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Sample records for adeep-ultraviolet resonance raman

  1. On the Increasing Fragility of Human Teeth with Age: ADeep-Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager III, J.W.; Nalla, R.K.; Balooch, G.; Kim, G.; Pugach, M.; Habelitz, S.; Marshall, G.W.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-07-14

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) using 244nm excitation was used to investigate the impact of aging on humandentin. The intensity of a spectroscopic feature from the peptide bondsin the collagen increases with tissue age, similar to a finding reportedpreviously for human cortical bone.

  2. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn;

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  3. Second order resonant Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cristobal, A.; Catarero, A. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Trallero-Giner, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados

    1996-03-01

    A theoretical model for resonant Raman scattering by two optical phonons in zincblende-type semiconductors is presented. The effect of Coulomb interaction between electrons and holes is taken into account by introducing discrete and continuous excitonic intermediate states. The model can be applied for laser frequencies below and above the band gap. We consider deformation potential and Froehlich interaction for the electron-one-phonon coupling. The absolute value of the scattering efficiency is evaluated for the L-O-phonons, TO-plus LO-phonon and two-TO-photons Raman processes, around the E{sub o} absorption edge of II-VI compound semiconductors. Comparison with the electron-hole uncorrelated theory and experimental data emphasizes the role if the excitonic effects. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences are...

  5. Resonance raman studies of phenylcyclopropane radical cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godbout, J.T.; Zuilhof, H.; Heim, G.; Gould, I.R.; Goodman, J.L.; Dinnocenzo, J.P.; Myers Kelley, A.

    2000-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the radical cations of phenylcyclopropane and trans-1-phenyl-2-methylcyclopropane are reported. A near-UV pump pulse excites a photosensitizer which oxidizes the species of interest, and a visible probe pulse delayed by 35 ns obtains the spectrum of the radical ion. The tr

  6. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and ultrafast chemical dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Nandita; Umapathy, Siva

    1998-01-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy is normally used to study the excited state structure and dynamics of various photochemical and photophysical processes. In this article. we briefly discuss the various applications of RR spectroscopy and show how experimental RR intensities along with time-dependent wavepacket dynamical calculations can be used to study the excited state structure and ultrafast dynamics (\\sim 10(- 15) secs).

  7. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  8. Preventing Raman Lasing in High-Q WGM Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    A generic design has been conceived to suppress the Raman effect in whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). Although it is possible to exploit the Raman effect (even striving to maximize the Raman gain to obtain Raman lasing), the present innovation is intended to satisfy a need that arises in applications in which the Raman effect inhibits the realization of the full potential of WGM resonators as frequency-selection components. Heretofore, in such applications, it has been necessary to operate high-Q WGM resonators at unattractively low power levels to prevent Raman lasing. (The Raman-lasing thresholds of WGM optical resonators are very low and are approximately proportional to Q(sup -2)). Heretofore, two ways of preventing Raman lasting at high power levels have been known, but both entail significant disadvantages: A resonator can be designed so that the optical field is spread over a relatively large mode volume to bring the power density below the threshold. For any given combination of Q and power level, there is certain mode volume wherein Raman lasing does not start. Unfortunately, a resonator that has a large mode volume also has a high spectral density, which is undesirable in a typical photonic application. A resonator can be cooled to the temperature of liquid helium, where the Raman spectrum is narrower and, therefore, the Raman gain is lower. However, liquid-helium cooling is inconvenient. The present design overcomes these disadvantages, making it possible to operate a low-spectral-density (even a single-mode) WGM resonator at a relatively high power level at room temperature, without risk of Raman lasing.

  9. Fast Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Short-Lived Radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Hansen, Karina Benthin;

    1976-01-01

    We report the first application of pulsed resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by pulse radiolysis. A single pulse from a flash-lamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the resonance Raman spectrum of the p-terphenyl anion radical with an initial...

  10. Resonant enhancement of Raman scattering in metamaterials with hybrid electromagnetic and plasmonic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Guddala, Sriram; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2016-01-01

    A tri-layer metamaterial perfect absorber of light, consisting of (Al/ZnS/Al) films with the top aluminium layer patterned as an array of circular disk nanoantennas, is investigated for resonantly enhancing Raman scattering from C-60 fullerene molecules deposited on the metamaterial. The metamaterial is designed to have resonant bands due to plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances at the Raman pump frequency (725 nm) as well as Stokes emission bands. The Raman scattering from C60 on the metamaterial with resonantly matched bands is measured to be enhanced by an order of magnitude more than from C60 on metamaterials with off-resonant absorption bands peaked at 1090 nm. The Raman pump is significantly enhanced due to the resonance with a propagating surface plasmon band, while the highly impedance matched electromagnetic resonance is expected to couple out the Raman emission efficiently. The nature and hybridization of the plasmonic and electromagnetic resonances to form compound resonances are investigated by...

  11. UV resonance Raman sensing of pharmaceutical drugs in hollow fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, D.; Popp, J.; Frosch, T.

    2014-05-01

    We report about the experimental combination of UV resonance Raman sensing (UV-RRS) and fiber enhanced Raman sensing (FERS) on pharmaceuticals. The results show that the chemical sensitivity is highly improved and at the same time the sample volume is reduced compared to conventional measurements. A hundreds-fold improvement of the limit of detection (LOD) has been achieved with the combination of resonance Raman enhancement and fiber enhancement. The enhanced Raman signal has a reliable linear relationship with the concentration of the analyte, and therefore shows great potential for quantitative analysis of pharmaceuticals.

  12. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Grossman, W.E.L.; Killough, P.M;

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene (DPB) in its ground state and the resonance Raman spectrum (RRS) of DPB in its short-lived electronically excited triplet state are reported. Transient spectra were obtained by a pump-probe technique using two pulsed lasers....... The preresonance spectrum of the ground state is not significantly changed from that of the nonresonance spectrum. In the resonance spectrum of the triplet state the double-bond stretching mode of the butadiene part is shifted by 43 cm-1 downward to 1582 cm-1 whereas the single-bond stretching mode is essentially...

  13. Investigation of anti-Stokes Raman processes at phonon-polariton resonance: from Raman oscillation, frequency upconversion to Raman amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yujie J

    2015-03-01

    Raman oscillation, frequency upconversion, and Raman amplification can be achieved in a second-order nonlinear medium at the phonon-polariton resonance. By beating two optical fields, a second-order nonlinear polarization is generated inside the medium. Such a polarization induces a spatially uniform nonpropagating electric field at the beat frequency, which in turn mixes with the input optical field at the lower frequency to generate or amplify the anti-Stokes optical field. Raman oscillation can be efficiently reached for the copropagating configuration. In comparison, efficient frequency upconversion and large amplifications are achievable for the counterpropagating configuration. These Raman processes can be used to effectively remove transverse-optical phonons before decaying to lower-frequency phonons, achieve laser cooling, and significantly enhance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The counterpropagating configuration offers advantages for amplifying extremely weak signals. PMID:25723418

  14. Raman albedo and deep-UV resonance Raman signatures of explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Lemoff, Brian E.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy (DUVRRS) is a promising approach to stand-off detection of explosive traces due to large Raman cross-section and background free signatures. In order to design an effective sensor, one must be able to estimate the signal level of the DUVRRS signature for solid-phase explosive residues. The conventional approach to signal estimation uses scattering cross-sections and molar absorptivity, measured on solutions of explosives dissolved in an optically-transparent solvent. Only recently have researchers started to measure solid-state cross-sections. For most solid-phase explosives and explosive mixtures, neither the DUV Raman scattering cross sections nor the optical absorption coefficient are known, and they are very difficult to separately measure. Therefore, for a typical solid explosive mixture, it is difficult to accurately estimate Raman signal strength using conventional approaches. To address this issue, we have developed a technique to measure the Raman scattering strength of optically-thick (opaque) materials, or "Raman Albedo", defined as the total power of Raman-scattered light per unit frequency per unit solid angle divided by the incident power of the excitation source. We have measured Raman Albedo signatures for a wide range of solid explosives at four different DUV excitation wavelengths. These results will be presented, and we will describe the use of Raman Albedo measurements in the design and current construction of a novel stand-off explosive sensor, based on dual-excitation-wavelength DUVRRS.

  15. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  16. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Free Radicals Produced by Ionizing Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1984-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p-nitrobenzylchloride and......Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p......-nitrobenzylchloride and subsequent formation of the p-nitrobenzyl radical and the reaction of p-nitrotoluene with O– are studied by resonance Raman and optical absorption spectroscopy....

  17. Resonant Raman Scattering from Silicon Nanoparticles Enhanced by Magnetic Response

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, Pavel A; Milichko, Valentin A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Samusev, Anton K; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions.

  18. Resonant Raman scattering from silicon nanoparticles enhanced by magnetic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Pavel A; Baranov, Denis G; Milichko, Valentin A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Samusev, Anton K; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have a much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of the Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions. PMID:27113352

  19. UV resonance Raman analysis of trishomocubane and diamondoid dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinke, Reinhard, E-mail: rene@physik.tu-berlin.de; Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Richter, Robert; Merli, Andrea [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Fokin, Andrey A. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Department of Organic Chemistry, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, pr. Pobedy 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Koso, Tetyana V.; Schreiner, Peter R. [Institute of Organic Chemistry, Justus-Liebig University, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 58, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Rodionov, Vladimir N. [Department of Organic Chemistry, Kiev Polytechnic Institute, pr. Pobedy 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-01-21

    We present resonance Raman measurements of crystalline trishomocubane and diamantane dimers containing a C=C double bond. Raman spectra were recorded with excitation energies between 2.33 eV and 5.42 eV. The strongest enhancement is observed for the C=C stretch vibration and a bending mode involving the two carbon atoms of the C=C bond, corresponding to the B{sub 2g} wagging mode of ethylene. This is associated with the localization of the π-HOMO and LUMO and the elongation of the C=C bond length and a pyramidalization of the two sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms at the optical excitation. The observed Raman resonance energies of the trishomocubane and diamantane dimers are significantly lower than the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the corresponding unmodified diamondoids.

  20. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in one-dimensional carbon materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dresselhaus Mildred S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has played an important role in the development and use of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a powerful characterization tool for materials science. Here we present a short history of Raman scattering research in Brazil, highlighting the important contributions to the field coming from Brazilian researchers in the past. Next we discuss recent and important contributions where Brazil has become a worldwide leader, that is on the physics of quasi-one dimensional carbon nanotubes. We conclude this article by presenting results from a very recent resonance Raman study of exciting new materials, that are strictly one-dimensional carbon chains formed by the heat treatment of very pure double-wall carbon nanotube samples.

  1. Photodissociation dynamics of dimethylnitrosamine studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenderink, Egbert; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1994-01-01

    The initial molecular dynamics in the dissociative S1 (n, pi*) state of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) is investigated using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We find that photochemical N-N bond cleavage in DMN proceeds via a bent conformation around the amine N atom, which supports the outcome of ab initio

  2. Fast Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of a Free Radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Hansen, K. B.;

    1975-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of a 10−3 molar solution of the stable diphenyl-pikryl-hydrazyl radical in benzene was obtained using a single laser pulse of 10 mJ energy and 600 ns duration from a flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser. Spectra were recorded using an image intensifier coupled to a TV...

  3. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  4. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce3+(4f1) in single crystals of LuPO4 and Er3+(4f11) in single crystals of ErPO4. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs

  5. UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhl, Martin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Schmitt, Heike; Lenarz, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Resonant enhancement of Raman signals is a useful method to increase sensitivity in samples with low concentration such as biological tissue. The investigation of resonance profiles shows the optimal excitation wavelength and yields valuable information about the molecules themselves. However careful characterization and calibration of all experimental parameters affecting quantum yield is required in order to achieve comparability of the single spectra recorded. We present an experimental technique for measuring the resonance profiles of different amino acids. The absorption lines of these molecules are located in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. One limitation for broadband measurement of resonance profiles is the limited availability of Raman filters in certain regions of the UV for blocking the Rayleigh scattered light. Here, a wavelength range from 244.8 nm to 266.0 nm was chosen. The profiles reveal the optimal wavelength for recording the Raman spectra of amino acids in aqueous solutions in this range. This study provides the basis for measurements on more complex molecules such as proteins in the human perilymph. The composition of this liquid in the inner ear is essential for hearing and cannot be analyzed non-invasively so far. The long term aim is to implement this technique as a fiber based endoscope for non-invasive measurements during surgeries (e. g. cochlear implants) making it available as a diagnostic tool for physicians. This project is embedded in the interdisciplinary cluster of excellence "Hearing for all" (H4A).

  6. Raman Scattering at Resonant or Near-Resonant Conditions: A Generalized Short-Time Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelsalam Mohammed; Yu-Ping Sun; Quan Miao; Hans (A)gren; Faris Gel'mukhanov

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of resonant Raman scattering in the course of the frequency detuning.The dephasing in the time domain makes the scattering fast when the photon energy is tuned from the absorption resonance.This makes frequency detuning to act as a camera shutter with a regulated scattering duration and provides a practical tool of controlling the scattering time in ordinary stationary measurements.The theory is applied to resonant Raman spectra of a couple of few-mode model systems and to trans-1,3,5-hexatriene and guanine-cytosine (G-C) Watson-Crick base pairs (DNA) molecules.Besides some particular physical effects,the regime of fast scattering leads to a simplification of the spectrum as well as to the scattering theory itself.Strong overtones appear in the Raman spectra when the photon frequency is tuned in the resonant region,while in the mode of fast scattering,the overtones are gradually quenched when the photon frequency is tuned more than one vibrational quantum below the first absorption resonance.The detuning from the resonant region thus leads to a strong purification of the Raman spectrum from the contamination by higher overtones and soft modes and purifies the spectrum also in terms of avoidance of dissociation and interfering fluorescence decay of the resonant state.This makes frequency detuning a very useful practical tool in the analysis of the resonant Raman spectra of complex systems and considerably improves the prospects for using the Raman effect for detection of foreign substances at ultra-low concentrations.

  7. Resonant electronic Raman scattering: A BCS-like system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonarde N.; Arantes, A.; Schüller, C.; Bell, M. J. V.; Anjos, V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the resonant intersubband Raman scattering of two-dimensional electron systems in GaAs-AlGaAs single quantum wells. Self-consistent calculations of the polarized and depolarized Raman cross sections show that the appearance of excitations at the unrenormalized single-particle energy are related to three factors: the extreme resonance regime, the existence of degeneracy in intersubband excitations of the electron gas, and, finally, degeneracy in the interactions between pairs of excitations. It is demonstrated that the physics that governs the problem is similar to the one that gives rise to the formation of the superconducting state in the BCS theory of normal metals. Comparison between experiment and theory shows an excellent agreement.

  8. Vortex solitons in an off-resonant Raman medium

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbach, A V; Harvey, C N

    2008-01-01

    We investigate existence and linear stability of coupled vortex solitons supported by cascaded four-wave mixing in a Raman active medium excited away from the resonance. We present a detailed analysis for the two- and three-component vortex solitons and demonstrate the formation of stable and unstable vortex solitons, and associated spatio-temporal helical beams, under the conditions of the simultaneous frequency and vortex comb generation.

  9. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  10. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  11. Resonance surface enhanced Raman optical activity of myoglobin as a result of optimized resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Johannessen, Christian; Nygaard, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Using Surface enhanced ROA (SEROA), novel results are achieved by combining Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and resonance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERRS), applied on myoglobin. The novelty of this work is ascribed the first time reporting on chiral results of a study performed on a protein...... has shown that the SERS effect behaves consequently, depending on the concentration ratio of each component, i.e., myoglobin, Ag colloids and NaCl. Accordingly, it is shown here that SERS intensity has its maximum at certain concentration of these components, whereas below or above this value......, the intensity decreases. The optimization results can be considered as a completion of the hitherto known phenomenon "dilution effect", which takes only account for higher concentrations. Furthermore, the optimization of the parameters seems to be necessary for a successful SEROA measurement, which enables...

  12. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Yulong; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of six types of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro. Forty-three RR spectra from seven subjects are investigated. The spectral peaks from malignant meningioma, stage III (cancer), benign meningioma (benign), normal meningeal tissues (normal), glioblastoma multiforme grade IV (cancer), acoustic neuroma (benign), and pituitary adenoma (benign) are analyzed. Using a 532-nm excitation, the resonance-enhanced peak at 1548 cm-1 (amide II) is observed in all of the tissue specimens, but is not observed in the spectra collected using the nonresonance Raman system. An increase in the intensity ratio of 1587 to 1605 cm-1 is observed in the RR spectra collected from meningeal cancer tissue as compared with the spectra collected from the benign and normal meningeal tissue. The peak around 1732 cm-1 attributed to fatty acids (lipids) are diminished in the spectra collected from the meningeal cancer tumors as compared with the spectra from normal and benign tissues. The characteristic band of spectral peaks observed between 2800 and 3100 cm-1 are attributed to the vibrations of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) groups. The ratio of the intensities of the spectral peaks of 2935 to 2880 cm-1 from the meningeal cancer tissues is found to be lower in comparison with that of the spectral peaks from normal, and benign tissues, which may be used as a distinct marker for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal meningeal tissues. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and the support vector machine are used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from meningeal tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% when two principal components are used.

  13. [Effect on Fermi Resonance by Some External Fields: Investigation of Fermi Resonance According to Raman Spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiu-lan; Sun, Cheng-lin; Zhou, Mi; Li, Dong-fei; Men, Zhi-wei; Li, Zuo-wei; Gao, Shu-qin

    2015-03-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of molecular vibrational coupling and energy transfer occurred between different groups of a single molecule or neighboring molecules. Many properties of Fermi resonance under different external fields, the investigation method of Raman spectroscopy as well as the application of Fermi resonance, etc need to be developed and extended further. In this article the research results and development about Fermi resonance obtained by Raman spectral technique were introduced systematically according to our work and the results by other researchers. Especially, the results of the behaviors of intramolecular and intermolecular Fermi resonance of some molecules under some external fields such as molecular field, pressure field and temperature field, etc were investigated and demonstrated in detail according to the Raman spectra obtained by high pressure DAC technique, temperature variation technique as well as the methods we planed originally in our group such as solution concentration variation method and LCOF resonance Raman spectroscopic technique, and some novel properties of Fermi resonance were found firstly. Concretely, (1) Under molecular field. a. The Raman spectra of C5H5 N in CH3 OH and H2O indicates that solvent effect can influence Fermi resonance distinctly; b. The phenomena of the asymmetric movement of the Fermi resonance doublets as well as the fundamental involved is tuned by the Fermi resonance which had not been found by other methods were found firstly by our variation solution concentration method; c. The Fermi resonance properties can be influenced distinctly by the molecular group reorganization induced by the hydrogen bond and anti-hydrogen bond in solution; d. Fermi resonance can occurred between C7 H8 and m-C8H10, and the Fermi resonance properties behave quite differently with the solution concentration; (2) Under pressure field. a. The spectral lines shift towards high wavenumber with increasing pressure, and

  14. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Luciano N., E-mail: lnvidal@utfpr.edu.br; Cappelli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.cappelli@unipi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 3, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Egidi, Franco [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Barone, Vincenzo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  15. Resonance Raman spectra of black soap film containing dye molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁映秋; 张韫宏

    1995-01-01

    Dye molecule brilliant yellow (BY) has been used as an acid-base probe in the study of the resonance Raman spectra of three kinds of microenvironments of the black soap film (BSF) containing BY, the BY-CTAB micellar solution, and the aqueous BY solution under various pH conditions. It has been revealed that BY bound to the sandwich interface of the BSF and that to the micellar interface show similar spectral changes, but the former owns the character of coexistence of acidic and basic structures in a relatively large range of pH values (neutral to basic). Further investigations have demonstrated that BSF exhibits the buffer effect that the pH value of the aqueous core is insensitive to the pH change of the bulk solution.

  16. Double resonance Raman modes in monolayer and few-layer MoTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng; Yamamoto, Mahito; Zhou, Lin; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ueno, Keiji; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Zhang, Zhidong; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2015-05-01

    We study the second-order Raman process of mono- and few-layer MoTe2, by combining ab initio density functional perturbation calculations with experimental Raman spectroscopy using 532, 633, and 785 nm excitation lasers. The calculated electronic band structure and the density of states show that the resonance Raman process occurs at the M point in the Brillouin zone, where a strong optical absorption occurs due to a logarithmic Van Hove singularity of the electronic density of states. The double resonance Raman process with intervalley electron-phonon coupling connects two of the three inequivalent M points in the Brillouin zone, giving rise to second-order Raman peaks due to the M -point phonons. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the second-order Raman spectra agree with the observed laser-energy-dependent Raman shifts in the experiment.

  17. Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Spectrum of Non-Resonant Aromatic Amine Showing Raman Forbidden Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Yuko S; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Zhang, Zhenglong; Kozu, Tomomi; Itoh, Tamitake; Nakanishi, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the experimentally obtained single-molecule (SM) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 4-aminibenzenethiol (4-ABT), also known as para-aminothiophenol (PATP). Measured at a 4-ABT concentration of 8 * 10^-10 M, the spectra show Raman forbidden modes. The SM-SERS spectrum of 4-ABT obtained using a non-resonant visible laser is different from the previously reported SERS spectra of 4-ABT, and could not be reconstructed using quantum mechanical calculations. Careful classical assignments (not based on quantum-mechanical calculations) are reported, and indicate that differences in the reported spectra of 4-ABT are mainly due to the appearance of Raman forbidden bands. The presence of Raman forbidden bands can be explained by the charge-transfer (CT) effect of 4-ABT adsorbed on the silver nanostructures, indicating a breakdown of Raman selection rules at the SERS hotspot.

  18. High-sensitivity pesticide detection using particle-enhanced resonant Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Bikas; Saito, Yuika; Verma, Prabhat

    2016-03-01

    The use of pesticides in agriculture has raised concerns, as even a small residual of pesticide on food can be harmful. It is therefore of great importance to develop a robust technique to detect tiny amounts of pesticides. Although Raman spectroscopy is frequently used for chemical identification, it is not suitable for extremely low molecular concentrations. We propose a technique called particle-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy to detect extremely low concentrations of pesticides, where gold nanoparticles of desired plasmonic resonance are synthesized to match the resonance in Raman scattering. We successfully demonstrated the detection of extremely low amounts of pesticides on oranges.

  19. Rapidly reconfigurable slow-light system based on off-resonant Raman absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vudyasetu, Praveen K.; Camacho, Ryan M.; Howell, John C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a slow-light system based on dual Raman absorption resonances in warm rubidium vapor. Each Raman absorption resonance is produced by a control beam in an off-resonant Λ system. This system combines all optical control of the Raman absorption and the low-dispersion broadening properties of the double Lorentzian absorption slow light. The bandwidth, group delay, and central frequency of the slow-light system can all be tuned dynamically by changing the properties of the control beam. We demonstrate multiple pulse delays with low distortion and show that such a system has fast switching dynamics and thus fast reconfiguration rates.

  20. Near-field enhanced ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy using aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Fang Lim, Shuang; Puretzky, Alexander A; Riehn, Robert; Hallen, H D

    2012-09-10

    An aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna is combined with the resonance Raman effect in the deep ultraviolet to dramatically increase the sensitivity of Raman spectra to a small volume of material, such as benzene used here. We further demonstrate gradient-field Raman peaks for several strong infrared modes. We achieve a gain of [Formula: see text] in signal intensity from the near field enhancement due to the surface plasmon resonance in the aluminum nanostructure. The on-line resonance enhancement contributes another factor of several thousands, limited by the laser line width. Thus, an overall gain of hundreds of million is achieved. PMID:23066168

  1. Near-field enhanced ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy using aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ling; Fang Lim, Shuang; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Riehn, Robert; Hallen, H. D.

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna is combined with the resonance Raman effect in the deep ultraviolet to dramatically increase the sensitivity of Raman spectra to a small volume of material, such as benzene used here. We further demonstrate gradient-field Raman peaks for several strong infrared modes. We achieve a gain of ∼105 in signal intensity from the near field enhancement due to the surface plasmon resonance in the aluminum nanostructure. The on-line resonance enhancement contributes ano...

  2. Calculation of optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators using time-dependent recursion relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Christian; Mortensen, O. Sonnich; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    Time-dependent recursion relationships are derived for optical absorption and resonance Raman correlators in the multidimensional harmonic case using a second-quantization formalism. Furthermore, a procedure is given for the calculation of correlators involving a general analytic coordinate...

  3. Hyper-Raman scattering and three-photon resonant ionization: Competitive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semiclassical theory of hyper-Raman scattering and three-photon resonant ionization via the coupled density-matrix and Maxwell equations is presented. A simplified three-level atom model is obtained, which includes two-photon resonant pumping and time dependent photoionization rates. We consider conditions typically encountered in atomic vapours to simulate numerically pulse propagation. A strong depletion of the photoionization probability in the hyper-Raman field saturation regime is predicted. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs

  4. Intercalation between antitumor anthracyclines and DNA as probed by resonance and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulevich, G.; Mantini, A. R.; Casu, M.; Marzocchi, M. P.

    1991-05-01

    The antiturnor anthracyclincs, idarubicin (IDA ), adrianiycin (ADM), epirubicin (EPI), carminomycin (CAR) and 1 1-deoxycarminornycin (DCM), whose siructural formula includes a substituted hydroxyanthraquirionc chrornophore and a sugar residue, form intercalation complexes with DNA. The stacking interaction between the chromophore and the base-pairs of DNA gives rise to noticeable ciTects on resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) scattering as well as on the absorption (ABS), its second derivative (D2) and fluorescence emission (FEM) spectra.

  5. Investigating the Environment-dependent Photophysics of Chlorine Dioxide With Resonance Raman Intensities

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Anthony P.; Foster, Catherine E.; Reid, Philip J.

    1999-01-01

    The condensed-phase excited-state reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide are investigated using resonance Raman intensity analysis. Absolute Raman intensities are measured on resonance with the 2B2–2A2 electronic transition and used to establish the excited-state structural evolution which occurs on the 2A2 surface following photoexcitation. Analysis of the intensities demonstrates that excited-state relaxation occurs along all three normal coordinates; however, only modest evolution is observ...

  6. On the inner Double-Resonance Raman scattering process in bilayer graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Mafra, D. L.; Moujaes, E. A.; Nunes, R. W.; Pimenta, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The dispersion of phonons and the electronic structure of graphene systems can be obtained experimentally from the double-resonance (DR) Raman features by varying the excitation laser energy. In a previous resonance Raman investigation of graphene, the electronic structure was analyzed in the framework of the Slonczewski-Weiss-McClure (SWM) model, considering the outer DR process. In this work we analyze the data considering the inner DR process, and obtain SWM parameters that are in better a...

  7. Resonant Raman and micro-Raman scattering from Si matrix with unburied beta-FeSi2 nanolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, M; Baleva, M; Zlateva, G

    2008-02-01

    Samples, representing Si matrix with nanolayers of the semiconducting beta-FeSi2 silicide are studied by Raman scattering. The unpolarized Raman spectra of the samples are measured in two different configurations. It is found that the characteristic beta-FeSi2 Raman modes are seen in the spectra, taken at incident angle of about 45 degrees , while only comparatively intensive broad feature is detected in a back-scattering geometry. The difference in the spectra is interpreted with the appearance of surface polariton modes of the optical phonons in the nanosized layers in near back-scattering geometry. The resonant Raman scattering is investigated at incident light angle of about 45 degrees and the energies of the interband transitions in the investigated energy range are determined. It is known that the resonant Raman scattering appears to be even more precise method for the determination of the interband transitions energies than the modulation spectroscopy. Thus we claim that the energies determined here are firstly determined with such a precision. PMID:18464405

  8. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  9. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  10. Nonlinearity in Intensity versus Concentration Dependence for the Deep UV Resonance Raman Spectra of Toluene and Heptane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2013-01-01

    by absorption and Resonance Raman effects. Raman spectra of toluene and heptane mixtures - with progressively increasing concentrations of heptane - were measured by use of 229 nm excitation. The results show that the characteristic band intensities are not directly proportional to the relative concentrations...... of the compounds and deviate due to absorption resonance effects. An approximated mathematical model is developed to demonstrate that the intensities of the normal Raman scattering bands are suppressed. An inhibition coefficient Ki is introduced to describe the situation and determine the penetration depth. Most......The relation between Raman scattering, resonance Raman scattering and absorption is reviewed to see to what extent quantitative analysis can be applied in Resonance Raman spectroscopy. In addition to this it is demonstrated experimentally that normal Raman spectra can be dramatically inhibited...

  11. Communication: Significant contributions of Albrecht's $A$ term to non-resonant Raman scattering processes

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Sai; Luo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The Raman intensity can be well described by the famous Albrecht equation that consists of $A$ and $B$ terms. It has become a textbook knowledge that the contribution from Albrecht's $A$ term can be neglected without loss of accuracy for non-resonant Raman scattering processes. However, as demonstrated in this study, we have found that this widely accepted long-standing assumption fails drastically for totally symmetric vibration modes of molecules. Perturbed first principles calculations for water molecule show that strong constructive interference between the $A$ and $B$ terms occurs for the Raman intensity of the symmetric O-H stretching mode, which can account for about 40% of the total intensity. Meanwhile, a minor destructive interference is found for the angle bending mode. The state to state mapping between the Albrecht's theory and the perturbation theory allows us to verify the accuracy of the widely employed perturbation method for the dynamic/resonant Raman intensities. The model calculations show...

  12. Multi-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy of bacteria to study the effects of growth condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunapareddy, Nagapratima; Grun, Jacob; Lunsford, Robert; Gillis, David; Nikitin, Sergei; Wang, Zheng

    2012-06-01

    We will examine the use of multi-wavelength UV resonance-Raman signatures to identify the effects of growth phase on different types of bacteria. Gram positive and gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Citrobacter koseri and Citrobacter braakii were grown to logarithmic and stationary phases in different culture media. Raman spectra of bacteria were obtained by sequential illumination of samples between 220 and 260 nm; a range which encompasses the resonance frequencies of cellular components. In addition to the information contained in the single spectrum, this two-dimensional signature contains information reflecting variations in resonance cross sections with illumination wavelength. Results of our algorithms in identifying the differences between these germs are discussed. Preliminary results indicate that growth affects the Raman signature, but not to an extent that would negate identification of the species.

  13. Resonance Raman measurements of carotenoids using light emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeson, S D; Eyring, N J; Fralick, J F; Stevenson, D N; Ferguson, S B

    2008-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact commercial instrument for measuring carotenoids in skin tissue. The instrument uses two light emitting diodes (LEDs) for dual-wavelength excitation and four photomultiplier tubes for multichannel detection. Bandpass filters are used to select the excitation and detection wavelengths. The f/1.3 optical system has high optical throughput and single photon sensitivity, both of which are crucial in LED-based Raman measurements. We employ a signal processing technique that compensates for detector drift and error. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the LED Raman instrument compares favorably to laser-based Raman spectrometers. This compact, portable instrument is used for non-invasive measurement of carotenoid molecules in human skin with a repeatability better than 10%.

  14. Resonant Raman scattering in GaSe and GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, T.C.; Camassel, J.; Voitchovsky, J.P.; Shen, Y.R.

    1976-07-01

    Multiphonon resonant Raman scattering up to four phonons in GaSe and one and two phonon resonant Raman scattering in the mixed GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1 - x/ crystals with x less than or equal to 0.23 were investigated. The results can be explained by a simple theory in which the dispersion of the resonance behavior is mainly dominated by resonances with the 1s direct exciton state.

  15. Characterization of the pigment xanthomonadin in the bacterial genus Xanthomonas using micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Mathews L.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Acosta, Tayro; deSilva, Asoka S.; Vowell, Tomie; Alvarez, Anne M.

    2012-06-01

    We used micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm and 514.5 nm laser excitation, respectively, to characterize a plant pathogenic bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae D150. The bacterial genus Xathomonas is closely related to bacterial genus Stenotrophomonas that causes an infection in humans. This study has identified for the first time the unique Raman spectra of the carotenoid-like pigment xanthomonadin of the Xanthomonas strain. Xanthomonadin is a brominated aryl-polyene pigment molecule similar to carotenoids. Further studies were conducted using resonance Raman spectroscopy with 514.5 nm laser excitation on several strains of the bacterial genus Xanthomonas isolated from numerous plants from various geographical locations. The current study revealed that the Raman bands representing the vibrations (v1, v2, v3) of the polyene chain of xanthomonadin are 1003-1005 (v3), 1135-1138 (v2), and 1530 (v1). Overtone bands representing xanthomonadin were identified as 2264-2275 (2v2), and combinational bands at 2653-2662 (v1+ v2). The findings from this study validate our previous finding that the Raman fingerprints of xanthomonadin are unique for the genus Xanthomonas. This facilitates rapid identification (~5 minutes) of Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial culture plates. The xanthomonadin marker is different from Raman markers of many other bacterial genus including Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Ralstonia. This study also identified Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial strains isolated from a diseased wheat sample on a culture plate.

  16. Atmospheric absorption versus deep ultraviolet (pre-)resonance in Raman lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen, Hans D.; Willitsford, Adam H.; Neely, Ryan R.; Chadwick, C. Todd; Philbrick, C. Russell

    2016-05-01

    The Raman scattering of several liquids and solid materials has been investigated near the deep ultraviolet absorption features corresponding to the electron energy states of the chemical species present. It is found to provide significant enhancement, but is always accompanied by absorption due to that or other species along the path. We investigate this trade-off for water vapor, although the results for liquid water and ice will be quantitatively very similar. An optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was pumped by the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, and the output frequency doubled to generate a tunable excitation beam in the 215-600 nm range. We use the tunable laser excitation beam to investigate pre-resonance and resonance Raman spectroscopy near an absorption band of ice. A significant enhancement in the Raman signal was observed. The A-term of the Raman scattering tensor, which describes the pre-resonant enhancement of the spectra, is also used to find the primary observed intensities as a function of incident beam energy, although a wide resonance structure near the final-state-effect related absorption in ice is also found. The results suggest that use of pre-resonant or resonant Raman LIDAR could increase the sensitivity to improve spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric water vapor measurements. However, these shorter wavelengths also exhibit higher ozone absorption. These opposing effects are modeled using MODTRAN for several configurations relevant for studies of boundary layer water and in the vicinity of clouds. Such data could be used in studies of the measurement of energy flow at the water-air and cloud-air interface, and may help with understanding some of the major uncertainties in current global climate models.

  17. Phase-locking transition in Raman combs generated with whispering gallery mode resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the mechanisms leading to phase locking in Raman optical frequency combs generated with ultrahigh Q crystalline whispering gallery mode disk resonators. We show that several regimes can be triggered depending on the pumping conditions, such as single-frequency Raman lasing, multimode operation involving more than one family of cavity eigenmodes, and Kerr-assisted Raman frequency comb generation. The phase locking and coherence of the combs are experimentally monitored through the measurement of beat signal spectra. These phase-locked combs, which feature high coherence and wide spectral spans, are obtained with pump powers in the range of a few tens of mW. In particular, Raman frequency combs with multiple free-spectral range spacings are reported, and the measured beat signal in the microwave domain features a 3 dB linewidth smaller than 50 Hz, thereby indicating phase locking. PMID:27519071

  18. Phase-locking transition in Raman combs generated with whispering gallery mode resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K

    2016-08-15

    We investigate the mechanisms leading to phase locking in Raman optical frequency combs generated with ultrahigh Q crystalline whispering gallery mode disk resonators. We show that several regimes can be triggered depending on the pumping conditions, such as single-frequency Raman lasing, multimode operation involving more than one family of cavity eigenmodes, and Kerr-assisted Raman frequency comb generation. The phase locking and coherence of the combs are experimentally monitored through the measurement of beat signal spectra. These phase-locked combs, which feature high coherence and wide spectral spans, are obtained with pump powers in the range of a few tens of mW. In particular, Raman frequency combs with multiple free-spectral range spacings are reported, and the measured beat signal in the microwave domain features a 3 dB linewidth smaller than 50 Hz, thereby indicating phase locking.

  19. Resonance enhancement effects in Raman-enhancing pyramid-like V-shape groove microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechler, M; Mechler, A; McNaughton, D

    2009-01-01

    Microscopic pyramidal pits in a reflective surface, a geometry similar to a retroreflector, are frequently used to enhance signal strength. The enhancement effect is generally attributed to surface plasmons, however, the sub-wavelength to near-wavelength dimensions of the pyramidal 3D geometry suggest contributions from diffraction and near-field effects. Our theoretical analysis of the light intensity distribution in the similar (but simpler) 2D geometry assuming a perfect conductor screen, that is, in the absence of any plasmon effects, shows that interference patterns forming within the cavity cause a significant resonant increase in local intensity. Such effect can be important for many applications, especially for the widely used Raman spectroscopy. Resonant enhancement without plasmons of the emitted Raman signal due to enhanced local field amplitude is also possible, which implies that the geometry practically implements a Raman laser. Comparison of diffraction patterns obtained with near-field and far...

  20. Single-Qubit Gates For Ensemble Qubits Using Off-Resonant Raman Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmedzhanov R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the single-qubit gates based on off-resonant Raman interaction when they are applied to qubits implemented as ensembles of active centers. We propose a new scheme which can be used to significantly decrease the influence of inhomogeneous broadening.

  1. Resonance raman and absorption spectra of isomeric retinals in their lowest excited triplet states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N.-H.; Houee-Levin, C.

    1985-01-01

    implications about the size of the energy barriers separating the various triplet species are discussed. The resonance Raman spectra obtained by using either anthracene (ET = 177.7 kJ mol-1) or naphthalene (ET = 254.8 kJ mol-1) as sensitizers were virtually identical for the corresponding triplet states from...

  2. Resonance Raman Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study of Geometry Distortion of Thiourea in 21A State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-bo Zhang; Yan-ying Zhao; Xu-ming Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The A-band resonance Raman spectra of thiourea were obtained in water and acetonitrile solution.B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and RCIS/6-311++G(3df,3pd) calculations were done to elucidate the ultraviolet electronic transitions,the distorted geometry structure and the saddle point of thiourea in 21A excited state,respectively.The resonance Raman spectra were assigned.The absorption spectrum and resonance Raman intensities were modeled using Heller's time-dependent wavepacket approach to resonance Raman scattering.The results indicate that largest change in the displacement takes place with the C=S stretch mode v6 (|Δ|=0.95) and noticeable changes appear in the HsN3H6+H8N4H7 wag v5 (|Δ|=0.19),NCN symmetric stretch+C=S stretch+N3H6+H8N4 wag v4 (|Δ|=0.18),while the moderate intensities of 2v15 and 4v15 are mostly due to the large excited state frequency changes of v15,but not due to its significant change in the normal mode displacement.The mechanism of the appearance of even overtones of the S=CN2 out of plane deformation is explored.The results indicate that a Franck-Condon region saddle point is the driving force for the quadric phonon mechanism within the standard A-term of resonance Raman scattering,which leads to the pyramidalization of the carbon center and the geometry distortion of thiourea molecule in 21A excited state.

  3. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddala, Sriram; Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2013-12-01

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm-1) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  4. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guddala, Sriram; Narayana Rao, D., E-mail: dnr.laserlab@gmail.com, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Dwivedi, Vindesh K.; Vijaya Prakash, G. [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, IIT Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2013-12-14

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm{sup −1}) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies.

  5. Effect of atomic diffusion on the Raman-Ramsey CPT resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchina, Elena; Novikova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the characteristics of two-photon transmission resonances in Rb vapor cells with different amount of buffer gas under the conditions of steady-state coherent population trapping (CPT) and pulsed Raman-Ramsey (RR-) CPT interrogation scheme. We particularly focused on the influence of the Rb atoms diffusing in and out of the laser beam. We showed that this effect modifies the shape of both CPT and Raman-Ramsey resonances, as well as their projected performance for CPT clock applications. In particular we found that at moderate buffer gas pressures RR-CPT did not improved the projected atomic clock stability compare to the regular steady-state CPT resonance.

  6. Raman scattering enhancement in photon-plasmon resonance mediated metal-dielectric microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, we report the photon-plasmon interaction scheme and enhanced field strengths resulted into the amplification of phonon in a novel microcavity. A metal-dielectric microcavity, with unified cavity photonic mode and localized surface plasmon resonances, is visualized by impregnating the gold nanoparticles into the deep see-through nano-sized pores of porous silicon microcavity. The intense optical field strengths resulting from the photon-plasmon interactions are probed by both resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering experiments. Due to photon-plasmon-phonon interaction mechanism, several orders of enhancement in the intensity of scattered Raman Stokes photon (at 500 cm−1) are observed. Our metal nanoparticle-microcavity hybrid system shows the potential to improve the sensing figure of merit as well as the applications of plasmonics for optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and related technologies

  7. Resonance Raman scattering and excitonic spectra in TlInS{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalamai, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 5 Academy Street, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Stamov, I.G. [T.G. Shevchenko State University of Pridnestrovie, 25 Oktyabrya Street 107, 3300 Tiraspol, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Syrbu, N.N., E-mail: sirbunn@yahoo.com [Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Avenue, 2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Ursaki, V.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 5 Academy Street, 2028 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Dorogan, V. [Technical University of Moldova, 168 Stefan cel Mare Avenue, 2004 Chisinau, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The excitons ground and excited states for E∥a and E∥b polarizations in absorption and reflection spectra of TlInS{sub 2} crystals were detected. The fundamental parameters of excitons and bands were determined at k=0. The resonance Raman spectra were investigated in the region of excitons transitions. The resonance Raman scattering spectra with participation of optical phonons that are active at the center of Brillouin zone were identified. The Raman scattering in Y(YX)Z and Y(ZX)Z geometries at 10 K with excitation by He–Ne laser was researched. Energies of phonons with A{sub g} and B{sub g} symmetries were determined. It was shown that the number of modes at 10 K was two times lower than expected according to theoretical calculations. - Highlights: • The resonance Raman scattering in geometry Y(YX)Z and Y(ZX)Z at 10 K was investigated. • Energies of phonons with A{sub g} and B{sub g} symmetries were determined. • The experimental and theoretical calculations completely conform if crystals are described by symmetry group D{sub 4h}{sup 15}. • The main parameters of excitons and bands were determined. • The model of electron transitions in k=0 was suggested.

  8. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Explosives Vapor at Standoff Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Ehlerding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to perform standoff measurements on nitromethane (NM, 2,4-DNT, and 2,4,6-TNT in vapor phase. The Raman cross sections for NM, DNT, and TNT in vapor phase have been measured in the wavelength range 210–300 nm under laboratory conditions, in order to estimate how large resonance enhancement factors can be achieved for these explosives. The results show that the signal is enhanced up to 250,000 times for 2,4-DNT and up to 60,000 times for 2,4,6-TNT compared to the nonresonant signal at 532 nm. Realistic outdoor measurements on NM in vapor phase at 13 m distance were also performed, which indicate a potential for resonance Raman spectroscopy as a standoff technique for detection of vapor phase explosives. In addition, the Raman spectra of acetone, ethanol, and methanol were measured at the same wavelengths, and their influence on the spectrum from NM was investigated.

  9. One phonon resonant Raman scattering in semiconductor quantum wires: Magnetic field effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt-Riera, Re., E-mail: rbriera@posgrado.cifus.uson.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Hermosillo, Avenida Tecnologico S/N, Colonia Sahuaro, C.P. 83170, Hermosillo, Sonor, (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, C.P. 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Betancourt-Riera, Ri. [Instituto Tecnologico de Hermosillo, Avenida Tecnologico S/N, Colonia Sahuaro, C.P. 83170, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Nieto Jalil, J.M. [Tecnologico de Monterrey-Campus Sonora Norte, Bulevar Enrique Mazon Lopez No. 965, C.P. 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Riera, R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, C.P. 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a theory of one phonon resonant Raman scattering in a semiconductor quantum wire of cylindrical geometry in the presence of an external magnetic field distribution, parallel to the cylinder axis. The effect of the magnetic field in the electron and hole states, and in the Raman scattering efficiency, is determinate. We consider the electron-phonon interaction using a Froehlich-type Hamiltonian, deduced for the case of complete confinement phonon modes by Comas and his collaborators. We also assume T=0 K, a single parabolic conduction and valence bands. The spectra are discussed for different magnetic field values and the selection rules for the processes are also studied.

  10. Demonstration of resonant backward Raman amplification in high-density gas-jet plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. H.; Zhou, K. N.; Zheng, X. M.; Wei, X. F.; Zhu, Q. H.; Su, J. Q.; Xie, N.; Jiao, Z. H.; Peng, H.; Wang, X. D.; Sun, L.; Li, Q.; Huang, Z.; Zuo, Y. L.

    2016-10-01

    Backward Raman amplification was observed in a 0.7 mm-long high-density gas jet plasma. The 800 nm 30 fs seed pulse was amplified by a factor  ∼28, with an output energy of 2.8 mJ. The output spectra showed that the waveband around 800 nm was significantly amplified. The experimental result demonstrated that the resonant Raman amplification can be realized in high-density plasma against strong plasma instability.

  11. Interpretation of the resonance Raman spectra of linear tetrapyrroles based on DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneip, Christa; Hildebrandt, Peter; Németh, Károly; Mark, Franz; Schaffner, Kurt

    1999-10-01

    Raman spectra of linear methine-bridged tetrapyrroles in different conformational and protonation states were calculated on the basis of scaled force fields obtained by density functional theory. Results are reported for protonated phycocyanobilin in the extended ZZZasa configuration, as it is found in C-phycocyanin of cyanobacteria. The calculated spectra are in good agreement with experimental spectra of the protein-bound chromophore in the α-subunit of C-phycocyanin and allow a plausible and consistent assignment of most of the observed resonance Raman bands in the region between 1000 and 1700 cm -1.

  12. Quantum State Absorptions Coupled To Resonance Raman Spectroscopy Could Result In A General Explanation of TERS

    CERN Document Server

    Schultz, Zachary D; Dekhter, Rimma; Anestopoulos, Dimitris; Grammatikopoulos, Spyridon; Papagelis, Kostantinos; Marr, James M; Lewis, David; Galiotis, Costas; Lev, Dimtry; Lewis, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) amplifies the intensity of vibrational Raman scattering by employing the tip of a probe interacting, in ultra close proximity, with a surface. Although a general understanding of the TERS process is still to be fully elucidated, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) feedback is often applied with success in TERS to keep a noble metal probe in intimate proximity with a noble metal substrate. Since such STM TERS is a common modality, the possible implications of plasmonic fields that may be induced by the tunneling process are investigated and reported. In addition, TERS of a 2D resonant molecular system, a MoS2 bilayer crystal and a 2D non-resonant, lipid molecular bilayer is compared. Data with multiple excitation wavelengths and surfaces for the resonant system in the near- (TERS) and far-field regimes are reported. An interpretation based on weak coupling interactions within the framework of conventional resonance Raman scattering can explain the observed TERS enhancements...

  13. Resonant Raman scattering theory for Kitaev models and their Majorana fermion boundary modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Brent; Knolle, Johannes; Perkins, Natalia B.; Burnell, F. J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the inelastic light scattering response in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Kitaev spin-liquid models with Majorana spinon band structures in the symmetry classes BDI and D leading to protected gapless surface modes. We present a detailed calculation of the resonant Raman/Brillouin scattering vertex relevant to iridate and ruthenate compounds whose low-energy physics is believed to be proximate to these spin-liquid phases. In the symmetry class BDI, we find that while the resonant scattering on thin films can detect the gapless boundary modes of spin liquids, the nonresonant processes do not couple to them. For the symmetry class D, however, we find that the coupling between both types of light-scattering processes and the low-energy surface states is strongly suppressed. Additionally, we describe the effect of weak time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations on the bulk Raman response of these systems.

  14. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped

    OpenAIRE

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Acar, SelÇuk; Kokal, İlkin; Haessler, Wolfgang; Weber, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp(3)-hybridized carbon r...

  16. Raman Theory for a Molecule in a Vibrating Microcavity Oscillating in Fundamental Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoXue; WU Ying

    2001-01-01

    We propose a model to describe the energy structure and dynamics of a system of a molecule interacting with infinite photon modes in a vibrating microcavity whose boundary oscillates in the fundamental resonance. By constructing an so(2,1) Lie algebra for the infinite photon modes, we obtain analytical expressions of the energy eigenstates, energy eigenvalues and the system's evolution operator for this Raman model under certain conditions.``

  17. Surface plasmon enhanced interfacial electron transfer and resonance Raman, surface-enhanced resonance Raman studies of cytochrome C mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Junwei

    1999-11-08

    Surface plasmon resonance was utilized to enhance the electron transfer at silver/solution interfaces. Photoelectrochemical reductions of nitrite, nitrate, and CO{sub 2} were studied on electrochemically roughened silver electrode surfaces. The dependence of the photocurrent on photon energy, applied potential and concentration of nitrite demonstrates that the photoelectrochemical reduction proceeds via photoemission process followed by the capture of hydrated electrons. The excitation of plasmon resonances in nanosized metal structures resulted in the enhancement of the photoemission process. In the case of photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}, large photoelectrocatalytic effect for the reduction of CO{sub 2} was observed in the presence of surface adsorbed methylviologen, which functions as a mediator for the photoexcited electron transfer from silver metal to CO{sub 2} in solution. Photoinduced reduction of microperoxidase-11 adsorbed on roughened silver electrode was also observed and attributed to the direct photoejection of free electrons of silver metal. Surface plasmon assisted electron transfer at nanostructured silver particle surfaces was further determined by EPR method.

  18. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  19. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  20. Resonance Raman spectra of phthalocyanine monolayers on different supports. A normal mode analysis of zinc phthalocyanine by means of the MNDO method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palys, Barbara J.; Ham, van den Dirk M.W.; Briels, Wim; Feil, Dirk

    1995-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of monolayers of transition metal phthalocyanines reveal specific interaction with the support. To elucidate its mechanism, Raman spectra of zinc phthalocyanine monolayers were studied. The analysis was based largely on the results of MNDO calculations. Calculated wavenumbers

  1. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of 85Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10-10 or less of 85Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace 85Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s5 metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p6 energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s4 level with the bulk of the 85Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine 85Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below

  2. Analysis of normal and diseased colon mucosa using ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustany, Nada N.; Manoharan, Ramasamy; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1996-04-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy was used to characterize normal and diseased colon mucosa in vitro. A tunable mode-locked Titanium:Sapphire laser operating at 76 MHz was used to irradiate normal and diseased colon tissue samples with 251 nm light generated from the third harmonic of the fundamental radiation. The Raman scattered light was collected and analyzed using a 1 meter spectrometer fitted with a UV coated, liquid nitrogen cooled CCD detector. The measured spectra show prominent bands that correspond to those of known tissue constituents including nucleic acids, aromatic amino acids and lipids. Using the Raman lineshapes measured from pure solutions of nucleotides, tryptophan, tyrosine, FAD, and from lipid-rich serosal fat, the colon spectra were modeled by a least square fitting algorithm whereby the colon spectra were assumed to be a linear combination of the pure biochemical lineshapes. The relative Raman scattering cross section of each biochemical was determined so that the relative concentration of each compound with respect to the others, could be extracted from a given tissue spectrum.

  3. Resonant Raman detectors for noninvasive assessment of carotenoid antioxidants in human tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Ermakova, Maia R.; Ermakov, Igor V.; Bernstein, P. S.

    2003-07-01

    Carotenoid antioxidants form an important part of the human body's anti-oxidant system and are thought to play an important role in disease prevention. Studies have shown an inverse correlation between high dietary intake of carotenoids and risk of certain cancers, heart disease and degenerative diseases. For example, the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, which are present in high concentrations in the human retina, are thought to prevent age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. We have developed various clinical prototype instruments, based on resonance Raman spectroscopy, that are able to measure carotenoid levels directly in the tissue of interest. At present we use the Raman technology to quantify carotenoid levels in the human retina, in skin, and in the oral cavity. We use resonant excitation of the π-conjugated molecules in the visible wavelength range and detect the molecules' carbon-carbon stretch frequencies. The spectral properties of the various carotenoids can be explored to selectively measure in some cases individual carotenoid species linked ot the prevention of cancer, in human skin. The instrumentation involves home-built, compact, high-throughput Raman systems capable of measuring physiological carotenoid concentrations in human subjects rapidly and quantitatively. The instruments have been demonstrated for field use and screening of tissue carotenoid status in large populations. In Epidemiology, the technology holds promise as a novel, noninvasive and objective biomarker of fruit and vegetable uptake.

  4. Resonant-Raman Intensities of N-layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Henrique; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Lorchat, Ettienne; Fernique, François; Molina-Sánchez, Alejandro; Berciaud, Stéphane; Wirtz, Ludger

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have interesting optical and electronic properties that make them good candidates for nano-engineering applications. Raman spectroscopy provides information about the vibrational modes and optical spectrum at the same time: when the laser energy is close to an electronic transition, the intensity is increased due to resonance. We investigate these effects combining different ab initio methods: we obtain ground-state and vibrational properties from density functional theory and the optical absorption spectrum using GW corrections and the Bethe-Salpeter equation to account for the excitonic effects which are known to play an important role in TMDs. Using a quasi-static finite differences approach, we calculate the dielectric susceptibility for different light polarizations and different phonon modes in order to determine the Raman tensor of TMDs, in particular of multi-layer and bulk MoTe2. We explain recent experimental results for the splitting of high-frequency modes and deviations from the non-resonant Raman model. We also give a brief outlook on possible improvements of the methodology.

  5. Stimulated Stokes and Antistokes Raman Scattering in Microspherical Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Cosi, Franco; Righini, Giancarlo C; Soria, Silvia; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric microspheres can confine light and sound for a length of time through high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGM). Glass microspheres can be thought as a store of energy with a huge variety of applications: compact laser sources, highly sensitive biochemical sensors and nonlinear phenomena. A protocol for the fabrication of both the microspheres and coupling system is given. The couplers described here are tapered fibers. Efficient generation of nonlinear phenomena related to third order optical non-linear susceptibility Χ((3)) interactions in triply resonant silica microspheres is presented in this paper. The interactions here reported are: Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), and four wave mixing processes comprising Stimulated Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (SARS). A proof of the cavity-enhanced phenomenon is given by the lack of correlation among the pump, signal and idler: a resonant mode has to exist in order to obtain the pair of signal and idler. In the case of hyperparametric oscillations (four wave mixing and stimulated anti-stokes Raman scattering), the modes must fulfill the energy and momentum conservation and, last but not least, have a good spatial overlap. PMID:27078752

  6. Resonant micro-Raman spectroscopy on few InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeppen, Tim; Brocke, Thomas; Kipp, Tobias; Schramm, Andreas; Heyn, Christian; Heitmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Zentrum fuer Mikrostrukturforschung der Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the electronic excitations in InAs quantum dots under the exploitation of resonant inelastic light scattering. In contrast to earlier measurements at the E{sub 0}+{delta} gap ({proportional_to}1.65 eV), we now excite resonantly at the E{sub 0} gap ({proportional_to}1.2 eV) using a TiSa-laser in the near-infrared regime. Furthermore we now use a microscope setup focussing the exciting laser to a diameter of about 1.8 {mu}m. Although there are still about 250 quantum dots under the laser spot, we observe very few sharp lines of individual quantum dots which arise due to resonant excitation. We can distinguish between Raman signals of electronic excitations and photoluminescence signals which reside in the same energy range.

  7. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy of single R6G molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Zeng-Hui; Liu Li; Wang Gui-Ying; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on colloidal silver clusters has been studied. Based on the great enhancement of the Raman signal and the quench of the fluorescence, the SERRS spectra of R6G were recorded for the samples of dye colloidal solution with different concentrations. Spectral inhomogeneity behaviours from single molecules in the dried sample films were observed with complementary evidences, such as spectral polarization, spectral diffusion, intensity fluctuation of vibrational lines and even "breathing" of the molecules. Sequential spectra observed from a liquid sample with an average of 0.3 dye molecules in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1 or 2 molecules. Difference between the SERRS spectra of R6G excited by linearly and circularly polarized light were experimentally measured.

  8. Resonance Raman study on distorted symmetry of porphyrin in nickel octaethyl porphyrin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Tewari; R Das; A Chakraborty; Ramendu Bhattacharjee

    2004-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of nickel octaethyl porphyrin, Ni(OEP), in CH2Cl2 (solvent) at different excitations such as 514.5, 488.0, 441.6 and 406.7 nm are recorded and analysed. The results of the theory of distortion-induced RR intensity is applied to the observed spectra to determine the excited electronic state symmetry of porphyrin in Ni(OEP). It is concluded that the porphyrin molecule (D4h structure) attains a non-polar distorted structure of D2 symmetry rather than S4 symmetry in CH2Cl2 solution.

  9. Monitoring LED-induced carotenoid increase in grapes by Transmission Resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, Alicia G.; Martínez, Nerea L.; Telle, Helmut H.; Ureña, Ángel González

    2013-02-01

    Transmission Resonance Raman (TRR) spectroscopy combines increased signal-to-noise ratio with enhanced analytical sensibility. TRR was applied to directly monitor, without any sample preparation, the enhancement of β-carotene content in table grapes when they are irradiated by low power UV-LEDs. It was shown that, with respect to control samples, the carotenoid content in the grapes increased about five-fold, using UV-LED irradiation doses being two orders of magnitude lower than the maximum limit allowed by United States Food and Drug Administration. These promising results may pave the way for the development of easy, non-invasive techniques to improve food quality.

  10. Resonance Raman Spectrum of the Transient (SCN)2 Free Radical Anion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn;

    1979-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the transient species (λmax = 475 nm, τ½ = 1.6 μs) formed by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of thiocyanate, SCN2−, is reported. The spectrum is discussed in terms of the previous assignment of this transient to the radical anion, (SCN)−2. The observed vibrat...... vibrational frequencies of the radical anion are consistent with substantial weakening of the S---S and the Ctriple bond; length as m-dashN bonds are compared with neutral thiocyanogen....

  11. Al-doped MgB2 materials studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateni, Ali; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Somer, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Undoped and aluminum (Al) doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using a high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. The microscopic defect structures of Al-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance. It was found that Mg-vacancies are responsible for defect-induced peculiarities in MgB2. Above a certain level of Al doping, enhanced conductive properties of MgB2 disappear due to filling of vacancies or trapping of Al in Mg-related vacancy sites.

  12. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  13. Visualizing resonances in the complex plane with vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurna, Martin; Garbacik, Erik T; Korterik, Jeroen P; Herek, Jennifer L; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2010-09-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant response can be determined, and the nonresonant background rejected, by extracting the imaginary component of the complex response, enhancing the sensitivity of CARS measurements. Second, selectivity is increased via determination of the phase and amplitude, allowing separation of individual molecular components of a sample even when their vibrational bands overlap. Here, using vibrational phase contrast CARS (VPC-CARS), we demonstrate enhanced sensitivity in quantitative measurements of ethanol/methanol mixtures and increased selectivity in a heterogeneous mixture of plastics and water. This powerful technique opens a wide range of possibilities for studies of complicated systems where overlapping resonances limit standard methodologies. PMID:20731373

  14. Magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy for early malaria diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Hemozoin is a by-product of malaria infection in erythrocytes, which has been explored as a biomarker for early malaria diagnosis. We report magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β--hematin crystals, which are the equivalent of hemozoin biocrystals in spectroscopic features, by using magnetic nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag). The external magnetic field enriches β--hematin crystals and enhances the binding between β--hematin crystals and magnetic nanoparticles, which provides further improvement in SERRS signals. The magnetic field-enriched SERRS signal of β--hematin crystals shows approximately five orders of magnitude enhancement in the resonance Raman signal, in comparison to about three orders of magnitude improvement in the SERRS signal without the influence of magnetic field. The improvement has led to a β--hematin detection limit at a concentration of 5 nM (roughly equivalent to 30 parasites/μl at the early stages of malaria infection), which demonstrates the potential of magnetic field-enriched SERRS technique in early malaria diagnosis.

  15. Resonance Raman study on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: Control of reactivity by substrate-binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Indoleamine 2,3-dioygenase has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. • Trp-binding to the enzyme induces high frequency shift of the Fe–His stretching mode. • Increased imidazolate character of histidine promotes the O–O bond cleavage step. • A fine-tuning of the reactivity of the O–O bond cleavage reaction is identified. • The results are consistent with the sequential oxygen-atom-transfer mechanism. - Abstract: Resonance Raman spectra of ligand-bound complexes including the 4-phenylimidazole complex and of free and L-Trp-bound forms of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in the ferric state were examined. Effects on the vinyl and propionate substituent groups of the heme were detected in a ligand-dependent fashion. The effects of phenyl group of 4-phenylimidazole on the vinyl and propionate Raman bands were evident when compared with the case of imidazole ligand. Substrate binding to the ferrous protein caused an upshift of the iron–histidine stretching mode by 3 cm−1, indicating an increase in negativity of the imidazole ring, which favors the O–O bond cleavage. The substrate binding event is likely to be communicated from the heme distal side to the iron–histidine bond through heme substituent groups and the hydrogen-bond network which includes water molecules, as identified in an X-ray structure of a 4-phenylimidazole complex. The results provide evidence for fine-tuning of the reactivity of O–O bond cleavage by the oxygenated heme upon binding of L-Trp

  16. Resonant Raman scattering in GaAsN: Mixing, localization and band impurity formation of electronic states

    OpenAIRE

    Bachelier, Guillaume; Mlayah, A.; Cazayous, M.; Groenen, J.; Zwick, Antoine; Carrère, Hélène; Bedel, Eléna; Arnoult, Alexandre; Rocher, A.; Ponchet, A.

    2003-01-01

    Raman measurements on a thick GaAsN layer and on GaAsN/GaAs quantum well structures are reported. The scattering was excited close to resonance with the N-induced E+ transition, and detected in both Stokes and anti-Stokes regions including the low-frequency range around the Rayleigh line. A broad continuous scattering due to acoustic phonons is observed on the thick GaAsN layer. Calculations of the Raman efficiency showed that localization and mixing of the resonant electronic states well acc...

  17. Vibrational techniques applied to photosynthesis: Resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Andrew; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process. Selectivity is achieved via resonance with the absorption transition of the chromophore of interest. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy is a complementary technique, in that it provides the same level of information (structure, conformation, interactions), but in this case for the emitting pigment(s) only (whether isolated or in an ensemble of interacting chromophores). The selectivity provided by these vibrational techniques allows for the analysis of pigment molecules not only when they are isolated in solvents, but also when embedded in soluble or membrane proteins and even, as shown recently, in vivo. They can be used, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these pigment molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment. These techniques are even able to follow subtle changes in chromophore conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopies, the information content of the vibrational spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this article, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter(s) each vibrational band is sensitive to. A selection of applications is then presented, in order to illustrate how these techniques have been used in the field of photosynthesis, and what type of information has been obtained. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25268562

  18. In situ monitoring of polymer redox states by resonance µRaman spectroscopy and its applications in polymer modified microfluidic channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Hella; Jellema, Laurens-Jan C.; Lopez-Martinez, Maria J.; Areephong, Jetsuda; Verpoorte, Elisabeth; Feringa, Ben L.; Browne, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    We report the application of multi-wavelength resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy for the characterisation of vinyl-bridged polysexithiophene films formed by electropolymerisation on gold electrodes. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of the neutral, polaronic and bipolaronic states of the polymer were dete

  19. Arsenic speciation by X-ray spectroscopy using resonant Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, H.J.; Leani, J.J. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cba (Argentina); Perez, C.A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The toxicity of arsenic species is widely known. A realistic evaluation of the risk posed by As depends on accurate determination of As speciation, because its toxicity and mobility varies with oxidation state and chemical environment. The most toxic species are inorganic As (III) and As (V) called respectively arsenite or trivalent arsenic, and arsenate or pentavalent arsenic. Recently, x-ray Resonant Raman Scattering spectroscopy has been successfully employed to determine the oxidation state of metals. In this work we use RRS spectroscopy to perform arsenic speciation. The measurements were carried out in XRF station of the D09B-XRF beamline at the Brazilian synchrotron facility (LNLS, Campinas). Mineral samples of As in different oxidation states (As(III) and AS(V)), and two biological forms of arsenic (monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V) and dimethylarsinic acid DMA(V)) were analysed. The samples were diluted, deposited on silicon wafers and allowed to dry. The amount of liquid deposited on the reflector before evaporation was 20 microliters for all the specimens. These samples were irradiated with monochromatic photons of 11816 eV, i.e., below the K-edge of arsenic in order to inspect the Raman emissions. The measuring lifetime was 3600 sec for each sample. Spectra were analysed with specific programs for spectrum analysis using non-conventional functions for data fitting, i.e., modified Voight functions (for Compton peaks), Gaussian functions for fluorescent and for low intensity peaks (such as escape peaks and other contributions), and polynomial functions for the background. Raman peaks were fitted using specific functions. In this work we have shown that resonant Raman scattering spectroscopy can be used to analyse arsenic species. The method is very simple and reliable. The most important feature of this method relies in the possibility of using the same spectrometer of XRF analysis or TXRF analysis. In this way, practically in the same experiment

  20. The first photoexcitation step of ruthenium-based models for artificial photosynthesis highlighted by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Neugebauer, Johannes; Presselt, Martin; Uhlemann, Ute; Schmitt, Michael; Rau, Sven; Popp, Jürgen; Reiher, Markus

    2007-05-31

    Ruthenium-polypyridine and related complexes play an important role as models for light-harvesting antenna systems to be employed in artificial photosynthesis. In this theoretical and experimental work, the first photoexcitation step of a tetranuclear [Ru2Pd2] complex composed of two ruthenium-bipyridyl subunits and two palladium-based fragments, {[(tbbpy)2Ru(tmbi)]2[Pd(allyl)]2}2+ (tbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine, tmbi = 5,6,5',6'-tetramethyl-2,2'-bibenzimidazolate), is investigated by means of experimental and theoretical resonance Raman spectroscopy. The calculated spectra, which were obtained within the short-time approximation combined with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), reproduce the experimental spectrum with excellent agreement. We also compared calculations on off-resonance Raman spectra, for which a completely different theoretical approach has to be used, to experimental ones and again found very good agreement. The [Ru2Pd2] complex represents the probably largest system for which a quantum chemical frequency analysis and a calculation of conventional Raman as well as resonance Raman spectra with reasonable basis sets have been performed. A comparison between the resonance Raman spectra of the [Ru2Pd2] complex and its mononuclear [Ru] building block [(tbbpy)2Ru(tmbi)]2+ and a normal-mode analysis reveal that the [Ru2Pd2] resonance Raman spectrum is composed uniquely from peaks arising from the [Ru] fragment. This observation and an analysis of the Kohn-Sham orbitals mainly involved in the initial electronic excitation in the TDDFT description of the [Ru2Pd2] system support the hypothesis that the initial photoexcitation step of [Ru2Pd2] is a charge-transfer excitation from the ruthenium atoms to the adjacent butyl-2,2'-bipyridine ligands. PMID:17489631

  1. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules using near field photon induced forces without resonant electronic enhancement gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Huang, Fei; Nowak, Derek; Kumar Wickramasinghe, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report on stimulated Raman spectroscopy and nanoscopy of molecules, excited without resonant electronic enhancement gain, and recorded using near field photon induced forces. Photon-induced interaction forces between the sharp metal coated silicon tip of an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a sample resulting from stimulated Raman excitation were detected. We controlled the tip to sample spacing using the higher order flexural eigenmodes of the AFM cantilever, enabling the tip to come very close to the sample. As a result, the detection sensitivity was increased compared with previous work on Raman force microscopy. Raman vibrational spectra of azobenzene thiol and l-phenylalanine were measured and found to agree well with published results. Near-field force detection eliminates the need for far-field optical spectrometer detection. Recorded images show spatial resolution far below the optical diffraction limit. Further optimization and use of ultrafast pulsed lasers could push the detection sensitivity towards the single molecule limit.

  2. Gold split-ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2013-10-24

    We used gold split ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The arrays of SRRs were fabricated by electron-beam lithography in combination with plasma etching. In the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, SERS enhancement factors of the order of 105 was achieved. This SERS enhancement increased as the size of the split gap decrease as a consequence of the matching between the resonance wavelength of the SRRs and the excitation wavelength of SERS. As the size of the split gap decreased, the localized surface plasmon resonance shifted to near the excitation wavelength and, thus, resulted in the increase in the electric field on the nanostructures. We used finite integration method (FIT) to simulate numerically the electromagnetic properties of the SRRs. The results of the simulation agreed well with our experimental observations. We anticipate this work will provide an approach to manipulate the SERS enhancement by modulating the size of split gap with SRRs without affecting the area and structural arrangement. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. In situ resonant Raman scattering and reversible photoinduced structural change in YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osada, M.; Käll, M.; Bäckström, J.;

    2005-01-01

    or absence of a specific Raman scattering resonance. A comparison of the spectral efficiencies for this photoswitching with analogous data for the persistent photoconductivity and photoconductivity quenching effects suggests that the two phenomena have the same microscopic origin. We argue that the effects...

  4. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  5. Low skin carotenoid concentration measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy is associated with metabolic syndrome in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Edward W; Wei, Esther K; Bennett, Nancy; Zhang, Laura M

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). Antioxidants, including carotenoids, are decreased in MS. We hypothesized that a low skin carotenoid score (SCS), calculated using resonance Raman spectroscopy, would correlate with the presence of MS. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients referred for dietary assessment between 2010 and 2012. For each patient, a nutrition history, medical history, and SCS were recorded. χ(2) and Student t test were used to determine factors associated with MS. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with MS. One hundred fifty-five patients were included. The mean age was 54.1 ± 13.1 years, and the mean body mass index was 28.3 ± 6.1 kg/m(2). Metabolic syndrome was present in 43.9% of patients. The mean SCS was 28 084 ± 14 006 Raman counts (RC), including 23 058 ± 9812 RC for patients with MS and 32 011 ± 15 514 RC for patients without MS (P = .0001). In a multivariate analysis, SCS less than 25 000 RC (odds ratio, 3.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-10.7; P = .01) was independently associated with MS. A higher number of MS components was associated with a progressively lower SCS (P = .004). In a consecutive sample of patients referred for dietary assessment, a noninvasively measured SCS was lower among patients with MS.

  6. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H Y; Jia, C J; Chen, Z Y; Wohlfeld, K; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Wu, W B; Okamoto, J; Lee, W S; Hashimoto, M; He, Y; Shen, Z X; Yoshida, Y; Eisaki, H; Mou, C Y; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O(8+δ). Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  7. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Single- and few-layer WTe2 and their suspended nanostructures: Raman signatures and nanomechanical resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesung; Ye, Fan; Wang, Zenghui; Yang, Rui; Hu, Jin; Mao, Zhiqiang; Wei, Jiang; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-04-01

    Single crystal tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) has recently been discovered to exhibit non-saturating extreme magnetoresistance in bulk; it has also emerged as a new layered material from which atomic layer crystals can be extracted. While atomically thin WTe2 is attractive for its unique properties, little research has been conducted on single- and few-layer WTe2. Here we report the isolation of single- and few-layer WTe2, as well as the fabrication and characterization of the first WTe2 suspended nanostructures. We have observed new Raman signatures of single- and few-layer WTe2 that have been theoretically predicted but have not been reported to date, in both on-substrate and suspended WTe2 flakes. We have further probed the nanomechanical properties of suspended WTe2 structures by measuring their flexural resonances, and obtain a Young's modulus of EY ~ 80 GPa for the suspended WTe2 flakes. This study paves the way for future investigations and utilizations of the multiple new Raman fingerprints of single- and few-layer WTe2, and for explorations of mechanical control of WTe2 atomic layers.

  9. Harmonic-seeded resonant Raman amplification in strong-field ionized nitrogen molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jinping; Tian, Chuanshan; Li, Ziting; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Generation of free-space laser-like emissions of high spatiotemporal coherence and narrow bandwidth in atmosphere opens promising opportunities for remote spectroscopic sensing. Here, we report on generation of such laser-like emissions, which results from the combined contributions of perturbative and non-perturbative nonlinear optical effects in nitrogen molecules exposed to intense mid-infrared laser fields. We systematically investigate the dependence of the generated free-space laser spectrum on wavelength and power of the driver laser. It is revealed that the free-space laser is produced by resonant Raman amplification of the fifth harmonic of the driver pulses in rotational wavepacket of the molecular nitrogen ions.

  10. Selective resonance enhancement of Raman scattering intensity in photoinduced nonradiative charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairamov, B. Kh.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on the formation of complexes consisting of isolated free-standing crystalline semiconductor quantum dots, for example, nc-Si/SiO2, functionalized by short oligonucleotides, for example, the single-stranded system d(20G, 20T). Here, d are deoxyribonucleotides, G and T are guanine and thymine nucleotides, respectively. It has been found that these complexes are unique objects for the elucidation of the specific features in the manifestation of new quantum-size effects in biomacromolecules. It has been demonstrated that the possibility exists of detecting and recording, in such complexes of biomacromolecules, spectrally selective resonance enhancement of Raman scattering intensity in fluctuations of nucleotide molecules due to coherent nonradiative transfer of a photoexcited electron and a hole at the interface of the complex. This dynamic optical imaging of spectral responses can be of applied interest for the development of nanobiophotonic technologies.

  11. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers.

  12. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, Jessica; Wood, Sebastian; Kim, Ji-Seon, E-mail: ji-seon.kim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Beatrup, Daniel; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Bronstein, Hugo [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-28

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability.

  13. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability

  14. Magnetic-bead-based sub-femtomolar immunoassay using resonant Raman scattering signals of ZnS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yadan; Cong, Tie; Chu, Xueying; Jia, Yan; Hong, Xia; Liu, Yichun

    2016-07-01

    Highly sensitive, specific, and selective immunoassays are of great significance for not only clinical diagnostics but also food safety, environmental monitoring, and so on. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and fluorescence-based and electrochemical immunoassays are important intensively investigated immunoassay techniques. However, they might suffer from low sensitivity or false-positive results. In this work, a simple, reliable, and ultrasensitive magnetic-bead-based immunoassay was performed using biofunctionalized ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals as resonant Raman probes. The resonant Raman scattering of ZnS nanocrystals displays evenly spaced multi-phonon resonant Raman lines with narrow bandwidths and has strong resistance to environmental variation due to the nature of the electron-phonon interaction, thus rendering reliable signal readout in the immunoassays. The superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles facilitated greatly the separation, purification, and concentration processes. It is beneficial for both reducing the labor intensity and amplifying the detection signals. The immobilization of antibodies on the surface of magnetic beads, the preparation of resonant Raman probes, and the immunological recognition between the antibody and analyte all occurred in the liquid phase, which minimized the diffusion barriers and boundary layer constraints. All these factors contributed to the ultralow detection limit of human IgG, which was determined to be about 0.5 fM (∼0.08 pg/ml). It is nearly the highest sensitivity obtained for IgG detection. This work shall facilitate the design of nanoplatforms for ultrasensitive detections of proteins, DNAs, bacteria, explosives, and so on. Graphical abstract An ultrasensitive magnetic-bead-based immunoassay was performed using multi-phonon resonant Raman lines of ZnS nanoparticles as detection signals. PMID:27173389

  15. Resonance raman spectroscopic study of alumina-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with 220 and 287 nm excitation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Stair, P. C.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We present detailed resonance Raman spectroscopic results excited at 220 and 287 nm for alumina-supported VO{sub x} catalysts. The anharmonic constant, harmonic wavenumber, anharmonic force constant, bond dissociation energy, and bond length change in the excited state for double bonded V{double_bond}O and single bonded V-O were obtained from fundamental and overtone frequencies. Totally symmetric and nontotally symmetric modes could be discerned and assigned on the basis of the overtone and combination progressions found in the resonance Raman spectra. Selective resonance enhancement of two different vibrational modes with two different excitation wavelengths was observed. This allowed us to establish a linear relationship between charge transfer energy and VO bond length and, consequently, to assign the higher-energy charge transfer band centered around 210?250 nm in the UV?vis spectra to the V{double_bond}O transition.

  16. Implantation effects on resonant Raman scattering in CdTe and Cd 0.23Hg 0.77Te

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsteiner, M.; Lusson, A.; Wagner, J.; Koidl, P.; Bruder, M.

    1990-04-01

    We have studied In + implanted CdTe and Cd 0.23Hg 0.77Te by resonant Raman scattering. The laser excitation was in resonance with the EO + Δ O band gap in CdTe or the E1 gap in Cd 0.23Hg 0.77Te. Under these conditions dipole forbidden but defect ind scattering by one longitudinal optical (LO) phonon as well as Fröhlich-induced two-LO phonon scattering is observed. In both cases scattering is found to be strongly affected by ion implantation. In + was implanted at an ion energy of 350 keV with doses ranging from 10 11 to 5×10 14 ions/cm 2. The intensity ratio of the one-LO phonon lines is found to be a quantitative measure of the implantation damage in CdTe and Cd 0.23Hg 0.77Te even for doses as low as 10 11 ions/cm 2. It is shown that the observed effects of implantation damage on resonant Raman scattering by LO phonons are due to a broadening and an energy shift of the corresponding resonances in the Raman scattering efficiency.

  17. A magnetic-field enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy strategy towards the early diagnosis of malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2012-03-01

    Early malaria diagnosis is important because malaria disease can develop into fatal illness within hours upon the appearance of the first symptom. The low concentration of the diagnosis biomarker, hemozoin, at the early stage of malaria disease makes early diagnosis difficult. In this paper, we present a magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) strategy for the sensitive detection of β - hematin crystals, which is equivalent to hemozoin in the characteristics of Raman spectrum, by using magnetic nanoparticles. We observe several orders of magnitude enhancement in the SERRS signal of enriched β - hematin in comparison to the Raman signal of β - hematin in the cases of SERRS alone or magnetic enrichment alone, showing the great potential of this method towards early malaria diagnosis.

  18. FTIR difference and resonance Raman spectroscopy of rhodopsins with applications to optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Clair, Erica C.

    The major aim of this thesis is to investigate the molecular basis for the function of several types of rhodopsins with special emphasis on their application to the new field of optogenetics. Rhodopsins are transmembrane biophotonic proteins with 7 alpha-helices and a retinal chromophore. Studies included Archaerhodopsin 3 (AR3), a light driven proton pump similar to the extensively studied bacteriorhodopsin (BR); channelrhodopsins 1 and 2, light-activated ion channels; sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), a light-sensing protein that modulates phototaxis used in archaebacteria; and squid rhodopsins (sRho), the major photopigment in squid vision and a model for human melanopsin, which controls circadian rhythms. The primary techniques used in these studies were FTIR difference spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These techniques, in combination with site directed mutagenesis and other biochemical methodologies produced new knowledge regarding the structural changes of the retinal chromophore, the location and function of internal water molecules as well as specific amino acids and peptide backbone. Specialized techniques were developed that allowed rhodopsins to be studied in intact membrane environments and in some cases in vivo measurements were made on rhodopsin heterologously expressed in E. coli thus allowing the effects of interacting proteins and membrane potential to be investigated. Evidence was found that the local environment of one or more internal water molecules in SRII is altered by interaction with its cognate transducer, HtrII, and is also affected by the local lipid environment. In the case of AR3, many of the broad IR continuum absorption changes below 3000 cm -1, assigned to networks of water molecules involved in proton transport through cytoplasmic and extracellular portions in BR, were found to be very similar to BR. Bands assigned to water molecules near the Schiff base postulated to be involved in proton transport were, however, shifted

  19. Many particle approach to resonance Raman scattering in crystals: Strong electron-phonon interaction and multi-phonon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Raman scattering (RS) of light by crystals was studied theoretically taking into account the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions. The partial diagonalization of the Hamiltonian using unitary transformation was fulfilled. It allowed the structure of the many phonon repetition of bands to be described as a function of the electron-phonon interaction constant. It is shown that the spectral relations obtained for the scattering intensity can describe both the RS and the resonance RS (RRS) processes. Numerical modelling calculations for different parameters were carried out and comparisons with the experimental data for CdS and ZnO crystals were made. Highlights: → Raman scattering of light by crystals studied theoretically. → Electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions taken into account. → Structure of many phonon repetition of bands described. → Both Raman and resonance Raman scattering covered. → Comparisons with experimental data for CdS and ZnO crystals. - Abstract: Raman scattering (RS) of light by crystals was studied theoretically taking into account the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions. The partial diagonalization of the Hamiltonian using unitary transformation was fulfilled. It allowed the structure of the many phonon repetition of bands to be described as a function of the electron-phonon interaction constant. It is shown that the spectral relations obtained for the scattering intensity can describe both the RS and the resonance RS (RRS) processes. Numerical modelling calculations for different parameters were carried out and comparisons with the experimental data for CdS and ZnO crystals were made.

  20. Resonance Raman imaging as a tool to assess the atmospheric pollution level: carotenoids in Lecanoraceae lichens as bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarrondo, I; Prieto-Taboada, N; Martínez-Arkarazo, I; Madariaga, J M

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy differentiation of carotenoids has traditionally been based on the ν 1 position (C = C stretching vibrations in the polyene chain) in the 1500-1600 cm(-1) range, using a 785 nm excitation laser. However, when the number of conjugated double bonds is similar, as in the cases of zeaxanthin and β-carotene, this distinction is still ambiguous due to the closeness of the Raman bands. This work shows the Raman results, obtained in resonance conditions using a 514 mm laser, on Lecanora campestris and Lecanora atra species, which can be used to differentiate and consequently characterize carotenoids. The presence of the carotenoid found in Lecanoraceae lichens has been demonstrated to depend on the atmospheric pollution level of the environment they inhabit. Astaxanthin, a superb antioxidant, appears as the principal xanthophyll in highly polluted sites, usually together with the UV screening pigment scytonemin; zeaxanthin is the major carotenoid in medium polluted environments, while β-carotene is the major carotenoid in cleaner environments. Based on these observations, an indirect classification of the stress suffered in a given environment can be assessed by simply analysing the carotenoid content in the Lecanoraceae lichens by using resonance Raman imaging. PMID:26620863

  1. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems. PMID:25791219

  2. CD and UV Resonance Raman Indicate Little arg-glu Side Chain α-helix Peptide Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Zhenmin; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Asher, Sanford A.

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions between side chains can control the conformation and folding of peptides and proteins. We used CD and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) to examine the impact of side chain charge on the conformations of two 21 residue mainly polyala peptides with a few arg and glu residues. We expected that attractions between arg-10 and glu-14 side chains would stabilize the α-helix conformation compared to a peptide with an arg-14. Surprisingly, CD suggests that the peptide w...

  3. An ultraviolet resonance Raman study of dehydrogenase enzymes and their interactions with coenzymes and substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J C; Wharton, C W; Hester, R E

    1989-02-21

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectra, with 260-nm excitation, are reported for oxidized and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+ and NADH, respectively). Corresponding spectra are reported for these coenzymes when bound to the enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and liver and yeast alcohol dehydrogenases (LADH and YADH). The observed differences between the coenzyme spectra are interpreted in terms of conformation, hydrogen bonding, and general environment polarity differences between bound and free coenzymes and between coenzymes bound to different enzymes. The possibility of adenine protonation is discussed. UVRR spectra with 220-nm excitation also are reported for holo- and apo-GAPDH (GAPDH-NAD+ and GAPDH alone, respectively). In contrast with the 260-nm spectra, these show only bands due to vibrations of aromatic amino acid residues of the protein. The binding of coenzyme to GAPDH has no significant effect on the aromatic amino acid bands observed. This result is discussed in the light of the known structural change of GAPDH on binding coenzyme. Finally, UVRR spectra with 240-nm excitation are reported for GAPDH and an enzyme-substrate intermediate of GAPDH. Perturbations are reported for tyrosine and tryptophan bands on forming the acyl enzyme.

  4. Molecular effects of high-pressure processing on food studied by resonance Raman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintchev, Filip; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Toepfl, Stefan; Knorr, Dietrich; Hildebrandt, Peter; Heinz, Volker

    2010-02-01

    Pressurization may cause unwanted side effects including color or texture changes of fish and meat. The color changes of poultry, pork, and smoked salmon were studied by CIE L*, a*, b* system, and resonance Raman (RR). High-pressure processing (HPP) of pork and chicken meat resulted in significant color modification at pressures higher than 270 and 280 MPa, respectively. RR spectra were taken after a high-pressure treatment of pork meat. According to the RR-data, deoxymyoglobin is the dominating myoglobin species in pork meat. High-pressure treatment causes conformational changes resulting in a stabile nonnative ferrous myoglobin species while the ferrous myoglobin state is maintained. High-pressure treatment causes a decrease of the relative RR intensities of astaxanthin by salmon as probed with 514 nm. RR spectra excited at 413 nm revealed a heterogeneous broadening of astaxanthin bands accompanied by the formation of deoxymyoglobin or deoxyhemoglobin. The broadening is interpreted as the degradation products of astaxanthin. Obviously, the high-pressure treatment of smoked salmon triggers redox processes of astaxanthin and the heme protein.

  5. Accurate Simulation of Resonance-Raman Spectra of Flexible Molecules: An Internal Coordinates Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-07-14

    The interpretation and analysis of experimental resonance-Raman (RR) spectra can be significantly facilitated by vibronic computations based on reliable quantum-mechanical (QM) methods. With the aim of improving the description of large and flexible molecules, our recent time-dependent formulation to compute vibrationally resolved electronic spectra, based on Cartesian coordinates, has been extended to support internal coordinates. A set of nonredundant delocalized coordinates is automatically generated from the molecular connectivity thanks to a new general and robust procedure. In order to validate our implementation, a series of molecules has been used as test cases. Among them, rigid systems show that normal modes based on Cartesian and delocalized internal coordinates provide equivalent results, but the latter set is much more convenient and reliable for systems characterized by strong geometric deformations associated with the electronic transition. The so-called Z-matrix internal coordinates, which perform well for chain molecules, are also shown to be poorly suited in the presence of cycles or nonstandard structures.

  6. Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy of oxygen- and water-ligated myoglobins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has recently been developed as a tool for studies of structural heterogeneity and photochemical dynamics in condensed phases. In this paper, 2DRR spectroscopy is used to investigate line broadening mechanisms of both oxygen- and water-ligated myoglobins. General signatures of anharmonicity and inhomogeneous line broadening are first established with model calculations to facilitate signal interpretation. It is shown that the present quasi-degenerate version of 2DRR spectroscopy is insensitive to anharmonicity, because signal generation is allowed for harmonic modes. Rather, the key information to be gained from 2DRR spectroscopy pertains to the line broadening mechanisms, which are fairly obvious by inspection of the data. 2DRR signals acquired for both heme protein systems reveal significant heterogeneity in the vibrational modes local to the heme's propionic acid side chains. These side chains are known to interact with solvent, because they protrude from the hydrophobic pocket that encloses the heme. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the heterogeneity detected in our 2DRR experiments reflects fluctuations in the geometries of the side chains. Knowledge of such thermal motions will be useful for understanding protein function (e.g., ligand binding) because the side chains are an effective "gateway" for the exchange of thermal energy between the heme and solvent.

  7. High resolution AFM and single cell resonance Raman spectroscopy of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms early in growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai eLebedev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AFM and confocal resonance Raman microscopy (CRRM of single-cells were used to study the transition of anode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms from lag phase (initial period of low current to exponential phase (subsequent period of rapidly increasing current. Results reveal that lag phase biofilms consist of lone cells and tightly packed single-cell thick clusters crisscrossed with extracellular linear structures that appear to be comprised of nodules approximately 20 nm in diameter aligned end to end. By early exponential phase cell clusters expand laterally and a second layer of closely packed cells begins to form on top of the first. Abundance of c-type cytochromes (c-Cyt is > 3-fold greater in 2-cell thick regions than in 1-cell thick regions. The results indicate that early biofilm growth involves two transformations. The first is from lone cells to 2-dimensionally associated cells during lag phase when current remains low. This is accompanied by formation of extracellular linear structures. The second is from 2- to 3-dimensionally associated cells during early exponential phase when current begins to increases rapidly. This is accompanied by a dramatic increase in c-Cyt abundance.

  8. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of 1,3,5-hexatrienes in the lowest excited triplet state. The potential energy surface in T1

    OpenAIRE

    Wilbrandt, R; Langkilde, F.W.; Brouwer, A.M.; Negri, F; Orlandi, G.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy is applied to the study of the T1 state of 1,3,5-hexatriene and deuteriated and methylated derivatives in solution. The technique is described briefly. The experimentally obtained resonance Raman spectra are discussed in the light of theoretical Quantum Chemical Force Field calculations. Implications for the potential energy surface of the T1 state are discussed.

  9. Effect of TiO2 particles on normal and resonance Raman spectra of coumarin 343: a theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linzhi; Wu, Wenpeng; Zhao, Yi

    2015-04-28

    It is well known that interfacial structures and charge transfer in dye-sensitized solar cells are extremely important for the enhancement of cell efficiency. Here, the normal Raman spectra (NRS) and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of a C343-sensitized TiO2 cluster (Ti9O18) are theoretically predicted from combined electronic structure calculations and a vibrationally-resolved spectral method to reveal the relationship between interfacial geometries and excited-state dynamics. The results show that although the NRS of free C343 and the C343-TiO2 cluster correspond to the vibrational motions of C343 in a high frequency domain, their mode frequencies show obvious differences due to the interaction of the TiO2 cluster on C343, and several new Raman active fingerprint modes, such as bidentate chelating bonding modes, can be used to determine interfacial geometries. However, the resonance Raman activities of low-frequency modes are significantly enhanced and several modes from the TiO2 cluster can be observed, consistent with experimental measurements. Furthermore, the RRS from a locally excited state and a charge transfer state of C343-TiO2 are dramatically different, for instance, new Raman active modes with 1212 cm(-1), 1560 cm(-1) and 1602 cm(-1), corresponding to the motions of CH2 rocking, C=C/C-N/C=O stretching and C=O/C=C stretching, appear from the charge transfer state. The obtained information on mode-specific reorganization energies from these excited states is greatly helpful to understand and control interfacial electron transfer.

  10. Resonance Raman study of the oxygenation cycle of optically trapped single red blood cells in a microfluidic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramser, Kerstin; Logg, Katarina; Enger, Jonas; Goksor, Mattias; Kall, Mikael; Hanstorp, Dag

    2004-10-01

    The average environmental response of red blood cells (RBCs) is routinely measured in ensemble studies, but in such investigations valuable information on the single cell level is obscured. In order to elucidate this hidden information is is important to enable the selection of single cells with certain properties while subsequent dynamics triggered by environmental stimulation are recorded in real time. It is also desirable to manipulate and control the cells under phsyiological conditions. As shown here, this can be achieved by combining optical tweezers with a confocal Raman set-up equipped with a microfluidic system. A micro-Raman set-up is combined with an optical trap with separate optical paths, lasers and objectives, which enables the acquisition of resonance Raman profils of single RBCs. The microfluidic system, giving full control over the media surrounding the cell, consists of a pattern of channels and reservoirs produced by electron beam lithography and moulded in PDMS. Fresh Hepes buffer or buffer containing sodium dithionite are transported through the channels using electro-osmotic flow, while the direct Raman response of the single optically trapped RBC is registered in another reservoir in the middle of the channel. Thus, it is possible to monitor the oxygenation cycle in a single cell and to study photo-induced chemistry. This experimental set-up has high potential for monitoring the drug response or conformational changes caused by other environmental stimuli for many types of single functional cells since "in vivo" conditions can be created.

  11. Resonant Raman spectroscopy study of swift heavy ion irradiated MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hang; Sun, Youmei; Zhai, Pengfei; Zeng, Jian; Zhang, Shengxia; Hu, Peipei; Yao, Huijun; Duan, Jinglai; Hou, Mingdong; Liu, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) crystal samples were irradiated by swift heavy ions (209Bi and 56Fe). Hillock-like latent tracks were observed on the surface of irradiated MoS2 by atomic force microscopy. The modifications of properties of irradiated MoS2 were investigated by resonant Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). A new peak (E1u2, ∼385.7 cm-1) occurs near the in-plane E2g1 peak (∼383.7 cm-1) after irradiation. The two peaks shift towards lower frequency and broaden due to structural defects and stress with increasing fluence. When irradiated with high fluence, two other new peaks appear at ∼ 190 and ∼ 230 cm-1. The peak at ∼230 cm-1 is disorder-induced LA(M) mode. The presence of this mode indicates defects induced by irradiation. The feature at ∼460 cm-1 is composed of 2LA(M) (∼458 cm-1) and A2u (∼466 cm-1) mode. With increasing fluence, the integrated intensity ratio between 2LA(M) and A2u increases. The relative enhancement of 2LA(M) mode is in agreement with the appearance of LA(M) mode, which both demonstrate structural disorder in irradiated MoS2. The ∼423-cm-1 peak shifts toward lower frequency due to the decrease in exciton energy of MoS2, and this was demonstrated by the results of UV-Vis spectra. The decrease in exciton energy could be due to introduction of defect levels into band gap.

  12. Resonance Raman study of the active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulevich, G; Feis, A; Focardi, C; Tams, J; Welinder, K G

    1994-12-27

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra for the resting state ferric and the reduced ferrous forms of recombinant Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP), obtained with different excitation wavelengths and in polarized light, are reported. The spectra are compared with those obtained previously for cytochrome c peroxidase expressed in Escherichia coli [(CCP(MI)] and horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C). Although the enzymic properties of CIP and HRP-C are similar, the RR data show that, in terms of the heme cavity structures, CIP and CCP(MI) are much more closely related to each other than to HRP-C. The ferric state of CIP at neutral pH is characteristic mainly of a five-coordinate high spin heme. However, the lower frequency of the v2 mode and a higher frequency of the v(C = C) vinyl stretching modes for CIP as compared to CCP, indicate a higher degree of vibrational coupling between the two modes in CIP. In addition, CIP is rather unstable under low laser power irradiation as an irreversible transition to a six-coordinate high spin heme followed by a second transition to a six-coordinate low spin heme is observed. This instability of CIP as compared to CCP(MI) is proposed to be a consequence of the presence of a distal Phe54 in CIP rather than the homologous Trp51 in CCP, as Trp51 is hydrogen-bonded to a distal water molecule located above the heme Fe thereby preventing its coordination in CCP. In CIP the FeII-His RR band has two components with frequencies at 230 and 211 cm-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Selective excitation of molecular mode in a mixture by femtosecond resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ping; Li Si-Ning; Fan Rong-Wei; Li Xiao-Hui; Xia Yuan-Qin; Yu Xin; Chen De-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is used to investigate gaseous molecular dynamics.Due to the spectrally broad laser pulses,usually poorly resolved spectra result from this broad spectroscopy.However,it can be demonstrated that by the electronic resonance enhancement optimization control a selective excitation of specific vibrational mode is possible.Using an electronically resonance-enhanced effect,iodine molecule specific CARS spectroscopy can be obtained from a mixture of iodine-air at room temperature and a pressure of 1 atm (corresponding to a saturation iodine vapour as low as about 35 Pa).The dynamics on either the electronically excited state or the ground state of iodine molecules obtained is consistent with previous studies (vacuum,heated and pure iodine) in the femtosecond time resolved CARS spectroscopy,showing that an effective method of suppressing the non-resonant CARS background and other interferences is demonstrated.

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Koc University, RumelifeneriYolu, Sariyer, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdem, Emre, E-mail: emre.erdem@physchem.uni-freiburg.de, E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Freiburg, Albertstr. 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin [Pavezyum Kimya Sanayi Dış Ticaret LTD. ŞTI., Tuzla, Istanbul (Turkey); Häßler, Wolfgang [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden (IFW), P.O. Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature T{sub c} was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra.

  16. Quantum-mechanical analysis of the intensity distribution in spectra of resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burova, T. G.; Shcherbakov, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the intensity distribution in the resonant Raman scattering spectra of aqueous solutions of tyrosine excited by laser radiation with wavelengths of 244, 229, 218, 200, and 193 nm, as well as in the nonresonant Raman scattering spectrum excited at a wavelength of 488 nm, are performed. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the calculation results and the experimental data. It is shown that the changes in the intensity distribution observed in the spectra with a change in the excitation wavelength from 244 to 193 nm correlate with the determined changes in the contribution made by excited electronic states into the scattering tensor components. It is noted that it is necessary to take into account the Herzberg-Teller effect and that the number of excited electronic states taken into account considerably affects the calculated relative intensities of lines. The possibility of existence of several tyrosine conformers in aqueous solution at room temperature is shown.

  17. Polarized resonance Raman spectroscopy of single-wall carbon nanotubes within a polymer under strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frogley, M. D.; Zhao, Q.; Wagner, H. D.

    2002-03-01

    The D* Raman band of single-wall carbon nanotubes aligned by shear flow in a polymer matrix has been measured as a function of tensile strain. The Raman intensity varies with the optical polarization direction, an effect which is used here to assess the degree of tube alignment. The strain dependence of the Raman shift depends strongly on the nanotube orientation and the polarization direction. We show that, using polarized light, unoriented nanotubes can be used as strain sensors so that no tube alignment is necessary and the strain can be measured in all directions in a single sample.

  18. Davydov Splitting and Excitonic Resonance Effects in Raman Spectra of Few-Layer MoSe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangwon; Lee, Jae-Ung; Nam, Dahyun; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2016-08-23

    Raman spectra of few-layer MoSe2 were measured with eight excitation energies. New peaks that appear only near resonance with various exciton states are analyzed, and the modes are assigned. The resonance profiles of the Raman peaks reflect the joint density of states for optical transitions, but the symmetry of the exciton wave functions leads to selective enhancement of the A1g mode at the A exciton energy and the shear mode at the C exciton energy. We also find Davydov splitting of intralayer A1g, E1g, and A2u modes due to interlayer interaction for some excitation energies near resonances. Furthermore, by fitting the spectral positions of interlayer shear and breathing modes and Davydov splitting of intralayer modes to a linear chain model, we extract the strength of the interlayer interaction. We find that the second-nearest-neighbor interlayer interaction amounts to about 30% of the nearest-neighbor interaction for both in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations. PMID:27479147

  19. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications. PMID:27149164

  20. Resonance Raman spectra of an O2-binding H-NOX domain reveal heme relaxation upon mutation†

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Rosalie; Boon, Elizabeth M.; Marletta, Michael A.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra are measured for Tt H-NOX WT and three other Tt H-NOX proteins containing mutations at key conserved residues to determine the heme conformation in solution. The most dramatic changes in heme conformation occurred in the O2-bound forms, and the single Tt H-NOX P115A mutation was sufficient to generate a significant relaxation of the chromophore. Clear evidence of heme relaxation in the Tt H-NOX I5L, P115A, and I5L/P115A mutants in solution is demonstrated by the observ...

  1. Optical pathology of human brain metastasis of lung cancer using combined resonance Raman and spatial frequency spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has become widely used for diagnostic purpose of breast, lung and brain cancers. This report introduced a new approach based on spatial frequency spectra analysis of the underlying tissue structure at different stages of brain tumor. Combined spatial frequency spectroscopy (SFS), Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic method is used to discriminate human brain metastasis of lung cancer from normal tissues for the first time. A total number of thirty-one label-free micrographic images of normal and metastatic brain cancer tissues obtained from a confocal micro- Raman spectroscopic system synchronously with examined RR spectra of the corresponding samples were collected from the identical site of tissue. The difference of the randomness of tissue structures between the micrograph images of metastatic brain tumor tissues and normal tissues can be recognized by analyzing spatial frequency. By fitting the distribution of the spatial frequency spectra of human brain tissues as a Gaussian function, the standard deviation, σ, can be obtained, which was used to generate a criterion to differentiate human brain cancerous tissues from the normal ones using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. This SFS-SVM analysis on micrograph images presents good results with sensitivity (85%), specificity (75%) in comparison with gold standard reports of pathology and immunology. The dual-modal advantages of SFS combined with RR spectroscopy method may open a new way in the neuropathology applications.

  2. Physical origin of Davydov splitting and resonant Raman spectroscopy of Davydov components in multilayer MoTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q. J.; Tan, Q. H.; Zhang, X.; Wu, J. B.; Sheng, B. W.; Wan, Y.; Wang, X. Q.; Dai, L.; Tan, P. H.

    2016-03-01

    We systematically study the high-resolution and polarized Raman spectra of multilayer (ML) MoTe2 . The layer-breathing (LB) and shear (C) modes are observed in the ultralow-frequency region, which are used to quantitatively evaluate the interlayer coupling in ML MoTe2 based on the linear chain model, in which only the nearest interlayer coupling is considered. The Raman spectra on three different substrates verify the negligible substrate effect on the phonon frequencies of ML MoTe2 . Ten excitation energies are used to measure the high-frequency modes of N -layer MoTe2 (N L MoTe2 ; N is an integer). Under the resonant excitation condition, we observe N -dependent Davydov components in ML MoTe2 , originating from the Raman-active A1'(A1g 2) modes at ˜172 c m-1 . More than two Davydov components are observed in N L MoTe2 for N >4 by Raman spectroscopy. The N -dependent Davydov components are further investigated based on the symmetry analysis. A van der Waals model only considering the nearest interlayer coupling has been proposed to well understand the Davydov splitting of high-frequency A1'(A1g 2) modes. The different resonant profiles for the two Davydov components in 3L MoTe2 indicate that proper excitation energy of ˜1.8 -2.2 eV must be chosen to observe the Davydov splitting in ML MoTe2 . Our work presents a simple way to identify layer number of ultrathin MoTe2 flakes by the corresponding number and peak position of Davydov components. Our work also provides a direct evidence from Raman spectroscopy of how the nearest van der Waals interactions significantly affect the frequency of the high-frequency intralayer phonon modes in multilayer MoTe2 and expands the understanding on the lattice vibrations and interlayer coupling of transition metal dichalcogenides and other two-dimensional materials.

  3. Understanding double-resonant Raman scattering in chiral carbon nanotubes: Diameter and energy dependence of the D mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herziger, Felix; Vierck, Asmus; Laudenbach, Jan; Maultzsch, Janina

    2015-12-01

    We present a theoretical model to describe the double-resonant scattering process in arbitrary carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We use this approach to investigate the defect-induced D mode in CNTs and unravel the dependence of the D -mode frequency on the CNT diameter and on the energy of the resonant optical transition. Our approach is based on the symmetry of the hexagonal lattice and geometric considerations; hence the method is independent of the exact model that is chosen to describe the electronic band structure or the phonon dispersion. We finally clarify the diameter dependence of this Raman mode that has been under discussion in the past and demonstrate that, depending on the experimental conditions, in general two different dependencies can be measured. We also prove that CNTs with an arbitrary chiral index can exhibit a D mode in their Raman spectrum, in contrast to previous symmetry-based arguments. Furthermore, we give a direct quantification of the curvature-induced phonon frequency corrections of the D mode in CNTs with respect to graphite.

  4. Generating monomeric 5-coordinated microperoxidase-11 using carboxylic acid functionalized silver nanoparticles: A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaivani, Govindasamy; Sivanesan, Arumugam; Kannan, Ayyadurai; Sevvel, Ranganathan

    2016-10-01

    Microperoxidase-11 (MP-11), a heme undecapeptide obtained by proteolytic digestion of cytochrome c, resembles peroxidase enzyme when its heme center is 5-coordinated with a vacant sixth coordination site. However, MP-11 always tends to aggregate in both solution and on surface and eventually forms the 6-coordinated heme. Thus, the present study investigates the immobilization strategy of MP-11 on nanoparticle surface in order to generate monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 and make them as an efficient biocatalyst. The powerful surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) technique is being employed to attain the detailed structural information of the catalytic site i.e., the heme center. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) tuned and 6-mercaptohexanoic acid (MHA) functionalized silver nanoparticles (Ag@MHA NPs) are used as Raman signal amplifier. The outcome of the SERRS study unambiguously portrays the existence of monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 on Ag@MHA NPs surface. Here, Ag@MHA NPs plays a dual role of providing a platform to create monomeric 5-coordinated MP-11 and to load large number of MP-11 due to its high surface to volume ratio. Further, the electrostatic interaction between Ag@MHA NPs and MP-11 leads to instantaneous SERRS signal enhancement with a Raman enhancement factor (EFSERS) of 2.36×10(6). Langmuir adsorption isotherm has been employed for the adsorption of MP-11 on Ag@MHA NPs surface, which provides the real surface coverage (ΓS(*)) and equilibrium constant (K) value of 1.54nm and 5×10(11)M(-1). Furthermore, the peroxidase activity of MP-11 has been demonstrated through electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:27434160

  5. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated

  6. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50

  7. A new combined nuclear magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopic probe applied to in situ investigations of catalysts and catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, Jules C. J.; Mantle, Michael D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); York, Andrew P. E. [Johnson Matthey Technology Centre, Blounts Court, Sonning Common, Reading RG4 9NH (United Kingdom); McGregor, James, E-mail: james.mcgregor@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Both Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies are valuable analytical techniques capable of providing mechanistic information and thereby providing insights into chemical processes, including catalytic reactions. Since both techniques are chemically sensitive, they yield not only structural information but also quantitative analysis. In this work, for the first time, the combination of the two techniques in a single experimental apparatus is reported. This entailed the design of a new experimental probe capable of recording simultaneous measurements on the same sample and/or system of interest. The individual datasets acquired by each spectroscopic method are compared to their unmodified, stand-alone equivalents on a single sample as a means to benchmark this novel piece of equipment. The application towards monitoring reaction progress is demonstrated through the evolution of the homogeneous catalysed metathesis of 1‑hexene, with both experimental techniques able to detect reactant consumption and product evolution. This is extended by inclusion of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capabilities with a custom made MAS 7 mm rotor capable of spinning speeds up to 1600 Hz, quantified by analysis of the spinning sidebands of a sample of KBr. The value of this is demonstrated through an application involving heterogeneous catalysis, namely the metathesis of 2-pentene and ethene. This provides the added benefit of being able to monitor both the reaction progress (by NMR spectroscopy) and also the structure of the catalyst (by Raman spectroscopy) on the very same sample, facilitating the development of structure-performance relationships.

  8. Resonance Raman spectrum of the allyl-d5 radical and the force field analysis of the allyl radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianming; Getty, James D.; Kelly, Peter B.

    1993-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the allyl-d5 radical have been obtained with excitation between 247 and 223 nm. Analysis of the spectra yields the first observation of fundamental frequencies, nu4, nu5, and nu7 and overtone frequencies 2nu9, 2nu10, and 2nu12. The new vibrational data are combined with previously observed frequencies of allyl-h5 and allyl-d5 radical to produce the force field analysis for the allyl radical. This study suggests reassignment of several previously observed infrared (IR) bands. Experimental frequencies and assignments for allyl-h5 and allyl-d5 are compared with results from ab initio calculations. Force constants obtained in the present work are compared with the force constants of other sp2 hybridization molecules such as benzene, allene, and ethylene.

  9. Formation of high-valent iron-oxo species in superoxide reductase: characterization by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Florence; Tremey, Emilie; von Stetten, David; Rat, Stéphanie; Duval, Simon; Carpentier, Philippe; Clemancey, Martin; Desbois, Alain; Nivière, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR), a non-heme mononuclear iron protein that is involved in superoxide detoxification in microorganisms, can be used as an unprecedented model to study the mechanisms of O2 activation and of the formation of high-valent iron-oxo species in metalloenzymes. By using resonance Raman spectroscopy, it was shown that the mutation of two residues in the second coordination sphere of the SOR iron active site, K48 and I118, led to the formation of a high-valent iron-oxo species when the mutant proteins were reacted with H2O2. These data demonstrate that these residues in the second coordination sphere tightly control the evolution and the cleavage of the O-O bond of the ferric iron hydroperoxide intermediate that is formed in the SOR active site. PMID:24777646

  10. Empirical Equation Based Chirality (n, m Assignment of Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Resonant Raman Scattering Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shamsul Arefin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a technique for the chirality (n, m assignment of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes by solving a set of empirical equations of the tight binding model parameters. The empirical equations of the nearest neighbor hopping parameters, relating the term (2n, m with the first and second optical transition energies of the semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes, are also proposed. They provide almost the same level of accuracy for lower and higher diameter nanotubes. An algorithm is presented to determine the chiral index (n, m of any unknown semiconducting tube by solving these empirical equations using values of radial breathing mode frequency and the first or second optical transition energy from resonant Raman spectroscopy. In this paper, the chirality of 55 semiconducting nanotubes is assigned using the first and second optical transition energies. Unlike the existing methods of chirality assignment, this technique does not require graphical comparison or pattern recognition between existing experimental and theoretical Kataura plot.

  11. Electronic many-body effects at metal-organic interfaces studied with PES, NEXAFS and resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeming, M.; Schoell, A.; Reinert, F. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Experimentelle Physik VII, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Umbach, E. [Karlsruhe Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Electronic many-body and correlation effects have been studied intensively at transition metal compounds with localized d/f electrons. They are related to interesting material properties, e.g. Mott metal-insulator transitions, charge transfer satellites and superconductivity. Recent investigations of graphene,{sup 1} C{sub 60},{sup 2} and TTF-TCNQ{sup 3} showed that many-body effects can also be important for organic thin films. We have investigated several organic thin films (PTCDA, PTCDI, BTCDA, BTCDI, SnPc) deposited on a Ag(111) surfaces with photoelectron spectroscopy, NEXAFS and resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. Our data provide significant indications for electronic many-body effects involving substrate-adsorbate charge transfer, which can be understood by concepts developed for charge transfer compounds. These results give insight into new, interesting aspects of physics at metal-organic interfaces. {sup 1} I.

  12. In Situ Resonance Raman Spectra of Organic Pigments in Momo Coral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Luwei; Yang Mingxing

    2008-01-01

    In this study, Raman scattering measurements were obtained for momo corals covering their typical range of colors. Three different excitation wavelengths (785, 633, 514 nm) are used for the same samples at the same points. All the samples show the two major Raman features of polyenic compounds assigned to double carbon-carbon (C=C) stretching vibration at approximately 1 500 cm-1 and single carbon-carbon (C--C) stretching vibration at approximately 1 130 cm-1 bond stretching mode. These peaks are not detected in the corresponding white parts of momo corals. However, somechanges in intensities, shape, and position of C=C stretching vibrations of the same point are observed by using different excitation wavelengths. The exact position of C-C stretching vibration of polyenic molecules depends strongly on the number of double bonds contained in their polyenic chain. In addition, the number of double bonds contained in the polyenic chains shows that different colors of the red momo coral are caused by different mixtures of polyenic compounds.

  13. A UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopic study on the extractable compounds of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) wood . Part I: Lipophilic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuopponen, M.; Willför, S.; Jääskeläinen, A.-S.; Sundberg, A.; Vuorinen, T.

    2004-11-01

    The wood resin in Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) stemwood and branch wood were studied using UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy. UVRR spectra of the sapwood and heartwood hexane extracts, solid wood samples and model compounds (six resin acids, three fatty acids, a fatty acid ester, sitosterol and sitosterol acetate) were collected using excitation wavelengths of 229, 244 and 257 nm. In addition, visible Raman spectra of the fatty and resin acids were recorded. Resin compositions of heartwood and sapwood hexane extracts were determined using gas chromatography. Raman signals of both conjugated and isolated double bonds of all the model compounds were resonance enhanced by UV excitation. The oleophilic structures showed strong bands in the region of 1660-1630 cm -1. Distinct structures were enhanced depending on the excitation wavelength. The UVRR spectra of the hexane extracts showed characteristic bands for resin and fatty acids. It was possible to identify certain resin acids from the spectra. UV Raman spectra collected from the solid wood samples containing wood resin showed a band at ˜1650 cm -1 due to unsaturated resin components. The Raman signals from extractives in the resin rich branch wood sample gave even more strongly enhanced signals than the aromatic lignin.

  14. A Study of the Cis—Trans Isomers of β—Apo—12′—Carotenal By Resonance Raman Spectroscopy at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YingHu; TadashiMizoguchi; 等

    1995-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study the cis-trans configurations and the intermolecular interactions of carotenoids bound to pigmentprotein complexes[1,2].In the present invertigation,we studied a set of cis-trans isomers of β-Apo-12′-carotenal,the conjugated chain of which has a length in -between those of β-carotene and retinal,to examine whether the configurational key Raman lines which have been established for β-carotene are still valid for β-Apo-12′-caotenal[3

  15. Resonant surface enhancement of Raman scattering of Ag nanoparticles on silicon substrates fabricated by dc sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) were deposited onto silicon substrates by direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering. The influences of sputtering power and sputtering time on the AgNP film morphology were studied using atomic force microscopy. The particle size was successfully tuned from 19 nm to 53 nm by varying the sputtering time at a dc power of 10 W. When Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule, the AgNP films showed significant surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. In particular, it is found that larger particles show stronger enhancement for lower concentrations of R6G while smaller particles display stronger enhancement for higher concentrations of R6G.

  16. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, R M; Rajeswari, B; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S N; Kshirsagar, R J; Natarajan, V

    2015-02-25

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P4(2)/mnm, a=4.5946(1) Å, c=2.9597(1) Å, V=62.48(1) (Å)(3), Z=2; anatase: space group I4(1)/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V=136.22(2) (Å)(3), Z=4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V(4+), Cr(3+), Mn(4+) and Fe(3+) species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V(4+)(d(1)), Cr(3+)(d(3)), Mn(4+)(d(3)) and Fe(3+)(d(5)) at Ti(4+) sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s>1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti(4+) in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S=3/2 and 5/2) are discussed.

  17. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in the presence of strong resonant signal from background molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bitter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy with broadband femtosecond laser pulses often involves simultaneous excitation of multiple molecular species with close resonance frequencies. Interpreting the collective optical response from molecular mixtures typically requires Fourier analysis of the detected time-resolved signal. We propose an alternative method of separating coherent optical responses from two molecular species with neighboring excitation resonances (here, vibrational modes of oxygen and carbon dioxide). We utilize ro-vibrational coupling as a mechanism of suppressing the strong vibrational response from the dominating molecular species (O$_{2}$). Coherent ro-vibrational dynamics lead to long "silence windows" of zero signal from oxygen molecules. In these silence windows, the detected signal stems solely from the minority species (CO$_{2}$) enabling background-free detection and characterization of the O$_2$/CO$_2$ mixing ratio. In comparison to a Fourier analysis, our technique does not require femtosecond time re...

  18. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, A; de la Flor, G; Aroyo, M I; Gospodinov, M; Bismayer, U; Mihailova, B

    2016-11-30

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba(2+), Sr(2+), La(3+), Bi(3+)) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb(5+) or Sn(4+) doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb(2+) have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba(2+)) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr(2+), La(3+)), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb(2+), increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi(3+)) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A

  19. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, A.; de la Flor, G.; Aroyo, M. I.; Gospodinov, M.; Bismayer, U.; Mihailova, B.

    2016-11-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba2+, Sr2+, La3+, Bi3+) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb5+ or Sn4+ doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb2+ have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba2+) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr2+, La3+), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb2+, increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi3+) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A-site Pb2+ cations leads to

  20. The effect of chemical variations on the structural polarity of relaxor ferroelectrics studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, A; de la Flor, G; Aroyo, M I; Gospodinov, M; Bismayer, U; Mihailova, B

    2016-11-30

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was applied to doped PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 and PbSc0.5Nb0.5O3 relaxor ferroelectrics, to better understand the effect of composition disorder on the mesoscopic-scale polar order in complex perovskite-type (ABO3) ferroelectrics. The excitation photon energy used was 3.8 eV, which is slightly above the energy gap and corresponds to the maximum of the optical dielectric permittivity. Group-theory analysis reveals that the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) observed under these conditions is allowed only in polar crystal classes. Therefore, RRS is dominated by the atomic dynamics of nanoregions with coherent polar distortions, which considerably facilitates the comparison of polar order in various compounds. The results show that A-site doping (Ba(2+), Sr(2+), La(3+), Bi(3+)) has significantly stronger effect on the structural polarity than the introduction of a third element at the B site (Nb(5+) or Sn(4+) doped in PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3). The A-site substitution by cations that in contrast to Pb(2+) have isotropic outermost electron shells disturbs the system of lone-pair electrons, thus reducing the correlation length of coupled polar distortions and the strength of the electric field associated with the mean polarization of polar nanoregions. A-site doping with larger cations (Ba(2+)) augments the polar deformation of the individual BO6 octahedra due to local elastic fields. As a result, such A-site doping intensifies the initial structural polarity at high temperatures and prevails the enlargement of the polar fraction at low temperatures. A-site doping with smaller cations (Sr(2+), La(3+)), regardless if they are isovalent or aliovalent to Pb(2+), increases the correlation length of antiferrodistortive order (BO6 tilts), which in turn assists the development of double-perovskite structure with coherent local polar distortions. A-site doping with aliovalent cations (Bi(3+)) having the same outermost electron shell and ionic radius as the host A

  1. Determination of Temperature-Dependent Stress State in Thin AlGaN Layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT Heterostructures by Near-Resonant Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent stress state in the AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate was investigated by ultraviolet (UV near-resonant Raman scattering. Strong scattering peak resulting from the A1(LO phonon mode of AlGaN is observed under near-resonance condition, which allows for the accurate measurement of Raman shifts with temperature. The temperature-dependent stress in the AlGaN layer determined by the resonance Raman spectra is consistent with the theoretical calculation result, taking lattice mismatch and thermal mismatch into account together. This good agreement indicates that the UV near-resonant Raman scattering can be a direct and effective method to characterize the stress state in thin AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT heterostructures.

  2. Detuning, wavebreaking, and Landau damping as limiting effects on laser compression by resonant backward Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2010-11-01

    Plasma waves mediate high-power pulse compression, where the persistence of the plasma wave is critical. In this scheme, the plasma wave mediates the energy transfer between long pump and short seed laser pulses through backward Raman scattering. High efficiency of the plasma wave excitation defines both the overall efficiency of the energy transfer and the duration of the amplified pulse. Based on recent extensive experiments, it is possible to deduce that the experimentally realized efficiency of the amplifier is likely constrained by two factors, namely the pump chirp and the plasma wavebreaking [1]. The limits arise because for compression the frequency of the plasma wave should match the bandwidth of the instability and the plasma wave amplitude should be small enough to be sustained by plasma. Both the detuning and the wavebreaking effects can be suppressed by using low pump intensity in plasma having the appropriate density gradient [1]. When these constraints are avoided, Landau damping will be the main limiting factor. However, the Landau damping rate can be significantly reduced in the presence of a strong plasma wave. Currently, nonlinear Landau damping can be described within two recently developed models [2,3]. We show that these two different descriptions result in the same dynamics for the plasma wave amplitude. We use the quasilinear description of nonlinear Landau damping [3] to identify a regime where initially high linear Landau damping can be significantly saturated. Because of the saturation effect, higher temperatures can be tolerated in achieving efficient amplification. Significantly, the plasma temperature can be as much as 50% larger compared to the case of unsaturated Landau damping.[4pt] [1] N.A. Yampolsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 113104 (2008).[0pt] [2] D. Benisti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 155002 (2009).[0pt] [3] N.A. Yampolsky and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas 16, 072104 (2009).

  3. Validating Resonance Raman Spectroscopy: a Non-invasive Assessment of Skin Carotenoids as a Biomarker of Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Sheryl Swain

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adult studies have found a strong correlation between serum carotenoids and skin carotenoids measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS). No published studies have examined correlations between skin and serum carotenoids among children. Objectives: (1) To validate skin RRS methodology against serum carotenoid measurements by high-performance liquid chromatography and (2) to determine if RRS skin carotenoids can be used as a valid biomarker of total fruit and vegetable (FV) inta...

  4. A density functional theory derived force field for p-cresol. Use of the ultraviolet resonance Raman intensities to check the vibrational analysis accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagant, P.; Gallouj, H.; Vergoten, G.

    1995-11-01

    An ab initio force field for p-cresol has been deduced from calculations based on density functional theory. A careful scaling of the internal force constants using correct vibrational assignments is shown to predict quite accurately the experimental vibrational frequencies and the potential energy distribution for p-cresol and all its deuterated analogs. Using this vibrational analysis, an attempt was made to predict the resonance Raman intensities for totally symmetric modes using the A-term part of the scattering tensor.

  5. Using resonance Raman cross-section data to estimate the spin state populations of Cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Piotr J; Zhu, Qianhong; Kincaid, James R

    2013-12-01

    The cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are heme proteins responsible for the oxidation of xenobiotics and pharmaceuticals and the biosynthesis of essential steroid products. In all cases, substrate binding initiates the enzymatic cycle, converting ferric low spin (LS) to high-spin (HS), with the efficiency of the conversion varying widely for different substrates, so documentation of this conversion for a given substrate is an important objective. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy can effectively yield distinctive frequencies for the ν3 "spin state marker" bands. Here, employing a reference cytochrome P450 (CYP101), the intensities of the ν3 modes (ILS) and (IHS) relative to an internal standard (sodium sulfate) yield relative populations for the two spin states; i.e., a value of 1.24 was determined for the ratio of the relative cross sections for the ν3 modes. Use of this value was then shown to permit a reliable calculation of relative populations of the two spin states from rR spectra of several other Cytochromes P450. The importance of this work is that, using this information, it is now possible to conveniently document by rR the spin state population without conducting separate experiments requiring different analytical methods, instrumentation and additional sample. PMID:24443630

  6. Investigation of the electronic structure of CuO by means of resonant X-ray Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Doering, G

    2001-01-01

    excited state. By means of a perturbation theoretical treatment of the Coulomb interaction between the core-hole and the 3d-electrons an expression for the cross-section of the shakeup-process is derived. Thereby the observed excitation energy dependence of the shakeup-satellite's intensity and its position in the energy loss spectrum can be explained. Furthermore, its intensity shows a strong dependence on the scattering angle in certain scattering geometries. By means of a model calculation this dependence is attributed to a polarisation-effect. In this thesis the electronic structure of CuO is investigated utilizing resonant X-ray Raman Scattering. The special properties of this transition metal oxide are emphasized and the potential of the method is shown. First it is explained how one can draw conclusions about the unoccupied density of states of CuO and its symmetry from measurements of the copper K-alpha fluorescence by using an excitation energy of a few eV below the absorption threshold. By this mean...

  7. Investigation of resonant Raman scattering in type II GaAs/AlAs superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, H

    2001-01-01

    GAMMA-related Type I outgoing RR spectra within several theoretical models. Thereby, the mechanisms of the Type II RR scattering, the origins of the RR lineshape and the polarisation dependence, are fully explained, clarifying the spectral features observed in the GaAs zone-centre optic phonon region. The Type II resonance also allows the observation of zone boundary (X-point) phonons from intervalley (IV) scattering. A model of the IV electron-phonon interaction involving X conduction band electrons and zone boundary phonons in Type II SLs is presented. With the predicted SL selection rules for IV scattering, the simultaneous observation of both the zone-boundary longitudinal acoustic and optic phonons can be understood and the spectral features quantitatively explained. As a consequence of the band alignment in GaAs/AIAs superlattices (SLs) and the indirect nature of bulk AIAs, quantum confinement can be used to engineer a Type II system. This produces an electron population in the AIAs longitudinal (X sub ...

  8. X-ray absorption and resonance raman spectroscopy of human myeloperoxidase at neutral and acid pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, K T; Taylor, K L; Kinkade, J M; Sinclair, R B; Powers, L S

    1997-04-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an important enzyme in the oxygen-dependent host defense system of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, utilizes hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the production of hypochlorous acid, an oxidizing bactericidal agent. While MPO shows significant sequence homology with other peroxidases and this homology is particularly striking among the active-site residues, MPO exhibits unusual spectral features and the unique ability to catalyze the oxidation of chloride ions. We have investigated the MPO active-site with X-ray absorption (XAS) and resonance Raman (RRS) spectroscopies at neutral pH and also at the physiological acidic pH (pH approximately 3) and have compared these results with those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). At pH 7.5, XAS results show that the iron heme active site is 6-coordinate where the distal ligand is likely nitrogen or oxygen, but not sulfur. The heme is distorted compared to HRP, other peroxidases, and heme compounds, but at pH approximately 3, the distal ligand is lost and the heme is less distorted. RRS results under identical pH conditions show that the skeletal core-size sensitive modes and v3 are shifted to higher frequency at pH approximately 3 indicating a 6- to 5-coordination change of high spin ferric heme. In addition, a new band at 270 cm(-1) is observed at pH approximately 3 which is consistent with the loss of the sixth ligand. The higher symmetry of the heme at pH approximately 3 is reflected by a single v4 mode in the (RRS) spectrum. HRP also loses its loosely associated distal water at this pH, but little change in heme distortion is observed. This change suggests that loss of the distal ligand in MPO releases stress on the heme which may facilitate binding of chloride ion.

  9. Probing the pigment binding sites in LHCII with resonance Raman spectroscopy: The effect of mutations at S123.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Elizabeth; Wang, Ke; Llansola-Portoles, Manuel J; Ilioaia, Cristian; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno; Yang, Chunhong

    2016-09-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the structure of light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl) a/b complexes of photosystem II (LHCII), reconstituted from wild-type (WT) and mutant apoproteins over-expressed in Escherichia coli. The point mutations involved residue S123, exchanged for either P (S123P) or G (S123G). In all reconstituted proteins, lutein 2 displayed a distorted conformation, as it does in purified LHCII trimers. Reconstituted WT and S123G also exhibited a conformation of bound neoxanthin (Nx) molecules identical to the native protein, while the S123P mutation was found to induce a change in Nx conformation. This structural change of neoxanthin is accompanied by a blue shift of the absorption of this carotenoid molecule. The interactions assumed by (and thus the structure of the binding sites of) the bound Chls b were found identical in all the reconstituted proteins, and only marginally perturbed as compared to purified LHCII. The interactions assumed by bound Chls a were also identical in purified LHCII and the reconstituted WT. However, the keto carbonyl group of one Chl a, originally free-from-interactions in WT LHCII, becomes involved in a strong H-bond with its environment in LHCII reconstituted from the S123P apoprotein. As the absorption in the Qy region of this protein is identical to that of the LHCII reconstituted from the WT apoprotein, we conclude that the interaction state of the keto carbonyl of Chl a does not play a significant role in tuning the binding site energy of these molecules.

  10. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieger, S.; Fischedick, M.; Boller, K-J.; Fallnich, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression wh

  11. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT

  12. Resonance raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical modeling studies of protein-astaxanthin interactions in alpha-crustacyanin (major blue carotenoprotein complex in carapace of lobster, Homarus gammarus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weesie, R J; Merlin, J C; de Groot, H J; Britton, G; Lugtenburg, J; Jansen, F J; Cornard, J P

    1999-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations were used to investigate the molecular origin of the large redshift assumed by the electronic absorption spectrum of astaxanthin in alpha-crustacyanin, the major blue carotenoprotein from the carapace of the lobster, Homarus gammarus. Resonance Raman spectra of alpha-crustacyanin reconstituted with specifically 13C-labeled astaxanthins at the positions 15, 15,15', 14,14', 13,13', 12,12', or 20,20' were recorded. This approach enabled us to obtain information about the effect of the ligand-protein interactions on the geometry of the astaxanthin chromophore in the ground electronic state. The magnitude of the downshifts of the C==C stretching modes for each labeled compound indicate that the main perturbation on the central part of the polyene chain is not homogeneous. In addition, changes in the 1250-1400 cm(-1) spectral range indicate that the geometry of the astaxanthin polyene chain is moderately changed upon binding to the protein. Semiempirical quantum chemical modeling studies (Austin method 1) show that the geometry change cannot be solely responsible for the bathochromic shift from 480 to 632 nm of protein-bound astaxanthin. The calculations are consistent with a polarization mechanism that involves the protonation or another interaction with a positive ionic species of comparable magnitude with both ketofunctionalities of the astaxanthin-chromophore and support the changes observed in the resonance Raman and visible absorption spectra. The results are in good agreement with the conclusions that were drawn on the basis of a study of the charge densities in the chromophore in alpha-crustacyanin by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From the results the dramatic bathochromic shift can be explained not only from a change in the ground electronic state conformation but also from an interaction in the excited electronic state that significantly decreases the energy of the pi-antibonding C==O orbitals and

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of red-shifted solitonic resonant radiation in photonic crystal fibers and generation of radiation seeded Raman soliton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redshifted solitonic resonant radiation (RR) is a fascinating phase-matching phenomenon that occurs when an optical pulse, launched in the normal dispersion regime of photonic crystal fiber, radiates across the zero-dispersion point. The formation of such phase-matched radiation is independent of the generation of any optical soliton and mainly governed by the leading edge of an input pump which forms a shock front. The radiation is generated at the anomalous dispersion regime and found to be confined both in the time and frequency domain. We experimentally investigate the formation of such radiation in fabricated photonic crystal fiber for two different pulse width regimes (femtosecond and picosecond) with detailed theoretical analyses. Theoretically predicted results corroborate well with experimental results and confirm the existence of such unique radiation which is robust in nature. Further, we extend the study to long-length fiber and investigate the interplay between redshifted solitonic RR and intrapulse Raman scattering (IPRS). The consequence of the formation of such solitonic RR in an anomalous dispersion domain is found to be very interesting where it seeds a series of Raman solitons and behaves like a secondary source. These Raman solitons are now continuously redshifted and open up the possibility of wideband supercontinuum generation even in normal dispersion pumping. We fabricate a suitable photonic crystal fiber and experimentally demonstrate the RR-seeded IPRS process. (paper)

  14. Optimization of Fe3O4@Ag nanoshells in magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering for malaria diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2013-11-01

    The great potential of magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) for early malaria diagnosis has been demonstrated previously. This technique is able to detect β-hematin, which is equivalent to a malaria biomarker (hemozoin) in Raman features, at a concentration of 5 nM. In this study, we present the optimization of nanoparticles used in the magnetic field enriched SERRS by tuning the core size and shell thickness of nanoparticles with an iron oxide core and a silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag). The discrete dipole approximation (DDA) model was introduced to investigate the localized electromagnetic field distributions and extinction efficiencies of the aggregate of Fe3O4@Ag and β-hematin, in correlation with their magnetic field enriched SERRS performance. We find that the optimal core-shell size of Fe3O4@Ag leading to the effective aggregation of Fe3O4@Ag and β-hematin under an external magnetic field with superior extinction efficiencies is the key to realize highly augmented Raman signals in this strategy. Furthermore, it is noted that the optimized result differs from the case without the external magnetic field to that with the external magnetic field. Therefore, this work demonstrates experimentally and theoretically the potential of tuning the core-shell Fe3O4@Ag for achieving the efficient magnetic field-enriched SERRS detection of β-hematin for early malaria diagnosis.

  15. Physical origin of Davydov splitting and resonant Raman spectroscopy of Davydov components in multilayer MoTe2

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Q. J.; Tan, Q. H.; Zhang, X; J. B. Wu; Sheng, B. W.; Wan, Y.; Wang, X. Q.; Dai, L.; Tan, P H

    2016-01-01

    We systematically study the high-resolution and polarized Raman spectra of multilayer (ML) MoTe2. The layer-breathing (LB) and shear (C) modes are observed in the ultralow-frequency region, which are used to quantitatively evaluate the interlayer coupling in ML MoTe2 based on the linear chain model, in which only the nearest interlayer coupling is considered. The Raman spectra on three different substrates verify the negligible substrate effect on the phonon frequencies of ML MoTe2. Ten excit...

  16. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  17. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Ring-Involved Vibrational Modes in the (1)B(2u) Absorption Band of Benzene, Including the Kekule Vibrational Modes ν(9) and ν(10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willitsford, Adam H; Chadwick, C Todd; Kurtz, Stewart; Philbrick, C Russell; Hallen, Hans

    2016-02-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy provides much stronger Raman signal levels than its off-resonant counterpart and adds selectivity by excitation tuning. Raman preresonance of benzene has been well studied. On-resonance studies, especially at phonon-allowed absorptions, have received less attention. In this case, we observe resonance of many of the vibration modes associated motion of the carbons in the ring while tuning over the (1)B2u absorption, including the related ν9 (CC stretch Herzberg notation, ν14 Wilson notation) and ν10 (CH-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν15 Wilson notation) vibrational modes along with the ν2 (CC-stretch or ring-breathing Herzberg notation, ν1 Wilson notation) mode and multiples of the ν18 (CCC-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν6 Wilson notation) vibrational mode. The ring-breathing mode is found to mix with the b2u modes creating higher frequency composites. Through the use of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to tune through the (1)B2u absorption band of liquid benzene, a stiffening (increase in energy) of the vibrational modes is observed as the excitation wavelength nears the (1)B2u absorption peak of the isolated molecule (vapor) phase. The strongest resonance amplitude observed is in the 2 × ν18 (e2g) mode, with nearly twice the intensity of the ring-breathing mode, ν2. Several overtones and combination modes, especially with ν2 (a1g), are also observed to resonate. Raman resonances on phonon-allowed excitations are narrow and permit the measurement of vibrations not Raman-active in the ground state. PMID:26731431

  18. Rational Design of a Chalcogenopyrylium-Based Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering-Nanoprobe with Attomolar Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Matthew A.; Huang, Ruimin; Detty, Michael R.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-01-01

    High sensitivity and specificity are two desirable features in biomedical imaging. Raman imaging has surfaced as a promising optical modality that offers both. Here, we report the design and synthesis of a group of near infrared absorbing 2-thienyl-substituted chalcogenopyrylium dyes tailored to have high affinity for gold. When adsorbed onto gold nanoparticles, these dyes produce biocompatible SERRS-nanoprobes with attomolar limits of detection amenable to ultrasensitive in vivo multiplexed tumor and disease marker detection. PMID:25800697

  19. Rational design of a chalcogenopyrylium-based surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering nanoprobe with attomolar sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Stefan; Bedics, Matthew A.; Wall, Matthew A.; Huang, Ruimin; Detty, Michael R.; Kircher, Moritz F.

    2015-03-01

    High sensitivity and specificity are two desirable features in biomedical imaging. Raman imaging has surfaced as a promising optical modality that offers both. Here we report the design and synthesis of a group of near-infrared absorbing 2-thienyl-substituted chalcogenopyrylium dyes tailored to have high affinity for gold. When adsorbed onto gold nanoparticles, these dyes produce biocompatible SERRS nanoprobes with attomolar limits of detection amenable to ultrasensitive in vivo multiplexed tumour and disease marker detection.

  20. Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra of O3- ions in γ-irradiated KC1O3 and NaC1O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra have been measured for the ozonide ion, O-3, produced in single crystals of KClO3 and NaClO3 by irradiation with γ rays. The O-3 ions are oriented in four to six symmetrically nonequivalent positions in KClO3 and appear to be oriented in two nonequivalent positions in NaClO3. Differences between the nonequivalent orientations affect both the ground and excited electronic states of O-3 as well as its ground vibrational states. The progressions of ν1 observed in the electronic spectra show that the vibrational spacing of ν1 in the excited electronic state is about 857 cm/sup -1/ as compared with the ground state spacing of about 1020 cm/sup -1/. Measurements of relative Raman intensities obtained with different exciting lines indicate that excitation near the center of a vibronic transition (0--n') produces extra enhancement of the intensity of the nν1 vibrational transition

  1. Resonant excitation of Mn local vibrational modes in the higher order Raman spectra of nanocrystalline Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias da Silva, J H; Leite, D M G [Department of Physics, Advanced Materials Group, UNESP-Sao Paulo State University, Bauru SP, 17033-360 (Brazil); Zanatta, A R [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, USP, Sao Carlos 13560-250 (Brazil)], E-mail: jhdsilva@fc.unesp.br, E-mail: dmgleite@fc.unesp.br, E-mail: zanatta@ifsc.usp.br

    2008-06-25

    The effect of manganese on the vibrational properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N (0{<=}x{<=}0.18) films has been investigated by Raman scattering using 488.0 and 632.8 nm photon excitations. The first-order transverse and longitudinal optical GaN vibrational bands were observed in the whole composition range using both excitations, while the corresponding overtones, as well as a prominent peak located in 1238 cm{sup -1} (153.5 meV) were only observed in the Mn-containing films under 488.0 nm excitation. We propose that the peak observed at 1238 cm{sup -1} is due to resonant Mn local vibrational modes, the excitation process being related to electronic transitions involving the Mn acceptor band. (fast track communication)

  2. Non-invasive determination of the CO contents in tuna fish using polarization resolved resonance Raman scattering and/or Rayleigh spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is used for Modified Atmosphere Packaging of fresh fish and meat. CO is added because it binds to the Myoglobin of the muscle tissue with high affinity resulting in a bright, cherry-red colored carboxy-Myoglobin complex. The product will because of the red color appear to be ...... with polarization resolved resonance Raman spectra of these molecules, can form the basis of the development of a fast and non-invasive method for the screening of the presence of CO in tuna fish and meat.......Carbon monoxide (CO) is used for Modified Atmosphere Packaging of fresh fish and meat. CO is added because it binds to the Myoglobin of the muscle tissue with high affinity resulting in a bright, cherry-red colored carboxy-Myoglobin complex. The product will because of the red color appear...

  3. Investigation of magnetic field enriched surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering performance using Fe3O4@Ag nanoparticles for malaria diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Clement; Liu, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the magnetic field-enriched surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of β-hematin by using nanoparticles with iron oxide core and silver shell (Fe3O4@Ag) for the potential application in the early malaria diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the dependence of the magnetic field-enriched SERRS performance of β-hematin on the different core and shell sizes of the Fe3O4@Ag nanoparticles. We note that the core and shell parameters are critical in the realization of the optimal magnetic field-enrich SERRS β-hematin signal. These results are consistent with our simulations that will guide the optimization of the magnetic SERRS performance for the potential early diagnosis in the malaria disease.

  4. Potential sodium D2 resonance radiation generated by intra-cavity SHG of a c-cut Nd:YVO4 self-Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Haiyong; Huang, Chenghui; Zhang, Ge; Wei, Yong

    2011-03-28

    Intra-cavity frequency doubling with 589 nm emission from a compact c-cut Nd:YVO4 crystal self-Raman laser was investigated. A 15-cm-length LBO with non-critical phase-matching cut (θ = 90°, ϕ = 0°) was used for efficient second-harmonic generation. At a pump power of 16.2 W and a pulse repetition frequency of 40 kHz, output power up to 2.15 W was achieved with a pulse width of 16 ns and a conversion efficiency of 13.3% with respect to the diode pump power. The center wavelength was measured to be 589.17 nm with a Half-Maximum-Full-Width of 0.2 nm, which was well in accordance with the sodium D2 resonance radiation. PMID:21451660

  5. Effective approach to strengthen plasmon resonance localized on top surfaces of Ag nanoparticles and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zhibing; Xu, Rui; Zheng, Xianzheng; Fu, Qun; Wu, Minghong; Lei, Yong

    2016-11-01

    The spatial distribution of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) plays a key role in many plasmonic applications. Based on the thermal stability of alumina templates, this work reports a novel approach to manipulate the distribution of LSPR and exhibits its significance for an important plasmonic application, the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A suitable thermal annealing sharpens the edges in top surfaces (far from the substrates) of Ag nanoparticles, which significantly strengthens the distal mode (DM) with the LSPR excited on the top surfaces. Because the top surface is the major place to adsorb probe molecules, this manipulation greatly improves the detection sensitivity of SERS. Our research provides a new way to improve the sensitivity of SERS, which also indicates that great care has to be taken on special LSPR mode which is largely responsible for a certain plasmonic application (e.g., the DM for SERS although it is not the major mode).

  6. Real-time measurements of the redox states of c-type cytochromes in electroactive biofilms: a confocal resonance Raman Microscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Virdis

    Full Text Available Confocal Resonance Raman Microscopy (CRRM was used to probe variations of redox state of c-type cytochromes embedded in living mixed-culture electroactive biofilms exposed to different electrode polarizations, under potentiostatic and potentiodynamic conditions. In the absence of the metabolic substrate acetate, the redox state of cytochromes followed the application of reducing and oxidizing electrode potentials. Real-time monitoring of the redox state of cytochromes during cyclic voltammetry (CV in a potential window where cytochromes reduction occurs, evidenced a measurable time delay between the oxidation of redox cofactors probed by CV at the electrode interface, and oxidation of distal cytochromes probed by CRRM. This delay was used to tentatively estimate the diffusivity of electrons through the biofilm. In the presence of acetate, the resonance Raman spectra of young (10 days, j = 208 ± 49 µA cm(-2 and mature (57 days, j = 267 ± 73 µA cm(-2 biofilms show that cytochromes remained oxidized homogeneously even at layers as far as 70 µm from the electrode, implying the existence of slow metabolic kinetics that do not result in the formation of a redox gradient inside the biofilm during anode respiration. However, old biofilms (80 days, j = 190 ± 37 µA cm(-2 with thickness above 100 µm were characterized by reduced catalytic activity compared to the previous developing stages. The cytochromes in these biofilm were mainly in the reduced redox state, showing that only aged mixed-culture biofilms accumulate electrons during anode respiration. These results differ substantially from recent observations in pure Geobacter sulfurreducens electroactive biofilms, in which accumulation of reduced cytochromes is already observed in thinner biofilms, thus suggesting different bottlenecks in current production for mixed-culture and G. sulfurreducens biofilms.

  7. Separation of multiple-quantum signals with different orders along with frequency axis in Raman magnetic resonance spectroscopy in heteronuclear systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪希茄; 卢广; 叶朝辉

    1997-01-01

    One-dimensional multiple-quantum spectroscopy with Raman magnetic resonance (RMR) in het-eronuclear systems was described by the product operator formalism in detail.The effects of the field strength and the frequency offset of the irradiation introduced during the detection period on the intensities and the resonant frequencies of the multiple-quantum signals in RMR spectra were investigated extensively by this product operator formalism.The results predicted by the formalism showed that the multiple-quantum signals in RMR spectroscopy had a higher sensitivity when a smaller frequency offset of irradiation field was employed.However,this situation would complicate the assignment and the separation of the multiple-quantum signals in different orders along the frequency axis in RMR spectra.On the other hand,a larger strength of the irradiation field would result in decoupling and therefore would obscure the detection of the multiple-quantum signals.In the meantime,a much weaker RF field might greatly dec

  8. Molecular near-field antenna effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering: Intermolecular vibronic intensity borrowing of solvent from solute through dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o, E-mail: hhama@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-28

    We quantitatively interpret the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon related to resonance Hyper-Raman (HR) scattering. In resonance HR spectra of all-trans-β-carotene (β-carotene) in solution, vibrations of proximate solvent molecules are observed concomitantly with the solute β-carotene HR bands. It has been shown that these solvent bands are subject to marked intensity enhancements by more than 5 orders of magnitude under the presence of β-carotene. We have called this phenomenon the molecular-near field effect. Resonance HR spectra of β-carotene in benzene, deuterated benzene, cyclohexane, and deuterated cyclohexane have been measured precisely for a quantitative analysis of this effect. The assignments of the observed peaks are made by referring to the infrared, Raman, and HR spectra of neat solvents. It has been revealed that infrared active and some Raman active vibrations are active in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed spectra in the form of difference spectra (between benzene/deuterated benzene and cyclohexane/deuterated cyclohexane) are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of the extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering. The theory incorporates the coupling of excited electronic states of β-carotene with the vibrations of a proximate solvent molecule through solute–solvent dipole–dipole and dipole–quadrupole interactions. It is shown that the infrared active modes arise from the dipole–dipole interaction, whereas Raman active modes from the dipole–quadrupole interaction. It is also shown that vibrations that give strongly polarized Raman bands are weak in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed solvent HR spectra are simulated with the help of quantum chemical calculations for various orientations and distances of a solvent molecule with respect to the solute. The observed spectra are best simulated with random orientations of the solvent molecule at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å.

  9. Resonance Raman spectroscopic study of the interaction between Co(II)rrinoids and the ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase PduO from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiyoung; Mera, Paola E; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C; Brunold, Thomas C

    2016-09-01

    The human-type ATP:corrinoid adenosyltransferase PduO from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) catalyzes the adenosylation of Co(II)rrinoids to generate adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) or adenosylcobinamide (AdoCbi(+)). This process requires the formation of "supernucleophilic" Co(I)rrinoid intermediates in the enzyme active site which are properly positioned to abstract the adeonsyl moiety from co-substrate ATP. Previous magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analyses revealed that LrPduO achieves the thermodynamically challenging reduction of Co(II)rrinoids by displacing the axial ligand with a non-coordinating phenylalanine residue to produce a four-coordinate species. However, relatively little is currently known about the interaction between the tetradentate equatorial ligand of Co(II)rrinoids (the corrin ring) and the enzyme active site. To address this issue, we have collected resonance Raman (rR) data of Co(II)rrinoids free in solution and bound to the LrPduO active site. The relevant resonance-enhanced vibrational features of the free Co(II)rrinoids are assigned on the basis of rR intensity calculations using density functional theory to establish a suitable framework for interpreting rR spectral changes that occur upon Co(II)rrinoid binding to the LrPduO/ATP complex in terms of structural perturbations of the corrin ring. To complement our rR data, we have also obtained MCD spectra of Co(II)rrinoids bound to LrPduO complexed with the ATP analogue UTP. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence that in the LrPduO active site, the corrin ring of Co(II)rrinoids is firmly locked in place by several amino acid side chains so as to facilitate the dissociation of the axial ligand. PMID:27383231

  10. Growth temperature dependent surface plasmon resonances of densely packed gold nanoparticles’ films and their role in surface enhanced Raman scattering of Rhodamine6G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Growth temperature produces and tunes the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold films. • Optimum thickness and growth temperature combination results narrow SPR band. • Alumina capping red-shifted the SPR band and showed marginal re-sputtering of films. • Densely packed gold nanoparticles of varying sizes can be realized by pulsed laser deposition. • High SERS intensity of dye from gold films of large SPR strength at excitation wavelength. - Abstract: Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) characteristics of gold nanoparticles films grown at different substrate temperatures and mass thicknesses with and without alumina capping were studied. At different film mass thicknesses, the LSPR response was observed mainly in the films grown at high substrate temperatures. About 300 °C substrate temperature was found to be optimum for producing narrow and strong LSPR band in both uncapped and alumina capped gold nanoparticles films. The LSPR wavelength could be tuned in the range of 600–750 nm by changing either number of ablation pulses or decreasing target to substrate distance (TSD) and alumina layer capping. Though the alumina capping re-sputtered the gold films still these films exhibited stronger LSPR response compared to the uncapped films. Atomic force microscopic analysis revealed formation of densely packed nanoparticles films exhibiting strong LSPR response which is consistent with the package density of the nanoparticles predicted by the theoretical calculations. The average size of nanoparticles increased with substrate temperature, number of ablation pulses and decreasing the TSD. For the same mass thickness of gold films grown at different substrate temperatures the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity of Rhodamine6G dye was found to be significantly different which had direct correlation with the LSPR strength of the films at the excitation wavelength

  11. Growth temperature dependent surface plasmon resonances of densely packed gold nanoparticles’ films and their role in surface enhanced Raman scattering of Rhodamine6G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Shweta, E-mail: shwetaverma@rrcat.gov.in [Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Rao, B. Tirumala [Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Laser Materials Development and Devices Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Sathe, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore 452 001 (India); Kukreja, L.M. [Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Growth temperature produces and tunes the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold films. • Optimum thickness and growth temperature combination results narrow SPR band. • Alumina capping red-shifted the SPR band and showed marginal re-sputtering of films. • Densely packed gold nanoparticles of varying sizes can be realized by pulsed laser deposition. • High SERS intensity of dye from gold films of large SPR strength at excitation wavelength. - Abstract: Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) characteristics of gold nanoparticles films grown at different substrate temperatures and mass thicknesses with and without alumina capping were studied. At different film mass thicknesses, the LSPR response was observed mainly in the films grown at high substrate temperatures. About 300 °C substrate temperature was found to be optimum for producing narrow and strong LSPR band in both uncapped and alumina capped gold nanoparticles films. The LSPR wavelength could be tuned in the range of 600–750 nm by changing either number of ablation pulses or decreasing target to substrate distance (TSD) and alumina layer capping. Though the alumina capping re-sputtered the gold films still these films exhibited stronger LSPR response compared to the uncapped films. Atomic force microscopic analysis revealed formation of densely packed nanoparticles films exhibiting strong LSPR response which is consistent with the package density of the nanoparticles predicted by the theoretical calculations. The average size of nanoparticles increased with substrate temperature, number of ablation pulses and decreasing the TSD. For the same mass thickness of gold films grown at different substrate temperatures the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity of Rhodamine6G dye was found to be significantly different which had direct correlation with the LSPR strength of the films at the excitation wavelength.

  12. Anti-Stokes Resonance Raman of Ir Illuminated Dendrimer Iron (III)-Porphyrins%红外辐照下树枝状铁(iii)卟啉的反斯托克斯共振拉曼

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Yu-jun; D.L.Jiang; M.Uymura; T.Aida; T.Kitagawa

    2005-01-01

    The benzene dendrimers of Fe(Ⅲ) tetraphenyl porphyrin chloride[LnFe(Ⅲ)TPPCl] with n = 3, 4, and 5 (n: number of layers) have been synthesized and the IR illumination effects at benzene bands were examined with anti- Stokes resonance Raman speetroseopy for their dioxane solutions.Boltzman temperatures were determined from the Stokes to anti - Stokes intensity ratio for the speetra excited at 413.1 nm in the presence and absence of IR illumination.

  13. Structure-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance characteristics and surface enhanced Raman scattering performances of quasi-periodic nanoarrays: Measurements and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: zhoujun@nbu.edu.cn [Institute of Photonics, Faculty of Science, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Rippa, Massimo; Petti, Lucia [Institute of Applied Sciences and Intelligent Systems “E. Caianiello” of CNR, Via Campi Flegrei 34, 80072 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2015-10-28

    A set of periodic and quasi-periodic Au nanoarrays with different morphologies have been fabricated by using electron beam lithography technique, and their optical properties have been examined experimentally and analyzed theoretically by scanning near-field optical microscope and finite element method, respectively. Results present that the localized surface plasmon resonance of the as-prepared Au nanoarrays exhibit the structure-depended characteristics. Comparing with the periodic nanoarrays, the quasi-periodic ones demonstrate stronger electric field enhancement, especially for Thue-Morse nanoarray. Meanwhile, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid molecular labeled nanoarrays show that the quasi-periodic nanoarrays exhibit distinct SERS enhancement, for example, a higher enhancement factor of ∼10{sup 7} is obtained for the Thue-Morse nanoarray consisted of square pillars of 100 nm size. Therefore, it is significant to optimally design and fabricate the chip-scale quasi-periodic nanoarrays with high localized electric field enhancement for SERS applications in biosensing field.

  14. A general time-dependent route to Resonance-Raman spectroscopy including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Barone, Vincenzo [Scuola Normale Superiore, piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Bloino, Julien [Scuola Normale Superiore, piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Chimica dei Composti OrganoMetallici (ICCOM-CNR), UOS di Pisa, Area della Ricerca CNR, Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-09-21

    We present a new formulation of the time-dependent theory of Resonance-Raman spectroscopy (TD-RR). Particular attention has been devoted to the generality of the framework and to the possibility of including different effects (Duschinsky mixing, Herzberg-Teller contributions). Furthermore, the effects of different harmonic models for the intermediate electronic state are also investigated. Thanks to the implementation of the TD-RR procedure within a general-purpose quantum-chemistry program, both solvation and leading anharmonicity effects have been included in an effective way. The reliability and stability of our TD-RR implementation are validated against our previously proposed and well-tested time-independent procedure. Practical applications are illustrated with some closed- and open-shell medium-size molecules (anthracene, phenoxyl radical, benzyl radical) and the simulated spectra are compared to the experimental results. More complex and larger systems, not limited to organic compounds, can be also studied, as shown for the case of Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride.

  15. A general time-dependent route to Resonance-Raman spectroscopy including Franck-Condon, Herzberg-Teller and Duschinsky effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    We present a new formulation of the time-dependent theory of Resonance-Raman spectroscopy (TD-RR). Particular attention has been devoted to the generality of the framework and to the possibility of including different effects (Duschinsky mixing, Herzberg-Teller contributions). Furthermore, the effects of different harmonic models for the intermediate electronic state are also investigated. Thanks to the implementation of the TD-RR procedure within a general-purpose quantum-chemistry program, both solvation and leading anharmonicity effects have been included in an effective way. The reliability and stability of our TD-RR implementation are validated against our previously proposed and well-tested time-independent procedure. Practical applications are illustrated with some closed- and open-shell medium-size molecules (anthracene, phenoxyl radical, benzyl radical) and the simulated spectra are compared to the experimental results. More complex and larger systems, not limited to organic compounds, can be also studied, as shown for the case of Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride.

  16. Comparison of simplified sum-over-state expressions to calculate resonance Raman intensities including Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthmuller, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Sum-over-state (SOS) expressions to simulate absorption spectroscopy and resonance Raman (RR) scattering including Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) effects are described. Starting from the general SOS method, several simplified SOS formulae are derived. In particular, within the so-called independent mode displaced harmonic oscillator model, it is shown that including the vibronic structure in the absorption and RR spectra only requires the calculation of FC overlap integrals of the type , where g, e, and v stand for the electronic ground state, excited state, and vibrational quantum number, respectively. Additionally, an approximation of the latter approach is introduced, referred as the simplified Φe method, in which the FC factors are neglected. This method is advantageous from the computational point of view and it is demonstrated that it reproduces the main characteristics of the more involved approaches. The merits and drawbacks of the different methods are discussed by applying them to the prototypical compound of Rhodamine 6G. Overall, this work intends to unravel and clarify some differences in the SOS theories of RR scattering.

  17. Bayesian Extraction of Deep UV Resonance Raman Signature of Fibrillar Cross-β Sheet Core based on H-D Exchange Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashilov, V. A.; Lednev, I. K.

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The application of conventional biophysical techniques including solution NMR and X-ray crystallography for structural characterization of fibrils is limited because they are neither crystalline nor soluble. The Bayesian approach was utilized for extracting the deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectrum of the lysozyme fibrillar β-sheet based on the hydrogen-deuterium exchange spectral data. The problem was shown to be unsolvable when using blind source separation or conventional chemometrics methods because of the 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of the species under study. Information about the mixing process was incorporated by forcing the columns of the concentration matrix to be proportional to the expected concentration profiles. The ill-conditioning of the matrix was removed by concatenating it to the diagonal matrix with entries corresponding to the known pure spectra (sources). Prior information about the spectral features and characteristic bands of the spectra was taken into account using the Bayesian signal dictionary approach. The extracted DUVRR spectrum of the cross-β sheet core exhibited sharp bands indicating the highly ordered structure. Well resolved sub-bands in Amide I and Amide III regions enabled us to assign the fibril core structure to anti-parallel β-sheet and estimate the amide group facial angle Ψ in the cross-β structure. The elaborated Bayesian approach was demonstrated to be applicable for studying correlated biochemical processes.

  18. A Study of the Dynamics of the Heme Pocket and C-helix in CooA upon CO Dissociation Using Time-Resolved Visible and UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizuno, Misao; Kimura, Tetsunari; Kubo, Minoru; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-18

    CooA is a CO-sensing transcriptional activator from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum that binds CO at the heme iron. The heme iron in ferrous CooA has two axial ligands: His77 and Pro2. CO displaces Pro2 and induces a conformational change in CooA. The dissociation of CO and/or ligation of the Pro2 residue are believed to trigger structural changes in the protein. Visible time-resolved resonance Raman spectra obtained in this study indicated that the ν(Fe-His) mode, arising from the proximal His77-iron stretch, does not shift until 50 μs after the photodissociation of CO. Ligation of the Pro2 residue to the heme iron was observed around 50 μs after the photodissociation of CO, suggesting that the ν(Fe-His) band exhibits no shift until the ligation of Pro2. UV resonance Raman spectra suggested structural changes in the vicinity of Trp110 in the C-helix upon CO binding, but no or very small spectral changes in the time-resolved UV resonance Raman spectra were observed from 100 ns to 100 μs after the photodissociation of CO. These results strongly suggest that the conformational change of CooA is induced by the ligation of Pro2 to the heme iron. PMID:27457181

  19. Coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in resonant 1 σ →2 π x-ray Raman scattering of CO molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Rafael C.; Guarise, Marco; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Jaouen, Nicolas; Chiuzbǎian, Gheorghe S.; Lüning, Jan; Ekholm, Victor; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Sâthe, Conny; Hennies, Franz; Guimarães, Freddy F.; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Journel, Loïc; Simon, Marc; Kimberg, Victor

    2016-03-01

    We present a detailed experimental-theoretical analysis of O K -edge resonant 1 σ -2 π inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) from carbon monoxide with unprecedented energy resolution. We employ high-level ab initio calculations to compute the potential energy curves of the states involved in the RIXS process and simulate the measured RIXS spectra using the wave-packet-propagation formalism, including Coulomb coupling in the final-state manifold. The theoretical analysis allows us to explain all the key features of the experimental spectra, including some that were not seen before. First, we clearly show the interference effect between different RIXS channels corresponding to the transition via orthogonal Π1x and Π1y core-excited states of CO. Second, the RIXS region of 13 eV energy loss presents a triple structure, revealed only by the high-resolution measurement. In previous studies, this region was attributed solely to a valence state. Here we show a strong Coulomb mixing of the Rydberg and valence final states, which opens the forbidden RIXS channels to the "dark" final Rydberg states and drastically changes the RIXS profile. Third, using a combination of high-resolution experiment and high-level theory, we improve the |4 σ-12 π1> final-state potential-energy curve by fitting its bottom part with the experiment. Also, the coupling constants between Rydberg and valence states were refined via comparison with the experiment. Our results illustrate the large potential of the RIXS technique for advanced studies of highly excited states of neutral molecules.

  20. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  1. Efficient and automatic calculation of optical band shapes and resonance Raman spectra for larger molecules within the independent mode displaced harmonic oscillator model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Taras; Neese, Frank

    2012-12-21

    In this work, an improved method for the efficient automatic simulation of optical band shapes and resonance Raman (rR) intensities within the "independent mode displaced harmonic oscillator" is described. Despite the relative simplicity of this model, it is able to account for the intensity distribution in absorption (ABS), fluorescence, and rR spectra corresponding to strongly dipole allowed electronic transitions with high accuracy. In order to include temperature-induced effects, we propose a simple extension of the time dependent wavepacket formalism developed by Heller which enables one to derive analytical expressions for the intensities of hot bands in ABS and rR spectra from the dependence of the wavepacket evolution on its initial coordinate. We have also greatly optimized the computational procedures for numerical integration of complicated oscillating integrals. This is important for efficient simulations of higher-order rR spectra and excitation profiles, as well as for the fitting of experimental spectra of large molecules. In particular, the multimode damping mechanism is taken into account for efficient reduction of the upper time limit in the numerical integration. Excited state energy gradient as well as excited state geometry optimization calculations are employed in order to determine excited state dimensionless normal coordinate displacements. The gradient techniques are highly cost-effective provided that analytical excited state derivatives with respect to nuclear displacements are available. Through comparison with experimental spectra of some representative molecules, we illustrate that the gradient techniques can even outperform the geometry optimization method if the harmonic approximation becomes inadequate. PMID:23267471

  2. Structure of enzyme-bound substrates: resonance Raman and kinetic evidence for differential enzyme-substrate contacts in N-(Pentafluoro-benzoyl)glycine dithioacyl and thioacyl papain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Angus, R. H.; Storer, A. C.; Carey, P. R.

    1989-12-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy is used to probe the structure of the substrate in the substrate-enzyme complex N-pentafluorobenzoyl) glycine (dithioacyl) papain (C 6F 5C(=O) NHCH 2C(=S)S-papain). This system was chosen since the high electron withdrawing capacity of the C 6F 5 group markedly affects electron density of the -NH- moiety which, in turn, is known to change catalytic activity. The RR spectrum of the enzyme-substrate complex is interpreted by reference to the model compound N-(pentafluorobenzoyl) glycine ethyl dithioester (C 6F 5(CO))NHCH 2C(=S)SC 2H 5. The RR spectra of this compound in aqueous or organic solvents can be understood in terms of the known conformational states of N-acylglycine dithioesters. Comparison of model with enzyme-substrate RR spectra shows that the substrate is binding in the active site in a conformer known as conformer B characterized by a small-NHCH 2CS(thiol) torsional angle and close N-to-S (thiol) contact. Kinetic rate-structure correlations are developed involving k3, the rate constant for deacylation, and the strength of the N-to-S (thiol) interaction. N-(Pentafluorobenzoyl) glycine dithioacyl papain fits the rate-structure correlation whereas the corresponding pentafluorobenzoyl glycine thiol intermediate does not. It is proposed that the difference in the size of the CS compared to the CO group brings about a small change in the dithioacyl papain compared to the thiolacyl papain conformation such that enzyme-substrate contacts involving ortho and meta F atoms in the thiol acyl enzyme case are weakened or removed in the case of the dithioacyl papain.

  3. The effect of an anti-hydrogen bond on Fermi resonance:A Raman spectroscopic study of the Fermi doublet v1-v12 of liquid pyridine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Dong-Fei; Gao Shu-Qin; Sun Cheng-Lin; Li Zuo-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The effects of an anti-hydrogen bond on the v1-v12 Fermi resonance (FR) of pyridine are experimentally investigated by using Raman scattering spectroscopy.Three systems,pyridine/water,pyridine/formamide,and pyridine/carbon tetrachloride,provide varying degrees of strength for the diluent-pyridine anti-hydrogen bond complex.Water forms a stronger anti-hydrogen bond with pyridine than with formamide,and in the case of adding non-polar solvent carbon tetrachloride,which is neither a hydrogen bond donor nor an acceptor and incapable of forming a hydrogen bond with pyridine,the intermolecular distance of pyridine will increase and the interaction of pyridine molecules will reduce.The dilution studies are performed on the three systems.Comparing with the values of the Fermi coupling coefficient W of the ring breathing mode v1 and triangle mode v12 of pyridine at different volume concentrations,which are calculated according to the Bertran equations,in three systems,we find that the solution with the strongest anti-hydrogen bond,water,shows the fastest change in thev1-v12 Fermi coupling coefficient W with the volume concentration varying,followed by the formamide and carbon tetrachloride solutions.These results suggest that the stronger anti-hydrogen bond-forming effect will cause a greater reduction in the strength of the v1-v12 FR of pyridine.According to the mechanism of the formation of an anti-hydrogen bond in the complexes and the FR theory,a qualitative explanation for the anti-hydrogen bond effect in reducing the strength of the v1 - v12 FR of pyridine is given.

  4. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  5. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI−)), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI− although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm−1 agrees well with the experimental measurement

  6. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, HuiLi; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-03-01

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI-)), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI- although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm-1 agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  7. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, HuiLi [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and Institute of Fujian Provincial Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and Institute of Fujian Provincial Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2014-03-07

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI{sup −})), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI{sup −} although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm{sup −1} agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  8. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein. PMID:17446273

  9. Resonance Raman spectroscopy reveals pH-dependent active site structural changes of lactoperoxidase compound 0 and its ferryl heme O-O bond cleavage products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Piotr J; Thammawichai, Warut; Wiedenhoeft, Dennis; Kincaid, James R

    2015-01-14

    The first step in the enzymatic cycle of mammalian peroxidases, including lactoperoxidase (LPO), is binding of hydrogen peroxide to the ferric resting state to form a ferric-hydroperoxo intermediate designated as Compound 0, the residual proton temporarily associating with the distal pocket His109 residue. Upon delivery of this "stored" proton to the hydroperoxo fragment, it rapidly undergoes O-O bond cleavage, thereby thwarting efforts to trap it using rapid mixing methods. Fortunately, as shown herein, both the peroxo and the hydroperoxo (Compound 0) forms of LPO can be trapped by cryoradiolysis, with acquisition of their resonance Raman (rR) spectra now permitting structural characterization of their key Fe-O-O fragments. Studies were conducted under both acidic and alkaline conditions, revealing pH-dependent differences in relative populations of these intermediates. Furthermore, upon annealing, the low pH samples convert to two forms of a ferryl heme O-O bond-cleavage product, whose ν(Fe═O) frequencies reflect substantially different Fe═O bond strengths. In the process of conducting these studies, rR structural characterization of the dioxygen adduct of LPO, commonly called Compound III, has also been completed, demonstrating a substantial difference in the strengths of the Fe-O linkage of the Fe-O-O fragment under acidic and alkaline conditions, an effect most reasonably attributed to a corresponding weakening of the trans-axial histidyl imidazole linkage at lower pH. Collectively, these new results provide important insight into the impact of pH on the disposition of the key Fe-O-O and Fe═O fragments of intermediates that arise in the enzymatic cycles of LPO, other mammalian peroxidases, and related proteins.

  10. Wall-to-wall stress induced in (6,5) semiconducting nanotubes by encapsulation in metallic outer tubes of different diameters: a resonance Raman study of individual C60-derived double-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando-Paez, Federico; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Farhat, Hootan; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2010-03-01

    We measure resonant Raman scattering from 11 individual C(60)-derived double-wall carbon nanotubes all having inner semiconducting (6,5) tubes and various outer metallic tubes. The Raman spectra show the radial breathing modes (RBM) of the inner and the outer tubes to be simultaneously in resonance with the same laser energy. We observe that an increase in the RBM frequency of the inner tubes is related to an increase in the RBM frequency of the outer tubes. The Raman spectra also contain a sharp G(-) feature that increases in frequency as the nominal diameter of the outer metallic tubes decreases. Finally, the one-phonon second-order D-band mode shows a two-way frequency splitting that decreases with decreasing nominal wall-to-wall distance. We suggest that the stress which increases with decreasing nominal wall-to-wall distance is responsible for the hardening that is observed in the frequencies of the RBM, D and G(-) modes of the inner (6,5) semiconducting tubes.

  11. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  12. Mapping of Low-Frequency Raman Modes in CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Layer Number, Stacking Orientation and Resonant Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Maria O’Brien; Niall McEvoy; Damien Hanlon; Toby Hallam; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2016-01-01

    Layered inorganic materials, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), have attracted much attention due to their exceptional electronic and optical properties. Reliable synthesis and characterization of these materials must be developed if these properties are to be exploited. Herein, we present low-frequency Raman analysis of MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Raman spectra are acquired over large areas allowing changes in the position and intens...

  13. Development of a femtosecond time-resolved near-IR multiplex stimulated Raman spectrometer in resonance with transitions in the 900-1550 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-07-21

    Charge transfer and charge delocalisation processes play key roles in the functions of large biomolecular systems and organic/inorganic devices. Many of the short-lived transients involved in these processes can be sensitively detected by monitoring their low-energy electronic transitions in the near-IR region. Ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for investigating the structural dynamics of the short-lived transients as well as their electronic dynamics. In this study, we have developed a femtosecond time-resolved near-IR multiplex stimulated Raman spectrometer using the Raman pump pulse at 1190 nm and a broadband probe pulse covering the 900-1550 nm region. Spectral and temporal instrument responses of the spectrometer are estimated to be 5 cm(-1) and 120 fs, respectively. Time-resolved near-IR stimulated Raman spectra of poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (P3DDT) are recorded in toluene solution for investigating its structural changes following the photoexcitation. The spectra strongly indicate conformational changes of P3DDT in excited states associated with the elongation of its effective conjugation length. The results on P3DDT fully demonstrate the effectiveness of the newly developed femtosecond time-resolved near-IR stimulated Raman spectrometer. PMID:27327140

  14. La spectrométrie Raman de résonance résolue dans le temps : une puissante méthode d'investigation en temps réel de la réactivité photochimique Time Resolved Resonance Raman Spectrometry: a Powerful Method for the Real-Time Investigation of Photochemical Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buntinx G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La spectroscopie Raman de résonance résolue dans le temps est une technique récente particulièrement bien adaptée à la caractérisation des intermédiaires réactionnels mis en jeu dans les réactions photochimiques (états excités, radicaux, paires d'ions, . . . . Elle permet de visualiser finement les variations de géométrie et de distribution électronique des espèces transitoires tout au long du chemin réactionnel. Nous présentons dans cet article une compilation des résultats obtenus dans notre laboratoire sur des molécules aromatiques dérivées du biphényle. Ces résultats constituent une bonne illustration des potentialités de cette technique à apporter des informations sur la réactivité de cette famille de composés. Après une partie consacrée à la description du dispositif expérimental utilisé dans de telles expériences, nous abordons l'étude structurale par spectrométrie Raman de résonance résolue dans le temps des radicaux cations et des états triplets de dérivés du biphényle. La dernière partie de cet article est consacrée à l'étude de la réactivité photochimique de dérivés de la pyridine (4,4'-bipyridine, 2,2'-bipyridine, 4-phénylpyridine, 2--phénylpyridine dans les solvants organiques par spectrométrie Raman de résonance résolue dans le temps. Time resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy is a recent technique that is particularly well suited for characterizing reaction intermediates involved in photochemical reactions (excited states, radicals, ion pair, etc. . It can finely visualize variations in geometry and electron distribution of transient species along the entire reaction path. This article describes a compilation of the results obtained in our laboratory on aromatic molecules derived from biphenyl. These results are a good illustration of the potentialities of this technique for providing information on the reactivity of this family of compounds. After a section devoted to

  15. PULSED KGd(WO42 RAMAN LASER: TOWARDS EMISSION LINEWIDTH NARROWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Savitski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The linewidth of a KGd(WO42 pulsed Raman laser is analysed experimentally for different configurations of the Raman and pump resonators: with narrow and broadband pump emission profiles, with and without linewidth narrowing elements in the Raman laser resonator, with and without injection seeding into the Raman cavity. The benefits of a narrow linewidth pump source in combination with linewidth narrowing elements in the Raman laser cavity for the efficient linewidth narrowing of the Raman emission are explained. 20 kW peak-power pulses at 1156 nm with 0,43 cm -1 emission linewidth are demonstrated from an injection seeded KGW Raman laser. 

  16. Raman Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Shona; Priore, Ryan J.; Nelson, Matthew P.; Treado, Patrick J.

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has seen an enormous increase in the number and breadth of imaging techniques developed for analysis in many industries, including pharmaceuticals, food, and especially biomedicine. Rather than accept single-dimensional forms of information, users now demand multidimensional assessment of samples. High specificity and the need for little or no sample preparation make Raman imaging a highly attractive analytical technique and provide motivation for continuing advances in its supporting technology and utilization. This review discusses the current tools employed in Raman imaging, the recent advances, and the major applications in this ever-growing analytical field.

  17. Mechanism of retinal schiff base formation and hydrolysis in relation to visual pigment photolysis and regeneration: resonance raman spectroscopy of a tetrahedral carbinolamine intermediate and oxygen-18 labeling of retinal at the metarhodopsin stage in photoreceptor membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, A.; Dixon, S.F.; Nutley, M.A.; Robb, J.L.

    1987-11-25

    The mechanism of formation and hydrolysis of N-retinylidene-n-butylamine, as a model of the rhodopsin chromophore, has been investigated by a study of the kinetic and equilibrium properties in aqueous anionic, cationic, and neutral detergent micelle systems. The pH dependence of steady-state formation and hydrolysis rate constants is consistent with the classical imine reaction mechanism involving tetrahedral carbinolamine intermediates. Kinetic transients consistent with such intermediates can be seen using rapid stopped-flow techniques. Hydrolysis rates in neutral detergent micelles exhibit general base catalysis, and there are pronounced detergent-specific effects which can be qualitatively interpreted in terms of ionic effects on Schiff base pK/sub a/ and micellar hydrogen ion activities. This suggests a rational explanation for the anomalous pK/sub a/ and thermodynamic stability of visual pigment chromophores under physiological conditions. The tetrahedral intermediate has been observed directly at room temperature by continuous-flow, pH-jump resonance Raman spectroscopy, and the spectrum of this transient species shows remarkable similarity with the previously reported Raman spectrum of the metarhodopsin II intermediate of bovine rhodopsin photolysis. Isotope-labeling experiments on bovine photoreceptor membranes exposed to oxygen-18 enriched water during bleaching show incorporation of /sup 18/O at the retinal aldehyde site during the metarhodopsin I ..-->.. II transition.

  18. Raman Spectroscopy of Deinococcus Radiodurans and β-Carotene on a Mineral Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijschuur, J. H.; Davies, G. R.; Ariese, F.

    2014-06-01

    “Is there life on other planets?” is one of the key questions in space exploration. Resonance Raman (RRS), Time Resolved Raman (TRRS) and Spatially Offset Raman (SORS) are Raman spectroscopic tools to find microorganisms hidden in minerals.

  19. 1H NMR, electronic-absorption and resonance-Raman spectra of isomeric okenone as compared with those of isomeric β-carotene, canthaxanthin, β-apo-8'-carotenal and spheroidene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Chen, Chun-Hai; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Koyama, Yasushi

    1998-05-01

    Eleven cis- trans isomers of okenone were isolated by means of HPLC using a silica-gel column from an isomeric mixture which was obtained by iodine-sensitized photo-isomerization of the all- trans isomer. The configurations of eight isomers among them were determined by NMR spectroscopy using the isomerization shifts of the olefinic 1Hs and the 1H- 1H NOE correlations to be all- trans, 7- cis, 7- cis,8-s- cis, 9- cis, 9'- cis, 13- cis, 13'- cis and 9,9'-di- cis, and their electronic-absorption and resonance-Raman spectra were recorded. Based on the results: (1) the chemical shifts of the olefinic 1Hs in NMR; (2) the wavelength of the A g-→B u+ transition; and (3) the relative intensity of the A g-→A g+ versus the A g-→B u+ transition in electronic absorption; (4) the CC stretching frequency; and (5) the relative intensity of the C10-C11 (C10'-C11') versus the C14-C15 (C14'-C15') stretching vibration in resonance Raman were compared among the all- trans, 7- cis, 9- cis (9'- cis) and 13- cis (13'- cis) isomers of β-carotene, canthaxanthin, β-apo-8'-carotenal, neurosporene, spheroidene and okenone. Relevance of the systematic changes in the above five different parameters originally found in β-carotene was examined in the rest of the carotenoids, and the effects of the peripheral groups on them were explained in terms of the length and asymmetry of the conjugated system consisting of the CC and CO bonds.

  20. Recent topics on single-molecule fluctuation analysis using blinking in surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering: clarification by the electromagnetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Yamamoto, Yuko S

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has become an ultrasensitive tool for clarifying molecular functions on plasmonic metal nanoparticles (NPs). SERS has been used for in situ probing of detailed behaviors of few or single molecules (SMs) at plasmonic NP junctions. SM SERS signals are commonly observed with temporal and spectral changes known as "blinking", which are related to various physical and chemical interactions between molecules and NP junctions. These temporal and spectral changes simultaneously take place, therefore resulting in serious complexities in interpretations of the SM SERS results. Dual contributions of Raman enhancement mechanisms in SERS (i.e., electromagnetic (EM) and chemical enhancements) also make interpretations more difficult. To resolve these issues and reduce the degree of complexities in SM SERS analyses, the present review is focused on the recent studies of probing SM behaviors using SERS exclusively within the framework of the EM mechanism. The EM mechanism is briefly introduced, and several recent topics on SM SERS blinking analysis are discussed in light of the EM mechanism. This review will provide a basis for clarification of complex SERS fluctuations of various molecules.

  1. Fermi resonance and solvent dependence of the vC=O frequency shifts of Raman spectra: cyclohexanone and 2-cyclohexene-1-one

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, S I; Lee, M S; Jung, Y M

    2001-01-01

    The carbonyl stretching vibration, vC=O of 2-cyclohexene-1-one , is in Fermi resonance with a combination tone. The amount of Fermi resonance interaction between these two modes is dependent upon the amount of solute/solvent interaction due to hydrogen bonding between the carbonyl oxygen and the solvent proton. The corrected vC=O frequency of 2-cyclohexene-1-one occurs at a lower frequency than the observed vC=O mode of cyclohexanone, possibly caused by expanded conjugation effects. The carbonyl stretching modes of cyclic ketones were also affected by interaction with the ROH/CCl sub 4 mixed solvent system.

  2. State detection using coherent Raman repumping and two-color Raman transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate state detection based on coherent Raman repumping and a two-color Raman state transfer. The Raman coupling during detection selectively eliminates unwanted dark states in the fluorescence cycle without compromising the immunity of the desired dark state to off-resonant scattering. We demonstrate this technique using 137Ba+ where a combination of Raman coupling and optical pumping leaves the metastable state, D3/2 |F''=3,mF''=3>, optically dark and immune to off-resonant scattering. All other states are strongly coupled to the upper P1/2 levels. We achieve a single-shot state-detection efficiency of 89.6(3)% in a 1-ms integration time, limited almost entirely by technical imperfections. Shelving to |F''=3,mF''=3> before detection is performed via a two-color Raman transfer with a fidelity of 1.00(3).

  3. In Vitro Polarized Resonance Raman Study of N719 and N719-TBP in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Nguyen, Phuong Tuyet;

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The working efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) depends on the long-term stability of the dye itself and on the microscopic structure of the dye-semiconductor interface. Previous experimental studies of DSCs based on ruthenium dye with bipyridine ligands (N719) adsorbed...... of the scattered light is generally different from the polarization of the laser light. When the excitation is chosen within the visible absorption band of N719 only the skeleton ring-modes in N719 are enhanced and are observed as the most intense bands in the RRS spectra. We demonstrate by experimental results...... the adsorption of the dye on TiO2 can be obtained. Furthermore it is found that the polarization fluorescence anisotropy is very different for adsorbed and non-adsorbed dye molecules. This information is automatically obtained when processing the Raman data. The conclusion is that if the polarization properties...

  4. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy to Virology and Microbial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harz, Michaela; Stöckel, Stephan; Ciobotă, Valerian; Cialla, Dana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    This chapter reports from the utilization of Raman spectroscopic techniques like Raman microscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA), UV-resonance Raman (UVRR)-spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) for the investigation of viruses and microorganisms, especially bacteria and yeasts for medical and pharmaceutical applications. The application of these Raman techniques allows for the analysis of chemical components of cells and subcellular regions, as well as the monitoring of chemical differences occurring as a result of the growth of microorganisms. In addition, the interaction of microorganisms with active pharmaceutical agents can be investigated. In combination with chemometric methods Raman spectroscopy can also be applied to identify microorganisms both in micro colonies and even on single cells.

  5. Raman spectral research on MPCVD diamond film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yan; ZHANG Shulin; ZHAO Xinsheng; HAN Yisong; HOU Li

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectra of MPCVD diamond film have been studied. Based on the resonance size selection effect, we think that there is no nano-crystalline diamond in the sample and the Raman peak at 1145 cm-1 can not be considered as the characteristic peak of nano-crystalline diamond though it has been used as the characteristic peak of nano-crystalline diamond widely for many years.

  6. Evidence for Jahn-Teller coupling and Fano-resonance of lower Hg modes in K3C60 and Rb3C60 films from Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Raman scattering study of superconducting thin film of A3C60 (A = K,Rb) carried out upon laser excitations at 1.16 and 2.41 eV have revealed the significant broadening and Fano-lineshapes of several low energy Hg intramolecular modes with relative intensities and widths depending om excitation energies. The most interesting feature of the 1.16 eV excited spectrum is the wide asymmetric band at 400 cm-1 which can be assigned by Fano-shape fitting to enormously broadened Hg(2) mode red shifted compared to its bare frequency of 408 cm-1. The narrowing of all lower Hg modes in insulating A6C60 phase indicates strong electron-phonon coupling of this Jahn-Teller modes in x=3 phase and suggests that this low energy vibrations are contributing to superconducting pairing. However, the possibility to interpret the wide band at 400 cm-1 as the maximum of electronic background can not be ruled out yet and is supported by our preliminary observations of its disappearance at low temperature below Tc. (author). 31 refs, 3 figs

  7. High purity efficient first Stokes Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Liu, Qinyong; Li, Daijun; Du, Keming

    2015-02-01

    The subject of the solid-state Raman frequency conversion to the yellow frequency spectra has been an active topic since the mid 1990's, because of its application in bio-medical and astronomy fields. However, the yellow laser performance is often limited because of the cascade conversion to second or higher Stokes. This cascade conversion not only limits the conversion efficiency and the output power of the first Stokes, but also degrades the pulse and the beam profile of the first Stokes. We present a type of polarization coupled Raman resonator, in which the higher order ( the second Stokes and higher ) laser output can be dramatically suppressed. Our Raman resonator is pumped by a Q-switched and frequency doubled slab laser, and we can get an almost pure (P559/(P559 +P532)>99%) 559 nm yellow light output with an efficiency over 39% from 532 nm to 559 nm. The resonator includes a high reflection rear mirror, a KGW crystal, a polarization coupled input/output element, and a high reflection output coupler of 559 nm (R559 nm = 0.6). Furthermore, we have proposed an improvement of this polarization coupled Raman resonator. The theoretical calculations of the temporal and spatial dependent Raman conversion equations show that the conversion efficiency of the first order Stokes is greatly enhanced with an additionalλ/2 waveplate for 589 nm and the BBO crystal.

  8. Polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide in the pressure range 0-10 kbar. I. Vibration frequencies, C-S bond length, and Fermi resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, S.; Whalley, Edward

    1986-09-01

    The effect of pressure on the polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulphide, i.e., the peak frequencies, bandwidths, and relative intensities of both the allowed ν1 and 2ν2 bands and the interaction-induced ν2 and ν3 bands, have been measured at 22 °C up to 10 kbar. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the frequencies and on the relative isotropic intensity of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands. The frequency of the ν1 band increases linearly with pressure, within the experimental uncertainty, at the rate 0.16±0.01 cm-1 kbar-1, and the frequencies of the ν2, ν3, and 2ν2 bands decrease nonlinearly. The frequency shifts are described by second-order perturbation theory with the molecular anharmonicity and the intermolecular interaction as perturbations. The leading terms of the shifts consist of the same derivative of the interaction potential, multiplied by different anharmonicity constants, and the shifts of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands suggests that the C-S bond length decreases at the rate 2×10-4 Å kbar-1. The relative isotropic intensity of the 2ν2 and ν1 bands increases with pressure at the rate 0.050 kbar-1, whereas the anisotropic 2ν2 intensity relative to the isotropic ν1 intensity is independent of pressure to the experimental precision of ˜0.005. The effect of pressure on the second derivative of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the polarizability with respect to the bend coordinate was estimated as 1.1×10-43 C m2 V-1 kbar-1 and ˜0, respectively, from these values.

  9. Transient Impulsive Giant Electronic Raman Redistribution

    CERN Document Server

    Miyabe, S

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Raman excitation by ultrafast vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses is a powerful means to study electron dynamics in molecules, but experiments must contend with linear background ionization: frequencies high enough to reach resonant core-valence transitions will usually ionize all occupied orbitals as well, and the ionization cross sections are usually dominant. Here we show that attosecond pulses can induce a new process, transient impulsive stimulated Raman scattering, which can overwhelm valence ionization. Calculations are performed for atomic sodium, but the principal is valid for many molecular systems. This approach opens the path for high fidelity multidimensional spectroscopy with attosecond pulses.

  10. Spectral interferometric polarised coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Littleton, Brad; Festy, Frederic; Richards, David

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an interferometric implementation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) which enables broadband coherent Raman spectroscopy free from non-resonant background (NRB), with a signal strength proportional to concentration. Spectra encode mode symmetry information into the amplitude response which can be directly compared to polarised spontaneous Raman spectra. The method requires only passive polarisation optics and is suitable for a wide range of laser linewidths and pulse durations

  11. Magnetic Circular Dichroism in Resonant Raman Scattering in the Perpendicular Geometry at the L edge of 3d Transition Metal Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured circular dichroism in resonant x-ray scattering 3dn→2p53dn+1→3s13dn+1 with incidence perpendicular to the magnetization where the absorption dichroism vanishes. The advantages of photon scattering over other techniques make it possible to study a wide range of materials. The Ni L3 dichroism in NiFe2O 4 is (28±5)% in agreement with a localized model. In the metal Co the dichroism is reduced to (10.4±1)% (L3) and (6.8±1.5)% (7.5 eV above L3 ), indicating a large sensitivity to the nature of the valence states despite the fact that this spectroscopy is based on inner shell transitions. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  12. On-Line Multichannel Raman Spectroscopic Detection System For Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An on-line multichannel Raman spectroscopic detection system for capillary electrophoresis was established by using an Ar+ laser and a cryogenically cooled ICCD. Resonant excitation Raman spectra of methyl red and methyl orange were employed to test the system. The result shows that it could yield on-line electrophoretogram and time series of Raman spectra.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Katrin

    2001-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a phenomenon resulting in strongly increased Raman signals from molecules which have been attached to metallic nanostructures such as colloidal silver or gold particles. The effect combines the structural information content of a vibrational spectroscopy with extremely high sensitivity and in some cases, it showes promise in overcoming the low-sensitivity problems inherent in Raman spectroscopy. Cross sections effective in SERS can reach 10 16 to 10 15 cm2 per molecule corresponding to enhancement factors of about fourteen orders of magnitude compared with “normal” non-resonant Raman scattering. Such extremely large cross sections are sufficient for single molecule Raman spectroscopy. The high sensitivity and particularly the single molecule capabilities open up exciting perspectives for SERS as tool for basic research in biophysics, biochemistry and in laboratory medicine, where it allows to study extremely small amounts of biolomedically relevant molecules in order to understand development of diseases, treatment and therapy control based on molecular structural information at the single molecule level. The most spectacular applications might appear in rapidly spectroscopic characterization of specific DNA fragments down to structurally sensitive detection of single bases in order to elucidate the human genome sequence without any labeling technology. I will briefly introduce the SERS effect and report experiments with Raman scattering of single molecules. Potential and limitations of surface-enhanced Raman techniques as a tool in biophysics and biomedical spectroscopy will be considered.

  14. Collective spectral properties of Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of collective Raman scattering has been developed by using the quantum-mechanical master-equation approach and secular approximation. The influence of the frequency detuning of resonance and other parameters on the collective spectral properties of scattered light is investigated

  15. Ultraviolet resonance Raman studies reveal the environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the native and partially folded states of the E colicin-binding immunity protein Im7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mendieta, Iñigo R; Spence, Graham R; Gell, Christopher; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the nature of partially folded proteins is a challenging task that is best accomplished when several techniques are applied in combination. Here we present ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy studies of the E colicin-binding immunity proteins, Im7* and Im9*, together with a series of variants of Im7* that are designed to trap a partially folded state at equilibrium. We show that the environments of the tryptophan and tyrosine residues in native wild-type Im7* and Im9* are indistinguishable, in contrast with models for their structures based on X-ray and NMR methods. In addition, we show that there is a general increase in the hydrophobicity in the environment of Trp75 in all of the variants compared with wild-type Im7*. These data suggest that a significant rearrangement of the tryptophan pocket occurs in the variants, which, together with an overall decrease in solvent accessibility of Trp75 as judged by time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements and fluorescence quenching experiments, rationalize the unusual fluorescence properties of the variants reported previously. The data highlight the power of UVRR in analyzing the structural properties of different conformational states of the same protein and reveal new information about the structural rearrangements occurring during Im7* folding, not possible using other spectroscopic methods alone. Finally, we describe a previously unreported dependence of the tryptophan Fermi doublet on excitation wavelength in the ultraviolet region revealed by these protein spectra. We corroborated this observation using tryptophan-containing model compounds and conclude that the conventional interpretation of this UVRR feature at these wavelengths is unreliable.

  16. Raman properties of GaSb nanoparticles embedded in SiO2 films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fa-Min; Wang Tian-Min; Zhang Li-De

    2004-01-01

    The Raman shifts of nanocrystalline GaSb excited by an Ar+ ion laser at wavelengths 514.5, 496.5, 488.0, 476.5,and 457.9nm are studied by an SPEX-1403 laser Raman spectrometer respectively, and they are explained by phonon confinement, tensile stress, resonant Raman scattering and quantum size effects. The Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra of GaSb nanocrystals strongly support the Raman feature of GaSb nanocrystals. The calculated optical spectra compare well with experimental data on Raman scattering GaSb nanocrystals.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    excised tissue samples and synthetic preparations and thus to identify potential biomarkers for the onset of this disease. Using resonance Raman detection techniques, the concentration and spatial distribution of macular pigment, a protective compound, can be detected in the living human retina Useable in clinical settings for patient screening, the technology is suitable to investigate correlations between pigment concentration levels and risk for macular degeneration and to monitor increases in pigment levels occurring as a result of dietary intervention strategies.

  18. Coherently controlling Raman-induced grating in atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipkin, V G; Timofeev, I V

    2015-01-01

    We consider dynamically controllable periodic structures, called Raman induced gratings, in three- and four-level atomic media, resulting from Raman interaction in a standing-wave pump. These gratings are due to periodic spatial modulation of the Raman nonlinearity and fundamentally differ from the ones based on electromagnetically induced transparency. The transmission and reflection spectra of such gratings can be simultaneously amplified and controlled by varying the pump field intensity. It is shown that a transparent medium with periodic spatial modulation of the Raman gain can be opaque near the Raman resonance and yet at the same time it can be a non-linear amplifying mirror. We also show that spectral properties of the Raman induced grating can be controlled with the help of an additional weak control field.

  19. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  20. Theory of Acoustic Raman Modes in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Timothy; Gordon, Reuven

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis that associates the resonances of extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy [Wheaton et al., Nat. Photonics 9, 68 (2015)] with the collective modes of proteins. The theory uses the anisotropic elastic network model to find the protein acoustic modes, and calculates Raman intensity by treating the protein as a polarizable ellipsoid. Reasonable agreement is found between EAR spectra and our theory. Protein acoustic modes have been extensively studied theoretically to assess the role they play in protein function; this result suggests EAR spectroscopy as a new experimental tool for studies of protein acoustic modes.

  1. Waveguide-coupled directional Raman radiation for surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Li, Jin-Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Dan-Feng; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2015-09-01

    Kretschmann-type waveguide structures, including Plasmon Waveguide (PW) and Resonant Mirror (RM), have been applied in interfacial Raman spectroscopy due to the following unique features: (1) unlike the classic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates made of either gold or silver, both PW and RM can be prepared using a large variety of inexpensive materials; (2) the field enhancement factors using these structures can be theoretically predicted and experimentally controlled, which enables us to manipulate the surface Raman sensitivity with high repeatability; (3) the use of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes for Raman excitation allows us to evaluate the orientation of target molecules immobilized on the waveguide surface; (4) the unwanted impact of noble metals on the Raman fingerprints of target molecules, which is often observed for conventional SERS substrates, can be avoided upon the use of dielectric waveguides. In this paper, guided-mode-coupled directional Raman emission, which is an additional important feature of the waveguide Raman technique, was theoretically investigated based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel equations. The simulation results indicate that the directional Raman emission from a dipole located within the field confinement and penetration depth of a guided mode depends on both the orientation of the dipole and its distance from the waveguide surface. Raman light from the TE-oriented dipoles is launched into the prism coupler at the TE-mode resonance angle and that from the non-TE-oriented dipoles propagates at the TM-mode resonance angle. The intensity of the guided-mode-excited Raman signal propagating at the mode resonance angle is proportional to the fourth power of the mode field (E(4)) at the depth of the dipole from the waveguide surface. This means that the guided-mode-excited and guided-mode-coupled directional Raman spectroscopy has a detection depth that is as

  2. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  3. Time—dependent Theory of Raman Scattering with Pulses—Application to Continuum Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo-Y.Lee

    1995-01-01

    A theory of real-time dependence of Raman scattering for a pulse-mode laser is developed within second-order perturbation theory and using the wavepacket terminology.We apply the theory to continuum Raman scattering for short and long pulses and varying pulse carrier frequency,For an initial ground virational state,it is shown that the rate of Raman emission as a funcition of time and pulse carrier frequency is structureless for all pulses,and for pulses that are longer than the dissociation time the rate also decays with the pulses.This is contrary to recently reported resonance fluorescence type structures at long times (M.Shapiro,J.Chem.Phys.99,2453(1993),We explain why such structures are unphysical for continuum Raman scattering.

  4. Effect of axial ligands on the spectroelectrochemical properties of zinc phthalocyanine films. In situ Raman and electroreflection spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palys, B.J.; Ham, van den D.M.W.; Otto, C.

    1994-01-01

    Electroreflection and Raman spectra (in situ and ex situ) of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) films (80 nm thick) have been studied. Raman spectra were resonantly and preresonantly enhanced. Both electroreflection and Raman experiments reveal the homogeneous inclusion of electrolyte anions upon oxidation

  5. Enhancing the efficiency of silicon Raman converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Nathalie; Sipe, John E.; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-05-01

    We propose a silicon ring Raman converter in which the spatial variation of the Raman gain along the ring for TE polarization is used to quasi-phase-match the CARS process. If in addition the pump, Stokes, and anti-Stokes waves involved in the CARS interaction are resonantly enhanced by the ring structure, the Stokes-to-anti-Stokes conversion efficiency can be increased by at least four orders of magnitude over that of one-dimensional perfectly phase-matched silicon Raman converters, and can reach values larger than unity with relatively low input pump intensities. These improvements in conversion performance could substantially expand the practical applicability of the CARS process for optical wavelength conversion.

  6. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  7. Novel Raman instrumentation for characterizing 2D nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight Walker, Angela

    2015-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a unique Raman microscope system to enable diffraction limited measurements of graphene and two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMD). The design enables low frequency phonon measurements down to ten wavenumbers through a triple grating Raman spectrometer, as well as resonance Raman spectroscopy through multiple laser excitation lines throughout the visible region. Through coupling to a cryogen-free magnet system, Raman spectra can be collected while the sample is in fields up 9 Tesla and at temperatures from 4 K to 400 K. Uniquely, both Farady and Voight geometries are accessible. Furthermore, multiple electronic feedthroughs permit collecting Raman scatter from devices at varying voltages. Proof of concept measurements on TMDs will highlight the full capabilities of the instrumentation. Collaborations are sought to demonstrate the utility of the new instrumentation.

  8. On-Chip Diamond Raman Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Latawiec, Pawel; Burek, Michael J; Hausmann, Birgit J M; Bulu, Irfan; Loncar, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic single-crystal diamond has recently emerged as a promising platform for Raman lasers at exotic wavelengths due to its giant Raman shift, large transparency window and excellent thermal properties yielding a greatly enhanced figure-of-merit compared to conventional materials. To date, diamond Raman lasers have been realized using bulk plates placed inside macroscopic cavities, requiring careful alignment and resulting in high threshold powers (~W-kW). Here we demonstrate an on-chip Raman laser based on fully-integrated, high quality-factor, diamond racetrack micro-resonators embedded in silica. Pumping at telecom wavelengths, we show Stokes output discretely tunable over a ~100nm bandwidth around 2-{\\mu}m with output powers >250 {\\mu}W, extending the functionality of diamond Raman lasers to an interesting wavelength range at the edge of the mid-infrared spectrum. Continuous-wave operation with only ~85 mW pump threshold power in the feeding waveguide is demonstrated along with continuous, mode-hop-fr...

  9. Enhanced Raman scattering of graphene on Ag nanoislands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Wei; HUANG ZhiYi; ZHOU YingHui; CAI WeiWei; KANG JunYong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Ag nanoislands on the Raman of graphene was investigated in this work.Compared with that on the bare silicon wafer,Raman enhancement was observed in the graphene film that covered on Ag/Si surface with nanoscale Ag islands,which would be induced by the localized plasmon resonance in Ag nanostructures.The interaction between the graphene sheet and Ag/Si substrate was further studied.The peak shift and line shape of Raman spectroscopy indicated a nonuniform strain distribution in the Ag/Si supported graphene film.

  10. Versatility of heme coordination demonstrated in a fungal peroxidase. Absorption and resonance Raman studies of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase and the Asp245-->Asn mutant at various pH values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulevich, G; Neri, F; Marzocchi, M P; Welinder, K G

    1996-08-13

    The pH dependence of the electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of FeIII and FeII forms of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and its Asp245-->Asn (D245N) mutant has been examined in detail. The spectral data were obtained in the pH range 3.8-12.0. These spectra were used to assess the spin and ligation states of the heme via the porphyrin marker band frequencies and the wavelengths of the absorption maxima, especially that of the band (CT1) due to the charge transfer from the porphyrin to the heme iron via the a' 2u(pi)-->eg (d pi) electronic transition. The RR spectra were obtained by using different excitation wavelengths and polarized light. The data obtained for ferric CIP show that two pH-induced structural transitions exist. At acid pH the Soret and the CT1 absorption maxima occur at 394 and 652 nm, respectively, compared with the values of 403 and 649 nm observed at neutral pH. The electronic data indicate that at acid pH the proximal Fe-Im bond might be weakened or ruptured, and the RR spectra show a new species (5-c HS) different from the normal neutral 5-coordinate high-spin (5-c HS) heme. At pH 12.0, the protein converts to a 6-coordinate low-spin (6-c LS) heme with a hydroxyl ligand coordinated in the sixth position of the heme iron and strongly hydrogen-bonded with the positively charged guanidinium group of the distal Arg51 residue. Replacement of the aspartate carboxylate group of Asp245, which acts as hydrogen-bond acceptor to the proximal His183 ligand of the heme Fe, with a carboxamide group of an asparagine residue has a profound influence on the heme coordination. The RR spectra of the Fe(II) form of this mutant at both neutral and alkaline pH values show a band at 204 cm-1 assigned to the Fe-His stretch associated with a fairly weak or non-hydrogen-bonded imidazole. The ferric form of the mutant shows a great variability in coordination and spin states upon pH titration. Between pH 8.8 and 3.8 the spectra are mainly

  11. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  12. Portable raman explosives detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, David Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scharff, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  13. Relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from S2 (1Bu(+)) state to S1 (2Ag(-)) state: femtosecond time-resolved near-IR absorption and stimulated resonance Raman studies in 900-1550 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-06-12

    Carotenoids have two major low-lying excited states, the second lowest (S2 (1Bu(+))) and the lowest (S1 (2Ag(-))) excited singlet states, both of which are suggested to be involved in the energy transfer processes in light-harvesting complexes. Studying vibrational dynamics of S2 carotenoids requires ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy, although it has much less sensitivity than visible Raman spectroscopy. In this study, the relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from the S2 state to the S1 state is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved multiplex near-IR absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The energy gap between the S2 and S1 states is estimated to be 6780 cm(-1) from near-IR transient absorption spectra. The near-IR stimulated Raman spectrum of S2 β-carotene show three bands at 1580, 1240, and 1050 cm(-1). When excess energy of 4000 cm(-1) is added, the S1 C═C stretch band shows a large upshift with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The fast upshift is explained by a model that excess energy generated by internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 state is selectively accepted by one of the vibronic levels of the S1 state and is redistributed among all the vibrational modes.

  14. Citrate-reduced silver hydrosol modified with omega-mercaptoalkanoic acids self-assembled monolayers as a substrate for surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering. A study with cytochrome c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifacio, A.; Sneppen, van der L.; Gooijer, C.; Zwan, van der G.

    2004-01-01

    A new citrate-reduced silver hydrosol coated with omega-mercaptoalkanoic acids (mercaptopropionic and mercaptoundecanoic acids) self-assembled monolayers was prepared and characterized with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The structure and the quality of the coating monolayers are discussed and

  15. Continuous-wave Raman Lasing in Aluminum Nitride Microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xianwen; Xiong, Bing; Wang, Lai; Wang, Jian; Han, Yanjun; Hao, Zhibiao; Li, Hongtao; Luo, Yi; Yan, Jianchang; Wei, Tongbo; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Junxi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first investigation on continuous-wave Raman lasing in high-quality-factor aluminum nitride (AlN) microring resonators. Although wurtzite AlN is known to exhibit six Raman-active phonons, single-mode Raman lasing with low threshold and high slope efficiency is demonstrated. Selective excitation of A$_1^\\mathrm{TO}$ and E$_2^\\mathrm{high}$ phonons with Raman shifts of $\\sim$612 and 660 cm$^{-1}$ is observed by adjusting the polarization of the pump light. A theoretical analysis of Raman scattering efficiency within ${c}$-plane (0001) of AlN is carried out to help account for the observed lasing behavior. Bidirectional lasing is experimentally confirmed as a result of symmetric Raman gain in micro-scale waveguides. Furthermore, second-order Raman lasing with unparalleled output power of $\\sim$11.3 mW is obtained, which offers the capability to yield higher order Raman lasers for mid-infrared applications.

  16. Quantitative interpretation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy with all Gaussian pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O

    2016-01-01

    Coherent Raman scattering spectroscopy is studied purposely, with the Gaussian ultrashort pulses as a hands-on elucidatory extraction tool of the clean coherent Raman resonant spectra from the overall measured data contaminated with the non-resonant four wave mixing background. The integral formulae for both the coherent anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman scattering are given in the semiclassical picture, and the closed-form solutions in terms of a complex error function are obtained. An analytic form of maximum enhancement of pure coherent Raman spectra at threshold time delay depending on bandwidth of probe pulse is also obtained. The observed experimental data for pyridine in liquid-phase are quantitatively elucidated and the inferred time-resolved coherent Raman resonant results are reconstructed with a new insight.

  17. Raman spectroscopic analysis of isomers of biliverdin dimethyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, J; Hildebrandt, P; Smit, K; Mark, F; Gärtner, W; Braslavsky, S E; Schaffner, K; Schrader, B

    1997-06-01

    The constitutional isomers of biliverdin dimethyl ester, IX alpha and XIII alpha, were studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. The far-reaching spectral similarities suggest that despite the different substitution patterns, the compositions of the normal modes are closely related. This conclusion does not hold only for the parent state (ZZZ, sss configuration) but also for the configurational isomers which were obtained upon double-bond photoisomerization. Based on a comparison of the resonance Raman spectra, a EZZ configuration is proposed for one of the two photoisomers of biliverdin dimethyl ester IX alpha, while a ZZE, ssa configuration has been assigned previously to the second isomer. PMID:9226559

  18. The attosecond regime of impulsive stimulated electronic Raman excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Ware, Matthew R; Cryan, James P; Haxton, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    We have calculated the resonant and nonresonant contributions to attosecond impulsive stimulated electronic Raman scattering (SERS) in regions of autoionizing transitions. Comparison with Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) calculations find that attosecond SERS is dominated by continuum transitions and not autoionizing resonances. These results agree quantitatively with a rate equation that includes second-order Raman and first-and second-order photoionization rates. Such rate models can be extended to larger molecular systems. Our results indicate that attosecond SERS transition probabilities may be understood in terms of two-photon generalized cross sections even in the high-intensity limit for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths.

  19. Raman scattering in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Random Raman lasing

    CERN Document Server

    Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Beier, Hope T; Rockwll, Benjamin A; Thomas, Robert J; Noojin, Gary D; Petrov, Georgi I; Golovan, Leonid A; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of light in a highly scattering medium is among the most fascinating optical effect that everyone experiences on an everyday basis and possesses a number of fundamental problems which have yet to be solved. Conventional wisdom suggests that non-linear effects do not play a significant role because the diffusive nature of scattering acts to spread the intensity, dramatically weakening these effects. We demonstrate the first experimental evidence of lasing on a Raman transition in a bulk three-dimensional random media. From a practical standpoint, Raman transitions allow for spectroscopic analysis of the chemical makeup of the sample. A random Raman laser could serve as a bright Raman source allowing for remote, chemically specific, identification of powders and aerosols. Fundamentally, the first demonstration of this new light source opens up an entire new field of study into non-linear light propagation in turbid media, with the most notable application related to non-invasive biomedical imaging.

  1. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy to Inorganic Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobinJHClarkFRS

    1995-01-01

    The renaissance in Raman spectroscopy some 25-30 years ago had particular and immediate impact on Inorganic Chemistry,viz in areas such as the study of deeply coloued compounds,structural changes on change of state,equilibria,vapour phase band contour analysis,Raman band intensities and the nature of the chemical bond,metal-metal bonding,species in melts,identification of species in solution and of radicals by time-resolved techniques,in bioinorganic chemistry,and of linear-chain semiconductors.More recently,much attention has been directed at the quantitative level at the evaluation of geometric changes in molecules on excitation by resonance Raman spectroscopy.At the qualitative level Raman microscopy is now recognised to be the most effective technique for the identification of pigments-particularly the inorganic ones-on medieval manuscripts and especially of the components(down to grain sizes of -1 um)of pigment mixtures,It is thus a very important technique at the Arts/Science borderling in conservation science.

  2. Stimulated Raman Scattering in Nanorod Silicon Carbide Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    When the film is excited by a very low excitation energy, the spontaneous Raman scattering emerges. The intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the excitation power below the threshold excitation. When the excited power reaches the excitation threshold, the intensity of Stokes light strongly increases. Meanwhile an anti-Stokes light at 495nm and multiple order but small Stokes peaks occur. The intensity of Stokes light is much larger than that of anti-Stokes. The full width of half maximum (FWHM) of Stokes peak is reduced from 0.4nm to less than 0.2nm, the scattering angle between both Stokes and incident lights becomes less than 1°, and the angle between the Stokes and anti-Stokes lights is about 3°. When the exciting power is in excess of the threshold, anti-Stokes and multiple Raman scattering peaks reappear. These experiments can be unlimitedly repeated. From this experiment, we can exclude the possibility of spontaneous Raman scattering. It is suggested that the nanorods are a quantum line dimension having a large surface. There will be Raman differential scattering section so long as the nanorod films become very strong scattering media; the surface-enhanced Raman scattering will be produced, the nanorod films of SiC will form a strong multiple scattering resonance cavities so as to form the stimulated Raman scattering oscillation.

  3. Rotational Raman scattering in sup 127 I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondry, G.; Wissmann, F.; Mueller, G.; Schroeder, F.; Rullhusen, P.; Smend, F.; Schumacher, M. (2. Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Goettingen (Germany)); Fettweis, P.; Carchon, R. (Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre de l' Etudes de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium))

    1991-09-02

    Elastic and Raman scattering of photons by {sup 181}Ta and {sup 127}I are studied using the 11.4 MeV mono-energetic photon beam installed at the Mol BR2 reactor. For the strongly deformed prolate nucleus {sup 181}Ta the simple rotator model is re-investigated and found to be valid. The intrinsic quadrupole moment Q{sub 0} derived from spectroscopic data by assuming a strong particle-surface coupling was found to be in agreement with the splitting of the giant dipole resonance, thus removing previous inconsistencies. When applying the same model to the oblate nucleus {sup 127}I a severe discrepancy between experimental and predicted Raman cross sections was observed; this discrepancy is discussed in terms of nuclear-structure properties. (orig.).

  4. Engineering Plasmonic Nanopillar Arrays for Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kaiyu

    This Ph.D. thesis presents (i) an in-depth understanding of the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the nanopillar arrays (NPs) for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and (ii) systematic ways of optimizing the fabrication process of NPs to improve their SERS efficiencies. Thi...

  5. Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon from first principles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Li; ZHU JiaQi; GAO Wei; HAN Xiao; DU ShanYi

    2009-01-01

    The non-resonant vibrational Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon have been calculated from first principles, including the generation of s structural model, and the calculation of vibrational frequencies, vibrational eigenmodes and Raman coupling tensors. The calculated Raman spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results. The broad band at around 500 cm~(-1) arises from mixed bonds. The T peak originates from the vibrations of sp~3 carbon and the G peak comes from the stretching vibrations of sp~2-type bonding of C=C and C=N. The simulation results indicate the direct contribution of N vibrations to Raman spectra.

  6. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic investigation on Lamiaceae plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, P.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgaris are studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The containing monoterpenes can be identified by their Raman spectra. Further the essential oils are investigated in their natural environment, the so-called oil cells of these Lamiaceae plants, with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This method has the advantage to enhance Raman signals and furthermore the SERS effect leads to fluorescence quenching.

  7. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.

    2012-11-05

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. Development of Raman spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the Raman spectrophotometer HG.2S Jobin Yvon rebuilt and developed, the Raman setup provided as a gift for Neelian University from Amsterdam University. The main parts, which were replaced, include monochromator, an air-cooled photomultiplier tube RCA IP 28, log amplifier, hand scanning lab VIEW card for computer interfacing. The components assembled and the whole device was tested successfully. The developed setup was checked using some standard solutions, which showed perfect consistency with literature in the references and published papers. Solutions included hexane, cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and sodium sulfate.(Author)

  9. Raman scattering in a two-layer antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morr, Dirk K.; Chubukov, Andrey V.; Kampf, Arno P.; Blumberg, G.

    1996-08-01

    Two-magnon Raman scattering is a useful tool to verify recent suggestions concerning the value of the interplanar exchange constant in antiferromagnetic two-layer systems, such as YBa2Cu3O6+x. We present a theory for Raman scattering in a two-layer antiferromagnet. We study the spectra for the electronic and magnetic excitations across the charge transfer gap within the one-band Hubbard model and derive the matrix elements for the Raman scattering cross section in a diagrammatic formalism. We analyze the effect of the interlayer exchange coupling J2 for the Raman spectra in A1g and B1g scattering geometries both in the nonresonant regime (when the Loudon-Fleury model is valid) and at resonance. We show that within the Loudon-Fleury approximation, a nonzero J2 gives rise to a finite signal in A1g scattering geometry. Both in this approximation and at resonance the intensity in the A1g channel has a peak at small transferred frequency equal to twice the gap in the spin-wave spectrum. We compare our results with experiments in YBa2Cu3O6.1 and Sr2CuO2Cl2 compounds and argue that the large value of J2 suggested in a number of recent studies is incompatible with Raman experiments in A1g geometry.

  10. Timing jitter of Raman solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gengji; Xin, Ming; Kaertner, Franz X; Chang, Guoqing

    2015-11-01

    We study the relative intensity noise (RIN) and timing jitter of a Raman soliton. We demonstrate that the RIN of an excitation pulse causes center-wavelength fluctuations of the resulting Raman soliton which translates by fiber dispersion into relative timing jitter (RTJ) between the Raman soliton and the excitation pulse. The Raman soliton's absolute timing jitter is dominated by the excitation pulse's timing jitter at low frequency and by the RTJ at high frequency. The experimental study reveals that RTJ can be significantly reduced by reducing the accumulated fiber dispersion (e.g., using less dispersive fibers with shorter length) experienced by the Raman soliton. PMID:26512530

  11. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  12. The Discovery of Raman Scattering in HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Sutherland, Ralph S; Kewley, Lisa J; Groves, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    We report here on the discovery of faint extended wings of H\\alpha\\ observed out to an apparent velocity of ~ 7600 km/s in the Orion Nebula (M42) and in five HII regions in the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. We show that, these wings are caused by Raman scattering of both the O I and Si II resonance lines and stellar continuum UV photons with H I followed by radiative decay to the H I n=2 level. The broad wings also seen in H\\beta\\ and in H\\gamma\\ result from Raman scattering of the UV continuum in the H I n=4 and n=5 levels respectively.The Raman scattering fluorescence is correlated with the intensity of the narrow permitted lines of O I and Si II. In the case of Si II, this is explained by radiative pumping of the same 1023.7\\AA\\ resonance line involved in the Raman scattering by the Ly\\beta\\ radiation field. The subsequent radiative cascade produces enhanced Si II 5978.9, 6347.1$ and 6371.4\\AA\\ permitted transitions. Finally we show that in O I, radiative pumping of the 1025.76\\AA\\ resonance line ...

  13. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-04-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine.

  14. Graphene-Enhanced Raman Scattering from the Adenine Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Pidhirnyi, Denys; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Lebedieva, Tetiana; Kiisk, Valter; Heinsalu, Siim; Lange, Sven; Jaaniso, Raivo; Sildos, Ilmo

    2016-12-01

    An enhanced Raman scattering from a thin layer of adenine molecules deposited on graphene substrate was detected. The value of enhancement depends on the photon energy of the exciting light. The benzene ring in the structure of adenine molecule suggests π-stacking of adenine molecule on top of graphene. So, it is proposed that the enhancement in the adenine Raman signal is explained by the resonance electron transfer from the Fermi level of graphene to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of adenine. PMID:27075339

  15. Theory for the Acoustic Raman Modes of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    DeWolf, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis that associates the resonances of extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR) spectroscopy [Wheaton et al., Nat Photon 9, 68 (2015)] with the collective modes of proteins. The theory uses the anisotropic elastic network model to find the protein acoustic modes, and calculates Raman intensity by treating the protein as a polarizable ellipsoid. Reasonable agreement is found between EAR spectra and our theory. Protein acoustic modes have been extensively studied theoretically to assess the role they play in protein function; this result suggests EAR as a new experimental tool for studies of protein acoustic modes.

  16. CuO-chain Raman scattering and photoinduced metastability in YBa2Cu3Ox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, M.; Osada, M.; Kakihana, M.;

    1998-01-01

    Raman measurements in YBa2Cu3Ox (x=6.72-6.82) high-T-c superconductors reveal intense phonon scattering due to an electronic resonance localized near oxygen vacancies on the CuO chains. Below room temperature the resonance can be photobleached in a manner similar to reported persistent photoinduc...... superconductivity effects, indicating photon-assisted oxygen ordering or electron vacancy capture. By comparing Raman and x-ray diffraction data we establish a correlation between the stability of the photoinduced state and the oxygen-ordering kinetics in the CuO chains.......Raman measurements in YBa2Cu3Ox (x=6.72-6.82) high-T-c superconductors reveal intense phonon scattering due to an electronic resonance localized near oxygen vacancies on the CuO chains. Below room temperature the resonance can be photobleached in a manner similar to reported persistent photoinduced...

  17. Amplifying the SERS signal of DNA bases via the chemical resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lindsay M.; Pang, Lin; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-03-01

    Label-free detection methods of DNA bases using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have yet to be successfully utilized due to inconsistent signal readouts. We have identified the primary reason for the discrepancies in the SERS signals of nucleic acids as being caused by the charge-transfer chemical resonance of the base silver system which is dependent on excitation wavelength. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods to calculate the electronic transitions and resonance Raman spectra of base silver complexes are performed, and the optimal excitation wavelength for the charge-transfer electronic transition is found for each base silver complex. The enhancement caused by the chemical resonance is then experimentally measured for adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine at multiple excitation wavelengths. The dependence of the Raman intensity on excitation wavelength shows good agreement with the TD-DFT calculations. In order to fully achieve the maximum Raman intensity, both the electromagnetic and chemical resonance must be enhanced by the appropriate wavelength selection. Based on the optimal chemical resonance Raman wavelength, we design a SERS substrate which has an electromagnetic maximum wavelength that matches the chemical resonance wavelength. By aligning both resonances, the highest Raman intensity can be found for each base silver system. We have proven that the variance in DNA bases' Raman intensities are caused by chemical enhancement. By incorporating the chemical resonance and optimizing both the chemical and electromagnetic resonance, we believe a label-free DNA SERS based detection method can be realized.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of small-diameter nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results based on Raman measurements of small-diameter nanotubes (NTs) are presented and discussed in this paper. The NTs with diameters from 1 nm down to 0.4 nm were produced either as the inner tubes in the double-wall carbon NTs (DWCNTs) or as tubes embedded in the channels of the zeolite crystals. While analysing the Raman spectra attention was paid to the radial breathing mode (RBM), the D line and the G band. For both NT systems the RBM frequency was found to follow the same functional diameter dependence as the tubes with larger diameters. However, in contrast to the latter, the diameters of the thin tubes obtained from density functional theory calculations must be taken into account to explain satisfactorily the observed line positions. The resonance behaviour of the RBM intensities was recorded for the tubes in zeolites. It allows us to ascribe a position of the RBM to a particular NT. This result also demonstrates the breakdown of a simple tight-binding approach to the electronic structure but agrees with predictions from ab initio calculations. The D line of the outer tubes in DWCNTs is dispersive, similar to the single-wall carbon NTs. However, the rate of dispersion is reduced for the inner tubes in DWCNTs. This is attributed to the fact that the inner and outer tubes are probed with the same laser excitation. The linear shift due to the increasing laser energy is compensated by the negative shift due to the NT diameter. The latter is smaller for the inner NTs which leads to a stronger compensation of their dispersive behaviour. This effect is even stronger for the NTs in zeolites. In the extreme case, the strong Raman lines are not dispersive at all. This unexpected behaviour was explained by the detailed ab initio calculation of the phonon structure. The G bands of the inner semiconducting tubes were observed as new features in the Raman spectra of DWCNTs. On the other hand, no lines of metallic inner tubes were found. G bands of semiconducting as

  19. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  20. Raman spectroscopy of magnetoliposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate monolayer and bilayer magnetite-based magnetoliposomes (MLs). The Raman probe is the hydroxyl (OH) group chemisorbed at the magnetite nanoparticle surface. Measurements were performed at room temperature in the typical OH stretching region. The data gathered for both samples are compared to each other and with those obtained for pure water. In comparison to liquid water (2.74 kcal/mol), it was found that the hydrogen bond strength between the chemisorbed OH-group and the polar headgroup of the inner phospholipid layer was reduced in both the monolayer (2.22 kcal/mol) and the bilayer (1.83 kcal/mol) ML samples

  1. Enhancement of Raman light scattering in dye-labeled cell membrane on metal-containing conducting polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushevskaya, H. V.; Krylova, N. G.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaja, T. I.; Egorova, V. P.; Shulitski, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    An enhanced Raman spectroscopy method based on a plasmon resonance in ultrathin metal-containing LB-film deposited on nanoporous anodic alumina supports has been proposed. This material has been utilized to enhance Raman scattering of light in fluorescent-labeled subcellular membrane structures. It has been shown that the plasmon resonance between vibrational modes of the organometallic complexes monolayers and dye-labeled subcellular structures happens. It makes possible to detect interactions between living cell monolayers and an extracellular matrix.

  2. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.

  3. Kontrollierte Erzeugung einzelner Photonen in einem optischen Resonator hoher Finesse

    OpenAIRE

    Hennrich, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Zur kontrollierten Erzeugung einzelner Photonen in einem optischen Resonator hoher Finesse werden einzelne Drei-Niveau Atome eingesetzt. Ein von außen eingestrahlter Laserpuls pumpt einen Zweig eines Ramanübergangs im Atom, während das Vakuumfeld des umgebenden Resonators eine Emission entlang des anderen Zweigs stimuliert. Dabei strahlt das Atom ein einzelnes Photon in den Resonator ab. Dieses wird durch den Auskoppelspiegel des Resonators gerichtet in den freien Raum emittiert. Über einen H...

  4. [Research Progress of Raman Spectroscopy on Dyestuff Identification of Ancient Relics and Artifacts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiu-ju; Wang, Li-qin

    2016-02-01

    As the birthplace of Silk Road, China has a long dyeing history. The valuable information about the production time, the source of dyeing material, dyeing process and preservation status were existed in organic dyestuff deriving from cultural relics and artifacts. However, because of the low contents, complex compositions and easily degraded of dyestuff, it is always a challenging task to identify the dyestuff in relics analyzing field. As a finger-print spectrum, Raman spectroscopy owns unique superiorities in dyestuff identification. Thus, the principle, characteristic, limitation, progress and development direction of micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS/µ-Raman), near infrared reflection and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (NIR-FT-Raman), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonance raman spectroscopy (RRS) have been introduced in this paper. Furthermore, the features of Raman spectra of gardenia, curcumin and other natural dyestuffs were classified by MRS technology, and then the fluorescence phenomena of purpurin excitated with different wavelength laser was compared and analyzed. At last, gray green silver colloidal particles were made as the base, then the colorant of madder was identified combining with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separation technology and SERS, the result showed that the surface enhancement effect of silver colloidal particles could significantly reduce fluorescence background of the Raman spectra. It is pointed out that Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and convenient molecular structure qualitative methodology, which has broad application prospect in dyestuff analysis of cultural relics and artifacts. We propose that the combination of multi-Raman spectroscopy, separation technology and long distance transmission technology are the development trends of Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Raman amplification in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Fiber Raman amplifiers are investigated with the purpose of identifying new applications and limitations for their use in optical communication systems. Three main topics are investigated, namely: New applications of dispersion compensating Raman amplifiers, the use Raman amplification to increase...

  6. Raman-Suppressing Coupling for Optical Parametric Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Rubiola, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    A Raman-scattering-suppressing input/ output coupling scheme has been devised for a whispering-gallery-mode optical resonator that is used as a four-wave-mixing device to effect an all-optical parametric oscillator. Raman scattering is undesired in such a device because (1) it is a nonlinear process that competes with the desired nonlinear four-wave conversion process involved in optical parametric oscillation and (2) as such, it reduces the power of the desired oscillation and contributes to output noise. The essence of the present input/output coupling scheme is to reduce output loading of the desired resonator modes while increasing output loading of the undesired ones.

  7. Time-dependent micro-Raman scattering studies of polyvinyl alcohol and silver nitrate thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Shadak Alee; D Narayana Rao

    2014-02-01

    In-situ monitoring of silver nanoparticle formation was studied in thin films of polyvinyl alcohol and silver nitrate. We proposed the observation of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a novel and simple technique to record the growth of silver nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol thin films. Observed enhancement in the Raman bands of polyvinyl alcohol is explained through the localized surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. Influence of temperature generated by silver nanoparticles on the formation of nanoparticles is also discussed.

  8. Enhanced Raman scattering of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Joseph R.

    The results presented in this thesis, originate from the aspiration to develop an identification algorithm for Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis (S. enterica), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Bacillus globigii ( B. globigii), and Bacillus megaterium ( B. megaterium) using "enhanced" Raman scattering. We realized our goal, with a method utilizing an immunoassay process in a spectroscopic technique, and the direct use of the enhanced spectral response due to bacterial surface elements. The enhanced Raman signal originates from Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and/or Morphological Dependent Resonances (MDR's). We utilized a modified Lee-Meisel colloidal production method to produce a SERS active substrate, which was applied to a SERS application for the amino acid Glycine. The comparison indicates that the SERS/FRACTAL/MDR process can produce an increase of 107 times more signal than the bulk Raman signal from Glycine. In the extension of the Glycine results, we studied the use of SERS related to S. enterica, where we have shown that the aromatic amino acid contribution from Phenylalanine, Tyrosine, and Tryptophan produces a SERS response that can be used to identify the associated SERS vibrational modes of a S. enterica one or two antibody complexes. The "fingerprint" associated with the spectral signature in conjunction with an enhanced Raman signal allows conclusions to be made: (1) about the orientation of the secondary structure on the metal; (2) whether bound/unbound antibody can be neglected; (3) whether we can lower the detection limit. We have lowered the detection limit of S. enterica to 106 bacteria/ml. We also show a profound difference between S. enterica and E. coli SERS spectra even when there exists non-specific binding on E. coli indicating a protein conformation change induced by the addition of the antigen S. enterica. We confirm TEM imagery data, indicating that the source of the aromatic amino acid SERS response is originating from

  9. Efficient Raman Sideband Generation in a Coherent Atomic Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Huss, A. F.; Peer, N.; Lammegger, R.; Korsunsky, E. A.; Windholz, L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficient generation of Raman sidebands in a medium coherently prepared in a dark state by continuous-wave low-intensity laser radiation. Our experiment is performed in sodium vapor excited in $\\Lambda $ configuration on the D$_{1}$ line by two laser fields of resonant frequencies $\\omega_{1}$ and $\\omega_{2}$, and probed by a third field $% \\omega_{3}$. First-order sidebands for frequencies $\\omega_{1}$, $\\omega_{2}$ and up to the third-order sidebands for frequency $\\omeg...

  10. Noninvasive laser Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; McClane, Robert W.

    2001-05-01

    We have used resonance Raman scattering as a novel non- invasive optical technology to measure carotenoid antioxidants in human skin of healthy volunteers. Using blue-green laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra are obtained which are superimposed on a large skin autofluorescence background. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 30 seconds, and the required laser light exposure levels are well within safety standards. Our technique can be used for rapid screening of carotenoid antioxidant levels in large populations and may have applications for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  11. Spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy - DFT assessment of the chemical effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Federico; Kupfer, Stephan; Bocklitz, Thomas; Kinzel, Daniel; Trautmann, Steffen; Gräfe, Stefanie; Deckert, Volker

    2016-05-21

    Experimental evidence of extremely high spatial resolution of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we present a full quantum chemical description (at the density functional level of theory) of the non-resonant chemical effects on the Raman spectrum of an adenine molecule mapped by a tip, modeled as a single silver atom or a small silver cluster. We show pronounced changes in the Raman pattern and its intensities depending on the conformation of the nanoparticle-substrate system, concluding that the spatial resolution of the chemical contribution of TERS can be in the sub-nm range.

  12. Two-magnon Raman scattering in cuprate superconductors: Evolution of magnetic fluctuations with doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report observation and resonance Raman studies of spin-pair excitations in YBa2Cu3O6+x (0.372Cu4O8 superconductors. These excitations at energy ∼3J (2700±150 cm-1), similar to two-magnon excitations in insulators, are evidence that antiferromagnetic fluctuations with spatial extent of at least three lattice constants are not overdamped in the underdoped superconductors. With optimal hole dopings, where Tc>80 K, the two-magnon peak can no longer be seen above the flat Raman continuum. Photoluminescence and the origin of the broad-spectrum Raman continuum are also discussed

  13. Can surface-enhanced Raman scattering serve as a channel for strong optical pumping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, T. L.; Tay, L.; Moskovits, M.

    2000-07-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of a number of dye and colorless molecules adsorbed on deposited coloidal silver films were systematically studied as a function of power and position using a Raman microscope. The anti-Stokes portions of the spectra of the dyes reproducibly show line intensities much greater than what is expected on the basis of the equilibrium population of the excited vibrational states, even at the lowest incident light intensities used. This behavior was observed previously and attributed to optical pumping of vibrationally excited states of the molecules by unusually intense surface-enhanced Raman transitions, [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2444 (1996)] suggesting either uncommonly large Raman cross-sections or very intense local field strengths exceeding those encountered in the most powerful currently available lasers. Based on this work, however, we ascribe the apparently large anti-Stokes intensities primarily to a difference in the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman cross-sections resulting from resonance or pre-resonance Raman processes in the adsorbate-surface complex rather than to strongly nonequilibrium populations in the molecular vibrational states. Finally, we observed no significant inhomogeneity in the Raman enhancement in the images of the deposited silver coloid samples down to spatial resolutions of ˜1 μm.

  14. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  15. Polarized Raman scattering study of kesterite type Cu2ZnSnS4 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guc, Maxim; Levcenko, Sergiu; Bodnar, Ivan V.; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontane, Xavier; Volkova, Larisa V.; Arushanov, Ernest; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    A non-destructive Raman spectroscopy has been widely used as a complimentary method to X-ray diffraction characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films, yet our knowledge of the Raman active fundamental modes in this material is far from complete. Focusing on polarized Raman spectroscopy provides important information about the relationship between Raman modes and CZTS crystal structure. In this framework the zone-center optical phonons of CZTS, which is most usually examined in active layers of the CZTS based solar cells, are studied by polarized resonant and non-resonant Raman spectroscopy in the range from 60 to 500 cm-1 on an oriented single crystal. The phonon mode symmetry of 20 modes from the 27 possible vibrational modes of the kesterite structure is experimentally determined. From in-plane angular dependences of the phonon modes intensities Raman tensor elements are also derived. Whereas a strong intensity enhancement of the polar E and B symmetry modes is induced under resonance conditions, no mode intensity dependence on the incident and scattered light polarization configurations was found in these conditions. Finally, Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relations are applied to estimate the ratios of the static to high-frequency optic dielectric constants parallel and perpendicular to c-optical axis.

  16. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.;

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  17. Raman Spectroscopy of Cocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Frank; Reardon, Paul; Ochoa, Romulo; Abourahma, Heba; Marti, Marcus; Dimeo, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Cocrystals are a class of compounds that consist of two or more molecules that are held together by hydrogen bonding. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are those that contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are of particular interest and have gained a lot of attention in recent years because they offer the ability to modify the physical properties of the API, like solubility and bioavailability, without altering the chemical structure of the API. The APIs that we targeted for our studies are theophylline (Tp) and indomethacin (Ind). These compounds have been mixed with complementary coformers (cocrystal former) that include acetamide (AcONH2), melamine (MLM), nicotinic acid (Nic-COOH), 4-cyanopyridine (4-CNPy) and 4-aminopyridine (4-NH2Py). Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize these cocrystals. Spectra of the cocrystals were compared to those of the coformers to analyze for peak shifts, specifically those corresponding to hydrogen bonding. A 0.5 m CCD Spex spectrometer was used, in a micro-Raman setup, for spectral analysis. An Argon ion Coherent laser at 514.5 nm was used as the excitation source. )

  18. Anomalous lattice vibrations of monolayer MoS 2 probed by ultraviolet Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive Raman scattering study of monolayer MoS2 with increasing laser excitation energies ranging from the near-infrared to the deep-ultraviolet. The Raman scattering intensities from the second-order phonon modes are revealed to be enhanced anomalously by only the ultraviolet excitation wavelength 354 nm. We demonstrate theoretically that such resonant behavior arises from a strong optical absorption that forms near the Γ point and of the band structure and an inter-valley resonant electronic scattering by the M-point phonons. These results advance our understanding of the double resonance Raman scattering process in low-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterials and provide a foundation for the technological development of monolayer MoS2 in the ultraviolet frequency range. © the Owner Societies 2015.

  19. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  20. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media. PMID:18033426

  1. Raman Spectroscopy for Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Fenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Advancements in early and improved diagnosis could help prevent a significant number of these deaths. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique which has received considerable attention recently with regards to applications in clinical oncology. Raman spectroscopy has the potential not only to improve diagnosis of cancer but also to advance the treatment of cancer. A number of studies have investigated Raman spectroscopy for its potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of cancers. In this paper the most recent advances in dispersive Raman spectroscopy, which have demonstrated promising leads to real world application for clinical oncology are reviewed. The application of Raman spectroscopy to breast, brain, skin, cervical, gastrointestinal, oral, and lung cancers is reviewed as well as a special focus on the data analysis techniques, which have been employed in the studies.

  2. Surface plasmon near-field back-action and displacement of enhanced Raman scattering spectrum in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamsari, Behnood G.; Berini, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    It has been recently observed that plasmonic nanoantennas tuned to the Stokes wavelengths associated with the G and 2D Raman bands of graphene, rather than the laser pump, not only enhance Raman scattering in graphene but also displace and broaden the Raman spectra Ghamsari et al (2015 Phys. Rev. B 91 201408(R)). This paper presents a model to explain the frequency pulling and lineshape broadening effects based on the back-action of surface plasmons near-field on the induced microscopic Raman dipoles in graphene. The model provides the relation among Raman enhancement factor, Raman frequency displacement, and broadening caused by Stokes-tuned resonant nanoantennas and compares the results to the previously reported experimental data.

  3. Ordered Gold Nanobowl Arrays as Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ling; LIU Fan-Xin; ZHAN Peng; PAN Jian; WANG Zhen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate that an interlinked gold half-shell array fabricated by metal deposition on a sacrificial twodimensional colloidal crystal template can show a large enhancement in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at its main transmission resonance.It isfurther observed that Raman signal enhancement shows a noticeable difference when reversing the orientations of the Au nanobowls in relation to the underlying flat dielectric substrate.As the pump laser wavelength is tuned in the vicinity of the resonant plasmonic mode of the structure,the nhancement on an upward Au nanobowl array can be five-fold compared to that on a downward one.Numerical simulation confirms that for the upward nanobowls,a strong localized mode inside the Au nanobowls is formed at the resonant excitation wavelength,which helps to explain this observed extra enhancement in Raman scattering.%We demonstrate that an interlinked gold half-shell array fabricated by metal deposition on a sacrificial twodimensional colloidal crystal template can show a large enhancement in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at its main transmission resonance.It is further observed that Raman signal enhancement shows a noticeable difference when reversing the orientations of the Au nanobowls in relation to the underlying flat dielectric substrate.As the pump laser wavelength is tuned in the vicinity of the resonant plasmonic mode of the structure, the enhancement on an upward Au nanobowl array can be five-fold compared to that on a downward one.Numerical simulation confirms that for the upward nanobowls, a strong localized mode inside the Au nanobowls is formed at the resonant excitation wavelength, which helps to explain this observed extra enhancement in Raman scattering.

  4. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Daniel R; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast nonlinear optical technique that provides vibrational structural information with high temporal (sub-50 fs) precision and high spectral (10 cm(-1) ) resolution. Since the first full demonstration of its capabilities ≈15 years ago, FSRS has evolved into a mature technique, giving deep insights into chemical and biochemical reaction dynamics that would be inaccessible with any other technique. It is now being routinely applied to virtually all possible photochemical reactions and systems spanning from single molecules in solution to thin films, bulk crystals and macromolecular proteins. This review starts with an historic overview and discusses the theoretical and experimental concepts behind this technology. Emphasis is put on the current state-of-the-art experimental realization and several variations of FSRS that have been developed. The unique capabilities of FSRS are illustrated through a comprehensive presentation of experiments to date followed by prospects. PMID:26919612

  5. Raman imaging of extraterrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alian; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Ling, Zongcheng

    2015-07-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been proposed and is under extensive development for surface exploration missions to planetary bodies of our Solar System. It reveals information on molecular structure and chemistry. The spatial distribution of molecular species in natural geological samples and planetary materials has significance for the geological processes by which they formed. Raman imaging is the best way to combine the molecular identification and characterization of geologic materials with their spatial distribution. This paper reports Raman imaging studies of five types of extraterrestrial materials and three terrestrial samples using a state-of-the-art Raman imaging system. The Raman spectral features of major, minor, and trace species in these samples, together with their spatial correlations revealed by these Raman imaging studies indicate the genetic relationships and the geological processes that these materials have been experienced. For robotic planetary surface exploration mission, a simple yet very useful molecular map of a sample can be generated by using line-scan or grid-scan of an in situ Raman system with tightly focused laser beam.

  6. Enhanced coherent Raman emission from uniform plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanism for the coherent emission of radio and microwaves from a warm uniform plasma is proposed. The output power from this mechanism appears to have the characteristics of a classical parametric amplification process. An earlier kinetic theory model for radiation by the scattering of plasma waves in a homogeneous plasma is revamped and modified to incorporate the dominant role of longitudinal Rayleigh scattered waves which stimulate the emission of transverse combination radiation (sum and difference of impressed and natural frequencies) by the resonant Raman scattering process in the plasma. This results in intense radio or microwave radiation at approximately twice the plasma frequency, the intensity depending upon plasma parameters. This intensity, its angular pattern, and the threshold condition for its enhanced emission are calculated. Comparisons of the computed results with the laboratory observation of the radiation output from dc discharges in argon gas, and from a helium theta-pinch plasma are made. Both qualitative and quantitative agreement are found

  7. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  8. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  9. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M., E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is motivated by the knowledge of the molecular geometry changes that accompany sub-picosecond chemical reactions. The detection of vibrational resonances throughout the entire fingerprint region of the spectrum with sub-100-fs delay precision is fairly straightforward to accomplish with the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS must contend with substantial technical challenges that stem from a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities when all laser pulses are electronically resonant with the equilibrium system. In this work, a geometry based on five incident laser beams is used to eliminate much of this undesired background in experiments conducted on metmyoglobin. Compared to a three-beam FSRS geometry with all electronically resonant laser pulses, the five-beam approach described here offers major improvements in the data acquisition rate, sensitivity, and background suppression. The susceptibility of the five-beam geometry to experimental artifacts is investigated using control experiments and model calculations. Of particular concern are undesired cascades of third-order nonlinearities, which are known to challenge FSRS measurements carried out on electronically off-resonant systems. It is generally understood that “forbidden” steps in the desired nonlinear optical processes are the origin of the problems encountered under off-resonant conditions. In contrast, the present experiments are carried out under electronically resonant conditions, where such unfortunate selection rules do not apply. Nonetheless, control experiments based on spectroscopic line shapes, signal phases, and sample concentrations are conducted to rule out significant contributions from cascades of third-order processes. Theoretical calculations are further used to estimate the relative intensities of the direct and cascaded responses. Overall, the control experiments and model calculations presented in

  10. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M.

    2015-06-01

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is motivated by the knowledge of the molecular geometry changes that accompany sub-picosecond chemical reactions. The detection of vibrational resonances throughout the entire fingerprint region of the spectrum with sub-100-fs delay precision is fairly straightforward to accomplish with the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS must contend with substantial technical challenges that stem from a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities when all laser pulses are electronically resonant with the equilibrium system. In this work, a geometry based on five incident laser beams is used to eliminate much of this undesired background in experiments conducted on metmyoglobin. Compared to a three-beam FSRS geometry with all electronically resonant laser pulses, the five-beam approach described here offers major improvements in the data acquisition rate, sensitivity, and background suppression. The susceptibility of the five-beam geometry to experimental artifacts is investigated using control experiments and model calculations. Of particular concern are undesired cascades of third-order nonlinearities, which are known to challenge FSRS measurements carried out on electronically off-resonant systems. It is generally understood that "forbidden" steps in the desired nonlinear optical processes are the origin of the problems encountered under off-resonant conditions. In contrast, the present experiments are carried out under electronically resonant conditions, where such unfortunate selection rules do not apply. Nonetheless, control experiments based on spectroscopic line shapes, signal phases, and sample concentrations are conducted to rule out significant contributions from cascades of third-order processes. Theoretical calculations are further used to estimate the relative intensities of the direct and cascaded responses. Overall, the control experiments and model calculations presented in this

  11. EPR, optical, infrared and Raman spectral studies of Actinolite mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, N O; Narasimhulu, K V; Rao, J L

    2004-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), optical, infrared and Raman spectral studies have been performed on a natural Actinolite mineral. The room temperature EPR spectrum reveals the presence of Mn(2+) and Fe(3+) ions giving rise to two resonance signals at g = 2.0 and 4.3, respectively. The resonance signal at g = 2.0 exhibits a six line hyperfine structure characteristic of Mn(2+) ions. EPR spectra have been studied at different temperatures from 123 to 433 K. The number of spins (N) participating in the resonance at g = 2.0 has been calculated at different temperatures. A linear relationship is observed between log N and 1/T in accordance with Boltzmann law and the activation energy was calculated. The paramagnetic susceptibility (chi) has been calculated at different temperatures and is found to be increasing with decreasing temperature as expected from Curie's law. From the graph of 1/chi versus T, the Curie constant and Curie temperature have been evaluated. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits bands characteristic of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions. The crystal field parameter Dq and the Racah parameters B and C have been evaluated from the optical absorption spectrum. The infrared spectral studies reveal the formation of Fe(3+)--OH complexes due to the presence of higher amount of iron in this mineral. The Raman spectrum exhibits bands characteristic of Si--O--Si stretching and Mg?OH translation modes. PMID:15294226

  12. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  13. Validation model for Raman based skin carotenoid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V; Gellermann, Werner

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy holds promise as a rapid objective non-invasive optical method for the detection of carotenoid compounds in human tissue in vivo. Carotenoids are of interest due to their functions as antioxidants and/or optical absorbers of phototoxic light at deep blue and near UV wavelengths. In the macular region of the human retina, carotenoids may prevent or delay the onset of age-related tissue degeneration. In human skin, they may help prevent premature skin aging, and are possibly involved in the prevention of certain skin cancers. Furthermore, since carotenoids exist in high concentrations in a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, and are routinely taken up by the human body through the diet, skin carotenoid levels may serve as an objective biomarker for fruit and vegetable intake. Before the Raman method can be accepted as a widespread optical alternative for carotenoid measurements, direct validation studies are needed to compare it with the gold standard of high performance liquid chromatography. This is because the tissue Raman response is in general accompanied by a host of other optical processes which have to be taken into account. In skin, the most prominent is strongly diffusive, non-Raman scattering, leading to relatively shallow light penetration of the blue/green excitation light required for resonant Raman detection of carotenoids. Also, sizable light attenuation exists due to the combined absorption from collagen, porphyrin, hemoglobin, and melanin chromophores, and additional fluorescence is generated by collagen and porphyrins. In this study, we investigate for the first time the direct correlation of in vivo skin tissue carotenoid Raman measurements with subsequent chromatography derived carotenoid concentrations. As tissue site we use heel skin, in which the stratum corneum layer thickness exceeds the light penetration depth, which is free of optically confounding chromophores, which can be easily optically accessed for in vivo RRS

  14. The Raman Fingerprint of Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, A. C.; Meyer, J. C.; Scardaci, V.; Casiraghi, C.; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Piscanec, S.; Jiang, Da; Novoselov, K. S.; Roth, S; Geim, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    Graphene is the two-dimensional (2d) building block for carbon allotropes of every other dimensionality. It can be stacked into 3d graphite, rolled into 1d nanotubes, or wrapped into 0d fullerenes. Its recent discovery in free state has finally provided the possibility to study experimentally its electronic and phonon properties. Here we show that graphene's electronic structure is uniquely captured in its Raman spectrum that clearly evolves with increasing number of layers. Raman fingerprint...

  15. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  16. Raman measurement of carotenoid composition in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2004-07-01

    The carotenoids lycopene and beta-carotene are powerful antioxidants in skin and are thought to act as scavengers for free radicals and singlet oxygen. The role of carotenoid species in skin health is of strong current interest. We demonstrate the possibility to use Resonance Raman spectroscopy for fast, non-invasive, highly specific, and quantitative detection of beta-carotene and lycopene in human skin. Analyzing Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue and green laser excitation, we were able to characterize quantitatively the relative concentrations of each carotenoid species in-vivo. In the selective detection, we take advantage of different Raman cross-section spectral profiles for beta-carotene and lycopene molecules, and obtain a quantitative assessment of individual long-chain carotenoid species in the skin rather than their cumulative levels. Preliminary dual-wavelength Raman measurements reveal significant differences in the carotenoid composition of different subjects. The technique holds promise for rapid screening of carotenoid compositions in human skin in large populations and may be suitable in clinical studies for assessing the risk for cutaneous diseases.

  17. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs

  18. Revisiting the Young's double slit experiment for background-free nonlinear Raman spectroscopy and microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Brustlein, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé

    2010-05-28

    In the Young's double slit experiment, the spatial shift of the interference pattern projected onto a screen is directly related to the phase difference between the fields diffracted by the two slits. We apply this property to fields emitted by nonlinear processes and thus demonstrate background-free coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy near an axial interface between a resonant and a nonresonant medium. This method is relevant to remove the nonresonant background in other coherent resonant processes.

  19. Nanopillars array for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Chang, A; Bora, M; Nguyen, H T; Behymer, E M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Carter, J C; Bond, T C

    2011-04-14

    The authors present a new class of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. Two types of nanopillars within this class are discussed: vertical pillars and tapered pillars. For the vertical pillars, the gap between each pair of nanopillars is small enough (< 50 nm) such that highly confined plasmonic cavity resonances are supported between the pillars when light is incident upon them, and the anti-nodes of these resonances act as three-dimensional hotspots for SERS. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of 1,2 bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE), benzenethiol (BT) monolayer and toluene vapor. The results show that SERS enhancement factor of over 0.5 x 10{sup 9} can be achieved, and BPE can be detected down to femto-molar concentration level. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors such as volatile organic compounds.

  20. Gold Nanoparticles as Probes for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy: Preliminary Experimental Results and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Le Nader

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an effective Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectrometer (TERS in backscattering reflection configuration. It combines a tip-probe nanopositioning system with Raman spectroscope. Specific tips were processed by anchoring gold nanoparticles on the apex of tapered optical fibers, prepared by an improved chemical etching method. Hence, it is possible to expose a very small area of the sample (~20 nm2 to the very strong local electromagnetic field generated by the lightning rod effect. This experimental configuration was modelled and optimised using the finite element method, which takes into account electromagnetic effects as well as the plasmon resonance. Finally, TERS measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes were successfully performed. These results confirm the high Raman scattering enhancement predicted by the modelling, induced by our new nano-Raman device.

  1. Raman imaging and spectroscopy of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are unique one-dimensional materials that are promising for many potential applications in various important areas. Their vibrational properties reflect the electron and phonon confinement as well as the structures of the tubes. Resonant Raman spectroscopy has been proven to be an exceedingly powerful tool for the characterization of the vibrational and electronic properties of SWNTs. This thesis focuses on the study of Raman spectroscopy of individual single carbon nanotubes. Single tube spectroscopy allows probing the structure dependent properties of SWNTs. A beam-scanning confocal Raman microscope system capable of large-area Raman imaging is first developed for characterizing SWNTs at the single tube level. Raman images and first-order Raman spectra of nanotubes, consisting of both semicoducting and metallic nanotubes, are systemically studied at room temperature in ambient air. The diameter of the nanotubes is determined from their radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency. A broad diameter distribution is observed for nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The tangential G mode Raman spectra of individual metallic nanotubes are found to exhibit a broad distribution of line shapes, which is attributed to shift of the Fermi level due to O2 adsorption. The doping dependence of Raman spectra of metallic tubes is further studied by both electrostatic gating and electrochemical gating. Significant changes in the G band Raman spectra of nanotubes are observed, suggesting the effect of doping on electron-phonon interaction. The observation of a gradual evolution of G band spectrum from a semiconducting type to the broad BWF type reveals evidence of phonon interaction between two G band modes. Raman imaging and Raman spectra of isolated SWNTs and single-layer graphenen are investigated at both room temperature and low temperature. The temperature-induced Raman spectral change of individual nanotubes is observed to be tube

  2. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  3. Raman sideband cooling of a 138Ba+ ion using a Zeeman interval

    CERN Document Server

    Seck, Christopher M; Dietrich, Matthew R; Odom, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Motional ground state cooling and internal state preparation are important elements for quantum logic spectroscopy (QLS), a class of quantum information processing. Since QLS does not require the high gate fidelities usually associated with quantum computation and quantum simulation, it is possible to make simplifying choices in ion species and quantum protocols at the expense of some fidelity. Here, we report sideband cooling and motional state detection protocols for $^{138}$Ba$^+$ of sufficient fidelity for QLS without an extremely narrowband laser or the use of a species with hyperfine structure. We use the two S$_{1/2}$ Zeeman sublevels of $^{138}$Ba$^+$ to Raman sideband cool a single ion to the motional ground state. Because of the small Zeeman splitting, near-resonant Raman sideband cooling of $^{138}$Ba$^+$ requires only the Doppler cooling lasers and two additional AOMs. Observing the near-resonant Raman optical pumping fluorescence, we estimate a final average motional quantum number $\\bar{n}\\appro...

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from finite arrays of gold nano-patches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally investigate the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of a 2D-periodic array of square gold nano-patches, functionalized by means of a conjugated, rigid thiol. We measure a Raman signal enhancement up to 200 times more intense compared to other plasmon-based nanostructures functionalized with the same molecule, and show that the enhancement is not strictly correlated to the presence of plasmonic resonances. The agreement between experimental and theoretical results reveals the importance of a full-wave analysis based on the inclusion of the actual scattering cross section of the molecule. The proposed numerical approach may serve not only as a tool to predict the enhancement of Raman signal scattered from strongly resonant nanostructure but also as an effective instrument to engineer SERS platforms that target specific molecules.

  5. Gold Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, Prepared by Electrodeposition in Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio H. Ogata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of gold into porous silicon was investigated. In the present study, porous silicon with ~100 nm in pore diameter, so-called medium-sized pores, was used as template electrode for gold electrodeposition. The growth behavior of gold deposits was studied by scanning electron microscope observation of the gold deposited porous silicon. Gold nanorod arrays with different rod lengths were prepared, and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties were investigated. We found that the absorption peak due to the surface plasmon resonance can be tuned by changing the length of the nanorods. The optimum length of the gold nanorods was ~600 nm for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a He-Ne laser. The reason why the optimum length of the gold nanorods was 600 nm was discussed by considering the relationship between the absorption peak of surface plasmon resonance and the wavelength of the incident laser for Raman scattering.

  6. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on aluminum using near infrared and visible excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Gühlke, Marina; Kneipp, Janina;

    2014-01-01

    We observed strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering on discontinuous nanostructured aluminum films using 785 nm excitation even though dielectric constants of this metal suggest plasmon supported spectroscopy in the ultraviolet range. The excitation of SERS correlates with plasmon resonances in ...

  8. Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering of Chlorophenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Wei; SHANG Xiao-hong; LU Yong; LIU Bing-bing; WANG Xu

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectrum is a powerful analytical tool for determining the chemical information of compounds.In this study,we obtained analytical results of chlorophenols(CPs) molecules including 4-chlorophenol(4-CP),2,6-dichlorophenol(2,6-DCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol(2,4,6-TCP) on the surface of Ag dendrites by surface-enhanced Raman scattering(SERS) spectra.SEM images indicate that the SERS substrate of Ag dendrites is composed of a large number of polygonal nanocrystallites,which self-assembled into a 3D hierarchical structure.It was found that there were distinct differences for those three molecules from Raman and SERS spectra.This indicates that SERS could be a new tool of detection technique regarding trace amounts of CPs.

  9. Resonance Raman Intensities and Structure of S2 State of Nickel(II) Porphyrin by Time-Dependent Approach%时间域方法分析镍卟啉的共振拉曼强度与S2激发态结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈东明; 丛涤非; 何天敬; 章应辉; 刘凡镇

    2001-01-01

    Resonance Raman intensities and UV-visible absorption spectrum of nickel(II) porphyrin (NiP) were analyzed with time-dependent formulas under standard approximations for Condon mechanism of enhancement. The resultant dimensionless displacements on S2 state are comparable with those obtained by Spiro et al. from Kramers-Kronig transform methods. It was deduced from the calculations that there are large dimensionless displacements on the excited state along ν8 and ν2 coordinates. These normal modes consist of relatively large components of CβCβ, Cα Cm bond stretching and CαCmCα bond bending motions. Compared with the ground state, the average bond-lengths of CβCβ, CαCm, and CαN bonds at S2 state increase respectively by 0.27, 0.14, and 0.07pm,while that of CαCβ bond decreases by 0.20pm,which are well in coincident with the SPMO calculations in literature.%研究了入射光波长与S0→S2跃迁共振的情形下,卟啉镍配合物(NiP)的振动拉曼光谱。用时间域方法计算了NiP的共振拉曼强度和吸收光谱。结果表明,相对于基态,S2态NiP的分子构型沿着ν8和ν2简正坐标有较大的位移。这些简正坐标主要涉及卟啉环的CαCm键和CβCβ键伸缩运动,以及CαCmCα变角运动。与基态相比, S2态的CβCβ、 CαCm和CαN键分别增大0.27、 0.14、 0.07 pm,而CαCβ键则减小0.20 pm,与前人的赝势分子轨道计算(SPMO)结果相近。还从RR强度角度讨论了S2态的Jahn-Teller畸变。

  10. Resonance Raman detection of carotenoid antioxidants in living human tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Ermakov, Igor V.; M Sharifzadeh; Ermakova, Maia; Gellermann, W.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to the beneficial effects of carotenoid antioxidants in the human body. Several studies, for example, support the protective role of lutein and zeaxanthin in the prevention of age-related eye diseases. If present in high concentrations in the macular region of the retina, lutein and zeaxanthin provide pigmentation in this most light sensitive retinal spot, and as a result of light filtering and/or antioxidant action, delay the onset of macular degeneration with incr...

  11. Raman spectroscopy under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-11-05

    We report the results of Raman measurements of various materials under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC). High temperatures are generated by laser heating or internal resistive (ohmic) heating or a combination of both. We present Raman spectra of cubic boron nitride (cBN) to 40 GPa and up to 2300 K that show a continuous pressure and temperature shift of the frequency of the transverse optical mode. We have also obtained high-pressure Raman spectra from a new noble metal nitride, which we synthesized at approximately 50 GPa and 2000 K. We have obtained high-temperature spectra from pure nitrogen to 39 GPa and up to 2000 K, which show the presence of a hot band that has previously been observed in CARS measurements. These measurements have also allowed us to constrain the melting curve and to examine changes in the intramolecular potential with pressure.

  12. Multi-scale nonlinear effects in whispering-gallery mode resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoping; Diallo, Souleymane; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-03-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators have been the focus of many research works in recent years. They allow to study the light-matter interactions induced by the confinement of photons in nonlinear media. In particular, Brillouin Raman and Kerr nonlinearities excite the resonator at the lattice, molecular and electronic scale. This difference in spatial scales give to whispering gallery-mode resonators the potential to be central photonic components in microwave photonics, quantum optics and optoelectronics. We discuss in this communication some of the key challenges that have to be met for the understanding of Kerr, Raman and Brillouin interactions that can take place in these resonators.

  13. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.;

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  14. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size.

  15. Challenges in higher order mode Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Nielsen, Kristian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk;

    2015-01-01

    A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed...

  16. High gain/broadband oxide glasses for next generation Raman amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Clara A.

    aware when conducting these measurements near the absorption band edge of the material. This led to the detection of an inherent frequency-dispersion in the Raman susceptibility and a resonant enhancement phenomenon when measurements were conducted near the absorption edge of the material.

  17. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Alistair Elfick; Andrew Downes

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (bio)chemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We dis...

  18. Theory of polariton-mediated Raman scattering in microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Hilario, L M; Bruchhausen, A; Lobos, A M; Aligia, A A

    2007-04-30

    We calculate the intensity of the polariton-mediated inelastic light scattering in semiconductor microcavities. We treat the exciton-photon coupling nonperturbatively and incorporate lifetime effects in both excitons and photons, and a coupling of the photons to the electron-hole continuum. Taking the matrix elements as fitting parameters, the results are in excellent agreement with measured Raman intensities due to optical phonons that are resonant with the upper polariton branches in II-VI microcavities with embedded CdTe quantum wells. PMID:21690956

  19. Simulations of the polarisation-dependent Raman intensity of β-carotene in photosystem II crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First polarisation-dependent Raman spectroscopy on photosystem II crystals. • Orientation-dependent Raman intensity simulations for di- and monomeric crystals. • Simulations account for all β-carotenes (β-Car) in the unit cell for the first time. • Prediction for identificationy of the β-Car cation in side-path electron transport. - Abstract: In order to clarify possibilities to identify the β-carotene (β-Car) radicals in secondary electron transfer (ET) reactions in the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc), Raman intensities of all 96 β-Car cofactors in the unit cell of PSIIcc-dimer crystals as a function of polarisation and crystal orientation were simulated based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure. The Raman-active symmetry Ag in the C2h group is assigned to the β-Car modes ν66 and ν67. Simulations are in agreement with experiment for off-resonant excitation at 1064 nm. Resonant measurements at 476 and 532 nm excitation can not be explained, which is attributed to mode mixing in the excited state and the existence of different spectral pools. The identity of the β-Car oxidised in secondary ET can not be resolved by Raman measurements on PSIIcc-dimer crystals. Additional simulations show that similar measurements on PSIIcc-monomer crystals could provide a possible route to solve this issue

  20. Simulations of the polarisation-dependent Raman intensity of β-carotene in photosystem II crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brose, K., E-mail: katharina.brose@gmx.net [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Zouni, A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Müh, F. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Mroginski, M.A. [Institut für Chemie, Max-Volmer-Laboratorium, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Maultzsch, J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • First polarisation-dependent Raman spectroscopy on photosystem II crystals. • Orientation-dependent Raman intensity simulations for di- and monomeric crystals. • Simulations account for all β-carotenes (β-Car) in the unit cell for the first time. • Prediction for identificationy of the β-Car cation in side-path electron transport. - Abstract: In order to clarify possibilities to identify the β-carotene (β-Car) radicals in secondary electron transfer (ET) reactions in the photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc), Raman intensities of all 96 β-Car cofactors in the unit cell of PSIIcc-dimer crystals as a function of polarisation and crystal orientation were simulated based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure. The Raman-active symmetry A{sub g} in the C{sub 2h} group is assigned to the β-Car modes ν{sub 66} and ν{sub 67}. Simulations are in agreement with experiment for off-resonant excitation at 1064 nm. Resonant measurements at 476 and 532 nm excitation can not be explained, which is attributed to mode mixing in the excited state and the existence of different spectral pools. The identity of the β-Car oxidised in secondary ET can not be resolved by Raman measurements on PSIIcc-dimer crystals. Additional simulations show that similar measurements on PSIIcc-monomer crystals could provide a possible route to solve this issue.

  1. Raman probing of competitive laser heating and local recrystallization effect in ZnO nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, J D; Parkinson, P; Ren, F F; Gu, S L; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C

    2012-10-01

    The competitive laser-induced local heating and recrystallization effects in ZnO nanocrystals embedded in a MgO/ZnO stack are reported via resonance Raman spectra. The dependence of the intensity, energy, and resonance effects of the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon on laser excitation condition are discussed in the context of Fröhlich interaction. Redistribution of defects, impurity-diffusion, and grain regrowth caused by thermal and photochemical effects lead to significant changes in coupling strength of electron-phonon interaction, and the resonance behaviors are strongly affected by the interplay of local heating, heat trapping, and local structural modification in such nanostructures.

  2. Raman spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    First volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  3. Electronic Raman Scattering in Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong-Yan; WANG Qiang-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Linear dispersion near the Dirac points in the band structure of graphenes can give rise to novel physical properties.We calculate the electronic contribution to the Raman spectra in graphenes, which also shows novel features.In the clean limit, the Raman spectrum in the undoped graphene is linear (with a universal slope against impurity scattering) at low energy due to the linear dispersion near the Dirac points, and it peaks at a position corresponding to the van Hove singularity in the band structure. In a doped graphene, the electronic Raman absorption is forbidden up to a vertical inter-band particle-hole gap. Beyond the gap the spectrum follows the undoped case. In the presence of impurities, absorption within the gap (in the otherwise clean case) is induced, which is identified as the intra-band contribution. The Drude-like intra-band contribution is seen to be comparable to the higher energy inter-band Raman peak. The results are discussed in connection to experiments.

  4. Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the characterization and classification of pollen; Raman-Spektroskopie als Werkzeug fuer die Charakterisierung und Klassifizierung von Pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Franziska

    2010-09-20

    The chemical composition of pollen, the physiological containers that produce the male gametophytes of seed plants, has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists, and lately even material scientists for various reasons. The aim of this work was the analysis of whole pollen grains and pollen components by Raman Spectroscopy. These experiments were complemented by other techniques such as Enviromental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM), High-Performance- Thin-Layer-Chromatography (HPTLC), Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and Nuclear-Magnetic-Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR). As reported here, individual fresh pollen grains and their morphological constituents can be characterized and also classified in situ without prior preparation. Classification of pollen is based on their biochemical fingerprint revealed in their Raman spectrum. Raman spectroscopy is nondestructive and can be carried out with single pollen grains or fragments. It could be shown that the biochemical makeup of the pollen (as a part of the recognition/mating system) is altered during formation of a new biological species and that the species-specific chemical similarities and dissimilarities indeed reflect in the Raman spectral fingerprint. On the basis of the chemical information, unsupervised multivariate analysis consisting of hierarchical clustering revealed in most cases chemical similarities between species that were indicative of both phylogenetic relationship and matin behavior. Therefore experiments were conducted that gave the in situ Raman spectroscopic signatures ot the carotenoid molecules. As the data indicates, the in situ Raman spectra of the carotenoid molecules measured in single intact pollen grains provide in situ evidence of interspecies variations in pollen carotenoid content, structure, and/or assembly without prior purification. Results from HPTLC confirmed that carotenoid composition varied greatly between species and that the different in situ spectral

  5. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  6. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  7. Nanoscale Analysis of Interwall Interaction in a Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunchaiyakul, Songpol; Yano, Takeshi; Khoklang, Kamonchanok; Krukowski, Pawel; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the study of carbon materials, but its spatial resolution is limited by the optical diffraction limit. Recently, we constructed a scanning tunneling microscope-based tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (STM-TERS) system in ultrahigh vacuum, which overcomes the optical diffraction limit, and enables the investigation of single-molecular Raman spectra simultaneously with topographic imaging. We have investigated position-sensitive Raman spectra along the tube axis of an isolated multiwalled carbon nanotube, which is a result of the different number of nanotube walls at each location. We found that the intensity ratio between the 2D to the G band increases with the number of walls. This indicates that the quantum interference between Raman scattering pathways affects each Raman mode differently. The interaction between nanotube walls induces splitting of the π and π* bands which increases the number of the 2D band scattering pathways owing to double resonance, eventually increasing the probability of scattering for the 2D band relative to the G band. These results provide a deeper understanding of the single-molecule interaction of carbon materials in the nanoscale.

  8. From molecular fragments to crystals: a UV Raman spectroscopic study on the mechanism of Fe-ZSM-5 synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fengtao; Sun, Keju; Feng, Zhaochi; Xia, Haian; Han, Bo; Lian, Yuxiang; Ying, Pinliang; Li, Can

    2009-01-01

    The nucleation process of iron-exchanged zeolite Fe-ZSM-5, from the assembly of distorted tetrahedrally coordinated iron species and silicate rings in the precursor to the final Fe-ZSM-5 crystals, as well as variations in the coordination environment of iron, were studied by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques.The entire sequence of crystallization events of Fe-ZSM-5 was monitored by UV Raman spectroscopy in combination with HRTEM, UV/Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction patterns, and periodic DFT calculations. Fe-ZSM-5 was synthesized by an organic-free method to avoid signal interference from the organic template in Raman spectra. Framework iron atoms with resonance Raman bands at 516, 1115, and 1165 cm(-1), and a Raman band at 1016 cm(-1) are detected for Fe-ZSM-5. In the early stage of Fe-ZSM-5 synthesis, the precursor contains iron atoms in distorted tetrahedral coordination and five- and six-membered silicate rings. Nucleation by aggregation of the precursor species was monitored by UV Raman spectroscopy based on the resonance Raman effect, and confirmed by periodic DFT calculations. Evolution of iron species on the surface and in the bulk phase was monitored by UV Raman spectroscopy with excitation at 244 and 325 nm, as well as HRTEM. Nucleation takes place first in the core of the amorphous particles, and crystalline nuclei with Fe-ZSM-5 structure are formed in the core by consuming the amorphous shell. Finally the amorphous particles are completely transformed into Fe-ZSM-5 crystals. PMID:19197930

  9. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, R; Tatsumi, Y; Huang, S; Ling, X; Dresselhaus, M S

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs. PMID:27388703

  10. Regime for a Self-ionizing Raman Laser Amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backward Raman amplification and compression at high power might occur if a long pumping laser pulse is passed through a plasma to interact resonantly with a counter-propagating short seed pulse [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 4448-4451]. One critical issue, however, is that the pump may be unacceptably depleted due to spontaneous Raman backscatter from intrinsic fluctuations in the amplifying plasma medium prior to its useful interaction with the seed. Premature backscatter may be avoided, however, by employing a gaseous medium with pump intensities too low to ionize the medium, and using the intense seed to produce the plasma by rapid photoionization as it is being amplified [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Plasmas (2001)]. In addition to allowing that only rather low power pumps be used, photoionization introduces a damping of the short pulse which must be overcome by the Raman growth rate for net amplification to occur. The parameter space of gas densities, laser wavelengths, and laser intensities is surveyed to identify favorable regimes for this effect. Output laser intensities of 10(superscript ''17'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') for 0.5 mm radiation are found to be feasible for such a scheme using a pump of 10(superscript ''13'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') and an initial seed of 5 x 10(superscript ''14'') W/cm(superscript ''2'') over an amplification length of 5.6 cm in hydrogen gas

  11. Regime for a self-ionizing Raman laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backward Raman amplification and compression at high power might occur if a long pumping laser pulse is passed through a plasma to interact resonantly with a counter-propagating short seed pulse [V. M. Malkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4448-4451 (1999)]. One critical issue, however, is that the pump may be unacceptably depleted due to spontaneous Raman backscatter from intrinsic fluctuations in the amplifying plasma medium prior to its useful interaction with the seed. Premature backscatter may be avoided, however, by employing a gaseous medium with pump intensities too low to ionize the medium and using the intense seed to produce the plasma by rapid photoionization as it is being amplified [V. M. Malkin et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4698-4699 (2001)]. In addition to allowing that only rather low power pumps be used, photoionization introduces a damping of the short pulse which must be overcome by the Raman growth rate for net amplification to occur. The parameter space of gas densities, laser wavelengths, and laser intensities is surveyed to identify favorable regimes for this effect. Output laser intensities of 2x1017 W/cm2 for 0.5 μm radiation are found to be feasible for such a scheme using a pump of 1x1013 W/cm2 and an initial seed of 5x1014 W/cm2 over an amplification length of 5.6 cm in hydrogen gas

  12. Raman scattering of few-layers MoTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeszczyk, M.; Gołasa, K.; Zinkiewicz, M.; Nogajewski, K.; Molas, M. R.; Potemski, M.; Wysmołek, A.; Babiński, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on room-temperature Raman scattering measurements in few-layer crystals of exfoliated molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2) performed with the use of 632.8 nm (1.96 eV) laser light excitation. In agreement with a recent study reported by Froehlicher et al (2015 Nano Lett. 15 6481) we observe a complex structure of the out-of-plane vibrational modes ({{{A}}}1{{g}}{/{{A}}}1\\prime ), which can be explained in terms of interlayer interactions between single atomic planes of MoTe2. In the case of low-energy shear and breathing modes of rigid interlayer vibrations, it is shown that their energy evolution with the number of layers can be well reproduced within a linear chain model with only the nearest neighbor interaction taken into account. Based on this model the corresponding in-plane and out-of-plane force constants are determined. We also show that the Raman scattering in MoTe2 measured using 514.5 nm (2.41 eV) laser light excitation results in much simpler spectra. We argue that the rich structure of the out-of-plane vibrational modes observed in Raman scattering spectra excited with the use of 632.8 nm laser light results from its resonance with the electronic transition at the M point of the MoTe2 first Brillouin zone.

  13. RAMAN SCATTERING AND EXCITATION SPECTROSCOPY IN CdTe/CdMnTe SUPERLATTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Viña, L.; Chang, L; J. Yoshino

    1987-01-01

    We have observed oscillatory structure in the excitation spectra of CdTe/CdxMN1-xTe superlattices. A comparison of these spectra with conventional Raman spectra shows that the structures correspond to first and higher order LO-phonons of the CdTe wells and the CdTe/CdxMn1-xTe barriers, as well as combination of them. A strong enhancement in Resonance Raman scattering of both the CdTe and the CdMnTe phonons, at the energy of the heavy-hole exciton of the superlattice, suggests a small valence-...

  14. Raman lasing and Fano lineshapes in a packaged fiber-coupled whispering-gallerymode microresonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Guangming; Wang, Tao; Xu, Linhua; Long, Gui-lu; Yang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    We report Raman lasing and the optical analog of electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) in a whispering-gallerymode (WGM) microtoroid resonator embedded in a low refractive index polymer matrix together with a tapered fiber coupler. The Raman laser supports both single and multimode operation with low power thresholds. Observations of Fano and EIT-like pheonomena in a packaged microresonator will enable high resolution sensors and can be used in networks where slow light process is needed. These results open the way for portable, robust, and stable WGM microlasers and laserbased sensors for applications in various environments.

  15. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  16. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  17. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    A tutorial article is presented for the use of linear and nonlinear Raman microspectroscopies in biomedical diagnostics. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is the most frequently applied nonlinear variant of Raman spectroscopy. The basic concepts of Raman and CARS are introduced first, and subsequent biomedical applications of Raman and CARS are described. Raman microspectroscopy is applied to both in-vivo and in-vitro tissue diagnostics, and the characterization and identification of individual mammalian cells. These applications benefit from the fact that Raman spectra provide specific information on the chemical composition and molecular structure in a label-free and nondestructive manner. Combining the chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope allows recording hyperspectral images with molecular contrast. We also elaborate on interfacing Raman spectroscopic tools with other technologies such as optical tweezing, microfluidics and fiber optic probes. Thereby, we aim at presenting a guide into one exciting branch of modern biophotonics research.

  18. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril;

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT......-molecular orbital calculations by use of the Gaussian 03W pro- gram, based on complete geometry minimizations of the conformational energy of the S-(+)-amphetamine molecule, the S-(+)-amphetamine-H+ ion, and the R-(–)-amphetamine molecule. Following this, harmonic frequency calculations have been made, providing...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  19. 瞬态吸收和共振拉曼光谱研究硝基对联苯氮宾、氮宾离子反应活性的影响%Investigation of the Influence of Nitro-Substitution on the Reaction of Biphenyl-Nitrene and Nitrenium Ion by Transient Absorption and Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚芳; 程博文; 沈超; 郑旭明; 薛佳丹; 杜勇; 汤文建

    2016-01-01

    利用光解芳基叠氮化合物得到单重态氮宾,运用纳秒瞬态吸收光谱、瞬态共振拉曼光谱实验手段,辅以密度泛函理论(DFT)计算,研究了4′-硝基-4-联苯氮宾在乙腈和水溶液中的光化学反应中间体。实验结果表明,在非质子溶剂中,4′-硝基-4-联苯氮宾发生系间窜越反应生成三线态氮宾;在质子溶剂中,单重态氮宾可被质子化产生氮宾离子。与4-联苯氮宾和氮宾离子相比,硝基对单重态氮宾系间窜越反应路径影响很小;降低了氮宾离子与水和叠氮阴离子的反应活性,却提高了其与鸟苷的反应活性。%Arylnitrenes and arylnitrenium ions are both short-lived intermediates that are highly reactive. In this work, nanosecond transient absorption and transient resonance Raman spectroscopic measurements were used to detect and identify the intermediates generated from the singlet 4′-nitro-4-biphenylnitrene after photolysis of the corresponding aryl azide in acetonitrile and aqueous solution. Combined with the density functional theory (DFT) simulation results, the structural and electronic characteristics of the above experimental intermediates were specified. The spectral results indicate that in aprotic solvents (such as acetonitrile), the singlet 4′-nitro-4-biphenylnitrene undergoes intersystem crossing (ISC) to the triplet nitrene. In contrast, in a protic solvent (such as the mixed aqueous solution used in this work), the singlet 4′-nitro-4-biphenylnitrene can be protonated to produce the nitrenium ion. Compared with its un-substituted counterpart, the nitro substitution has little influence on the ISC reaction pathway of the singlet 4-biphenylnitrene. With regard to the un-substituted nitrenium ion, the nitro group decreases its reactivity towards water and azide anion, while accelerating its reaction rate towards 2′-deoxyguanosine based on the different quench reaction rates between the nitrenium ion and

  20. Novel systems of resonant wave interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matrix Riemann–Hilbert problem (RHP) is constructed using the dressing method starting from two uncoupled, one-directional linear wave equations; the RHP thus obtained is then used to derive a novel integrable matrix non-local system of equations describing resonant wave interactions, together with its Lax pair. This system is shown to be a matrix generalization of the equations for resonant three-wave interactions and stimulated Raman scattering. Several compatible reductions admitted by this system are also discussed. (paper)

  1. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  2. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  3. Parametric Self-Oscillation via Resonantly Enhanced Multiwave Mixing

    OpenAIRE

    Zibrov, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.; Scully, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient nonlinear process in which Stokes and anti-Stokes components are generated spontaneously in a Raman-like, near resonant media driven by low power counter-propagating fields. Oscillation of this kind does not require optical cavity and can be viewed as a spontaneous formation of atomic coherence grating.

  4. Diffusion Raman et luminescence dans des aerogels de silice purs ou dopes Dy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, F.; Fabre, F.; Zwick, A.; Bournett, D.

    1994-02-01

    Light scattering studies of pure and Dy doped aerogels are presented. Careful examination of Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra allow the discrimination between Raman and luminescence processes. It is shown that in pure aerogels, scattered intensity is due to Raman processes only, and the density of vibrational states does not exhibit any singularity. The fractal properties of the structure imply modifications not only in the spectral distribution of the low frequency modes (usually labelled phonons and fractons) but alsoin the high frequency one, at least up to 600 cm-1. In Dy-doped dense silica, coupling between electronic and vibronic excitations is evidenced by the presence of anti-Stokes luminescence. In Dy-doped aerogels, the enlarged Dy3+ electronic levels, strongly coupled with vibrational states give rise to emission processes traducing the response of the sample as a whole, rather than resonant Raman scattering or luminescence processes.

  5. Surface Plasmons and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectra of Aggregated and Alloyed Gold-Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fleger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of size, morphology, and composition of gold and silver nanoparticles on surface plasmon resonance (SPR and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS are studied with the purpose of optimizing SERS substrates. Various gold and silver films made by evaporation and subsequent annealing give different morphologies and compositions of nanoparticles and thus different position of the SPR peak. SERS measurements of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid obtained from these films reveal that the proximity of the SPR peak to the exciting laser wavelength is not the only factor leading to the highest Raman enhancement. Silver nanoparticles evaporated on top of larger gold nanoparticles show higher SERS than gold-silver alloyed nanoparticles, in spite of the fact that the SPR peak of alloyed nanoparticles is narrower and closer to the excitation wavelength. The highest Raman enhancement was obtained for substrates with a two-peak particle size distribution for excitation wavelengths close to the SPR.

  6. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm−1) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule

  7. Increased wavelength options in the visible and ultraviolet for Raman lasers operating on dual Raman modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, R P; Piper, J A

    2008-03-01

    We report increased wavelength options from Raman lasers for Raman media having two Raman modes of similar gain coefficient. For an external-cavity potassium gadolinium tungstate Raman laser pumped at 532 nm, we show that two sets of Stokes orders are generated simultaneously by appropriate orientation of the Raman crystal, and also wavelengths that correspond to sums of the two Raman modes. Up to 14 visible Stokes lines were observed in the wavelength range 555-675 nm. The increase in Stokes wavelengths also enables a much greater selection of wavelengths to be accessed via intracavity nonlinear sum frequency and difference frequency mixing. For example, we demonstrate 30 output wavelength options for a wavelength-selectable 271-321 nm Raman laser with intracavity sum frequency mixing in BBO. We also present a theoretical analysis that enables prediction of wavelength options for dual Raman mode systems.

  8. Increased wavelength options in the visible and ultraviolet for Raman lasers operating on dual Raman modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, R P; Piper, J A

    2008-03-01

    We report increased wavelength options from Raman lasers for Raman media having two Raman modes of similar gain coefficient. For an external-cavity potassium gadolinium tungstate Raman laser pumped at 532 nm, we show that two sets of Stokes orders are generated simultaneously by appropriate orientation of the Raman crystal, and also wavelengths that correspond to sums of the two Raman modes. Up to 14 visible Stokes lines were observed in the wavelength range 555-675 nm. The increase in Stokes wavelengths also enables a much greater selection of wavelengths to be accessed via intracavity nonlinear sum frequency and difference frequency mixing. For example, we demonstrate 30 output wavelength options for a wavelength-selectable 271-321 nm Raman laser with intracavity sum frequency mixing in BBO. We also present a theoretical analysis that enables prediction of wavelength options for dual Raman mode systems. PMID:18542414

  9. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Maxim F; Domcke, Wolfgang; Rao, B Jayachander

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach. PMID:27179484

  10. Raman LIDAR Detection of Cloud Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoz, Belay; Starr, David; Whiteman, David; Evans, Keith; Hlavka, Dennis; Peravali, Ravindra

    1999-01-01

    Advantages introduced by Raman lidar systems for cloud base determination during precipitating periods are explored using two case studies of light rain and virga conditions. A combination of the Raman lidar derived profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol scattering ratio, together with the Raman scattered signals from liquid drops, can minimize or even eliminate some of the problems associated with cloud boundary detection using elastic backscatter lidars.

  11. 2 nm continuously tunable 488nm micro-integrated diode-laser-based SHG light source for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, M.; Maiwald, M.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy in the visible spectral range is of great interest due to resonant Raman effects. Nevertheless, fluorescence and ambient light can mask the weak Raman lines. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy is a demonstrated tool to overcome this drawback. To apply this method, a light source with two alternating wavelengths is necessary. The spectral distance between these two wavelengths has to be adapted to the width of the Raman signal. According to the sample under investigation the width of the Raman signal could be in the range of 3 cm-1 - 12 cm-1. In this work, a micro-integrated light source emitting at 488 nm with a continuous wavelength tuning range up to 2 nm (83 cm-1) is presented. The pump source, a DFB laser emitting at 976 nm, and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) ridge waveguide crystal is used for the second harmonic generation (SHG). Both components are mounted on a μ-Peltier-element for temperature control. Here, a common wavelength tuning of the pump wavelength and the acceptance bandwidth of the SHG crystal via temperature is achieved. With the results the light source is suitable for portable Raman and SERDS experiments with a flexible spectral distance between both excitation wavelengths for SERDS with respect to the sample under investigation.

  12. Fluorocarbon Fiber-Optic Raman Probe for Non-Invasive Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Okagbare, Paul I.; Morris, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a novel fiber-optic Raman probe using a graded index fluorocarbon optical fiber. The fluorocarbon fiber has a simple Raman spectrum, a low fluorescence background, and generates a Raman signal that in turbid media serves as an intense reference Raman signal that corrects for albedo. The intensity of the reference signal can easily be varied as needed by scaling the length of the excitation fiber. Additionally, the fluorocarbon probe eliminates the broad silica Ram...

  13. Recent Advances in Biophysical/Biochemical/Biomedical Application of Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NaitengYu; XiaoyuanLi

    1995-01-01

    Examples of some important biophysical,biochemical and biomedical problems that have been uniquely solved by Raman spectroscopy will be illustrated and discussed.The first example concerns the electronic structure,metal-ligand bonding,and reactivity of metalloporphyrins,the synthetic models for the ubiquitous chromophore in hemoproteins.we will demonstrate how off-resonance scattering,electronic resonance enhanced scattering,as well as nonlinear hyper-Raman(three-photon)scattering can provide a highly complementary picture about the effective electronic symmetry and bonding of metalloporphyrins in its electronic ground and excited states.we will illustrate how the bonding information otained from the Raman effect can be useful in understanding the chemical behavior of metalloporhyrin such as its affinity toward exogenous ligand and its preference for the orientation of planar axial ligand(such as imidazole from histidine's sidechain).Some paradoxical misconception about the relationship between bond strength and ligand binding affinity will be discussed.Raman spectroscopy,particular with near infraed laser excitation to avoid fluorescence,has been applied successfully to extract significant biochemical information from intact eye lenses.The long-standing cotroversy over the exact nature of the involvement of disulfide cross-linking in lens aging and cataract formation has been settled by the Raman spectroscopy because of its ability for monitoring the sulfhydryl to disulfide reaction of an intact lens in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner.A more recent contribution to the lens biochemistry is the use of Raman spectroscopy for a clear demonstration of the biochemical changes induced by near ultraviolet light in the lens of an animal model,resembling the changes observed in human lens aging and cataract formation.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  15. Titanium-enhanced Raman microcavity laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Nishita; Maker, Ashley J; Armani, Andrea M

    2014-03-15

    Whispering gallery mode microcavities are ideally suited to form microlaser devices because the high circulating intensity within the cavity results in ultralow lasing thresholds. However, to achieve low-threshold Raman lasing in silica devices, it is necessary to have quality factors above 100 million. One approach to circumvent this restriction is to intercalate a sensitizer into the silica, which increases the Raman gain. In the present work, we demonstrate a Raman laser based on a titanium sensitized silica solgel coated toroidal microcavity. By tuning the concentration of the Ti, the Raman efficiency improves over 3× while maintaining sub-mW thresholds. PMID:24690786

  16. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... performance of the amplifier is also investigated for both configurations. Our results show an on/off gain exceeding 20 dB at 1810 nm for which the obtained effective noise figure is below 3 dB....

  17. Raman gain induced mode evolution and on-demand coupling control in whispering-gallery-mode microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yilmaz, Huzeyfe; Lei, Fu-Chuan; Long, Gui-Lu; Yang, Lan

    2015-11-16

    Waveguide-coupled optical resonators have played an important role in a wide range of applications including optical communication, sensing, nonlinear optics, slow/fast light, and cavity QED. In such a system, the coupling regimes strongly affect the resonance feature in the light transmission spectra, and hence the performance and outcomes of the applications. Therefore it is crucial to control the coupling between the waveguide and the microresonator. In this work, we investigated a fiber-taper coupled whispering-gallery-mode microresonator system, in which the coupling regime is traditionally controlled by adjusting the distance between the resonator and the fiber-taper mechanically. We propose and experimentally demonstrate that by utilizing Raman gain one can achieve on-demand control of the coupling regime without any mechanical movement in the resonator system. Particularly, the application of Raman gain is accompanied by Q enhancement. We also show that with the help of Raman gain control, the transitions between various coupling regimes can affect the light transmission spectra so as to provide better resolvability and signal amplification. This all-optical approach is also suitable for monolithically integrated and packaged waveguide-resonator systems, whose coupling regime is fixed at the time of manufacturing. It provides an effective route to control the light transmission in a waveguide-couple resonator system without mechanically moving individual optical components. PMID:26698440

  18. Self-assembled microtubes and rhodamine 6G functionalized Raman-active gold microrods from 1-hydroxybenzotriazole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravula Thirupathi; Erode N Prabhakaran

    2011-05-01

    1-Hydroxybenzotriazole spontaneously self-assembles to form hollow, linear microtubes initiated by controlled evaporation from water. The tube cavities act as thermo-labile micromoulds for the synthesis of linear gold microrods. Rhodamine 6G-labelled gold microrods, exhibiting surface enhanced resonance Raman activity, have been synthesized using the HOBT microtubes.

  19. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... of an IT project in a Danish local government spans a two-year time period and demonstrates a double-loop legitimization process. First, resonating statements are produced to localize a national IT initiative to support the specificity of a local government discourse. Second, the resonating statements are used...

  20. Experimental and ab initio DFT calculated Raman Spectrum of Sudan I, a Red Dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Liu, Chuan;

    2011-01-01

    of the Sudan I molecule was involved in the majority of the vibrations through N N and C–N stretching and various bending modes. Low-intensity bands in the lower wavenumber range (at about 721, 616, 463 and 218 cm−1) were selectively enhanced by the resonance Raman effect when using the 532 nm excitation line......The red dye Sudan I was investigated by Raman spectroscopy using different excitation wavelengths (1064, 532 and 244 nm). A calculation of the Raman spectrum based on quantum mechanical ab initio density functional theory (DFT) was made using the RB3LYP method with the 3-21G and 6-311+G(d,p) basis....... Comparison was made with other azo dyes in the literature on natural, abundant plant pigments. The results show that there is a possibility in foodstuff analysis to distinguish Sudan I from other dyes by using Raman spectroscopy with more than one laser wavelength for resonance enhancement of the different...

  1. Resonance conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Rebusco, P

    2005-01-01

    Non-linear parametric resonances occur frequently in nature. Here we summarize how they can be studied by means of perturbative methods. We show in particular how resonances can affect the motion of a test particle orbiting in the vicinity of a compact object. These mathematical toy-models find application in explaining the structure of the observed kHz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations: we discuss which aspects of the reality naturally enter in the theory, and which one still remain a puzzle.

  2. Resonance conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebusco, P.

    2005-11-01

    Non-linear parametric resonances occur frequently in nature. Here we summarize how they can be studied by means of perturbative methods. We show in particular how resonances can affect the motion of a test particle orbiting in the vicinity of a compact object. These mathematical toy-models find application in explaining the structure of the observed kHz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations: we show which aspects of the reality naturally enter in the theory, and which one still remain a puzzle.

  3. Baryon Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Oset, E; Sun, Bao Xi; Vacas, M J Vicente; Ramos, A; Gonzalez, P; Vijande, J; Torres, A Martinez; Khemchandani, K

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance, as well as the prediction of one $1/2^+$ baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the $\\gamma p \\to K^+ \\Lambda$ reaction.

  4. Baryon Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Sarkar, S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sun Baoxi [Institute of Theoretical Physics, College of Applied Sciences, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Ramos, A. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia and Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gonzalez, P. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Vijande, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Martinez Torres, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptdo. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Khemchandani, K. [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-04-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the {lambda}(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2{sup +} baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}{lambda} reaction.

  5. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    tailored channeling of sensory stimulus aligned as ‘art-making’ and ‘game playing’ core experiences. Thus, affecting brain plasticity and human motoric-performance via the adaptability (plasticity) of digital medias result in closure of the human afferent-efferent neural feedback loop closure through...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  6. Phase Matching of Diverse Modes in a WGM Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan; Matsko, Andrey; Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2008-01-01

    Phase matching of diverse electromagnetic modes (specifically, coexisting optical and microwave modes) in a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator has been predicted theoretically and verified experimentally. Such phase matching is necessary for storage of microwave/terahertz and optical electromagnetic energy in the same resonator, as needed for exploitation of nonlinear optical phenomena. WGM resonators are used in research on nonlinear optical phenomena at low optical intensities and as a basis for design and fabrication of novel optical devices. Examples of nonlinear optical phenomena recently demonstrated in WGM resonators include low-threshold Raman lasing, optomechanical oscillations, frequency doubling, and hyperparametric oscillations. The present findings regarding phase matching were made in research on low-threshold, strongly nondegenerate parametric oscillations in lithium niobate WGM resonators. The principle of operation of such an oscillator is rooted in two previously observed phenomena: (1) stimulated Raman scattering by polaritons in lithium niobate and (2) phase matching of nonlinear optical processes via geometrical confinement of light. The oscillator is partly similar to terahertz oscillators based on lithium niobate crystals, the key difference being that a novel geometrical configuration of this oscillator supports oscillation in the regime. The high resonance quality factors (Q values) typical of WGM resonators make it possible to achieve oscillation at a threshold signal level much lower than that in a non-WGM-resonator lithium niobate crystal.

  7. Time- and space-modulated Raman signals in graphene-based optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reserbat-Plantey, Antoine; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Reita, Valérie; Marty, Laëtitia; Arcizet, Olivier; Ruben, Mario; Bendiab, Nedjma; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    We present fabrication and optical characterization of micro-cavities made of multilayer graphene (MLG) cantilevers clamped by metallic electrodes and suspended over Si/SiO2 substrates. Graphene cantilevers act as semi-transparent mirrors closing air wedge optical cavities. This simple geometry implements a standing-wave optical resonator along with a mechanical one. Equal thickness interference fringes are observed in both Raman and Rayleigh backscattered signals, with interfringe given by their specific wavelength. Chromatic dispersion within the cavity makes possible the spatial modulation of graphene Raman lines and selective rejection of the silicon background signal. Electrostatic actuation of the multilayer graphene cantilever by a gate voltage tunes the cavity length and induces space and time modulation of the backscattered light, including the Raman lines. We demonstrate the potential of these systems for high-sensitivity Raman measurements of generic molecular species grafted on a multilayer graphene surface. The Raman signal of the molecular layer can be modulated both in time and space in a similar fashion and shows enhancement with respect to a collapsed membrane.

  8. Single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy via fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Park, Joo Hyun; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Bragg grating is used in a variety of applications. In this study, we suggest compact, cost-effective coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopy which is based on the pulse shaping methods via commercialized fiber Bragg grating. The experiment is performed incorporating a commercialized femtosecond pulse laser system (MICRA, Coherent) with a 100 mm length of 780-HP fiber which is inscribed 50 mm of Bragg grating. The pump laser for coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy has a bandwidth of 90 nm and central wavelength of 815 nm with a notch shaped at 785 nm. The positive chirped pulse is compensated by chirped mirror set. We compensate almost 14000 fs2 of positive group delay dispersion for the transform-limited pulse at the sample position. The pulse duration was 15 fs with average power of 50 mW, and showed an adequate notch shape. Finally, coherent anti-Stokes Raman signals are observed using a spectrometer (Jobin Yvon Triax320 and TE-cooled Andor Newton EMCCD). We obtained coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal of acetone sample which have Raman peak at the spectral finger-print region. In conclusion, the proposed method is more simple and cost-effective than the methods of previous research which use grating pairs and resonant photonic crystal slab. Furthermore, the proposed method can be used as endoscope application.

  9. Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-09-06

    We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

  10. Raman scattering determination of strain in CdTe/ZnTe superlattices

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, M K; Miles, R. H.; McGill, T. C.; Faurie, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The strain configuration in CdTe/ZnTe strained-layer superlattices has been measured by Raman scattering near resonance. The ZnTe-like longitudinal optical phonon energy in the superlattice is significantly shifted from the bulk value to lower energies and the shift increases with increasing superlattice CdTe fraction. The observed shifts agree with calculations of strain shifts based on a free-standing strain distribution.

  11. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  12. Raman spectra of human dentin mineral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuda, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    1996-01-01

    Human dentin mineral has been investigated by using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Fluorescence and thermal problems were largely avoided by preparing dentin samples by grinding and ultrasonic agitation in acetone. The Raman spectral features were consistent with those of impure hydroxyapatite containing

  13. Axillary lymph node analysis using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jenny; Christie-Brown, Jonathan; Sammon, Alastair; Stone, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is an optical diagnostic technique applied in this study to classify axillary lymph nodes from breast cancer patients as positive or negative for metastases. The mapping technique in this study is 81% sensitive and 97% specific for the correct classification of positive lymph nodes. Raman spectral images of lymph node sections are constructed to facilitate interpretation of tissue features.

  14. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  15. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  16. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  17. RAMAN-SPECTRA OF HUMAN DENTAL CALCULUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSUDA, H; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    Raman spectra of human dental calculus have been observed for the first time by use of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral features of calculus were influenced easily by heating caused by laser irradiation. Therefore, the measurements were carried out at relatively low power (5 mW, 1-mu m spot si

  18. Raman scattering in orthorhombic CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhagan, V.M.; Valakh, M.Ya. [Institute of Semiconductors Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Litvinchuk, A.P. [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Kruszynska, M.; Kolny-Olesiak, J. [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg (Germany); Himcinschi, C. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Zahn, D.R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    We report the results of non-resonant and resonant Raman scattering in orthorhombic nanocrystalline CuInS{sub 2} semiconductor, supported by density functional first principle lattice dynamics calculations. A larger number of dominant phonon modes in comparison with standard tetragonal CuInS{sub 2} phases is shown to be associated with peculiarities of cation sublattice ordering and is the ''fingerprint'' of the corresponding structural polymorph. Good overall agreement is found between theoretical and experimental phonon mode frequencies. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Population transfer of a NaH molecule via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Jing-Bo; Zhan, Wei-Shen; Wang, Shuo; Dang, Hai-Ping; Han, Xiao

    2016-09-01

    The population transfer of a NaH molecule from the ground state {{X}1}{Σ+} to the target state {{A}1}{Σ+} via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is investigated. The results show that the intensity, delay time and detuning have a significant effect on population transfer. A large population transfer is observed with increased pump and Stokes intensity, especially when the pump and Stokes intensity match. Population transfer also depends on the delay time between the pump laser pulse and the Stokes laser pulse. The detuning of the two pulses influences the population transfer. Efficient population transfer can be realized under the resonant or two-photon resonant condition.

  20. Strongly enhanced Raman scattering of graphene by a single gold nanorod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Cheng, Yuqing [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lu, Guowei, E-mail: guowei.lu@pku.edu.cn; Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-08-03

    Individual gold nanorods (AuNRs) and monolayer graphene hybrid system is investigated experimentally. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the graphene is observed due to a single AuNR with enhancement factor up to ∼1000-fold. The SERS intensity is strongly polarization dependent and the enhancement effect varies with the detuning between the excitation laser and the AuNR resonance. The SERS effect is highest when the resonant wavelength of the AuNRs matches well with the excitation light. By correlating the scattering and photoluminescence, it is demonstrated that the conventional background in SERS ascribes to the photon emission of metallic nanostructures.

  1. Measurement of Wigner function via atomic beam deflection in Raman- Nath regime

    CERN Document Server

    Khosa, A H; Khosa, Ashfaq Hussain

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method for the reconstruction of photon statistics and hence the Wigner function of a quantized cavity field. The method is based on the measurement of momentum distribution of two level atoms after atom- field interaction in Raman-Nath regime. We reconstruct the photon statistics of the cavity field both the cases of resonant and off- resonant atom field interaction.. For the measurement of Wigner function we propose to displace the photon statistics of the cavity field. We successfully reconstruct the Wigner function of the Schrodinger-cat state in a straightforward manner by employing the proposed method without much mathematical manipulation of the experimental data.

  2. Rashba realization: Raman with RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L; Spielman, I B

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically explore a Rashba spin–orbit coupling scheme which operates entirely in the absolute ground state manifold of an alkali atom, thereby minimizing all inelastic processes. An energy gap between ground eigenstates of the proposed coupling can be continuously opened or closed by modifying laser polarizations. Our technique uses far-detuned ‘Raman’ laser coupling to create the Rashba potential, which has the benefit of low spontaneous emission rates. At these detunings, the Raman matrix elements that link mF magnetic sublevel quantum numbers separated by two are also suppressed. These matrix elements are necessary to produce the Rashba Hamiltonian within a single total angular momentum f manifold. However, the far-detuned Raman couplings can link the three XYZ states familiar to quantum chemistry, which possess the necessary connectivity to realize the Rashba potential. We show that these XYZ states are essentially the hyperfine spin eigenstates of 87Rb dressed by a strong radio-frequency magnetic field. PMID:27524933

  3. Rashba realization: Raman with RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L; Spielman, I B

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically explore a Rashba spin–orbit coupling scheme which operates entirely in the absolute ground state manifold of an alkali atom, thereby minimizing all inelastic processes. An energy gap between ground eigenstates of the proposed coupling can be continuously opened or closed by modifying laser polarizations. Our technique uses far-detuned ‘Raman’ laser coupling to create the Rashba potential, which has the benefit of low spontaneous emission rates. At these detunings, the Raman matrix elements that link mF magnetic sublevel quantum numbers separated by two are also suppressed. These matrix elements are necessary to produce the Rashba Hamiltonian within a single total angular momentum f manifold. However, the far-detuned Raman couplings can link the three XYZ states familiar to quantum chemistry, which possess the necessary connectivity to realize the Rashba potential. We show that these XYZ states are essentially the hyperfine spin eigenstates of 87Rb dressed by a strong radio-frequency magnetic field.

  4. Raman barometry of diamond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izraeli, E. S.; Harris, J. W.; Navon, O.

    1999-11-01

    Pressures and temperatures of the diamond source region are commonly estimated using chemical equilibria between coexisting mineral inclusions. Here we present another type of geobarometer, based on determination of the internal pressure in olivine inclusions and the stresses in the surrounding diamond. Using Raman spectroscopy, pressures of 0.13 to 0.65 GPa were measured inside olivine inclusions in three diamonds from the Udachnaya mine in Siberia. Stresses in the diamond surrounding the inclusions indicated similar pressures (0.11-0.41 GPa). Nitrogen concentration and aggregation state in two of the diamonds yielded mantle residence temperatures of ˜1200°C. Using this temperature and the bulk moduli and thermal expansion of olivine and diamond, we calculated source pressures of 4.4-5.2 GPa. We also derived a linear approximation for the general dependence of the source pressure ( P0, GPa) on source temperature ( T0, °C) and the measured internal pressure in the inclusion ( Pi): P0=(3.259×10 -4Pi+3.285×10 -3) T0+0.9246 Pi+0.319. Raman barometry may be applied to other inclusions in diamonds or other inclusion-host systems. If combined with IR determination of the mantle residence temperature of the diamond, it allows estimation of the pressure at the source based on a non-destructive examination of a single diamond containing a single inclusion.

  5. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  6. Active resonance tuning of stretchable plasmonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    Active resonance tuning is highly desired for the applications of plasmonic structures, such as optical switches and surface enhanced Raman substrates. In this paper, we demonstrate the active tunable plasmonic structures, which composed of monolayer arrays of metallic semishells with dielectric...... cores on stretchable elastic substrates. These composite structures support Bragg-type surface plasmon resonances whose frequencies are sensitive to the arrangement of the metallic semishells. Under uniaxial stretching, the lattice symmetry of these plasmonic structures can be reconfigured from...... hexagonal to monoclinic lattice, leading to not only large but also polarization-dependent shifts of the resonance frequency. The experimental results are supported by the numerical simulations. Our structures fabricated using simple and inexpensive self-assembly and lift-transfer techniques can open up...

  7. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of β-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than β- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  8. Raman spectroscopy of ZnS quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trajić, J., E-mail: jelena@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kostić, R.; Romčević, N.; Romčević, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Mitrić, M. [Institute Vinča, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Lazović, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Balaž, P. [Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 043 53 Košice (Slovakia); Stojanović, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized mechanochemically by high-energy milling. • Optical properties were investigated applying Raman spectroscopy. • Continuum medium model of optical phonon confinement in ZnS QD. • Second-order Raman modes in ZnS QDs. - Abstract: ZnS nanoparticles were synthesized mechanochemically by high-energy milling. In order to investigate influence off milling time to sample properties, samples were produced in three different milling times (5 min, 10 min and 20 min). The morphology of samples has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigation of synthesized nanocrystals identified cubic structure. From XRD, ZnS size of crystallites was estimated as 1.9 nm (after 5 min milling time), 2.3 nm (10 min) and 2.4 nm (20 min), implying that we are in strong confinement regime. The optical properties were studied by Raman spectroscopy, in spectral region 100–500 cm{sup −1}, excitation source was 514.5 nm (E{sub L} = 2.41 eV), which means that we are in off resonant regime. Dominant spectral structures, of comparable intensity, are registered in spectral region 130–180 cm{sup −1}, around 265 cm{sup −1} and around 345 cm{sup −1}. First two are assigned as second-order ZnS modes. A theoretical model of continuum medium was used to calculate frequencies of the confined optical phonons in ZnS. Satisfactory agreement with experimental results was found and mode at 345 cm{sup −1} is assigned as LO type phonon confined in ZnS nanocrystal.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Based on Polymer Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Sheng Zheng; Yong-Hua Lu; Zhi-Guo Xie; Jun Tao; Kai-Qun Lin; Hai Ming

    2008-01-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for directly sensing in biological studies, chemical detection and environmental pollution monitoring. In this paper, we present polymer optical fiber application in SPR sensors, including wavelength interrogation surface enhanced Raman scattering SPR sensor and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe.Long-period fiber gratings are fabricated on single mode polymer optical fiber (POF) with 120 μm period and 50% duty cycle. The polarization characteristic of this kind of birefringent grating is studied. Theoretical analysis shows it will be advantageous in SPR sensing applications.

  10. Wide-field Raman imaging for bone detection in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papour, Asael; Kwak, Jin Hee; Taylor, Zach; Wu, Benjamin; Stafsudd, Oscar; Grundfest, Warren

    2015-10-01

    Inappropriate bone growth in soft tissue can occur after trauma to a limb and can cause a disruption to the healing process. This is known as Heterotopic Ossification (HO) in which regions in the tissue start to mineralize and form microscopic bone-like structures. These structures continue to calcify and develop into large, non-functional bony masses that cause pain, limit limb movement, and expose the tissue to reoccurring infections; in the case of open wounds this can lead to amputation as a result of a failed wound. Both Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and X-ray imaging have poor sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HO, thus delaying therapy and leading to poor patient outcomes. We present a low-power, fast (1 frame per second) optical Raman imaging system with a large field of view (1 cm(2)) that can differentiate bone tissue from soft tissue without spectroscopy, this in contrast to conventional Raman microscopy systems. This capability may allow for the development of instrumentation which permits bedside diagnosis of HO. PMID:26504639

  11. Influence of the ordered structure of short-chain polymer molecule all-trans-β-carotene on Raman scattering cross section in liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Guan-Nan; OuYang Shun-Li; Wang Wei-Wei; Li Zuo-Wei; Sun Cheng-Lin; Men Zhi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We measured the resonant Raman spectra of all-trans-β-carotene in solvents with different densities and concentrations at different temperatures. The results demonstrated that the Raman scattering cross section (RSCS) of short-chain polymer all-trans-β-carotene is extremely high in liquid. Resonance and strong coherent weakly damped CC bond vibrating properties play important roles under these conditions. Coherent weakly damped CC bond vibration strength is associated with molecular ordered structure. All-trans-β-carotene has highly ordered structure and strong coherent weakly damped CC bond vibrating properties, which lead to large RSCS in the solvent with large density and low concentration at low temperature.

  12. Raman spectroscopy of 'Bisphenol A'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ramzan; Zheng, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectra (95 - 3000 cm-1) of 'Bisphenol A' are presented. Absorption peaks have been assigned by Density Functional Theory (DFT) with B3LYP 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) and wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd). B3LYP 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) gives frequencies which are nearer to experimental frequencies than wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) which involves empirical dispersion. Scale factor for wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) is found out to be 0.95008 by least squares fit.

  13. Raman investigation of tannin foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Tannin-based organic foams are new foam materials which are environmentally friendly, resistant to re and inexpensive, and intended to be used for building insulation, and also as water absorber or shock absorber. These foams can be produced via an acid catalyzed polycondensation reaction between condensed flavonoids and furfuryl alcohol. Several studies deal with the mechanism involved in this process, but some ambiguities still persist. Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique suitable for the non-destructive chemical investigation of polymers, allowing to determine the presence of functional groups within a polymer through the interaction of laser light with the vibrational modes of the molecules setting up the sample under investigation. By this spectroscopic technique we have characterized the tannin-based foams and compared their spectral signature with that of tannins, and of polymerized furfuryl alcohol. Similarities and differences to the spectral features of carbonaceous material are discussed. (author)

  14. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  15. Light source for narrow and broadband coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Maximilian; Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    We present a light source that is well adapted to both narrow- and broadband coherent Raman scattering (CRS) methods. Based on a single oscillator, the light source delivers synchronized broadband pulses via supercontinuum generation and narrowband, frequency-tunable pulses via four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber. Seeding the four-wave mixing with a spectrally filtered part of the supercontinuum yields high-pulse energies up to 8 nJ and the possibility of scanning a bandwidth of 2000  cm(-1) in 25 ms. All pulses are emitted with a repetition frequency of 1 MHz, which ensures efficient generation of CRS signals while avoiding significant damage of the samples. Consequently, the light source combines the performance of individual narrow- and broadband CRS light sources in one setup, thus enabling hyperspectral imaging and rapid single-resonance imaging in parallel. PMID:26625022

  16. Finite-duration Seeding Effects in Powerful Backward Raman Amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.A. Yampolsky; V.M. Malkin; N.J. Fisch

    2003-07-14

    In the process of backward Raman amplification (BRA), the leading layers of the seed laser pulse can shadow the rear layers, thus weakening the effective seeding power and affecting parameters of output pulses in BRA. We study this effect numerically and also analytically by approximating the pumped pulse by the ''*-pulse'' manifold of self-similar solutions. We determine how the pumped pulse projection moves within the *-pulse manifold, and describe quantitatively the effective seeding power evolution. Our results extend the quantitative theory of BRA to regimes where the effective seeding power varies substantially during the amplification. These results might be of broader interest, since the basic equations, are general equations for resonant 3-wave interactions.

  17. Efficient Raman Sideband Generation in a Coherent Atomic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Huss, A F; Lammegger, R; Korsunsky, E A; Windholz, L

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficient generation of Raman sidebands in a medium coherently prepared in a dark state by continuous-wave low-intensity laser radiation. Our experiment is performed in sodium vapor excited in $\\Lambda $ configuration on the D$_{1}$ line by two laser fields of resonant frequencies $\\omega_{1}$ and $\\omega_{2}$, and probed by a third field $% \\omega_{3}$. First-order sidebands for frequencies $\\omega_{1}$, $\\omega_{2}$ and up to the third-order sidebands for frequency $\\omega_{3}$ are observed. The generation starts at a power as low as 10 microwatt for each input field. Dependencies of the intensities of both input and generated waves on the frequency difference ($\\omega_{1}-\\omega_{2}$), on the frequency $\\omega_{3}$ and on the optical density are investigated.

  18. Reduced Modeling of Electron Trapping Nonlinearity in Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Berger, R. L.; Rose, H. A.; Langdon, A. B.; Williams, E. A.

    2009-11-01

    The trapping of resonant electrons in Langmuir waves generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) gives rise to several nonlinear effects, which can either increase or decrease the reflectivity. We have implemented a reduced model of these nonlinearities in the paraxial propagation code pF3D [R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998)], consisting of a Landau damping reduction and Langmuir-wave frequency downshift. Both effects depend on the local wave amplitude, and gradually turn on with amplitude. This model is compared with 1D seeded Vlasov simulations, that include a Krook relaxation operator to mimic, e.g., transverse sideloss out of a multi-D, finite laser speckle. SRS in these runs develops from a counter-propagating seed light wave. Applications to ICF experiments will also be presented.

  19. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  20. Raman scattering from superhard rhenium diboride under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattice vibrational properties of superhard rhenium diboride (ReB2) were examined up to 8 GPa in a diamond anvil cell using Raman spectroscopy techniques. Linear pressure coefficients and mode Grüneisen parameters are obtained. Good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical calculated Grüneisen parameters. Examination of the calculated mode Grüneisen parameters reveals that both B-B and Re-B covalent bonds play a dominant role in supporting the applied load under pressure. A comparison of vibrations parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis indicates that bonds along the c-axis tend to take greater loads. Our results agree with observations of elastic lattice anisotropy obtained from both in situ X-ray diffraction measurements and ultrasonic resonance spectra

  1. Possibility of VOx/SiO2 Complexes Speciation: Comparative Multi-wavelength Raman and DR UV-vis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulánek, Roman; Čičmanec, Pavel; Setnička, Michal

    Raman spectroscopy is one of the very often used spectroscopic methods for characterization of vanadium surface species. However, Raman spectra of VOx-silica systems are more complex and interpretation is more difficult in comparison with other supports (like Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2 or Nb2O5) because there is strong vibrational coupling between the vanadia species and the silica support. Therefore, assignment and interpretation of some vibrational bands is still subject of controversy. This fact results in incongruity of suggested molecular structure and population of individual vanadium surface complexes. In this contribution, we present systematic comparative study of diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra and Raman spectra excited by 325 and 514.5 nm lasers obtained on set of dehydrated vanadium modifed hexagonal mesoporous silica (VOx-HMS) samples with vanadium loading from 2 up to 12 wt. %. We prove that changes in population of oligomeric and monomeric VOx species in individual samples are not manifested by significant changes in the character of Raman signals. On the other hand it is evident that with increasing of vanadium loadings the UV-vis spectra show systematic changes. Raman spectroscopy is useful characterization technique for detection presence of very small amount of V2O5 microcrystallites, especially if suitable wavelength of laser is used for remarkable resonant enhancement of Raman intensity of its bands (e.g. 514.5 nm).

  2. Dependence of Raman and absorption spectra of stacked bilayer MoS2 on the stacking orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seki; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Min Su; Han, Gang Hee; Kim, Jeongyong

    2016-09-19

    Stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) exhibits interesting physical properties depending on the stacking orientation and interlayer coupling strength. Although optical properties, such as photoluminescence, Raman, and absorption properties, are largely dependent on the interlayer coupling of stacked bilayer MoS2, the origin of variations in these properties is not clearly understood. We performed comprehensive confocal Raman and absorption mapping measurements to determine the dependence of these spectra on the stacking orientation of bilayer MoS2. The results indicated that with 532-nm laser excitation, the Raman scattering intensity gradually increased upon increasing the stacking angle from 0° to 60°, whereas 458-nm laser excitation resulted in the opposite trend of decreasing Raman intensity with increasing stacking angle. This opposite behavior of the Raman intensity dependence was explained by the varying resonance condition between the Raman excitation wavelength and C exciton absorption energy of bilayer MoS2. Our work sheds light on the intriguing effect of the subtle interlayer interaction in stacked MoS2 bilayers on the resulting optical properties.

  3. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Greenman, Loren; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    We combine multi-channel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier envelope phase. Our results open a route to creating core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent the first step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  4. Analysis of lipsticks using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, P; Bertino, M F; Weimer, R; Hazelrigg, E

    2013-10-10

    In this study, 80 lipsticks were obtained and evaluated using Raman spectroscopy at excitation wavelengths of 532 and 780 nm. Fluorescence severely limited analysis with the 532 nm line while the 780 nm line proved useful for all samples analyzed. It was possible to differentiate 95% of the lipsticks evaluated based on one or more Raman peaks. However, there were no peak trends observed that could be used to identify a manufacturer or categorize a sample. In situ analysis of lipstick smears was found to be possible even from several Raman active substrates, but was occasionally limited by background fluorescence and in extreme cases, photodegradation. PMID:24053867

  5. Differentiation of Lipsticks by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Salahioglu, Fatma; Went, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersive Raman spectra have been obtained using a Raman microscope and an excitation wavelength of 632.8 nm from 69 lipsticks of various colours and from a range of manufacturers without any pre-treatment of the samples. 10% of the samples were too fluorescent to give Raman spectra. 22% of the samples gave spectra which were unique to the brand and colour within the collected sample set. The remaining 68% of the samples gave spectra which could be classified into seven distinct groups. Dis...

  6. Raman spectroscopy as a tool for reagent free estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2014-01-01

    We present results of Raman spectroscopic studies of urine to determine the suitability of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for quantitative estimation of urinary urea. The Raman spectra were acquired from the urine samples with an inbuilt Raman spectroscopy setup that employs a 785-nm diode laser as the Raman excitation source. A multivariate algorithm based on partial least square (PLS) regression was developed to predict the concentration of urea depending on the measured sets of Raman spectra and the reference urea concentration. The computed results shows that Raman spectroscopy in amalgamation with PLS-based multivariate chemometric algorithm can detect urea in urine samples with an accuracy of >90 %.

  7. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the thrombin-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Chin; Vasudev, Milana; Dutta, Mitra; Stroscio, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is used to study the Raman spectra and peak shifts the thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) on substrates having two different geometries; one with a single stranded sequence and one with double stranded sequence. The Raman signals of the deoxyribonucleic acids on both substrates are enhanced and specific peaks of bases are identified. These results are highly reproducible and have promising applications in low cost nucleic acid detection.

  8. Hyperspectral Imaging with Stimulated Raman Scattering by Chirped Femtosecond Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Fu, Dan; Freudiger, Christian Wilhelm; Zhang, Xu; Holtom, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Raman microscopy is a quantitative, label-free, and noninvasive optical imaging technique for studying inhomogeneous systems. However, the feebleness of Raman scattering significantly limits the use of Raman microscopy to low time resolutions and primarily static samples. Recent developments in narrowband stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy have significantly increased the acquisition speed of Raman based label-free imaging by a few orders of magnitude, at the expense of reduced spec...

  9. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...

  10. Random number generation from spontaneous Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, M. J.; Clark, A. S.; Xiong, C.; Mägi, E.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the generation of random numbers via the quantum process of spontaneous Raman scattering. Spontaneous Raman photons are produced by illuminating a highly nonlinear chalcogenide glass ( As 2 S 3 ) fiber with a CW laser at a power well below the stimulated Raman threshold. Single Raman photons are collected and separated into two discrete wavelength detuning bins of equal scattering probability. The sequence of photon detection clicks is converted into a random bit stream. Postprocessing is applied to remove detector bias, resulting in a final bit rate of ˜650 kb/s. The collected random bit-sequences pass the NIST statistical test suite for one hundred 1 Mb samples, with the significance level set to α = 0.01 . The fiber is stable, robust and the high nonlinearity (compared to silica) allows for a short fiber length and low pump power favourable for real world application.

  11. Design of an 1800 nm Raman Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    Different approaches are being explored to increase the capacity of communication systems [1,2], both long and short range systems. One approach is by exploiting new optical wavelength bands, outside the conventional communication window from 1530 nm to 1625 nm. Hollow core fibers have been...... in the pump power requirement and deteriorated noise properties. Here we demonstrate a Raman amplifier designed for signal wavelengths around 1800 nm. The amplification fiber is an OFS PM Raman fiber, and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser emitting at 1680 nm [4]. The amplifier was pumped co......-polarized and backward, with respect to the singal. In Fig. 2 a measured Raman on/off gain exceeding 9 dB for 285 mW of injected pump power is obtained in a 4.35 km long fiber. A broadband supercontinuum source was used as a signal from 1700 nm to 1900 nm....

  12. Mobile Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Jehlička, Jan

    2014-12-13

    Raman spectroscopy has proved to be a very useful technique in astrobiology research. Especially, working with mobile instrumentation during fieldwork can provide useful experiences in this field. In this work, we provide an overview of some important aspects of this research and, apart from defining different types of mobile Raman spectrometers, we highlight different reasons for this research. These include gathering experience and testing of mobile instruments, the selection of target molecules and to develop optimal data processing techniques for the identification of the spectra. We also identify the analytical techniques that it would be most appropriate to combine with Raman spectroscopy to maximize the obtained information and the synergy that exists with Raman spectroscopy research in other research areas, such as archaeometry and forensics.

  13. Single-pulse stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Frostig, Hadas; Natan, Adi; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the acquisition of stimulated Raman scattering spectra with the use of a single femtosecond pulse. High resolution vibrational spectra are obtained by shifting the phase of a narrow band of frequencies in the broadband input pulse spectrum, using spectral shaping. The vibrational spectrum is resolved by examining the amplitude features formed in the spectrum after interaction with the sample. Using this technique, low frequency Raman lines (<100cm^-1) are resolved in a straightforward manner.

  14. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  15. Control system of the Raman spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Kostka, F. (František); Žďánský, K. (Karel); J. Zavadil; Starý, R. (Robert)

    2010-01-01

    Universal apparatus for measuring Raman spectrography (RS) on surface of solid state samples was designed and realized. It enables to obtain Raman spectrum from the measured semiconductor sample excited by powerful Ar-ion or HeNe lasers, alternatively. The PC controlled equipment consists of a composite optical setup, lasers, optical monochromator, very sensitive CCD camera, micromanipulators, and electric circuits serving to extract relevant signal from the noisy background

  16. Raman assisted lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level.......We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level....

  17. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  18. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Zauner, Dan;

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report low resolution surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) conducted with a chip based spectrometer. The flat field spectrometer presented here is fabricated in SU-8 on silicon, showing a resolution of around 3 nm and a free spectral range of around 100 nm. The output facet...... fiber. The obtained spectra show that chip based spectrometer together with the SERS active surface can be used as Raman sensor....

  19. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Ota Samek; Katarina Mlynariková; Silvie Bernatová; Jan Ježek; Vladislav Krzyžánek; Martin Šiler; Pavel Zemánek; Filip Růžička; Veronika Holá; Martina Mahelová

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to...

  20. Confocal Raman microscopy of frozen bread dough

    OpenAIRE

    Huen, Julien; Weikusat, Christian; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Weikusat, Ilka; Ringer, Linda; Lösche, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The use of freezing technology is well established in industrial and craft bakeries and is still gaining importance. In order to optimize recipes and processes of frozen baked goods, it is essential to be able to investigate the products' microstructure. Especially ice crystals and their interaction with the other components of the frozen products are of interest. In this study, frozen wheat bread dough was investigated by confocal Raman microscopy. The Raman spectra measured within the dough...

  1. Optical nanoantennas for multiband surface-enhanced infrared and raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    D'Andrea, Cristiano

    2013-04-23

    In this article we show that linear nanoantennas can be used as shared substrates for surface-enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy (SERS and SEIRS, respectively). This is done by engineering the plasmonic properties of the nanoantennas, so to make them resonant in both the visible (transversal resonance) and the infrared (longitudinal resonance), and by rotating the excitation field polarization to selectively take advantage of each resonance and achieve SERS and SEIRS on the same nanoantennas. As a proof of concept, we have fabricated gold nanoantennas by electron beam lithography on calcium difluoride (1-2 μm long, 60 nm wide, 60 nm high) that exhibit a transverse plasmonic resonance in the visible (640 nm) and a particularly strong longitudinal dipolar resonance in the infrared (tunable in the 1280-3100 cm -1 energy range as a function of the length). SERS and SEIRS detection of methylene blue molecules adsorbed on the nanoantenna\\'s surface is accomplished, with signal enhancement factors of 5 × 102 for SERS (electromagnetic enhancement) and up to 105 for SEIRS. Notably, we find that the field enhancement provided by the transverse resonance is sufficient to achieve SERS from single nanoantennas. Furthermore, we show that by properly tuning the nanoantenna length the signals of a multitude of vibrational modes can be enhanced with SEIRS. This simple concept of plasmonic nanosensor is highly suitable for integration on lab-on-a-chip schemes for label-free chemical and biomolecular identification with optimized performances. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  2. Visualizing cell state transition using Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ichimura

    Full Text Available System level understanding of the cell requires detailed description of the cell state, which is often characterized by the expression levels of proteins. However, understanding the cell state requires comprehensive information of the cell, which is usually obtained from a large number of cells and their disruption. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy, which can report changes in the cell state without introducing any label, as a non-invasive method with single cell capability. Significant differences in Raman spectra were observed at the levels of both the cytosol and nucleus in different cell-lines from mouse, indicating that Raman spectra reflect differences in the cell state. Difference in cell state was observed before and after the induction of differentiation in neuroblastoma and adipocytes, showing that Raman spectra can detect subtle changes in the cell state. Cell state transitions during embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation were visualized when Raman spectroscopy was coupled with principal component analysis (PCA, which showed gradual transition in the cell states during differentiation. Detailed analysis showed that the diversity between cells are large in undifferentiated ESC and in mesenchymal stem cells compared with terminally differentiated cells, implying that the cell state in stem cells stochastically fluctuates during the self-renewal process. The present study strongly indicates that Raman spectral morphology, in combination with PCA, can be used to establish cells' fingerprints, which can be useful for distinguishing and identifying different cellular states.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Surface Enhanced Raman Mechanism of Pristine and Chemically Doped Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Simin; Dos Santos, Maria C.; Lu, Ruitao; Elias, Ana L.; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-03-01

    It is demonstrated that graphene could be used as an efficient surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate. Recently, our group has also shown that chemically doped graphene can improve the SERS signal of pristine graphene. Here we present an experimental and theoretical study on the SERS mechanism for both pristine (PG) and Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG). Large-area and highly-crystalline monolayer PG and NG sheets have been synthesized. Common molecules, such as Rhodamine B, Crystal Violet, Methylene Blue and Melamine were used as Raman probes using different laser excitation energies. It was observed that for each molecule, specific laser energy exhibits large intensity Raman signals when compared to others. More importantly, some signals can be detected even for concentrations as low as 10-8 M, which provides excellent molecular sensing properties. Then the system was modeled using DFT-B3LYP/6-31(d,p) and the Mulliken population analysis was used to calculate the net charge on the adsorbed molecules. By comparing the cases of PG and NG, our preliminary results suggest that stronger Raman enhancement of NG would likely be coming from the resonance of EF of graphene and the LUMO level of the adsorbed molecules.

  4. Advances in Low-Frequency 3-color Broadband Coherent Raman Spectroscopy of Condensed Phase Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, Laszlo

    2016-05-01

    Low-frequency dispersive spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a very useful method to measure phonon frequencies in crystals or characterize collective vibrational motions of macromolecules. The coherent version of the method has not been fully explored yet. It is shown here that the 3-color Broadband Coherent Raman scattering can be a very powerful extension to not only gas phase but condensed phase low frequency (5-500 cm-1) vibrational measurements with large frequency separation between the narrowband and broadband radiation generating the signal. The spectral measurements presented here used volumetric Brag filters for the first time to record coherent Raman spectra. Specific spectral analysis using model independent methods to derive the vibrational information is also presented. The technic can be extended to measure electronic resonance enhanced spectra by tuning only the frequency of the narrowband laser close to the electronic transition frequencies. This makes the method suitable for coherent Raman microscopy. The polarization properties of the signal is also explained and experimentally verified. Financial support from the College of Sciences and Engineering of UWF is acknowledged.

  5. Polarization modulated background-free hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Marie-Andrée.; Andreana, Marco; Ridsdale, Andrew; Moffatt, Doug; Lausten, Rune; Légaré, François; Stolow, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy is a nonlinear microscopy technique based on Raman vibrational resonances determined by the frequency difference between Pump and Stokes laser pulses. Modulation of one laser beam transfers the modulation to the other, as either a gain in Stokes (SRG) or a loss in Pump power (SRL). SRS microscopy does not exhibit the four-wave mixing nonresonant background characteristic of CARS microscopy. However, other background signals due to two-photon absorption, thermal lensing or cross-phase modulation (XPM) do reduce the detection sensitivity and can distort the hyperspectral scans. Phase sensitive lock-in detection can reduce contributions from two-photon absorption, which is out-of-phase for the SRG case. However, the background signal due to XPM, which can be in-phase with SRS, can reduce the detection sensitivity. We present a novel polarization modulation (PM) scheme in SRS microscopy which greatly reduces the nonresonant XPM background, demonstrated here for the SRL case. Since many Raman vibrational transitions are parallel polarized, the SRS signal is maximum (minimum) when the polarizations of the pump and the Stokes beams are parallel (perpendicular). However, in both parallel and perpendicular Pump-Stokes geometries, XPM is non-zero in many media. Therefore, PM can remove the XPM background without significantly reducing the SRS signal. Our results show that the PM-SRS successfully removes the nonresonant signal due to XPM. High imaging contrast is observed, concomitant with high sensitivity at very low analyte concentrations and undistorted Raman spectra.

  6. Molecular cavity optomechanics as a theory of plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelli, Philippe; Galland, Christophe; Piro, Nicolas; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-02-01

    The exceptional enhancement of Raman scattering by localized plasmonic resonances in the near field of metallic nanoparticles, surfaces or tips (SERS, TERS) has enabled spectroscopic fingerprinting down to the single molecule level. The conventional explanation attributes the enhancement to the subwavelength confinement of the electromagnetic field near nanoantennas. Here, we introduce a new model that also accounts for the dynamical nature of the plasmon-molecule interaction. We thereby reveal an enhancement mechanism not considered before: dynamical backaction amplification of molecular vibrations. We first map the system onto the canonical Hamiltonian of cavity optomechanics, in which the molecular vibration and the plasmon are parametrically coupled. We express the vacuum optomechanical coupling rate for individual molecules in plasmonic 'hot-spots' in terms of the vibrational mode's Raman activity and find it to be orders of magnitude larger than for microfabricated optomechanical systems. Remarkably, the frequency of commonly studied molecular vibrations can be comparable to or larger than the plasmon's decay rate. Together, these considerations predict that an excitation laser blue-detuned from the plasmon resonance can parametrically amplify the molecular vibration, leading to a nonlinear enhancement of Raman emission that is not predicted by the conventional theory. Our optomechanical approach recovers known results, provides a quantitative framework for the calculation of cross-sections, and enables the design of novel systems that leverage dynamical backaction to achieve additional, mode-selective enhancements. It also provides a quantum mechanical framework to analyse plasmon-vibrational interactions in terms of molecular quantum optomechanics. PMID:26595330

  7. The disorder-induced Raman scattering in Au/MoS2 heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gołasa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Raman scattering has been studied in heterostructures composed of a thin MoS2 flake and a 1-1.5 nm layer of thermally evaporated gold (Au. There have been Au nanoislands detected in the heterostructure. It has been found that their surface density and the average size depend on the MoS2 thickness. The Raman scattering spectrum in the heterostructure with a few monolayer MoS2 only weakly depends on the excitation (resonant vs. non-resonant mode. The overall Raman spectrum corresponds to the total density of phonon states, which is characteristic for disordered systems. The disorder in the MoS2 layer is related to the mechanical strain induced in the MoS2 layer by the Au nanoislands. The strain results in the localization of phonon modes, which leads to the relaxation of the momentum conservation rule in the scattering process. The relaxation allows phonons from the whole MoS2 Brillouin zone to interact with electronic excitations. Our results show that the Au nanoislands resulted from thermal evaporation of a thin metal layer introduce substantial disorder into the crystalline structure of the thin MoS2 layers.

  8. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications.

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman nanodomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charles J; Xu Zhida; Wu, Hsin-Yu; Liu, Gang Logan; Cunningham, Brian T, E-mail: bcunning@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate consisting of a closely spaced metal nanodome array fabricated on flexible plastic film. We used a low-cost, large-area replica molding process to produce a two-dimensional periodic array of cylinders that is subsequently overcoated with SiO{sub 2} and silver thin films to form dome-shaped structures. Finite element modeling was used to investigate the electromagnetic field distribution of the nanodome array structure and the effect of the nanodome separation distance on the electromagnetic field enhancement. The SERS enhancement from the nanodome array substrates was experimentally verified using rhodamine 6G as the analyte. With a separation distance of 17 nm achieved between adjacent domes using a process that is precisely controlled during thin film deposition, a reproducible SERS enhancement factor of 1.37 x 10{sup 8} was demonstrated. The nanoreplica molding process presented in this work allows for simple, low-cost, high-throughput fabrication of uniform nanoscale SERS substrates over large surface areas without the requirement for high resolution lithography or defect-free deposition of spherical microparticle monolayer templates.

  10. Resonant Nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Gleiser, M; Gleiser, Marcelo; Howell, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the role played by fast quenching on the decay of metastable (or false vacuum) states. Instead of the exponentially-slow decay rate per unit volume, $\\Gamma_{\\rm HN} \\sim \\exp[-E_b/k_BT]$ ($E_b$ is the free energy of the critical bubble), predicted by Homogeneous Nucleation theory, we show that under fast enough quenching the decay rate is, in fact, a power law $\\Gamma_{\\rm RN} \\sim [E_b/k_BT]^{-B}$, where $B$ is weakly sensitive to the temperature. We argue that the fast quench generates large-amplitude fluctuations about the metastable state which promote its rapid decay via parametric resonance. Possible decay mechanisms and their dependence on $E_b$ are proposed and illustrated in a (2+1)-dimensional scalar field model with an asymmetric double-well potential.

  11. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.)

  12. Laser printing of resonant plasmonic nanovoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchmizhak, A; Vitrik, O; Kulchin, Yu; Storozhenko, D; Mayor, A; Mirochnik, A; Makarov, S; Milichko, V; Kudryashov, S; Zhakhovsky, V; Inogamov, N

    2016-06-16

    Hollow reduced-symmetry resonant plasmonic nanostructures possess pronounced tunable optical resonances in the UV-vis-IR range, being a promising platform for advanced nanophotonic devices. However, the present fabrication approaches require several consecutive technological steps to produce such nanostructures, making their large-scale fabrication rather time-consuming and expensive. Here, we report on direct single-step fabrication of large-scale arrays of hollow parabolic- and cone-shaped nanovoids in silver and gold thin films, using single-pulse femtosecond nanoablation at high repetition rates. The lateral and vertical size of such nanovoids was found to be laser energy-tunable. Resonant light scattering from individual nanovoids was observed in the visible spectral range, using dark-field confocal microspectroscopy, with the size-dependent resonant peak positions. These colored geometric resonances in far-field scattering were related to excitation and interference of transverse surface plasmon modes in nanovoid shells. Plasmon-mediated electromagnetic field enhancement near the nanovoids was evaluated via finite-difference time-domain calculations for their model shapes simulated by three-dimensional molecular dynamics, and experimentally verified by means of photoluminescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27273005

  13. Enhancement of Raman Scattering of 1,4-Benzenedithiol by CdS Nanoparticles Assembled on a Silver Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qun; ZHAO Hong; LI Xiao-wei; ZHENG Jun-wei

    2004-01-01

    CdS nanoparticles were assembled on the smooth surface of a piece of silver by using 1,4-benzenedithiol as coupling molecules. The SEM and resonance Raman spectroscopic characterizations demonstrate that the nanosized structure of CdS was still preserved upon assembly, and a two-dimensional structure of CdS nanoparticles was formed on the substrate surface. The FT-Raman spectra indicate that 1,4-benzenedithiol was coupled between CdS nanoparticles and the silver surface with a tilted orientation. The Raman scattering of 1,4-benzenedithiol was substantially enhanced by the assembled CdS nanoparticles, probably due to the alteration of the polarizability of 1,4-benzenedithiol and the electromagnetic interaction between the dipoles of the CdS particle with its image in the metal substrate.

  14. Raman parametric excitation effect upon the third harmonic generation by a metallic nanoparticle lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a theoretical study on third harmonic generation in the nonlinear propagation of an intense laser pulse through a periodic three-dimensional lattice of nanoparticles. Using a perturbative method, the nonlinear equations that describe the laser–nanoparticle interaction in the weakly relativistic regime are derived. Additionally, the nonlinear dispersion relation and the amplitude of the third harmonic are obtained. Finally, the effects of the nanoparticle radius and separation length, the distribution of the nanoparticle electron density, and the laser frequency upon the third harmonic efficiency are investigated. In addition to the expected resonance that occurs when the third harmonic resonates with the plasmon wave, another resonance appears when the nonlinear interaction of the fundamental mode with the third harmonic excites a longitudinal collective plasmon wave via the parametric Raman mechanism

  15. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  16. Raman amplification in plasma: thermal effects and damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J. P.; Ersfeld, B.; Raj, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2009-05-01

    The role of thermal effects on Raman amplification are investigated. The direct effects of damping on the process are found to be limited, leading only to a decrease from the peak output intensity predicted by cold plasma models. However, the shift in plasma resonance due to the Bohm-Gross shift can have a much larger influence, changing the required detuning between pump and probe and introducing an effective chirp through heating of the plasma by the pump pulse. This "thermal chirp" can both reduce the efficiency of the interaction and alter the evolution of the amplified probe, avoiding the increase in length observed in the linear regime without significant pump depletion. The influence of this chirp can be reduced by using a smaller ratio of laser frequency to plasma frequency, which simultaneously increases the growth rate of the probe and decreases the shift in plasma resonance. As such, thermal effects only serve to suppress the amplification of noise at low growth rates. The use of a chirped pump pulse can be used to suppress noise for higher growth rates, and has a smaller impact on the peak output intensity for seeded amplification. For the parameter ranges considered, Landau damping was found to be negligible, as Landau damping rates are typically small, and the low collisionality of the plasma causes the process to saturate quickly.

  17. Simultaneous Spectral Temporal Adaptive Raman Spectrometer - SSTARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a prime candidate for the next generation of planetary instruments, as it addresses the primary goal of mineralogical analysis, which is structure and composition. However, large fluorescence return from many mineral samples under visible light excitation can render Raman spectra unattainable. Using the described approach, Raman and fluorescence, which occur on different time scales, can be simultaneously obtained from mineral samples using a compact instrument in a planetary environment. This new approach is taken based on the use of time-resolved spectroscopy for removing the fluorescence background from Raman spectra in the laboratory. In the SSTARS instrument, a visible excitation source (a green, pulsed laser) is used to generate Raman and fluorescence signals in a mineral sample. A spectral notch filter eliminates the directly reflected beam. A grating then disperses the signal spectrally, and a streak camera provides temporal resolution. The output of the streak camera is imaged on the CCD (charge-coupled device), and the data are read out electronically. By adjusting the sweep speed of the streak camera, anywhere from picoseconds to milliseconds, it is possible to resolve Raman spectra from numerous fluorescence spectra in the same sample. The key features of SSTARS include a compact streak tube capable of picosecond time resolution for collection of simultaneous spectral and temporal information, adaptive streak tube electronics that can rapidly change from one sweep rate to another over ranges of picoseconds to milliseconds, enabling collection of both Raman and fluorescence signatures versus time and wavelength, and Synchroscan integration that allows for a compact, low-power laser without compromising ultimate sensitivity.

  18. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  19. Immunoassay utilizing biochemistry reaction product via surface-enhanced Raman scattering in near field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Haiying; NI Yi; JIANG Wei; LUO Peiqing; HUANG Meizheng; YIN Guangzhong; DOU Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    We propose here a kind of applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to immunology. It is a new enzyme immunoassay based on SERS. In the proposed system, antibody immobilized on a solid substrate reacts with antigen, which binds with another antibody labeled with peroxidase. If this immunocomplex is subjected to reaction with o-phenylenediamine and hydrogenperoxide, azoaniline is generated. This azo compound is adsorbed on a silver colloid and only the azo compound gives a strong surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) spectrum. A linear relationship was observed between the peak intensity of the N=N stretching band and the concentration of antigen, revealing that one can determine the concentration of antigen by the SERRS measurement of the reaction product. The detection limit of this SERS enzyme immunoassay method was found to be about 10-15 mol/L.

  20. A filter based analyzer for studies of X-ray Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Seidler, G T

    2001-01-01

    Non-resonant X-ray Raman scattering (XRS) with hard X-rays holds the potential for measuring local structure and local electronic properties around low-Z atoms in environments where traditional soft X-ray techniques are inapplicable. However, the small cross-section for XRS requires that experiments must simultaneously achieve high detection efficiency, large collection solid angles, and good energy resolution. We report here that a simple X-ray analyzer consisting of an absorber and a point-focusing spatial filter can be used to study some X-ray Raman near-edge features. This apparatus has greater than 10% detection efficiency, has an energy resolution of 8 eV, and can be readily extended to collection angles of more than 1 sr. We present preliminary measurements of the XRS from the nitrogen 1 s shell in pyrolitic boron nitride.

  1. Raman scattering and anomalous Stokes–anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Tong, Jiayue; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering are performed on atomic layers of hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor. The data reveal all six types of zone center optical phonons, along with their corresponding Davydov splittings, which have been challenging to see in other TMDCs. We discover that the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, and find the effect to be tunable by excitation frequency and number of atomic layers. These observations are interpreted as a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center in the photon-electron-phonon interaction process.

  2. Raman scattering and anomalous Stokes-anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Tong, Jiayue; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering are performed on atomic layers of hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor. The data reveal all six types of zone center optical phonons, along with their corresponding Davydov splittings, which have been challenging to see in other TMDCs. We discover that the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, and find the effect to be tunable by excitation frequency and number of atomic layers. These observations are interpreted as a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center in the photon-electron-phonon interaction process. PMID:27324297

  3. Vibrational dynamics (IR, Raman, NRVS) and a DFT study of a new antitumor tetranuclearstannoxane cluster, Sn(iv)-oxo-{di-o-vanillin} dimethyl dichloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, F; Sharma, S; Usman, M; Leu, B M; Hu, M Y; Toupet, L; Gosztola, D; Tabassum, S

    2016-07-21

    The vibrational dynamics of a newly synthesized tetrastannoxane was characterized with a combination of experimental (Raman, IR and tin-based nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) and computational (DFT/B3LYP) methods, with an emphasis on the vibrations of the tin sites. The cytotoxic activity revealed a significant regression selectively against the human pancreatic cell lines. PMID:27328161

  4. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  5. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  6. Raman Barcode for Counterfeit Drug Product Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Latevi S; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-05-01

    Potential infiltration of counterfeit drug products-containing the wrong or no active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-into the bona fide drug supply poses a significant threat to consumers worldwide. Raman spectroscopy offers a rapid, nondestructive avenue to screen a high throughput of samples. Traditional qualitative Raman identification is typically done with spectral correlation methods that compare the spectrum of a reference sample to an unknown. This is often effective for pure materials but is quite challenging when dealing with drug products that contain different formulations of active and inactive ingredients. Typically, reliable identification of drug products using common spectral correlation algorithms can only be made if the specific product under study is present in the library of reference spectra, thereby limiting the scope of products that can be screened. In this paper, we introduce the concept of the Raman barcode for identification of drug products by comparing the known peaks in the API reference spectrum to the peaks present in the finished drug product under study. This method requires the transformation of the Raman spectra of both API and finished drug products into a barcode representation by assigning zero intensity to every spectral frequency except the frequencies that correspond to Raman peaks. By comparing the percentage of nonzero overlap between the expected API barcode and finished drug product barcode, the identity of API present can be confirmed. In this study, 18 approved finished drug products and nine simulated counterfeits were successfully identified with 100% accuracy utilizing this method. PMID:27043140

  7. Raman microspectroscopic study of oral buccal mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Isha; Mamgain, Hitesh; Deshmukh, Atul; Kukreja, Lekha; Hole, Arti R.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancer is the most common cancer among Indian males, with 5-year- survival-rates of less than 50%. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopic methods in non-invasive and objective diagnosis of oral cancers and confounding factors has already been demonstrated. The present Raman microspectroscopic study was undertaken for in-depth and site-specific analysis of normal and tumor tissues. 10 normal and 10 tumors unstained sections from 20 tissues were accrued. Raman data of 160 x 60 μm and 140 x 140 μm in normal and tumor sections, respectively, were acquired using WITec alpha 300R equipped with 532 nm laser, 50X objective and 600 gr/mm grating. Spectral data were corrected for CCDresponse, background. First-derivitized and vector-normalized data were then subjected to K-mean cluster analysis to generate Raman maps and correlated with their respective histopathology. In normal sections, stratification among epithelial layers i.e. basal, intermediate, superficial was observed. Tumor, stromal and inflammatory regions were identified in case of tumor section. Extracted spectra of the pathologically annotated regions were subjected to Principal component analysis. Findings suggest that all three layers of normal epithelium can be differentiated against tumor cells. In epithelium, basal and superficial layers can be separated while intermediate layer show misclassifications. In tumors, discrimination of inflammatory regions from tumor cells and tumor-stroma regions were observed. Finding of the study indicate Raman mapping can lead to molecular level insights of normal and pathological states.

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . ...

  9. Sub-micrometer-scale mapping of magnetite crystals and sulfur globules in magnetotactic bacteria using confocal Raman micro-spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Stephan H K; Gigler, Alexander M; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite Fe3O4 is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35-120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (greigite (cubic Fe3S4; Raman lines of 253 and 351 cm(-1)) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (S8: 151, 219, 467 cm(-1)), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  10. Gold nanorods combine photoacoustic and Raman imaging for detection and treatment of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Cole, Adam J.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) were synthesized with surfactant templating and coated with IR792 to produce surface-enhanced Raman signal (SERS). Subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor models were created in nude mice using the OV2008 cell line, and a Nexus128 scanner from Endra LifeSciences was used to collect the photoacoustic data. We used GNRs with resonance at 756 nm, and the Raman signal was 10-fold larger than 60 nm gold core/silica shell nanoparticles. This signal was stable for over 24 hours in 50% serum. The batch-to-batch reproducibility was 15.5% and 3.6% in the SERS and photoacoustic modalities for n=4 batches. Animals were injected with 200 μL of 2.5, 5.4, and 16.8 nM GNRs. Relative to baseline photoacoustic signal, these concentrations increased tumor signal 1.3-, 1.6-, and 2.5-fold, respectively. The maximum signal increase occurred within 2 hours of injection persisted for at least 24 hours and was significant at panimals. Assaying for gold in the tumors validated signal—we found a strong correlation (R2>0.90) between tumor gold concentration and photoacoustic signal. By 24 hours, free GNRs had been sequestered to the liver and spleen with 2%ID/g immobilized in the tumor. The same GNRs produced SERS signal, and Raman maps were created with least squares analysis. We used the Raman signal to identify tumor margins and also to monitor resection and ensure complete removal of tumor tissue. Thus, the GNRs allow pre-surgical photoacoustic visualization for tumor staging and intra-operative Raman imaging to guide resection. Future work will study GNRs targeted to cell surface proteins to increase tumor accumulation.

  11. Raman quantum memory of photonic polarized entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Shuai; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-05-01

    The storage of photonic entanglement is central to the achievement of long-distance quantum communication based on quantum repeaters and scalable linear optical quantum computation. Among the memory protocols reported to date, the Raman scheme has the advantages of being broadband and high-speed, resulting in a huge potential in quantum networks. To date there have been no reports on the storage of photonic polarized entanglement using the Raman protocol. Here, two storage experiments using the Raman scheme are reported: (1) heralded single-photon entanglement of the path and polarization storage in a cold atomic ensemble, and (2) polarization entanglement storage in two cold atomic ensembles. The experimental data clearly show that the quantum entanglement is preserved in this memory platform. Our work shows great promise for the establishment of quantum networks in high-speed communications.

  12. Subsurface Raman analysis of thin painted layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Claudia; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Zerbi, Giuseppe; Matousek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Here we present, for the first time, an extension of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to thin (tens of micrometers thick), highly turbid stratified media such as those encountered in paintings. The method permits the non-destructive interrogation of painted layers in situations where conventional Raman microscopy is not applicable due to high turbidity of the top layer(s). The concept is demonstrated by recovering the pure Raman spectra of paint sub-layers that are completely obscured by paint over-layers. Potential application areas include the analysis of paintings in art preservation and restoration avoiding the cross-sectional analysis used currently with this type of samples. The technique also holds promise for the development as a non-destructive subsurface tool for in situ analysis using portable instruments.

  13. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  14. Differentiation of lipsticks by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahioglu, Fatma; Went, Michael J

    2012-11-30

    Dispersive Raman spectra have been obtained using a Raman microscope and an excitation wavelength of 632.8 nm from 69 lipsticks of various colours and from a range of manufacturers without any pre-treatment of the samples. 10% of the samples were too fluorescent to give Raman spectra. 22% of the samples gave spectra which were unique to the brand and colour within the collected sample set. The remaining 68% of the samples gave spectra which could be classified into seven distinct groups. Discrimination of red lipsticks by this technique was the most difficult. The spectra of deposited lipstick samples remained unchanged over a period of a least a year. PMID:22959771

  15. Effects of corner radius on periodic nanoantenna for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Bo-Kai; Lin, Shih-Che; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2015-12-01

    Corner radius is a concept to approximate the fabrication limitation due to the effective beam broadening at the corner in using electron-beam lithography. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of corner radius on the electromagnetic field enhancement and resonance wavelength for three periodic polygon dimers of bowtie, twin square, and twin pentagon. The enhancement factor of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy due to the localized surface plasmon resonances in fabricated gold bowtie nanostructures was investigated using both Raman spectroscopy and finite-difference time-domain simulations. The simulated enhancement factor versus corner radius relation was in agreement with measurements and it could be fitted by a power-law relation. In addition, the resonance wavelength showed blue shift with the increasing corner radius because of the distribution of concentrated charges in a larger area. For different polygons, the corner radius instead of the tip angle is the dominant factor of the electromagnetic field enhancement because the surface charges tend to localize at the corner. Greater enhancements can be obtained by having both the smaller gap and sharper corner although the corner radius effect on intensity enhancement is less than the gap size effect.

  16. Resolved-sideband Raman cooling of an optical phonon in semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Xingzhi; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-09-01

    The radiation pressure of light has been widely used to cool trapped atoms or the mechanical vibrational modes of optomechanical systems. Recently, by using the electrostrictive forces of light, spontaneous Brillouin cooling and stimulated Brillouin excitation of acoustic modes of the whispering-gallery-type resonator have been demonstrated. The laser cooling of specific lattice vibrations in solids (that is, phonons) proposed by Dykman in the late 1970s, however, still remains sparsely investigated. Here, we demonstrate the first strong spontaneous Raman cooling and heating of a longitudinal optical phonon (LOP) with a 6.23 THz frequency in polar semiconductor zinc telluride nanobelts. We use the exciton to resonate and assist photoelastic Raman scattering from the LOPs caused by a strong exciton–LOP coupling. By detuning the laser pump to a lower (higher) energy-resolved sideband to make a spontaneous scattering photon resonate with an exciton at an anti-Stokes (Stokes) frequency, the dipole oscillation of the LOPs is photoelastically attenuated (enhanced) to a colder (hotter) state.

  17. Suppression of two-photon resonantly enhanced nonlinear processes in extended media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, W.R.; Moore, M.A.; Payne, M.G.; Wunderlich, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    On the basis of combined experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear processes associated with two-photon excitations near 3d and 4d states in Na, we show how resonantly enhanced stimulated hyper-Raman emission, parametric four-wave mixing processes and total resonant two-photon absorption can become severely suppressed through the actions of internally generated fields on the total atomic response in extended media. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Ultra low-threshold monolithic micro-Raman laser

    OpenAIRE

    Spillane, S. M.; Armani, D. K.; Vahala, K. J.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a Raman laser integrated onto a silicon microchip, using an ultra-high-Q toroidal microcavity. Low pump power thresholds (210 microwatts) and Raman output powers of 1.2 milliWatts were obtained at 1650 nm.

  19. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2011-01-01

    Denne afhandling, "Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy”, består i hovedsagen af to dele. Deep Ultraviolet – også kaldt DUV – står for bølgelængdeområdet 200 til 300 nm. Første del, kapitlerne 1 til 4, handler om den instrumentelle teknologi i DUV Raman-systemet. Anden del, kapitlerne 5 og 6 fokuserer på nogle få anvendelser af DUV Ramanspektroskopien. Kapitel 1 giver en kort introduktion til Ramanspektroskopi i almindelighed og DUVs relation hertil. DUV Ramanspektrometrien h...

  20. Raman Fingerprints of Atomically Precise Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzhbitskiy, Ivan A.; Corato, Marzio De; Ruini, Alice; Molinari, Elisa; Narita, Akimitsu; Hu, Yunbin; Schwab, Matthias G.; Bruna, Matteo; Yoon, Duhee; Milana, Silvia; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Casiraghi, Cinzia; Prezzi, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Bottom-up approaches allow the production of ultra-narrow and atomically precise graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), with electronic and optical properties controlled by the specific atomic structure. Combining Raman spectroscopy and ab-initio simulations, we show that GNR width, edge geometry and functional groups all influence their Raman spectra. The low-energy spectral region below 1000 cm-1 is particularly sensitive to edge morphology and functionalization, while the D peak dispersion can be used to uniquely fingerprint the presence of GNRs, and differentiates them from other sp2 carbon nanostructures.

  1. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY STRUCTURAL STUDY OF FIRED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŠÁRKA PEŠKOVÁ

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopic structural analysis of concrete cementious matrix represents elegant method to determination of thermal history of highly exposed concrete. Experiments were carried out in furnace at 1200°C. On the surface of heated concrete mechanical cracks and the mixture of dicalcium silicate and gehlenite were found, while inside the cracks the development of gehlenite, pseudowollastonite, pseudobrookite and various iron oxides and spinels was observed. The products of chemical reactions analyzed by Raman spectroscopy can be used as markers for the identification and understanding the structural changes during a fire treatment.

  2. Raman Amplifier Based on Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Ferrara; Rendina, I.; S. N. Basu; Dal Negro, L.; Sirleto, L.

    2012-01-01

    The observation of stimulated Raman scattering in amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in Si-rich nitride/silicon superlattice structures (SRN/Si-SLs) is reported. Using a 1427 nm continuous-wavelength pump laser, an amplification of Stokes signal up to 0.9 dB/cm at 1540.6 nm and a significant reduction in threshold power of about 40% with respect to silicon are experimentally demonstrated. Our results indicate that amorphous silicon nanoparticles are a great promise for Si-based Raman la...

  3. Blood proteins analysis by Raman spectroscopy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, D. N.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Khristoforova, Yu. A.; Lykina, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Kuzmina, T. P.; Davydkin, I. L.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to study the possibility of plasma proteins (albumin, globulins) concentration measurement using Raman spectroscopy setup. The blood plasma and whole blood were studied in this research. The obtained Raman spectra showed significant variation of intensities of certain spectral bands 940, 1005, 1330, 1450 and 1650 cm-1 for different protein fractions. Partial least squares regression analysis was used for determination of correlation coefficients. We have shown that the proposed method represents the structure and biochemical composition of major blood proteins.

  4. High Power Photonic Crystal Fibre Raman Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Pei-Guang; RUAN Shuang-Chen; YU Yong-Qin; GUO Chun-Yu; GUO Yuan; LIU Cheng-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    A cw Raman laser based on a 100-m photonic crystal fibre is demonstrated with up to 3.8 W output power at the incident pump power of 12 W, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of about 31.6%. The second order Stokes light, which is firstly reported in a cw photonic crystal fibre Raman laser, is obtained at 1183nm with an output power of 1.6 W and a slope efficiency of about 45.7%.

  5. Spin-orbit-induced resonances and threshold anomalies in a reduced dimension Fermi gas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Su-Ju

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the reflection and transmission probabilities in a one-dimensional Fermi gas with an equal mixing of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (RD-SOC) produced by an external Raman laser field. These probabilities are computed over multiple relevant energy ranges within the pseudo-potential approximation. Strong scattering resonances are found whenever the incident energy approaches either a scattering threshold or a quasi-bound state attached to one of the energetically closed higher dispersion branches. A striking difference is demonstrated between two very different regimes set by the Raman laser intensity, namely between scattering for the single- minimum dispersion versus the double-minimum dispersion at the lowest threshold. The presence of RD-SOC together with the Raman field fundamentally changes the scattering behavior and enables the realization of very different one-dimensional theoretical models in a single experimental setup when combined with a confinement-induced resonance.

  6. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for renal condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingting; Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Santos, Greggy M.; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Non- and minimally-invasive techniques can provide advantages in the monitoring and clinical diagnostics in renal diseases. Although renal biopsy may be useful in establishing diagnosis in several diseases, it is an invasive approach and impractical for longitudinal disease monitoring. To address this unmet need, we have developed two techniques based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we have investigated the potential of diagnosing and staging nephritis by analyzing kidney tissue Raman spectra using multivariate techniques. Secondly, we have developed a urine creatinine sensor based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with performance near commercial assays which require relatively laborious sample preparation and longer time.

  7. Quantitative Chemical Imaging with Multiplex Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Lu, Fake; Zhang, Xu; Freudiger, Christian Wilhelm; Pernik, Douglas R.; Holtom, Gary; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a newly developed label-free chemical imaging technique that overcomes the speed limitation of confocal Raman microscopy while avoiding the nonresonant background problem of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Previous demonstrations have been limited to single Raman band measurements. We present a novel modulation multiplexing approach that allows real-time detection of multiple species using the fast Fourier transform. ...

  8. Scaling the Raman gain coefficient: Applications to Germanosilicate fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Bromage, J.; Stentz, A.J.;

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the temperature dependence of a Raman amplifier and the scaling of the Raman gain coefficient with wavelength, modal overlap, and material composition. The temperature dependence is derived by applying a quantum theoretical description, whereas the...... scaling of the Raman gain coefficient is derived using a classical electromagnetic model. We also present experimental verification of our theoretical findings....

  9. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  10. Analyzing the fundamental properties of Raman amplification in optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Povlsen, Jørn Hedegaard

    2005-01-01

    The Raman response of germanosilicate fibers is presented. This includes not only the material dependence but also the relation between the spatial-mode profile of the light and the Raman response in the time and frequency domain. From the Raman-gain spectrum, information is derived related...

  11. Optimizing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by genetic algorithm controlled pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenlong; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-10-01

    The hybrid coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has been successful applied to fast chemical sensitive detections. As the development of femto-second pulse shaping techniques, it is of great interest to find the optimum pulse shapes for CARS. The optimum pulse shapes should minimize the non-resonant four wave mixing (NRFWM) background and maximize the CARS signal. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to make a heuristic searching for optimized pulse shapes, which give the best signal the background ratio. The GA is shown to be able to rediscover the hybrid CARS scheme and find optimized pulse shapes for customized applications by itself.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on novel black silicon-based nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Orinak, A.;

    2009-01-01

    Two different black silicon nanostructured surfaces modified with thin gold layers were tested for analytical signal enhancement with Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). The relationship between the thicknesses of the gold layers and the analytical signal enhancement was studied. Also......, effects of Ti and Ti/Pt adhesion layers underneath the gold layers on the analytical signal enhancement were tested. An enhancement factor of 7.6 x 10(7) with the excitation laser 785 nm was achieved for the tested analyte, Rhodamine 6G, and non-resonance SER spectra were recorded in a 5 s acquisition...

  13. Raman Spectra of Interchanging β lactamase Inhibitor Intermediates on the Millisecond Time Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Torkabadi, Hossein Heidari; Che, Tao; Shou, Jingjing; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Crowder, Michael W.; Robert A Bonomo; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Carey, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid mix - rapid freeze is a powerful method to study the mechanisms of enzyme-substrate reactions in solution. Here we report a protocol that combines this method with normal (non-resonance) Raman microscopy to enable us to define molecular details of intermediates at early time points. With this combined method, SHV-1, a class A β-lactamase, and tazobactam, a commercially available β-lactamase inhibitor, were rapidly mixed on the millisecond time-scale, then were flash-frozen by injecting ...

  14. Dicke Coherent Narrowing in Two-Photon and Raman Spectroscopy of Thin Vapour Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Dutier, G; Hamdi, I; Maurin, I; Saltiel, S; Bloch, D; Ducloy, M; Dutier, Gabriel; Todorov, Petko; Hamdi, Ismah\\`{e}ne; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-01-01

    The principle of coherent Dicke narrowing in a thin vapour cell, in which sub-Doppler spectral lineshapes are observed under a normal irradiation for a l/2 thickness, is generalized to two-photon spectroscopy. Only the sum of the two wave vectors must be normal to the cell, making the two-photon scheme highly versatile. A comparison is provided between the Dicke narrowing with copropagating fields, and the residual Doppler-broadening occurring with counterpropagating geometries. The experimental feasibility is discussed on the basis of a first observation of a two-photon resonance in a 300 nm-thick Cs cell. Extension to the Raman situation is finally considered.

  15. Inverse bremsstrahlung stabilization of noise in the generation of ultrashort intense pulses by backward Raman amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the pump laser beam in a backward Raman amplifier over the round-trip light transit time through the subcritical density plasma can more than double the electron temperature of the plasma and produce time-varying axial temperature gradients. The resulting increased Landau damping of the plasma wave and detuning of the resonance can act to stabilize the pump against unwanted amplification of Langmuir noise without disrupting nonlinear amplification of the femtosecond seed pulse. Because the heating rate increases with the charge state Z, only low-Z plasmas (hydrogen, helium, or helium-hydrogen mixtures) will maintain a low enough temperature for efficient operation

  16. Raman scattering enhanced by plasmonic clusters and its application to single-molecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, Tomokazu [The Open University of Japan, Wakaba 2-11, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8586 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Nobusada, Katsuyuki [Institute for Molecular Science and SOKENDAI, Nishigonaka 38, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The optical response of the linear Au{sub 8} cluster is investigated by the linear response theory based on the density functional theory. It is revealed that the observed many peaks in the visible region originate from the interaction of the ideal plasmonic excitation along the molecular axis with the background d-electron excitations, i.e., the Landau damping. In spite of the existence of the damping, the Raman scattering is shown to be enhanced remarkably by the incident light resonant to the visible excitations. The novel imaging experiment with the atomic resolution is proposed by utilizing a plasmonic cluster as the probing tip.

  17. Time-encoded Raman scattering (TICO-Raman) with Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Wieser, Wolfgang; Klein, Thomas; Huber, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We present a new concept for performing stimulated Raman spectroscopy and microscopy by employing rapidly wavelength swept Fourier Domain Mode locked (FDML) lasers [1]. FDML lasers are known for fastest imaging in swept-source optical coherence tomography [2, 3]. We employ this continuous and repetitive wavelength sweep to generate broadband, high resolution stimulated Raman spectra with a new, time-encoded (TICO) concept [4]. This allows for encoding and detecting the stimulated Raman gain on the FDML laser intensity directly in time. Therefore we use actively modulated pump lasers, which are electronically synchronized to the FDML laser, in combination with a fast analog-to-digital converter (ADC) at 1.8 GSamples/s. We present hyperspectral Raman images with color-coded, molecular contrast.

  18. THz-Raman: accessing molecular structure with Raman spectroscopy for enhanced chemical identification, analysis, and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyler, Randy A.; Carriere, James T. A.; Havermeyer, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Structural analysis via spectroscopic measurement of rotational and vibrational modes is of increasing interest for many applications, since these spectra can reveal unique and important structural and behavioral information about a wide range of materials. However these modes correspond to very low frequency (~5cm-1 - 200cm-1, or 150 GHz-6 THz) emissions, which have been traditionally difficult and/or expensive to access through conventional Raman and Terahertz spectroscopy techniques. We report on a new, inexpensive, and highly efficient approach to gathering ultra-low-frequency Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra (referred to as "THz-Raman") on a broad range of materials, opening potential new applications and analytical tools for chemical and trace detection, identification, and forensics analysis. Results are presented on explosives, pharmaceuticals, and common elements that show strong THz-Raman spectra, leading to clear discrimination of polymorphs, and improved sensitivity and reliability for chemical identification.

  19. MicroRaman Spectroscopy and Raman Imaging of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, M. A.; Zeng, H.; Lui, H.

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of normal and cancerous skin tissues using a confocal microRaman spectrograph with a sub-micron spatial resolution. We found that the Raman spectrum of a cell nucleolus is different from the spectra measured outside the nucleolus and considerably different from those measured outside the nucleus. In addition, we found significant spectroscopic differences between normal and cancer-bearing sites in the dermis region. In order to utilize these differences for non-invasive skin cancer diagnosis, we have developed a Raman imaging system that clearly demonstrates the structure, location and distribution of cells in unstained skin biopsy samples. Our method is expected to be useful for the detection and characterization of skin cancer based on the known distinct cellular differences between normal and malignant skin.

  20. Surface and waveguide collection of Raman emission in waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zilong; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate Raman spectroscopy on a high index thin film tantalum pentoxide waveguide and compare collection of Raman emission from the waveguide end with that from the waveguide surface. Toluene was used as a convenient model analyte, and a 40-fold greater signal was collected from the waveguide end. Simulations of angular and spatial Raman emission distributions showed good agreement with experiments, with the enhancement resulting from efficient collection of power from dipoles near the surface into the high-index waveguide film and substrate, combined with long interaction length. The waveguide employed was optimized at the excitation wavelength but not at emission wavelengths, and full optimization is expected to lead to enhancements comparable to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in robust low-cost metal-free and nanostructure-free chips. PMID:27607994