WorldWideScience

Sample records for addressing college student

  1. Briefly...Unplanned Pregnancy among College Students and Strategies to Address It

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 2015

    2015-01-01

    As colleges strive to improve student success and completion, helping students delay pregnancy and parenting (or having additional children) means one less factor that can interfere with their college education. However, pregnancy planning and prevention is not something most colleges address, especially at the community college level. There are…

  2. Preventing distracted driving among college students: Addressing smartphone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Sahar; Kelly, Erin H; Smith, Jennifer; Thorpe, Sara; Sozzer, Fatima H; Atchley, Paul; Sullivan, Elroy; Larson, Dean; Vogel, Lawrence C

    2017-02-01

    Based on the National Highway Traffic Safety Association's (NHTSA) Report, fatalities due to distracted driving are on the rise and the highest proportion of fatalities by age group is the 20-29 year old category. To date little has been done to educate college students about the dangers of distracted driving and engage these students in promoting a safe driving culture. Intervening among college students has the potential for making real-time behavior change, can foster a lifetime of safe driving habits among these students, and can help contribute to a culture of safe driving that can be created and sustained through positive messages from peers. The goals of this study were to develop, implement and evaluate a distracted driving presentation for college students to change knowledge, attitude and behavior on distracted driving. A 30-min, multi-media presentation on distracted driving was presented to 19 colleges and universities, totaling 444 college students (mean age 23.7±7.0 years of age, 61% females, 39% males). Students completed three surveys: prior to the workshop (interview 1), immediately after the workshop (interview 2), and 3 months following the workshop (interview 3). We assessed changes between interview 1 and interview 2 and found 15 of the 15 attitude-knowledge based questions significantly improved after the course. In addition, we assessed changes from interviews 1 and 3, and found 11 of the 15 attitude-knowledge based questions maintained their significance. Responses to behavior related questions at three months were also compared to baseline, and significant improvements were found for 12 of the 14 questions. While this study was successful in improving the short-term attitude-knowledge and behaviors on distracted driving, work is needed to sustain (and evaluate) long-term effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistence of Latino Students in Community Colleges: An Empowerment Model Addressing Acculturative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    College student persistence has been a concern of researchers and practitioners since the early 1960s. Traditional models have addressed the need for students to be integrated into the academic and social domains of the college campus. Recently, critical theorists and researchers have been questioning the relevance of the traditional models for…

  4. How Are 2-Year US Colleges Addressing Student Alcohol Use and Related Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin J.; Toomey, Traci L.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of attention and research has been dedicated to addressing alcohol use and related problems among students at 4-year colleges; however, less attention has been given to alcohol-related issues among students at 2-year technical/community colleges. This article describes research that expands on a study by Chiauzzi and…

  5. An Integrated Approach to Addressing Addiction and Depression in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Arri; Kushner, Howard; McLeod, Mark; Queen, Edward; Gordon, Jonathan; Ford, John L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to address the problem of increasing student mental health issues on college campuses. The model uses addiction and depression as lenses into the problem and links residence life and academic and community internship experiences. The project has a positive impact on student attitudes…

  6. Measuring students' attitudes toward college education's role in addressing social issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, James E; Weber, Paula S; Craven, Barney L

    2008-06-01

    As service-learning projects have spread throughout academia, efforts to assess the service-learning experience have assumed a greater importance. The BERSI scale (Business Education's Role in addressing Social Issues) was developed as a measure of business students' attitudes toward social issues being addressed as part of a business education. As such, it was intended to be useful in assessing attitudinal outcomes of service learning. In order for the BERSI to be useful for nonbusiness students, the scale would need to be reconceptualized and revalidated. This study modified the BERSI items with a focus on college students in general rather than business students, making the resulting scale, College Education's Role in addressing Social Issues (CERSI), potentially helpful to service-learning researchers in a broader setting. The CERSI scale was then validated using standard techniques and normative data were reported.

  7. Addressing Alcohol Use and Problems in Mandated College Students: A Randomized Clinical Trial Using Stepped Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsari, Brian; Hustad, John T. P.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Tevyaw, Tracy O'Leary; Barnett, Nancy P.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Short, Erica Eaton; Monti, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Over the past 2 decades, colleges and universities have seen a large increase in the number of students referred to the administration for alcohol policies violations. However, a substantial portion of mandated students may not require extensive treatment. Stepped care may maximize treatment efficiency and greatly reduce the demands on…

  8. College students identify university support for basic needs and life skills as key ingredient in addressing food insecurity on campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler D. Watson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A recent University of California (UC systemwide survey showed that 42% of UC college students experience food insecurity, consistent with other studies among U.S. college students. As part of UC's efforts to understand and address student food insecurity, we conducted 11 focus group interviews across four student subpopulations at UC Los Angeles (n = 82. We explored student experiences, perceptions and concerns related to both food insecurity and food literacy, which may help protect students against food insecurity. Themes around food insecurity included student awareness about food insecurity, cost of university attendance, food insecurity consequences, and coping strategies. Themes around food literacy included existing knowledge and skills, enjoyment and social cohesion, and learning in the dining halls. Unifying themes included the campus food environment not meeting student needs, a desire for practical financial and food literacy “life skills” training, and skepticism about the university's commitment to adequately address student basic needs. The results of this study broadly suggest there is opportunity for the university to address student food insecurity through providing food literacy training, among other strategies.

  9. Assessing and Addressing Student Barriers: Implications for Today's College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterholt, Dorothy A.; Dennis, Sophie Lampard

    2014-01-01

    The increasingly diverse set of learners in colleges and universities poses considerable challenges for educators. Dorothy A. Osterholt and Sophie Lampard Dennis explain the four domains of learning they have identified and suggest ways to apply them to help students overcome a variety of obstacles to learning.

  10. Addressing the Mental Health Problems of Chinese International College Students in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Meirong Liu

    2009-01-01

    This article identifies unique mental health problems experienced by Chinese international students in the United States. The uniqueness of these problems suggests the need to address them independently from other Chinese and international student communities. First, an overview of the common sources of mental health problems and specific stressors these students face is provided. This article then develops culturally sensitive programming recommendations to improve collaborative efforts betw...

  11. Addressing the Mental Health Problems of Chinese International College Students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies unique mental health problems experienced by Chinese international students in the United States. The uniqueness of these problems suggests the need to address them independently from other Chinese and international student communities. First, an overview of the common sources of mental health problems and specific stressors these students face is provided. This article then develops culturally sensitive programming recommendations to improve collaborative efforts between health providers, mental health social workers, faculty, and academic staff within universities to serve these students more effectively.

  12. Assessing and Promoting Resilience: An Additional Tool to Address the Increasing Number of College Students with Psychological Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the assessment of resilience in undergraduate college students. Multigroup comparisons of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC; Connor & Davidson, 2003) were performed on general population students and students recruited from campus mental health offices offering college counseling, psychiatric-support, and…

  13. Gay Nineties: Addressing the Needs of Homosexual Community and Junior College Students and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Judith A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the needs of lesbians and homosexuals in community colleges in terms of heterosexism. Cites specific examples of heterosexism on campus and defines homophobia, internalized homophobia, and heterosexism. Utilizes interactionist theory to identify sources of heterosexism. Discusses "coming out," and suggests solutions to…

  14. College Students' Views of Work-Life Balance in STEM Research Careers: Addressing Negative Preconceptions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tan-Wilson, Anna; Stamp, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    .... A subsequent survey showed that many students, both men and women, thought work-life balance would be more difficult to achieve in a STEM research path than in other professions they were considering...

  15. College Students? Views of Work?Life Balance in STEM Research Careers: Addressing Negative Preconceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Tan-Wilson, Anna; Stamp, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    In career discussions, female undergraduates said that if they were to attend graduate school in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and were to follow a career based on their research training, they would have to give up having a family. A subsequent survey showed that many students, both men and women, thought work?life balance would be more difficult to achieve in a STEM research path than in other professions they were considering. Their views of STEM research being l...

  16. College Students' Views of Work-Life Balance in STEM Research Careers: Addressing Negative Preconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan-Wilson, Anna; Stamp, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    In career discussions, female undergraduates said that if they were to attend graduate school in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and were to follow a career based on their research training, they would have to give up having a family. A subsequent survey showed that many students, both men and women, thought work-life balance would be more difficult to achieve in a STEM research path than in other professions they were considering. Their views of STEM research being less family-friendly were more pronounced on issues of parental leaves and caring for children than finding a spouse/partner and landing two jobs in the same locality. To provide role models of work-life balance in STEM professions, we convened panels of dual-career couples who described how they worked together to raise their children while advancing their scientific careers. Our selection of panelists and topics of discussion were based on findings of social science research on work-life balance. On a survey with the same questions administered afterward, the changes in paired responses of male and female students with respect to all four issues showed a significant shift toward thinking that a research-based STEM career would be no more difficult than other careers they were considering. © 2015 A. Tan-Wilson and N. Stamp. et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. How College Affects Student Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Hamilton, Mary F.; Sina, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how college affects student athletes. Research cited includes studies using theories of student development and results from the National Study on Student Learning that describe the desired outcomes of college for student athletes. Discusses implications for policies and practices that address the critical needs of student athletes.…

  18. College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese College Students with ADHD No. 111; Updated December 2013 Many students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) attend college. College students with ADHD face ...

  19. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  20. Multiracial College Students' Experiences with Multiracial Microaggressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica C.

    2017-01-01

    While research on monoracial college students' experiences with racial microaggressions increases, minimal, if any, research focuses on multiracial college students' experiences with racial microaggressions. This manuscript addresses the gap in the literature by focusing on multiracial college students' experiences with multiracial…

  1. Addressing the Learning Outcomes and Assessment Methods Associated with Participation in Student Government Associations: A Qualitative Study of California Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    This document analysis synthesized student learning outcomes (SLOs) and assessment methods from a sample of 36 student government associations in the California Community College system. Student learning outcomes were grouped according to "governance, ethical and civic behavior", and "experiential learning functions." Using…

  2. College Student Suicide: A Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westefeld, John S.; Button, Christopher; Haley, James T., Jr.; Kettmann, Julie Jenks; Macconnell, Jennifer; Sandil, Riddhi; Tallman, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This article examines current issues related to the topic of college student suicide and why it continues to be an issue of major concern. The nature/extent of the problem, risk and protective factors, responses to college student suicide, legal issues, and training issues are discussed. The importance of addressing the issue of college student…

  3. Loneliness among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzetti, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews empirical research concerning loneliness among college students to sensitize family life specialists to the importance of loneliness within this age group. Presents a profile of the lonely college student from research findings which relate loneliness to personal attributes, interpersonal behaviors, and social network conditions. Discusses…

  4. Student Marketing for Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Richard

    2004-01-01

    AACRAO's new publication "Student Marketing for Colleges and Universities" is the single authoritative source interpreting basic and advanced marketing techniques within the context of student marketing. Four sections address marketing fundamentals in the higher education setting, strategic planning, consumer behavior of the college-bound student…

  5. Using Dynamic Software to Address Common College Calculus Stumbling Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneres, Alice W.; Kerrigan, John A.

    2014-01-01

    There are specific topics in college calculus that can be major stumbling blocks for students. Having taught college calculus for four years to over a thousand students, we observed that even the students who have already taken pre-calculus or calculus during their high school careers had common misunderstandings. Students may remember a technique…

  6. Marijuana: College Students' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumstein, Regina

    1980-01-01

    Focused on college students' expectations about marijuana. Undergraduates (N=210) expected marijuana to have sedating effects; they largely discounted psychological consequences. Students considered marijuana to be an educational issue and favored decriminalization of the drug. Users, occasional users, and nonusers differed significantly in…

  7. ADHD in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L; DuPaul, George

    2006-08-01

    According to the American Psychiatric Association, 3% to 7% of the school-age population has ADHD and many children continue to display significant symptoms throughout adolescences and adulthood. Relative to the childhood literature, less is known about ADHD in adults, especially college students with ADHD. The principle purpose of this review articles is to summarize the major research findings concerning ADHD in the college student population with regard to prevalence of symptoms, neuropsychological and psychological functioning. Overall, findings suggest that college students with ADHD are at greater risk for academic and psychological difficulties, and they perform similar to non-ADHD controls on many neuropsychological tasks. These findings are preliminary, however, and are tempered by the small number of studies that have been conducted as well as the methodological limitations of these studies. Future research using larger sample sizes, rigorous assessment criteria, and a longitudinal design is needed to better understand the psychological, academic, and neuropsychological functioning of college students with ADHD. Studies are also needed to elucidate the effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological effects of treatment on the functioning of college students with this disorder.

  8. The Healthy College Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Adams O’Connell PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the impact of health behaviors on morbidity often focus on the limited impact of a single behavior or a limited group of behaviors. In this study, we examine college student behaviors and investigate the link of these behaviors with a 2-week illness profile. Through self-reported surveys, we measure acute illness and a general illness burden, a cumulative measure of major and minor ailments. We explore how daily routines correlate with these illness measures. Eighty-four students from a random sample of 90 students attending a small liberal arts school completed the survey for a response rate of 93%. Living arrangements, exercise, sleep patterns, eating preferences and habits, and “social” behaviors were all significantly associated with illness burden. Students living in “singles” and those who got regular exercise and an average of 7 hr of sleep per night reported less illness. Most interesting is the effect of social behaviors. Students who greet others with a handshake reported higher illness rates, as did students who share food and/or drinks. While we can conceptualize why these behaviors would lead to a greater illness burden, students who engaged more frequently in these behaviors also reported being “happier.” In trying to reduce illness among college students, we might suggest less handshaking and food and beverage sharing, but these actions are ways in which college students express and maintain friendships. College administrators are challenged to discover ways to reduce illness while maintaining the positive aspects of local student culture. This study begins to explore some ways to balance health and camaraderie.

  9. Response of heavy-drinking voluntary and mandated college students to a peer-led brief motivational intervention addressing alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Nadine R; Oakley, William C; Eaton, Erica M; Borsari, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the way in which mandated and heavy-drinking voluntary students comparatively respond to peer-led brief motivational interventions (BMIs) and the mediators and moderators of intervention effects. Research suggests that mandated students may be more defensive due to their involvement in treatment against their will and this defensiveness, in turn, may relate to treatment outcome. Furthermore, it is not clear how mandated and heavy-drinking voluntary students perceived satisfaction with peer-led BMIs relates to treatment outcomes. Using data from two separate randomized controlled trials, heavy drinking college students (heavy-drinking voluntary, n = 156; mandated, n = 82) completed a peer-led brief motivational intervention (BMI). Both mandated and heavy-drinking volunteer students significantly reduced drinking behaviors at 3-month follow-up, reported high levels of post-intervention session satisfaction, yet no effects for mediation or moderation were found. Findings offer continued support for using peer counselors to deliver BMIs; however, results regarding the mechanisms of change were in contrast to previous findings. Implications for treatment and future areas of research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. College Students Talk Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, John A.; Harwood, Richard C.

    This volume reports on a study undertaken to determine views of college students themselves on civic life and politics and also follows four related studies and action research projects on the relationship between citizens and the political process. The central study was a series of 10 campus discussions in the focus group format, with college…

  11. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Community College Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lijuan

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the development and validation of a survey instrument to measure community college students' satisfaction with their educational experiences. The initial survey included 95 questions addressing community college student experiences. Data were collected from 558 community college students during spring of 2001. An exploratory…

  12. College students and the flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/007446.htm College students and the flu To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Every year, the flu spreads across college campuses nationwide. Close living quarters, ...

  13. Practices and Perspectives of College Instructors on Addressing Religious Beliefs When Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution is a core concept of biology, and yet many college biology students do not accept evolution because of their religious beliefs. However, we do not currently know how instructors perceive their role in helping students accept evolution or how they address the perceived conflict between religion and evolution when they teach evolution.…

  14. College 411: Get the Scoop. A Small Group Plan to Promote College Success for First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Christy W.; Ziomek-Daigle, Jolie

    2013-01-01

    First generation college students have more difficulty preparing for and succeeding in post-secondary institutions. Informed by the literature review and relevant research the school counselor presents a small group design for high school students in their junior year. This small group plan for first generation college students addresses issues of…

  15. Addressing Student Debt in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David; Johnston, Tim; Lytle, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Student debt is a national concern. The authors address debt in the classroom to enhance students' understanding of the consequences of debt and the need for caution when financing their education. However, student feedback indicates this understanding has a delayed effect on borrowing behavior and underscores the importance of making difficult…

  16. Suicidal Risk among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Mary; And Others

    Although the suicide rate of young adults has increased dramatically, few empirical studies examine suicide in the normal population. To examine suicidal thinking and behavior in a college student sample, 43 female and 23 male college students responded to an adverse life event scenario and then filled out an extended questionnaire regarding…

  17. College Student Depression: Counseling Billy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    A substantial portion of the college student population experiences affective disorders. This case study presents the conceptualization, course of treatment, and outcomes for a male college student presenting for counseling with depression. A review of Adlerian, cognitive-behavioral, and Gestalt techniques is provided. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  19. Little Known, Much Needed: Addressing the Cocurricular Needs of LGBTQ Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the invisible nature of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) undergraduate population, it is difficult for student affairs professionals at community colleges to identify and address the needs of sexual minority students on campus. Given the lack of literature regarding LGBTQ students at community colleges, student…

  20. Career Identity among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Kate J.; Kerpelman, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Career identity development is salient in adolescence and young adulthood, but little research has assessed career identity in populations other than four-year college students. Context should be considered when examining career identity, and to address this gap in the literature, the current study examined the extent to which parental support for…

  1. College Student Environmental Activism: How Experiences and Identities Influence Environmental Activism Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laura A. H.

    2016-01-01

    College student environmental activism is one way students civically engage in addressing social issues. This study explores the environmental activism of twelve college students and how their experiences outside of college and in college influenced their activism. In addition, how students' identities influenced their approach to activism was…

  2. Conceptions of a Good College Student, Parent-Student Communication About College, First-Year Grades, and College Retention Among First- and Non-First-Generation College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Palbusa, Julienne Marie Alipio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined conceptions of a good college student, parent-student communication about college, academic achievement, college student retention, and college generation status among first-year college students. 344 undergraduates described the characteristics and skills of a good college student. In addition, they reported the frequency, perceived helpfulness, and quality (instrumental and emotional support) of parent-student communication about college. Student GPA and second year rete...

  3. Using Motivational Interviewing to Address College Client Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Mark B.; Schmitt, Dorothy M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI; W. R. Miller & S. Rollnick, 2002) is presented as a potentially effective counseling strategy for assisting traditionally aged college students in reducing their problematic, heavy alcohol use. MI's congruence with two developmental theories--Self-Determination Theory (R. M. Ryan & E. L. Deci, 2000) and…

  4. A College Financial Management Center: What Do Students Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienne, Kristy; Slate, John R.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing cost of a college education on the rise, college administrators need to address the long term financial, psychological, and academic risks associated with the increased responsibility of personal debt. In this qualitative study, college students' perspectives regarding the need for a personal financial management center at a…

  5. Assessing Knowledge of Professional Burnout in College Students Entering Helping Professions: A Pilot Study Addressing the Need for Inclusion of Burnout Information in Undergraduate Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lesley A.; Attaway, Tracey L.; Staik, Irene M.; Harwell, Brad D.; Burling, John W.; Gilbert, D. Kristen.

    Many Web sites and professional journal articles address professional burnout in helping professions. Professional organizations in social work, psychology, and medicine have identified stressors and developed effective coping strategies, allowing helping professionals to alleviate stress and burnout via a reactive approach. This pilot study…

  6. College Students' Attitudes Toward Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, James, Jr.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined perceptions of wellness among college students (N=3,190) from 11 different colleges using Hettler's six wellness dimensions (physical, emotional, spiritual, occupational, social, and intellectual). Found support for belief that the dimensions had an effect on overall wellness. Rated physical dimension most important, followed closely by…

  7. Dating Violence among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  8. Impediments to academic performance of bisexual college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nicole Aydt; Dudley, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate health-related impediments to academic success for bisexual college students. Respondents to the Fall 2011 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II) survey who self-identified as bisexual, heterosexual, gay, or lesbian. Secondary analyses of the ACHA-NCHA II data were conducted to compare the experiences of bisexual students with both each other (bisexual men and bisexual women) and those of their nonbisexual counterparts (heterosexual and gay/lesbian students). Bisexual college students are a large and distinct sexual minority group. On all measures with the exception of discrimination, bisexual college students reported the strongest threats to academic success of all sexual orientations. Given the unique impediments for bisexual students, college health professionals should consider specifically addressing needs for bisexual students, bisexual women in particular.

  9. Preparing Students for College: Lessons Learned from the Early College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Arshavsky, Nina; Lewis, Karla; Thrift, Beth; Unlu, Fatih; Furey, Jane

    2017-01-01

    This article utilizes mixed methods--a lottery-based experimental design supplemented by qualitative data--to examine college readiness within an innovative high school setting: early college high schools. Early colleges are small schools that merge the high school and college experiences and are targeted at students underrepresented in college.…

  10. Providing Benefit to Black College Students in Counseling Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chalmer E.

    Counseling psychologists are in ideal positions to address issues pertinent to black college students, particularly via empirical research study and advocacy. The first step towards maximizing benefit to black college students is to respond to their need for personal and community-wide intervention. It is necessary to collaborate with the…

  11. Classroom Texting in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F.; Frazier, Erik; Rieser, Elizabeth; Vaughn, Nicholas; Hupp-Wilds, Bobbi

    2015-01-01

    A 21-item survey on texting in the classroom was given to 235 college students. Overall, 99.6% of students owned a cellphone and 98% texted daily. Of the 138 students who texted in the classroom, most texted friends or significant others, and indicate the reason for classroom texting is boredom or work. Students who texted sent a mean of 12.21…

  12. Practices and Perspectives of College Instructors on Addressing Religious Beliefs When Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution is a core concept of biology, and yet many college biology students do not accept evolution because of their religious beliefs. However, we do not currently know how instructors perceive their role in helping students accept evolution or how they address the perceived conflict between religion and evolution when they teach evolution. This study explores instructor practices and beliefs related to mitigating students’ perceived conflict between religion and evolution. Interviews with 32 instructors revealed that many instructors do not believe it is their goal to help students accept evolution and that most instructors do not address the perceived conflict between religion and evolution. Instructors cited many barriers to discussing religion in the context of evolution in their classes, most notably the instructors’ own personal beliefs that religion and evolution may be incompatible. These data are exploratory and are intended to stimulate a series of questions about how we as college biology instructors teach evolution. PMID:27193289

  13. Experiences of Community College Student Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Student governance is one way for students to become involved on college campuses. Student government allows participants to represent the needs of the student body and to voice their concerns to college administrators. In a qualitative study, five presidents of community college student government associations were interviewed. The student…

  14. College Student Credit Card Usage and Debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the concerns related to credit card usage by college students. Offers information student affairs professionals can use to help college students make responsible choices. (Contains 26 references.) (GCP)

  15. College Student Use of Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Lola; Skidmore, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported (Aagaard & Skidmore, 2004; Sikorski et al., 2002) that only a minority of college students actually read the course textbook in preparation for examinations. Although professors widely lament students' propensity to ignore the carefully chosen textbooks, research specifically investigating why this phenomenon occurs is…

  16. The College Student with a Disability: A Faculty Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynn M.

    A guide to the instruction of students with disabilities is presented to enhance learning in a college or university setting. Various adjustments that can be made in the environment or in teaching style are suggested. The following categories of disabled students are addressed: blind students, partially sighted students, deaf or hearing-impaired…

  17. Substance Use Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Chloe R; Kaufman, Erin A; Crowell, Sheila E

    2016-10-01

    Emerging adulthood has heightened risk for substance use. College students experience unique challenges, making them prone to use of alcohol, marijuana, and nonmedical use of prescription drugs. This article reviews rates of college students' substance use, risk factors, and populations at elevated risk. Consequences include legal, academic, and mental health problems; engagement in other risky behaviors; increased rates of injury; and death. Researchers, clinicians, and university administrators must identify those at greatest risk and provide prevention and intervention programs. Despite broad evidence supporting such programs, many students fail to access appropriate treatment. Future research should elucidate treatment barriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Review of College Student Study Time

    OpenAIRE

    中島, ゆり

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to review college student study time. Study time is one of the significant variables to understand how well each college manages its curriculum. Colleges conduct student survey and measure how much time students spend on homework or assignments each week, often employing categorized measurement scales. Scholars point out that Japanese students do not study as much as the US students do. Japanese governments demand each college to make students study at least two hours o...

  19. Depression in College Students: Student Experience Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Angela G.; Redfield, Doris L.

    To assess depression in college students, two inventories were compared: the Student Experience Inventory (SEI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). SEI, a self-report questionnaire, contains 56 items that are designed to measure hopelessness and decreased energy levels, as well as five factors covered in BDI: (1) negative affect toward self,…

  20. Preparing High School Students for College: An Exploratory Study of College Readiness Partnership Programs in Texas. NCPR Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elisabeth A.; Corrin, William; Nakanishi, Aki; Bork, Rachel Hare; Mitchell, Claire; Sepanik, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Nationwide, about 40 percent of college students take at least one remedial course to prepare for college-level coursework. One cause of this high rate of remedial enrollment is the misalignment of high school graduation standards and college academic expectations. College readiness partnership programs attempt to address this problem by…

  1. Polytobacco Use Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Karen M; Ickes, Melinda J; Rayens, Mary Kay; Wiggins, Amanda T; Hahn, Ellen J

    2016-02-01

    Use of more than one tobacco product among college students is increasing in popularity, leading to nicotine addiction and additional health risks. The study (1) examined polytobacco use patterns among college students who had ever used tobacco; and (2) assessed the sociodemographic and personal factors associated with current polytobacco use, compared to current single product use and former tobacco use among college students. Of 10,000 randomly selected college students from a large public university in the Southeast, a sample of 1593 students age 18 or older completed an online survey assessing tobacco use and attitudes. Ever tobacco users were included in this study (n = 662, or 41.6% of survey completers). About 15% of ever users reported current polytobacco use, and more than 70% of polytobacco users smoked cigars, little cigars, or clove cigarettes in combination with one or more products. Cigarettes were the most commonly-used product among single users, followed by hookah. Males, underclassmen, and students with greater acceptance of cigarette use were more likely to be polytobacco users. Race/ethnicity was marginally related to polyuse status, with white/non-Hispanics 28% less likely to be polytobacco users versus single product users. Polytobacco users were more likely than single users to consume emerging tobacco products, (ie, hookah and electronic cigarettes). Males, underclassmen, and racial/ethnic minorities were more at risk for polytobacco use. As young people are particularly prone to nicotine addiction, there is a need to further investigate polytobacco use among college students. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Handwashing among female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drankiewicz, Danielle; Dundes, Lauren

    2003-04-01

    Handwashing has been recognized as a critical factor in infection control policies. Whereas handwashing compliance among health care workers and school-aged students has been previously documented, practices among college students remain relatively unknown. The objective of this study was to determine handwashing compliance of female college students after using the bathroom. A researcher situated in a toilet stall unobtrusively observed handwashing compliance among 100 female students. Most students (63%) washed their hands, 38% used soap, 32% washed with soap for 5 or more seconds, but only 2% washed their hands with soap for 10 or more seconds. Fewer students left without handwashing when someone else was present in the sink area (9%) than when they were alone (45%) (P =.002). Substantial bacterial colony counts were found on a female bathroom sink faucet and toilet seat confirming the need for programs to increase handwashing compliance. Potential strategies to optimize infection control include harnessing the influence of peer pressure on handwashing and the installation of motion-activated faucets, disposable seat covers, and exit doors that can be pushed open. These results should be confirmed in a larger study that includes both male and female college students.

  3. Loneliness among Japanese and American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, T; Klopf, D W

    1990-08-01

    Both Japanese and American college students (ns = 100), away from home at their first year in college, showed high scores in the Differential Loneliness Scale, with Japanese students scoring higher on all subscales.

  4. Electronic cigarette use by college students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sutfin, Erin L; McCoy, Thomas P; Morrell, Holly E R; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    .... college students have been reported. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette use and identify correlates of use among a large, multi-institution, random sample of college students...

  5. Student Suicide and Colleges' Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert B.; Fleming, Dana L.

    2007-01-01

    Virginia recently became the first state to pass legislation that bars public colleges and universities from punishing or expelling students "solely for attempting to commit suicide, or seeking mental-health treatment for suicidal thoughts or behaviors." While well intentioned, the law adds nothing to current law and will, in fact, make…

  6. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  7. Mushroom Use by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John P.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 1,507 college students to investigate the extent of hallucinogenic mushroom use and compared mushroom users to nonusers. Results showed that among the respondents who reported use of hallucinogenic drugs (17 percent), over 85 percent had used hallucinogenic (psilocybin) mushrooms and over half had used mushrooms but no other…

  8. Sexual Harassment of Female Students: Implications for Community College Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Patricia H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Addresses issues related to sexual harassment in community colleges. Discusses the legal basis and types of harassment that have been reported on college campuses, indicating that the most prevalent form involves male professors harassing female students. Describes grievance procedures and provides suggestions for handling sexual harassment. (48…

  9. LGBT Students in the College Composition Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrow, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the concerns of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in college writing classrooms. The researcher interviewed 37 college students and 11 faculty members from a variety of different types of colleges and universities. LGBT students stated concerns about their overall campus experiences, safety, and identity.…

  10. College Student Stress and Satisfaction with Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Laverghetta, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The following study was performed to determine if general life satisfaction is negatively correlated with college student stress. We administered the satisfaction with life scale (Diener et al., 1985), college student stress scale (Feldt, 2008) and a brief demographics survey to a sample of college students at a regional southwestern university in…

  11. Gender Differences in Depression in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiano, Ann K.; Barrett, Marty

    1991-01-01

    Sixty-nine female college students report more depressive symptoms and more maladaptive attributional styles than 64 male college students as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory and the Expanded Attributional Style Questionnaire. A study involving 77 male and 95 female college students' responses to the Selves Questionnaire supports these…

  12. Successful Community College Transfer Students Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Martha M.

    2013-01-01

    The community college as the entranceway into the baccalaureate degree is becoming a prevalent choice for students. This study was a qualitative approach to understanding attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge acquisition by successful community college transfer students. University students who transferred from a community college and were making…

  13. Engaging college physics students with photonics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rhys; Chen, Lawrence R.

    2017-08-01

    As educators and researchers in the field of photonics, we find what we do to be very exciting, and sharing this passion and excitement to our university students is natural to us. Via outreach programs and college research funding, a new college and university collaboration has broadened our student audience: photonics is brought into the college classroom and research opportunities are provided to college students. Photonics-themed active learning activities are conducted in the college Waves and Modern Physics class, helping students forge relationships between course content and modern communications technologies. Presentations on photonics research are prepared and presented by the professor and past college student-researchers. The students are then given a full tour of the photonics university laboratories. Furthermore, funds are set aside to give college students a unique opportunity to assist the college professor with experiments during a paid summer research internship.

  14. The Challenges, Persistence, and Success of White, Working-Class, First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightweis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This essay addresses persistence and success of an underrepresented group enrolled in college who are white, working-class first-generation students. The discussion examines these college students and the challenges they face. The discussion analyzes why first-generation college students persist while others do not. Additionally, the discussion…

  15. College Characteristics and Black Students' Four-Year College Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail E.

    1981-01-01

    A study evaluated the influence of college type, family background, and academic performance on Black students' success in completing a four-year college program on schedule. Among college characteristics, availability of financial aid proved the most critical variable for prompt graduation. (APM)

  16. Factors associated with small cigar use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Kymberle; Berg, Carla J; Thomas, Akilah N; Glantz, Stanton A; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2013-05-01

    To assess small cigar use among college students in the southeastern United States. Data from a 2010 online survey were analyzed to examine small cigar smoking and its sociodemographic and psychosocial correlates among 4388 college students, aged 18-30. Small cigar users were more likely to be younger, male, black, and current cigarette, cigar, hookah, or marijuana smokers (p's stress. Menthol cigarette smokers were more likely to smoke small cigars. Small cigar use and the co-occurrence of other tobacco and substance use should be addressed among college students.

  17. College Students' Adjustment: The Role of Parent-College Student Expectation Discrepancies and Communication Reciprocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliata, Allison Kanter; Renk, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    Parents' influence on college students' adjustment is underestimated frequently. As college students often set goals based on their perceptions of their parents' expectations, discrepancies between college students' and their parents' expectations may be related to their adjustment. The purpose of this study was to examine parent-college student…

  18. Sexting Behavior among College Students: Implications for College Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Twist, Markie L. C.

    2017-01-01

    The practice of sexting is becoming increasingly common among college students but has the potential to both initiate productive interactions with others and interfere with relationship development. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a study on sexting among college students and to provide a framework through which…

  19. College Choices of Academically Talented Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hope E.; Adelson, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    The decision-making process of academically talented students when making the transition to college is complex. This study investigates the factors that contribute to the selectivity of the colleges by Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate students for application. A multilevel model was created to find which college-level and…

  20. Understanding and Preventing College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamis, Dorian A.; Lester, David

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death among college students in the United States. This complex issue on college campuses is often overlooked, and this book combines the efforts from several leaders in the field of suicidology in an attempt to grasp a better understanding of college student suicide. The book is divided into four…

  1. Treat and Teach Our Students Well: College Mental Health and Collaborative Campus Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Downs, Nancy S; Alderman, Tracy; Schneiber, Katharina; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-01-01

    .... College mental health services are delivered in a specialized milieu, designed to address many of the unique needs of college students and to support their successful scholastic advancement and graduation...

  2. Academic Success and the College Minority Student. A Guidebook for College Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Michael; And Others

    College performance of minority groups is addressed, including oppressed ethnic groups (Native Americans, Asian Americans, Puerto Ricans, Chicanos or Latinos, and Afro-Americans), as well as handicapped students and female students. This definition includes those who face discrimination because of race and/or oppressed ethnic status, physical…

  3. A Student-Led Health Education Initiative Addressing Health Disparities in a Chinatown Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin J; Wang, Sheila K; So, Chunkit; Chiu, Brandon G; Wang, Wesley Y; Polisetty, Radhika; Quiñones-Boex, Ana; Liu, Hong

    2015-11-25

    Together with community advocates, professional student organizations can help improve access to health care and sustain services to address the health disparities of a community in need. This paper examines the health concerns of an underserved Chinese community and introduces a student-led health education initiative that fosters service learning and student leadership. The initiative was recognized by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) and received the 2012-2013 Student Community Engaged Service Award.

  4. Gay with a Disability: A College Student's Multiple Cultural Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Wilma J.; Fuerth, Katherine; Figliozzi, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, student issues regarding disability and sexuality have been viewed and addressed in isolation on college campuses. However, students with multiple minority identities are in need of services and personnel that are responsive to their unique needs as members of two historically oppressed minority groups. This qualitative exploration…

  5. Community College Students and Federal Student Financial Aid: A Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkiewicz, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    The federal government plays an indispensable role in helping community college students pay for their education. It is hard to imagine today's community college campuses without needs-based federal student aid, such as the Pell Grant program and subsidized loans. There are, however, significant differences between community college students and…

  6. Becoming a College Student: An Empirical Phenomenological Analysis of First Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Patrick M.; Wright, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This article is an empirical phenomenological examination of the perceived security that first generation college students have in their identity as college students. First generation college students (FGCS) have been defined as students whose parents or guardians have not completed a 2- or 4-year postsecondary degree. Previous research (Davis,…

  7. Alcohol drinking among college students: college responsibility for personal troubles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorant, Vincent; Nicaise, Pablo; Soto, Victoria Eugenia; d'Hoore, William

    2013-06-28

    One young adult in two has entered university education in Western countries. Many of these young students will be exposed, during this transitional period, to substantial changes in living arrangements, socialisation groups, and social activities. This kind of transition is often associated with risky behaviour such as excessive alcohol consumption. So far, however, there is little evidence about the social determinants of alcohol consumption among college students. We set out to explore how college environmental factors shape college students' drinking behaviour. In May 2010 a web questionnaire was sent to all bachelor and master students registered with an important Belgian university; 7,015 students participated (participation = 39%). The survey looked at drinking behaviour, social involvement, college environmental factors, drinking norms, and positive drinking consequences. On average each student had 1.7 drinks a day and 2.8 episodes of abusive drinking a month. We found that the more a student was exposed to college environmental factors, the greater the risk of heavy, frequent, and abusive drinking. Alcohol consumption increased for students living on campus, living in a dormitory with a higher number of room-mates, and having been in the University for a long spell. Most such environmental factors were explained by social involvement, such as participation to the student folklore, pre-partying, and normative expectations. Educational and college authorities need to acknowledge universities' responsibility in relation to their students' drinking behaviour and to commit themselves to support an environment of responsible drinking.

  8. ADHD stigma among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amanda Chi; Lefler, Elizabeth K

    2016-03-01

    The current study examined ADHD stigma within a college-enrolled young adult population, including the debate regarding the cause of stigma: label or behavior. In Phase 1, 135 college students rated stigma toward one of the four fictitious partners described as having either: the label of ADHD alone, the behaviors associated with ADHD alone, the label of ADHD and a set of behaviors associated with ADHD, or neither the label nor behaviors. In Phase 2, 48 college students rated stigma toward one of the two assigned fictitious partners described as having either: the label of ADHD and a set of behaviors associated with ADHD, or the label of Depression and a set of behaviors associated with Depression. It was hypothesized that the interaction between the label and the behaviors would cause the highest levels of ADHD stigma and that ADHD would elicit more stigma than Depression. In Phase 1, stigma was associated with the behaviors of ADHD, but not the label. In Phase 2, ADHD and Depression were found to be equally stigmatized. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

  9. A Study of Students' Adaptation to College

    OpenAIRE

    谷島, 弘仁

    2005-01-01

    The conditions pertaining to students adaptation to a college environment were analyzed using seven items (working outside college, deciding on future career, and so on). A questionnaire listing these items was administered to 207 students tudying in two colleges, along with the Self-rating Depression Scale; this was done in order to examine the relationship between adaptation to the college environment and depression tendency. A correlation analysis revealed a positive relationship tween the...

  10. Diverse Millennial Students in College: Implications for Faculty and Student Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Fred A., II, Ed.; Marbley, Aretha F., Ed.; Howard-Hamilton, Mary F., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    While many institutions have developed policies to address the myriad needs of Millennial college students and their parents, inherent in many of these initiatives is the underlying assumption that this student population is a homogeneous group. This book is significant because it addresses and explores the characteristics and experiences of…

  11. College students' views on suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S R; Hampton, W R; Bernstein, B; Schichor, A

    1996-05-01

    College students were asked to rate the acceptability of suicide for themselves and for others in various circumstances. It was hypothesized that acceptability would vary as a function of circumstance of the suicide, the students' religious affiliation, history of past attempts, and whether the suicide was contemplated for oneself or another. The authors found that the highest acceptability for suicide was in the circumstances of terminal or chronic illness and depression. Students affiliated with organized religion were less accepting of suicide than were the individuals without such an affiliation. Previous suicide attempts were associated with greater acceptance of suicide for oneself or for others. In general, participants were more likely to accept suicide for others than for themselves, but the individuals who had previously attempted suicide displayed the opposite pattern under the circumstance of depression. Implications of these findings and directions for further research are discussed.

  12. Characterizing, modeling, and addressing gender disparities in introductory college physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost-Smith, Lauren Elizabeth

    2011-12-01

    The underrepresentation and underperformance of females in physics has been well documented and has long concerned policy-makers, educators, and the physics community. In this thesis, we focus on gender disparities in the first- and second-semester introductory, calculus-based physics courses at the University of Colorado. Success in these courses is critical for future study and careers in physics (and other sciences). Using data gathered from roughly 10,000 undergraduate students, we identify and model gender differences in the introductory physics courses in three areas: student performance, retention, and psychological factors. We observe gender differences on several measures in the introductory physics courses: females are less likely to take a high school physics course than males and have lower standardized mathematics test scores; males outscore females on both pre- and post-course conceptual physics surveys and in-class exams; and males have more expert-like attitudes and beliefs about physics than females. These background differences of males and females account for 60% to 70% of the gender gap that we observe on a post-course survey of conceptual physics understanding. In analyzing underlying psychological factors of learning, we find that female students report lower self-confidence related to succeeding in the introductory courses (self-efficacy) and are less likely to report seeing themselves as a "physics person". Students' self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of their performance, even when measures of physics and mathematics background are controlled, and account for an additional 10% of the gender gap. Informed by results from these studies, we implemented and tested a psychological, self-affirmation intervention aimed at enhancing female students' performance in Physics 1. Self-affirmation reduced the gender gap in performance on both in-class exams and the post-course conceptual physics survey. Further, the benefit of the self

  13. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  14. How Do Underage College Students Get Alcohol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Lindsey E. A.; Toomey, Traci L.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Erickson, Darin J.

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol consumption and related problems are common among underage college students, yet qualitative, in-depth information on how/where these students obtain alcohol is limited. We conducted focus groups pertaining to access to alcohol and related issues with 19 underage college students. They reported that alcohol is easy to obtain from a variety…

  15. Cigarette Use among Young Adults: Comparisons between 2-Year College Students, 4-Year College Students, and Those Not in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kathleen; Rode, Peter; Fabian, Lindsey; Bernat, Debra; Klein, Elizabeth; Forster, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine cigarette smoking among young adults based on education status. Participants: Community-based sample of 2,694 young adults in the United States Methods: The authors compared 3 groups--those not in college with no college degree, 2-year college students/graduates, 4-year college students/graduates--on various smoking measures:…

  16. Student Success Reports: College of Alameda, Laney College, Merritt College, and Vista College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. System, Oakland, CA.

    This document analyzes the extent to which the four community colleges in the Peralta district (California) have been successful in terms of student outcomes. Student success is defined as the percentage of successful course completions as compared to unsuccessful course completions. This document looks at the period from the fall of 1993 through…

  17. Meaning in Life in College Students: Implications for College Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Dominic A.; Bass, Ellyn; Powell, Kevin; Eckerd, Lizabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between meaning in life and college adjustment in a sample of 96 college students. In line with previous research on meaning in life and positive psychosocial functioning measures, presence of meaning was positively correlated with adjustment, whereas searching for meaning was negatively correlated with…

  18. Assessing Christian-Faith and Cognitive Development in College Students: CFCDS Instrument Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    What happens when students go to college? An important outcome of college attendance is student cognitive development. Part of that developmental process is learning how to address contrasting values, beliefs, knowledge structures, and worldviews critically. This study addressed the relationship between cognitive and Christian-faith development in…

  19. College student stressors, depression, and suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    2014-02-01

    This study was designed to explore whether stressors from college-related activities and stressors from general life experiences differed in their power to predict depression and suicidal ideation in college students. In a sample of 165 college undergraduates, depression was predicted by both sources of stress whereas past and current suicidal ideation were predicted only by general life stress.

  20. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos; Sofia Tsiori; Kalliopi Koundi; Xenia Pappa; Pavlos Sakkas; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)...

  1. Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166856.html Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students When erratic snoozers improve shut-eye habits, ... Health and Human Services. More Health News on College Health Healthy Sleep Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics College ...

  2. Psychological Factors in Community College Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Chad; Redekop, Frederick; Burgin, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This study explored psychological factors in the context of a community college population purported to impact decisions to remain in college from one semester to another. Researchers examined results from 1191 responses from students attending a community college in the Mid-Atlantic United States. The study further explored the predictive power…

  3. Microaggressions and marijuana use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pro, George; Sahker, Ethan; Marzell, Miesha

    2017-03-09

    This study examines the association between exposure to microaggressions and marijuana use, using original survey data from a sample of racial/ethnic minority college students (n = 332) from a large Division I university in the United States. Nearly all of our sample (96%) reported at least one experience with microaggressions in the past 6 months, while 33% reported using marijuana regularly. We modeled regular use of marijuana using multiple logistic regression, with consideration of sex, age, race/ethnicity, and microaggression scale scores as covariates. Age, sex, the microinvalidations subscale score, and the full microaggression scale score were significantly associated with marijuana use in our full models (p marijuana use increase. Academic communities may consider the primary prevention of discriminatory behavior when addressing student substance use.

  4. [Alcohol drinking patterns of college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, T; Asaga, E; Matsuura, Y; Kocha, T

    1990-04-01

    Drinking patterns of 245 college students (88 boys and 157 girls) were surveyed by using modified questionnaire of Hirayama's 18 years ago survey and the principal results were as follows. 1. The increased tendencies of the drinking of the girl students were found here and there. 2. The principal favorite drinking places of the college students were the popular taverns (YAKITORI-YA, ODEN-YA etc.).3. The doubts or tendencies of alcohol dependence of the college students were small as the results of Hirayama's 18 years ago survey. 4. The first age of drinking tends to lower. The principal purpose of drinking of the college students was social intercourse and the motive of the drinking was principally solicitation by others and the sincere lovers of drinking were unexpectedly a few similar to Hirayama's survey. So, the counterplans to drinking habits and the alcoholism among college students should be considered from the social point of view as before.

  5. Sexual harassment of Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C S; Yik, M S; Cheung, F M; Choi, P K; Au, K C

    1996-04-01

    Sexual harassment of Chinese college students with a focus on their awareness, experiences, responses, and expectations of institutional intervention to the problem was examined. 358 male and 491 female Chinese college students in Hong Kong participated. There were no gender differences in students' awareness of the phenomenon. Students' own experiences were less frequent than what they had heard about sexual harassment. Peer harassment occurred twice as frequently as faculty harassment. Compared to men, twice as many women said they had been sexually harassed. About one in four women students experienced various forms of sexual harassment and 1% were coerced into sexual activities during their college years by either teachers or peers. Students typically avoided and ignored the harassers and felt that the university should take up active roles in combating the problem. Comparisons with U.S. studies suggested that Chinese college students had a lower awareness and experience level in sexual harassment than U.S. students.

  6. Food Safety Tips for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices ... Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Food Safety Tips for College Students When students pack ...

  7. The American College Student Cell Phone Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study of cell phone use among college students. This group is considered particularly important because college students tend to be among the first to try new technology, are the group most likely to innovate new ways of using existing technology, and are most vocal about what they need and/or want to see changed…

  8. Adjustment to College in Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine college adjustment in students reporting an ADHD diagnosis and the effect of medication treatment on students' adjustment. Method: 1,648 first-semester freshmen attending a public and a private university completed a Web-based survey to examine their adjustment to college. Results: Compared with 200 randomly selected control…

  9. Group Psychodrama for Korean College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Soo Eun; Kim, Soo Jin

    2017-01-01

    Psychodrama was first introduced in the Korean literature in 1972, but its generalization to college students did not occur until the 1990s. Despite findings from psychodrama studies with Korean college students supporting psychodrama as effective for developing and maintaining good interpersonal relationships, as well as decreasing anxiety and…

  10. Images of Fictional Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Brian; Major, Claire H.; Harris, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Popular media represent outlets for shaping and informing public perception of institutions and institutional actors found in our society. Community colleges and their students have been featured in a number of fictional works. This paper provides an analysis of the portrayal of community college students in the fictional works of novels, short…

  11. The Assessment of Student Accomplishment in College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, James M., Jr.; And Others

    To assess the non-academic accomplishments of college students more broadly than do grades, a questionnaire having 12 scales was designed and administered to 3147 freshmen, 5127 sophomores, and 1566 seniors in a variety of colleges. The scales measured achievement, as determined by the students themselves, in leadership, social participation, the…

  12. Identifying Indicators of Student Development in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hassan, Karma

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of college on student goals and aspirations, in addition to identifying the determinants of overall quality of instruction, satisfaction with college in general, and the predictors of various aspects of student self-reported growth (intellectual, personal, social, preparation for further…

  13. College Student Self-Care Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jerrold S.; Dintiman, George B.

    The purpose of this docoment is to help college students maintain health by keeping a weekly diary of health related behaviors including diet, exercise, and stress levels. In addition each weekly entry presents a self-care tip for health improvement. Discussions of the college student and health, health and lifestyle, instructions on use of the…

  14. College Student Debt and Anticipated Repayment Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jonathan J.; Bartholomae, Suzanne; Letkiewicz, Jodi C.; Montalto, Catherine P.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes factors associated with anticipated difficulty with repayment of debt accumulated during college using a basic model of credit risk that includes socialization processes influencing college student financial decisions. The empirical analysis uses data from the 2010 Ohio Student Financial Wellness Study. Results provide evidence…

  15. College Students' Attitudes toward Their ADHD Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Brandi L.; Jensen, Scott A.; Rosen, Lee A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The attitudes of college students with and without ADHD toward peers with ADHD were examined. Method: A total of 196 college students (30 diagnosed with ADHD) anonymously completed four attitude measures. General analyses of attitudes toward peers with ADHD as well as comparisons between those with and without ADHD are made. Results:…

  16. Community Colleges: Preparing Students for Diverse Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    Postgraduation outcomes for community college students are complex. In addition to traditional job placement and earnings information, transferring to a 4-year institution is a positive first-destination outcome. Furthermore, community college students may have education and career goals that do not include earning a degree. Community college…

  17. Addressing the Factors Inhibiting Students' Participation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    desired learning behaviour were given. The key concepts are: Action. Research .... is the teacher's ability to cooperatively manage, time, space, resource and the student roles and behaviors to provide a climate .... Students will be encouraged to enroll for extra-English language classes. - They will also be encourAged to ...

  18. Student-Mentor Relationships and Students' College Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Chenoa S.; Preciado, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Many college and SAT preparation programs are designed to improve the postsecondary success of traditionally marginalized students. In addition to academic preparation, students' social and emotional preparation is important for the transition from high school to college. Mentors can serve as role models and supports to aid students in this…

  19. Distance and Intrastate College Student Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, James; Winters, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Most studies of student migration focus on "interstate" migration of college students, largely because the aggregate data typically used are limited in geographic specificity to states. However, interstate migration is only a small part of the total student migration. Public institutions generally get most of their students from within…

  20. Unblurring the lines of sexual consent with a college student-driven sexual consent education campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Rebecca R; Shafer, Autumn

    2018-02-06

    To test the effectiveness of a college student-driven sexual consent education campaign to improve college students' sexual consent understanding. Undergraduate students (N = 992) at a large, public Midwestern university between March and December 2015. Three online survey questionnaires assessing relevant outcome measures were distributed to the university's undergraduate student population before, during, and after the campaign's implementation over two consecutive academic semesters. Exposure to the campaign and the sexual consent understanding of the student population improved over time. College men and members of university-affiliated social sororities or fraternities resulted in greater improvement than their respective counterparts (i.e., college women, non-members). Sexual consent education campaigns for college students that are student-driven and address relevant sociocultural factors while authentically interacting with students can improve students' sexual consent understanding. These type of campaigns also have the opportunity to reach historically hard-to-reach audiences, such as college men.

  1. Understanding Chinese international college and university students' physical activity behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Yan

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Understanding factors that influence PA among Chinese international students is an important step in the process of promoting their long-term health and wellbeing. Designing program that address the identified key factors may help colleges and universities achieve this goal.

  2. Alexithymia, Affect Regulation, and Binge Drinking in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, F. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Numerous programs have been instituted to address the widely recognized problem of binge drinking in college students, with some excellent results. Yet binge drinking is commonly still viewed as a socially acceptable form of relaxing and bonding with peers, often with the stated goal of getting as drunk as possible as quickly as possible. The…

  3. Examining How Motivational Interviewing May Foster College Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarussi, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors practicing in higher education settings aspire to meet the developmental needs of college students in addition to addressing their mental health and substance use concerns. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based counseling approach that focuses on enhancing motivation and commitment to change. This article…

  4. Substance use in college students with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Mary; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Yoon, Yesel

    2012-04-01

    The college years represent a developmental transition during which the initiation and escalation of heavy drinking set the stage for lifelong difficulties with alcohol and other drugs. Evidence from studies of adolescents and young adults with ADHD suggests that college students with the disorder may be uniquely vulnerable to alcohol- and drug-related problems. However, no studies have examined substance use in college students with ADHD. Tobacco, alcohol, illicit drug use, and associated impairment were examined in 91 college students with (n = 53) and without (n = 38) ADHD. ADHD was associated with increased frequency of tobacco use, higher rates of dangerous or hazardous patterns of alcohol use, and higher levels of impairment related to marijuana and nonmarijuana illicit drug use, independent of conduct disorder history. These findings suggest that college students with ADHD may be at elevated risk for problematic patterns of substance use.

  5. Addressing the Factors Inhibiting Students' Participation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    developing country, whether in a city or countryside. However, they are more pronounced in .... relations in the classroom; using a wide range of counseling and behavioral methods that involve students in ..... Vol. 7. Addis. Ababa. Com. Ent. Printers. Gronuld N. O. (1981) Measurement and Evaluation in Education. NY:.

  6. Addressing Students with Disabilities in School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Karen Kow Yip; Beigi, Amir Biglar

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive education can help facilitate the inclusion of students with disabilities in mainstream schools. Inclusive education has proven to be a key benefit for disabled children as an end in itself and as a means to an end of greater social acceptance of difference and disability. However there needs to be greater awareness-raising measures at…

  7. Addressing the nutritional needs of university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA Delta Obesity Prevention Research Project seeks to identify and evaluate dietary and physical activity patterns in African American students to develop an educational intervention that is nutritionally adequate and culturally relevant for 18- to 24-year-old African-American university stude...

  8. Addressing the Factors Inhibiting Students' Participation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This action research was conducted in 2007 with these aims: to discover the stressors to active students' participation in classroom; attempt solving the identified stressors immediately; and to design some mitigating measures for both short term and long term solutions. Although Ethiopian Ministry of Education stresses the ...

  9. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  10. Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershner, Shelley D; Chervin, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    Daytime sleepiness, sleep deprivation, and irregular sleep schedules are highly prevalent among college students, as 50% report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient sleep. The consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood, and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. This article reviews the current prevalence of sleepiness and sleep deprivation among college students, contributing factors for sleep deprivation, and the role of sleep in learning and memory. The impact of sleep and sleep disorders on academics, grade point average, driving, and mood will be examined. Most importantly, effective and viable interventions to decrease sleepiness and sleep deprivation through sleep education classes, online programs, encouragement of naps, and adjustment of class time will be reviewed. This paper highlights that addressing sleep issues, which are not often considered as a risk factor for depression and academic failure, should be encouraged. Promotion of university and college policies and class schedules that encourage healthy and adequate sleep could have a significant impact on the sleep, learning, and health of college students. Future research to investigate effective and feasible interventions, which disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a time and cost effective manner, is a priority. PMID:25018659

  11. Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershner SD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shelley D Hershner, Ronald D ChervinDepartment of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Daytime sleepiness, sleep deprivation, and irregular sleep schedules are highly prevalent among college students, as 50% report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient sleep. The consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood, and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. This article reviews the current prevalence of sleepiness and sleep deprivation among college students, contributing factors for sleep deprivation, and the role of sleep in learning and memory. The impact of sleep and sleep disorders on academics, grade point average, driving, and mood will be examined. Most importantly, effective and viable interventions to decrease sleepiness and sleep deprivation through sleep education classes, online programs, encouragement of naps, and adjustment of class time will be reviewed. This paper highlights that addressing sleep issues, which are not often considered as a risk factor for depression and academic failure, should be encouraged. Promotion of university and college policies and class schedules that encourage healthy and adequate sleep could have a significant impact on the sleep, learning, and health of college students. Future research to investigate effective and feasible interventions, which disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a time and cost effective manner, is a priority.Keywords: grade point average, GPA, sleep deprivation, academic performance, adolescence, sleep education programs

  12. Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershner, Shelley D; Chervin, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    Daytime sleepiness, sleep deprivation, and irregular sleep schedules are highly prevalent among college students, as 50% report daytime sleepiness and 70% attain insufficient sleep. The consequences of sleep deprivation and daytime sleepiness are especially problematic to college students and can result in lower grade point averages, increased risk of academic failure, compromised learning, impaired mood, and increased risk of motor vehicle accidents. This article reviews the current prevalence of sleepiness and sleep deprivation among college students, contributing factors for sleep deprivation, and the role of sleep in learning and memory. The impact of sleep and sleep disorders on academics, grade point average, driving, and mood will be examined. Most importantly, effective and viable interventions to decrease sleepiness and sleep deprivation through sleep education classes, online programs, encouragement of naps, and adjustment of class time will be reviewed. This paper highlights that addressing sleep issues, which are not often considered as a risk factor for depression and academic failure, should be encouraged. Promotion of university and college policies and class schedules that encourage healthy and adequate sleep could have a significant impact on the sleep, learning, and health of college students. Future research to investigate effective and feasible interventions, which disseminate both sleep knowledge and encouragement of healthy sleep habits to college students in a time and cost effective manner, is a priority.

  13. College Students' Perceptions of the Importance of Sexual Assault Prevention Education: Suggestions for Targeting Recruitment for Peer-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowski, Kristen N.; Henry, Dayna S.; Sturm, Ashley A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual assault continues to be a pervasive health issue among college students in the USA. Prevention education initiatives have been implemented to address this concern. However, little is known about college students' perceptions of such programming. The purpose of this study was to assess predictors of college students'…

  14. Greek college students and psychopathology: new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C

    2015-04-29

    College students' mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. To investigate Greek college students' psychopathology. During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024) and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039) respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students' origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students' school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students' family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7%) do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck's depression inventory scale. Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students' college life.

  15. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  16. Evaluation of the College Bound Summer Program for High School Students with Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, Jane Moss

    2004-01-01

    Jane Warner's Dissertation In the current education environment, students with disabilities may lack adequate transition planning in high school that may explain why these students often experience poor outcomes in higher education. The College Bound Summer Program was developed in 1999 as a supplement program within the state of Virginia to address transition issues and college success strategies for students with disabilities planning to attend college. The purpose...

  17. Food Safety Tips for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2005

    2005-01-01

    When students pack up for college, they take along the basics-- TV, laptop, MP3 player, and cell phone. Many students will arrive at school with a microwave oven, tabletop grill, mini fridge, and toaster oven in tow. Most students, however, don't know there are food safety considerations when cooking with these appliances. The USDA Meat and…

  18. Educating College Students of the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and administrators of higher education today face a challenge with their student populations, many of whom are part of what is known as the net generation. As students become more technologically advanced, faculty must be technologically ready to meet the needs of students. Many college faculty and administrators are from earlier…

  19. Native Hawaiian Community College Students: What Happens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Lester, Jaime; Moon, Hye Sun; Tibbetts, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Using a weighted database of approximately 3,000 students, this study involves the tracing of the postsecondary history of 2,516 students who identified as Native Hawaiian, graduated from high school between 1993 and 1995, and attended college. Virtually none of the students are 100% Hawaiian. Due to a long history of intermarriage, the Hawaiian…

  20. Response of colleges to risky drinking college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Nadine R; Logan, Diane E

    2014-10-01

    Heavy drinking and related consequences continue to affect college campuses due to fatalities, assaults, serious injuries, and arrests that occur among students. Several approaches aimed at reducing the harm incurred by students and the college communities as a result of heavy drinking are being used with varying success. A review of interventions including educational, individual, and environmental approaches are described, as well as new, promising, strategies. Despite some success, elevated and risky drinking patterns continue. As such, concerns over implementation of evidence-based treatments and areas in need of further study are discussed. [Full text available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2014-10.asp, free with no login].

  1. Evaluating College Student Interest in Pet Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamle, Kathleen N.; Riley, Tracy A.; Carlson, Tracey

    2009-01-01

    The first year of college can be extremely stressful, especially for students residing on campus. Objective: The authors obtained information from college freshmen about their relationships with pets and investigated interest in a pet therapy program as social support for transient stressful periods. Participants: As part of a university…

  2. Assisting College Students with Athletic Disengagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lone, Jeffrey S.; Siembor, Michael; Mistler, Brian J.; Mapstone, David J.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines college student disengagement from sports, presents a multidimensional concept of athletic identity, and introduces a new measure intended to assist college counselors in their work with disengaged athletes. The Multidimensional Athletic Identity and Engagement Scale (MAIES) is introduced (Cronbach alpha 0.98, with subscale…

  3. Prediction of College Performance of Superior Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Roy J.

    1965-01-01

    Using 857 male National Merit Finalists and Commended Students, scales to predict 1st year college grades and science, writing, art, music, speech, and leadership achievement were developed by analysis of 906 pre-college questionnaire items. Two item analysis strategies were used: responses of achieving subjects (S's) and general samples of…

  4. Isaac Newton and Student College Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Success in college is built upon classroom success, but success in the classroom does not in itself ensure college completion. Completion arises from success in a sequence of classes one after another over time. It does so most frequently when students are presented with coherent course pathways to degree completion, are able to gain degree credit…

  5. Some Colleges Provide Success Coaches for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2007-01-01

    The road to a college degree is often littered with potholes of self-doubt, and sometimes those are deep enough to discourage even the most ambitious students. If the transition from high school to college were easy, the average six-year graduation rate at four-year institutions in the U.S. would probably be higher than 63%. To improve those…

  6. Substance Use in College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Mary; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Yoon, Yesel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The college years represent a developmental transition during which the initiation and escalation of heavy drinking set the stage for lifelong difficulties with alcohol and other drugs. Evidence from studies of adolescents and young adults with ADHD suggests that college students with the disorder may be uniquely vulnerable to alcohol-…

  7. Some Colleges Provide Success Coaches for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2007-01-01

    The road to a college degree is often littered with potholes of self-doubt, and sometimes those are deep enough to discourage even the most ambitious students. If the transition from high school to college were easy, the average six-year graduation rate at four-year institutions in the United States would probably be higher than 63 percent. To…

  8. Personality Traits and College Student Reading Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J.; And Others

    This document is concerned with studies of the possible relationship between the college reader and his personality traits. The results of the three studies reported gave evidence that there was a relationship between personality types and college reading skills. Intuitive and introverted personality types were better readers. When students were…

  9. Smokeless Tobacco Use among American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Elbert D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from a study which sought to determine prevalence and to delineate patterns of smokeless tobacco use among college students (N=5,894). Analysis of findings produced a profile of the typical college user. Implications of the data for intervention strategies and cessation programs are discussed. (IAH)

  10. Student Leadership Development within Student Government at Snow College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gordon Ned

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the leadership development process of former student leaders at Snow College. More specifically, the study focused on understanding how, when, and where leadership development took place in their "lived experience" within the student government at Snow College (Van Manen, 1998). Examining the lived…

  11. Risky behavior of adolescent college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Nancy R

    2009-04-01

    Nurses who provide care to adolescent college students are challenged to meet their diverse health care needs. Recent national survey data on American college students indicate that many participate in risky behaviors, which can have detrimental effects on their physical and psychosocial health. These data also reveal that college students rank health educators and health center medical staff as the most believable sources of health-related information. Thus, nurses are in key positions to screen for and educate about stress, coping styles, and mental health issues. In addition to decreasing barriers to access, nurses can inform students on the kinds of resources available and their locations. This article also describes interventions that may be effective on college campuses for the reduction of risks and the promotion of positive coping and health outcomes in this population.

  12. Coaching for College Students with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that ADHD can impair academic achievement in college students and throughout the life span. College students with ADHD are an at-risk population who might benefit from interventions. An offshoot of CBT-oriented therapy that has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years is ADHD coaching. ADHD coaching is a psychosocial intervention that helps individuals develop skills, strategies, and behaviors to cope with the core impairments associated with ADHD. Most coaching programs are primarily based on a CBT approach and target planning, time management, goal setting, organization, and problem solving. This paper describes ADHD coaching for college students and discusses how coaching is different from standard CBT treatment. This is followed by a review of empirical studies of the effectiveness of ADHD coaching for college students. Finally, some specific considerations and procedures used in coaching are described.

  13. Mental health of dubai medical college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of the participants, 47 (45.6%) were found to be in normal range (GHQ mean College students reported a significant level of psychiatric distress, however, it should not be underestimated, and actions should be taken to encourage Dubai Medical College students to get help from for psychiatric services for their emotional problems. The risk factors as well as the protective factors must be identified in nation-wide studies to promote mental health of medical students.

  14. Psychological correlates of optimism in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R L; Haemmerlie, F M; Ray, D M

    2003-04-01

    This study assessed optimism held by 300 college students at a midwestern university using Scheier and Carver's Life Orientation Test. Optimism ratings were compared to measures of psychological functioning. Analysis showed that optimism was significantly associated with all of the adjustment measures (social, academic, personal, and goal commitment) assessed with Baker and Siryk's Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire, higher self-esteem measured with Rosenberg's Self-esteem scale, and with lower ratings of loneliness as assessed with the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale.

  15. Alcohol and College Students: Do Parents Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffes, Errin J.

    2001-01-01

    Higher education in America has attempted to define the relationships it has with both students and parents for many years. While some argue that the philosophy of in loco parentis has seemingly disappeared, others suggest that its return is imminent on American college campuses. One example of this return is the trend among campuses towards notifying parents when students are involved in judicial matters. Recent changes in federal privacy laws have clarified the right of colleges and univers...

  16. Compulsive use of alcohol among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrelli, Paola; Bentley, Kate; Vitali, Mario; Clain, Alisabet J.; Nyer, Maren; Fava, Maurizio; Farabaugh, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    Among college students alcohol consumption is associated with other high-risk behaviors that can lead to short- and long-term negative health consequences. Identification of college students consuming alcohol who are at high risk for problems may have important public health implications. This study examines the ability of the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item to detect high-risk behaviors relative to other screening measures and its association with different dimensions of compulsive drinki...

  17. Cyberbullying: The hidden side of college students

    OpenAIRE

    Martins,Maria José D.; Francisco, Sofia Mateus; Simão,Ana Margarida Veiga; Ferreira, Paula Costa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how university students perceive their involvement in the cyberbullying phenomenon, and its impact on their well-being. Thus, this study presents a preliminary approach of how college students’ perceived involvement in acts of cyberbullying can be measured. Firstly, Exploratory Factor Analysis (N = 349) revealed a unidimensional structure of the four scales included in the Cyberbullying Inventory for College Students. Then, Item Respons...

  18. College students' attitudes and knowledge of AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teka, T

    1993-10-01

    To determine attitudes and knowledge of AIDS, a survey was conducted among students at the Gondar College of Medical Sciences, Gondar, Ethiopia. One hundred sixty four new incoming students (115 males, 49 females) in all departments in 1990-91 academic year provided information. The results reveal that 40% of the students have experienced sexual intercourse. Their knowledge of AIDS was adequate and comparable with other college and high school students, but the majority of those who practice sex do not use condoms and a fifth have had a sexual contact with a high risk individual.

  19. Motives underlying smoking in college students with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kerrie Glass; Flory, Kate

    2017-05-01

    The positive association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and smoking in youth has been well documented. Less research has examined why individuals with ADHD, particularly college students, are at increased risk for smoking. This longitudinal study examined whether smoking motives [cognitive enhancement, tolerance, negative reinforcement (smoking to reduce negative affect or stress), craving, social influences, and weight control] helped to explain the relation between ADHD symptoms (inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity) and cigarette smoking among college students. Participants were 889 undergraduates (21% men) and their parents who completed online surveys at the beginning and end of the Fall semester regarding their smoking behaviors, ADHD symptoms, and smoking motives. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze data and answer research questions. Nineteen percent of students reported smoking, while 20% reported one or more inattentive symptoms, 35% reported one or more hyperactive/impulsive symptoms, and 3.3% met criteria for ADHD. All smoking motives significantly moderated the relation between inattentive symptoms and smoking, while most smoking motives (negative reinforcement, tolerance, craving, cognitive enhancement, and weight control) moderated the link between hyperactive/impulsive symptoms and smoking. Results remained significant after controlling for stimulant medication use and conduct disorder symptoms. Conclusions/Importance. Addressing negative reinforcement, craving, social influences, and tolerance in prevention and intervention efforts on college campuses may reduce smoking. Results also highlight the importance of assessing a range of ADHD symptoms in college students as ADHD symptoms, even at subthreshold levels, were associated with increased smoking rates among college students.

  20. Alcohol drinking among college students: college responsibility for personal troubles

    OpenAIRE

    Lorant, Vincent; Nicaise, Pablo; Soto Rojas, Victoria; D?Hoore, William

    2013-01-01

    Background One young adult in two has entered university education in Western countries. Many of these young students will be exposed, during this transitional period, to substantial changes in living arrangements, socialisation groups, and social activities. This kind of transition is often associated with risky behaviour such as excessive alcohol consumption. So far, however, there is little evidence about the social determinants of alcohol consumption among college students. We set out to ...

  1. Islam on Campus: Identity Development of Muslim-American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Farouk

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of college student development has progressed during the last decades to address various aspects of identity development across a wide range of diverse populations, there is a noticeable gap in the literature about Muslim-American college students and how the university experience impacts their development as young adults. The…

  2. Expanding Pathways: A Summer Bridge Program for Community College STEM Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaburg, Lubella; Aguirre, Ofelia; Goodchild, Fiona; Kuhn, Jens-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the transition of community college students to degree programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The paper presents the results of an evaluation of a two-week residential summer bridge program that recruited community college students from a wide range of academic, ethnic, and socioeconomic…

  3. A Hidden Crisis: Including the LGBT Community When Addressing Sexual Violence on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Zenen Jaimes; Hussey, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sexual assault on college campuses has received increased national attention. In its first report, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault highlighted steps colleges and universities can take to curb the number of sexual assaults on campuses. For the first time, the U.S. Department of Education has released the…

  4. CAPP: A Comprehensive Preventative Program Model Addressing Alcohol Misuse among College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol consumption by college students in the United States has increased in quantity and frequency over the past five years. With this increase, there has come evidence of a rise in negative consequences caused by alcohol misuse. To help reduce these problems, colleges and universities nationwide have begun implementing alcohol programs for…

  5. Recognizing and diagnosing ADHD in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Larry

    2011-10-01

    College students have greater independence, autonomy, and academic expectations than children and adolescents. Combined with the minimal structure and supervision provided on campus, the temptations and challenges of this transitional phase can exacerbate symptoms of undiagnosed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and lead to poor academic performance, social difficulties and interpersonal conflicts, financial problems, and substance use. Recognition by college personnel and proper evaluation and consistent follow-up by clinicians can help college students with ADHD get the treatment that they need in order to thrive in an academic setting. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  6. Rural Community College Student Perceptions of Barriers to College Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shanda; Miller, Michael T.; Morris, Adam A.

    2016-01-01

    Rural community college students face unique difficulties in higher education for many reasons, including the resources they typically have access to, their collective histories, and in many cases, the preparation they received in high school. These challenges might be low-performing secondary schools, a lack of tradition and precedence in…

  7. Indigenous Women College Students' Perspectives on College, Work, and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Jennie L.; Adolpho, Quintina Bearchief; Jackson, Aaron P.; Alexitch, Louise R.

    2014-01-01

    Native American and First Nations (herein collectively referred to as Indigenous) women college students are faced with the challenge of balancing their cultural imperatives and the demands of the dominant Western culture in family, school, and work/employment roles. In order to explore these women's experiences and perspectives, this study…

  8. Building Bridges: College to Career for Underrepresented College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Darris R.; Bryant, Immanuel; Crutchfield, Stacey; Jones, Michelle; Wade, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Colleges and universities have increased institutional outreach to diversify their campuses, however, campus leaders, faculty, and staff, particularly at predominantly White institutions (PWIs), must provide more and different support services as their institutional demographics shift to include more underrepresented students. The shift in…

  9. Leadership Matters: Addressing the Student Success and Completion Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenney, Byron N.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes a movement to significantly increase student attainment in community and technical colleges. The observations of Leadership Coaches in Achieving the Dream, developed over a nine-year period of involvement, provide insight into the leadership required to transform institutional culture.

  10. Addressing Changing Times: Teaching Disability Etiquette to PETE Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelle L.

    2007-01-01

    The behaviors of many college students have changed over the past 10 years. These behavioral changes include a rise in poor social skills, such as inappropriate actions and comments in social situations. It has become increasingly important for educators to incorporate proper behaviors and professional etiquette in their curricula for physical…

  11. The Anxiety of Students Viewed from the Point of the Life Cycle in College On Differences between College Students and Junior College Students

    OpenAIRE

    徳田, 完二

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the differences in anxiety accompanied with college life between college students and junior college students. The subjects were 242 college students (61 1st grade males, 33 2nd grade males, 58 1 st grade females, and 88 2nd grade females) and 182 junior college students (75 1st grade females and 107 2nd grade females). The college life anxiety scale was adopted to mesure the level of subjects' anxiety accompanied with college life. The scale contai...

  12. ADHD in college students: Developmental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L; Dupaul, George J

    2008-01-01

    According to the American Psychiatric Association [DSM-IV-TR, 2000], Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) affects approximately 3-7% of the school aged population and 2-4% of the adult population. Recently, college students with ADHD have begun to receive more attention, largely due to the increase in numbers of high school students with ADHD pursuing higher education, as well as reports of prescription stimulant misuse on college campuses. The purpose of the present article is to summarize major research findings concerning developmental issues facing college students with ADHD. Overall, findings suggest that relative to the general college population, college students with ADHD are at greater risk for academic and psychological difficulties, and misuse of prescription stimulants is indeed a problem on many campuses. Primary treatment strategies include psychostimulant medication, coaching, and educational accommodations; however, very little controlled treatment outcome research has been conducted with this population. These findings are preliminary and are tempered by methodological limitations as well as the small number of studies that have been conducted. Future research using larger sample sizes, rigorous assessment criteria, and employing longitudinal designs is needed to better understand the developmental issues facing college students with ADHD.

  13. Suicidal ideation in Pakistani college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokher, Sehar; Khan, Murad M

    2005-01-01

    Suicidal behavior includes ideation, attempts and completed suicides. Information on suicidal behavior from Pakistan, a conservative South Asian Islamic country, is lacking. To address the issue, a pilot study was carried out to assess the prevalence of suicidal ideation in Pakistani college students. Suicidal ideation was assessed on the basis of responses to four questions contained in the depression subscale of the General Health Questionnaire-28. Of the total 217 completed questionnaires, the overall rate of suicidal ideation was 31.4%. While there was no significant difference between genders, more females (33%) than males (29.2%) responded positively. Respondents belonging to single parent families and those living at home, compared to those using hostel facilities, reported higher rates. The reported rate in our sample is higher than similar studies conducted elsewhere. There is the need for more information in this important area of suicidal behavior, including studying such feelings in school going children as well as in a larger community sample. The findings of such studies can contribute to our understanding of the suicidal process in the Pakistani population and to address it at various levels.

  14. Depressive Symptomatology and College Persistence among African American College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Güler; Horne, Sharon G; Owens, Archandria C; Armstrong, Aisha P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptomatology and college outcomes among African American students, as well as to determine whether these relationships were moderated by gender and type of university. Participants included 569 African American first-year students attending two public universities in the Southeast United States: a historically Black college/university (HBCU) and a predominantly White institution (PWI). Using a longitudinal study design, data were collected at three time points. Results indicated that, after adjusting for the effects of the control variables (gender, type of institution, high school GPA, participation in on-campus activities, institutional and goal commitments), depressive symptomatology present in the first semester of college was associated with increased likelihood of dropping out of college before the end of the second year of college. The relationship between these two variables was mediated by first-year cumulative GPA. Results also indicated that the hypothesized relationships did not vary as a function of gender and the university type.

  15. Hazardous drinking and weight-conscious drinking behaviors in a sample of college students and college student athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ryan J; Chaney, Beth H; Vail-Smith, Karen; Gallucci, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    "Weight-conscious drinking" refers to behaviors to restrict calories in conjunction with consuming alcohol and is associated with numerous negative consequences. This behavior has been observed in the college student population but has not been examined among college student athletes. This cross-sectional study assessed drinking, hazardous drinking levels (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption [AUDIT-C] sum score), and weight-conscious drinking behaviors (for weight loss purposes and for intoxication purposes) using a paper-and-pencil survey that was completed by students at a large, private university in the Southwest United States. The sample for this study included college student nonathletes (n = 482; 212 males and 270 females) who completed the survey in 1 of 34 classes and college student athletes (n = 201; 79 males and 122 females) who completed the survey during practice. These analyses examined whether hazardous drinking level and other personal covariates (gender, race, and athlete status) predicted the 2 weight-conscious drinking behaviors of interest. Among the subsample of students who drank, the same proportion of participants indicated weight-conscious drinking behavior for weight loss and weight-conscious drinking behavior for intoxication (both 24.9%; n = 122). In the multivariate analyses, students with higher hazardous drinking scores and females were significantly more likely to report engaging in both weight-conscious drinking behaviors. In those analyses, neither weight-conscious drinking behavior varied by athlete status. In this sample of college students, hazardous drinking most predicted weight-conscious drinking behavior and superseded gender and athlete status. In response, college health professionals should consider evidenced-based approaches to address hazardous drinking.

  16. Daily college student drinking patterns across the first year of college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeppner, Bettina B; Barnett, Nancy P; Jackson, Kristina M; Colby, Suzanne M; Kahler, Christopher W; Monti, Peter M; Read, Jennifer; Tevyaw, Tracy; Wood, Mark; Corriveau, Donald; Fingeret, Allan

    2012-07-01

    Despite the long recognized importance and well-documented impact of drinking patterns on health and safety, college student drinking patterns are understudied. This study used a daily-level, academic-year-long, multisite sample to identify subpopulations of college student drinking patterns and to describe how these groups differ from one another before, during, and after their first year of college. Two cohorts of first-year college students (n = 588; 59% female) reported daily drinking on a biweekly basis using web-based surveys and completed surveys before and after their first year of college. Cluster analyses based on time series analysis estimates of within-person drinking differences (per weekday, semester, first 6 weeks) and other descriptors of day-to-day drinking identified five drinking patterns: two low (47% and 6%), two medium (24% and 15%), and one high (8%) drinking cluster. Multinomial logistic regression analyses examined cluster differences in pre-college characteristics (i.e., demographics, alcohol outcome expectancies, alcohol problems, depression, other substance use) and first-year college experiences (i.e., academic engagement, alcohol consequences, risky drinking practices, alcohol problems, drinking during academic breaks). Low-drinking students appeared to form a relatively homogeneous group, whereas two distinct patterns were found for medium-drinking students with different weekend and Thursday drinking rates. The Thursday drinking cluster showed lower academic engagement and greater participation in risky drinking practices. These findings highlight quantitative and qualitative differences in day-to-day drinking patterns and suggest a link between motivational differences and drinking patterns, which may be addressed in developing tailored interventional strategies.

  17. The Role of Pets in the Lives of College Students: Implications for College Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Aimee C.; Sharkin, Bruce S.; Bottinelli, Jennifer J.

    2017-01-01

    The roles that pets play in the lives of college students have received little attention in the college counseling literature. This article will review four topics related to college students and pets that have implications for counselors: (a) the separation anxiety that students experience from not having their pets at college, (b) the…

  18. Alcohol expectancy challenges for college students: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, Allison K; Maisto, Stephen A

    2011-06-01

    Heavy alcohol use among college students has become a substantial health concern. With national survey data indicating that 40% of college students report consuming five or more alcoholic drinks at least monthly (Johnston, O'Malley, Bachman, & Schulenberg, 2009), prevention and intervention programs are needed to address this problem. The Task Force on College Drinking, commissioned by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), designated alcohol expectancy challenges (ECs) as a recommended treatment strategy to reduce alcohol use among college students (NIAAA, 2002). This paper is a systematic critical review of the studies that have been conducted to assess for the efficacy of ECs among college students with a focus on changes in expectancies and alcohol consumption, and possible differences in efficacy for men and women. The review revealed that ECs were most efficacious when administered to male-only groups of participants; while ECs for female-only and mixed-gender groups demonstrated less consistent results. The implications of the findings of this critical review for the direction of future research are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How College Students View a Professor's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    1977-01-01

    Views of 3,670 students from six colleges and universities on most and least important traits of an ideal professor were analyzed. All data were collected with the same instrument. Data revealed students selected similar MOST and LEAST important traits of a quality professor. (Author)

  20. College Football Players: The New Nontraditional Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Michael Gary

    2010-01-01

    The focus on the collegiate careers of student athletes continues to grow within the community of higher education. As the focus has been centered on academic performance, a growing concern is evolving for the overall experience student athletes obtain in a higher education setting. As the focus on college experience gains momentum, higher…

  1. Everyday Health Communication Experiences of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Leslie; Egbert, Nichole; Ho, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined college students' day-to-day health communication experiences. Participants: A convenience sample of 109 midwestern university students participated in the study. Methods: The participants completed health communication diaries for 2 weeks, generating 2,185 records. Frequent health topics included nutrition and…

  2. The Videogame and the College Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, Dave; And Others

    College students' activities and personality characteristics associated with video game use were studied using existing theories about the effects of television as a framework. A three-part questionnare was given to 275 students enrolled in introductory communication classes at a large, midwestern university to gather data on: (1) the…

  3. Celebratory Socialization: Welcoming Latino Students to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Berta Vigil

    This paper describes the Puente Project, a program developed to provide support services to Latino students attending California community colleges. A discussion of the organizational response to students of color and of organizational socialization practices is followed by a description of the development of the Puente Project. The project's…

  4. Adolescent Perceptions of College Student Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Dennis L.; Olds, R. Scott; Ray-Tomasek, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed secondary school students regarding their perceptions of college student drinking. Most 7th graders had normative perceptions of collegiate drinking. Adolescent substance use most closely related to peer norms. Perceptions of collegiate drinking independently related to alcohol use intensity, drinking onset, and indicators of tobacco and…

  5. College Students, Diversity, and Community Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, Scott; Huguley, James P.; Novick, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: Over the past two decades, more than 200 studies have been published on the effects of community service learning on university students. However, the majority of these studies have focused on the effects of such programming on White and affluent college students, and few have considered whether there are differential effects…

  6. Roots of Mathematics Anxiety in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan-Lorey, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    A majority of college students exhibit feelings of fear and discomfort when put into situations that require the use of mathematics. These students are characterized to be mathematics-anxious and tend to overlook the idea that one can gain many benefits from learning the subject. This paper investigates the various factors that have led to and…

  7. Qualitative Description of College Students' Dinner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Brita; Brown, Lora Beth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover how college students conduct dinner groups and perceptions of the benefits and difficulties of participation. Design: Qualitative study conducted with 7 focus groups. Setting and Participants: A university campus, with 36 students participating in dinner groups, defined as a group of 3 people or more cooking for one another…

  8. College Student Performance and Credit Card Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Palmer, Todd Starr

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship between credit card usage, employment, and academic performance among a group of college students with credit cards. Results reveal that the students differed significantly in the level of anxiety felt from carrying debt, perceived need to work, and perceived impact of employment on academic performance. (Contains 57…

  9. Measuring and Reducing College Students' Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Christopher J.; Miller, Neal; Haberlin, Alayna T.; Ivy, Jonathan W.; Meindl, James N.; Neef, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined college students' procrastination when studying for weekly in-class quizzes. Two schedules of online practice quiz delivery were compared using a multiple baseline design. When online study material was made available noncontingently, students usually procrastinated. When access to additional study material was contingent on completing…

  10. Compulsive use of alcohol among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrelli, Paola; Bentley, Kate; Vitali, Mario; Clain, Alisabet J; Nyer, Maren; Fava, Maurizio; Farabaugh, Amy H

    2013-01-30

    Among college students alcohol consumption is associated with other high-risk behaviors that can lead to short- and long-term negative health consequences. Identification of college students consuming alcohol who are at high risk for problems may have important public health implications. This study examines the ability of the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item to detect high-risk behaviors relative to other screening measures and its association with different dimensions of compulsive drinking. Three hundred thirty-two college students completed measures on compulsive drinking and hazardous behaviors. Results showed that among male students the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item was not sensitive to detect hazardous alcohol consumption but co-occurred with the use of illicit drugs. Among female students it was sensitive to detect heavy drinking but not alcohol or drug problems. Among college students compulsive use of alcohol corresponds to an urge to consume alcohol that may be associated with use of illicit drugs in male students, with heavy drinking in female students and with substance use problems. This study suggest that the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item should not be used as a stand-alone screening for alcohol or drug problems but it could be considered a marker for at-risk behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Depression and suicidal ideation in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabaugh, Amy; Bitran, Stella; Nyer, Maren; Holt, Daphne J; Pedrelli, Paola; Shyu, Irene; Hollon, Steven D; Zisook, Sidney; Baer, Lee; Busse, Wilma; Petersen, Timothy J; Pender, Maribeth; Tucker, Dorothy D; Fava, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in college students and is often associated with depression. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of suicidal ideation (SI) on college campuses and to identify its correlates. On-campus depression screening sessions were conducted at 3 universities (n = 898; 55% female; mean age 20.07 ± 1.85 years). Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; mean ± SD of total score = 6.27 ± 6.31) and other measures. Eighty-four students endorsed a '1' on the BDI suicidality item, suggesting thoughts of suicide. Results showed that students with greater depression severity, higher levels of hopelessness, and poorer quality of life were more likely to endorse SI. Factors associated with SI highlighted in this study may aid in the identification of college students at risk for suicide. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Engaging Math-Avoidant College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Paul Latiolais

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an informal, personal account of how we, as two college teachers, became interested in math anxiety, decided to explore it amongst students at our institution in order to inform our teaching, and became convinced that the massive problem is math avoidance. We tried discussion groups, but few students attended, although those that did made useful suggestions. Thus informed, we designed an innovative course, Confronting College Mathematics as a Humanities course with the possibility of credit toward the math requirement, but it was undersubscribed in its first offering and had to be canceled. How can we get college students who avoid math to break through the barrier of math avoidance? We have now begun to explore a new approach: Second Life, where students can engage math—and quantitative literacy—virtually, and anonymously.

  13. Addressing health literacy: the experiences of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckel, Martha; Emery, Nicole; Nosek, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    To describe undergraduate nursing students' experiences of learning and providing patient education. To teach nursing students principles and practices of patient education, nurse educators design instructional strategies using educational and clinical practice guidelines, research and theories. This means teachers' approaches to teaching patient education are derived from evidence and support the evidence-based teaching movement. Despite their efforts, research shows that students lack knowledge and skills needed for proficiency in providing patient education. However, this research does not explicate students' experiences of learning and providing patient education, which can inform teachers of ways to structure approaches to teaching students this nursing practice. The philosophical background for this study was interpretive phenomenology. Eight undergraduate nursing students in their final semester of a baccalaureate nursing programme were interviewed using face-to-face, unstructured interviews. Data were collected using unstructured interviews and analysed using hermeneutics. Common meanings from the analysis of data shows that a primary practice of students' learning and providing patient education is addressing health literacy. Three sub-themes: (1) respecting languages: learning persistence (2) helping patients understand: learning to teach and (3) promoting engagement: learning sensitivity, exemplify how students are addressing health literacy. Contrary to literature on students' lack of proficiency in providing patient education, the findings of this study reveal extraordinary competencies students already have in addressing health literacy. The results of this study show the paramount need for teachers to design instructional strategies that deepen students' extant knowledge and skills in health literacy prior to graduation from nursing programmes. Using the findings of this study, teachers will gain novel approaches to teaching patient education that

  14. Psychological Morbidity in Students of Medical College and Science and Art College Students - A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Mahawar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of quality of life in medical students we have conducted a cross sectional & descriptive study on screening of mental illness of 60 medical students of prefinal year and comparing it with 60 students of third year of Science and Art College. Students were selected via random sampling. GHQ-12 was used as a screening tool and after obtaining scores students were graded in 3 categories - individuals screened positive for psychological morbidity were of Grades 2 and 3 and individuals screened negative for psychological morbidity were of Grade 1 and they were compared according to college, gender & residence. Students screened positive for psychological morbidity as per GHQ-12 were found higher in medical college (87% as compared to Science and Art College (45% and a statistically significant association was found between psychological morbidity and medical students. Psychological morbidity was not significantly associated with residence and gender.

  15. Dating violence among college students: the risk and protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    The research review synthesizes the knowledge base on risk and protective factors for dating violence while highlighting its relevance to violence against college women. In particular, the review highlights the personal, family, relationship, and behavioral factors that heighten the risk of dating violence victimization and perpetration while also noting the methodological limitations of the current body of empirical research and identifying directions for future academic work. Researchers have identified the correlation between risky health and behavioral factors and dating violence, most often modeling these as part of the etiology of dating violence among college students. Less often have scholars explored these as co-occurring risk factors. This approach to dating violence may be used to develop meaningful and impactful interventions to reduce the incidence and prevalence of college dating violence while also addressing the other health risk behaviors that impact academic success and place students' well-being at risk. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ; (b The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90; (c The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; (d State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024 and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039 respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7% do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life.

  17. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024) and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039) respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7%) do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life. PMID:25938913

  18. Are female college students who are diagnosed with depression at greater risk of experiencing sexual violence on college campus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mian B; Memiah, Peter; Adeyinka, Adeyemi

    2014-08-01

    We examined the association between depression and sexual violence among 18-24 year-old female college students using National College Health Assessment survey. Data were collected from a nationally representative sample of 10,541 female students on 33 college campuses. Results showed that female students who were reportedly ever diagnosed with depression were 1.56 times more likely than those who had never been diagnosed with depression to have experienced sexual violence. Female students who had one or more sexual partners currently were found 3.17 times more likely than those who had no sexual partner to have experienced sexual violence; similarly, female students who engaged in binge drinking in the previous two weeks were found about two times more likely than their counterparts to have experienced sexual violence. Depression is a public health issue and must be addressed sooner rather than later in order to reduce and prevent sexual violence on college campuses.

  19. Addressing the Problems Faced by Married International Students

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Nor Yaacob,, Elham Vaez, Rumaya Juhari

    2015-01-01

    In recent decade, there has been an increasing rate of International students all over the world, but little is known about the marital life of this population. The need to understand graduate students' intentions to pursue an academic career has become more important over the years. While International students' cross-cultural adjustment has received considerable attention in the sojourner literature, there is a paucity of research that addresses the unique challenges faced by the married In...

  20. Addressing the Problems Faced by Married International Students

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Nor Yaacob, Elham Vaez Rumaya Juhari

    2015-01-01

    In recent decade, there has been an increasing rate of international students all over the world, but little is known about the marital life of this population. The need to understand graduate students€™ intentions to pursue an academic career has become more important over the years. While International students€™ cross-cultural adjustment has received considerable attention in the sojourner literature, there is a paucity of research that addresses the unique challenges faced by the married ...

  1. [Suicide ideation among college students in Chongqing.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-mei; Ai, Ming; Kuang, Li; Wang, Min-jian; Shen, Yan; Li, Da-qi; Gao, Xin-xue; Li, Xue-mei; Philips, Michael R; Niu, Ya-juan

    2010-03-01

    To describe the prevalence and risk factors for suicide ideation among college students in Chongqing city. Data on suicide ideation and related factors were collected from 9808 college students at 11 colleges randomly selected in Chongqing. A multiple logistic regression model was used to identify risk factors for suicide ideation. 1279 (13.0%) of the 9808 students reported suicide ideation and the constituent ratio of boys and girls was 3:4 while risk factors for suicide ideation were ranked as follows: high frequency of feeling hopeless in prior year (OR = 5.07, 95%CI: 4.27 - 6.02); having psychological problems in recent 1 month that affecting daily lives and learning (2.07, 1.79 - 2.38); relatives having suicide behavior (1.77, 1.52 - 2.08); having had sexual experience (1.95, 1.65 - 2.30); being female (1.66, 1.45 - 1.90) and friends who had had suicide attempts (1.46, 1.28 - 1.67); having diseases in the last 1 month that affecting daily lives and learning (1.29, 1.08 - 1.52). The prevalence of suicide ideation among these college students was high that calls the development, implementation and assessment of suicide prevention plans for college students that focusing on the risk factors identified for suicide ideation.

  2. Predictors of Stress in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Dalia; Camart, Nathalie; Romo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    University students often face different stressful situations and preoccupations: the first contact with the university, the freedom of schedule organization, the selection of their master's degree, very selective fields, etc. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a model of vulnerability to stress in French college students. Stress factors were evaluated by a battery of six scales that was accessible online during 3 months. A total of 483 students, aged between 18 and 24 years (Mean = 20....

  3. Maternal and peer influences on drinking among Latino college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Turrisi, Rob; Hospital, Michelle M; Mallett, Kimberly A; Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra Y

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on college drinking has paid little attention to Latino students. Social development models (Catalano, Hawkins, & Miller, 1992) suggest that protective influences in one domain (e.g., mothers) can offset negative influences from other domains (e.g., peers) though this possibility has not been explored with respect to Latino college student drinking. The present study had two aims: 1) to determine whether four specific maternal influences (monitoring, positive communication, permissiveness, and modeling) and peer descriptive norms were associated with college drinking and consequences among Latino students, and 2) to determine whether maternal influences moderated the effect of peer norms on college drinking and consequences. A sample of 362 first-year students (69.9% female) completed an online assessment regarding their mothers' monitoring, positive communication, permissiveness, and modeling, peer descriptive norms, and drinking and related consequences. Main effects and two-way interactions (mother×peer) were assessed using separate hierarchical regression models for three separate outcomes: peak drinking, weekly drinking, and alcohol-related consequences. Maternal permissiveness and peer descriptive norms were positively associated with drinking and consequences. Maternal communication was negatively associated with consequences. Findings indicate that previously identified maternal and peer influences are also relevant for Latino students and highlight future directions that would address the dearth of research in this area. © 2013.

  4. Why Community College Students Make Successful Transfer Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, David; Sygielski, John J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two stories that represent a common paradigm shift at the community college level. The life journeys of Tony and Mary Ann are very different. Tony, a traditional-aged student, reluctantly entered his local community college because he was unable to prove, scholastically, that he was capable of handling the coursework at his…

  5. Using Theatre for Social Change to Address Sexual Violence against College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mary Candace

    2012-01-01

    The present study focuses on the need for sexual assault prevention interventions among college student populations. A review of the literature indicates that theatre-based prevention interventions are effective in preventing sexual violence among student populations. Chapter 2 of this dissertation is a literature review synthesizing scholarship…

  6. Community college students' perceptions of stress

    OpenAIRE

    MAUREEN JOHNSON

    2009-01-01

    As adolescents entering adulthood more frequently enrol in community colleges, the need for research concerning stress experienced by this population is increasing as well. The purpose of the current study is to explore and describe community college students' perceptions of stress and stressors. Data were collected through the use of focus groups, observation, and written Feedback Forms. Content analysis was used as the data analysis method. Participants' perceptions of stress were generally...

  7. How important is nutrition for college students?

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Troncoso; Carlos Doepking; Eduardo Silva

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. A balanced diet, both in quality and quantity, is required in order to reduce the risk of nutritionally related chronic diseases and to improve quality of life in all age groups. Among these, college-age adults are key beneficiaries of healthy eating habits that will serve them well in later professional and personal life. Methods. The purpose of this investigation was to interpret the perception of importance given to eating habits in college students. A qualitative phenomenolo...

  8. The Effect of Athletic Identity and Locus of Control on the Stress Perceptions of Community College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 72,000 student-athletes compete annually in athletic programs at the community college level. However, research addressing the effect of athletic participation on the psychological well-being of the community college student-athlete is sparse. This study represents an attempt to address this gap by examining the relationship among perceived…

  9. Mediating Factors of Personal Wellbeing in Gifted College Students: Early-College Entrants and Honors College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANETTE K. BOAZMAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Many educational, behavioral, dietary, safety, and other factors influence the wellbeing of adolescents around the world (Currieet al., 2008. Previous studies examined multiple adolescent subpopulations, but none looked at academically advanced students.In this study, the Personal Wellbeing Index (International Wellbeing Group, 2005 was used to assess the wellbeing of 213 giftedcollege students who entered university in either an early-college-entrance program or entered at normal ages and were acceptedinto an honors college. One hundred twenty-two participants were students from the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science(TAMS. TAMS is an early-college entrance program allowing gifted students to enter college after their sophomore (secondyear of high school, approximately 15 to 16 years old at the time of entrance to the University. Ninety-one participants werestudents who attended the UNT Honors College. Honors College students are gifted students who enter college at a traditionalage in America, after high school graduation (18 to 19 years old. This study also examined the participants’ general self-efficacy,beliefs about of intelligence, hope, gratitude, religiosity, and resiliency; and assessed any mediating effects they had on personalwellbeing in the high-ability college students. Data analysis included latent transition, general linear model, repeated measures,and regression. Results of the study revealed that dispositional mood and hope-agency were significantly related to the developmentof personal wellbeing for high-ability students during their first year of college regardless of age. Knowledge of psychologicalconstructs that are facilitative of the positive personal wellbeing helps parents, teachers, administrators, and counselors preparegifted students for success in college and beyond.

  10. Cultural Literacy for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, Jeremiah

    2007-01-01

    An article by Lois Roman, which appeared in the December 25, 2005 issue of the "Washington Post" under the title "Literacy of College Graduates Is on Decline: Survey's Finding of a Drop in Reading Proficiency Is Inexplicable," gives the results of a study conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics. According to the story "Only 31…

  11. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  12. College Students' Attitudes Toward Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Joseph W.

    1970-01-01

    Attitudes toward the desirability of abortion were significaantly related to sex, college, classification, level of church activity, residence background, family size, exposure to abortion, and attitude toward premarital sex. The data suggest an increasing acceptance of abortion in the future. (Author)

  13. Mental Health of Dubai Medical College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. Methods: One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results: The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of the participants, 47 (45.6%) were found to be in normal range (GHQ mean students reported evidence of psychiatric distress. Only 23 (22.3%) were found to have severe psychiatric distress. Conclusions: Early detection of psychiatric distress is important to prevent psychiatric morbidity and its unwanted effects on medical students and young doctors. Our results reveals that although a low percentage of Dubai Medical College students reported a significant level of psychiatric distress, however, it should not be underestimated, and actions should be taken to encourage Dubai Medical College students to get help from for psychiatric services for their emotional problems. The risk factors as well as the protective factors must be identified in nation-wide studies to promote mental health of medical students. PMID:24644486

  14. Qualitative description of college students' dinner groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Brita; Brown, Lora Beth

    2012-01-01

    To discover how college students conduct dinner groups and perceptions of the benefits and difficulties of participation. Qualitative study conducted with 7 focus groups. A university campus, with 36 students participating in dinner groups, defined as a group of 3 people or more cooking for one another (or together) and eating together at least 4 times a week. Dinner groups. The focus group recordings were transcribed, coded, and reconciled. NUDIST NVivo software (version 8, QSR International, Victoria, Australia, 2008) assisted in coding data to identify themes and subthemes. Dinner groups were composed of roommates or students living nearby. They rotated who made each dinner. Benefits identified included social interaction, increasing confidence in cooking, saving money and time, and eating more varied and healthful foods. Difficulties, which were uncommon, included increased time spent on days the student cooked and stresses related to cooking on a schedule. Students found that the benefits far outweighed the difficulties and universally wanted to continue in a dinner group. College students enjoyed dinner groups, and promoting them may be an option for improving college students' eating habits. Nearly all students believed that they ate better in a dinner group, but research is needed to assess actual intake. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations between smoking and media literacy in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Sidani, Jaime; Carroll, Mary V; Fine, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Organizations recommend media literacy to reduce tobacco use, and higher media literacy has been associated with lower smoking among high school students. The relationship between smoking media literacy and tobacco use, however, has not been systematically studied among college students. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between smoking and smoking media literacy among college students. We conducted the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) at a large, urban university, adding six items measuring smoking media literacy. A total of 657 students responded to this random sample e-mail survey. We used multiple logistic regression to determine independent associations between smoking media literacy items and current smoking. The media literacy scale was internally consistent (alpha = 0.79). Of the respondents, 21.5% reported smoking cigarettes over the past 30 days. In a fully adjusted multivariate model, participants with medium media literacy had an odds ratio (OR) for current smoking of 0.45 (95% CI = 0.29, 0.70), and those with high media literacy had an OR for current smoking of 0.38 (95% CI = 0.20, 0.70). High smoking media literacy is independently associated with lower odds of smoking. Smoking media literacy may be a valuable construct to address in college populations.

  16. [Experience of College Students on Suicide Attempts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Mi

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore and describe the experience of Korean college students on suicide attempts. Eight students participated and data were collected through in-depth individual interviews between September, 2011 and April, 2012. Data were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory method. Analysis showed that the central phenomenon of suicide attempt experience of college students was 'inextricable despair'. Causal conditions were 'sense of shame by failure to achieve perfect independence' and 'a big gap between reality and ideals'. Contextual conditions were 'extreme situation of being cornered' and 'excessive changes in emotions'. Intervening conditions were 'important others' and 'perspectives on the world'. Action/interaction strategies were 'temporary efforts' and 'gathering up one's mind'. Consequences were 'trauma as one's own hurt', 'conflict between life and death' and 'becoming mature'. The results of this study provide an in-depth understanding of the experience of college students with attempted suicide. It is necessary to develop programs to prevent suicide attempts by college students and these results can be used as a basis for program development.

  17. College-"Conocimiento": Toward an Interdisciplinary College Choice Framework for Latinx Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    This paper builds upon Perna's college choice model by integrating Anzaldúa's theory of "conocimiento" to propose an interdisciplinary college choice framework for Latinx students. Using previous literature, this paper proposes college-"conocimiento" as a framework that contextualizes Latinx student college choices within the…

  18. A Mixed Analysis of College Students' Best and Poorest College Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slate, John R.; LaPrairie, Kimberly; Schulte, Don P.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the views of 171 college students concerning their best and poorest college professors. In a multi-stage conversion mixed analysis design, students' stories of their best and poorest college professors were thematically analysed, resulting in 15 dominant themes for their best college professors and 12 dominant…

  19. The Impact of Exposure to Early College Students on Community College Student Academic and Social Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Catherine Fairley

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade, the nation has seen an increase in high school dropout rates as well as an increased need for a more skilled workforce. The Early College movement in North Carolina was a collaboration between public schools and colleges designed to address these needs. The program immersed child learners beginning in the 9th grade in classes…

  20. Factors that Influence Community College Students' Interest in Science Coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasway, Hope

    six significant variables that predicted increased student interest: older students, previous degree holders, students that took courses at night rather than during the daytime, students who were taught by instructors who taught high school, instructors who taught part-time, and students who had a non-STEM major. Methodological triangulation ensured that the research questions were adequately addressed, as qualitative data corroborated and provided insights for quantitative results. These findings imply that interventions such as implementation of professional development, specifically in andragogical training for instructors and support personnel, are necessary in order to properly address the needs of community college students. Policy makers need to ensure that proper academic and financial counseling systems are in place for students enrolled in these science courses. Students were affected by past experiences and required support from others in order to increase their interest and motivation to study science. This study will inform efforts to help community college students persist in the pipeline to join in the STEM workforce or transfer to four-year colleges.

  1. Deaf college students' perspectives on literacy portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    The study examined how literacy portfolios were used as tools in a college developmental English class in which deaf students assessed their reading comprehension as well as their writing processes and products. The students' reading and writing assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Immediate feedback was provided. The study was multidimensional, longitudinal, and ongoing. A variety of field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences of portfolios in regard to students' reading, writing, and reflective thinking. The results support the idea that the use of literacy portfolios can positively influence students who are deaf when they assess their reading and writing abilities.

  2. Summer Pre-College Programs for Students with Disabilities, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This list has been prepared as a reference for students with disabilities who are looking for ways to prepare for college and enhance college performance. Campus disability support providers report that students who receive some preview of the college experience can manage the first year with fewer adjustment problems than others. Colleges not…

  3. Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of California Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Sang Leng; Bratton, Sally; Marshak, Helen Hopp

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of students from 13 community college campuses in California. Participants: Heterosexual college students, ages 18 to 24, who have had sexual intercourse (N = 4,487). Methods: The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey was…

  4. Internet gambling in problem gambling college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Gonzalez-Ibanez, Angels

    2015-06-01

    Internet gambling is popular in college students and associated with problem gambling behaviors. This study evaluated Internet gambling in 117 students participating in study evaluating brief interventions to reduce gambling; the brief interventions consisted of minimal advice, motivational enhancement therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (1-4 sessions). Compared to their counterparts who did not gamble via the Internet (n = 60), those who reported recent Internet gambling (n = 57) wagered in greater frequencies and amounts and reported missing school more often and more problems with family and anxiety due to gambling. Recent Internet gamblers demonstrated similar reductions in gambling over time and in response to the brief interventions as non-Internet gamblers. These data suggest that Internet gambling is common in problem gambling college students, and students who wager over the Internet can benefit from brief interventions.

  5. Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Christopher J; Miller, Neal; Haberlin, Alayna T; Ivy, Jonathan W; Meindl, James N; Neef, Nancy A

    2011-01-01

    We examined college students' procrastination when studying for weekly in-class quizzes. Two schedules of online practice quiz delivery were compared using a multiple baseline design. When online study material was made available noncontingently, students usually procrastinated. When access to additional study material was contingent on completing previous study material, studying was more evenly distributed. Overall, the mean gain in percentage correct scores on weekly in-class quizzes relative to pretests was greater during contingent access than during noncontingent access conditions.

  6. Developing Stress Inventory for College Student

    OpenAIRE

    松尾, 美香; 山﨑, めぐみ; 望月, 雅光; 関田, 一彦; Mika, MATSUO; Megumi, Yamasaki; Masamitsu, Mochizuki; Kazuhiko, SEKITA

    2016-01-01

    Recently, checking employees’ stress level became a mandatory. The reason why\\checking employees’ stress level becomes critical is that the employer can take\\appropriate actions when necessary. Tolerance against stress, however, does not build\\over night. Therefore, if students do not have an opportunity to cultivate resiliency\\during college years, they have to develop on their own. Probably, in the past, university\\expected students personally develop their resiliency before their graduatio...

  7. Determinants of Alcohol Consumption By College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Elia Kacapyr; Samira Choudhury

    2006-01-01

    This paper exploits a random survey of 704 Ithaca College students regarding their demographics and alcohol consumption. Regression analysis is used to explore a variety of issues including: gender differences in alcohol consumption, whether marijuana and alcohol are complements or substitutes, underage drinking, the drinking habits of athletes, family history and alcohol abuse, the efficacy of specific policies designed to curb alcohol consumption by students. A separate logistic regression ...

  8. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Zhai; Lu Chen; Yanjie Yang; Hailian Sun; Hui Pan; Jincai He; Xiongzhao Zhu; Hong Sui; Wenbo Wang; Xiaohui Qiu; Zhengxue Qiao; Xiuxian Yang; Jiarun Yang; Yunmiao Yu; Bo Ban

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students? depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students. ...

  9. Speaking up: using OSTEs to understand how medical students address professionalism lapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Constance R; Choby, Beth A; Moore, Andrew; Parker, Robert Scott; Zambetti, Benjamin R; Naids, Sarah; Scott, Jillian; Loome, Jennifer; Gaffney, Sierra

    2016-01-01

    Objective-structured teaching encounters (OSTEs) are used across many disciplines to assess teaching ability. The OSTE detailed in this paper assesses 191 fourth-year medical students' (M4) ability to identify and address lapses in professionalism based on Association of American Medical Colleges' professionalism competencies. The research questions addressed are How frequently do M4s address professionalism lapses observed during an OSTE? What factors influence whether M4s provide feedback when they observe professionalism lapses in an OSTE? Standardized patients (SPs) and standardized learners (SLs) were recruited and trained to participate in a standardized encounter with specific cognitive, social, and behavioral errors, including professionalism lapses. M4s viewed this encounter and then offered feedback to the SL, while remotely observed by faculty. Post-encounter, the SL and faculty completed identical checklists to assess both teaching readiness and ability to address professionalism concerns. An analysis of frequencies showed that six of the Association of American Medical Colleges' nine professional competencies were addressed in the checklist and/or discussed in the focus group. Analysis of transcribed debriefing sessions confirmed that M4s did not consistently address professionalism lapses by their peers. In focus groups, M4s indicated that, while they noticed professionalism issues, they were uncomfortable discussing them with the SLs. Findings of the current study suggest how medical educators might support learners' ability to address lapses in professionalism as well as topics for future research.

  10. Nonintellective Variables and Nontraditional College Students: A Domain-Based Investigation of Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, David N; Myers, Charlsie A.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between domain-specific nonintellective variables and academic achievement among nontraditional students was explored to address uninvestigated factors and clarify distinctions between nontraditional and traditional student achievement. College students (nontraditional n = 72, traditional n = 67) completed an online survey…

  11. Loneliness and Irrational Beliefs among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Collette L.; Collison, Brooke B.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated relationship between loneliness and irrational beliefs among 236 college students who completed the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale and the Irrational Beliefs Test (IBT). Results revealed three specific irrational beliefs (Dependency, Anxious Overconcern, and Frustration Reactivity) to be predictive of…

  12. Instructor Touch Enhanced College Students' Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2013-01-01

    Touch between people is associated with several outcomes, including reduced stress, more positive mood, enhanced feelings of closeness, and positive behavioral change. However, the potential utility of touch rarely has been examined in a college sample, with teachers touching their students. In the present study, we used instrumental touch…

  13. Predicting the Social Commitments of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Ellen; O'Ryan, Leslie W.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the nature of social beliefs and commitments during the college years in relation to developmental orientations as measured by the Dakota Inventory of Student Orientations. Results support Creative-Reflective scale scores as predictive of commitment to the more humanitarian issues such as race and women's rights, whereas…

  14. The Behavioral Risks of Today's College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    In the past 10 to 15 years, the wide prevalence of various forms of negative behavior among young people in college has become one of the main causes of their deteriorating health. Traditionally classified among such forms are the excessive consumption of alcohol, smoking, and narcotics abuse. Issues relating to the protection of students' health…

  15. Obsessional Slowness in College Students: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aleta

    2014-01-01

    Cases of obsessional slowness, a variant of obsessive compulsive disorder, have been documented in case literature regarding relatively low functioning populations. However, obsessional slowness can also present in higher functioning populations, including college and graduate students, as illustrated here by three case examples from a competitive…

  16. Moral Perceptions of College Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Eric

    This thesis argues that college-level science education is in need of explicit moral focuses centered on society's use of scientific knowledge. Many benefits come with scientific advancements but unfortunately the misuse of scientific knowledge has led to planetary crises that should be a concern for all who inhabit the Earth (e.g., climate change). The teaching of the misuses of science is often left out of college science classrooms and the purpose of this thesis is to see what effect college science students' education has had on their moral perception of these pressing issues. To evaluate how college science students morally perceive these global issues within their educational experiences, two focus group interviews were conducted and analyzed. Students converged on three themes when thinking of society's misuse of science: 1) there is something wrong with the way science is communicated between science and non-science groups; 2) misusing science for private benefit is not right, and 3) it is important for people to comprehend sustainability along different scales of understanding and action. This thesis concludes that although to some extent students were familiar with moral features that stem from society's misuse of science, they did not attribute their learning of those features from any of their required coursework within their programs of study.

  17. Homesickness among American and Turkish College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Ayse Ilgaz; Feicht, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    Cultural differences in homesickness were studied for 75 U.S. and 69 Turkish female first-year students attending a private U.S. liberal arts college for women in the southeast and a coeducational university in Istanbul, respectively. Some aspects of the experience of homesickness transcended cultural boundaries, but others were culture specific.…

  18. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  19. Promoting Wellness for Thai College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Rodriguez, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    There are few in-depth studies of Thai college student health and mental health behaviors that focus on the cultural influences that shape such behaviors. Thus, the purposes of this study are: (1) to conduct the needs assessment survey on health and mental health issues at a public university in Thailand in order to better understand the issues…

  20. Deaf College Students' Perspectives on Literacy Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    This study examined use of literacy portfolios in a college developmental English class in which students who are deaf assessed their reading comprehension, writing processes, and products. Assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Various field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences…

  1. Colleges and Gay Student Organizations: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Annette

    1984-01-01

    Reviews recent litigation concerning colleges' refusal to recognize gay student organizations. Concludes that recognition can be denied only in very rare circumstances when groups fail to abide by reasonable time, place, and manner regulations or when their behavior incites unlawful action. (JAC)

  2. Characteristics Shaping College Student Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Cary J.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the concept of Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) in relation to undergraduate college students. The extensive research on OCB within traditional work environments indicates that while workers who demonstrate OCB usually receive more favorable performance evaluations, those behaviors also help build community and culture…

  3. The state ob the college students health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vovchenko I.I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the problem of health worsening among people suffering from many different diseases. Young people make up risk group. The article highlights the health conditions of pedagogical and medical college students. Medical groups have been determined as well as the increasing tendency within special medical group.

  4. Attitude Change among College Students toward Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Raymond

    1982-01-01

    College students' attitudes toward homosexuality changed after they participated in a program that taught about homosexuality through the use of: (1) a film on the topic of prejudice; (2) a videotape of a homosexual clergyman who discussed sexual variance; (3) two films in which couples engaged in homosexual behavior; and (4) a lecture. Results…

  5. Drug Use Among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebstock, James; Young, Sarah

    1978-01-01

    Reports on the Broward Community College's investigation of student use of illegal (marijuana, cocaine), and socially approved drugs (alcohol, cigarettes), which found marijuana and alcohol to be used most frequently by the predominantly white, middle class, under 23 population; and gender and income to have a significant influence on use. (TP)

  6. Predictors of College Adjustment among Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Toews, Michelle L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess personal and interpersonal predictors of college adjustment among a sample of 190 first-year Hispanic students. Specifically, we examined the extent to which personal factors such as self-esteem, acculturation, and ethnic identity and interpersonal factors such as parental education and parental attachment…

  7. Functions of Marijuana Use in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Julie K.; Accordino, Michael P.; Hewes, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypothesis that specific functional factors of marijuana use would predict past 30-day marijuana use in 425 college students more precisely than demographic variables alone. This hypothesis was confirmed. Functional factors of personal/physical enhancement as well as activity enhancement were…

  8. Correlates of College Students' Attitudes toward Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Changhwan; And Others

    This study describes the development of the Attitude Toward Grades (ATG) survey instrument, a brief internally consistent measure of college student attitude toward grades and reports on selected behavioral correlates of that attitude. An initial item pool of approximately 50 attitude statements was created and the Thurstone equal appearing…

  9. Gaps in Alzheimer's Knowledge among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the disease, it appears that there may be a need for increased education for formal and family caregivers of those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today's college students will be asked to fill both of these roles in the future. This study examined the level of knowledge of Alzheimer's disease among…

  10. College Students in Transition: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Stephanie M., Ed.; Hinkle, Sara M., Ed.; Kranzow, Jeannine, Ed.; Pistilli, Matthew D., Ed.; Miles, LaTonya Rease, Ed.; Simmons, Jannell G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The transition from high school to college is an important milestone, but it is only one of many steps in the journey through higher education. This volume is an annotated bibliography of the emerging literature examining the many other transitions students make beyond the first year, including the sophomore year, the transfer experience, and the…

  11. Prevalence of Snoring in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal; Tran, Duyen; Chakrabarti, Ashoke; Vasquez, Audrey; Gilbert, Paul; Davidson, Terence

    2008-01-01

    Snoring in college students may be the earliest presentation of adult sleep-disordered breathing, yet the literature contains few studies that demonstrate its effects on learning or whether early diagnosis leads to interruption of disease progression or prevention of comorbidities. Objective and Participants: The authors conducted this study in…

  12. Food Follies: Food Safety for College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This project involves the production and dissemination of a basic food storage and safety course geared toward college students. The course covers basic preparation, sanitation, proper cooking temperatures, chilling and storage, as well as common pathogens to be aware of. MALS

  13. Environmental Mental Models of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuellner, Melissa R.; Vincent, Leslie; Felts, Brandi

    2017-01-01

    Primary and secondary students in the United States are provided environmental education in their curricula due in part to national legislation, but higher education, for many U.S. citizens, is the last opportunity to educate young adults about the environment and humans' role in it in a formalized setting. Pre-college education and other life…

  14. Female College Students' Perceptions of Organ Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Kathleen; Baker, Kerrie

    2010-01-01

    The current process of organ donation in the U.S. relies on the premise of altruism or voluntary consent. Yet, human organs available for donation and transplant do not meet current demands. The literature has suggested that college students, who represent a large group of potential healthy organ donors, often are not part of donor pools. Before…

  15. Motivations of College Student Volunteers: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winniford, Janet C.; Carpenter, D. Stanley; Grider, Clint

    1997-01-01

    Examines the literature on volunteer motivation to provide a conceptual framework for future studies on traits and motivations of college student volunteers. Focuses on the relationship between egoistic and altruistic motivational components, as well as situational factors. Explores motivation constructs, mixed motivation, and results'…

  16. Getting Inked: Tattoos and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Laura; Sheehan, Eugene P.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores whether college students with tattoos or piercings demonstrate extreme personalities and behaviors. Participants were 46 men and 164 women (mean=20.0 years). Questions assessed participants' attitudes toward tattooing, presence of a tattoo, and participation in risk taking behaviors. Participants completed the Personality…

  17. Critical Junctures in Community College Student Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, Sam

    2010-01-01

    Existing research demonstrates a strong relationship between the prevalence of irregular enrollment patterns among community college students and their low rates of degree attainment (Adelman 2006; Bahr 2009; Berkner et al. 2000; Goldrick-Rab 2004, 2007; Horn and Nevill 2006). However, very little is known about the features and processes that…

  18. Connected yet Distracted: Multitasking among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Kouider; Delello, Julie; Reichard, Carla

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 935 undergraduate college students from a regional four-year university responded to an online time-diary survey asking them to report their multitasking habits and practices while engaged in four main activities: reading voluntarily for fun, reading for academic purposes, watching television (TV), and using the Internet. Results…

  19. Communicator Style: A Study of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Eletra S.

    This study uses Norton's Communicator Style as an instrument to determine communication styles of college students in relation to grade point average (GPA), education level, extracurricular activity involvement, and gender. The communication styles eliciting more positive communicator images are also examined. The communication discipline benefits…

  20. BASIC JAPANESE FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS. REVISED EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIWA, TAMAKO; MATSUDA, MAYAKO

    THE 24 LESSONS IN THIS TEXT ARE DESIGNED FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS BEGINNING JAPANESE LANGUAGE STUDY. THE SELECTION OF VOCABULARY AND THE PRESENTATION OF GRAMMAR ARE DIRECTED TO THE GOAL OF ACQUIRING FACILITY IN SPEAKING RATHER THAN WRITING. FOR A READING TEXT RECOMMENDED FOR USE WITH THIS SPOKEN LANGUAGE TEXT, SEE HIBBETT AND ITSAKA "MODERN…

  1. Transfer of Elaborative Strategies in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Lola; Conner, Timothy W., II; Skidmore, Ronald L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of elaboration as a memory strategy has been researched for decades and has been shown to be effective for preschool through adult ages (Pressley, 1982). However, the literature examining elaborative strategy use among students in college is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the transfer of elaborative…

  2. Teaching College Students about the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Timothy J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Proposes that college students and instructors become more future oriented by studying classical utopian thinkers, futurists, and science fiction based on societal projections and fantasized future technology. Contends that futurism raises philosophical questions of determinism and freedom, ethics, theology, and the nature of man. (DMM)

  3. Induced Psychotic Reactions among College Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As it may prolong energy and mental alertness, khat has gained popularity among college students. However, many undesirable psychoactive effects khat use are not reported. A dorm-to-dorm survey was carried out from May 5-15, 2006 to investigate the prevalence of khat –induced psychotic reactions among habitual ...

  4. Decreasing Math Anxiety in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Andrew B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the phenomenon of mathematics anxiety in contemporary college and university students. Forms of math anxiety range from moderate test anxiety to extreme anxiety including physiological symptoms such as nausea. For each of several types of math anxiety, one or more case studies is analyzed. Selected strategies for coping with…

  5. Student Loans, Financial Stress, and College Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Sonya L.; Ammerman, David Allen; Barrett, Sarah F.; Jones, Scott

    2017-01-01

    This study examined a sample of 2,475 undergraduate students to determine the influence of financial stress, debt loads, and financial counseling on retention rates. Results indicate, among other findings, that financial stress contributes to an increased likelihood of discontinuing college. Self-reported student loan debt contributes to an…

  6. How important is nutrition for college students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Troncoso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A balanced diet, both in quality and quantity, is required in order to reduce the risk of nutritionally related chronic diseases and to improve quality of life in all age groups. Among these, college-age adults are key beneficiaries of healthy eating habits that will serve them well in later professional and personal life. Methods. The purpose of this investigation was to interpret the perception of importance given to eating habits in college students. A qualitative phenomenological approach was chosen. A semi-structured survey was applied to 12 students. Furthermore, a focus group comprised of 6 students who fulfilled the study’s selection criteria was conducted. The results were analyzed by the principal investigator using semantic analysis. Results. Students identify the importance of eating habits for their quality of life. However, they also perceive that healthy diets are not favored by university life, especially due to lack of time. The students expressed that including contents on healthy eating habits in university curricula is necessary, particularly in the teacher-training courses. Conclusion. Healthy eating habits are important for college students; however, university life is a hurdle to attaining them.

  7. Development and Validation of the College Mattering Inventory with Diverse Urban College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Esau; Simon, Merril A.; Lee, Howard B.

    2009-01-01

    The perceived impact of mattering is quite accepted in higher education yet has not been well measured with diverse college students. This article describes the development and validation of the College Mattering Inventory with community college and university students. Results and implications for faculty and student affairs professionals are…

  8. Supportive College Environment for Meaning Searching and Meaning in Life among American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joo Yeon; Steger, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether American college students who perceive their college environment as supportive for their meaning searching report higher levels of meaning in life. We also examined whether students' perception of college environmental support for meaning searching moderates the relation between the presence of and search for meaning. Students'…

  9. Fish consumption in college students

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Adriana; Rodrigues, Andreia; Martins, Daniela; Fernandes, António; Ferro-Lebres, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Fish is an important part of a healthy diet, the possibility of substituting meals with a higher content of saturated fat raising cardiovascular diseases risk, by meals with fish has innumerous health benefits. Objective This study aimed to study the consumption of fish in higher education students, and its socio demographic cofactors. Methods A sample of 238 Portuguese higher education students was used in a cross sectional study. A questionnaire regarding socio demographic and...

  10. Combining Career and Couples Counseling for College Students: A Narrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Melinda M.; Shurts, W. Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Career and personal counseling have been dichotomized as distinct practices in much of the counseling literature. However, many college students seek counseling for career development and romantic relationship issues occurring concomitantly. A model for addressing career and relationship issues with heterosexual college couples in a group format…

  11. Developing Math Learning Skills: A Parallel Support Course for the Math-Anxious College Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces.

    Anxiety toward mathematics is a persistent barrier to successful completion of a college degree for women and minorities. This program adapted materials and philosophies from other programs to meet the needs of students identified as impaired by mathematics anxiety in their pursuit of a college education. The program addresses both influencing…

  12. Socializing and Mentoring College Students of Color: The Puente Project as an Exemplary Celebratory Socialization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laden, Berta Vigil

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the literature on mentoring and the role of organizational socialization, then presents highlights from the Puente Project, a California community college program, as an exemplary model that addresses the needs of first-generation Latino college students from a cultural context. The paper discusses program successes and notes implications…

  13. Student Perceptions of Using Games to Address Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Cara M.

    The purpose of this qualitative evaluative case study was to gain insight into how students perceived the efficacy of using games to address their science literacy concerns. Scientists in the United States are concerned with the lack of science literacy. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 requires proficiency in reading, mathematics, language arts, and science by the completion of the 2013--2014 school year. The high school participating in this study received substandard test scores on both the 2009 state graduation test and the science portion of the ACT test. The research question included understanding how students perceive the use of games in addressing their science literacy needs. The data from the student journals, field notes, and transcribed class discussions were analyzed using a 6 step method that included coding the data into main themes. The triangulated data were used to both gain insight into student perspective and inform game development. Constructivist theories formed the conceptual framework of the study. The findings of the study suggested that games may prove a valuable tool in science literacy attainment. The study indicated that games were perceived by the students to be effective tools in meeting their learning needs. Implications for positive social change included providing students, educators, and administrators with game resources that can be used to meet the science learning needs of struggling students, thereby improving science scores on high stakes tests.

  14. Are Teacher and Principal Candidates Prepared to Address Student Cyberbullying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Ronald A., Jr.; Bonner, Jessica L.; Styron, Jennifer L.; Bridgeforth, James; Martin, Cecelia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the preparation of teacher and principal candidates to address problems created in K-12 settings as a result of cyberbullying. Participants included teacher and principal preparation students. Findings indicated that respondents were familiar with the most common forms of cyberbullying and its impact on…

  15. Disturbed eating behaviours and associated psychographic characteristics of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, V M; Byrd-Bredbenner, C

    2013-07-01

    Young adulthood is a stressful transition period that may increase the risk for disturbed eating, especially for college students. The present study aimed to explore disturbed eating behaviours and a broad array of associated psychographic characteristics in a large, diverse sample of college students. College students (n = 2604; 58% white; 63% female) enrolled at three large, public US universities in 2009 and 2010 were recruited to take an online survey. The survey included reliable and valid disturbed eating behaviour and associated psychographic characteristic measures. Many participants engaged in disturbed eating practices. For example, one-quarter of women and one-fifth of men engaged in dietary restraint. One in seven reported regularly binge eating. One-third used inappropriate compensatory behaviours (self-induced vomiting, medicine misuse and excessive exercise) as a means for controlling weight and/or shape, with the rate of these behaviours reaching clinically significant levels for 4%, 3% and 5% of participants, respectively. Examination of psychographic characteristics revealed that one-fifth had moderate levels of depression and anxiety severity and almost half engaged in at least one obsessive-compulsive disorder type behaviour. Females felt under more pressure to attain the media physical appearance standard than males. The findings of the present study suggest that nutrition education interventions for college students may be needed to address disturbed eating behaviours and to provide guidance on how to seek professional help. The findings also suggest that it may be prudent for healthcare professionals to routinely screen college students for disturbed eating behaviours and offer interventions early when treatment is likely to be most effective. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Test Anxiety and College Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jason M.; Lindstrom, Will; Foels, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Test anxiety was examined in college students with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Results indicated that, relative to college students without ADHD, college students with ADHD reported higher total test anxiety as well as specific aspects of test anxiety, including worry (i.e., cognitive aspects of test anxiety) and…

  17. Understanding the Atheist College Student: A Qualitative Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and understand atheist college students' views on faith and how they experience the college campus as a result. I conducted interviews with 16 undergraduate and graduate self-identified atheist college students. Students discussed losing faith and transitioning to atheism; making meaning of life, death, and…

  18. Examining Victimization and Psychological Distress in Transgender College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effrig, Jessica C.; Bieschke, Kathleen J.; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment-seeking and non-treatment-seeking transgender college students were examined with regard to victimization and psychological distress. Findings showed that transgender college students had elevated rates of distress as compared with college students who identified as men or women. Results indicated that treatment-seeking and non-treatment…

  19. The Sociology of College Students' Identity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The dominant paradigm in the literature of college student development reflects a cognitive or psychological bias when considering the effect that college has on students. This chapter offers an alternative perspective by recognizing college as a social process and subsequently examines students' identity formation from a sociological…

  20. Distributional Learning in College Students with Developmental Language Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica; Van Horne, Amanda Owen; McGregor, Karla K.; Farmer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether college students with developmental language disorder (DLD) could use distributional information in an artificial language to learn about grammatical category membership in a way similar to their typically developing (TD) peers. Method: Seventeen college students with DLD and 17 TD college students participated…

  1. Using Narrative Career Counseling with the Underprepared College Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amber N.; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Mynatt, Blair

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of students enter college underprepared. These students do not have the academic skills to take college-level courses and are placed in remedial classes. Career counseling can help underprepared college students make educated career decisions based on their current situations. This article explores the characteristics of…

  2. An Investigation into Credit Card Debt among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dylan; Waterwall, Brian; Giardelli, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    It is no surprise that the amount of credit card debt and outstanding loan balances of college students is increasing every year. College students are heavily targeted by credit companies through the use of e-mail, campus booths, and standard mail. The reason for these solicitations is because of the soaring expense levels of college students and…

  3. Three Studies on Drinking Game Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jennifer Marie

    2010-01-01

    The majority of college students consume alcohol. Some college students consume heavily and these abusive patterns of alcohol use can be associated with substantial negative consequences. Drinking game participation has increased in popularity among college students and is associated with high levels of alcohol consumption and an increased…

  4. Addresses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Point features representing locations of all street addresses in Orange County, NC including Chapel Hill, NC. Data maintained by Orange County, the Town of Chapel...

  5. The health status of African American college students: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, C

    1994-03-01

    African American college students represent 1.3 million of the 14 million students currently enrolled in postsecondary institutions in the United States, but research specifically investigating or addressing the health status of these young people is rare. The author reviews the literature that has examined components of the social, mental, and physical health of African American college students. This literature review indicates a need for more information and for further research that specifically addresses health behaviors and practices of African American and other minority students. Health educators must recognize the importance of knowing about and understanding the mechanisms that support unhealthy as well as healthy behaviors in different cultural and ethnic groups.

  6. Addressing the Effectiveness of Athletics Intramural Programs in Tehran Medical College

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hossein Mousavi; Hossein Allahyari; Naghi Kamali

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to Evaluate the effectiveness of Athletic Intramural Programs in Tehran Medical Unit. The research community was all male and female students in Tehran Medical college of whom 150 were randomly chosen. It was descriptive research study whose data were collected with a researcher-made questionnaire. To determine the factors determining the relationship between academic achievement, student satisfaction levels, gender and educational groups of subjects participated...

  7. Socioeconomic stereotypes among undergraduate college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Amanda K; Harris, Paul B

    2008-12-01

    Classism, i.e., socioeconomic stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination that college students direct toward their peers, was examined. A sample of 53 undergraduate students (36 women and 17 men), ages 18 to 22 years (M = 19.0, SD = 1.2), were recruited from psychology courses. Utilizing a computer-administered questionnaire, participants were randomly assigned to rate a fictitious student whose family income was specified as among the lowest or highest at the college. Upper Income targets were rated as more sociable, judgmental, attractive, more likely to use alcohol and drugs, and more likely to belong to a fraternity or sorority. Lower Income targets were rated as more likable, agreeable, conscientious, intelligent, creative, and better able to maintain close friendships. Research directed toward the middle class could help fill a gap in the classism literature. Research on classism in higher education could clarify this potentially divisive issue among undergraduates.

  8. Mental Health of Dubai Medical College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. Methods: One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results: The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of th...

  9. College versus the real world: student perceptions and implications for understanding heavy drinking among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Suzanne M; Colby, John J; Raymond, George A

    2009-01-01

    College student heavy drinking is a persistent problem despite widespread initiatives. Using focus group methodology, this study examined student perceptions of factors that promote and limit drinking during and after college. The goal was to better understand factors that reduce drinking post-college to develop strategies to moderate college drinking. Twelve groups (N=75) were conducted with undergraduates at a northeastern Catholic college. Most participants drank; the majority exceeded a clinical indicator of problematic drinking. Transcript analysis identified themes that were coded with high reliability. Drinking in college was perceived to enhance socialization, bonding, and disinhibition. College, characterized by a high level of freedom and low level of responsibility, was seen as time-out from the "real world". In that context, heavy drinking was permissible. Students expected their future lifestyle to be burdensome and tedious; nostalgia for the good times associated with heavy drinking was anticipated. They imagined post-college drinking to be a threat to career and family and therefore irresponsible. Implications for intervention development and future research are described.

  10. Media Literacy as an Educational Method for Addressing College Women's Body Image Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Karen L.; Alexander, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of media literacy in the college classroom by comparing two modalities of learning, watching a video versus reading a text. The research questions guiding this project are: as teachers can we facilitate critical awareness among our students in order to alter the way women appropriate media images to evaluate…

  11. Is My Teaching Disturbing You? Strategies for Addressing Disruptive Behaviors in the College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelle

    2010-01-01

    Faculty in higher education are experiencing a new generation of college students referred to as Generation X (Gen-Xers) and Millennials. The characteristics and behaviors of Gen-Xers and Millennials have created a more challenging classroom learning environment. Some educators may choose to ignore disruptive behaviors or may simply not know which…

  12. Assessing and Addressing Safe Food Handling Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors of College Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Susan E.; Dirks, Brian P.; Quinlan, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors determined the food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of undergraduates (n = 1122) on an urban college campus using a previously piloted survey tool. Data obtained found that while students reported high levels of confidence in their ability to engage in safe food handling practices, their knowledge and self-reported behaviors…

  13. Subjective Life Expectancy Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodemann, Alyssa E; Arigo, Danielle

    2017-09-14

    Establishing healthy habits in college is important for long-term health. Despite existing health promotion efforts, many college students fail to meet recommendations for behaviors such as healthy eating and exercise, which may be due to low perceived risk for health problems. The goals of this study were to examine: (1) the accuracy of life expectancy predictions, (2) potential individual differences in accuracy (i.e., gender and conscientiousness), and (3) potential change in accuracy after inducing awareness of current health behaviors. College students from a small northeastern university completed an electronic survey, including demographics, initial predictions of their life expectancy, and their recent health behaviors. At the end of the survey, participants were asked to predict their life expectancy a second time. Their health data were then submitted to a validated online algorithm to generate calculated life expectancy. Participants significantly overestimated their initial life expectancy, and neither gender nor conscientiousness was related to the accuracy of these predictions. Further, subjective life expectancy decreased from initial to final predictions. These findings suggest that life expectancy perceptions present a unique-and potentially modifiable-psychological process that could influence college students' self-care.

  14. Treatment of alcohol-dependent college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Teena M; Kelly, Terri Ann

    2012-10-01

    A report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that excessive alcohol consumption is responsible for more than 4,600 deaths in underage youth annually. Alcohol abuse is common among college-age youth and may progress to alcohol dependence, which includes tolerance, craving, physical dependence, and loss of control. Although treatment for alcohol dependence is effective, like all other chronic disorders, relapse is common. The purpose of this article is to examine the issues surrounding alcohol abuse and dependence as well as maintaining sobriety in light of the high-risk college student drinking environment. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Predictors of health behaviours in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Ah, Diane; Ebert, Sheryl; Ngamvitroj, Anchalee; Park, Najin; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports a study examining the direct effects of perceived stress, perceived availability of and satisfaction with social support, and self-efficacy, and examines the intermediary roles of perceived threat (perceived susceptibility x perceived severity), benefits, and barriers on alcohol behaviour, smoking behaviour, physical activity and nutrition behaviour, general safety behaviour and sun-protective behaviour in college students. Health behaviours formed during young adulthood may have a sustaining impact on health across later life. Entering college can be an exciting, yet stressful event for many adolescents and young adults as they face trying to adapt to changes in academic workloads, support networks, and their new environment. Coupled with these changes and new-found responsibilities, they have greater freedom and control over their lifestyles than ever before. However, researchers have shown globally that many college students engage in various risky health behaviours. A cross-sectional sample of 161 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course completed self-report questionnaires regarding stress; social support; self-efficacy; and components of the Health Belief Model including perceived threat, perceived benefits, perceived barriers; and common health behaviours. Step-wise multiple regression analysis was conducted and significant predictors were retained as modifiers in the path analysis. Self-efficacy significantly predicted alcohol and smoking behaviour, physical activity and nutrition protective behaviour, general safety protective behaviour and sun-protective behaviour. Under high-perceived threat, self-efficacy was mediated by perceived barriers for binge drinking and moderated by perceived barriers for physical activity and nutrition behaviours. In addition, under high-perceived threat, self-efficacy was moderated by perceived threat for alcohol use at 30 days and 6 months. Under low threat, self-efficacy was mediated

  16. A Study on English Writing Anxiety of Chinese College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭敏

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between English writing anxiety and English proficiency of Chinese college stu-dents. A total of 149 college students participated in the study. Research data was collected through a writing anxiety test and the final course scores of writing classes. In order to address assess writing anxiety, three factors (Negative perception about writing ability, Fear of evaluation, and Avoidance of writing in English) were examined. The results found that Chinese college students were highly apprehensive in the process of English writing, and the Negative perception about the writing ability was a most im-portant and significant component of their writing anxiety. It also found that there was a significant correlation between the writ-ing anxiety and the final English writing score, and it also provided evidence that self-perception about the writing ability had the strongest relationship with the writing performance. Students who are not interested in taking more advanced English writing classes were more anxiety than the participant who were willing to enroll the courses.

  17. College Student Internet Use: Convenience and Amusement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve M. Johnson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Four hundred five college students completed a questionnaire that assessed patterns of Internet use. Results describe college students, with rare exception, as Internet users. The vast majority of college students frequently communicate online and access websites. While an Internet game experience is typical, relatively few college students are heavy online gamers. Overwhelmingly (i.e., 77.8%, college students conceptualized the Internet as a convenience, although 17.8% considered the Internet a source of amusement. Approximately 5% of college students reported negative perceptions of the Internet (frustrating or a waste of time. Principal component analysis revealed three patterns of online behaviour; integrated-Internet-use, games-only use, and dating-only use. Implications for online instructional practice are presented. Résumé : Quatre cent cinq étudiants du niveau collégial ont répondu à un questionnaire mesurant leurs tendances de l’utilisation d’Internet. Les résultats présentent ces étudiants comme des usagers d’Internet, à quelques exceptions près. La grande majorité de ces étudiants utilisent fréquemment les outils de communication en ligne et naviguent sur Internet. Alors qu’une expérience de jeu en ligne s’avère commune, peu d’étudiants du collège s’avèrent être des joueurs en ligne excessifs. Essentiellement (c.à-d. 77,8 %, ces étudiants perçoivent Internet comme une commodité, même si 17,8 % d’entre eux le considère comme une source d’amusement. Environ 5 % ont indiqué des perceptions négatives d’Internet (frustrations ou pertes de temps. L’analyse en composantes principales a révélé 3 tendances de comportements en ligne, l’utilisation intégrée d’Internet, l’utilisation seule de jeux et l’utilisation à des fins de rencontre seulement. On présente des conséquences pour la pratique de l’enseignement en ligne.

  18. Predicting academic success among deaf college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Carol M; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patricia; Sarchet, Thomastine; Zupan, Megan

    2009-01-01

    For both practical and theoretical reasons, educators and educational researchers seek to determine predictors of academic success for students at different levels and from different populations. Studies involving hearing students at the postsecondary level have documented significant predictors of success relating to various demographic factors, school experience, and prior academic attainment. Studies involving deaf and hard-of-hearing students have focused primarily on younger students and variables such as degree of hearing loss, use of cochlear implants, educational placement, and communication factors-although these typically are considered only one or two at a time. The present investigation utilizes data from 10 previous experiments, all using the same paradigm, in an attempt to discern significant predictors of readiness for college (utilizing college entrance examination scores) and classroom learning at the college level (utilizing scores from tests in simulated classrooms). Academic preparation was a clear and consistent predictor in both domains, but the audiological and communication variables examined were not. Communication variables that were significant reflected benefits of language flexibility over skills in either spoken language or American Sign Language.

  19. Examining the Weight Trajectory of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Lizzy; Hansen, Danielle; Harvey, Jean

    2017-02-01

    To examine the weight trajectory of students over 4 years of college. Anthropometric assessments were completed at the beginning and end of students' freshman year and the end of senior year to calculate body mass index. Questionnaires assessing weight-related behaviors were completed in senior year. Of the original 117 students, 86 remained in the study for 4 years. Body mass index was significantly higher at the end of senior year (mean, 24.84; SD, 4.46) vs the beginning of freshman year (mean, 23.59; SD, 4.01; t[85] = 5.61; P freshman year (mean, 66.94 kg; SD, 14.02; t[85] = 6.60; P college, which highlights the need for weight control interventions to target more than just freshman college students. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. College student use of Salvia divinorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, James E; Reed, Mark B; Croff, Julie M Ketchie; Clapp, John D

    2008-04-01

    Salvia divinorum (salvia) is a plant that appears to be enjoying increased popularity as a legal hallucinogen in many U.S. jurisdictions. While the popular press has claimed that its use has become widespread, there have been no epidemiological studies published documenting this within the U.S. A sample of college students was randomly drawn from a large public university in the southwestern U.S. and invited to participate in an online survey that included salvia use among a set of other drug use items. From the sample of 1516 college student respondents, a pattern of use emerged that indicates that salvia is indeed becoming a significant member of the list of drugs used, with 4.4% of students reporting using salvia at least once within the past 12 months. Subpopulations that are typically most at risk for drug use within college students (Whites, males, fraternity members, heavy episodic drinkers) also were most likely to use salvia. The results indicate that more research is needed to determine the generalizability of these findings, and identify whether there are any negative consequences experienced either by the user or the community associated with this drug.

  1. College Student use of Salvia Divinorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, James E.; Reed, Mark B.; Ketchie Croff, Julie M.; Clapp, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Salvia divinorum (salvia) is a plant that appears to be enjoying increased popularity as a legal hallucinogen in many U.S. jurisdictions. While the popular press has claimed that its use has become widespread, there have been no epidemiological studies published documenting this within the U.S. Method A sample of college students was randomly drawn from a large public university in the southwestern U.S. and invited to participate in an online survey that included salvia use among a set of other drug use items. Results From the sample of 1,571 college student respondents, a pattern of use emerged that indicates that salvia is indeed becoming a significant member of the list of drugs used, with 4.4% of students reporting using salvia at least once within the past 12 months. Subpopulations that are typically most at risk for drug use within college students (Whites, males, fraternity members, heavy episodic drinkers) also were most likely to use salvia. Conclusions The results indicate that more research is needed to determine the generalizability of these findings, and identify whether there are any negative consequences experienced either by the user or the community associated with this drug. PMID:18093751

  2. Electronic cigarette use by college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutfin, Erin L; McCoy, Thomas P; Morrell, Holly E R; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-08-01

    Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, are battery operated devices that deliver nicotine via inhaled vapor. There is considerable controversy about the disease risk and toxicity of e-cigarettes and empirical evidence on short- and long-term health effects is minimal. Limited data on e-cigarette use and correlates exist, and to our knowledge, no prevalence rates among U.S. college students have been reported. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette use and identify correlates of use among a large, multi-institution, random sample of college students. 4444 students from 8 colleges in North Carolina completed a Web-based survey in fall 2009. Ever use of e-cigarettes was reported by 4.9% of students, with 1.5% reporting past month use. Correlates of ever use included male gender, Hispanic or "Other race" (compared to non-Hispanic Whites), Greek affiliation, conventional cigarette smoking and e-cigarette harm perceptions. Although e-cigarette use was more common among conventional cigarette smokers, 12% of ever e-cigarette users had never smoked a conventional cigarette. Among current cigarette smokers, e-cigarette use was negatively associated with lack of knowledge about e-cigarette harm, but was not associated with intentions to quit. Although e-cigarette use was more common among conventional cigarette smokers, it was not exclusive to them. E-cigarette use was not associated with intentions to quit smoking among a sub-sample of conventional cigarette smokers. Unlike older, more established cigarette smokers, e-cigarette use by college students does not appear to be motivated by the desire to quit cigarette smoking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Students' Lived Experiences in Women's College Classrooms: A Phenomenological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Katherine Cox

    2017-01-01

    Several positive student academic outcomes are associated with women's college attendance, yet little is known about how women's college students make meaning of classroom practices, experiences, and interactions. The purpose of this study, a qualitative research endeavor in the hermeneutic phenomenological tradition, was to achieve a better understanding of the nature of the lived classroom experience at a women's college and the meaning women's college students made from their everyday liv...

  4. College campus smoking policies and programs and students' smoking behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen Lee; Bacchi Donna; Xu K Tom; Borders Tyrone F; SoRelle-Miner Danielle

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Although tobacco use in the United States has declined over the past 20 years, cigarette use among college students remains high. Additional research is thus needed to determine how university tobacco control policies and preventive education programs affect college students' smoking behaviors. Methods Approximately 13,000 undergraduate students at 12 universities or colleges in the state of Texas completed a web-based survey. College smoking policies were obtained from a ...

  5. Suicide Prevention: College Students' Intention to Intervene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Rosalie S

    2017-07-03

    The objective of this article was to examine college students' intention to intervene with a suicidal individual and examine the Willingness to Intervene against Suicide questionnaire (WIS). College students (n = 1065) completed an online questionnaire about their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control regarding suicide and suicide intervention as well as their intention to intervene with a suicidal individual. The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis, reliability analysis, and multiple regression. It was found that the WIS significantly predicted intention to intervene with a suicidal individual. The WIS was internally consistent with adequate goodness-of-fit indices for three of the four sub-scales. The WIS is an effective tool for predicting intention to intervene; however, the subjective norms sub-scale should be revised to improve the model.

  6. Perceptions of interethnic dating among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Mendez, Elisaida

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to examine the demographic variables of gender, ethnicity, income, and the perception of success in interethnic/interracial couples. The Interethnic Couples Resource Questionnaire (ICREQ) was created and administered to 153 college students in a predominantly White campus. Other measures administered were the Modern Racism Scale and the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure. A pilot with Latino/a- White couples on the ICREQ revealed ethnicity not as a variable of interest amo...

  7. Student Suicide and College Administrators: A Perceptual Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Steven; Cameron, Catherine A.

    1975-01-01

    One-third of college student deaths are the result of suicide and the rate is rising. A survey of deans of students suggests considerable ignorance of this fact. An implication is that college student personnel, with the power to provide help for desperate students, must first recognize the need. (Editor/PG)

  8. Psychosocial Correlates of Recreational Ecstasy Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Tiffanie; Jordan-Green, Lisa; Lee, Jieun; Wolfman, Jade; Jahangiri, Ava

    2005-01-01

    College students' ecstasy (MDMA) use increased significantly in recent years, yet little is known about these students. In this study, the authors used the Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Studies (CORE) survey to compare 29 college students who had used ecstasy and other illicit drugs with 90 students who had used marijuana and no other illicit…

  9. Visually Impaired Students' Perceptions of Their Social Integration in College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Jan S.; Keller, M. Jean

    1999-01-01

    A study identified the perceptions of six college students with visual impairments on what influenced their social activity on campus. It found influences were different for visually-impaired students than for traditional students. The need to intervene in the social development of students with visual impairments before college is stressed.…

  10. Yes, No, Maybe So: College Students' Attitudes Regarding Debt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerquera, Desiree D.; McGowan, Brian L.; Ferguson, Tomika L.

    2016-01-01

    We examined college student attitudes regarding debt. Based on focus group interviews with 31 students from 4 different institutions within a Midwestern university system, data analysis yielded a continuum that captures students' debt approaches while enrolled in college. Findings indicate that students avoided debt completely, made intentional…

  11. Reasons for Synthetic THC Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Burbage, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic THC, also known as fake marijuana, is used by college students in the United States. The present study examined reasons for recent synthetic THC use among college students (N = 339). Students completed a 3-page survey during regularly scheduled class times. Results indicated students reported using synthetic THC for curiosity, to get…

  12. College Students' Alcohol Use and Their Adherence to Health Principles: Optimism, Values, Self-Care, Relationships, Community, Nature, and Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, April

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of high-risk use of alcohol by college students has been studied for over 20 years. Most prevention methodology has focused on reducing supply to students rather than addressing the root causes that students use alcohol in self-abusive manner. One holistic health approach that addresses the root causes of alcohol abuse promotes the…

  13. An Examination of the Impact of a College Level Meditation Course on College Student Well Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Claire; Munk, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: The competing pressures of college life can increase stress and anxiety in college students and have negative outcomes on academic performance and overall well-being. The purpose of this study was to use qualitative measures to examine how participation in a college level experiential meditation course impacted students'…

  14. Leadership Behaviour of College Students in Relation to Their Leisure Time Activities in College Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the Leadership behaviour of college students in relation to their Leisure time activities in college life. In this study, the researcher wants to see the contribution of leisure time activities in developing the qualities of leadership of college students. The main objective of the study was to find out the relationship…

  15. Body image attitude among Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Liang, Rui; Ma, Zhen-Ling; Chen, Jue; Cheung, Eric F C; Roalf, David R; Gur, Ruben C; Chan, Raymond C K

    2018-01-03

    The present study aimed to examine body image attitude in Chinese college students and related psychological consequences. A silhouette-matching test was administered to 425 college students in mainland China. Self-esteem, negative emotions, subjective well-being, and eating-disorder-related weight-controlling behaviors were also measured. Only 12.9% of the participants were satisfied with their figure and the extent of body image dissatisfaction was comparable for both sexes. The majority of the female participants indicated a preference to be more slender. Their ideal figure was underweight and was far smaller than the most attractive female figure chosen by male participants. For male participants, the proportion wanting a fuller figure was comparable to that wanting a slimmer figure. Among female participants, body image dissatisfaction negatively correlated with self-esteem and subjective well-being, and positively correlated with negative emotions. Drive for thinness correlated with eating-disorder-related weight-controlling behaviors not only for females, but also for males. Body image dissatisfaction, as a diagnostic feature for major subtypes of eating disorders, may signal serious concern among Chinese college students. © 2018 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Biofeedback and Counseling for Stress and Anxiety among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Sverduk, Kevin; Prince, Judy; Hayashino, Diane

    2012-01-01

    With the rise in stress and anxiety among college students, there is a need for more comprehensive and effective counseling options for counselors in college counseling centers. This study investigated the impact of using biofeedback and brief counseling in treating stress and anxiety in an ethnically diverse college student population. Results…

  17. College Students' Perceptions of Wellness and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepfer, Shaley DePolo

    2013-01-01

    College students are increasingly less physically active. Investigation into this problem is important because individuals develop lifelong habits during the college time period. College students' perceptions regarding physical activity and overall wellness are important factors in creating positive change toward healthier lifestyle habits. Based…

  18. Racial-Ethnic Differences in Social Anxiety among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSure-Lester, G. Evelyn; King, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated racial-ethnic differences in social anxiety among college students in two-year colleges. The sample consisted of 189 Asian American, African American, White American, and Hispanic American students from two colleges in the Southeast. Participants completed a questionnaire measure of social anxiety. The results…

  19. Mental Health and Career Development of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelman, Jeanne M.; Luzzo, Darrell Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Little has been written about the reciprocal effects of the mental health and the career development of college students. Nevertheless, college students seeking services in college career and counseling centers often present both types of issues simultaneously. Service providers must, therefore, be cognizant of these potentially interactive…

  20. Psychosocial Factors Predicting First-Year College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrei-Mancuso, Elizabeth J.; Newton, Fred B.; Kim, Eunhee; Wilcox, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This study made use of a model of college success that involves students achieving academic goals and life satisfaction. Hierarchical regressions examined the role of six psychosocial factors for college success among 579 first-year college students. Academic self-efficacy and organization and attention to study were predictive of first semester…

  1. Community College and University Student Gambling Beliefs, Motives, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherba, R. Thomas; Gersper, Beth E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to inform policymakers on current gambling beliefs, motives, and behaviors of both community college and university students in an effort to evaluate the extent of problem gambling in the overall college student population. To examine differences in gambling and problem gambling between community college and…

  2. Understanding Sleep Disorders in a College Student Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Dallas R.

    2003-01-01

    College students' sleep habits are changing dramatically, and related sleep problems are increasing. Reviews the current literature on sleep problems, focusing on the college student population. The unique challenges of college settings are discussed as they apply to understanding sleep problems, and suggestions are made for professionals who work…

  3. Publishers Press Colleges To Stop Software Piracy by Their Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Karla

    1997-01-01

    Software piracy among college students is increasing, and the software publishing industry insists colleges are responsible for the activities of their computer nets' users. Colleges generally cooperate with publishers when their students are found infringing on copyrights. The Software Publishers Association is holding a University of Puget Sound…

  4. College Student Eligibility. SNAP Policy Brief. June 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower-Basch Elizabeth; Lee, Helly

    2014-01-01

    Even after accounting for all financial aid, many low-income college students have thousands of dollars of unmet need, even when they attend low-cost institutions such as community colleges. This is one factor that contributes to low rates of college completion, especially by low-income and other non-traditional students. One way to close this gap…

  5. Cyberbullying Behaviors among Female College Students: Witnessing, Perpetration, and Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkie, Ellen M.; Kota, Rajitha; Moreno, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Problem: Cyberbullying is common among adolescents, and emerging studies also describe this phenomenon in college students. Less is known about specific cyberbullying behaviors and roles in cyberbullying incidents experienced by college females. Methods: 249 female students from 4 colleges completed online surveys assessing involvement in 11…

  6. Financial Stress, Coping Strategy, and Academic Achievement of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Sonya L.; Mendiola, Melanie R.; Schink, Gregory H.; Tibbetts, Racquel H.; Jones, Scott H.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of financial stress on college students can range from psychological distress to adverse academic outcomes. The purpose of this study was to identify how resources and perceptions alter the amount of financial stress felt by college students and how this relates to academic achievement. Results from 2,236 Midwestern college students…

  7. Drinking to Get Drunk among Incoming Freshmen College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Novik, Melinda G.; Bush, Elizabeth N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The consumption of alcohol is ubiquitous on many college and university campuses. For some freshmen students, drinking may even be considered a "right of passage." Purpose: This study examined college freshmen who intentionally drink alcohol to get drunk (DTGD). Methods: Survey data from 307 incoming freshmen college students living in…

  8. Athletic Identity of Community College Student Athletes: Issues for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Daniel B.; Newman, Richard; Miller, Michael T.; Nadler, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Community college student athletes are unique in their setting in the world of college student athletes. Many compete for the love of their sport, while others have aspirations for transferring to major colleges to continue their participation. The current study made use of the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale with a sample of nearly 400…

  9. Practice and Cognition to Strengthen College Students' Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wanbin

    2009-01-01

    College students' ideological morality always is the hotspot concerned by various circles of the society, and to strengthen and improve the ideological and moral education in colleges, continually enhance the pertinence and actual effect of the moral education, help college students to dissolve their worldly confusion in moral culture, further…

  10. Regular college preparatory students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions approach in an academic college preparatory biology class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Aarti P.

    Cooperative learning allows individuals with varying abilities to work alongside their peers. Students are placed into achievement levels based on placement test scores. The Regular College Preparatory (RCP) level is a score of 59% or lower and Academic College Preparatory (ACP) level is a score of 60-92% on the placement test. The purpose of this study was to obtain 9th grade RCP students' perceptions of the student teams achievement divisions (STAD) approach which allows each member of a team to have a defined role in group work. The research questions addressed 9 th grade RCP students' perceptions of integrated STAD teams. Qualitative data from 6 RCP participants were collected from interviews and observations. Data were analyzed using typological analysis by creating codes and categories. Findings indicated that RCP students retained more content and enhanced their skills in communication, critical thinking, and problem solving. Teachers need to serve as guides to monitor motivation and enhance peer interaction. School administrators are advised to provide professional development opportunities allowing educators to learn how to incorporate cooperation for optimal student learning communication, negotiation, and problem solving.

  11. Social anxiety in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdon, C; Antony, M; Monteiro, S; Swinson, R P

    2001-01-01

    Individuals with social phobia often hold erroneous beliefs about the extent to which others experience symptoms of social anxiety and the ways in which others evaluate people who appear to be anxious. The purpose of this study was to: (a) provide normative data on the frequency with which individuals in a nonclinical sample experience particular symptoms of social anxiety (e.g., sweating, shaking, etc.); (b) to examine how the perception of anxiety in others influences participants' immediate impressions of various personal characteristics (e.g., intelligence, attractiveness, etc); and, (c) investigate the relationship between social anxiety and perceptions regarding others who appear to be anxious. Eighty-one undergraduate students completed self-report measures of social anxiety and social desirability, and then rated the degree to which their impressions of various personal characteristics were influenced when another individual was perceived to be anxious. Results suggested that the vast majority of individuals experience symptoms of anxiety in social situations from time to time. In addition, individuals who themselves reported elevated social anxiety were more likely than individuals less socially anxious to judge others who appear anxious to have less strength of character and to be less attractive and more compassionate compared to others who do not appear anxious. Clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  12. Self-Monitoring and Student Integration of Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Anthony; Michael, William B.; Hocevar, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Reports on how the Self-Monitoring Scale was used to predict academic and social integration among 380 community college students. Finds that among men, high self-monitors were more likely to achieve social integration than low self-monitors while low self-monitors were more likely to integrate academically than high self-monitors regardless of…

  13. Addressing the need and void of leadership and management development among medical students in the UK

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherwani, Yusuf; Ahmed, Aaniya; Ahmed, Maroof; Ashraf, Muhammad; Najim, Muhammad; Rabee, Riham; Aljibury, Osama

    2015-01-01

    ... incorporated into the existing undergraduate curriculum. As medical students at Imperial College London who have both completed a BSc in management and subsequently founded the Imperial College Medical Leadership Society, which aims at providing leadership...

  14. Impact of degree program satisfaction on the persistence of college students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Harskamp, Evert

    Many theories on college retention recognize the significance of student satisfaction as a positive factor in students' persistence. Yet, there are few theories that address the relationship of degree program satisfaction to study behaviour and dropout. This paper explores the impact of degree

  15. Predictive Modeling to Forecast Student Outcomes and Drive Effective Interventions in Online Community College Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon C.; Lange, Adam; Huston, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges continue to experience growth in online courses. This growth reflects the need to increase the numbers of students who complete certificates or degrees. Retaining online students, not to mention assuring their success, is a challenge that must be addressed through practical institutional responses. By leveraging existing student…

  16. Designing Interdisciplinary Assessments in Sciences for College Students: An Example on Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji; Liu, Ou Lydia; Sung, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    College science education needs to foster students' habit of mind beyond disciplinary constraints. However, little research has been devoted to assessing students' interdisciplinary understanding. To address this problem, we formed a team of experts from different disciplines to develop interdisciplinary assessments that target…

  17. A Passion for Service? Motivations for Volunteerism among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, John T.; Dodson, Kyle; Elias, Kaitlyn; Gewirtzman, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study addressed the links between first-year college students' motivations to volunteer, gender, and past volunteering practices. We surveyed 149 first-year students using items from the Volunteer Functions Inventory (Clary et al., 1998). The results of a series of one-way ANOVAs determined significant differences in motivations when…

  18. Educational Expectations and Progress of Community College Students: Does Socialization Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueli

    2016-01-01

    Background: While literature is abundant on factors associated with community college student outcomes, limited attention has been paid to what shapes educational expectations after students enroll, and how these expectations are linked to educational progress. To address this gap, Weidman's (1989) undergraduate socialization theory is…

  19. What Impacts Success in College? Findings from the Perceptions of Korean Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-il; Ra, Young-An

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the factors influencing Korean college students' academic success. To address this aim, 46 Korean students, all juniors in their Bachelors of Arts, who earned a GPA of above 4.0/4.3 were interviewed. The interview questions included: "What factors relate to your academic success?" and "What…

  20. College Success: A Fresh Look at Differentiated Instruction and Other Student-Centered Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightweis, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    This essay addresses the success of differentiated instruction (DI) as a student-centered teaching strategy in grades K-12 and how it can be used in higher education. Most college instructors deliver instruction through lectures, a teacher-centered strategy. A review of research studies in higher education demonstrated students achieve higher…

  1. High School-to-College Transition: An Intervention to Reduce Student Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan E.

    1997-01-01

    Survey responses from 665 11th graders identified 10 leading causes of student anxiety during high school-to-college transition. Eleventh graders (N=40) participated in an intervention program to address the identified causes. Results indicate an overall reduction in student anxiety following the intervention program. (Author/MKA)

  2. The Initial Conceptions for Earthquakes Phenomenon for Moroccan Students of the First Year Secondary College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddif, Aâtika; Touir, Rachid; Majdoubi, Hassan; Larhzil, Hayat; Mousaoui, Brahim; Ahmamou, Mhamed

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes initially to identify the initial conceptions of Moroccan students in the first year of secondary college about the notion of earthquakes. The used methodology is based on a questionnaire addressed to students of life science and Earth in Meknes city, before any official teaching about the said phenomenon. The obtained results…

  3. Mental Health Issues Facing a Diverse Sample of College Students: Results from the College Student Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soet, Johanna; Sevig, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been increased attention given to mental health issues on college and university campuses across the country. However, few research efforts have been conducted to systematically investigate the mental health of college students. The College Student Mental Health Survey was undertaken as a first step towards gaining…

  4. College Students and Alcohol Abuse: New Resources Can Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. College Students and Alcohol Abuse: New Resources Can Help Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... to curb college alcohol abuse. NIAAA Tools You Can Use The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and ...

  5. Six Smart Things College Students Should Do for Their Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 Releases 2010 Releases JUL 28, 2014 Six Smart Things College Students Should Do for Their Eyes ... during college: Don't shower or swim in contact lenses . Acanthamoeba is a parasite that lives in water ...

  6. Associations among Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress, and Hazardous Drinking in College Students: Considerations for Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Jennifer P.; Radomski, Sharon; Borsari, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Students with trauma and posttraumatic stress are disproportionately at risk for heavy drinking and for alcohol-related consequences. Brief motivational interventions (BMIs) have been shown to reduce hazardous drinking in college students, and could serve as a first-line approach to reduce heavy drinking in students with trauma and posttraumatic stress (PTS). Yet the standard BMI format may not adequately address the factors that lead to hazardous drinking in these students. Here, we review t...

  7. High school and college biology: A multi-level model of the effects of high school biology courses on student academic performance in introductory college biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, John Francis

    The issue of student preparation for college study in science has been an ongoing concern for both college-bound students and educators of various levels. This study uses a national sample of college students enrolled in introductory biology courses to address the relationship between high school biology preparation and subsequent introductory college biology performance. Multi-Level Modeling was used to investigate the relationship between students' high school science and mathematics experiences and college biology performance. This analysis controls for student demographic and educational background factors along with factors associated with the college or university attended. The results indicated that high school course-taking and science instructional experiences have the largest impact on student achievement in the first introductory college biology course. In particular, enrollment in courses, such as high school Calculus and Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, along with biology course content that focuses on developing a deep understanding of the topics is found to be positively associated with student achievement in introductory college biology. On the other hand, experiencing high numbers of laboratory activities, demonstrations, and independent projects along with higher levels of laboratory freedom are associated with negative achievement. These findings are relevant to high school biology teachers, college students, their parents, and educators looking beyond the goal of high school graduation.

  8. Alcohol use in high school: predicting students' alcohol use and alcohol problems in four-year colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Shacket, R W

    2001-11-01

    This research examined the effect of students' drinking behaviors in high school on their alcohol use and alcohol problems in college. Five colleges in New York State were randomly selected for the study. The telephone interview method was employed to survey college students during the spring semester of 1998. Within each participating college, students were randomly selected through the use of complete student telephone directories provided by the college administration. A total of 813 students were interviewed. Alcohol problems were measured with items from DSM-IV. Results indicate that both frequency and quantity of alcohol use in high school significantly affect students' alcohol consumption in college. Furthermore, the impact of alcohol use in high school on alcohol problems in college tends to be composed of a moderate direct effect and a relatively strong indirect effect via its impact on current alcohol consumption in college. Prevention efforts for drinking in college may need to start in high school to reduce or delay alcohol use by high school students. Additional assessment services and more readily available treatment services may be required to address potential alcohol problems among college students. Future research should examine the effect and longevity of students' alcohol problem symptoms after they graduate from college.

  9. Engaging community college students in physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Megan; Napoli, Maria; Lubin, Arica; Kramer, Liu-Yen; Aguirre, Ofelia; Kuhn, Jens-Uwe; Arnold, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    Recruiting talent and fostering innovation in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) disciplines demands that we attract, educate, and retain a larger and more diverse cohort of students. In this regard, Community Colleges (CC), serving a disproportionate number of underrepresented minority, female and nontraditional students, represent a pool of potential talent that, due to a misguided perception of its students as being less capable, often remains untapped. We will present our strategies to attract and support the academic advancement of CC students in the STEM fields through our NSF-sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates program entitled Internships in Nanosystems Science Engineering and Technology (INSET). For more than a decade, INSET has offered a physics research projects to CC students. The key components of INSET success are: 1) the involvement of CC faculty with a strong interest in promoting student success in all aspects of program planning and execution; 2) the design of activities that provide the level of support that students might need because of lack of confidence and/or unfamiliarity with a university environment; and 3) setting clear goals and high performance expectations.

  10. Assessing and Addressing Students' Scientific Literacy Needs in Physical Geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Stone, E. A.; Myers, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    Exacting excellence equally from university students around the globe can be accomplished by providing all students with necessary background tools to achieve mastery of their courses, even if those tools are not part of normal content. As instructors we hope to see our students grasp the substance of our courses, make mental connections between course material and practical applications, and use this knowledge to make informed decisions as citizens. Yet many educators have found that students enter university-level introductory courses in mathematics, science and engineering without adequate academic preparation. As part of a FIPSE-funded project at the University of Wyoming, the instructors of the Physical Geology course have taken a new approach to tackling the problem of lack of scientific/mathematic skills in incoming students. Instead of assuming that students should already know or will learn these skills on their own, they assess students' needs and provide them the opportunity to master scientific literacies as they learn geologic content. In the introductory geology course, instructors identified two categories of literacies, or basic skills that are necessary for academic success and citizen participation. Fundamental literacies include performing simple quantitative calculations, making qualitative assessments, and reading and analyzing tables and graphs. Technical literacies are those specific to understanding geology, and comprise the ability to read maps, visualize changes through time, and conceptualize in three dimensions. Because these skills are most easily taught in lab, the in-house lab manual was rewritten to be both literacy- and content-based. Early labs include simple exercises addressing literacies in the context of geological science, and each subsequent lab repeats exposure to literacies, but at increasing levels of difficulty. Resources available to assist students with literacy mastery include individual instruction, a detailed

  11. Ability Sorting and the Importance of College Quality to Student Achievement: Evidence from Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the effect of institutional quality on the educational attainment of community college students, a large group that has been mostly overlooked in previous work. The effect of institutional quality is generally difficult to separate from that of student ability because more capable students usually sort into better colleges. A…

  12. The Black Student Experience at Predominantly White Colleges: Implications for School and College Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiffrida, Douglas A.; Douthit, Kathryn Z.

    2010-01-01

    Research from higher education and cultural studies that has examined the Black college student experience at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) is presented to assist counselors in understanding how Black college students' relationships with faculty, family, friends from home, and peers in Black student organizations can become assets or…

  13. Alcohol and marijuana use among college students: economic complements or substitutes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J; Liccardo Pacula, Rosalie; Chaloupka, Frank J; Wechsler, Henry

    2004-09-01

    Previous research has shown that the recent tightening of college alcohol policies has been effective at reducing college students' drinking. Over the period in which these stricter alcohol policies have been put in place, marijuana use among college students has increased. This raises the question of whether current policies aimed at reducing alcohol consumption are inadvertently encouraging marijuana use. This paper begins to address this question by investigating the relationship between the demands for alcohol and marijuana for college students using data from the 1993, 1997 and 1999 waves of the Harvard School of Public Health's College Alcohol Study (CAS). We find that alcohol and marijuana are economic complements and that policies that increase the full price of alcohol decrease participation in marijuana use.

  14. "It Was Just that I Was Afraid": Promoting Success by Addressing Students' Fear of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the risk of failing college and how the fear of failure shapes students' behavior. Drawing on a semester-long study of students and instructors in a community college English composition course, this analysis highlights the potential for students to undermine their own educational goals in the absence of active intervention…

  15. Engaging College Students by Singing the Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Heineman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Setting scientific ideas to music can increase student engagement and help with memorization. However, some instructors may be intimidated by the thought of performing educational music for their STEM students, or concerned that it is frivolous. To address this issue, I spell out step by step protocols for either writing one’s own parody songs to teach specific concepts, or finding songs online (which can be used directly or modified. I also discuss presentation techniques that help students, such as showing lyrics and adding annotations that clarify or emphasize ideas. A survey suggests that this approach is appreciated and effective.

  16. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hui; Chen, Lu; Yang, Yanjie; Sun, Hailian; Pan, Hui; He, Jincai; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Sui, Hong; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Jiarun; Yu, Yunmiao; Ban, Bo; He, Changzhi

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students' depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students. A total of 5180 respondents were selected using a cross-sectional survey. We examined the association of parental education, adverse family and college environments with depression in college students using the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory and socio-demographic questionnaires. Lower parental educational level is significantly correlated with depression in college students in our sample. Additionally, low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, having been scolded and beaten by parents, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends, heavy course load and failure in selection processes are also associated with parental education. Low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends and heavy course load mediated the relationship between parental education and depression in college students. Adverse family and college environments could explain the influence of parental educational level on depression in college students.

  17. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhai

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students' depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students.A total of 5180 respondents were selected using a cross-sectional survey. We examined the association of parental education, adverse family and college environments with depression in college students using the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist, Beck Depression Inventory and socio-demographic questionnaires.Lower parental educational level is significantly correlated with depression in college students in our sample. Additionally, low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, having been scolded and beaten by parents, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends, heavy course load and failure in selection processes are also associated with parental education. Low family economic status, paternal or maternal unemployment, long periods spent apart from family, family conflicts, poor or dissatisfying test performance, conflict with friends and heavy course load mediated the relationship between parental education and depression in college students.Adverse family and college environments could explain the influence of parental educational level on depression in college students.

  18. The Acculturation and Self-Efficacy of International College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauson-Sells, Heather N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between acculturation, academic self-efficacy and academic achievement of international college students in the United States during the 2013-2014 academic year. The subjects were 83 international students from 17 different countries- 36 students were enrolled full-time in community college level English…

  19. Suicidal Behavior and Help Seeking among Diverse College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Chris; Becker, Martin Swanbrow; Shadick, Richard; Jaggars, Shanna S.; Nitkin-Kaner, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal and help-seeking behaviors of students of color remain a significant problem on college campuses. Self-reported suicidal experiences and help-seeking behavior of diverse students are examined on the basis of results from a national survey of college student mental health. The results suggest significant differences in the expression of…

  20. EFL College Students' Perceptions of Classroom English Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Abdul-Kareem, Muneera M.; Taqi, Hanan A.

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions of their classroom English tests play a crucial role in affecting their performance. Hence, the present study is interested in soliciting college students' perceptions of their classroom English tests to find out the reasons behind test difficulties. Participants were 585 female college students chosen randomly from all grade…

  1. Exploring College Students' Cultural View from a Knowledge Creation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Guo-Tsai; Hong, Huang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate college students' cultural views. To this end, an exploratory study was implemented, and data mainly came from students' essay writing (via individual reflective activities) and focused group discussion (via collective reflective activities). The participants were 176 college students taking a…

  2. Suicide Ideation Among College Students Evidencing Subclinical Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Schlegel, Erin F.; Smith, Phillip N.; Jacobs, Matthew P.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Paukert, Ambert L.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; JOINER, THOMAS E.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying elevated suicide ideation in college students is a critical step in preventing suicide attempts and deaths by suicide on college campuses. Although suicide ideation may be most prominent in students with severe depression, this should not suggest that only students with severe depression experience significant risk factors for suicide.

  3. Personal Factors that Influence Deaf College Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the "Noel-Levitz College…

  4. High Risk Drinking among Non-Affiliated College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Margaret; Finneran, John; Droppa, Marj

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the high risk drinking practices of unaffiliated college students who are not involved in formal athletics, fraternities, or sororities. Using a qualitative research design, the investigators interviewed students at a northeast public college in fall 2010 to learn about unaffiliated students' drinking experiences and their…

  5. College Students' Perceptions of Their Misuse of Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Merle; Avioli, Paula Smith

    A study was done of college students' perceptions of their own consumption of alcohol and their perception of their alcohol-related problems. The study surveyed 92 undergraduates students from a public college in northeastern United States. The sample was limited to students between the ages of 18 and 22. Fifty-four percent were female, and 46…

  6. Gay Students: The Latest Outreach Target at Many Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Today's colleges strive for diversity in order to enrich students' personal development, perspectives, and real-world knowledge. While colleges have been trying to recruit students of different races for decades, they are now expanding their perspective of what true diversity entails. LGBT students, due to their orientation, often have different…

  7. Yavapai College Student Satisfaction Survey Conducted December 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavapai Coll., Prescott, AZ.

    Yavapai College, Arizona, conducted a telephone survey of current college students in December 2002. The survey provides data for future marketing efforts, as well as providing information to be used as part of an ongoing assessment of student opinions and needs. An independent telemarketing firm called students from a random list of 1,400 credit…

  8. The Impact of Social Media on College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrodicasa, Jeanna; Metellus, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous ways, positive and negative, in which social media impact college students. Understanding sheer volume of time and the type of activities for which college students use social networking sites is crucial for higher education administrators. Researchers have begun to empirically examine impacts on students' well-being and have…

  9. The Identification of Factors Influencing College Students' Attitudes toward Radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crater, Harold L., Jr.

    The two basic questions considered in this study were: (1) What attitudes do college students hold toward radioactivity? and (2) What are some characteristics associated with the college students who hold the more favorable attitudes toward radioactivity? The sample studied included 1,205 mostly undergraduate students at the University of Texas at…

  10. Suicide Ideation among College Students Evidencing Subclinical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Schlegel, Erin F.; Smith, Phillip N.; Jacobs, Matthew P.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Paukert, Ambert L.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying elevated suicide ideation in college students is a critical step in preventing suicide attempts and deaths by suicide on college campuses. Although suicide ideation may be most prominent in students with severe depression, this should not suggest that only students with severe depression experience significant risk factors for suicide.…

  11. The Ecological Culture of Russian and American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaeva, P. O.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative research data show that there is both a high level of ecological concern and a high level of ecological passivity among students in Russia, indicating that their ecological culture exists only on the symbolic level. The "green" culture of American college students, in contrast to that of Russia's college students, has become…

  12. Treat and Teach Our Students Well: College Mental Health and Collaborative Campus Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nancy S; Alderman, Tracy; Schneiber, Katharina; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a selective review of best practices for the psychiatric care of college student populations. It describes psychiatric advances in evidence-based practice for college students and offers a brief compendium for college health practitioners. College mental health services are delivered in a specialized milieu, designed to address many of the unique needs of college students and to support their successful scholastic advancement and graduation. Practical steps for implementing these best practices within the college community setting are identified, with a focus on the initial student evaluation, risk assessment, treatment planning and goal setting, and steps to optimize academic functioning during psychopharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment. At the center of these practices is the use of a collaborative team and psychoeducation that engages students to actively learn about their mental health. By applying common sense and evidence-based practices within interdisciplinary and student-centered services, college communities can effectively meet the mental health needs of their students and empower them to reach their educational goals.

  13. A Longitudinal Analysis of Contextual Exposure to Peers with College Educated Parents and Students' College Enrollment

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kate H.; Raley, R. Kelly; Muller, Chandra; RIEGLE-CRUMB, CATHERINE

    2008-01-01

    Students with college educated parents are more likely to attain higher levels of education than students of parents with lower levels of education. Past research has explained this favorable outcome as the result of advantageous placement and greater availability of educational resources. Using data from Add Health and AHAA, we find evidence that exposure to students of college educated parents at the school level and within courses increase the likelihood of four year college enrollment eve...

  14. Intimate partner violence among college students without disabilities and college students with disabilities: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Sue Terry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this exploratory research study was to examine the gender differences and role of disability among college students experienced intimate partner violence. The research project sought to address two questions: (1 are there gender differences? and (2 are there differences between people with disabilities and people without disabilities? Setting and Design: A large university in the Midwest, United States of America. A quantitative research design was used. Materials and Methods: This research project used a quantitative research design using a packet consisting of abuse screening surveys: Abuse Assessment Screen-Disability (AAS-D and Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS2. Statistical analysis used: The quantitative surveys were analyzed using IBM SPSS version 22.0. Data input used a double entry method where the investigator entered the data into one SPSS sheet, an assistant entered the data into a separate SPSS sheet, and then the sheets were merged to check for discrepancies. The hypotheses were addressed using inferential statistics, such as Likelihood Ratio. Results: The results of this study indicate that there were no statistical differences between the rates at which men and women experience abuse. These results are not similar to previous literature. Other findings of this study indicate that people with disabilities experience similar rates of abuse as people without disabilities. These findings are similar to previous literature. Conclusions: Due to the small number of participants with disabilities, the statistical findings showed trends. A larger scale study would need to be conducted to draw any conclusions statistically. These trends should provide a shift in society and its views on who is affected by intimate partner violence and ensure everyone who is experiencing abuse has options to leave the relationship and has resources available and accessible to them.

  15. A comparison of the college experience for students with and without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotner, Anthony J; May, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) have joined the ranks of college students in pursuit of personal independence, community integration, and employment. To achieve these aims, there is a need for a strong understanding of the college experience for students with IDD, including identification of the academic, social, and personal challenges they face as well as the supports that are available to address those challenges. This research provides preliminary insights into the college experience for students with IDD by comparing the perceptions, attitudes, and activities of students with IDD to those of students without disabilities and students with mild learning disabilities (MLD). Our data suggest a number of similarities in the college experience for students with and without disabilities such as similar influences from family and teachers with respect to attending college. In addition, some surprising advantages expressed by students with IDD were found, such as reporting greater ease in developing close friendships than students with MLD. Considerations and discussion on the ways in which students with IDD benefit from the additional supports and services provided to them are also discussed.

  16. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Substance Use Disorders in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Borsari, Brian; Read, Jennifer P.; Campbell, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that many college students report post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or substance use disorder (SUD), yet there has been scant attention paid to the co-occurrence of these disorders in college students. This review examines the co-occurrence of PTSD and SUD in college students. Recommendations for counseling centers are provided regarding the assessment of this population, an overview of treatment issues, and three areas of clinical importance when working with this popu...

  17. Associations Between Smoking and Media Literacy in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Primack, Brian A; Sidani, Jaime; Carroll, Mary V.; Fine, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Organizations recommend media literacy to reduce tobacco use, and higher media literacy has been associated with lower smoking among high school students. The relationship between smoking media literacy and tobacco use, however, has not been systematically studied among college students. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between smoking and smoking media literacy among college students. We conducted the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) at a large, urban unive...

  18. Smoking and drinking among college students: "it's a package deal".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichter, Mimi; Nichter, Mark; Carkoglu, Asli; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on qualitative research on smoking in contexts associated with drinking among college students. Although a plethora of survey research has shown a positive association between smoking and alcohol use, little attention has been given to the utility functions of these co-occurring behaviors. Data are drawn from semi-structured interviews with college freshmen at a large Mid-western university in the U.S. (n=35). In addition, eleven focus groups with fraternity and sorority members were conducted (n=70). Interviews and focus groups focused on a range of issues including current smoking behavior, reasons for smoking, and smoking and drinking. A review of qualitative responses reveals that smoking served multiple utility functions for this population including (1) facilitating social interaction across gender, (2) allowing one to structure time and space at a party, (3) enabling "party" smokers to smoke with fewer negative side effects, and (4) helping to calm one down when drunk. Whereas smoking was stigmatized during the context of one's everyday life as a student, at parties while consuming alcohol, smoking was viewed as normative and socially acceptable. Preventive interventions are needed on college campus that target co-substance use and address widespread misperceptions about the harm of tobacco use and addiction. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Social support and mental health among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    This study is the first, to our knowledge, to evaluate the relationship between mental health and social support in a large, random sample of college students. A Web-based survey was administered at a large, public university, with 1,378 students completing the measures in this analysis (response rate = 57%). The results support our hypothesis that students with characteristics differing from most other students, such as minority race or ethnicity, international status, and low socioeconomic status, are at greater risk of social isolation. In addition, the authors found that students with lower quality social support, as measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, were more likely to experience mental health problems, including a sixfold risk of depressive symptoms relative to students with high quality social support. These results may help administrators and health providers to identify more effectively the population of students at high risk for mental illness and develop effective interventions to address this significant and growing public health issue. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Cracking the Student Aid Code: Parent and Student Perspectives on Paying for College

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Board Advocacy & Policy Center, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Paying for college is a challenge for many Americans and navigating the financial aid process can be very difficult, especially for low-income and first-generation college students. The College Board commissioned research to learn more about students' and parents' knowledge, beliefs and attitudes about the importance of a college education and how…

  1. College student grief, grief differences, family communication, and family satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chye Hong; Servaty-Seib, Heather L

    2017-05-30

    Although family grief communication has received solid research attention, few studies have examined how communication about grief differences among family members may relate to college students' grief experiences and family satisfaction. Online survey data were collected from emerging adults attending college (n = 335) at a large Midwestern university and analyzed using hierarchical multiple regressions. Findings indicated that family communication about grief differences was positively associated with family satisfaction but was not related to individual grief reactions. This study contributes to the understanding of family grief communication among college students and offers implications for student affairs personnel working with grieving college students.

  2. Inaccuracy and Uncertainty in Estimates of College Student Suicide Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Allan J.

    1980-01-01

    Innacurate sample data and uncertain estimates are defined as obstacles to assessing the suicide rate among college students. A standardization of research and reporting services is recommended. (JMF)

  3. An Investigation Into Alternative Television Viewership Habits Of College Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katie J Damratoski; April R Field; Katie N Mizell; Michael C Budden

    2011-01-01

    .... Research focused on the television viewing habits of college students, current challenges in television advertising and marketing and the increasing use of DVRs and the Internet are investigated...

  4. Scores on loneliness of Chinese and American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X

    1997-08-01

    197 American college students going to school in Oklahoma and 91 Chinese college students going to school in China participated. Chinese students from extended families (families with three generations) reported less loneliness than those from nuclear families. In the younger group (aged 18 to 20 yr.), Chinese students scored higher on loneliness than American students as did all freshman compared with all sophomore students. Significant interactions between nation and years in college and between nation and family structure (extended families vs nuclear families) were found within the same age group.

  5. Makerere University College of Health Sciences’ role in addressing challenges in health service provision at Mulago National Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekandi Juliet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH, Uganda’s primary tertiary and teaching hospital, and Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS have a close collaborative relationship. MakCHS students complete clinical rotations at MNRH, and MakCHS faculty partner with Mulago staff in clinical care and research. In 2009, as part of a strategic planning process, MakCHS undertook a qualitative study to examine care and service provision at MNRH, identify challenges, gaps, and solutions, and explore how MakCHS could contribute to improving care and service delivery at MNRH. Methods Key informant interviews (n=23 and focus group discussions (n=7 were conducted with nurses, doctors, administrators, clinical officers and other key stakeholders. Interviews and focus groups were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim, and findings were analyzed through collaborative thematic analysis. Results Challenges to care and service delivery at MNRH included resource constraints (staff, space, equipment, and supplies, staff inadequacies (knowledge, motivation, and professionalism, overcrowding, a poorly functioning referral system, limited quality assurance, and a cumbersome procurement system. There were also insufficiencies in the teaching of professionalism and communication skills to students, and patient care challenges that included lack of access to specialized services, risk of infections, and inappropriate medications. Suggestions for how MakCHS could contribute to addressing these challenges included strengthening referral systems and peripheral health center capacity, and establishing quality assurance mechanisms. The College could also strengthen the teaching of professionalism, communication and leadership skills to students, and monitor student training and develop courses that contribute to continuous professional development. Additionally, the College could provide in-service education for providers on professionalism

  6. Potholes on the Road to College: High School Effects in Shaping Urban Students' Participation in College Application, Four-Year College Enrollment, and College Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Melissa; Coca, Vanessa; Nagaoka, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which indicators of the college-going climate of urban high schools are associated with students' application to, enrollment in, and choice among four-year colleges. The investigators examine two mechanisms by which high schools may shape college enrollment among low-income students in an urban school system:…

  7. The Debate about Increasing College Student Psychopathology: Are College Students Really Getting "Sicker?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, Kari; Swanson, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    In the past couple of decades, there have been numerous claims made about the increasing severity of college student mental health issues. While the question of increasing severity seems to be well documented by the perception-based surveys of university counseling center directors, very limited data exists to prove that this trend is actually…

  8. The Consumption of Energy Drinks Among a Sample of College Students and College Student Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Andrew R; Martin, Ryan J; Morgan, Grant B

    2016-02-01

    To assess energy drink (ED) consumption, potential ED correlates, and ED-related motivations among a sample of college students to determine differences based on athlete status (student athlete vs. non-athlete). Six hundred and ninety-two college students completed surveys at a large private university in the United States. Participants completed a paper based questionnaire assessing ED and ED-related variables. Over thirty-six percent (197 non-athletes, 58 student athletes) of participants reported ED consumption in the preceding 30 days. Multivariately, there was no difference in ED consumption based on athlete status. Heavy episodic drinking and prescription stimulant misuse were both correlated with increased ED consumption. ED motivations differed based on the frequency of ED consumption. ED use was common among student athletes and non-athletes in our sample. It is important to be aware of the correlation between heavy episodic drinking, prescription stimulant misuse, and ED consumption among college student populations because of the adverse consequences associated with these behaviors.

  9. Comparing Japanese International College Students' and U.S. College Students' Mental-Health-Related Stigmatizing Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Hayes, Steven C.; Twohig, Michael P.; Lillis, Jason; Fletcher, Lindsay B.; Gloster, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined differences between Japanese international college students and U. S. college students on stigma toward people with psychological disorders, stigma tolerance in help seeking, and self-concealment. Japanese international students had greater stigma toward individuals with psychological disorders than did their U.S. counterparts.…

  10. Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A steady rise in the prevalence of depression among college students has negatively affected student quality of life. This study investigates the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based model, including Skype, to screen and provide psychiatric consultation to depressed college students. Methods. Students completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 online; those who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 10 or endorsed any level of suicidal ideation were offered Web-based psychiatric consultation using Skype. After the consultation, students filled out a 7-item satisfaction questionnaire to report on the acceptability of this Web-based method. Results. A total of 972 students consented to the online depression screening and 285 screened positive. Of those, 69 students consented and 17 students successfully completed the psychiatric consultation via Skype. Thirteen (76.4% students found the interview useful in helping them understand their depression. Fifteen (88.2% students thought that psychologists and psychiatrists could successfully see patients via videoconferencing. Conclusions. Current online technologies can provide depression screening and psychiatric consultation to college students; those who participated reported a positive experience. Future studies will need to address the low levels of participation among college students and attract students who are underserved, as well as use a videoconferencing platform that adequately protects data confidentiality.

  11. Web-Based Depression Screening and Psychiatric Consultation for College Students: A Feasibility and Acceptability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Aya; LaRocca, Rachel; Chang, Trina; Trinh, Nhi-Ha; Fava, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background. A steady rise in the prevalence of depression among college students has negatively affected student quality of life. This study investigates the feasibility and acceptability of a Web-based model, including Skype, to screen and provide psychiatric consultation to depressed college students. Methods. Students completed the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) online; those who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥ 10) or endorsed any level of suicidal ideation were offered Web-based psychiatric consultation using Skype. After the consultation, students filled out a 7-item satisfaction questionnaire to report on the acceptability of this Web-based method. Results. A total of 972 students consented to the online depression screening and 285 screened positive. Of those, 69 students consented and 17 students successfully completed the psychiatric consultation via Skype. Thirteen (76.4%) students found the interview useful in helping them understand their depression. Fifteen (88.2%) students thought that psychologists and psychiatrists could successfully see patients via videoconferencing. Conclusions. Current online technologies can provide depression screening and psychiatric consultation to college students; those who participated reported a positive experience. Future studies will need to address the low levels of participation among college students and attract students who are underserved, as well as use a videoconferencing platform that adequately protects data confidentiality. PMID:24799895

  12. The Effects of Student Coaching in College: An Evaluation of a Randomized Experiment in Student Mentoring

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Bettinger; Rachel Baker

    2011-01-01

    College completion and college success often lag behind college attendance. One theory as to why students do not succeed in college is that they lack key information about how to be successful or fail to act on the information that they have. We present evidence from a randomized experiment which tests the effectiveness of individualized student coaching. Over the course of two separate school years, InsideTrack, a student coaching service, provided coaching to students from public, private, ...

  13. The Relationship between a College Preparation Program and At-Risk Students' College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jennifer T.; Schaefle, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between elements of a college preparation program and the college readiness of low-income and/or Latina/o students at the completion of 6 years of participation in the program. Hours of participation in tutoring, mentoring, advising, college campus visits, summer programs, and educational field trips are…

  14. College Student Psychological Well-Being during the Transition to College: Examining Individuation from Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, DenYelle Baete; Koerner, Susan Silverberg

    2009-01-01

    Problem: The present study examined whether incoming college student individuation from parents was associated with later well-being and adjustment to college. Method: Data were collected via online surveys with incoming college freshmen (during the summer or first week of class, follow-up three months later). Results: Analyses revealed that…

  15. A STUDY OF ACADEMIC SUCCESS OF COLLEGE READINESS STUDENTS AT THE COLLEGE OF SAN MATEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEARCE, FRANK C.

    THE COLLEGE READINESS PROGRAM AT THE COLLEGE OF SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA, WAS DESIGNED TO INTEGRATE MINORITY YOUTH INTO THE COLLEGE AND THE COMMUNITY. A STUDY OF STUDENTS WHO HAD ENROLLED IN THE PROGRAM SINCE ITS BEGINNING IN 1966 INCLUDED THESE OBSERVATIONS--(1) 95 PERCENT WERE NEGROES, (2) ALTHOUGH 40 PERCENT HAD NOT CHOSEN A MAJOR, ACADEMIC OR…

  16. A Qualitative Study of the Adaptation of Rural College Students to College Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiquan, Zhang; Yijie, Wang

    2015-01-01

    We conducted interview via email with nine college students from rural areas. Data about their adaptation to college life was collected. We found that they did not adapt well and how distress, confusion, anxiety, resentment, and uneasiness in colleges. [This article was translated by Jeff Keller.

  17. "Hipster Freshman": Popular Culture's Portrayal of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Jena L.; Hill, Lilian H.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its seemingly unclear and ambiguous mission, the community college has somewhat of a stigma attached to it, as the four-year institution defines the American college experience (LaPaglia, 1994). Although only a few studies concerning media portrayals of community college students have been published within the last 20 years, the existing…

  18. Community College Student-Parents: Priorities for Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    This study of community college student-parents used interpretive phenomenological analysis of interview data contributed by 15 participants from three Mountain West Community Colleges. The participants qualified by the following criteria: had delayed college entrance by 2 years or more, had a child not yet in kindergarten, were full-time students…

  19. Student Success in College Composition through the Puente Project Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Barbara

    Much can be learned from California's Puente Project Model that would help students' success in classrooms as well as in college in general, and in their daily lives. Puente, which means "bridge" in Spanish, began in 1982 at Chabot College in northern California and is now in 38 colleges and 19 high schools statewide. Originally designed…

  20. First-Generation College Student Success in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricks, Jonathan Ryan

    2016-01-01

    A college education is an essential component to obtaining many successful careers which lead to financial stability. Entering college can be a stressful transition that involves academic, emotional, and social adjustments for adolescents, and can be especially challenging for first-generation college students. A wealth of research has found that…

  1. Assessment and Placement: Supporting Student Success in College Gateway Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandal, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that the vast majority of students who are currently placed into prerequisite remedial education could be successful in gateway college-­level courses if they receive additional academic support as a corequisite. Recent research on college placement exams reveals that the exams are unreliable at predicting college success, and…

  2. Parenting styles and academic achievement in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anupama; Ferris, Jennifer C; Otto, Amy L; Regan, Pamela C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between parenting styles and college academic achievement. An ethnically diverse group of college students reported their GPA and responded to the Parenting Style Index. Parenting style scores were unrelated to college GPA. Additional analyses of ethnic groups indicated differences in maternal involvement and strictness and relationship of these variables to GPA.

  3. Characteristics and Motivations of College Students Volunteering for Community Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, R. Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Designed and administered the Student Community Service Involvement Survey to assess students' reasons for volunteering. College students indicated that their motives for involvement in community service were egoistic and altruistic. Demographically, student volunteers were not too different from the general student population. Volunteerism was…

  4. College Students' Compliance with Food Guide Pyramid Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura; Rosenberg, Rachel I.; Grady, Frances M.; Howard, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    A study assessed dietary compliance among 192 college students. Students who lived on campus, younger students, females, students who ate out infrequently, and students who rarely/never consumed high-fat foods showed the lowest compliance with the recommended number of daily servings from all food groups. (Contains 36 references.) (JOW)

  5. Flipping College Algebra: Effects on Student Engagement and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Cherie; Clinkenbeard, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study compared student engagement and achievement levels between students enrolled in a traditional college algebra lecture course and students enrolled in a "flipped" course. Results showed that students in the flipped class had consistently higher levels of achievement throughout the course than did students in the traditional…

  6. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhai, Hui; Chen, Lu; Yang, Yanjie; Sun, Hailian; Pan, Hui; He, Jincai; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Sui, Hong; Wang, Wenbo; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Yang, Xiuxian; Yang, Jiarun; Yu, Yunmiao; Ban, Bo; He, Changzhi

    2016-01-01

    .... Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students' depression are not well understood...

  7. Suicide ideation among college students evidencing subclinical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Schlegel, Erin F; Smith, Phillip N; Jacobs, Matthew P; Van Orden, Kimberly A; Paukert, Ambert L; Pettit, Jeremy W; Joiner, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Identifying elevated suicide ideation in college students is a critical step in preventing suicide attempts and deaths by suicide on college campuses. Although suicide ideation may be most prominent in students with severe depression, this should not suggest that only students with severe depression experience significant risk factors for suicide. The purpose of these 3 studies was to explore the relation between suicide ideation and severity of depressive symptoms in college students. In each study a sample of college students were recruited for participation. Participants completed self-report assessments of depressive symptoms and suicide ideation. The results of these studies suggest that although the greatest elevation in suicide ideation occurs at the highest depressive symptoms, significant suicide ideation is also experienced by college students with mild and moderate depressive symptoms. The implications of these findings for the assessment of suicide ideation are discussed.

  8. The First Year of College: Understanding Student Persistence in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Marina Calvet

    This research study aimed to expand our understanding of the factors that influence student persistence in engineering. The unique experiences of engineering students were examined as they transitioned into and navigated their first year of college at a public research university in California. Most students provided similar responses with respect to the way they experienced the transition to college and social life. There was, however, wide student response variation regarding their experience of academic life and academic policies, as well as in their level of pre-college academic preparation and financial circumstances. One key finding was that students' experiences during the first year of college varied widely based on the extent to which they had acquired organizational and learning skills prior to college. The study used a mixed methods approach. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through an online survey and one-on-one interviews conducted with freshman students near the end of their first year of college. The theoretical foundations of this study included Astin's Theory of Student Involvement and Tinto's Theory of Student Departure. The design of the study was guided by these theories which emphasize the critical importance of student involvement with the academic and social aspects of college during the first year of college.

  9. Predictors of Stress in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Dalia; Camart, Nathalie; Romo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    University students often face different stressful situations and preoccupations: the first contact with the university, the freedom of schedule organization, the selection of their master's degree, very selective fields, etc. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a model of vulnerability to stress in French college students. Stress factors were evaluated by a battery of six scales that was accessible online during 3 months. A total of 483 students, aged between 18 and 24 years (Mean = 20.23, standard deviation = 1.99), was included in the study. The results showed that 72.9, 86.3, and 79.3% of them were suffering from psychological distress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. More than half the sample was also suffering from low self-esteem (57.6%), little optimism (56.7%), and a low sense of self-efficacy (62.7%). Regression analyses revealed that life satisfaction, self-esteem, optimism, self-efficacy and psychological distress were the most important predictors of stress. These findings allow us to better understand stress-vulnerability factors in students and drive us to substantially consider them in prevention programs. PMID:28179889

  10. Predictors of Stress in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Dalia; Camart, Nathalie; Romo, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    University students often face different stressful situations and preoccupations: the first contact with the university, the freedom of schedule organization, the selection of their master's degree, very selective fields, etc. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a model of vulnerability to stress in French college students. Stress factors were evaluated by a battery of six scales that was accessible online during 3 months. A total of 483 students, aged between 18 and 24 years (Mean = 20.23, standard deviation = 1.99), was included in the study. The results showed that 72.9, 86.3, and 79.3% of them were suffering from psychological distress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, respectively. More than half the sample was also suffering from low self-esteem (57.6%), little optimism (56.7%), and a low sense of self-efficacy (62.7%). Regression analyses revealed that life satisfaction, self-esteem, optimism, self-efficacy and psychological distress were the most important predictors of stress. These findings allow us to better understand stress-vulnerability factors in students and drive us to substantially consider them in prevention programs.

  11. Jay Gatsby goes to college: engaging at-risk students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trott, Barry; Barrett, Laura; Ghezzi, Ridie; Satterfield, Jay

    2015-01-01

      Many students can call on the experiences of family members to help them acclimate to the college environment, but first-generation students lack a road map for academic success and social comfort...

  12. Correlates of Alcohol-Related Regretted Sex among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchowski, Lindsay M.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Borsari, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of alcohol-related regretted sex in college students warrants a better understanding of the characteristics of students who report such experiences. Therefore, the present study examined correlates of regretted sexual experiences involving alcohol use among two specific high-risk college student samples: Students mandated to alcohol intervention (N = 522) and volunteer first-year students transitioning to college (N = 481). Results indicated that alcohol-related regretted sex occurred in similar rates in mandated and volunteer students, with approximately 25% of the students reporting at least one occurrence in the past month. Women were more likely to report alcohol-related regretted sex compared to men. The belief that alcohol use would result in “liquid courage” was associated with alcohol-related regretted sex among college students, even after accounting for greater alcohol use and problem alcohol use behaviors. These findings have significant implications for intervention efforts and future research. PMID:22448762

  13. Coping in Women College Students: The Influence of Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eric; Toray, Tamina

    1998-01-01

    Examines coping responses in a female college population by focusing on a common definable stressful situation experienced by all students: final exam week. Identifies the coping responses that differentiate between freshmen students and the more experienced juniors and seniors. (MKA)

  14. Correlates of alcohol-related regretted sex among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchowski, Lindsay M; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Borsari, Brian

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of alcohol-related regretted sex in college students warrants a better understanding of the characteristics of students who report such experiences. Therefore, the present study examined correlates of regretted sexual experiences involving alcohol use among 2 specific high-risk college student samples: students mandated to alcohol intervention (n = 522) and volunteer 1st-year students transitioning to college (n = 481). Results indicated that alcohol-related regretted sex occurred at similar rates in mandated and volunteer students, with approximately 25% of the students reporting at least 1 occurrence in the past month. Women were more likely to report alcohol-related regretted sex compared with men. The belief that alcohol use would result in "liquid courage" was associated with alcohol-related regretted sex among college students, even after accounting for greater alcohol use and problem alcohol use behaviors. These findings have significant implications for intervention efforts and future research. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  15. Preventing Online Victimization: College Students' Views on Intervention and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Wendi E; Carmody, Dianne

    2016-01-14

    Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking sites have changed the way we interact online. Technological advances have also facilitated the emergence of cyberstalking and online harassment, a growing issue on college campuses. This study utilizes focus group data to examine college students' experiences with online harassment and cyberstalking. Students voiced concerns with online tracking, falsifying identities, and harassment. They also noted that incoming first-year students and those negotiating some of their first romantic relationships are especially vulnerable. In addition, students were asked to propose appropriate prevention, education, and intervention strategies at the college level. Surprisingly, many students recommended offline programs to battle this online problem. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Factors Affecting Change in Major and College Persistence for Traditional and Nontraditional Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shuntay

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges enroll a substantial proportion of both traditional and nontraditional students pursuing various academic goals. Consequently, these types of students have different characteristics that influence their success in community colleges. The purpose of this study was to analyze the contributing factors in traditional and…

  17. A study of “sense of Ibasho” and college life anxiety in college students

    OpenAIRE

    粂原, 民子; 社浦, 竜太

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of "sense of Ibasho" on college life. We separated college students into three groups by score of “sense of Ibasyo” and found significant difference between these groups in level of anxiety on campus. The result suggests that students who have “sense of Ibasyo” feel less anxiety than these who don’t have.

  18. Civic Engagement and Activism: Do College Students and College Athletes Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jennifer; Kihl, Lisa; Browning, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This study uses measures from the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement to examine rates of volunteerism, use of political voice, and electoral indicators between college students and college student-athletes attending three institutions with Division I athletic programs. Findings illustrate increased volunteer…

  19. College Students' Evaluations of Heavy Drinking: The Influence of Gender, Age, and College Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Suzanne M.; Swanton, Dale N.; Colby, John J.

    2012-01-01

    College students tend not to view their drinking as problematic despite negative consequences. Nevertheless, excessive drinking tends to desist when students graduate. We examined how college drinking is influenced by attitudes and perceived norms using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA). Using standardized vignettes, we assessed the extent to…

  20. Achieving a College Education: The Psychological Experiences of Latina/o Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Maristela C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the psychological and subjective experiences of Latina/o community college students. The impact of these experiences on their persistence toward achieving their education goals is also examined. Interviews with 17 community college students yielded 8 themes: overcoming personal and social challenges, maturation, self-discovery…

  1. Perceptions of First-Time in College Community College Students Regarding Factors and Barriers for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Deana K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of first-generation first-time in college (FTIC) students who have completed a student success course (Learning Frameworks: First-Year Experience-EDUC 1300) at the community college level regarding (a) factors that enable them to succeed and (b) factors that are barriers to their success. A…

  2. Recreational marijuana legalization and college student use: Early evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Austin M. Miller; Robert Rosenman; Benjamin W. Cowan

    2017-01-01

    We analyze marijuana use by college undergraduates before and after legalization of recreational marijuana. Using survey data from the National College Health Assessment, we show that students at Washington State University experienced a significant increase in marijuana use after legalization. This increase is larger than would be predicted by national trends. The change is strongest among females, Black students, and Hispanic students. The increase for underage students is as much as for le...

  3. Antidepressant Use Amongst College Students: Findings of a Phenomenological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reshmi L. Singh, Ph.D; College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota; Marcia M. Worley, Ph.D; Cynthia Peden-McAlpine, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Depression among college students is an escalating problem and could have serious consequences such as suicide. There has been an increase in use of antidepressants on college campuses in United States. However, an in depth understanding of this phenomenon from the college student’s perspective is lacking in the literature. Objective: This study examined college students’ experiences and treatment decision making during their depression treatment. Methods: A longitudinal, phenomen...

  4. Professor perceptions of college students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Teresa Ann; Weyandt, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    From April to June 2005, the authors investigated professor perceptions of college students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). 253 participants completed the ADHD Beliefs Survey-Revised, a 40-question survey measuring professor perceptions of ADHD. Analysis of variance measured false and reasonable beliefs related to ADHD. Results indicated that professors with differing levels of education, years of teaching experience, colleges in the university or community college, previous experiences with a student with ADHD, and ADHD training did not differ significantly in perceptions regarding general ADHD knowledge or college students with ADHD.

  5. Smoking among East Asian college students: prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Chung Gun; Choe, Siyoung

    2013-03-01

    To compare the prevalence and correlates of cigarette smoking among East Asian college students. Data were collected from college students (N=16,558) in China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan (response rate: 78%). Religion was independently associated with college students' smoking in China (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.82) and South Korea (AOR = 0.80). Being a heavy drinker and having a higher exposure to secondhand smoke were associated with higher smoking rates (Ps college smoking but a similar pattern of relationship with its correlates.

  6. Advising Financially At-Risk Students: Detecting and Addressing Premature Affluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Leigh S.

    2014-01-01

    Academic advisors likely will encounter financially at-risk (FAR) students who jeopardize their chances of completing a college education and compromise their economic futures by accruing burdensome debt. Students may use loans and credit cards to pay for the necessities of a college education, but many also generate personal debt by financing…

  7. College student employment and drinking: a daily study of work stressors, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Adam B; Dodge, Kama D; Faurote, Eric J

    2010-07-01

    We examined the within-person relationships between daily work stressors and alcohol consumption over 14 consecutive days in a sample of 106 employed college students. Using a tension reduction theoretical framework, we predicted that exposure to work stressors would increase alcohol consumption by employed college students, particularly for men and those with stronger daily expectancies about the tension reducing properties of alcohol. After controlling for day of the week, we found that hours worked were positively related to number of drinks consumed. Workload was unrelated to alcohol consumption, and work-school conflict was negatively related to consumption, particularly when students expressed strong beliefs in the tension reducing properties of alcohol. There was no evidence that the effects of work stressors were moderated by sex. The results illustrate that employment during the academic year plays a significant role in college student drinking and suggest that the employment context may be an appropriate intervention site to address the problem of student drinking.

  8. Physician shadowing by college students: what do patients think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert G; Hayes, Victoria M; Skolfield, Jennifer L

    2014-03-14

    The objective of this study is to determine patients' perceptions of physician shadowing by college students. Thirty-two patients who agreed to have a college student shadow their physician participated in semi-structured interviews during July and August 2013 at two outpatient family medicine centers. Qualitative techniques were utilized to analyze the transcripts of the patient interviews and identify common themes. The majority of patients (78.1%) felt the college student had a neutral effect on their visit and denied having concerns about confidentiality (87.5%). No patient felt that having the college student present affected their ability to maintain a trusting relationship with their physician. Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: benefits to students, willing participation and sensitive issues. Most patients (78.5%) recognized that the student was in college or was a premedical student. The overwhelming majority of patients stated that they would have a college student shadow their physician again in the future. Despite concerns raised by other authors about the possible negative effects of physician shadowing by college students, this study shows that patients feel the impact to be primarily neutral and that there are many perceived benefits to both student and patient.

  9. Non-Medical Use of Prescription Stimulants: A Comparison of College Students and their Same-Age Peers Who Do Not Attend College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A; Pomykacz, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Data show that the prevalence of non-medical use of prescription stimulants is higher among college students than their same-age peers who do not attend college. Because of this, most of the research in this area focuses on data from samples of college students and on use motivated by academic demands. There is little research that examines whether attending college increases the odds of non-medical use of prescription stimulants while including important covariates in the analytical models. The current research addresses this gap in the literature using data from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health for respondents aged 18 to 25 years old. We estimate a multivariate logistic regression model to determine whether college attendance increased the odds of non-medical use of prescription stimulants. The analysis showed that young adults who enrolled in college full-time were more likely to report non-medical use of prescription stimulants than their same-age peers who did not attend college. There was no significant difference between part-time college students and non-college students. Future research should focus on how specific aspects of the college environment, other than academic stress, may increase the risk of non-medical use of prescription stimulants.

  10. Self-Injury, Gender, and Loneliness among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger-Ness, Lorrie Ann; Handler, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated relationships between loneliness and numerous psychological and physical difficulties among college students. The purpose of this study was to examine whether loneliness might be a factor associated with increased risk of self-injury among college students. The findings did not support the hypothesis that…

  11. Cyber Victimization and Depressive Symptoms in Sexual Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jaimi L.; DiLalla, Lisabeth F.; McCrary, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relations between sexual orientation, cyber victimization, and depressive symptoms in college students. Study aims were to determine whether sexual minority college students are at greater risk for cyber victimization and to examine whether recent cyber victimization (self-reported cyber victimization over the last…

  12. Students' Perceptions of Factors that Affect College Funding Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Julia Y.; Fossey, W. Richard; Davis, William E.; Burnett, Michael F.; Stuhlmann, Janice; Suchy, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the factors that college students perceive are important in helping them make good financial decisions about paying for a college education. The study categorizes and summarizes students' self-reported responses to an open-ended survey question about recommendations for changes in financial aid counseling practices.…

  13. Academic Performance and Satisfaction with Homework Completion among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer; White, Marie C.

    2013-01-01

    Under the umbrella of the social cognitive theory of self-regulation of learning, we examined the association between homework practices of college students, motivation and self-regulation of learning, and final course grades. Data from one hundred thirty-three college students, who completed measures of help-seeking, self-efficacy, intrinsic…

  14. Civic Engagement Measures for Latina/o College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantar, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter uses a critical quantitative approach to study models and measures of civic engagement for Latina/o college students. The chapter describes the importance of a critical quantitative approach to study civic engagement of Latina/o college students, then uses Hurtado et al.'s (Hurtado, S., 2012) model to examine the civic engagement…

  15. Exploring Community College Student Perceptions of Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Terry Ann

    2010-01-01

    Successful completion of online courses by community college students is an issue both at the national and local level. The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore community college student perceptions of online learning within the theoretical construct of the Community of Inquiry model, which describes the manner in…

  16. Perceptions Concerning College Student Suicide: Data from Four Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westefeld, John S.; Homaifar, Beeta; Spotts, Jennifer; Furr, Susan; Range, Lilian; Werth, James L., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of suicide, including prevention, intervention, and postvention, continues to be a problem on college campuses. For this study, data concerning a variety of issues related to college student suicide were collected from 1,865 students at four different universities. Incidence, risk factors, and potential solutions are described, as well…

  17. Dialect and Influences on the Academic Experiences of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Stephany Brett; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The dialects that college students speak represent a type of diversity that can influence many elements of their experiences in college, including academic experiences. In this study, we examined the influence of speaking a stigmatized dialect on academic experiences for White and African American students (both male and female) from rural…

  18. Developing Ube College's System to Support Students with Developmental Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    浅原, 京子; 内堀, 晃彦; 江原, 史朗; 久保田, 良輔

    2017-01-01

    Providing necessary support for students with difficulties or special needs requires a college-wide framework. This paper reports how National Institute of Technology, Ube College has been developing its system to support students with developmental disabilities for the past several years, and discusses what more can and should be done to keep improving its current system.

  19. Stress, Emotional Intelligence, and Life Satisfaction in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holinka, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have examined stress, life satisfaction, and emotional intelligence in college students. Research on stress in college students has focused on the sources of stress, coping styles, and relevant outcomes. Research on life satisfaction has focused on specific relationships between life satisfaction and concepts like worry,…

  20. Depression in College Students: Personality and Experiential Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenburg, Karel; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined college student depression and its relation to personality variables and experiences unique to college life. Depressed (N=35) and nondepressed (N=39) students completed depression inventory, personality scales, and other measures. Results revealed that 75 percent of depressed subjects had been depressed for over three months; one-half had…

  1. The Impact of the Recession on College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg-Cross, Linda; Green, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    This article had three goals: (a) to provide a brief economic review of the relationship between recessionary times, institutional reactions, and the life trajectory of recession-era college students; (b) to discuss the recession-related psychosocial stressors facing today's college students; and (c) to discuss how counseling centers can help…

  2. Rape Myth Beliefs and Bystander Attitudes among Incoming College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The bystander approach to rape prevention is gaining popularity on college campuses, although research is limited. This study explored bystander attitudes and their relationship with rape myths in a sample of college students. Participants: Surveys from 2,338 incoming undergraduate students at a large, northeastern university were…

  3. The Full Extent of Student-College Academic Undermatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan; Pender, Matea; Howell, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    This paper quantifies the extent of student-college "academic undermatch," which occurs when a student's academic credentials permit them access to a college or university that is more selective than the postsecondary alternative they actually choose. Using a nationally representative dataset, we find that 41 percent of students…

  4. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Individual Criteria in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jill; Lofgren, Ingrid E.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is present in young adults and because coronary heart disease (CHD) is likely, screening to determine MetS prevalence and its criteria is critical. Objective: To determine MetS prevalence and most prevalent criteria in a sample of first-year college students. Participants: First-year college students between 18 and 24…

  5. Applying Queer Theory in Practice with College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abes, Elisa S.

    2008-01-01

    Grounded in a narrative inquiry study of traditional-aged lesbian college students' perceptions of the relationships among their multiple social identities, this article explores implications of queer theory in practice with college students. This case study examines the emancipatory impact of queer notions and a queer theoretical framework on one…

  6. Developing and Implementing a Bereavement Support Program for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Cynthia L.; Greer, Joseph A.; Ortiz-Hernandez, Samia; Todd, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The death of a loved one can be particularly difficult for college students, as significant losses are not anticipated during this time. Bereavement experiences are, however, not uncommon among college students, and campus environments can be isolating and nonconducive to recovery. To date, few interventions have been developed to meet bereaved…

  7. AOD Screening Tools for College Students. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the goal of screening in student health or other college settings is to reduce alcohol-related harm. NIAAA points out that identifying those students at greatest risk for alcohol problems is the first step in prevention. Colleges and universities have used a number of…

  8. African American College Students: Literacy of Depression and Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Kim L.; Wimsatt, Maureen; Simpson, Gaynell Marie; Martin, Fayetta; Nelson, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a serious public health concern in the United States affecting almost 18.8 million adults. It is a common mental disorder in college students, with estimates of 1 in 4 "experiencing an episode by age 24." African American college students are at an elevated risk for depression due to racism, stress, sleep deprivation, and lack of…

  9. The Prevalence and Correlates of Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Billie J.; Fabiano, Patricia; Stark, Chris

    2009-01-01

    This study examined depression among a random sample of students (N = 618) enrolled in a medium size university in the Pacific Northwest who responded to the American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment. The results indicated that one in four students experienced depression in the past year and men were as likely as…

  10. Correlates of Depression in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatte, Aude; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and rank the personal, family-related, social, and academic correlates of depressive symptoms in first-year college students. A questionnaire that included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was administered to 389 first-year college students (mean age = 18.9; SD = 3.38; 59.4% female). Eight variables…

  11. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  12. Anthropometric and Behavioral Measures Related to Mindfulness in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinnell, Sarah; Greene, Geoffrey; Melanson, Kathleen; Blissmer, Bryan; Lofgren, Ingrid E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether mindfulness is associated with physical and behavioral measures in first semester college students. Participants: Male and female first year college students (n = 75) from the University of Rhode Island. Methods: Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure were assessed and online questionnaires…

  13. College Students and Academic Performance: A Case of Taking Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Phylis M.; Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Wortman, Thomas I.

    2009-01-01

    College students face a myriad of pressures and challenges in the academic environment as they seek to maintain optimal performance or even to remain in the academic program. In 2002, it was reported that more than 30% of first-year students did not return for their second year of college (Smith), and only 40% are reported to actually compete…

  14. Disparities in Overweight and Obesity among US College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Toben F.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Subramanian, S. V.; Cheung, Lilian; Wechsler, Henry

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To examine social disparities and behavioral correlates of overweight and obesity over time among college students. Methods: Multilevel analyses of BMI, physical activity, and television viewing from 2 representative surveys of US college students (n=24,613). Results: Overweight and obesity increased over time and were higher among…

  15. Marijuana and College Students: A Critical Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blavos, Alexis A.; Glassman, Tavis J.; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Thompson, Amy; DeNardo, Faith; Diehr, Aaron J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Marijuana represents the most widely used illicit drug on college campuses. Repeated use can impair students' academic, emotional, and physical success and can lead to chronic diseases. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate existing literature on the associated effects of marijuana use on U.S. college students' academic…

  16. Willingness among College Students to Help a Smoker Quit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Janet L.; Gerber, Tracy A.; Brockman, Tabetha A.; Patten, Christi A.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Offord, Kenneth P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Between February and March 2003, the authors examined college students' willingness to help a smoker quit and assessed demographic and psychosocial characteristics associated with willingness to help. Participants: Survey respondents were 701 college students (474 women, 227 men) aged 18 to 24 years who indicated there was someone close…

  17. Mass Media Use by College Students during Hurricane Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of studies on how college students prepare for the threat of natural disasters. This study surveyed college students' preferences in mass media use prior to an approaching hurricane. The convenience sample (n = 76) were from a university located in the hurricane-prone area of the central Gulf of Mexico coast. Interestingly,…

  18. College Students' Perspectives on Dating a Person Who Stutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Robert; Mayo, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine college students' perspectives on dating a person who stutters (PWS). One hundred and thirty-two college students responded to a 19-item survey questionnaire. Survey items included questions about participants' familiarity with persons who stutter, family and/or personal history of stuttering, knowledge of…

  19. Sleep Trends and College Students: Does it Connect to Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Bridget F.; Langdon, Jody; McDaniel, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate and compare local to national averages in college-aged students' sleep disturbances, as well as further investigate key demographics (obesity classification, gender, race, year in college) among sleep issues. Methods: This study investigated 636 undergraduate students (333 males, 303 Females,…

  20. The Effectiveness of Light Therapy for College Student Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Lisa A.; Walton, Barry

    2018-01-01

    There is a growing number of students on college campuses with mental health problems and college counseling services are reporting significant increases in student demand for counseling. Depression, a mental illness consisting of profound sadness, fatigue, and irritability, as well as low motivation, poor academic performance, and suicidal…

  1. Self-Reported Sexual Behavior in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Annette; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the actual behaviors or problems which college students are experiencing, as opposed to their general attitudes concerning sexuality. The study surveys sexual behavior in college students, including usage of sexual enhancements (such as pornography, provocative dress, and sadomasochism), "safe…

  2. Supporting Students with Asperger Syndrome on College Campuses: Current Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhill, Gena P.

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing number of students with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) enrolling in college, it has become apparent that support services are greatly needed to assist these students in navigating college life, both academically and socially. Yet, there is a dearth of research describing the specific supports needed…

  3. What College Students Need to Know about Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Roger E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed drinking habits of 212 college students, allowing comparison of heavier drinkers with light drinkers. Combining the findings from this survey with results from previous research on tolerance suggests 10 primary prevention guidelines for college students who choose to drink. (Author/NB)

  4. Student Engagement and the College Experience in Hospitality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Student perceptions of competency in Hospitality Management, (HM) and the level of engagement in the college experience were compared between two programs to verify engagement as a construct consisting of three domains; classroom, campus, and off-campus. Administrator and student descriptions of engagement in the college experience described the…

  5. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  6. Perceptions of Binge Drinking as Problematic among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrye, Bethany A. E.; Pruitt, Courtney L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the way in which college students perceive binge drinking on college campuses in order to better understand the impetus behind this undesirable behavior. A survey administered on-line prompted undergraduate students to identify whether or not they perceived binge drinking to be a problem on college…

  7. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  8. Work Ethics Training: Reflections of Technical College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sandy

    2017-01-01

    Ample research exists on ethics in the workplace and skills college graduates should have to seek and attain long-term gainful employment. The literature has provided some insight into the understanding of ethical behavior as reported by students and employers; however a gap exists in research which documents college student experiences during…

  9. Motivational Interviewing for Smoking Cessation among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, Kelly; Carter, Kimberly; Curtin, Lisa; Martz, Denise M.; Gagnon, Sandy G.; Michael, Kurt D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing has shown some success as an intervention for college student cigarette smokers. We tested the efficacy and process of a two session motivational-interviewing-based smoking intervention compared to an assessment/information session. College student participants assigned to the motivational interviewing condition did not…

  10. Students' Perceptions regarding Their Impending Transition out of College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Kielaszek, Becki J.; Toews, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Although researchers have argued students experience feelings of stress, fear, and uncertainty as they transition from college to work life, there is limited empirical research supporting this argument. Our study filled this gap by exploring 183 fourth-year students' perceptions regarding their impending transition out of the college environment.…

  11. External Dynamics Influencing Tattooing among College Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael; Tse, Luke; Foster, Janna; Angelini, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    The study utilized qualitative research methodology to assess external dynamics and their influences on tattooing practices among college students. Twenty-four undergraduates supplied in-depth interviews regarding the external variables related to college students' decisions to tattoo. The present research follows (Tse, Firmin, Angelini, &…

  12. College Students' Gambling Behavior: When Does It Become Harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Jeremiah; Whelan, James P.; Meyers, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated behavioral indicators of pathological gambling in a college student sample. Participants and Methods: The authors administered a diagnostic interview for pathological gambling to 159 college students, who also completed a demographic questionnaire, and a self-report measure of psychological distress. Results:…

  13. Student and Instructor Perceptions of a Flipped College Algebra Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaster, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Each year about half a million students fail to make planned academic progress due to college algebra, hence the need for researchers to find ways of improving the quality of instruction in the course. Recent research suggests that flipping college algebra to allow time for active learning in the classroom may improve student performance. Also,…

  14. Understanding How and Why College Students Engage in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowiak, Twila; Hunzicker, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Part of a larger research project, this article presents a phenomenological self-study exploring the qualities of student engagement that occurred in one professors' college class-room over two semesters' time. The purpose of the study was to better understand college students' engagement in learning utilizing a reflective, data-based process. The…

  15. A Post-Intentional Exploration of Agnostic College Students' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Scholars have adapted college student identity development models to examine and highlight the unique, laborious, and varied experiences of marginalized populations. However, researchers have minimally explored the perspectives of nontheistic and nonreligious college students using poststructural methodologies. I followed a post-intentional…

  16. Community-College Students Need Better Financial Advising, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    All the tutoring in the world cannot save students who run short of the money they need to pay for college. This year's Community College Survey of Student Engagement affirms as much. In the survey, known as Cessie, nearly half (45 percent) of respondents cited a lack of finances as a hardship that would likely cause them to withdraw from classes…

  17. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  18. Guidelines for Death Notification in College Student Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Lou Ann

    2008-01-01

    College is a time for intellectual growth and also an important time for psychological and emotional maturation and the development of coping skills. The death loss of a family member or friend is a relatively common experience for college students. How students and family members are notified of a death can have a long-standing impact on their…

  19. Causes of Mortality among American College Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C.; Leno, E. Victor; Keller, Adrienne

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study from self-selected institutions of higher education provides an estimate of the causes and rates of mortality among college students between the ages of 18 and 24 years old. One hundred fifty-seven 4-year colleges participated in an online survey of student deaths during one academic year. A total of 254 deaths were reported. The…

  20. Assessing College Student Needs for Comprehensive Financial Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shinae; Gudmunson, Clinton G.; Griesdorn, Timothy S.; Hong, Gong-Soog

    2016-01-01

    To meet college student needs for financial counseling, it is important to assess why they seek counseling and the extent to which differing financial situations are tied to financial stress. This study examined these issues with a sample of 554 college students who participated in financial counseling and found financial problems in various…

  1. A Phenomenological Study of College Students Subjected to Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKennie, Stephanie Williams

    2017-01-01

    Currently cyberbullying is a behavior that is discussed worldwide. Within the discussion, there is a need to know about the lived experiences of college students subjected to cyberbullying. The purpose of this hermeneutic (interpretive) phenomenological study was to explore the lived experiences of ten college students subjected to bullying in…

  2. Japanese College Students' Attitudes towards Japan English and American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Shoko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated contemporary Japanese college students' attitudes towards Japan English (JE) and American English (AE) through a verbal guise test (VGT) as well as a questionnaire. Forty-four Japanese college students listened to four Japanese and four North Americans reading a text in English, rated them in terms of solidarity-related…

  3. Psychosocial Correlates of Cigarette Smoking among College Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rong; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Wang, Jing; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Hongshia; Chen, Xinguang

    2009-01-01

    The objectives are to examine the smoking practice and intention among Chinese college students and to explore the association between cigarette smoking and individual and psychosocial factors. Cross-sectional data were collected from 1874 students from 19 college campuses in Jiangsu province, China. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses were…

  4. Motivational Factors Affecting Advanced Literacy Learning of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca J.; Dagostino, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the possible intrinsic and extrinsic motivational factors that community college students may bring with them into the classroom. It examines how these motivational factors affect students' learning inside and outside the community college classroom walls. The motivational factors such as mastery, self-determination,…

  5. The Conditional Effects of Interracial Interactions on College Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    Given the increasing racial diversity among American college students and society, it is critical to promote meaningful interracial interactions during college. Although a burgeoning literature demonstrates the link between interracial interactions and an array of student outcomes, some important issues have been largely overlooked. Most research…

  6. College and University Student Suicide: Trends and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westefeld, John S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Sees suicide among college and university students as an important campus issue because of its frequency and the severe trauma often precipitated by a suicide. Summarizes the prominent literature in the area of college student suicide, provides a critical review, identifies relevant themes, and discusses future directions. (TE)

  7. Attitude of physics students towards Physics at College of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitude of physics students towards Physics at College of Science and Technology – University of Rwanda. ... Rwandan Journal of Education ... A low performance of physics students at University of Rwanda – College of Science and Technology Nyarugenge campus in physics subjects is observed since it has been ...

  8. Community College Research Center: Collaborative Research to Improve Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Davis

    2015-01-01

    This article presents three lessons from research by the Community College Research Center (CCRC) on strategies community colleges can use to improve completion rates while maintaining broad access and keeping costs low for students and taxpayers. I also identify two sets of data pointing to the potential returns to students and society that could…

  9. Social Problems as Perceived by College Students in Nizhnii Novgorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiavina, E. E.; Petrova, I. E.; Shinkarenko, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Data from a study of the social problems of college students in Nizhnii Novgorod show that the views of those studying social science are the same as those who are not, regarding both general social problems and those specific to college students. [Based on Materials of Nizhnii Novgorod N. I. Lobachevskii State University. This article was…

  10. The Experience and Persistence of College Students in STEM Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong Jade

    2018-01-01

    In this study, an online survey was constructed based on the extant literature on college student success. The survey was used to collect data from a sample of college students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors in order to examine their learning experiences and to identify the factors that may influence their persistence…

  11. College Students' Moral Evaluations of Illegal Music Downloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon, Marc M.; Smetana, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Although unauthorized music downloading is illegal, a majority of college students have downloaded music for free online. Evaluations of illegal music downloading and their association with downloading behavior were examined using social domain theory in a sample of 188 ethnically diverse college students (M[subscript age] = 19.80 years, SD =…

  12. A Collaborative Approach to Nutrition Education for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Tara M.; Goldstein, Marion; Franko, Debra L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well established in the literature that college students have poor eating habits and that many barriers exist to achieving optimal nutrition for this busy population. Little is known about students' perceptions of this problem or suggestions for improving their dietary habits. Similarly, college health professionals need innovative…

  13. Life's Stress Events That American River College Students Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, Richard A.; Grill, Cathleen; Barr, James E.

    This study investigated stress levels and the sources of stress upon students enrolled at American River College (California), a community college of 20,000 students. Participants responded to a questionnaire measuring degrees of stress experienced in 43 life events within the past 12 months. Each individual's stress weights were then summed to…

  14. Risk Factors for Suicide in Taiwanese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Tsai, Fang-Ju; Lee, Ming-Been; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Soong, Wei-Tsuen; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated the personality characteristics, psychopathology, parenting style, and family function among Taiwanese college students with high, moderate, and low suicidal risks. Participants: The sample included 2,919 first-year college students (1,414 men, 1,505 women) from a university in Taipei, Taiwan. Methods: A…

  15. Psychological Abuse and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avant, Elizabeth M.; Swopes, Rachel M.; Davis, Joanne L.; Elhai, Jon D.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that among college students, physical and sexual abuse in intimate relationships are associated with posttraumatic stress. Psychological abuse occurs in intimate relationships among college students, and though there is evidence that such abuse has a negative emotional impact, posttraumatic stress has not been extensively…

  16. Bereavement: Applying Erikson's Theory of Psychosocial Development to College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Debra S.

    One of the developmental challenges that a college student may have to face is the death of a significant other, friend, spouse, relative, child, or parent. This article reviews the literature on the potential effects of bereavement on a college student with respect to Erik Erikson's stage six of psychosocial development (intimacy versus…

  17. Nigerian College Students\\' Attitudes about Love, Marriage and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    214 (116 females and 98 males) Nigerian college students enrolled in three Nigerian universities responded to a questionnaire designed to replicate a previous study of African- American college students' attitudes about love, marriage and sexual relations. The results showed that in agreement with previous studies, none ...

  18. Study Skills of Arts and Science College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, J. Master Arul; Rajendran, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to find out the level of study skills of arts and science college students. Study Skills Check List developed and standardized by Virginia University, Australia (2006) is used to collect the relevant data. The sample consists of 216 Government arts and science college students of Tiruchirappalli district, Tamil…

  19. What Do We Really Know about ADHD in College Students?

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Andrea L.; Rabiner, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Research on ADHD in college students began in the 1990s and has been steadily increasing in recent years. Because young adults with ADHD who attend college have experienced greater academic success during high school than many peers with the disorder, which is likely to be associated with better overall functioning, the degree to which they experience similar patterns of adjustment difficulties was not initially known. Accumulating research suggests that college students with ADHD experience ...

  20. PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION IN COLLEGE STUDENTS: A METAANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Cuijpers, Pim; Cristea, Ioana A.; Ebert, David D; Koot, Hans M.; Auerbach, Randy P.; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Expanded efforts to detect and treat depression among college students, a peak period of onset, have the potential to bear high human capital value from a societal perspective because depression increases college withdrawal rates. However, it is not clear whether evidence-based depression therapies are as effective in college students as in other adult populations. The higher levels of cognitive functioning and IQ and higher proportions of first-onset cases might lead to treatment effects bei...