christensen, Jonatan Riis; Amidi, Maryam|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834912; Hennink, Wim E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070880409; Ossendorp, Ferry

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to develop a cancer vaccine formulation for treatment of human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced malignancies. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) derived from HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins have been used for therapeutic vaccination in clinical trials with promising results. In

  15. Phosphorylation of murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2) protein at serine-267 by protein kinase CK2 in vitro and in cultured cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, M; Milne, D; Dumaz, N

    2001-01-01

    Murine double minute clone 2 oncoprotein (MDM2) is a key component in the regulation of the tumour suppressor p53. MDM2 mediates the ubiqutination of p53 in the capacity of an E3 ligase and targets p53 for rapid degradation by the proteasome. Stress signals which impinge on p53, leading to its ac...

  16. Oit1/Fam3D, a gut-secreted protein displaying nutritional status-dependent regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, N.J.; Ijssennagger, N.; Oosterink, E.; Keshtkar, S.; Hooiveld, G.J.; Mensink, R.P.; Hammer, S.; Smit, J.W.A.; Muller, M.; der Meer, R.

    2012-01-01

    Oncoprotein-induced transcript 1 (Oit1) was previously identified as a dietary fat-induced gene in the small intestine of C57Bl/6J mice. In this study, we further characterized Oit1 and its human ortholog family with sequence similarity 3, member D (Fam3D), on the messenger RNA as well as the

  17. Oit/Fam3D, a gut secreted protein displaying nutritional status-dependent regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de N.J.W.; IJssenagger, N.; Oosterink, E.; Keshtkar, S.; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J.; Mensink, R.P.; Hammer, S.; Smit, J.W.A.; Muller, M.R.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Oncoprotein-induced transcript 1 (Oit1) was previously identified as a dietary fat-induced gene in the small intestine of C57Bl/6J mice. In this study, we further characterized Oit1 and its human ortholog family with sequence similarity 3, member D (Fam3D), on the messenger RNA as well as the

  18. Eradication of established HPV16-transformed tumours after immunisation with recombinant Semliki Forest virus expressing a fusion protein of E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Riezebos-Brilman, A; Bungener, L; Regts, J; Dontje, B; Wischut, J

    2003-01-01

    Previously, we described the efficacy of immunisation with recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV), expressing the human papillomavirus 16 (HPV) oncoproteins E6 and E7, in inducing HPV-specific CTLs and anti-tumour responses. Recently, we developed a novel recombinant SFV construct encoding a

  19. Immunization strategy against cervical cancer involving an alphavirus vector expressing high levels of a stable fusion protein of human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Regts, J; Holtrop, M; Wilschut, J

    We are developing immunization strategies against cervical carcinoma and premalignant disease, based on the use of recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the onco-proteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV). Thus far, protein-based, as well as genetic immunization

  20. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    April 2003, pages 248-358. Viral Evasion of Host Responses ... pp 273-285 Articles. Lessons in Détente or know thy host: The immunomodulatory gene products of myxoma virus .... pp 337-348 Articles. Molecular interactions of 'high risk' human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncoproteins: implications for tumour progression.

  1. Rapid enrichment of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific polyclonal T cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Annemieke; van der Hulst, Jeanette M.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Vermeij, Pieter; Offringa, Rienk; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). Cervical cancer is associated with an ineffective host immune response against the HPV16 oncoproteins, characterized by the lack of the strong E6-specific T-helper type 1 (Th1) immunity that is generally present in

  2. Evaluation of BCL-2 and transforming growth factor alpha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of BCL-2 and transforming growth factor alpha oncoproteins in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection: impact on hepatocellular carcinoma. Mahmoud I Hassan, Amal Abou El Fadle, Gamal M Kenawy, Fayda I Abdel Motaleb, Fatma M AbdelSalam ...

  3. and p53 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... cellular gene product or viral oncoprotein and wild- type p53 protein45. It has already been shown that the p53 protein can bind to cellular proteins, such as the mdm2 oncogene product and heat-shock protein. 70 and to several DNA tumor virus proteins, including SV40 T antigen and E1b protein from.

  4. CD103+tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are tumor-reactive intraepithelial CD8+T cells associated with prognostic benefit and therapy response in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, Fenne L.; Prins, Thalina M.; van de Wall, Stephanie; Plat, Annechien; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Hollema, Harry; Daemen, Toos; Church, David N.; De Bruyn, Marco; Nijman, Hans W.

    2017-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced cervical cancer constitutively expresses viral E6/E7 oncoproteins and is an excellent target for T cell-based immunotherapy. However, not all tumor-infiltrating T cells confer equal benefit to patients, with epithelial T cells being superior to stromal T cells.To

  5. CD103+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are tumor-reactive intraepithelial CD8+ T cells associated with prognostic benefit and therapy response in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, F.L.; Prins, T.M.; Wall, S. van de; Plat, A.; Wisman, G.B.; Hollema, H.; Daemen, T.; Church, D.N.; Bruyn, M. de; Nijman, H.W.

    2017-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-induced cervical cancer constitutively expresses viral E6/E7 oncoproteins and is an excellent target for T cell-based immunotherapy. However, not all tumor-infiltrating T cells confer equal benefit to patients, with epithelial T cells being superior to stromal T cells. To

  6. The Hematopoietic Transcription Factors RUNX1 and ERG Prevent AML1-ETO Oncogene Overexpression and Onset of the Apoptosis Program in t(8;21) AMLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandoli, Amit; Singh, Abhishek A.; Prange, Koen H. M.; Tijchon, Esther; Oerlemans, Marjolein; Dirks, Rene; Ter Huurne, Menno; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Janssen-Megens, Eva M.; Berentsen, Kim; Sharifi, Nilofar; Kim, Bowon; Matarese, Filomena; Nguyen, Luan N.; Hubner, Nina C.; Rao, Nagesha A.; van den Akker, Emile; Altucci, Lucia; Vellenga, Edo; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Martens, Joost H. A.

    2016-01-01

    The t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated oncoprotein AML1-ETO disrupts normal hematopoietic differentiation. Here, we have investigated its effects on the transcriptome and epigenome in t(8,21) patient cells. AML1-ETO binding was found at promoter regions of active genes with high levels

  7. The retinoblastoma protein as a transcriptional repressor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Ed, H

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is one of the best-studied tumour suppressor gene products. Its loss during the genesis of many human tumours, its inactivation by several DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, and its ability to inhibit cell growth when introduced into dividing cells all suggest that p...

  8. Impaired PTPN13 phosphatase activity in spontaneous or HPV-induced squamous cell carcinomas potentiates oncogene signaling through the MAP kinase pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoover, A.C.; Strand, G.L.; Nowicki, P.N.; Anderson, M.E.; Vermeer, P.D.; Klingelhutz, A.J.; Bossler, A.D.; Pottala, J.V.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Lee, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a causative factor in over 90% of cervical and 25% of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). The C terminus of the high-risk HPV 16 E6 oncoprotein physically associates with and degrades a non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPN13), and PTPN13 loss

  9. miR-339-5p regulates the p53 tumor-suppressor pathway by targeting MDM2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, M D; Djodji Damas, Nkerorema; Lees, M

    2014-01-01

    proliferation in response to stress and represents the most commonly lost and mutated gene in human cancers. The function of p53 is inhibited by the MDM2 oncoprotein. Using a high-throughput screening approach, we identified miR-339-5p as a regulator of the p53 pathway. We demonstrate that this regulation...

  10. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT -1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission from Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Blood 2010; 116(2):171... CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 19b

  11. c-Myc/Max heterodimers bind cooperatively to the E-box sequences located in the first intron of the rat ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walhout, A.J.M.; Gubbels, J.M.; Bernards, R.A.; Vliet, P.C. van der; Timmers, H.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    The oncoprotein c-Myc plays an important role in cell proliferation, transformation, inhibition of differentiation and apoptosis. These functions most likely result from the transcription factor activity of c-Myc. As a heterodimer with Max, the c-Myc protein binds to the E-box sequence (CACGTG),

  12. Assessment and clinicopathological correlation of p16 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Ralli

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: As HPV integration with transcription of viral oncoprotein induces overexpression of p16, immunohistochemical expression of p16 can be used as a surrogate marker of HPV. This approach can be implemented in diagnostic laboratories and can provide support for vaccination program in high risk group.

  13. Survivin is a therapeutic target in Merkel cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, Reety; Shuda, Masahiro; Guastafierro, Anna; Feng, Huichen; Toptan, Tuna; Tolstov, Yanis; Normolle, Daniel; Vollmer, Laura L; Vogt, Andreas; Dömling, Alexander; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Chang, Yuan; Moore, Patrick S

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes ~80% of primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs). By comparing digital transcriptome subtraction deep-sequencing profiles, we found that transcripts of the cellular survivin oncoprotein [BIRC5a (baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat-containing

  14. Analysis of the ARF/p53 Pathway During Oncogenic Stimulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nahle, Zaher

    2003-01-01

    ... or deficient for the ARF and/or p53 genes. We found that the ElA oncoprotein regulates the expression of a myriad of targets involved in a diversity of functions such as apoptosis, cell cycle progression, checkpoint control, DNA replication...

  15. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    host cell and how they contribute to the development of the transformed phenotype.. [Ganguly N and Parihar S P 2009 Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for tumorigenesis; J. Biosci. 34 113–123]. Keywords. HPV .... The viral life cycle is linked to the differentiation stage of the infected host cell, and ...

  16. http://www.bioline.org.br/js 37 The Prevalence Overexpression Of C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    The Prevalence Overexpression Of C-Erbb-2 Oncoprotein In Carcinoma Of The Prostate-. Mulago Hospital. R. Alenyo1, M. Odida2, S Watya1. 1Department of Surgery, 2Department of Pathology, Makerere University, Kampala – Uganda. Correpondence to: Dr. Rose Alenyo, Email: Rose Alenyo ,.

  17. Effect of His(6)-tagging of anterior gradient 2 protein on its electro-oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostatná, Veronika; Vargová, Veronika; Hrstka, R.; Durech, M.; Vojtešek, B.; Paleček, Emil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 150, DEC2014 (2014), s. 218-222 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00956S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Anterior Gradient 2?oncoprotein * His-tagged proteins * carbon electrodes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.504, year: 2014

  18. Cancer: Some genetic considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammad Saad Zaghloul Salem

    2014-09-22

    Sep 22, 2014 ... of the humoral immune system and/or attacking or binding to immune cells responsible for recognition of, and differenti- ation between, self and nonself, thus nullifying their ability to recognize cancer cells or oncoproteins as foreign nonself components. In spite of the major role of the immune system as the ...

  19. Superior therapeutic efficacy of alphavirus-mediated immunization against human papilloma virus type 16 antigens in a murine tumour model : effects of the route of immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daemen, T; Riezebos-Brilman, A; Regts, J; Dontje, B; van der Zee, A; Wilschut, J

    2004-01-01

    In our efforts to develop a strong, effective immune response against cervical carcinoma and premalignant disease, we study the use of recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the oncoproteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs). Optimal immunization conditions are

  20. Human Papilloma Virus 16 E6 RNA Interference Enhances Cisplatin and Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Shinta; Hougardy, Brigitte M. T.; Meersma, Gert J.; Schaap, Bessel; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; de Jong, Steven

    In cervical cancer, the p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor pathways are disrupted by the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, because E6 targets p53 and E7 targets pRb for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. We have investigated whether E6 suppression with small