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Sample records for addition 2003-2006 chapter

  1. Characterization of the Kootenai River Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community before and after Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2003-2006. [Chapter 3

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    Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Bonners

    2009-02-19

    The Kootenai River ecosystem has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam, completed in 1972 on the river near Libby Montana. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel, eliminating nutrient production and habitat diversity crucial to the functioning of a large river-floodplain ecosystem. Libby Dam continues to create large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows, and greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches. These changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to this artificial loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the Kootenay Lake's North Arm in 1992, the South Arm in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes the macroinvertebrate community in the Kootenai River and its response to experimental nutrient addition during 2005 and 2006. This report also provides an initial evaluation of cascading trophic interactions in response to nutrient addition. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 12 sites along a 325 km section of the Kootenai River, representing an upriver unimpounded reference reach, treatment and control canyon reach sites, and braided and meandering reach sites, all downstream from Libby Dam. Principle component analysis revealed that richness explained the greatest amount of variability in response to nutrient addition as did taxa from Acari, Coleoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. Analysis of variance revealed that nutrient addition had a

  2. [Tuberculosis among foreigners in the Czech Republic 2003-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, J; Krejbich, F

    2008-01-01

    Authors compared the situation in tuberculosis among foreigners in the Czech Republic during the years 2003-2006. Foreigners participated in 13.0-14.2% of total notified tuberculosis cases during this period. Proportion of smear positive cases among foreigners in this period grew up from 32.8% to 40.8%. The proportion of active case finding of tuberculosis cases among foreigners declined from 36.0% to 15.4%. At the same time foreigners formed an important part in drug resistance of TB-strains in the Czech Republic. 50% of MDR-TB cases were detected in foreigners. In 20 MDR-TB cases notified in the years 2003-2006 10 were detected in foreigners. If the number of immigrants from countries with high prevalence of tuberculosis to the Czech Republic increases the control of TB in the Czech Republic could be negatively influenced.

  3. Fatalities among oil and gas extraction workers--United States, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-25

    Oil and gas extraction (i.e., removing oil and natural gas from the ground) is a growing industry in the United States, employing approximately 380,000 workers in 2006. In recent years, activity in this industry has increased substantially, from an average of 800 actively drilling rigs in the United States during the 1990s to approximately 1,300 during 2003-2006. In August 2005, the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) asked CDC to investigate a 15% increase in fatalities among oil and gas extraction workers (from 85 fatalities in 2003 to 98 in 2004). CDC analyzed data from the BLS Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) for the period 2003-2006. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that increases in oil and gas extraction activity were correlated with an increase in the rate of fatal occupational injuries in this industry, with an annual fatality rate of 30.5 per 100,000 workers (404 fatalities) during 2003-2006, approximately seven times the rate for all workers (4.0 per 100,000 workers). Nearly half of all fatal injuries among these workers were attributed to highway motor-vehicle crashes and workers being struck by machinery or equipment. Employers should work with existing industry groups and federal, state, and local government agencies to promote seatbelt use. In addition, researchers and public health officials should collaborate with industry groups to establish engineering and process controls that remove workers from potentially dangerous machinery while drilling and servicing oil and gas wells.

  4. Changes in West Nile virus seroprevalence and antibody titers among Wisconsin mesopredators 2003-2006.

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    Docherty, Douglas E; Samuel, Michael D; Egstad, Kristina F; Griffin, Kathryn M; Nolden, Cherrie A; Karwal, Lovkesh; Ip, Hon S

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 occurrence of West Nile virus (WNV) in Wisconsin (WI), we collected sera, during 2003-2006, from south-central WI mesopredators. We tested these sera to determine WNV antibody prevalence and geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT). Four-fold higher antibody prevalence and 2-fold higher GMAT in 2003-2004 indicated greater exposure of mesopredators to WNV during the apparent epizootic phase. The period 2005-2006 was likely the enzootic phase because WNV antibody prevalence fell to a level similar to other flaviviruses. Our results suggest that, in mesopredators, vector-borne transmission is the primary route of infection and WNV antibodies persist for < 1 year. Mesopredators may be sensitive indicators of West Nile virus spill-over into humans and horses. Mesopredator sero-surveys may complement dead crow surveillance by providing additional data for the timing of public health interventions. Research is needed to clarify the dynamics of WNV infection in these mammals and their role as potential WNV amplifiers.

  5. Short report: Changes in West Nile virus seroprevalence and antibody titers among Wisconsin mesopredators 2003-2006

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    Docherty, D.E.; Samuel, M.D.; Egstad, K.F.; Griffin, K.M.; Nolden, C.A.; Karwal, L.; Ip, Hon S.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 occurrence of West Nile virus (WNV) in Wisconsin (WI), we collected sera, during 2003-2006, from south-central WI mesopredators. We tested these sera to determine WNV antibody prevalence and geometric mean antibody titer (GMAT). Four-fold higher antibody prevalence and 2-fold higher GMAT in 2003-2004 indicated greater exposure of mesopredators to WNV during the apparent epizootic phase. The period 2005-2006 was likely the enzootic phase because WNV antibody prevalence fell to a level similar to other flaviviruses. Our results suggest that, in mesopredators, vector-borne transmission is the primary route of infection and WNV antibodies persist for West Nile virus spill-over into humans and horses. Mesopredator sero-surveys may complement dead crow surveillance by providing additional data for the timing of public health interventions. Research is needed to clarify the dynamics of WNV infection in these mammals and their role as potential WNV amplifiers. Copyright ?? 2009 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. Mountain Lions of the Flagstaff Uplands: 2003-2006 Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Executive Summary Stakeholders in management of mountain lions in the Flagstaff Uplands of northern Arizona have expressed increasing concern about both potential impacts of humans on lions and potential risks posed by lions to humans. A series of human-mountain lion encounters during 2000-2001 on Mt. Elden, immediately adjacent to Flagstaff, and similar incidents during 2004 near Tucson brought increased attention to management of human safety in mountain lion range. These human-centered concerns, together with long-standing questions about how the human infrastructure centered on Flagstaff might be affecting lion movements led us to initiate a mountain lion study in 2003 which we plan to continue through 2009. Our study focuses on movements and other behaviors of mountain lions, with the goal of providing information that can be used to increase human safety, decrease human impacts, and, overall, provide insight into the ecology of lions in this region. To serve this goal, we have focused on collecting data that will be the basis of explanatory models that can provide spatially-explicit predictions of mountain lion activity, specify the effects of human facilities, such as highways and urban areas, and provide insight into when, where, and how often different kinds of lions kill different kinds of prey. During 2003-2006, we captured six female and five male mountain lions in the Flagstaff Uplands, 10 of which we fitted with collars that collected up to six high-precision GPS fixes per day, transmitted daily to our offices via Argos satellites. This timely delivery of data allowed us to visit kill sites and other foci of localized activity to collect detailed information on lion behavior. By June 2006 we had obtained 9357 GPS locations and visited 394 sites, at which we documented 218 kills, 165 of which were by five females and 53 by five males. These data were the basis for preliminary analyses presented in this report. All lions during all seasons exhibited a

  7. An epidemiological analysis of drunk driving accidents in Kagawa Prefecture - comparison of 1997-2000 and 2003-2006.

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    Fujita, Yoshitsugu; Inoue, Ken; Sakuta, Akira; Seki, Nobuhiko; Miyazawa, Teruomi; Eguchi, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we examined the number of drunk driving accidents and drunk driving accident toll in 1997-2000 and 2003-2006 for Kagawa Prefecture, which had Japan's highest number of traffic accident fatalities per 100,000 population.

  8. Geographic patterns of frequent mental distress: U.S. adults, 1993-2001 and 2003-2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moriarty, David G; Zack, Matthew M; Holt, James B; Chapman, Daniel P; Safran, Marc A

    2009-01-01

    ... (BRFSS). In 2007 and 2008, analysis was performed on BRFSS data reported by 2.4 million adults from 1993-2001 and 2003-2006 to map and describe the prevalence of frequent mental distress (FMD)-defined as having...

  9. [Assessment of financial flow in the health system of Serbia in a period 2003-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić-Stevanović, Milena; Teodorović, Nevenka; Dimitrijević, Snezana; Jovanović, Dragan

    2010-05-01

    GDP in Serbia. Establishing NHA provided a pattern of national healthcare spending and allowed a comparison of healthcare system in Serbia with the systems of other countries. Analysing a period 2003-2006 revealed a similarity between Serbia and the countries of the European Unity in regard to the level of average financial resources allocation for healthcare expressed as a percentage of GDP, as well as in regard to financiers in the system of healthcare. A high purchasing power disparity, however, in healthcare services was observed between the population of Serbia and other European countries.

  10. Tenerife Island Ddeformation Analysis in the 2003-2006 Period Employing the Coherent Pixel Technique and ENVISAT SAR Images

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    Arjona, A.; Mallorqui, J. J.; Fernandez, J.; Blanco, P.; Camacho, A. G.; Duque, S.; Gonzalez, P. J.; Monells, D.

    2007-12-01

    Geodetic measurements in volcanic areas are crucial as they serve as input information to the deformation analysis techniques in order to achieve pre-eruption ground displacement predictions. We present ground motion results obtained by applying the Coherent Pixel Technique, an Advanced Differential SAR Interferometry algorithm, which reveal surface deformation episodes in the Tenerife Island. The study is carried out by employing DInSAR interferograms concerning the 2003-2006 period corresponding to both ascending and descending images acquired by the ENVISAT ASAR sensor. The obtained results highlight a clear deformation areas in several parts of the island Tenerife, which is consistent with previous results.

  11. A case study of speculative financial bubbles in the South African stock market 2003-2006

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    Zhou, Wei-Xing; Sornette, Didier

    2009-03-01

    We tested 45 indices and common stocks in the South African stock market for the possible existence of a bubble over the period from January 2003 to May 2006. A bubble is defined by a faster-than-exponential acceleration with significant log-periodic oscillations. These two traits are analyzed using different methods. Sensitivity tests show that the estimated parameters are robust. With the insight of 6 additional months of data since the analysis was performed, we observe that many of the stocks on the South African market experienced an abrupt drop at mid-June 2006, which is compatible with the predicted tc for several of the stocks, but not all. This suggests that the mini-crash that occurred around mid-June of 2006 was only a partial correction, which has resumed into a renewed bubbly acceleration bound to end some time in 2007, similarly to what happened in the US market from October 1997 to August 1998.

  12. Suspended-sediment and nutrient loads for Waiakea and Alenaio Streams, Hilo, Hawaii, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Todd K.; Jamison, Marcael T.J.; Nishimoto, Dale C.

    2008-01-01

    Suspended sediment and nutrient samples were collected during wet-weather conditions at three sites on two ephemeral streams in the vicinity of Hilo, Hawaii during March 2004 to March 2006. Two sites were sampled on Waiakea Stream at 80- and 860-foot altitudes during March 2004 to August 2005. One site was sampled on Alenaio Stream at 10-foot altitude during November 2005 to March 2006. The sites were selected to represent different land uses and land covers in the area. Most of the drainage area above the upper Waiakea Stream site is conservation land. The drainage areas above the lower site on Waiakea Stream, and the site on Alenaio Stream, are a combination of conservation land, agriculture, rural, and urban land uses. In addition to the sampling, continuous-record streamflow sites were established at the three sampling sites, as well as an additional site on Alenaio Stream at altitude of 75 feet and 0.47 miles upstream from the sampling site. Stage was measured continuously at 15-minute intervals at these sites. Discharge, for any particular instant, or for selected periods of time, were computed based on a stage-discharge relation determined from individual discharge measurements. Continuous records of discharge were computed at the two sites on Waiakea Stream and the upper site on Aleniao Stream. Due to non-ideal hydraulic conditions within the channel of Alenaio Stream, a continuous record of discharge was not computed at the lower site on Alenaio Stream where samples were taken. Samples were analyzed for suspended sediment, and the nutrients total nitrogen, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, and total phosphorus. Concentration data were converted to instantaneous load values: loads are the product of discharge and concentration, and are presented as tons per day for suspended sediment or pounds per day for nutrients. Daily-mean loads were computed by estimating concentrations relative to discharge using graphical constituent loading analysis techniques. Daily

  13. Borehole geophysical investigation of a formerly used defense site, Machiasport, Maine, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carole D.; Mondazzi, Remo A.; Joesten, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, collected borehole geophysical logs in 18 boreholes and interpreted the data along with logs from 19 additional boreholes as part of an ongoing, collaborative investigation at three environmental restoration sites in Machiasport, Maine. These sites, located on hilltops overlooking the seacoast, formerly were used for military defense. At each of the sites, chlorinated solvents, used as part of defense-site operations, have contaminated the fractured-rock aquifer. Borehole geophysical techniques and hydraulic methods were used to characterize bedrock lithology, fractures, and hydraulic properties. In addition, each geophysical method was evaluated for effectiveness for site characterization and for potential application for further aquifer characterization and (or) evaluation of remediation efforts. Results of borehole geophysical logging indicate the subsurface is highly fractured, metavolcanic, intrusive, metasedimentary bedrock. Selected geophysical logs were cross-plotted to assess correlations between rock properties. These plots included combinations of gamma, acoustic reflectivity, electromagnetic induction conductivity, normal resistivity, and single-point resistance. The combined use of acoustic televiewer (ATV) imaging and natural gamma logs proved to be effective for delineating rock types. Each of the rock units in the study area could be mapped in the boreholes, on the basis of the gamma and ATV reflectivity signatures. The gamma and mean ATV reflectivity data were used along with the other geophysical logs for an integrated interpretation, yielding a determination of quartz monzonite, rhyolite, metasedimentary units, or diabase/gabbro rock types. The interpretation of rock types on the basis of the geophysical logs compared well to drilling logs and geologic mapping. These results may be helpful for refining the geologic framework at depth. A stereoplot of all fractures

  14. Cardiovascular health metrics and accelerometer-measured physical activity levels: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Tiago V; Harrington, Deirdre M; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether relationships exist between accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and other cardiovascular (CV) health metrics in a large sample. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2006, were used. Overall, 3454 nonpregnant adults 20 years or older who fasted for 6 hours or longer, with valid accelerometer data and with CV health metrics, were included in the study. Blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), smoking status, diet, fasting plasma glucose level, and total cholesterol level were defined as ideal, intermediate, and poor on the basis of American Heart Association criteria. Results were weighted to account for sampling design, oversampling, and nonresponse. Significant increasing linear trends in mean daily MVPA were observed across CV health levels for BMI, BP, and fasting plasma glucose (Phealth metrics (Phealth metrics in this large sample. These results support the inclusion of physical activity in the overall definition of ideal CV health. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium intake in the United States from dietary and supplemental sources across adult age groups: new estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

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    Mangano, Kelsey M; Walsh, Stephen J; Insogna, Karl L; Kenny, Anne M; Kerstetter, Jane E

    2011-05-01

    Adequate lifelong calcium intake is essential in optimizing bone health. Recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data were used to quantify variation in calcium intake across adult age groups and to relate age-associated changes in calcium intake with energy intake. Additional goals were to assess differences in dietary calcium intake between supplemental calcium users and nonusers and to evaluate associations between age and calcium density in the diet. This cross-sectional analysis determined calcium and energy intake for National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey respondents during 2003-2006. Diet was assessed with 24-hour recall and supplement use via questionnaire. Trends in median intakes for dietary calcium, total calcium, and energy across age categories were assessed using survey analysis methods. Nutrient density was represented using calcium to energy intake ratios. The analyses included data from 9,475 adults. When compared to the 19- to 30-year age group, median dietary calcium intake was lower in the ≥81-year age group by 23% in men (Pcalcium supplement use increased (Pcalcium intake was greater than in nonusers (P=0.02). Calcium density in the diet significantly increased relative to age in men and women (Pcalcium to energy ratios were insufficient to meet target ratios inferred by adequate intake standards after age 50 years. Although supplemental calcium use and calcium density were highest in older age groups, they were not sufficient in meeting recommended levels. New approaches to increasing the frequency and level of calcium supplement use to enhance calcium density in diets may be necessary to reduce osteoporosis risk among older Americans. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Using Logistic Regression to Predict the Probability of Debris Flows in Areas Burned by Wildfires, Southern California, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Michael G.; Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Helsel, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    Logistic regression was used to develop statistical models that can be used to predict the probability of debris flows in areas recently burned by wildfires by using data from 14 wildfires that burned in southern California during 2003-2006. Twenty-eight independent variables describing the basin morphology, burn severity, rainfall, and soil properties of 306 drainage basins located within those burned areas were evaluated. The models were developed as follows: (1) Basins that did and did not produce debris flows soon after the 2003 to 2006 fires were delineated from data in the National Elevation Dataset using a geographic information system; (2) Data describing the basin morphology, burn severity, rainfall, and soil properties were compiled for each basin. These data were then input to a statistics software package for analysis using logistic regression; and (3) Relations between the occurrence or absence of debris flows and the basin morphology, burn severity, rainfall, and soil properties were evaluated, and five multivariate logistic regression models were constructed. All possible combinations of independent variables were evaluated to determine which combinations produced the most effective models, and the multivariate models that best predicted the occurrence of debris flows were identified. Percentage of high burn severity and 3-hour peak rainfall intensity were significant variables in all models. Soil organic matter content and soil clay content were significant variables in all models except Model 5. Soil slope was a significant variable in all models except Model 4. The most suitable model can be selected from these five models on the basis of the availability of independent variables in the particular area of interest and field checking of probability maps. The multivariate logistic regression models can be entered into a geographic information system, and maps showing the probability of debris flows can be constructed in recently burned areas of

  17. Social disparities in exposures to bisphenol A and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals: a cross-sectional study within NHANES 2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Jessica W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bisphenol A (BPA and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs are suspected endocrine disrupting compounds known to be ubiquitous in people's bodies. Population disparities in exposure to these chemicals have not been fully characterized. Methods We analyzed data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Using multivariable linear regression we examined the association between urinary concentrations of BPA, serum concentrations of four PFCs, and multiple measures of socioeconomic position (SEP: family income, education, occupation, and food security. We also examined associations with race/ethnicity. Results All four PFCs were positively associated with family income, whereas BPA was inversely associated with family income. BPA concentrations were higher in people who reported very low food security and received emergency food assistance than in those who did not. This association was particularly strong in children: 6-11 year-olds whose families received emergency food had BPA levels 54% higher (95% CI, 13 to 112% than children of families who did not. For BPA and PFCs we saw smaller and less consistent associations with education and occupation. Mexican Americans had the lowest concentrations of any racial/ethnic group of both types of chemicals; for PFCs, Mexican Americans not born in the U.S. had much lower levels than those born in the U.S. Conclusions People with lower incomes had higher body burdens of BPA; the reverse was true for PFCs. Family income with adjustment for family size was the strongest predictor of chemical concentrations among the different measures of SEP we studied. Income, education, occupation, and food security appear to capture different aspects of SEP that may be related to exposure to BPA and PFCs and are not necessarily interchangeable as measures of SEP in environmental epidemiology studies. Differences by race/ethnicity were independent of SEP.

  18. Relationship Between Objectively Measured Physical Activity, Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers, and Hearing Sensitivity Using Data From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Joyner, Chelsea

    2017-06-13

    Limited research has examined the interrelationships among cardiometabolic parameters, physical activity, and hearing function, which was this study's purpose. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006 were used in the path analyses. Physical activity and hearing function were both objectively measured. Various cardiometabolic parameters were assessed from a blood sample. Adults 30-85 years (N = 1,070) constituted the analytic sample. Physical activity was negatively associated with triglycerides (β = -0.11, p physical activity to HPTA was nonsignificant (β = 0.01, p = .99). Physical activity was associated with select cardiovascular disease risk factors. Several cardiovascular disease risk factors were associated with hearing function.

  19. The German Environmental Survey on Children 2003-2006 (GerES IV). Sample and study description; Der Kinder-Umwelt-Survey 2003-2006 (KUS). Stichprobe und Studienbeschreibung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Christine; Seiwert, Margarete; Becker, Kerstin; Conrad, Andre; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike [Umweltbundesamt, Dessau-Rossau / Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The German Environmental Survey on Children (GerES IV) carried out by the German Federal Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt, UBA) provides representative population data to describe health-related environmental exposure of 3 to 14 year old children in Germany and environment-related effects on the children's health. In addition, the conjunction of GerES IV with the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (German acronym: KiGGS), conducted by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), makes it possible to study the relationship between environmental influences and adverse health effects. From May 2003 to May 2006, a random sample of 1,790 children aged 3 to 14 from 150 locations, and their parents, participated in GerES IV and in KiGGS. 77.3% of the selected children participated in KUS. Since participation in GerES IV was limited to children that had previously participated in KiGGS, total response in GerES IV resulted in 52.6%. Response rates did not differ significantly between western and eastern Germany, different community sizes, age groups and genders. The basic study programme included sampling of blood, morning urine, tap water and house dust as well as extensive questionnaire-based interviews. In addition, sub-groups were studied with regard to ''hearing capacity, noise and stress hormones'', ''chemical compounds in indoor air'' and ''biological pollutants indoors''. A key element of the field work in GerES IV was a home visit to carry out measurements, collect samples - except for blood sampling, which took place in KiGGS and do the interview. The quality of the field work, of data collection and evaluation, and of the chemical, biological and physical analyses was successfully evaluated by internal and external quality assurance. (orig.)

  20. A catalog of rules, variables, and definitions applied to accelerometer data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Camhi, Sarah M; Troiano, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) included accelerometry in the 2003-2006 data collection cycles. Researchers have used these data since their release in 2007, but the data have not been consistently treated, examined, or reported. The objective of this study was to aggregate data from studies using NHANES accelerometry data and to catalogue study decision rules, derived variables, and cut point definitions to facilitate a more uniform approach to these data. We conducted a PubMed search of English-language articles published (or indicated as forthcoming) from January 2007 through December 2011. Our initial search yielded 74 articles, plus 1 article that was not indexed in PubMed. After excluding 21 articles, we extracted and tabulated details on 54 studies to permit comparison among studies. The 54 articles represented various descriptive, methodological, and inferential analyses. Although some decision rules for treating data (eg, criteria for minimal wear-time) were consistently applied, cut point definitions used for accelerometer-derived variables (eg, time spent in various intensities of physical activity) were especially diverse. Unique research questions may require equally unique analytical approaches; some inconsistency in approaches must be tolerated if scientific discovery is to be encouraged. This catalog provides a starting point for researchers to consider relevant and/or comparable accelerometer decision rules, derived variables, and cut point definitions for their own research questions.

  1. INTERPRETASI KONSEP KREATIVITAS ANTARA AKADEMISI DAN PRAKTISI DESAIN KOMUNIKASI VISUAL PADA KUALITAS KARYA KREATIF PEMENANG CITRA PARIWARA KATEGORI PRINT AD (2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Waloeyo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available How far is the difference and the similarity of academicians dan practicioners’s interpretation in difine the advertising creativity’s concept and to appreciate the creative quality of Citra Pariwara’s winner advertisement works print ad category, from 2003 until 2006. An Advertisement work can be categorized for being creative, if it contains the element of novelty, freshness, innovative, original, and can fulfill it’s early destination, which is to rise the product’s sale or even to solve it’s audience’s problem. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Sejauh mana perbedaan dan persamaan interpretasi, antara akademisi dan praktisi Desain Komunikasi Visual, dalam mendefinisikan konsep kreativitas periklanan dan menilai kualitas kreatif karya iklan pemenang Citra Pariwara kategori iklan cetak, mulai tahun 2003-2006. Sebuah karya iklan dapat dikategorikan kreatif jika memiliki unsur kebaruhan (novel, segar, inovatif original, dan mampu memenuhi tujuan awal dibuatnya iklan tersebut, baik untuk meningkatkan penjualan produk maupun untuk memecahkan masalah target audiens-nya. Kata kunci: Interpretasi, konsep kreativitas, iklan cetak pemenang Citra Pariwara.

  2. Jaaroverzicht Luchtkwaliteit 2003-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijk R; Mooibroek D; Hoogerbrugge R; LVM

    2007-01-01

    In Nederland zijn tussen 2003 en 2006 Europese normen voor de luchtkwaliteit overschreden. Dit geldt in het bijzonder voor stikstofdioxide, fijn stof en ozon. Vooral in 2003 was het aantal overschrijdingen hoog, mede vanwege weersomstandigheden als langdurige droge periodes. Dit blijkt uit

  3. Diet quality is positively associated with 100% fruit juice consumption in children and adults in the United States: NHANES 2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanovec Michael

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One hundred percent fruit juice (100% FJ has been viewed by some as a sweetened beverage with concerns about its effect on weight. Little regard has been given to the contribution of 100% FJ to diet quality. Methods In this study data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used to examine the association of 100% FJ consumption with diet quality in participants 2-5 years of age (y (n = 1665, 6-12 y (n = 2446, 13-18 y (n = 3139, and 19+y (n = 8861. Two 24-hour dietary recalls were used to determine usual intake using the National Cancer Institute method. Usual intake, standard errors, and regression analyses (juice independent variable and Healthy Eating Index-2005 [HEI-2005] components were dependent variables, using appropriate covariates, were determined using sample weights. Results The percentage of participants 2-5 y, 6-12 y, 13-18 y, and 19+y that consumed 100% FJ was 71%, 57%, 45%, and 62%, respectively. Usual intake of 100% FJ (ounce [oz]/day among the four age groups was: 5.8 ± 0.6, 2.6 ± 0.4, 3.7 ± 0.4, and 2.4 ± 0.2 for those in age groups 2-5 y, 6-12 y, 13-18 y, and 19+y, respectively. Consumption of 100% FJ was associated with higher energy intake in 6-12 y, 13-18 y, and 19+y; and higher total, saturated, and discretionary fats in 13-18 y participants. Consumption of 100% FJ was associated with higher total HEI-2005 scores in all age groups ( Conclusions Usual intake of 100% FJ consumption exceeded MyPyramid recommendations for children 2-5 y, but was associated with better diet quality in all age groups and should be encouraged in moderation as part of a healthy diet.

  4. Vitamin D intake and status are associated with lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome in U.S. adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Kevin C; Fulgoni, Victor L; Keast, Debra R; Rains, Tia M; Park, Keigan M; Rubin, Martyn R

    2012-10-01

    Previous reports have shown that metabolic syndrome and some metabolic syndrome components are associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), 2003-2006, we evaluated the associations of vitamin D intake (n=3543) and vitamin D status [25(OH)D; n=3529], with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in adults 20 years and older. Exclusion criteria included nonfasted subjects, those pregnant and/or lactating, and, for intake analyses, those with unreliable 24-h recall records. Subjects were separately classified into quartiles of vitamin D intake (both including and excluding supplements) and serum 25(OH)D. Logistic regression was used to determine odds ratios (OR) for metabolic syndrome after adjusting for multiple confounders. Those in the highest quartile of serum 25(OH)D had 60% lower odds for metabolic syndrome as compared to those in the lowest quartile [OR=0.40; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27, 0.59]. Elevated waist circumference (OR=0.57; 95% CI 0.39, 0.84), low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (OR=0.54; 95% CI 0.39, 0.75), and high homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=0.40; 95% CI 0.29, 0.55) were the main components associated with serum 25(OH)D. Compared with the lowest vitamin D intake quartile (excluding supplements), those in the highest intake quartile had 28% lower odds for metabolic syndrome (OR=0.72; 95% CI 0.58, 0.90). No components of metabolic syndrome were significantly associated with dietary intake of vitamin D with supplements included or excluded. We conclude that higher 25(OH)D, and, to a lesser degree, greater dietary vitamin D intake, are associated with reduced prevalence of metabolic syndrome.

  5. Body mass index percentiles for children and adolescents in Germany based on a nationally representative sample (KiGGS 2003-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, A Schaffrath; Kurth, B-M; Stolzenberg, H; Ellert, U; Neuhauser, H

    2010-04-01

    To present body mass index (BMI) percentiles representative for children in Germany and to compare them with the currently used percentiles by Kromeyer-Hauschild (KH) and international percentiles of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF). Representative examination survey of 17 641 children and adolescents aged 0-17 years living in Germany (KiGGS 2003-2006 study, response rate 67%) with standardized measurement of height and weight. Generally, BMI in KiGGS was higher than in the reference populations from previous decades. KiGGS shows an asymmetric upward shift of the BMI distribution from about age 6 years and an earlier adiposity rebound compared with KH. The BMI peak in the first year of life is shown by KiGGS and WHO, but much less by KH. The cut-offs for overweight and obesity determined with the IOTF methodology in KiGGS (percentiles corresponding to BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2) at 18 years of age) were similar to IOTF cut-offs from age 18 to 10 years but systematically lower for younger children. The KiGGS BMI percentiles appear more valid for Germany than present alternatives and should be used for population monitoring. Despite their methodological limitations, the general shape of the older German KH references is confirmed by KiGGS for the ages 2-17 years. In order not to obscure the increase in obesity rates in the last decades, we therefore propose to continue using KH for individual diagnosis and estimation of the prevalence of overweight and obesity in this age range.

  6. Fruit juice consumption is associated with improved nutrient adequacy in children and adolescents: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Zanovec, Michael; Kleinman, Ronald E; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2012-10-01

    To examine the contribution of 100 % fruit juice (FJ) consumption to dietary adequacy of shortfall nutrients by children and adolescents. Cross-sectional. Secondary analysis of data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Children and adolescents aged 2-18 years (n 7250). Usual intake, determined from two 24 h dietary recalls, was calculated using the National Cancer Institute method. The population was dichotomized into consumers or non-consumers of 100 % FJ. The age/gender-specific percentage of the two consumption groups with intakes less than the Estimated Average Requirement or that exceeded the Adequate Intake for selected nutrients was determined. A Z-statistic for differences in population proportions was used to determine significance (P Requirement for vitamin A (24.4 (SE 2.5) % v. 42.2 (SE 2.5) %), vitamin C (0.1 (SE 0.2) % v. 38.9 (SE 4.1) %), folate (8.8 (SE 1.5) % v. 22.1 (SE 2.4) %), P (11.6 (SE 2.1) % v. 21.3 (SE 2.6) %) and Mg (25.8 (SE 1.7) % v. 46.1 (SE 2.0) %). A greater percentage of 100 % FJ consumers exceeded the Adequate Intake for K (2.4 (SE 0.5) v. 0.5 (SE 0.2) %) compared with non-consumers. Consumption of 100 % FJ is associated with improved nutrient adequacy and can contribute to a healthy diet.

  7. Ethnic disparities among food sources of energy and nutrients of public health concern and nutrients to limit in adults in the United States: NHANES 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Carol E; Nicklas, Theresa A; Keast, Debra R; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2014-01-01

    Identification of current food sources of energy and nutrients among US non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Mexican American (MA) adults is needed to help with public health efforts in implementing culturally sensitive and feasible dietary recommendations. The objective of this study was to determine the food sources of energy and nutrients to limit [saturated fatty acids (SFA), added sugars, and sodium] and nutrients of public health concern (dietary fiber, vitamin D, calcium, and potassium) by NHW, NHB, and MA adults. This was a cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of NWH (n=4,811), NHB (2,062), and MA (n=1,950) adults 19+ years. The 2003-2006 NHANES 24-h recall (Day 1) dietary intake data were analyzed. An updated USDA Dietary Source Nutrient Database was developed using current food composition databases. Food grouping included ingredients from disaggregated mixtures. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from food sources were sample-weighted. Percentages of total dietary intake contributed from food sources were ranked. Multiple differences in intake among ethnic groups were seen for energy and all nutrients examined. For example, energy intake was higher in MA as compared to NHB; SFA, added sugars, and sodium intakes were higher in NHW than NHB; dietary fiber was highest in MA and lowest in NHB; vitamin D was highest in NHW; calcium was lowest in NHB; and potassium was higher in NHW as compared to NHB. Food sources of these nutrients also varied. Identification of intake of nutrients to limit and of public health concern can help health professionals implement appropriate dietary recommendations and plan interventions that are ethnically appropriate.

  8. Beyond insurance coverage: usual source of care in the treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Erica S; Ross, Joseph S; Desai, Mayur M; Canavan, Maureen E; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2010-07-01

    Expanding insurance coverage, while necessary, may not be sufficient to ensure high-quality care for adults with cardiovascular disease. We sought to examine the association between having a usual source of care (USOC) and receiving medication treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Using the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we categorized USOC (a place to go when sick or need medical advice) and insurance status in adults >or=35 years old with an indication for medication treatment of hypertension (n = 3,142) and hypercholesterolemia (n = 1,134), determined using the Joint National Committee 7 and Adult Treatment Panel III recommendations, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to determine the independent effect of USOC on receiving treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and comorbidities. Separate multivariable models were examined stratified by insurance status. Among subjects with an indication for treatment of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, 32.4% and 42.0% were untreated, respectively. When compared with adults with a USOC, adults without a USOC were more likely to be untreated for hypertension (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 2.43, 95% CI 1.88-2.85) and hypercholesterolemia (aPR 1.79, 95% CI 1.31-2.13). In stratified analyses among subjects with insurance, no USOC remained associated with being untreated (hypertension, aPR 2.58, 95% CI 1.88-3.08; hypercholesterolemia, aPR 1.65, 95% CI 0.97-2.18). Absence of a USOC was associated with being untreated for hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, even among individuals with insurance, suggesting that efforts to improve chronic disease management should also facilitate access to a regular source of care. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Política Científica e Tecnológica e as Demandas da Inclusão Social no Governo Lula (2003-2006 [Science and Technology Policy and Demands for Social Inclusion in the Lula Administration (2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Pavan Serafim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo parte da percepção de que houve um fortalecimento da questão social, em especial da inclusão social, no Governo Lula. Seu objetivo é analisar em que medida a Política Científica e Tecnológica incorporou modificações e/ou preocupações semelhantes em sua agenda. Para tanto, apresentamos a trajetória dessa política, destacando o período mais recente. Ao analisar documentos oficiais e bibliografias especializadas, constatamos que a criação da Secretaria Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia para a Inclusão Social deve ser reconhecida como o surgimento de um novo espaço de disputa, ainda que assimétrica e frágil, no qual os atores antes excluídos do processo de conformação da agenda da PCT podem agora tomar parte. --- Science and Technology Policy and Demands for Social Inclusion in the Lula Administration (2003-2006 --- Abstract --- This paper is based on the perception that there has been increasing concern towards social issues in Brazil, particularly that of social inclusion, during the Lula Administration. The main objective of this paper is to analyze to what degree the agenda of science and technology policy has incorporated similar changes or concerns. We therefore explore the trajectory of this policy, in particular the more recent period. Based on the study of official documents and specialized references, we note that the creation of the National Secretary of Science and Technology for Social Inclusion should be recognized as the emergence of a new field for political struggle, albeit still asymmetrical and frail, in which previously excluded actors may now take part in the agenda setting.

  10. How do African American men rate their health care? An analysis of the consumer assessment of health plans 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Keith; Meret-Hanke, Louise; Dean, Caress; Wiltshire, Jacqueline; Gilbert, Keon L; Wang, Jing; Shacham, Enbal; Barnidge, Ellen; Baker, Elizabeth; Wray, Ricardo; Rice, Shahida; Johns, Marquisha; Moore, Tondra

    2015-05-01

    African American (AA) men remain one of the most disconnected groups from health care. This study examines the association between AA men's rating of health care and rating of their personal physician. The sample included 12,074 AA men aged 18 years or older from the 2003 to 2006 waves of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Adult Commercial Health Plan Survey. Multilevel models were used to obtain adjusted means rating of health care systems and personal physician, and the relationship of ratings with the rating of personal physician. The adjusted means were 80 (on a 100-point scale) for most health ratings and composite health care scores: personal physician (83.9), specialist (83.66), health care (82.34), getting needed care (89.57), physician communication (83.17), medical staff courtesy (86.58), and customer service helpfulness (88.37). Physician communication was the strongest predictor for physician rating. AA men's health is understudied, and additional research is warranted to improve how they interface with the health care system. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Estudo comparativo da estratégia da Federação Portuguesa de Atividades Subaquáticas entre os ciclos 2003/2006 e 2007/2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel António Delgado Preto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo tem como objetivo fazer a análise estratégica e de decisões dos corpos diretivos da Federação Portuguesa de Atividades Subaquáticas (FPAS entre os quadriênios 2003/2006 e 2007/2010. Para atender este objetivo utilizamos o modelo iconográfico de análise proposto por Correia (1999 que contempla quatro dimensões (recursos; análise estratégica; natureza de decisão e resultados nas quais são utilizados indicadores que nos permitiram chegar a valores quantificáveis. A amostra foi constituída por 82 instrutores de mergulho que são stakeholders¹ desse processo. Foi aplicado um questionário em dois momentos (início e fim de cada ciclo presidencial. Os resultados obtidos indicam uma tendência de falibilidade do processo de tomada de decisão. Esta incapacidade deve-se essencialmente ao fato do processo não estar assente em instrumentos robustos. Os objetivos da estratégia, ainda que conseguidos, não o foram de forma sustentada, potenciando conflitos, que hipotecam de forma clara a sedimentação das linhas estratégicas.

  12. Counterinsurgency in Iraq (2003-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    youth with a bonanza of DVD players with which to watch extremist propaganda videos, cell phones to spot for insurgent cell leaders, and cars from...Shi’ite Arabs. During early 2006, young Sunni males were repeatedly bound or handcuffed and killed by shots to the head. Death squads within the...in part to attacks on high-voltage lines and generators in southern Iraq. At the same time, Iraqis purchased large numbers of electrical appliances

  13. Adaptation illustrations: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Matt St. Pierre; Linda. Parker

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how the Adaptation Workbook (Chapter 3) can be used with the Adaptation Strategies and Approaches (Chapter 2) to develop adaptation tactics for two real-world management issues. The two illustrations in this chapter are intended to provide helpful tips to managers completing the Adaptation Workbook, as well as to show how the anticipated...

  14. Objectively measured sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on the health-related quality of life in US adults: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghoon; Im, Jeong-Soo; Choi, Yoon-Hyeong

    2017-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) represents an individual's perception of physical, mental, and social well-being and is a strong predictor of health status. Few studies have examined associations of sedentary behavior (SB) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with HRQOL in the general population. This study aimed to determine combined associations of objectively measured SB and MVPA on the risk of poor HRQOL in the general US population, after controlling for potential confounding factors. We analyzed data from 5359 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006. HRQOL was measured using a HRQOL-4 consisting of four questions focused on the self-perception of general health, physical health, mental health, and activity limitation. We dichotomized each HRQOL-4 component as good versus poor and defined poor overall HRQOL when participants had any poor HRQOL components. SB and MVPA were measured using an accelerometer. Survey logistic models were examined to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for poor HRQOL by SB and MVPA as tertiles. When examined as a combination of SB and MVPA, a substantial decrease in the risk of poor overall HRQOL was found in individuals with low SB/high MVPA [OR 0.69 (95% CI 0.51-0.94) and moderate SB/high MVPA (OR 0.56 (95% CI 0.40-0.78)], but no significant decrease was found in individuals with high SB/high MVPA (vs. high SB/low MVPA). Our findings suggest that both increasing MVPA and reducing time spent in SB may be useful strategies to improve HRQOL.

  15. Nutrients from dairy foods are difficult to replace in diets of Americans: food pattern modeling and an analyses of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgoni, Victor L; Keast, Debra R; Auestad, Nancy; Quann, Erin E

    2011-10-01

    Because dairy products provide shortfall nutrients (eg, calcium, potassium, and vitamin D) and other important nutrients, this study hypothesized that it would be difficult for Americans to meet nutritional requirements for these nutrients in the absence of dairy product consumption or when recommended nondairy calcium sources are consumed. To test this hypothesis, MyPyramid dietary pattern modeling exercises and an analyses of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 were conducted in those aged at least 2 years (n = 16 822). Impact of adding or removing 1 serving of dairy, removing all dairy, and replacing dairy with nondairy calcium sources was evaluated. Dietary pattern modeling indicated that at least 3 servings of dairy foods are needed to help individuals meet recommendations for nutrients, such as calcium and magnesium, and 4 servings may be needed to help some groups meet potassium recommendations. A calcium-equivalent serving of dairy requires 1.1 servings of fortified soy beverage, 0.6 serving of fortified orange juice, 1.2 servings of bony fish, or 2.2 servings of leafy greens. The replacement of dairy with calcium-equivalent foods alters the overall nutritional profile of the diet and affects nutrients including protein, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, riboflavin, vitamins A, D and B(12). Similar modeling exercises using consumption data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey also demonstrated that nondairy calcium replacement foods are not a nutritionally equivalent substitute for dairy products. In conclusion, although it is possible to meet calcium intake recommendations without consuming dairy foods, calcium replacement foods are not a nutritionally equivalent substitute for dairy foods and consumption of a calcium-equivalent amount of some nondairy foods is unrealistic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 100% Orange juice consumption is associated with better diet quality, improved nutrient adequacy, decreased risk for obesity, and improved biomarkers of health in adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Neil Carol E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumption of 100% orange juice (OJ has been positively associated with nutrient adequacy and diet quality, with no increased risk of overweight/obesity in children; however, no one has examined these factors in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the association of 100% OJ consumption with nutrient adequacy, diet quality, and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS in a nationally representative sample of adults. Methods Data from adults 19+ years of age (n = 8,861 participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006 were used. The National Cancer Institute method was used to estimate the usual intake (UI of 100% OJ consumption, selected nutrients, and food groups. Percentages of the population below the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR or above the Adequate Intake (AI were determined. Diet quality was measured by the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005. Covariate adjusted logistic regression was used to determine if consumers had a lower odds ratio of being overweight or obese or having risk factors of MetS or MetS. Results Usual per capita intake of 100% OJ was 50.3 ml/d. Among consumers (n = 2,310; 23.8%, UI was 210.0 ml/d. Compared to non-consumers, consumers had a higher (p  Conclusion The results suggest that moderate consumption of 100% OJ should be encouraged to help individuals meet the USDA daily recommendation for fruit intake and as a component of a healthy diet.

  17. Addition to chapter VI b (p. 2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1972-01-01

    Botanic Garden at the University of Malaya. A plan was submitted by Professor W.R. Stanton, head of the Botany Division, University of Malaya, K.L., to establish a new botanic garden of some 100 acres as a teaching facility and for the benefit of biological education institutes and the general

  18. Physical activity, aerobic fitness and parental socio-economic position among adolescents: the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents 2003-2006 (KiGGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Jonas D; Mensink, Gert B M; Banzer, Winfried; Lampert, Thomas; Tylleskär, Thorkild

    2014-03-22

    The positive association between parental socio-economic position (PSEP) and health among adolescents may be partly explained by physical activity behaviour. We investigated the associations between physical activity, aerobic fitness and PSEP in a population based sample of German adolescents. 5,251 participants, aged 11-17 years, in the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents 2003-2006 (KiGGS) underwent a sub-maximal cycle ergometer test and completed a questionnaire obtaining information on physical activity and media use. The associations between physical activity, media use, aerobic fitness and PSEP were analysed with multivariate logistic regression models for boys and girls separately. Odds ratios (ORs) of PSEP (education, occupation and income) on the outcomes were calculated adjusted for age, region, and other influencing factors. Parental education was more strongly associated with the outcome variables than parental occupation and income. After adjusting for age and region, a higher parental education level was associated with better aerobic fitness - with an OR of 1.5 (95% CI 1.2-1.9) for girls whose parents had secondary education and 1.9 (1.4-2.5) for girls whose parents had tertiary education compared to girls whose parents had primary education. The corresponding ORs for boys were 1.3 (1.0-1.6) and 1.6 (1.2-2.1), respectively. Higher parental education level was associated with lower media use: an OR of 2.1 (1.5-3.0) for girls whose parents had secondary education and 2.7 (1.8-4.1) for girls whose parents had primary education compared to girls whose parents had tertiary education. The corresponding ORs for boys were 1.5 (1.2-1.9) and 1.9 (1.5-2.5), respectively. Higher parental education level was associated with a higher physical activity level only among girls: an OR of 1.3 (1.0-1.6) for girls whose parents had secondary education and 1.2 (0.9-1.5) for girls whose parents had tertiary education compared to girls

  19. Major food sources of calories, added sugars, and saturated fat and their contribution to essential nutrient intakes in the U.S. diet: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Peter J; Fulgoni, Victor L; Keast, Debra R; Park, Keigan; Auestad, Nancy

    2013-08-08

    The risk of chronic disease cannot be predicted simply by the content of a single nutrient in a food or food group in the diet. The contribution of food sources of calories, added sugars and saturated fat (SFA) to intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients of public health importance is also relevant to understanding the overall dietary impact of these foods. Identify the top food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA in the U.S. diet and quantify their contribution to fiber and micronutrient intakes. Single 24-hour dietary recalls (Day 1) collected from participants ≥2 years (n = 16,822) of the What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (WWEIA/NHANES 2003-2006) were analyzed. All analyses included sample weights to account for the survey design. Calorie and nutrient intakes from foods included contributions from disaggregated food mixtures and tabulated by rank order. No one food category contributes more than 7.2% of calories to the overall U.S. diet, but half of the top 10 contribute 10% or more of total dietary fiber and micronutrients. Three of the top 10 sources of calories and SFA (beef, milk and cheese) contribute 46.3% of the calcium, 49.5% of the vitamin D, 42.3% of the vitamin B12 as well as other essential nutrients to the American diet. On the other hand, foods categorized as desserts, snacks, or beverages, contribute 13.6% of total calories, 83% of added sugar intake, and provide little or no nutritional value. Including food components of disaggregated recipes more accurately estimated the contribution of foods like beef, milk or cheese to overall nutrient intake compared to "as consumed" food categorizations. Some food sources of calories, added sugars and SFA make major contributions to American dietary fiber and micronutrient intakes. Dietary modifications targeting reductions in calories, added sugar, or SFA need to take these key micronutrient sources into account so as not to have the unintended

  20. Basic Principles - Chapter 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This chapter described at a very high level some of the considerations that need to be made when designing algorithms for a vehicle health management application....

  1. ABRF Affiliates and Chapters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Stephen; Fleming, Bryan; Grills, George; Hendrickson, William; Hensley, Preston; Hockberger, Philip; Jennings, Steven; Jonscher, Karen; Kuster-Schock, Elke; Sol-Church, Katia; Thannhauser, Theodore; Detwiler, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the ABRF is to advance core facilities and biotechnology laboratories through research, communication, and education. To achieve this mission, the ABRF has implemented both the ABRF Affiliates and Chapters Program and the ABRF Affiliates and Chapters Committee for the following purposes: a) To encourage the formation and coordinate the activities of new regional and special interest groups whose goals are aligned with those of the ABRF.b) To support the operations of and establish collaborative partnerships with these groups.c) To promote biomolecular resource facilities by fostering both technical and administrative excellence.d) To enhance and extend our leadership role in the networking of core laboratories by connecting researchers, students and other stakeholders with synergistic interests and skill sets.e) To enhance communication on the regional, national and international level.f) To enlighten the scientific community concerning the value of the ABRF.g) To increase the number and diversity of laboratories that benefit from ABRF sponsored by activities. The ABRF Affiliates and Chapters initiative is now in its second year and, to date, has been very successful! Our poster will present details on current Affiliates and Chapters, procedures and protocols on how to apply for Chapter or Affiliate status, relevant resources, ongoing and future projects and more.

  2. Water quality (chapter 11). Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCutcheon, S.C.; Martin, J.L.; Barnwell, T.O.

    1993-01-01

    Water quality is important not only because of its linkage to the availability of water for various uses and its impact on public health, but also because water quality has an intrinsic value. The quality of life is often judged on the availability of pristine water. Contamination of water deprives present and future generations of a birthright. There is also the need to preserve the aquatic habitats of fish, birds, and mammals. To assist the practicing hydrologist in planning for and adapting to limitations on the use of water and to aid in the protection of valuable water resources, the chapter covers the basic concepts of water chemistry, the physical properties of water, and the constituents or impurities of water. To aid in the interpretation of measurements, water quality standards and criteria for various uses are presented.

  3. Estimating abundance: Chapter 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  4. Materials for Spacecraft. Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria M.

    2016-01-01

    The general knowledge in this chapter is intended for a broad variety of spacecraft: manned or unmanned, low Earth to geosynchronous orbit, cis-lunar, lunar, planetary, or deep space exploration. Materials for launch vehicles are covered in chapter 7. Materials used in the fabrication of spacecraft hardware should be selected by considering the operational requirements for the particular application and the design engineering properties of the candidate materials. The information provided in this chapter is not intended to replace an in-depth materials study but rather to make the spacecraft designer aware of the challenges for various types of materials and some lessons learned from more than 50 years of spaceflight. This chapter discusses the damaging effects of the space environment on various materials and what has been successfully used in the past or what may be used for a more robust design. The material categories covered are structural, thermal control for on-orbit and re-entry, shielding against radiation and meteoroid/space debris impact, optics, solar arrays, lubricants, seals, and adhesives. Spacecraft components not directly exposed to space must still meet certain requirements, particularly for manned spacecraft where toxicity and flammability are concerns. Requirements such as fracture control and contamination control are examined, with additional suggestions for manufacturability. It is important to remember that the actual hardware must be tested to understand the real, "as-built" performance, as it could vary from the design intent. Early material trades can overestimate benefits and underestimate costs. An example of this was using graphite/epoxy composite in the International Space Station science racks to save weight. By the time the requirements for vibration isolation, Space Shuttle frequencies, and experiment operations were included, the weight savings had evaporated.

  5. Nursery management [Chapter 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim M. Wilkinson

    2009-01-01

    This handbook provides an overview of the factors that go into starting and operating a native plant nursery. Management includes all aspects of working with plants in all their phases of growth as described in Chapter 3, Crop Planning and Developing Propagation Protocols. Management also includes working with the community; organizing materials and infrastructure;...

  6. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  7. Forestry [Chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Gyde Lund; William A. Befort; James E. Brickell; William M. Ciesla; Elizabeth C. Collins; Raymond L. Czaplewski; Attilio Antonio Disperati; Robert W. Douglass; Charles W. Dull; Jerry D. Greer; Rachel Riemann Hershey; Vernon J. LaBau; Henry Lachowski; Peter A. Murtha; David J. Nowak; Marc A. Roberts; Pierre Schram; Mahadev D. Shedha; Ashbindu Singh; Kenneth C. Winterberger

    1997-01-01

    Foresters and other resource managers have used aerial photographs to help manage resources since the late 1920s. As discussed in chapter 1, however, it was not until the mid-1940s that their use became common. Obtaining photographic coverage was always a problem. For many areas of the world, reasonably complete coverage did not exist until after World War II. In...

  8. Water resources (Chapter 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas C. Brown; Romano Foti; Jorge Ramirez

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we focus on the vulnerability of U.S. freshwater supplies considering all lands, not just forest and rangelands. We do not assess the condition of those lands or report on how much of our water supply originates on lands of different land covers or ownerships, because earlier Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment work addressed these topics....

  9. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  10. Tundra, Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Nadelhoffer; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The North American Arctic, comprising the Tundra and Arctic Cordillera ecoregions (CEC 1997, Chapter 2), covers more than 3 million km2 (300 million ha), and accounts for nearly 14 percent of the North American land mass. The North American Arctic also constitutes about 20 percent of the much larger circumpolar Arctic shared by Canada, the United...

  11. Chapter 8: Youth Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    2016-01-01

    . The chapter builds on findings from a Danish and a European context, but they can be expanded to think about mobile youth culture in general. Gitte Stald discusses the concepts of digital natives and digital immigrants, sharing, immediacy, and the feeling of presence (or absent presence), social coordination...

  12. Chapter 8. Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman L. McDonald; Christina D. Vojta; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest barrier between monitoring and management is data analysis. Data languish in drawers and spreadsheets because those who collect or maintain monitoring data lack training in how to effectively summarize and analyze their findings. This chapter serves as a first step to surmounting that barrier by empowering any monitoring team with the basic...

  13. Chapter 14. Greenhouses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    Greenhouse heating is one of the most common uses of geothermal resources. Because of the significant heating requirements of greenhouses and their ability to use very low- temperature fluids, they are a natural application. The evaluation of a particular greenhouse project involves consideration of the structure heating requirements, and the system to meet those requirements. This chapter is intended to provide information on each of these areas.

  14. Chapter Houses, Navajo Nation, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains point features representing Chapter Houses in the Navajo Nation. Chapter Name is included in the Attributes. This dataset contains 111...

  15. Scenarios and activities (Chapter 1)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burns, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The description and quantification of the shale gas-related activities presented in this Chapter informs the assessment of ecological and social risk addressed in other Chapters. For the Exploration Only scenario, activities that will manifest...

  16. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  17. Chapter 8. Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This chapter presents the findings arrived at by applying the resource allocation model to tuberculosis control in the Republic of Korea. Optimum subprogrammes are obtained for the four objectives of the programme: reduction of disability, impairment, excess mortality, and economic loss. These subprogrammes are discussed in terms of the content and operational level of the technologies selected and the stratum and age of the population included. The use of resources is examined in relation to the optimality of the programme. Shadow prices are introduced to provide guidance for modifying constraints in order to render the programme more effective. The feasibility of modifying the ceilings of resources and of introducing new constraints, and the significance of such variations, are discussed. Methodological problems are identified and discussed.

  18. Chapter 7: Microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efroymson, Rebecca; Coleman, Andre; Wigmosta, Mark; Schoenung, Susan; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Langholtz, Matthew; Davis, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    This chapter of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report provides an estimate of biomass potential at given minimum selling prices. This is not a projection of actual measured biomass or a simulation of commercial projects. Biomass potential is estimated based on 30 years of hourly local climate and strain-specific biophysical characteristics using the Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT), assuming sufficient available nutrients (including CO2). As is the case for terrestrial feedstocks, important resource analysis questions for algae include not only how much of the crop may be available but also what price might be needed to procure that supply. Identifying resource co-location opportunities for algal biofuel facilities has the potential to reduce costs, utilize waste resources, and focus attention on appropriate technologies and locations for commercialization.

  19. Chapter 6: Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hauer, F. Richard; F. Richard Hauer,; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Stream temperature has direct and indirect effects on stream ecology and is critical in determining both abiotic and biotic system responses across a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales. Temperature variation is primarily driven by solar radiation, while landscape topography, geology, and stream reach scale ecosystem processes contribute to local variability. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in freshwater ecosystems influences habitat distributions, physiological functions, and phenology of all aquatic organisms. In this chapter we provide an overview of methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. Recent advances in temperature monitoring allow for more comprehensive studies of the underlying processes influencing annual variation of temperatures and how thermal variability may impact aquatic organisms at individual, population, and community based scales. Likewise, the development of spatially explicit predictive models provide a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes which is integral for sustainable management of freshwater systems.

  20. Chapter 8: Youth Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stald, Gitte Bang

    2016-01-01

    Gitte Stald has been researching mobile technologies since their early days of adoption by younger audiences. In her talk, she focuses on adolescents and their mobile media use. Stald shares her findings from the longitudinal and cross-cultural studies she has been conducting over the years....... The chapter builds on findings from a Danish and a European context, but they can be expanded to think about mobile youth culture in general. Gitte Stald discusses the concepts of digital natives and digital immigrants, sharing, immediacy, and the feeling of presence (or absent presence), social coordination...... to large social movements, making it crucial for researchers to employ context-aware, collaborative and mixed-methods research to study this new technology....

  1. CHAPTER 1. Introduction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2016-02-23

    With the development of modern industry and modern economies, environmental problems, especially water pollution and water scarcity, have become the most serious global challenges. In dealing with these challenges, various kinds of functionalized materials and devices are purposefully developed, fabricated, and utilized. It is clear that smart materials have not only provided effective strategies for solving environmental problems, but have also exhibited unprecedented advantages over traditional materials by integrating multifunctions and/or processes into one advanced device/material. In this book, we will present a broad collection of bioinspired smart materials and systems that are used in environmental problem solving. The topics of these chapters span from bioinspired fog collection, self-healing materials, responsive particle-stabilized emulsions, smart draw solutions in forward osmosis, slippery coating, insightful analysis of problems and opportunities for hydrophobic surfaces applied in real conditions, to superwetting materials for oil-water separation.

  2. Towards the next chapter

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    In the late 1970s, while the CERN community was busy preparing the SPS to operate as a collider and planning for LEP, people also had their eyes on the next chapter in the unfolding story of CERN.   That the LEP tunnel should be built with a future hadron collider in mind was a given by the end of the decade. But there had also been proposals to build large proton storage rings, or re-equip the ISR with superconducting magnets. Some people had suggested building an electron-proton collider at CERN, and there were ambitious plans looking far into the future at a possible Very Big Accelerator to be built somewhere in the world, which went by its acronym VBA. For the field of particle physics, with its very long lead times, this is part of the normal cycle, and while most of those options never came to fruition, this process did pave the way for the LHC. Today, with the LHC programme underway, the time has come for CERN to start seriously considering the options for its post-LHC future. Perhaps ...

  3. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Bonners Ferry, ID; Anders, Paul [Cramer Fish Sciences; Moscow, ID; Shafii, Bahman [Statistical Consulting Services; Clarkston, WA

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach

  4. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  5. Chapter 59: Web Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state

  6. Found in Translation, Chapter L

    OpenAIRE

    Frampier, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Chapter D, chapter H and chapter L sont les trois premiers tomes de l’exposition bruxelloise et luxembourgeoise, intitulée Found in Translation, présentée en dernière instance au Casino Luxembourg (oct. 2011-janv. 2012). La traduction est ici à appréhender non pas en son sens linguistique mais comme le mouvement d’un médium, d’une histoire, d’un langage vers un autre. La translation est processuelle ; la traduction devient un passage de témoin, une transmission d’expériences. Le catalogue s’o...

  7. A política africana do governo Lula: (2003-2006 The Lula government's African policy: (2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Oliveira Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa as relações Brasil-África entre 2003 e 2006, procurando demonstrar que a eleição de Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva trouxe nova dinâmica às relações do Brasil com o continente africano. O discurso e a prática diplomática deste governo convergem para a construção de alianças preferenciais com parceiros no âmbito das relações Sul-Sul. Nesse contexto, defende-se que África do Sul, Angola e Nigéria são parceiros políticos e econômicos essenciais à estratégia diplomática brasileira para o continente africano.The article analyzes Brazil-Africa relations between 2003 and 2006, aiming to demonstrate that the election of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva injected a new dynamic to Brazil's relations with the African continent. The discourse and diplomatic practice of the Lula government have combined to help build preferential alliances with partners within the arena of South-South relations. In this context the text argues that South Africa, Angola and Nigeria are essential political and economic partners in Brazil's diplomatic strategy for the African continent.

  8. Nuclear metallurgy lectures, Chapter 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-05-18

    This chapter covers process tubes; it is divided into: philosophy of safety factors, mechanical properties of available materials (C steel, mo steel, Cr-Mo steel, ss-304, ss-347), and costs (zircaloy-2).

  9. American Red Cross Chapter Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Regions are part of the national field level structure to support chapters. The Regions role is admistrative as well as provides oversight and program technical...

  10. Introduction [Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon M. Hood; Donald Long; Melanie Miller; Kevin C. Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Many areas throughout the United States are facing the triple threat of increasing fire severity, residential growth in areas prone to wildland fire, and suppression costs and losses. In addition, substantial changes are occurring in the way we plan and implement management on federal lands relative to use of wildland fire, prescribed fire, and mechanical fuel...

  11. Introduction, Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.H. Pardo; C.T. Driscoll; C.L. Goodale

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides a scientific synthesis of the current state of research and knowledge about the response of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems to nitrogen (N) inputs (N deposition or N additions), and, where possible, identifi es critical loads for atmospheric N deposition. It also targets policy makers and resource managers who are seeking a scientific basis...

  12. Stakeholder Communication : Chapter 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. J. T. van der Linden; I. Wilmont; M. E. Iacob; Stijn Hoppenbrouwers; C. Amrit; W. van Stokkum

    2012-01-01

    Onbekend.Economies around the globe have evolved into being largely service-oriented economies. Consumers no longer just want a printer or a car, they rather ask for a printing service or a mobility service. In addition, service-oriented organizations increasingly exploit new devices, technologies

  13. Social disparities in parental smoking and young children’s exposure to secondhand smoke at home: a time-trend analysis of repeated cross-sectional data from the German KiGGS study between 2003-2006 and 2009-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kuntz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children who are exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS have an increased risk of a wide range of health problems and illnesses. Smoke-free legislation aims to improve indoor air quality and in this way protect the health of people who do not smoke. This paper examines trends in SHS exposure at home among children in Germany since the introduction of smoking bans in public places. Special focus is placed on the importance of the family of origin’s socioeconomic status (SES and on parental smoking behaviour. Methods The analyses are based on two waves of the “German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents” (KiGGS—one of which was conducted immediately before the introduction of central smoke-free legislation in the 2003-2006 period, the other approximately 6 years later from 2009 to 2012. A comparison is made between the answers given by the parents of children aged between 0 to 6 (KiGGS baseline study, n = 6680; KiGGS Wave 1, n = 4455. Domestic SHS exposure is covered in the parent interviews by asking whether anyone is allowed to smoke at home in the presence of their child. Parental smoking behaviour is determined separately for mothers and fathers. SES is determined on the basis of the parents’ education, occupational status and income. Results The percentage of 0- to 6-year-old children exposed to SHS in the parental home fell from 23.9 to 6.6 % in the period from 2003-2006 to 2009-2012. At the same time, the percentage of children with at least one parent who smokes decreased from 49.8 to 41.8 %. While relative social inequalities in parental smoking behaviour have tended to increase over time, inequalities in domestic SHS exposure have persisted. Children whose parents smoke and children from low-SES families are still most likely to be exposed to tobacco smoke. In both study periods and after statistical adjustment for parental smoking behaviour, children with a low SES had a

  14. Contributions of enriched cereal-grain products, ready-to-eat cereals, and supplements to folic acid and vitamin B-12 usual intake and folate and vitamin B-12 status in US children: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Lorraine F; Cogswell, Mary E; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Bailey, Lynn B; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Berry, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    US children consume folic acid from multiple sources. These sources may contribute differently to usual intakes above the age-specific tolerable upper intake level (UL) for folic acid and to folate and vitamin B-12 status. We estimated usual daily folic acid intakes above the UL and adjusted serum and red blood cell folate, serum vitamin B-12, homocysteine, and methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentrations in US children by age group and by the following 3 major folic acid intake sources: enriched cereal-grain products (ECGP), ready-to-eat cereals (RTE), and supplements containing folic acid (SUP). We analyzed data in 4 groups of children aged 1-3, 4-8, 9-13, and 14-18 y from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003-2006 (n = 7161). A total of 19-48% of children consumed folic acid from ECGP only. Intakes above the UL varied from 0-0.1% of children who consumed ECGP only to 15-78% of children who consumed ECGP+RTE+SUP. In children aged 1-8 y, 99-100% of those who consumed ≥ 200 μg folic acid/d from supplements exceeded their UL. Although < 0.5% of children had folate deficiency or low vitamin B-12 status, the consumption of RTE or SUP with folic acid was associated with higher mean folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations and, in some older children, with lower homocysteine and MMA concentrations. Our data suggest that the majority of US children consume more than one source of folic acid. Postfortification, the consumption of RTE or SUP increases usual daily intakes and blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B-12.

  15. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  16. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  17. Dissolved oxygen: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, David; Downing-Kunz, Maureen; Novick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration serves as an important indicator of estuarine habitat condition, because all aquatic macro-organisms require some minimum DO level to survive and prosper. The instantaneous DO concentration, measured at a specific location in the water column, results from a balance between multiple processes that add or remove oxygen (Figure 6.1): primary production produces O2; aerobic respiration in the water column and sediments consumes O2; abiotic or microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions utilize O2 as an oxidant (e.g., oxidation of ammonium, sulfide, and ferrous iron); O2 exchange occurs across the air:water interface in response to under- or oversaturated DO concentrations in the water column; and water currents and turbulent mixing transport DO into and out of zones in the water column. If the oxygen loss rate exceeds the oxygen production or input rate, DO concentration decreases. When DO losses exceed production or input over a prolonged enough period of time, hypoxia ((<2-3 mg/L) or anoxia can develop. Persistent hypoxia or anoxia causes stress or death in aquatic organism populations, or for organisms that can escape a hypoxic or anoxic area, the loss of habitat. In addition, sulfide, which is toxic to aquatic organisms and causes odor problems, escapes from sediments under low oxygen conditions. Low dissolved oxygen is a common aquatic ecosystem response to elevated organic

  18. Chapter 1: Direct Normal Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myer, Daryl R.

    2016-04-15

    This chapter addresses the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the solar resource, the direct solar radiation. It discusses the total or integrated broadband direct beam extraterrestrial radiation (ETR). This total integrated irradiance is comprised of photons of electromagnetic radiation. The chapter also discusses the impact of the atmosphere and its effect upon the direct normal irradiance (DNI) beam radiation. The gases and particulates present in the atmosphere traversed by the direct beam reflect, absorb, and scatter differing spectral regions and proportions of the direct beam, and act as a variable filter. Knowledge of the available broadband DNI beam radiation resource data is essential in designing a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system. Spectral variations in the DNI beam radiation affect the performance of a CPV system depending on the solar cell technology used. The chapter describes propagation and scattering processes of circumsolar radiation (CSR), which includes the Mie scattering from large particles.

  19. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 3: Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Klioner, S.; Hernandez, J.; Lammers, U.; Bombrun, A.; Mignard, F.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Davidson, M.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter presents the models and processing steps used for Gaia's core solution, namely, the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). The inputs to this solution rely heavily on the basic observables (or astrometric elementaries) which have been pre-processed and discussed in Chapter 2, the results of which have been published in Fabricius et al. (2016). The models consist of reference systems and time scales; assumed linear stellar motion and relativistic light deflection; in addition to fundamental constants and the transformation of coordinate systems. Higher level inputs such as: planetary and solar system ephemeris; Gaia tracking and orbit information; initial quasar catalogues and BAM data are all needed for the processing described here. The astrometric calibration models are outlined followed by the details processing steps which give AGIS its name. The final Section 3.5 represents a basic quality assessment and validation of the scientific results which has also been published in detail in Lindegren et al. (2016). However, the validation of the science products was not restricted to just this, a more independent catalogue consolidation and validation of the science results for Gaia DR1 was also performed and are documented in Chapter 7 and have been published in Arenou et al. (2017).

  20. Chapter 07: Species description pages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    These pages are written to be the final step in the identification process; you will be directed to them by the key in Chapter 6. Each species or group of similar species in the same genus has its own set of pages. The information in the first page describes the characteristics of the wood covered in the manual. The page shows images of similar or confusable woods,...

  1. Chapter 1. Traditional marketing revisited

    OpenAIRE

    LAMBIN, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to review the traditional marketing concept and to analyse its main ambiguities as presented in popular textbooks. The traditional marketing management model placing heavy emphasis of the marketing mix is in fact a supply-driven approach of the market, using the understanding of consumers’ needs to mould demand to the requirements of supply, instead of adapting supply to the expectations of demand. To clarify the true role of marketing, a distinction is made b...

  2. WIN Chapters: Milestones and Future Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, P.; Pelegrí, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the WIN Chapters: milestones and future plans are presented. WIN-IAEA has rewarded-in the three last years - to Australia-2014, South-Africa-2013 and Sweden-2012. WIN-Global -specially WiN IAEA- can collaborate a lot with the CTBTO presenting the content of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons actually increasing the signatory members in 2015. Historical decisions on NTP are already affecting WiN IAEA. The research reactors or high flux reactors are important in the field of medical applications and other future applications. In Australia women-scientist of OPAL, can become WiN. Between the OPAL applications there is a production of silicon plates to be used in laptops/mobiles. WIN-Europe activities related with the climatic change and with the academic promotion. 2015 is also a very important year due the celebration of 20th Anniversary of WIN-Spain; plans of this Chapter and Conferences of WIN-Global are presented. In addition there are women working in ITER, in some activities in the EU, China, India, Japan, South Korea, USA and Russia both in the academic (R+D) field and into the Industry. (Author)

  3. Fourier Transform Methods. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) for accurate spectrophotometry over a wide spectral range. After a brief exposition of the basic concepts of FTS operation, we discuss instrument designs and their advantages and disadvantages relative to dispersive spectrometers. We then examine how common sources of error in spectrophotometry manifest themselves when using an FTS and ways to reduce the magnitude of these errors. Examples are given of applications to both basic and derived spectrophotometric quantities. Finally, we give recommendations for choosing the right instrument for a specific application, and how to ensure the accuracy of the measurement results..

  4. Anglo-American Cataloging Rules. Chapter Six, Separately Published Monographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL.

    Chapter Six of the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules has been revised to accord with the International Standard Bibliographic Description for separately published monographs. Three of the appendixes also contain additions and revision concerning: (1) the glossary, (2) abbreviations, and (3) punctuation and diacritics. A concordance of rule numbers…

  5. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luco, Nicolas; Kircher, Charles A.; Crouse, C. B.; Charney, Finley; Haselton, Curt B.; Baker, Jack W.; Zimmerman, Reid; Hooper, John D.; McVitty, William; Taylor, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion into parameters for use in design. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7 (the Standard). Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 describes site-specific ground motion requirements and provides example site-specific design and MCER response spectra and example values of site-specific ground motion parameters. Section 3.4 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in various types of response history analysis permitted in the Standard.

  6. Chapter 12. Space Heating Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    The performance evaluation of space heating equipment for a geothermal application is generally considered from either of two perspectives: (a) selecting equipment for installation in new construction, or (b) evaluating the performance and retrofit requirements of an existing system. With regard to new construction, the procedure is relatively straightforward. Once the heating requirements are determined, the process need only involve the selection of appropriately sized hot water heating equipment based on the available water temperature. It is important to remember that space heating equipment for geothermal applications is the same equipment used in non-geothermal applications. What makes geothermal applications unique is that the equipment is generally applied at temperatures and flow rates that depart significantly from traditional heating system design. This chapter presents general considerations for the performance of heating equipment at non-standard temperature and flow conditions, retrofit of existing systems, and aspects of domestic hot water heating.

  7. Chapter 3 - At the roadside: Forest resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce Stokes; Timothy G. Rials; Leonard R. Johnson; Karen L. Abt; Prakash Nepal; Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Lixia He; Burton C. English

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 3 assesses the availability of forest resources to the roadside. Not all woody feedstocks are discussed in this chapter. Logging residues and wholetree biomass are included. Other feedstock categories have been moved to chapter 5 or are redefined to be included in the whole-tree biomass category. New methodologies and data are used in the assessment to

  8. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or

  9. Chapter 12: Human microbiome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xochitl C Morgan

    Full Text Available Humans are essentially sterile during gestation, but during and after birth, every body surface, including the skin, mouth, and gut, becomes host to an enormous variety of microbes, bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and viral. Under normal circumstances, these microbes help us to digest our food and to maintain our immune systems, but dysfunction of the human microbiota has been linked to conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to antibiotic-resistant infections. Modern high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatic tools provide a powerful means of understanding the contribution of the human microbiome to health and its potential as a target for therapeutic interventions. This chapter will first discuss the historical origins of microbiome studies and methods for determining the ecological diversity of a microbial community. Next, it will introduce shotgun sequencing technologies such as metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, the computational challenges and methods associated with these data, and how they enable microbiome analysis. Finally, it will conclude with examples of the functional genomics of the human microbiome and its influences upon health and disease.

  10. Chapter 6. Landscape Analysis for Habitat Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin McGarigal; Kevin S. McKelvey; Christina D. Vojta; Claudia M. Regan

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this chapter is to describe standardized methods for measur¬ing and monitoring attributes of landscape pattern in support of habitat monitoring. This chapter describes the process of monitoring categorical landscape maps in which either selected habitat attributes or different classes of habitat quality are represented as different patch types...

  11. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  12. 106-17 Telemetry Standards Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 1, July 2017 1-1 CHAPTER 1 Introduction The Telemetry Standards address the here-to-date...for Federal Radio Frequency Management . Copies of that manual may be obtained from: Executive Secretary, Interdepartmental Radio Advisory Committee

  13. Harvesting, storing, and shipping [Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    Plants are ready for harvest and delivery to clients after they have reached target specifications (see Chapter 2, The Target Plant Concept) and have been properly hardened (see Chapter 12, Hardening). Originally, nursery stock was grown in soil in fields; nursery managers would "lift" those seedlings out of the ground to harvest them. That traditional...

  14. Various chapter styles for the memoir class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Document showcasing various chapter title page designs either included in the LaTeX memoir class or is easily manually coded.......Document showcasing various chapter title page designs either included in the LaTeX memoir class or is easily manually coded....

  15. IRIG 106 Chapter 10 Programmers Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-16

    WING ARNOLD ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT COMPLEX NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION IRIG 106 Chapter 10 Programmers’ Handbook RCC 123-16...2-2 Figure 2-2. TMATS Attribute Parser Example Code...assist programmers to develop software for use with IRIG 106 standard instrumentation recorders. This handbook primarily addresses IRIG 106 Chapter

  16. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  17. Chapter 8: Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Arbogast, Stephen; Bellman, Don; Paynter, Dave; Wykowski, Jim

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis is heating on the order of 1000 degrees C/s in the absence of oxygen to 40-600 degrees C, which causes decomposition of the biomass. Liquid product yield from biomass can be as much as 80% of starting dry weight and contains up to 75% of the biomass energy content. Other products are gases, primarily carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as solid char and ash. Residence time in the reactor is only 0.5-2 s so that relatively small, low-capital-cost reactors can be used. The low capital cost combined with greenhouse gas emission reductions relative to petroleum fuels of 50-95% makes pyrolysis an attractive process. The pyrolysis liquids have been investigated as a refinery feedstock and as stand-alone fuels. Utilization of raw pyrolysis oil has proven challenging. The organic fraction is highly corrosive because of its high organic acid content. High water content lowers the net heating value and can increase corrosivity. It can be poorly soluble in petroleum or petroleum products and can readily absorb water. Distillation residues can be as high as 50%, viscosity can be high, oils can exhibit poor stability in storage, and they can contain suspended solids. The ignition quality of raw pyrolysis oils is poor, with cetane number estimates ranging from 0 to 35, but more likely to be in the lower end of that range. While the use of raw pyrolysis oils in certain specific applications with specialized combustion equipment may be possible, raw oils must be significantly upgraded for use in on-highway spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Upgrading approaches most often involve catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, one of a class of reactions known as hydrotreating or hydroprocessing. This chapter discusses the properties of raw and upgraded pyrolysis oils, as well as the potential for integrating biomass pyrolysis with a petroleum refinery to significantly reduce the hydroprocessing cost.

  18. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  19. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R O Payne

    Full Text Available The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed

  20. Chapter 13. Exploring Use of the Reserved Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmen, John [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). SCI Inst. and School of Computing; Humphrey, Alan [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). SCI Inst. and School of Computing; Berzins, Martin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). SCI Inst. and School of Computing

    2015-07-29

    In this chapter, we illustrate benefits of thinking in terms of thread management techniques when using a centralized scheduler model along with interoperability of MPI and PThread. This is facilitated through an exploration of thread placement strategies for an algorithm modeling radiative heat transfer with special attention to the 61st core. This algorithm plays a key role within the Uintah Computational Framework (UCF) and current efforts taking place at the University of Utah to model next-generation, large-scale clean coal boilers. In such simulations, this algorithm models the dominant form of heat transfer and consumes a large portion of compute time. Exemplified by a real-world example, this chapter presents our early efforts in porting a key portion of a scalability-centric codebase to the Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. Specifically, this chapter presents results from our experiments profiling the native execution of a reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing-based radiation model on a single coprocessor. These results demonstrate that our fastest run configurations utilized the 61st core and that performance was not profoundly impacted when explicitly oversubscribing the coprocessor operating system thread. Additionally, this chapter presents a portion of radiation model source code, a MIC-centric UCF cross-compilation example, and less conventional thread management technique for developers utilizing the PThreads threading model.

  1. Where Social and Professional Networking Meet: The Virtual Association Chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noxon, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Online Capella University wanted to sponsor an International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) chapter. Using social networking platforms, a new type of chapter was designed. The virtual chapter breaks new ground on more than the chapter's platform; it is also the first university-sponsored chapter and has a unique approach to…

  2. Chapter 42. Waterborne and Foodborne Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter identifies the most prominent parasites in North America that are acquired through contaminated food and water including protozoa (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Entamoeba, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, and Balantidium), nematodes (Trichinella, Angiostrongyl...

  3. The Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Finnell

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Brief: This article discusses the creation, philosophy, and future directions of the Innovation in Libraries Awesome Foundation Chapter, a grassroots crowdfunding initiative incubated within Library Pipeline.

  4. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoers, Nine V A M; Monnens, Leo A H

    2006-02-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide (protein). In addition, several basic and frequently used general molecular tools, such as restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, DNA amplification and sequencing are discussed, in order to lay the foundations for the forthcoming chapters.

  5. Paramyxoviruses of fish: Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Theodore R; Batts, William N.; Kibenge, Frederick S. B.; Godoy, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The first fish paramyxovirus was isolated from normal adult Chinook salmon returning to a coastal hatchery in Oregon in the fall of 1982. Subsequently, the virus was isolated from other stocks of adult Chinook salmon and one stock of adult coho salmon in California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska, leading to its designation as the Pacific salmon paramyxovirus (PSPV). The slow-growing virus can be isolated from tissues and ovarian fluids of healthy adult fish returning to spawn and apparently causes no clinical signs of disease or mortality. In 1995, a different and widely disseminated paramyxovirus was isolated from farmed Atlantic salmon in Norway and was designated as Atlantic salmon paramyxovirus (ASPV). Although this virus caused no disease or mortality when injected into juvenile Atlantic salmon, ASPV has been associated with proliferative gill inflammation in sea-reared yearling fish; however, additional infectious agents may be involved in the etiology of the condition. Sequence analysis of PSPV and ASPV isolates using the polymerase gene established their placement in the family Paramyxoviridaeand has shown the two viruses to be closely related but sufficiently different from each other and from other known paramyxoviruses to possibly represent new genera within the family. The viruses can be diagnosed by isolation in cell culture with final confirmation by molecular methods. Other paramyxovirus-like agents have been observed or isolated from rainbow trout in Germany, from seabream in Japan associated with epithelial necrosis, from turbot in Spain associated with erythrocytic inclusion bodies and buccal/opercular hemorrhaging and from koi and common carp associated with gill necrosis in the European Union.

  6. CHAPTER 5-RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.

    2010-05-05

    The ore pitchblende was discovered in the 1750's near Joachimstal in what is now the Czech Republic. Used as a colorant in glazes, uranium was identified in 1789 as the active ingredient by chemist Martin Klaproth. In 1896, French physicist Henri Becquerel studied uranium minerals as part of his investigations into the phenomenon of fluorescence. He discovered a strange energy emanating from the material which he dubbed 'rayons uranique.' Unable to explain the origins of this energy, he set the problem aside. About two years later, a young Polish graduate student was looking for a project for her dissertation. Marie Sklodowska Curie, working with her husband Pierre, picked up on Becquerel's work and, in the course of seeking out more information on uranium, discovered two new elements (polonium and radium) which exhibited the same phenomenon, but were even more powerful. The Curies recognized the energy, which they now called 'radioactivity,' as something very new, requiring a new interpretation, new science. This discovery led to what some view as the 'golden age of nuclear science' (1895-1945) when countries throughout Europe devoted large resources to understand the properties and potential of this material. By World War II, the potential to harness this energy for a destructive device had been recognized and by 1939, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman showed that fission not only released a lot of energy but that it also released additional neutrons which could cause fission in other uranium nuclei leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction and an enormous release of energy. This suggestion was soon confirmed experimentally by other scientists and the race to develop an atomic bomb was on. The rest of the development history which lead to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is well chronicled. After World War II, development of more powerful weapons systems by the United States and the Soviet Union continued to

  7. 21 CFR 73.1 - Diluents in color additive mixtures for food use exempt from certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter Not more than 2 pct of the ink solids. Terpene resins, natural As set forth in sec. 172.615 of this chapter Terpene resins, synthetic Polymers of α- and β-pinene (2) Diluents in color additive...

  8. Addressing uncertainty in vulnerability assessments [Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda Joyce; Molly Cross; Evan Girvatz

    2011-01-01

    This chapter addresses issues and approaches for dealing with uncertainty specifically within the context of conducting climate change vulnerability assessments (i.e., uncertainties related to identifying and modeling the sensitivities, levels of exposure, and adaptive capacity of the assessment targets).

  9. Denmark - Chapter in Handbook of Global Bioethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Linda; Faber, Berit A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter about bioethics in Denmark focuses on specific Danish characteristics. These are the early start of a bioethics debate, legislation and bioethics councils; the independence of the councils and the parliamentarians voting on ethical issues; the introduction and extraordinary importance...... of laymen as a part of the bioethical debate and decisions; and the strong focus on debate and educational tools....

  10. Adaptation strategies and approaches: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Maria Janowiak; Linda Parker; Matt St. Pierre; Leslie. Brandt

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of information is available on climate change adaptation, but much of it is very broad and of limited use at the finer spatial scales most relevant to land managers. This chapter contains a "menu" of adaptation actions and provides land managers in northern Wisconsin with a range of options to help forest ecosystems adapt to climate change impacts....

  11. Chapter Five: Language Learning and Discursive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is framed by the three questions related to learning in Practice Theory posed by Johannes Wagner (2008): (1) What is learned?; (2) Who is learning?; and (3) Who is participating in the learning? These questions are addressed in two learning theories: Language Socialization and Situated Learning theory. In Language Socialization, the…

  12. Other pospiviroids infecting Solanaceous plants (Book Chapter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aside from potato spindle tuber viroid, the genus Pospiviroid contains several agents reported to naturally infect solanaceous crops (e.g. tomato, potato, pepper) or ornamental plants (e.g. Petunia hybrida, Solanum spp., Brugmansia spp.). The present chapter focuses on the following so-called solana...

  13. 31 CFR Appendixes to Chapter V - Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Note Appendixes to Chapter V Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS... vessel appear in shipping documents presented under a letter of credit or if noticed in a documentary...

  14. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  15. Meadow management and treatment options [chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne C. Chambers; Jerry R. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Restoration and management objectives and approaches are most effective when based on an understanding of ecosystem processes and the long- and short-term causes of disturbance (Wohl and others 2005). As detailed in previous chapters, several factors are critical in developing effective management strategies for streams and their associated meadow ecosystems in the...

  16. Transfer of property inter vivos : chapter 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This chapter will give an overview of the various transfer systems for movable property and immovable property. It will focus on voluntary transfers based on a legal act between the transferor and transferee. First the difference between the unitary approach and the functional approach to passing of

  17. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  18. Life cycle analysis of biochar [Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Hongmei Gu; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Nathaniel M. Anderson

    2017-01-01

    All products, including bioproducts, have an impact on the environment by consuming resources and releasing emissions during their production. Biochar, a bioproduct, has received considerable attention because of its potential to sequester carbon in soil while enhancing productivity, thus aiding sustainable supply chain development. In this chapter, the environmental...

  19. The reinvigorated South African GRSS Chapter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schwegmann, Colin P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available accepted a GRSS plaque, a first for the South African GRSS Chapter. Opportunities to present current research being conducted in South Africa to the world at large and foster new international collabo- rations were the most valuable activities...

  20. Workplace innovation in the Netherlands: chapter 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, F.; Dhondt, S.; Korte, E. de; Oeij, P.; Vaas, F.

    2012-01-01

    Social innovation of work and employment is a prerequisite to achieve the EU2020 objectives of smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. It covers labor market innovation on societal level and workplace innovation on organizational level. This chapter focuses on the latter. Workplace innovations are

  1. Science, practice, and place [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2013-01-01

    Place-oriented inquiry and practice are proposed as keys to overcoming the persistent gap between science and practice. This chapter begins by describing some of the reasons science fails to simplify conservation practice, highlighting the challenges associated with the social and ecological sciences of multi-scaled complexity. Place concepts help scientists and...

  2. Chapter 7: Materials for Launch Vehicle Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Grant; Jone, Clyde S. III

    2017-01-01

    This chapter concerns materials for expendable and reusable launch vehicle (LV) structures. An emphasis is placed on applications and design requirements, and how these requirements are met by the optimum choice of materials. Structural analysis and qualification strategies, which cannot be separated from the materials selection process, are described.

  3. Chapter 16: Public safety and cognitive radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heskamp, M.; Schiphorst, Roelof; Slump, Cornelis H.; Wyglinsk, Alexander M.; Nekovee, Maziar; Hou, Y. Thomas

    This book gives comprehensive and balanced coverage of the principles of cognitive radio communications, cognitive networks, and details of their implementation, including the latest developments in the standards and spectrum policy. Case studies, end-of-chapter questions, and descriptions of

  4. Landscape genomics: A brief perspective [Chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz; Gordon Luikart; Kevin S. McKelvey; Samuel A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    Landscape genetics is the amalgamation of population genetics and landscape ecology (see Manel et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2007). In Chapter 17, we discuss landscape genetics and provide two examples of applications in the area of modeling population connectivity and inferring fragmentation. These examples, like virtually all extant landscape genetic analyses, were...

  5. Metrology of Large Parts. Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    As discussed in the first chapter of this book, there are many different methods to measure a part using optical technology. Chapter 2 discussed the use of machine vision to measure macroscopic features such as length and position, which was extended to the use of interferometry as a linear measurement tool in chapter 3, and laser or other trackers to find the relation of key points on large parts in chapter 4. This chapter looks at measuring large parts to optical tolerances in the sub-micron range using interferometry, ranging, and optical tools discussed in the previous chapters. The purpose of this chapter is not to discuss specific metrology tools (such as interferometers or gauges), but to describe a systems engineering approach to testing large parts. Issues such as material warpage and temperature drifts that may be insignificant when measuring a part to micron levels under a microscope, as will be discussed in later chapters, can prove to be very important when making the same measurement over a larger part. In this chapter, we will define a set of guiding principles for successfully overcoming these challenges and illustrate the application of these principles with real world examples. While these examples are drawn from specific large optical testing applications, they inform the problems associated with testing any large part to optical tolerances. Manufacturing today relies on micrometer level part performance. Fields such as energy and transportation are demanding higher tolerances to provide increased efficiencies and fuel savings. By looking at how the optics industry approaches sub-micrometer metrology, one can gain a better understanding of the metrology challenges for any larger part specified to micrometer tolerances. Testing large parts, whether optical components or precision structures, to optical tolerances is just like testing small parts, only harder. Identical with what one does for small parts, a metrologist tests large parts and optics

  6. Chapter 8: Plasma operation and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ITER Physics Expert Group on Disruptions, Control, Plasma, and MHD; ITER Physics Expert Group on Energetic Particles, Heating, Current and Drive; ITER Physics Expert Group on Diagnostics; ITER Physics Basis Editors

    1999-12-01

    Wall conditioning of fusion devices involves removal of desorbable hydrogen isotopes and impurities from interior device surfaces to permit reliable plasma operation. Techniques used in present devices include baking, metal film gettering, deposition of thin films of low-Z material, pulse discharge cleaning, glow discharge cleaning, radio frequency discharge cleaning, and in situ limiter and divertor pumping. Although wall conditioning techniques have become increasingly sophisticated, a reactor scale facility will involve significant new challenges, including the development of techniques applicable in the presence of a magnetic field and of methods for efficient removal of tritium incorporated into co-deposited layers on plasma facing components and their support structures. The current status of various approaches is reviewed, and the implications for reactor scale devices are summarized. Creation and magnetic control of shaped and vertically unstable elongated plasmas have been mastered in many present tokamaks. The physics of equilibrium control for reactor scale plasmas will rely on the same principles, but will face additional challenges, exemplified by the ITER/FDR design. The absolute positioning of outermost flux surface and divertor strike points will have to be precise and reliable in view of the high heat fluxes at the separatrix. Long pulses will require minimal control actions, to reduce accumulation of AC losses in superconducting PF and TF coils. To this end, more complex feedback controllers are envisaged, and the experimental validation of the plasma equilibrium response models on which such controllers are designed is encouraging. Present simulation codes provide an adequate platform on which equilibrium response techniques can be validated. Burning plasmas require kinetic control in addition to traditional magnetic shape and position control. Kinetic control refers to measures controlling density, rotation and temperature in the plasma core as

  7. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 1: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Abreu, A.; Brown, A. G. A.; Castañeda, J.; Cheek, N.; Crowley, C.; De Angeli, F.; Fabricius, C.; Fleitas, J. M.; Gracia, G.; Guerra, R.; Hutton, A.; Messineo, R.; Mora, A.; Nienartowicz, K.; Panem, C.; Siddiqui, H.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter describes the Gaia mission, the Gaia spacecraft, and the organisation of the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), which is responsible for the processing and analysis of the Gaia data. Furthermore, various properties of the data release are summarised, including statistical properties, sky-coverage maps, object statistics, magnitude histograms, error histograms, completeness, selection and filtering criteria, and limitations of the data.

  8. Why a European chapter of IALE?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jesper; Antrop, Marc; de Blust, Geert

    2009-01-01

    Association (IALE) and its national chapters. The reasons have to do with the development of the scientific discipline of landscape ecology, with the concept landscape with its multiple interpretations, with the landscape characteristics of Europe and with the changing demands for research, planning......The European Association for Landscape Ecology (EALE) groups landscape ecologists working on the specific problems of landscapes in Europe. The specificity of European landscapes, their history, use, conservation and constant change justify such an association besides the existing International...

  9. Chapter 13. Phonology: Stress and Vowel Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Nesset, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Where do the complex stress patterns in Modern Russian come from? And why is Москва ‘Moscow’ pronounced with an unstressed [a] in the first syllable? In this chapter, you learn about the history of two related phenomena that cause problems for learners of Russian: stress patterns and vowel reduction in unstressed syllables. Click on the links below to learn more!13.2 Akanje

  10. Dust and human health: Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Knippertz, Peter; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that exposure to fine particulate matter may increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. Until recently, population health related studies examining the effects of particulate matter on human health generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from natural sources. This chapter provides an overview of naturally occurring inorganic mineral dust research and associated human health ailments and some of the challenges in elucidating the etiological mechanisms responsible.

  11. Life story chapters, specific memories and the reminiscence bump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Pillemer, David B.; Ivcevic, Zorana

    2011-01-01

    are over-represented at the beginning of chapters. Potential connections between chapters and the cultural life script are also examined. Adult participants first divided their life story into chapters and identified their most positive and most negative chapter. They then recalled a specific memory from......Theories of autobiographical memory posit that extended time periods (here termed chapters) and memories are organised hierarchically. If chapters organise memories and guide their recall, then chapters and memories should show similar temporal distributions over the life course. Previous research...... demonstrates that positive but not negative memories show a reminiscence bump and that memories cluster at the beginning of extended time periods. The current study tested the hypotheses that (1) ages marking the beginning of positive but not negative chapters produce a bump, and that (2) specific memories...

  12. Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge : Hunting Chapter of Visitor Service Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Hunting Chapter precedes the overall Visitor Services Plan for Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (Agassiz NWR). This chapter includes specific guidelines for...

  13. Potlining Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  14. Columbia: The Economic Foundation of Peace. Chapters 21-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugale, Marcelo M., Ed.; Lafourcade, Olivier, Ed.; Luff, Connie, Ed.

    This document contains 8 chapters of a 35-chapter book that presents a comprehensive diagnosis of current economic, social, and educational conditions in Colombia and their importance to development prospects and the quest for peace. The eight chapters covered here are part of a section titled "Sharing the Fruits of Growth with All…

  15. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  16. Promoting the APS Chapter Program by Sharing Its History, Best Practices, and How-to Guide for Establishing New Chapters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari K.

    2017-01-01

    Early establishment of physiological societies in Oklahoma and Ohio demonstrated the benefits of networking physiologists and paved the way for establishing the APS Chapter Program. Designed to promote the general objectives of the APS, the Chapter Program was officially launched in 1995, with Ohio being the first recognized chapter. There are 13…

  17. Environment. Chapter 5; Medio ambiente. Capitulo 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Castillo, Carlos [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    In this chapter it is mentioned the concern for the care of the environment in Mexico by prominent foreign and Mexican scientists who impelled the creation of a Forest Law. The ecological policies for the conservation of natural resources that cause a sustainable development in Mexico are commented; it is described what the environmental infrastructure consists of; the case of trash handling is analyzed and the Chapter concludes with the relationship of the environment, the climatic change, the infrastructure and the planning. [Spanish] En este capitulo se menciona la preocupacion por el cuidado del medio ambiente en Mexico, por prominentes cientificos extranjeros y mexicanos que impulsaron la creacion de una Ley Forestal. Se comentan las politicas ecologicas para la conservacion de recursos naturales que propicien un desarrollo sustentable en Mexico; se describe en que consiste la infraestructura ambiental; se analiza el caso del manejo de la basura y; se concluye con la relacion del medio ambiente, el cambio climatico, la infraestructura y la planeacion.

  18. Map projections and the Internet: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Fritz; Battersby, Sarah E.; Finn, Michael P.; Clarke, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The field of map projections can be described as mathematical, static, and challenging. However, this description is evolving in concert with the development of the Internet. The Internet has enabled new outlets for software applications, learning, and interaction with and about map projections . This chapter examines specific ways in which the Internet has moved map projections from a relatively obscure paper-based setting to a more engaging and accessible online environment. After a brief overview of map projections, this chapter discusses four perspectives on how map projections have been integrated into the Internet. First, map projections and their role in web maps and mapping services is examined. Second, an overview of online atlases and the map projections chosen for their maps is presented. Third, new programming languages and code libraries that enable map projections to be included in mapping applications are reviewed. Fourth, the Internet has facilitated map projection education and research especially with the map reader’s comprehension and understanding of complex topics like map projection distortion is discussed.

  19. NCCOS IKONOS Imagery for the Republic of Palau, 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) is tasked with the coral mapping element of the U.S. Coral Reef Task...

  20. Climate and heat-related emergencies in Chicago, Illinois (2003-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Donna A; Golden, Jay S; Sister, Chona; Chuang, Wen-Ching; Brazel, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    Extreme heat events are responsible for more deaths in the United States than floods, hurricanes and tornados combined. Yet, highly publicized events, such as the 2003 heat wave in Europe which caused in excess of 35,000 deaths, and the Chicago heat wave of 1995 that produced over 500 deaths, draw attention away from the countless thousands who, each year, fall victim to nonfatal health emergencies and illnesses directly attributed to heat. The health impact of heat waves and excessive heat are well known. Cities worldwide are seeking to better understand heat-related illnesses with respect to the specifics of climate, social demographics and spatial distributions. This information can support better preparation for heat-related emergency situations with regards to planning for response capacity and placement of emergency resources and personnel. This study deals specifically with the relationship between climate and heat-related dispatches (HRD, emergency 911 calls) in Chicago, Illinois, between 2003 and 2006. It is part of a larger, more in-depth, study that includes urban morphology and social factors that impact heat-related emergency dispatch calls in Chicago. The highest occurrences of HRD are located in the central business district, but are generally scattered across the city. Though temperature can be a very good predictor of high HRD, heat index is a better indicator. We determined temperature and heat index thresholds for high HRD. We were also able to identify a lag in HRD as well as other situations that triggered higher (or lower) HRD than would typically be generated for the temperature and humidity levels, such as early afternoon rainfall and special events.

  1. Large-Scale Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Chesapeake Bay: Status Report, 2003-2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shafer, Deborah J; Bergstrom, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Chesapeake Bay Office began a comprehensive research effort to restore submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV...

  2. Benthic Habitats of Palau Derived From IKONOS Imagery, 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort among the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment; the...

  3. Multiple Classes of Environmental Chemicals are Associated with Liver Disease: NHANES 2003-2006 [Journal Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomonitoring of human tissues and fluids has shown that virtually all individuals, worldwide, carry a “body burden” of synthetic chemicals (Thornton et al. 2002; CDC 2009). Although the measurement of an environmental chemical in a person’s tissues or fluids is an indication of...

  4. NCCOS Shoreline for the Republic of Palau - Derived from IKONOS Imagery, 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment,...

  5. Large-Scale Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Restoration in Chesapeake Bay: Status Report, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Corbicula fluminea ) invasion and system-level ecological change in the Potomac River estuary near Washington, D.C. Estuaries 17(3):614–621...facilitated in part by an explosion of the exotic Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea , in the same region of the Potomac at about the same time (Phelps 1994

  6. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2007-02-01

    The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotype and Case Notification Rates, Rural Vietnam, 2003-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buu, T.N.; Huyen, M.N.T.; Lan, N.N.T.; Quy, H.T.; Hen, N.V.; Zignol, M.; Borgdorff, M.W.; van Soolingen, D.; Cobelens, F.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis case notification rates (CNRs) for young adults in Vietnam are increasing. To determine whether this finding could reflect emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype, we studied all new sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients registered for treatment in 3

  8. LBA-ECO ND-11 Stream Carbon and Nutrients, Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains baseflow streamwater concentrations of pH, specific conductivity, base cations, carbon (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic...

  9. U.S. Marine Corps Operations in Iraq, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Armor. The PASGT ballistic filler consists of 13 plies of treated (water repellent) aramid Kevlar 29 fabric and improved the M-1969’s protection...rock between limestone escarpments. The reservoir formed by the Hadithah Dam submerged the ancient town of Anah and dozens of smaller settlements as...usual characteristics. Residences make up most of its over 50,000 buildings except in the industrial Sina’a District. The brick or concrete homes

  10. Teaching medical ethics to undergraduate students in post-apartheid South Africa, 2003 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Keymanthri

    2007-11-01

    The apartheid ideology in South Africa had a pervasive influence on all levels of education including medical undergraduate training. The role of the health sector in human rights abuses during the apartheid era was highlighted in 1997 during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings. The Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) subsequently realised the importance of medical ethics education and encouraged the introduction of such teaching in all medical schools in the country. Curricular reform at the University of Stellenbosch in 1999 presented an unparalleled opportunity to formally introduce ethics teaching to undergraduate students. This paper outlines the introduction of a medical ethics programme at the Faculty of Health Sciences from 2003 to 2006, with special emphasis on the challenges encountered. It remains one of the most comprehensive undergraduate medical ethics programmes in South Africa. However, there is scope for expanding the curricular time allocated to medical ethics. Integrating the curriculum both horizontally and vertically is imperative. Implementing a core curriculum for all medical schools in South Africa would significantly enhance the goals of medical education in the country.

  11. Surface water quality in streams and rivers: introduction, scaling, and climate change: Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, John

    2013-01-01

    A variety of competing and complementary needs such as ecological health, human consumption, transportation, recreation, and economic value make management and protection of water resources in riverine environments essential. Thus, an understanding of the complex and interacting factors that dictate riverine water quality is essential in empowering stake-holders to make informed management decisions (see Chapter 1.15 for additional information on water resource management). Driven by natural and anthropogenic forcing factors, a variety of chemical, physical, and biological processes dictate riverine water quality, resulting in temporal and spatial patterns and cycling (see Chapter 1.2 for information describing how global change interacts with water resources). Furthermore, changes in climatic forcing factors may lead to long-term deviations in water quality outside the envelope of historical data. The goal of this chapter is to present fundamental concepts dictating the conditions of basic water quality parameters in rivers and streams (herein generally referred to as rivers unless discussing a specific system) in the context of temporal (diel (24 h) to decadal) longitudinal scaling. Understanding water quality scaling in rivers is imperative as water is continually reused and recycled (see also Chapters 3.1 and 3.15); upstream discharges from anthropogenic sources are incorporated into bulk riverine water quality that is used by downstream consumers. Water quality parameters reviewed here include temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), and suspended sediment and were selected given the abundance of data available for these parameters due to recent advances in water quality sensor technology (see Chapter 4.13 for use of hydrologic data in watershed management). General equations describing reactions affecting water temperature, pH, DO, and suspended sediment are included to convey the complexity of how simultaneously occurring reactions can affect water quality

  12. Structural equation modeling: building and evaluating causal models: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B.; Scheiner, Samuel M.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists frequently wish to study hypotheses about causal relationships, rather than just statistical associations. This chapter addresses the question of how scientists might approach this ambitious task. Here we describe structural equation modeling (SEM), a general modeling framework for the study of causal hypotheses. Our goals are to (a) concisely describe the methodology, (b) illustrate its utility for investigating ecological systems, and (c) provide guidance for its application. Throughout our presentation, we rely on a study of the effects of human activities on wetland ecosystems to make our description of methodology more tangible. We begin by presenting the fundamental principles of SEM, including both its distinguishing characteristics and the requirements for modeling hypotheses about causal networks. We then illustrate SEM procedures and offer guidelines for conducting SEM analyses. Our focus in this presentation is on basic modeling objectives and core techniques. Pointers to additional modeling options are also given.

  13. Chapter 2: Stand-alone Applications - TOPCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.

    Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables or TOPCAT is a graphical viewer for table data. It offers a variety of ways to work with data tables, including a browser for the cell data, viewers for information about table and column metadata, dataset visualization, and even analysis. We discuss a small subset of TOPCAT's functionalities in this chapter. TOPCAT was originally developed as part of the Starlink program in the United Kingdom. It is now maintained by AstroGrid. The program is written in pure Java and available under the GNU General Public License. It is available for download and a version is included in the software distribution accompanying this book. TOPCAT is a GUI interface on top of the STIL library. A command line interface to this library, STILTS, described in Chapter 21 provides scriptable access to many of the capabilities described here. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide an overview of TOPCAT to the novice user. The best place to look for and learn about TOPCAT is the web page maintained by Mark B. Taylor. There, TOPCAT documentation is provided in HTML, PDF, via screen shots, etc. In this chapter we take the user through a few examples that give the general idea of how TOPCAT works. The majority of the functionality of TOPCAT is not included in this short tutorial. Our goal in this tutorial is to lead the reader through an exercise that would result in a publication quality figure (e.g. for a journal article). Specifically, we will use TOPCAT to show how the color-magnitude relation of a galaxy cluster compares to that of all galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (York et al. 2000). This diagnostic is used not only in cluster finding, but its linear fit can provide insight into the age and/or metallicity of the oldest galaxies in galaxy clusters (which are some of the oldest galaxies in the Universe). The data we need for this exercise are: 1) the entire spectroscopic galaxy catalog from the SDSS, with galaxy positions, galaxy

  14. Materials for Liquid Propulsion Systems. Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halchak, John A.; Cannon, James L.; Brown, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Earth to orbit launch vehicles are propelled by rocket engines and motors, both liquid and solid. This chapter will discuss liquid engines. The heart of a launch vehicle is its engine. The remainder of the vehicle (with the notable exceptions of the payload and guidance system) is an aero structure to support the propellant tanks which provide the fuel and oxidizer to feed the engine or engines. The basic principle behind a rocket engine is straightforward. The engine is a means to convert potential thermochemical energy of one or more propellants into exhaust jet kinetic energy. Fuel and oxidizer are burned in a combustion chamber where they create hot gases under high pressure. These hot gases are allowed to expand through a nozzle. The molecules of hot gas are first constricted by the throat of the nozzle (de-Laval nozzle) which forces them to accelerate; then as the nozzle flares outwards, they expand and further accelerate. It is the mass of the combustion gases times their velocity, reacting against the walls of the combustion chamber and nozzle, which produce thrust according to Newton's third law: for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Solid rocket motors are cheaper to manufacture and offer good values for their cost. Liquid propellant engines offer higher performance, that is, they deliver greater thrust per unit weight of propellant burned. They also have a considerably higher thrust to weigh ratio. Since liquid rocket engines can be tested several times before flight, they have the capability to be more reliable, and their ability to shut down once started provides an extra margin of safety. Liquid propellant engines also can be designed with restart capability to provide orbital maneuvering capability. In some instances, liquid engines also can be designed to be reusable. On the solid side, hybrid solid motors also have been developed with the capability to stop and restart. Solid motors are covered in detail in chapter 11. Liquid

  15. Chapter 4: Protein interactions and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileidy W Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Proteins do not function in isolation; it is their interactions with one another and also with other molecules (e.g. DNA, RNA that mediate metabolic and signaling pathways, cellular processes, and organismal systems. Due to their central role in biological function, protein interactions also control the mechanisms leading to healthy and diseased states in organisms. Diseases are often caused by mutations affecting the binding interface or leading to biochemically dysfunctional allosteric changes in proteins. Therefore, protein interaction networks can elucidate the molecular basis of disease, which in turn can inform methods for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. In this chapter, we will describe the computational approaches to predict and map networks of protein interactions and briefly review the experimental methods to detect protein interactions. We will describe the application of protein interaction networks as a translational approach to the study of human disease and evaluate the challenges faced by these approaches.

  16. Packaging and transportation manual. Chapter on the packaging and transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to outline the requirements that Los Alamos National Laboratory employees and contractors must follow when they package and ship hazardous and radioactive waste. This chapter is applied to on-site, intra-Laboratory, and off-site transportation of hazardous and radioactive waste. The chapter contains sections on definitions, responsibilities, written procedures, authorized packaging, quality assurance, documentation for waste shipments, loading and tiedown of waste shipments, on-site routing, packaging and transportation assessment and oversight program, nonconformance reporting, training of personnel, emergency response information, and incident and occurrence reporting. Appendices provide additional detail, references, and guidance on packaging for hazardous and radioactive waste, and guidance for the on-site transport of these wastes.

  17. 77 FR 780 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ...-3259. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT COMMENTS CONTACT: Barry S. Lineback, Telephone: (703) 603... (41 U.S.C. Chapter 85) in connection with the product and service proposed for addition to the..., globes/lenses, trophies/display cases, drapes/curtains, venetian blinds and curtain rods; display and...

  18. The Life Cycle Completed. Extended Version with New Chapters on the Ninth Stage of Development by Joan M. Erikson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Erik H.

    This expanded edition of a 1982 book by Erik Erikson summarizes his work on the stages of the human life cycle, including chapters on psychosexuality and the cycle of generations, major stages in psychosocial development, and ego and ethos. An additional chapter on the ninth stage sets forth his philosophy on old age--i.e. the 80s and 90s--and how…

  19. 106-17 Telemetry Management Resources Chapter 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    17 Chapter 25, July 2017 iii Acronyms DSCP Differentiated Services Code Point FTP File Transfer Protocol HTML Hypertext Markup Language HTTP...available tools to auto-generate Hypertext Markup Language ( HTML ) Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 25, July 2017 25-6 documentation of the...document exchange Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17 Chapter 25, July 2017 25-11 text/ html Serve HTML pages to a web browser text/plain Web

  20. Pesticide Registration Manual: Chapter 10 - Data Compensation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter provides information about data compensation requirements, procedures, and obligations when submitting an application for registration, amended registration, reregistration or registration review.

  1. Chapter 24: Programmatic Interfaces - IDL VOlib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.

    In this chapter, we describe a library for working with the VO using IDL (the Interactive Data Language). IDL is a software environment for data analysis, visualization, and cross-platform application development. It has wide-usage in astronomy, including NASA (e.g. http://seadas.gsfc.nasa.gov/), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (http://www.sdss.org), and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Instrument (http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/archanaly/contributed/smart/). David Stern, the founder of Research Systems, Inc. (RSI), began the development of IDL while working with NASA's Mars Mariner 7 and 9 data at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. In 1981, IDL was rewritten in assembly language and FORTRAN for VAX/VMS. IDL's usage has expanded over the last decade into the fields of medical imaging and engineering, among many others. IDL's programming style carries over much of this FORTRAN-legacy, and has a familiar feel to many astronomers who learned their trade using FORTRAN. The spread of IDL-usage amongst astronomers can in part be attributed to the wealth of publicly astronomical libraries. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) maintains a list of astronomy-related IDL libraries, including the well known Astronomy User's Library (hereafter ASTROLIB2). We will use some of these GSFC IDL libraries. We note that while IDL is a licensed-software product, the source code of user-written procedures are typically freely available to the community. To make the most out of this section as a reader, it is important that many of the data discovery, access, and analysis protocols are understood before reading this chapter. In the next section, we provide an overview of some of the NVO terminology with which the reader should be familiar. The IDL library discussed here is specifically for use with the Virtual Observatory and is named VOlib. IDL's VOlib is available at http://nvo.noao.edu and is included with the software distrubution for this

  2. Chapter 15: Integration and (De-)installation

    CERN Document Server

    Fessia, P.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 15 in High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Amo...

  3. [Rare diseases: a new chapter in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales Espert, Angel

    2004-01-01

    Rare Diseases (RD) form a new chapter of Medicine which consists of more than 5.000 different diseases. RD have low prevalence (less than 5/10.000), chronic and severe evolution and usually produce serious alteration of quality of life and relationships with physical and social environment. The scarce number of patients with each RD produces very limited interest in research, specially in theraphy. "Orphan drugs" are useful drugs for treating some RD, and in spite of this they are not made because the low number of patients. The particular problem of one RD can be considered not important but as a whole it has great importance, having in mind its consequences over the patient, family and society. It is thought that there are about 20.000 patients in Spain and between 20 and 30 millions in the EU. Care of RD must be multidisciplinary (general practitioners, pediatricians, experts in RD, sociologists and social workers) with a permanent linkage between primary and specialised medicine. An appropriate training of professionals that work with these diseases is needed, as well as to increase and improve the research about RD and to give support to the patients and their families. Global Associations of patients with RD (FEDER in Spain, EURORDIS in EU and NORD in USA) as well as particular associations of some RD (more than 60 in Spain) have developed a very important task to improve health care and social attention about RD and must receive government and social support.

  4. Energy. Chapter 4; Energia. Capitulo 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Castillo, Carlos [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    This chapter stands out that the infrastructure for the electric energy generation, as well as the one departing from fossil fuels has been the responsibility of two institutions with great solvency in the scope of engineering: the Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX). It is presented here the energy future in a sustainable context; a prospective study to year 2050; a strategic proposal of Petroleos Mexicanos; the forecast of the oil industry in Mexico and a technological prospective of the energy. [Spanish] En este capitulo se destaca que la infraestructura para la generacion de energia, tanto electrica como a partir de combustibles fisiles ha corrido a cargo de dos instituciones con gran solvencia en el ambito de la ingenieria: la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) y Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex). Se presenta el futuro de la energia en un contexto sustentable; un estudio prospectivo al ano 2050; una propuesta estrategica de Petroleos Mexicanos; la prospectiva de la industria petrolera en Mexico y; una prospectiva tecnologica de la energia.

  5. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 6: Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, L.; Rimoldini, L.; Guy, L.; Holl, B.; Clementini, G.; Cuypers, J.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; De Ridder, J.; Charnas, J.; Nienartowicz, K.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter describes the photometric variability processing of the Gaia DR1 data. Coordination Unit 7 is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources. In particular the definition, design, development, validation and provision of a software package for the data processing of photometrically variable objects. Data Processing Centre Geneva (DPCG) responsibilities cover all issues related to the computational part of the CU7 analysis. These span: hardware provisioning, including selection, deployment and optimisation of suitable hardware, choosing and developing software architecture, defining data and scientific workflows as well as operational activities such as configuration management, data import, time series reconstruction, storage and processing handling, visualisation and data export. CU7/DPCG is also responsible for interaction with other DPCs and CUs, software and programming training for the CU7 members, scientific software quality control and management of software and data lifecycle. Details about the specific data treatment steps of the Gaia DR1 data products are found in Eyer et al. (2017) and are not repeated here. The variability content of the Gaia DR1 focusses on a subsample of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars around the South ecliptic pole, showcasing the performance of the Gaia photometry with respect to variable objects.

  6. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  7. Microscopic functional anatomy: Integumentary system: Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Diane G.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    2000-01-01

    Many of the features of the fish integument can only be observed microscopically. Because there are over 20,000 living fishes, mostly higher bony fishes (teleosts), a great diversity exists in the microscopic anatomy of the integument. This chapter presents several examples from varied taxonomic groups to illustrate the variation in morphological features. As in all vertebrate epidermis, the fundamental structural unit is the epithelial cell. This is the only constant feature, as a great diversity of cell types exists in the various fish taxa. Some of these include apocrine mucous cells and a variety of other secretory cells, ionocytes, sensory cells, and wandering cells such as leukocytes. The dermis consists essentially of two sets of collagen fibers arranged in opposing geodesic spirals around the body. The dermis of most fishes is divided into two major layers. The upper (outer) layer, the stratum spongiosum or stratum laxum, is a loose network of connective tissue, whereas the lower layer, the stratum compactum, is a dense layer consisting primarily of orthogonal collagen bands. There are also specialized dermal elements such as chromatophores scales, and fin rays.

  8. Implications of fire management on cultural resources [Chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca S. Timmons; Leonard deBano; Kevin C. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Previous chapters in this synthesis have identified the important fuel, weather, and fire relationships associated with damage to cultural resources (CR). They have also identified the types of effects commonly encountered in various fire situations and provided some guidance on how to recognize damages and minimize their occurrence. This chapter describes planning...

  9. Valley segments, stream reaches, and channel units [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter A. Bisson; David R. Montgomery; John M. Buffington

    2006-01-01

    Valley segments, stream reaches, and channel units are three hierarchically nested subdivisions of the drainage network (Frissell et al. 1986), falling in size between landscapes and watersheds (see Chapter 1) and individual point measurements made along the stream network (Table 2.1; also see Chapters 3 and 4). These three subdivisions compose the habitat for large,...

  10. Ecological consequences of manipulative parasites: chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    phrases such as “may ultimately infl uence community structure” (Kiesecker and Blaustein 1999), yet few demonstrate ecological effects. Here, we consider the conditions under which manipulative parasites might have a substantial ecological effect in nature and highlight those for which evidence exists (see also Chapter 10).

  11. Getting the Most from Pi Sigma Alpha Chapters: Exploring the Chapter Activity Grant Program and Its Multiplier Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha, has chapters in nearly 700 institutions across the United States. The organization sponsors many programs that can contribute a great deal to students of political science; however, many students are unaware of these opportunities. This article encourages chapter advisors to make use of these…

  12. Seville City Hall Chapter Room ceiling decoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robador, M. D.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes a chemical and physical study of the colour, chemical composition and mineral phases of the decorative materials in the Seville City Hall Chapter House ceiling. The findings showed that the inner most layer of material, calcite, was covered with white lead, in turn concealed under a layer of gilded bole. The ceiling underwent re-gilding, also over bole, due in all likelihood to wear on the original gold leaf. In the nineteenth century, the entire ceiling with the exception of the inscriptions was whitewashed with calcite and white lead. Silver was employed on King John I’s sword (coffer 27. Gold leaf was used to adorn the royal attributes: crowns, belts, sceptres, swords and rosary beads. The high reliefs were likewise gilded. The pigments identified on the ceiling adornments included azurite, malachite, vermilion and gas black. A lime and ground dolomite mortar was used throughout.

    El objetivo de este trabajo es el estudio de diferentes aspectos, como el color, la composición química y las fases mineralógicas presentes en los diferentes materiales que forman la ornamentación del techo de la Sala Capitular del Ayuntamiento de Sevilla, mediante métodos físicos y químicos. Nuestros resultados muestran que el dorado fue realizado sobre una capa de bol previamente depositada sobre una lámina de blanco de plomo que cubría un estrato de calcita. Posteriormente, y probablemente debido a alteraciones en el dorado original, el techo fue de nuevo dorado usando una técnica similar. En el siglo XIX, casi todo el techo, excepto las zonas con inscripciones, fue blanqueado usando una mezcla de calcita y blanco de plomo. Se empleó plata para cubrir la espada del rey Juan I (casetón 27. Finísimas láminas de oro se usaron para decorar los atributos reales: coronas, cinturones, cetros, espadas y rosarios. En diferentes partes de la decoración fueron detectados pigmentos como azurita, malaquita, bermellón y

  13. 106 17 Telemetry Standards Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    spectrum is a limited natural resource; therefore, efficient use of available spectrum is mandatory. In addition, susceptibility to interference...satellite ( sound ) service has been brought into use in such a manner as to affect or be affected by the mobile and radiolocation services in those... amplification and differential encoding/decoding in an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) environment with no fading. Other combinations of equipment may

  14. Applied Space Systems Engineering. Chapter 17; Manage Technical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Effective space systems engineering (SSE) is conducted in a fully electronic manner. Competitive hardware, software, and system designs are created in a totally digital environment that enables rapid product design and manufacturing cycles, as well as a multitude of techniques such as modeling, simulation, and lean manufacturing that significantly reduce the lifecycle cost of systems. Because the SSE lifecycle depends on the digital environment, managing the enormous volumes of technical data needed to describe, build, deploy, and operate systems is a critical factor in the success of a project. This chapter presents the key aspects of Technical Data Management (TDM) within the SSE process. It is written from the perspective of the System Engineer tasked with establishing the TDM process and infrastructure for a major project. Additional perspectives are reflected from the point of view of the engineers on the project who work within the digital engineering environment established by the TDM toolset and infrastructure, and from the point of view of the contactors who interface via the TDM infrastructure. Table 17.1 lists the TDM process as it relates to SSE.

  15. Chapter 19: HVAC Controls (DDC/EMS/BAS) Evaluation Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romberger, J.

    2014-11-01

    The HVAC Controls Evaluation Protocol is designed to address evaluation issues for direct digital controls/energy management systems/building automation systems (DDC/EMS/BAS) that are installed to control heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in commercial and institutional buildings. (This chapter refers to the DDC/EMS/BAS measure as HVAC controls.) This protocol may also be applicable to industrial facilities such as clean rooms and labs, which have either significant HVAC equipment or spaces requiring special environmental conditions. This protocol addresses only HVAC-related equipment and the energy savings estimation methods associated with installing such control systems as an energy efficiency measure. The affected equipment includes: Air-side equipment (air handlers, direct expansion systems, furnaces, other heating- and cooling-related devices, terminal air distribution equipment, and fans); Central plant equipment (chillers, cooling towers, boilers, and pumps). These controls may also operate or affect other end uses, such as lighting, domestic hot water, irrigation systems, and life safety systems such as fire alarms and other security systems. Considerable nonenergy benefits, such as maintenance scheduling, system component troubleshooting, equipment failure alarms, and increased equipment lifetime, may also be associated with these systems. When connected to building utility meters, these systems can also be valuable demand-limiting control tools. However, this protocol does not evaluate any of these additional capabilities and benefits.

  16. Loss and modification of habitat: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemckert, Francis; Hecnar, Stephen; Pilliod, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Amphibians live in a wide variety of habitats around the world, many of which have been modified or destroyed by human activities. Most species have unique life history characteristics adapted to specific climates, habitats (e.g., lentic, lotic, terrestrial, arboreal, fossorial, amphibious), and local conditions that provide suitable areas for reproduction, development and growth, shelter from environmental extremes, and predation, as well as connectivity to other populations or habitats. Although some species are entirely aquatic or terrestrial, most amphibians, as their name implies, lead a dual life and require a mosaic of habitats in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. With over 6 billion people on Earth, most species are now persisting in habitats that have been directly or indirectly influenced by human activities. Some species have disappeared where their habitats have been completely destroyed, reduced, or rendered unsuitable. Habitat loss and degradation are widely considered by most researchers as the most important causes of amphibian population decline globally (Barinaga 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991; Alford and Richards 1999). In this chapter, a background on the diverse habitat requirements of amphibians is provided, followed by a discussion of the effects of urbanization, agriculture, livestock grazing, timber production and harvesting, fire and hazardous fuel management, and roads on amphibians and their habitats. Also briefly discussed is the influence on amphibian habitats of natural disturbances, such as extreme weather events and climate change, given the potential for human activities to impact climate in the longer term. For amphibians in general, microhabitats are of greater importance than for other vertebrates. As ectotherms with a skin that is permeable to water and with naked gelatinous eggs, amphibians are physiologically constrained to be active during environmental conditions that provide appropriate body temperatures and adequate

  17. Seleucid, Demotic and Mediterranean mathematics versus Chapters VIII and IX of the Nine Chapters: accidental or significant similarities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyrup, Jens

    Similarities of geometrical diagrams and arithmetical structures of problems have often been taken as evidence of transmission of mathematical knowledge or techniques between China and “the West”. Confronting on one hand some problems from Chapter VIII of the Nine Chapters with comparable problems...... known from Ancient Greek sources, on the other a Seleucid collection of problems about rectangles with a subset of the triangle problems from Chapter IX, it is concluded, (1) that transmission of some arithmetical riddles without method – not “from Greece” but from a transnational community of traders...

  18. Chapter 23. Shrubs of other families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen B. Monsen; Richard Stevens; Nancy L. Shaw

    2004-01-01

    Numerous genera and species of shrubs occur throughout the Intermountain region in addition to those included in the Asteraceae, Chenopodiaceae, and Rosaceae families. Although shrubs are widespread throughout this region and dominate many areas, species richness is low compared to the shrub flora of the Pacific United States, Chile, western Australia, and South Africa...

  19. Planning a native plant nursery [Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim M. Wilkinson; Thomas D. Landis

    2009-01-01

    Every nursery is unique. The environmental, social, and economic context is different for each nursery. A wide variety of species and outplanting environments contributes to nursery diversity. In addition, each nursery has a distinct vision and purpose.The methods a nursery will use to bring people together, produce high-quality plants for the community, and share...

  20. An Agile Way of Working : Chapter 6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. J. T. van der Linden; M.E. Lacob; C. Amrit; W. van Stokkum; I. Wilmont; Stijn Hoppenbrouwers

    2012-01-01

    Economies around the globe have evolved into being largely service-oriented economies. Consumers no longer just want a printer or a car, they rather ask for a printing service or a mobility service. In addition, service-oriented organizations increasingly exploit new devices, technologies and

  1. Renormalized Perturbation Theory A Missing Chapter

    CERN Document Server

    Stora, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Renormalized perturbation theory à la BPHZ can be founded on causality as analyzed by H. Epstein and V. Glaser in the seventies. Here, we list and discuss a number of additional constraints of algebraic character some of which have to be considered as parts of the core of the BPHZ framework.

  2. Implications of climate and land use change: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jefferson S.; Murgueitio, Enrique; Calle, Zoraida; Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara; Stallard, Robert F.; Balvanera, Patricia; Hall, Jefferson S.; Kirn, Vanessa; Yanguas-Fernandez, Estrella

    2015-01-01

    This chapter relates ecosystem services to climate change and land use. The bulk of the chapter focuses on ecosystem services and steepland land use in the humid Neotropics – what is lost with land-cover changed, and what is gained with various types of restoration that are sustainable given private ownership. Many case studies are presented later in the white paper. The USGS contribution relates to climate change and the role of extreme weather events in land-use planning.

  3. Qalandar-name. Chapter 1. «Monotheism»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismagilova M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The proposed excerpt of theological work is the translation of the first chapter of «Qalandar-name», supplemented by comments. This is the first edition of chapter from the medieval theological work written in the Golden Horde during the active Islamization of its population, during the times of great Khans – Muhammad Uzbek and Janibek. Its author, Abu Bakr Qalandar, was a native of the city of Aksaray (in modern Turkey, Sufi, great scholar, imam of a mosque in the city of Stary Krym. «Qalandar-name» is an encyclopedic work on Islamic matters and Sufism that begins with a traditional intonation typical for the works of Muslim authors, especially for compilers of theological writings. In this chapter entitled «Tawhid» (monotheism, Abu Bakr Qalandar speaks about beautiful names of the Almighty, about his creative work (comparing it with the jewelry craftsmanship, about heaven and hell, a small (world of sagri and the highest (world of kibriya worlds. D. Shagivaleev who wrote commentaries on the first chapter, supplied the text with verses, to which, according to him, Abu Bakr made allusions. Analysis of the work of Abu Bakr Qalandar reveals that the author of this source was an educated man of his time. In this chapter, Abu Bakr reports about the basic concepts of Islam. The authors plan to publish subsequent chapters of this work in the next issues.

  4. Myriapods (Myriapoda). Chapter 7.2

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Stoev; Marzio Zapparoli; Sergei Golovatch; Henrik Enghoff; Nesrine Akkari; Anthony Barber

    2010-01-01

    Alien myriapods in Europe have never been subject to a comprehensive review. Currently, 40 species belonging to 23 families and 11 orders can be regarded as alien to Europe, which accounts approximately for about 1.8% of all species known on the continent. Millipedes (Class Diplopoda) are represented by 20 alien species, followed by centipedes (Class Chilopoda) with 16, symphylans with 3 and pauropods with only 1. In addition there are numerous cases of continental species introduced to the A...

  5. Chapter three: methodology of exposure modeling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moschandreas, DJ

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available and Turner, 1996). Steady-state Gaussian plume dispersion models require hourly single-point meteorological data at the surface and an upper air station to estimate the mixing 928 D.J. Moschandreas et al. / Chemosphere 49 (2002) 923?946 height. More... require core parameters (Table 1). These include surface wind direction, wind speed, air temperature and cloud data. In addition, upper air data, typically measured twice per day, determines wind, temperature, and humidity changes with height (Schulze...

  6. Intelligent Control and Health Monitoring. Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay; Kumar, Aditya; Mathews, H. Kirk; Rosenfeld, Taylor; Rybarik, Pavol; Viassolo, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced model-based control architecture overcomes the limitations state-of-the-art engine control and provides the potential of virtual sensors, for example for thrust and stall margin. "Tracking filters" are used to adapt the control parameters to actual conditions and to individual engines. For health monitoring standalone monitoring units will be used for on-board analysis to determine the general engine health and detect and isolate sudden faults. Adaptive models open up the possibility of adapting the control logic to maintain desired performance in the presence of engine degradation or to accommodate any faults. Improved and new sensors are required to allow sensing at stations within the engine gas path that are currently not instrumented due in part to the harsh conditions including high operating temperatures and to allow additional monitoring of vibration, mass flows and energy properties, exhaust gas composition, and gas path debris. The environmental and performance requirements for these sensors are summarized.

  7. The Canadian celiac health survey – the Ottawa chapter pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ian D

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease may manifest with a variety of symptoms which can result in delays in diagnosis. Celiac disease is associated with a number of other medical conditions. The last national survey of members of the Canadian Celiac Association (CCA was in 1989. Our objective was to determine the feasibility of surveying over 5,000 members of the CCA, in addition to obtaining more health related information about celiac disease. Methods The Professional Advisory Board of the CCA in collaboration with the University of Ottawa developed a comprehensive questionnaire on celiac disease. The questionnaire was pre-tested and then a pilot survey was conducted on members of the Ottawa Chapter of the CCA using a Modified Dillmans' Total Design method for mail surveys. Results We had a 76% response to the first mailout of the questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 55.5 years and the mean age at diagnosis was 45 years. The majority of respondents presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fatigue or weight loss. Prior to diagnosis, 30% of respondents consulted four or more family doctors. Thirty seven percent of individuals were told they had either osteoporosis or osteopenia. Regarding the impact of the gluten-free diet (GFD, 45% of individuals reported that they found following a GFD was very or moderately difficult. The quality of life of individuals with celiac disease was comparable to the mean quality of life of Canadians. Conclusion On the basis of our results, we concluded that a nationwide survey is feasible and this is in progress. Important concerns included delays in the diagnosis of celiac disease and the awareness of associated medical conditions. Other issues include awareness of celiac disease by health professionals and the impact of the GFD on quality of life. These issues will be addressed further in the national survey.

  8. Toxicity testing using microcosms. Chapter 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C

    1996-07-01

    Microcosms are, literally, small worlds, and there are very nearly as many interpretations of what that means as there are researchers willing to use them. There is a lively debate on what constitutes a microcosm, and if there are any advantages to be gained over single-species ecotoxicological investigations (Cairns, 1983). As a result, few microcosm toxicity tests have any form of official sanction (van Gestel and van Straalen, 1994), and no soil microcosm tests are in widespread, routine usage. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) does list one soil microcosm methodology (E 1197-87, ASTM, 1987). As Golley (1985) comments, there are 4 or 5 million species of organisms on earth, and they each live in communities of 1000 to 2000 species with substantial ecological interconnections. We cannot build systems as complex, and yet we must study impacts on such systems. Microcosms offer an additional step on the way from studies of single species toward studies of true ecological complexity. (author)

  9. Chapter 14: Electron Microscopy on Thin Films for Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Manuel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Abou-Ras, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB); Nichterwitz, Melanie [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB); Schmidt, Sebastian S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB)

    2016-07-22

    This chapter overviews the various techniques applied in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and highlights their possibilities and also limitations. It gives the various imaging and analysis techniques applied on a scanning electron microscope. The chapter shows that imaging is divided into that making use of secondary electrons (SEs) and of backscattered electrons (BSEs), resulting in different contrasts in the images and thus providing information on compositions, microstructures, and surface potentials. Whenever aiming for imaging and analyses at scales of down to the angstroms range, TEM and its related techniques are appropriate tools. In many cases, also SEM techniques provide the access to various material properties of the individual layers, not requiring specimen preparation as time consuming as TEM techniques. Finally, the chapter dedicates to cross-sectional specimen preparation for electron microscopy. The preparation decides indeed on the quality of imaging and analyses.

  10. Mirror Lake: Past, present and future: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the hydrological and biogeochemical characteristics of Mirror Lake and the changes that resulted from air-land-water interactions and human activities. Since the formation of Mirror Lake, both the watershed and the lake have undergone many changes, such as vegetation development and basin filling. These changes are ongoing, and Mirror Lake is continuing along an aging pathway and ultimately, it will fill with sediment and no longer be a lake. The chapter also identifies major factors that affected the hydrology and biogeochemistry of Mirror Lake: acid rain, atmospheric deposition of lead and other heavy metals, increased human settlement around the lake, the construction of an interstate highway through the watershed of the Northeast Tributary, the construction of an access road through the West and Northeast watersheds to the lake, and climate change. The chapter also offers future recommendations for management and protection of Mirror Lake.

  11. Bioenergetics modeling of percid fishes: Chapter 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Kestemont, Patrick; Dabrowski, Konrad; Summerfelt, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    A bioenergetics model for a percid fish represents a quantitative description of the fish’s energy budget. Bioenergetics modeling can be used to identify the important factors determining growth of percids in lakes, rivers, or seas. For example, bioenergetics modeling applied to yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in the western and central basins of Lake Erie revealed that the slower growth in the western basin was attributable to limitations in suitably sized prey in western Lake Erie, rather than differences in water temperature between the two basins. Bioenergetics modeling can also be applied to a percid population to estimate the amount of food being annually consumed by the percid population. For example, bioenergetics modeling applied to the walleye (Sander vitreus) population in Lake Erie has provided fishery managers valuable insights into changes in the population’s predatory demand over time. In addition, bioenergetics modeling has been used to quantify the effect of the difference in growth between the sexes on contaminant accumulation in walleye. Field and laboratory evaluations of percid bioenergetics model performance have documented a systematic bias, such that the models overestimate consumption at low feeding rates but underestimate consumption at high feeding rates. However, more recent studies have shown that this systematic bias was due, at least in part, to an error in the energy budget balancing algorithm used in the computer software. Future research work is needed to more thoroughly assess the field and laboratory performance of percid bioenergetics models and to quantify differences in activity and standard metabolic rate between the sexes of mature percids.

  12. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  13. Nationwide mobile communication systems. Volume 2, chapter 5: Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schworer, William Joseph, III

    1990-06-01

    Previous chapters discussed nationwide mobile communication system technologies and modeled user costs and benefits. This chapter provides a brief overview of mobile communication system economics, the projected U.S. market for nationwide mobile communications, and the potential revenues. The basic cost structure of satellite and meteor-burst systems are also modeled. A combination of all these factors will ultimately govern which systems will be commercially successful. Because of improvements in technology, communication system costs and user terminal costs (A) per unit of capacity tend to decline over time. However, inflation tends to drive the price of an identical product upward over time.

  14. Chapter 3. Researching Chinese Nationalism: the Foreign Relations Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Zha, Daojiong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nyíri on Zha’s chapterThis chapter is the only one in this book written by a political scientist, and it bears the mark of the positivist, ”rational choice,” noncultural argumentation of that discipline. This discipline is, in fact, the most visible in discussions of Chinese nationalism and the one that, more than others, gets the ears of policy makers. The text gives a good overview of the ”hot” topics in that discussion in political science and its various sub- and neighboring ...

  15. Chapter L: U.S. Industrial Garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, James G.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    2006-01-01

    industrial-grade garnet or its possible occurrence has been reported. Other natural and manmade materials compete with garnet in nearly all of the applications for which garnet can be used; garnet, however, has the advantages that it is reusable, nontoxic, and nonreactive. In addition, garnet produces much less dust than other abrasive materials, and spills are relatively benign and easy to clean up.

  16. From Literacy Activities to Entrepreneurship in Siete Pilas. Chapter 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Antonio; Polo, Angel

    This chapter describes a community development project in Siete Pilas (Spain), a village whose economy is based primarily on small family farms and unskilled labor. The project grew out of the Sierra Education Program, which in 1980 sent adult-education teachers to five villages in the Sierra de Ronda region. The goal was to stimulate a socially…

  17. Woody biomass from short rotation energy crops. Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.S., Jr. Zalesny Jr.; M.W. Cunningham; R.B. Hall; J. Mirck; D.L. Rockwood; J.A. Stanturf; T.A. Volk

    2011-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) are ideal for woody biomass production and management systems because they are renewable energy feedstocks for biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts that can be strategically placed in the landscape to conserve soil and water, recycle nutrients, and sequester carbon. This chapter is a synthesis of the regional implications of producing...

  18. Landscape ecology: Past, present, and future [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Jeffrey S. Evans; Kevin McGarigal

    2010-01-01

    In the preceding chapters we discussed the central role that spatial and temporal variability play in ecological systems, the importance of addressing these explicitly within ecological analyses and the resulting need to carefully consider spatial and temporal scale and scaling. Landscape ecology is the science of linking patterns and processes across scale in both...

  19. A supply chain approach to biochar systems [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel M. Anderson; Richard D. Bergman; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2017-01-01

    Biochar systems are designed to meet four related primary objectives: improve soils, manage waste, generate renewable energy, and mitigate climate change. Supply chain models provide a holistic framework for examining biochar systems with an emphasis on product life cycle and end use. Drawing on concepts in supply chain management and engineering, this chapter presents...

  20. Lynx conservation in an ecosystem management context [Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin S. McKelvey; Keith B. Aubry; James K. Agee; Steven W. Buskirk; Leonard F. Ruggiero; Gary M. Koehler

    2000-01-01

    In an ecosystem management context, management for lynx must occur in the context of the needs of other species, watershed health, and a variety of products, outputs, and uses. This chapter presents a management model based on the restoration of historical patterns and processes. We argue that this model is sustainable in a formal sense, practical, and likely...

  1. Chapter 7. Assessing soil factors in wildland improvement programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur R. Tiedemann; Carlos F. Lopez

    2004-01-01

    Soil factors are an important consideration for successful wildland range development or improvement programs. Even though many soil improvement and amelioration practices are not realistic for wildlands, their evaluation is an important step in selection of adapted plant materials for revegetation. This chapter presents information for wildland managers on: the...

  2. The role of place-based social learning [Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2017-01-01

    Hummel's observations on the limits of science to inform practice provides a useful starting point for a book chapter devoted to examining post-normal environmental policy where the "facts are uncertain, values in dispute, stakes high, and decisions urgent" (Funtowicz and Ravetz 1993, 739, 744). Central to the argument here is that the integration of...

  3. Forest management and water in the United States [Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel G. Neary

    2017-01-01

    This chapter outlines a brief history of the United States native forests and forest plantations. It describes the past and current natural and plantation forest distribution (map, area, main species), as well as main products produced (timber, pulp, furniture, etc.). Integrated into this discussion is a characterization of the water resources of the United States and...

  4. Chapter Two: Foundations for the Study of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the historical roots of contemporary Practice Theory are unearthed in the work of semioticians, philosophers, and anthropologists. Saussure's semiotic theory is contrasted with that of Peirce, and the importance of Peirce's work for understanding the context of signs is stressed. The philosophy of language in the writings of…

  5. Fire history, effects and management in southern Nevada [Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew L. Brooks; Jeanne C. Chambers; Randy A. McKinley

    2013-01-01

    Fire can be both an ecosystem stressor (Chapter 2) and a critical ecosystem process, depending on when, where, and under what conditions it occurs on the southern Nevada landscape. Fire can also pose hazards to human life and property, particularly in the wildland/urban interface (WUI). The challenge faced by land managers is to prevent fires from occurring where they...

  6. CHAPTER FOUR LİBERTY AND TURKISH CONSTITUTIONS:

    OpenAIRE

    FENDOĞLU, Doç.Dr.Hasan Tahsin

    2014-01-01

    CHAPTER FOUR LIBERTY AND TURKISH CONSTITUTIONS: Doç.Dr.Hasan Tahsin FENDOĞLU ABSTRACT: Turkish Constitution of 1982 is the first and only Turkish Constitution that has a main purpose on strengthening the political power not the liberty or democr...

  7. Chapter 11. Quality evaluation of apple by computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple is one of the most consumed fruits in the world, and there is a critical need for enhanced computer vision technology for quality assessment of apples. This chapter gives a comprehensive review on recent advances in various computer vision techniques for detecting surface and internal defects ...

  8. Validation and verification of emission inventory data (chapter 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, M.P.J.; Builtjes, P.J.H.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes principles and practice of validation and verification of emission inventories as means to establish the quality of an emission inventory. It is argued that the perspective of the user of the data is important in defming the quality of emission data. Monitoring of the progress

  9. Chapter 4. Monitoring vegetation composition and structure as habitat attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. DeMeo; Mary M. Manning; Mary M. Rowland; Christina D. Vojta; Kevin S. McKelvey; C. Kenneth Brewer; Rebecca S.H. Kennedy; Paul A. Maus; Bethany Schulz; James A. Westfall; Timothy J. Mersmann

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation composition and structure are key components of wildlife habitat (Mc- Comb et al. 2010, Morrison et al. 2006) and are, therefore, essential components of all wildlife habitat monitoring. The objectives of this chapter are to describe common habitat attributes derived from vegetation composition and structure and to provide guidance for obtaining and using...

  10. An uncertainty analysis of wildfire modeling [Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Riley; Matthew Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Before fire models can be understood, evaluated, and effectively applied to support decision making, model-based uncertainties must be analyzed. In this chapter, we identify and classify sources of uncertainty using an established analytical framework, and summarize results graphically in an uncertainty matrix. Our analysis facilitates characterization of the...

  11. Element cycling in upland/peatland watersheds Chapter 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel Urban; Elon S. Verry; Steven Eisenreich; David F. Grigal; Stephen D. Sebestyen

    2011-01-01

    Studies at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) have measured the pools, cycling, and transport of a variety of elements in both the upland and peatland components of the landscape. Peatlands are important zones of element retention and biogeochemical reactions that greatly influence the chemistry of surface water. In this chapter, we summarize findings on nitrogen (N...

  12. Mechanism and kinetics of addition polymerizations

    CERN Document Server

    Kucera, M

    1991-01-01

    This volume presents an up-to-date survey of knowledge concerning addition type polymerizations. It contains nine chapters, each of which covers a particular basic term. Whenever necessary, the phenomena are discussed from the viewpoint of both stationary and non-stationary state of radical, ionic (i.e. anionic and cationic) and coordination polymerization. Special attention has been paid to the propagation process. It provides not only a general overview but also information on important special cases (theoretical conditions of propagation, influence of external factors, controlled propagatio

  13. Chapter 10: Mining genome-wide genetic markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association study (GWAS aims to discover genetic factors underlying phenotypic traits. The large number of genetic factors poses both computational and statistical challenges. Various computational approaches have been developed for large scale GWAS. In this chapter, we will discuss several widely used computational approaches in GWAS. The following topics will be covered: (1 An introduction to the background of GWAS. (2 The existing computational approaches that are widely used in GWAS. This will cover single-locus, epistasis detection, and machine learning methods that have been recently developed in biology, statistic, and computer science communities. This part will be the main focus of this chapter. (3 The limitations of current approaches and future directions.

  14. Chapter 19: Catalysis by Metal Carbides and Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaidle, Joshua A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nash, Connor P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yung, Matthew M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chen, Yuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl, Sarah [University of Michigan; Thompson, Levi [University of Michigan

    2017-08-09

    Early transition metal carbides and nitrides (ETMCNs), materials in which carbon or nitrogen occupies interstitial sites within a parent metal lattice, possess unique physical and chemical properties that motivate their use as catalysts. Specifically, these materials possess multiple types of catalytic sites, including metallic, acidic, and basic sites, and as such, exhibit reactivities that differ from their parent metals. Moreover, their surfaces are dynamic under reaction conditions. This chapter reviews recent (since 2010) experimental and computational investigations into the catalytic properties of ETMCN materials for applications including biomass conversion, syngas and CO2 upgrading, petroleum and natural gas refining, and electrocatalytic energy conversion, energy storage, and chemicals production, and attempts to link catalyst performance to active site identity/surface structure in order to elucidate the present level of understanding of structure-function relationships for these materials. The chapter concludes with a perspective on leveraging the unique properties of these materials to design and develop improved catalysts through a dedicated, multidisciplinary effort.

  15. Chapter 1 Historical Background on Gamete and Embryo Cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jaffar; AlHarbi, Naif H; Ali, Nafisa

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes the development of the science of cryopreservation of gametes and embryos of various species including human. It attempts to record in brief the main contributions of workers in their attempts to cryopreserve gametes and embryos. The initial difficulties faced and subsequent developments and triumphs leading to present-day state of the art are given in a concise manner. The main players and their contributions are mentioned and the authors' aim is to do justice to them. This work also attempts to ensure that credit is correctly attributed for significant advances in gamete and embryo cryopreservation. In general this chapter has tried to describe the historical development of the science of cryopreservation of gametes and embryos as accurately as possible without bias or partiality.

  16. Computer modelling for ecosystem service assessment: Chapter 4.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Robert; Harrison, Paula; Bagstad, Kenneth J.

    2017-01-01

    Computer models are simplified representations of the environment that allow biophysical, ecological, and/or socio-economic characteristics to be quantified and explored. Modelling approaches differ from mapping approaches (Chapter 5) as (i) they are not forcibly spatial (although many models do produce spatial outputs); (ii) they focus on understanding and quantifying the interactions between different components of social and/or environmental systems and (iii)

  17. Impacts on integrated spatial and infrastructure planning (Chapter18)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Huyssteen, Elsona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available and sanitation, to which South African citizens have a constitutional right. CHAPTER 18: IMPACTS ON INTEGRATED SPATIAL AND INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING Page 18-7 Karoo landscapes, resource-scarce municipalities and low-growth regional economies, it also... and even pipeline infrastructure, as well as, 3) the private ownership of land and mineral rights assisted (amongst other things) in creating a set of specific circumstances that supported rapid commercial SGD in that country (Fakir, 2015). Site visits...

  18. 106-17 Telemetry Standards Metadata Configuration Chapter 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    of multiple test mission networks. This chapter defines the Metadata Description Language (MDL), which has a syntax that defines vocabulary and...syntax, which includes a vocabulary , a set of types, and the rules for how an MDL instance document shall be structured. The syntax definition is...existing knowledge to describe concepts and domains beyond those in the MDL. The MDL does not explicitly constrain the available mechanisms to use

  19. Inducible defenses in food webs: Chapter 3.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Matthijs; Kooi, Bob W.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Mooij, Wolf M.; de Ruiter, Peter; Wolters, Volkmar; Moore, John C.; Melville-Smith, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews the predicted effects of induced defenses on trophic structure and two aspects of stability, “local” stability and persistence, as well as presenting novel results on a third, resilience. Food webs are structures of populations in a given location organized according to their predator–prey interactions. Interaction strengths and, therefore, prey defenses are generally recognized as important ecological factors affecting food webs. Despite this, surprisingly, little light has been shed on the food web-level consequences of inducible defenses. Inducible defenses occur in many taxa in both terrestrial and aquatic food webs. They include refuge use, reduced activity, adaptive life history changes, the production of toxins, synomones and extrafloral nectar, and the formation of colonies, helmets, thorns, or spines. In the chapter, theoretical results for the effects of inducible defenses on trophic structure and the three aspects of stability are reviewed. This is done, in part, using bifurcation analysis—a type of analysis that is applied to nonlinear dynamic systems described by a set of ordinary differential or difference equations. The work presented in the chapter suggests that heterogeneity, as caused by induced defenses in prey species, has major effects on the functioning of food webs. Inducible defenses occur in many species in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, and theoretical work indicates they have major effects on important food web properties such as trophic structure, local stability, persistence, and resilience.

  20. Field Surveys of Rare Plants on Santa Cruz Island, California, 2003-2006: Historical Records and Current Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, A. Kathryn; Chess, Katherine A.; Niessen, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Santa Cruz Island is the largest of the northern Channel Islands located off the coast of California. It is owned and managed as a conservation reserve by The Nature Conservancy and the Channel Islands National Park. The island is home to nine plant taxa listed in 1997 as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act, because of declines related to nearly 150 years of ranching on the island. Feral livestock were removed from the island as a major conservation step, which was part of a program completed in early 2007 with the eradication of pigs and turkeys. For the first time in more than a century, the rare plants of Santa Cruz Island have a chance to recover in the wild. This study provides survey information and living plant materials needed for recovery management of the listed taxa. We developed a database containing information about historical collections of the nine taxa and used it to plan a survey strategy. Our objectives were to relocate as many of the previously known populations as possible, with emphasis on documenting sites not visited in several decades, sites that were poorly documented in the historical record, and sites spanning the range of environmental conditions inhabited by the taxa. From 2003 through 2006, we searched for and found 39 populations of the taxa, indicating that nearly 80 percent of the populations known earlier in the 1900s still existed. Most populations are small and isolated, occupying native-dominated habitat patches in a highly fragmented and invaded landscape; they are still at risk of declining through population losses. Most are not expanding beyond the edges of their habitat patches. However, most taxa appeared to have good seed production and a range of size classes in populations, indicating a good capacity for plant recruitment and population growth in these restricted sites. For these taxa, seed collection and outplanting might be a good strategy to increase numbers of populations for species recovery. Several taxa have particular problems evidenced by lack of fruit set, very small population sizes, or unstable habitats. We collected seeds of all but two taxa for seed banking, and live cuttings of two clonal shrubs for cultivation at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. The survey data, seeds and cuttings provide a baseline and a foundation for planning, conducting, and tracking recovery of the nine federally listed plant taxa of Santa Cruz Island.

  1. Race, Urban Context, and Russian Roulette: Findings from the National Violent Death Reporting System, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Ira; Stack, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Previous work on Russian roulette has focused on data from large cities. It is unclear if the epidemiological patterns based on large cities will replicate for the nation as a whole, and if the influence of minority status will be moderated by urban context. The present investigation fills these gaps by providing descriptive epidemiological data…

  2. Using emergency department data to conduct dog and animal bite surveillance in New York City, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Brooke; Slavinski, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Most animal bites in the United States are due to dogs, with approximately 4.7 million reports per year. Surveillance for dog and other animal bites requires a substantial investment of time and resources, and underreporting is common. We described the use and findings of electronic hospital emergency department (ED) chief complaint data to characterize patients and summarize trends in people treated for dog and other animal bites in New York City (NYC) EDs between 2003 and 2006. Retrospective data were obtained from the syndromic surveillance system at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. We used a statistical program to identify chief complaint free-text fields as one of four categories of animal bites. We evaluated descriptive statistics and univariate associations on the available demographic data. The findings were also compared with data collected through the existing passive reporting animal bite surveillance system. During the study period, more than 6,000 animal bite patient visits were recorded per year. The proportion of visits for animal bites did not appear to change over time. Dog bites accounted for more than 70% and cat bites accounted for 13% of animal bite patient visits. Demographic characteristics of patients were similar to those identified in NYC's passive surveillance system. Our findings suggest that the use of ED data offers a simple, less resource-intensive, and sustainable way of conducting animal bite surveillance and a novel use of syndromic surveillance data. However, it cannot replace traditional surveillance used to manage individual patients for potential rabies exposures.

  3. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

  4. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease: prospective European case-control ECCO-EpiCom study, 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D; D'Inca, R; Gionchetti, P; Panelli, M R; Ardizzone, S; Sanroman, A L; Gisbert, J P; Arena, I; Riegler, G; Marrollo, M; Valpiani, D; Corbellini, A; Segato, S; Castiglione, F; Munkholm, P

    2011-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies. To evaluate the pregnancy outcome in patients with IBD in a prospective European multicentre case-control study. Inflammatory bowel disease pregnant women from 12 European countries were enrolled between January 2003 and December 2006 and matched (1:1) to non-IBD pregnant controls by age at conception and number of previous pregnancies. Data on pregnancy and newborn outcome, disease activity and therapy were prospectively collected every third month using a standard questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis with odds ratio was used for statistical analyses. P valuedisease (CD) and 187 with ulcerative colitis (UC). Median age (range) at conception was 31 years (15-40) in CD and 31 (19-42) in UC patients. No statistically significant differences in frequency of abortions, preterm deliveries, caesarean sections, congenital abnormalities and birth weight were observed comparing CD and UC women with their non-IBD controls. In CD, older age was associated with congenital abnormalities and preterm delivery; smoking increased the risk of preterm delivery. For UC, older age and active disease were associated with low birth weight; while older age and combination therapy were risk factors for preterm delivery. In this prospective case-control study, women with either Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis have a similar pregnancy outcome when compared with a population of non-inflammatory bowel disease pregnant women. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. [Malaria among women aged 10 to 49 years, according to SIVEP-Malaria, Manaus, State of Amazonas, 2003-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Lesliane Balbino de; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale; Martinez-Espinosa, Flor Ernestina

    2010-01-01

    The SIVEP-Malaria Epidemiological Surveillance Information System has been in use for notification of malaria cases diagnosed in Brazil since 2003. This study analyzed malaria cases notified among women aged 10 to 49 years between 2003 and 2006, according to the presence or absence of pregnancy. Authorization to evaluate the data was requested from the Health Surveillance Foundation (FVS). Over this period, 13,308 malaria cases were notified, of which 815 (6.1%) were among pregnant women. There was a gradual decrease in the absolute numbers of cases among pregnant and non-pregnant women. Regarding species, 14.3% of the notified cases were caused by Plasmodium falciparum; 85% by Plasmodium vivax and 0.6 % by both of them. The frequency of Plasmodium falciparum infection was greater among pregnant women than among non-pregnant women (p > 0.05). Although most of the cases lived in the eastern zone of the city, the western zone appeared to be the likely location of infection in 39% of the cases. Endemic peaks of malaria in July and August were observed among the non-pregnant women in all four years analyzed. The data showed that SIVEP-Malaria was an important tool for determining the distribution of malaria cases and that it should be used for controlling the endemic disease. However, the data from its first four years of operation showed that the quality was compromised by data entry failures, using the field of notification of pregnancy as an example.

  6. Monitoreo del glaciar horcones inferior y sus termokarst, antes y durante el surge de 2003-2006: Andes centrales argentinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Lenzano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se expone el monitoreo de termokarts glaciarios y su relación e interacción con los eventos surges ocurridos en el glaciar cubierto Horcones Inferior (GHI. Este glaciar se encuentra ubicado a los 32º 41'S y 69º 57'W, al pie de la pared sur del C° Aconcagua, Parque Provincial Aconcagua, en la Provincia de Mendoza, Argentina. El estudio fue llevado a cabo a través de la implementación de métodos indirectos de detección utilizando imágenes de los sensores Landsat y Aster durante el período 1997-2006. En el Glaciar Horcones Inferior "GHI", la superficie ocupada por los termokarst alcanza valores que varían entre el 4.3% y el 0% de la superficie total del glaciar, al finalizar un evento de surge. Las velocidades registradas en la superficie del glaciar cubierto arrojaron valores promedios entre 0.4 y 12 m/día. La metodología aplicada, con imágenes satelitales históricas, representa una herramienta fundamental para separar períodos de flujo glaciario catastróficos y no catastróficos.This work analyses the temporal evolution of thermokarst and their relationship to the surges in a reconstituted debris covered glacier. The glacier Horcones Inferior is located at Lat 32º 41' S and Long 69º 57' W in the Provincial Park Aconcagua, Mendoza, Argentina, on the foot of the Aconcagua massif. The study and monitoring of the thermokarst was carried out applying indirect methods using Landsat and Aster images from 1997-2006. Detected percentages of thermokarst, in relation to the total glacial area, showed that they varied between 4.3% to 0% at the end of the surge event. The registered speeds of the glacier -on the glacial surface- reached averages of between 0.4 and 12 m/d. This methodology, with historical images from archives, represents a fundamental tool to separate catastrophic and non-catastrophic glacial flow periods.

  7. Occurrence of organic wastewater-indicator compounds in urban streams of the Atlanta area, Georgia, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Stephen J.; LaFontaine, Jacob H.

    2010-01-01

    Between March 2003 and January 2006, 863 water samples were collected from streams in seven urban watersheds with varying land uses within or near the City of Atlanta, Georgia. Sixty-four sampling sites representing three site types were established in those watersheds. The first type consisted of sites within three watersheds not affected by combined sewer overflows; these were designated as the control basins. The second and third site types were established in four watersheds and were designated as sites upstream or downstream from combined sewer outfalls.

  8. Estudio descriptivo de la enfermedad cerebrovascular en el Hospital Regional Docente de Ica-Perú 2003 - 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jhonnel Alarco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo, Determinar algunas características epidemiológicas de la enfermedad cerebro vascular (ECV, describir las características de la población estudiada según sexo, edad, procedencia, raza, forma de inicio, ubicación, tipos y subtipos, síntomas, antecedentes patológicos y mortalidad intrahospitalaria. Materiales y métodos, estudio descriptivo. Lugar, Hospital Regional Docente de Ica. Criterios de inclusión, pacientes ingresados con diagnóstico de accidente cerebrovascular. Intervenciones, revisión de historias clínicas de archivo entre los años 2003 y 2006 Principales medidas de resultados, análisis estadístico, porcentajes y medidas de tendencia central, tabuladas en una base de datos con ayuda del programa Microsoft Excel 2003 para Windows®. Resultados, de 152 pacientes ingresados al servicio de Medicina 119 fueron casos de ECV isquémico, 33 casos fueron ECV hemorrágico. El principal antecedente patológico fue la hipertensión arterial con un 75.0 %. El síntoma más frecuente fue el trastorno motor con 80.3% seguido por alteraciones del lenguaje con 55.9%. El mayor número fue encontrado entre la séptima y octava décadas de la vida. La edad mínima fue de 17 y máxima de 102 años. La mortalidad global fue de 18 casos obteniéndose una tasa de letalidad específica para el ECV isquémico de 0,8% y de 51,5% para el ECV hemorrágico. Conclusiones: Se distingue a la HTA como el principal antecedente modificable, cuya prevención reduciría notablemente su mortalidad.

  9. LBA-ECO LC-02 Hot Pixel Fire Indicator Data for Tri-national MAP Region: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires, that were detected by various satellites in the tri-national MAP region (Madre de Dios-Peru,...

  10. LBA-ECO LC-02 Hot Pixel Fire Indicator Data for Tri-national MAP Region: 2003-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides hot pixel data, as an indicator of fires, that were detected by various satellites in the tri-national MAP region (Madre de...

  11. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    Chapter 1. Measurement 1. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2. Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. 2 Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3. Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the desert plains? 3-1 What Is Physics? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4. Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5. Force and Motion--I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to .y the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6. Force and Motion--II. Can a

  12. Chapter 29: Using an Existing Environment in the VO (IDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. J.

    The local environment of a Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) can provide insight into the (still not understood) formation process of the BCG itself. BCGs are the most massive galaxies in the Universe, and their formation and evolution are a popular and current research topic (Linden et al. 2006, Bernardi et al. 2006, Lauer et al. 2006). They have been studied for some time (Sandage 1972, Ostriker & Tremaine 1975, White 1976, Thuan & Romanishin 1981, Merritt 1985, Postman and Lauer 1995, among many others). Our goal in this chapter is to study how the local environment can affect the physical and measurable properties of BCGs. We will conduct an exploratory research exercise. In this chapter, we will show how the Virtual Observatory (VO) can be effectively utilized for doing modern scientific research on BCGs. We identify the scientific functionalities we need, the datasets we require, and the service locations in order to discover and access those data. This chapter utilizes IDL's VOlib, which is described in Chapter 24 of this book and is available at http://www.nvo.noao.edu. IDL provides the capability to perform the entire range of astronomical scientific analyses in one environment: from image reduction and analysis to complex catalog manipulations, statistics, and publication quality figures. At the 2005 and 2006 NVO Summer Schools, user statistics show that IDL was the most commonly used programming language by the students (nearly 3-to-1 over languages like IRAF, Perl, and Python). In this chapter we show how the integration of IDL to the VO through VOlib provides even greater capabilities and possibilities for conducting science in the era of the Virtual Observatory. The reader should familiarize themselves with the VOlib libraries before attempting the examples in this tutorial. We first build a research plan. We then discover the service URLs we will need to access the data. We then apply the necessary functions and tools to these data before we can do our

  13. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 1.Measurement. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2.Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3.Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the deser t plains? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4.Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5.Force and Motion-I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to fly the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6.Force and Motion-II. Can a Grand Prix race car be driven

  14. Chapter Leadership Profiles among Citizen Activists in the Drunk Driving Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerleider, Steven; Bloch, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Study of Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) analyzed the chapter emphasis, levels of satisfaction and relationship to national office on several measures. Surveying 212 chapters, MADD leadership provided profile of independent, autonomous activists in the drunk driving countermeasure movement. (Author)

  15. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 3 (Chapters 22-33)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-03-01

    Chapter 21. Electric Charge. Why do video monitors in surgical rooms increase the risk of bacterial contamination? 21-1 What Is Physics? 21-2 Electric Charge. 21-3 Conductors and Insulators. 21-4 Coulomb's Law. 21-5 Charge Is Quantized. 21-6 Charge Is Conserved. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 22. Electric Fields. What causes sprites, those brief .ashes of light high above lightning storms? 22-1 What Is Physics? 22-2 The Electric Field. 22-3 Electric Field Lines. 22-4 The Electric Field Due to a Point Charge. 22-5 The Electric Field Due to an Electric Dipole. 22-6 The Electric Field Due to a Line of Charge. 22-7 The Electric Field Due to a Charged Disk. 22-8 A Point Charge in an Electric Field. 22-9 A Dipole in an Electric Field. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 23. Gauss' Law. How can lightning harm you even if it do es not strike you? 23-1 What Is Physics? 23-2 Flux. 23-3 Flux of an Electric Field. 23-4 Gauss' Law. 23-5 Gauss' Law and Coulomb's Law. 23-6 A Charged Isolated Conductor. 23-7 Applying Gauss' Law: Cylindrical Symmetry. 23-8 Applying Gauss' Law: Planar Symmetry. 23-9 Applying Gauss' Law: Spherical Symmetry. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 24. Electric Potential. What danger does a sweater pose to a computer? 24-1 What Is Physics? 24-2 Electric Potential Energy. 24-3 Electric Potential. 24-4 Equipotential Surfaces. 24-5 Calculating the Potential from the Field. 24-6 Potential Due to a Point Charge. 24-7 Potential Due to a Group of Point Charges. 24-8 Potential Due to an Electric Dipole. 24-9 Potential Due to a Continuous Charge Distribution. 24-10 Calculating the Field from the Potential. 24-11 Electric Potential Energy of a System of Point Charges. 24-12 Potential of a Charged Isolated Conductor. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 25. Capacitance. How did a fire start in a stretcher being withdrawn from an oxygen chamber? 25-1 What Is Physics? 25-2 Capacitance. 25-3 Calculating the Capacitance. 25

  16. Additive Similarity Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  17. Climate change and the Rocky Mountains: Chapter 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James M.; Fagre, Daniel B.; MacDonald, Ryan; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2014-01-01

    For at least half of the year, the Rocky Mountains are shrouded in snow that feeds a multitude of glaciers. Snow and ice eventually melt into rivers that have eroded deep valleys that contain rich aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Because the Rocky Mountains are the major divide on the continent, rainfall and melt water from glaciers and snowfields feed major river systems that run to the Pacific, Atlantic, and Arctic oceans. The Rockies truly are the water tower for much of North America, and part of the Alpine backbone of North and South America. For purposes of this chapter, we limit our discussion to the Rocky Mountains of the Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, and the U.S. states of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Colorado. Similar to other mountain systems, the altitude of the Rocky Mountains condenses the weather, climate and ecosystems of thousands of kilometres of latitude into very short vertical distances. In one good day, a strong hiker can journey by foot from the mid-latitude climates of the great plains of North America to an arctic climate near the top of Rocky Mountain peaks. The steep climatic gradients of mountain terrain create some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, but it is those rapid changes in microclimate and ecology that make mountains sensitive to climate change. The energy budget in mountains varies dramatically not only with elevation but with slope and aspect. A modest change in the slope of the terrain over short distances may radically change the solar radiation available in that location. Shaded or north facing slopes have very different microclimates than the same elevations in a sunlit location, or for a hill slope facing south. The complexities associated with the mountain terrain of the Rockies compound complexities of weather and climate to create diverse, amazing ecosystems. This chapter addresses the impacts of climate change on Rocky Mountain ecosystems in light of their complexities and

  18. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 2 (Chapters 12-20)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 12 Equilibrium and Elasticity. What injury can occur to a rock climber hanging by a crimp hold? 12-1 What Is Physics? 12-2 Equilibrium. 12-3 The Requirements of Equilibrium. 12-4 The Center of Gravity. 12-5 Some Examples of Static Equilibrium. 12-6 Indeterminate Structures. 12-7 Elasticity. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 13 Gravitation. What lies at the center of our Milky Way galaxy? 13-1 What Is Physics? 13-2 Newton's Law of Gravitation. 13-3 Gravitation and the Principle of Superposition. 13-4 Gravitation Near Earth's Surface. 13-5 Gravitation Inside Earth. 13-6 Gravitational Potential Energy. 13-7 Planets and Satellites: Kepler's Laws. 13-8 Satellites: Orbits and Energy. 13-9 Einstein and Gravitation. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 14 Fluids. What causes ground effect in race car driving? 14-1 What Is Physics? 14-2 What Is a Fluid? 14-3 Density and Pressure. 14-4 Fluids at Rest. 14-5 Measuring Pressure. 14-6 Pascal's Principle. 14-7 Archimedes' Principle. 14-8 Ideal Fluids in Motion. 14-9 The Equation of Continuity. 14-10 Bernoulli's Equation. Review & SummaryQuestionsProblems. Chapter 15 Oscillations. What is the "secret" of a skilled diver's high catapult in springboard diving? 15-1 What Is Physics? 15-2 Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-3 The Force Law for Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-4 Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-5 An Angular Simple Harmonic Oscillator. 15-6 Pendulums. 15-7 Simple Harmonic Motion and Uniform Circular Motion. 15-8 Damped Simple Harmonic Motion. 15-9 Forced Oscillations and Resonance. Review & Summary Questions Problems. Chapter 16 Waves--I. How can a submarine wreck be located by distant seismic stations? 16-1 What Is Physics? 16-2 Types of Waves. 16-3 Transverse and Longitudinal Waves. 16-4 Wavelength and Frequency. 16-5 The Speed of a Traveling Wave. 16-6 Wave Speed on a Stretched String. 16-7 Energy and Power of a Wave Traveling Along a String. 16-8 The Wave Equation. 16-9 The Principle of Superposition

  19. 106-17 Telemetry Standards Chapter 7 Packet Telemetry Downlink

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Figure 7-22. PTFR Payload Structure .................................................................................... 7-13 Figure 7-23. Start of...Acronyms IP Internet Protocol IPv4 Internet Protocol, Version 4 IPv6 Internet Protocol, Version 6 LLP low-latency PTDP MAC media access control...o 4’b0101: PT Internet Protocol (IP) Packet o 4’b0110: PT Chapter 24 TmNSMessage Packet o 4’b0111 – 4’b1111: Reserved • Fragment (bits 17 – 16

  20. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection Task started the development of a real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record for the additive manufacturing process using infrared camera imaging and processing techniques. This project will benefit additive manufacturing by providing real-time inspection of internal geometry that is not currently possible and reduce the time and cost of additive manufactured parts with automated real-time dimensional inspections which deletes post-production inspections.

  1. [Food additives and healthiness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  2. Chapter 24: Computational modeling of self-organized spindle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Stuart C; José, Jorge V

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide a derivation and computational details of a biophysical model we introduced to describe the self-organized mitotic spindle formation properties in the chromosome dominated pathway studied in Xenopus meiotic extracts. The mitotic spindle is a biological structure composed of microtubules. This structure forms the scaffold on which mitosis and cytokinesis occurs. Despite the seeming mechanical simplicity of the spindle itself, its formation and the way in which it is used in mitosis and cytokinesis is complex and not fully understood. Biophysical modeling of a system as complex as mitosis requires contributions from biologists, biochemists, mathematicians, physicists, and software engineers. This chapter is written for biologists and biochemists who wish to understand how biophysical modeling can complement a program of biological experimentation. It is also written for a physicist, computer scientist, or mathematician unfamiliar with this class of biological physics model. We will describe how we built such a mathematical model and its numerical simulator to obtain results that agree with many of the results found experimentally. The components of this system are large enough to be described in terms of coarse-grained approximations. We will discuss how to properly model such systems and will suggest effective tradeoffs between reliability, simulation speed, and accuracy. At all times we have in mind the realistic biophysical properties of the system we are trying to model.

  3. Chapter 12: the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter provides an itinerary of knowledge on nervous system anatomy as one of the pillars of clinical neurology. The journey starts from the Renaissance explosion on the approach to the human body, its functions and its diseases, dealing with the seminal contributions of Leonardo da Vinci and Vesalius. The itinerary proceeds through the contributions of the 17th century, especially by Thomas Willis and the pioneering investigations of Marcello Malpighi and Antony van Leeuwenhoek, and onto the 18th century. The itinerary thus leads to the progress from gross anatomy to the microscopic investigation of the nervous system in the 19th century: the reticular theories, the revolution of the neural doctrine and their protagonists (Camillo Golgi and Santiago Ramón y Cajal), which initiated the modern era of the neurosciences. The chapter also includes sections on the contributions of developmental neuroanatomy to neurology, on the history of tract tracing, and on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebral cortex. The never-ending story of the anatomical foundations of clinical neurology continues to evolve at the dawn of the 21st century, including knowledge that guides deep brain stimulation, and novel approaches to the anatomy of the living brain based on rapidly developing neuroimaging technology.

  4. Experiences gained by establishing the IAMG Student Chapter Freiberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Sebastian M.; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Shahzad, Faisal

    2013-04-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG) Student Chapter Freiberg was founded in 2007 at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) in Germany by national and international graduate and undergraduate students of various geoscientific as well as natural science disciplines. The major aim of the IAMG is to promote international cooperation in the application and use of Mathematics in Geosciences research and technology. The IAMG encourages all types of students and young scientists to found and maintain student chapters, which can even receive limited financial support by the IAMG. Following this encouragement, generations of students at TUBAF have build up and established a prosperous range of activities. These might be an example and an invitation for other young scientists and institutions worldwide to run similar activities. We, some of the current and former students behind the student chapter, have organised talks, membership drives, student seminars, guest lectures, several short courses and even international workshops. Some notable short courses were held by invited IAMG distinguished lecturers. The topics included "Statistical analysis in the Earth Sciences using R - a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics", "Geomathematical Natural Resource Modeling" and "Introduction to Geostatistics for Environmental Applications and Natural Resources Evaluation: Basic Concepts and Examples". Furthermore, we conducted short courses by ourselves. Here, the topics included basic introductions into MATLAB, object oriented programming concepts for geoscientists using MATLAB and an introduction to the Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Most of those short courses lasted several days and provided an excellent and unprecedented teaching experience for us. We were given credit by attending students for filling gaps in our university's curriculum by providing in-depth and hands-on tutorials on topics, which were merely

  5. Additives in yoghurt production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milna Tudor

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In yoghurt production, mainly because of sensory characteristics, different types of additives are used. Each group, and also each substance from the same group has different characteristics and properties. For that reason, for improvement of yoghurt sensory characteristics apart from addition selection, the quantity of the additive is very important. The same substance added in optimal amount improves yoghurt sensory attributes, but too small or too big addition can reduce yoghurt sensory attributes. In this paper, characteristics and properties of mostly used additives in yoghurt production are described; skimmed milk powder, whey powder, concentrated whey powder, sugars and artificial sweeteners, fruits, stabilizers, casein powder, inulin and vitamins. Also the impact of each additive on sensory and physical properties of yoghurt, syneresis and viscosity, are described, depending on used amount added in yoghurt production.

  6. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  7. Streamflow and fluvial sediment transport in Pool C, restored section of the Kissimmee River: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Joann; Gellis, Allen C.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Pearman, J. Leroy; Garfield, Ursula; Schenk, Edward R.; Rasmussen, Jim; Habermehl, Philip J.; Mossa, Joann; Valdes, Jose

    2009-01-01

    The Kissimmee River Restoration Project was authorized by Congress in 1992 to restore more than 64 km2 (square kilometers) of river/floodplain ecosystem including 69 km of meandering river channel and 10,900 hectares (ha) of wetlands. Although biologic monitoring is an integral and active part of the Kissimmee River restoration, by 2007 geomorphic monitoring that included sediment transport was lacking. In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into a cooperative agreement with the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) to determine sediment transport characteristics of the restored section of the Kissimmee River in Pool C. Sediment transport characteristics that are monitored include suspended-sediment concentrations and loads, bedload, and bed material. In addition, the organic content of suspended sediment and bedload was determined. This chapter describes methods and results of the sediment transport monitoring from July 2007 through September 2008 in the Kissimmee River in Pool C.

  8. Chapter 13: Assessing Persistence and Other Evaluation Issues Cross-Cutting Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Violette, Daniel M. [Navigant, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Addressing other evaluation issues that have been raised in the context of energy efficiency programs, this chapter focuses on methods used to address the persistence of energy savings, which is an important input to the benefit/cost analysis of energy efficiency programs and portfolios. In addition to discussing 'persistence' (which refers to the stream of benefits over time from an energy efficiency measure or program), this chapter provides a summary treatment of these issues -Synergies across programs -Rebound -Dual baselines -Errors in variables (the measurement and/or accuracy of input variables to the evaluation).

  9. Binaural additivity of loudness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levelt, W.J.M.; Riemersma, J.B.; Bunt, A.A.

    1972-01-01

    A definition of binaural additivity is given in terms of the theory of simultaneous conjoint measurement. Additivity is then tested and verified by a conjoint measurement procedure. Methods for deriving psychophysical scales from such procedures are discussed, and the experimental scales are

  10. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On the design of novel multifunctional materials by using particulate additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnigan, Ross Daniel

    This thesis has been organized into five chapters. The main focus of this thesis is to design novel multifunctional materials by using particulate additives. Chapter 1 is devoted to reviewing recent studies in additive manufacturing (AM) and other background information. In Chapter 2, the synthesis and characterization of novel Ti3SiC2-reinforced Zn-matrix composites is reported. During this study, all the Zn composites were hot pressed at 500°C for 5 min at a uniaxial pressure of ~150 MPa. Microstructure analysis by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and phase analysis by XRD (X-ray Diffraction) confirmed that there was minimal interfacial reaction between Ti3SiC 2 particles and the Zn matrix. The addition of Ti3SiC 2 improved the tribological performance of these composites against alumina substrates but did not have any beneficial effect on the mechanical performance. The addition of Ti3SiC2 particulates to metal and polymer matrices show interesting properties. Chapter 3 will focus on additive manufacturing of Ti3SiC2 particulates in a polymer matrix. Waste materials are a big problem in the world. Chapters 4 and 5 focus on recycling materials. The mechanical and tribological properties of the Resin-Nylon and ResinPolyester composites are reported, respectively.

  12. Chapter 3 – VPPD-Lab: The Chemical Product Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalakul, Sawitree; Cignitti, Stefano; Zhang, L.

    2017-01-01

    Computer-aided methods and tools for current and future product–process design and development need to manage problems requiring efficient handling of models, data, and knowledge from different sources and at different times and size scales. In this chapter, a systematic model-based framework...... for computer-aided chemical product design and evaluation, implemented in the software called VPPD-Lab, is presented. In the same way a typical process simulator works, the VPPD-Lab allows users to: (1) analyze chemical-based products by performing virtual experiments (product property and performance...... calculations), (2) predict the properties of products, and (3) create new product property and product performance models when needed. However, unlike process simulators, VPPD-Lab can also be used directly for (1) design of chemicals based products using design templates for various types of products...

  13. Rehabilitating sea otters: Feeling good versus being effective; Chapter 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Kareiva, Peter; Marvier, Michelle; Silliman, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This chapter examines the complexities of assessing the merits and drawbacks of wildlife rehabilitation. Wildlife rehabilitation is often costly, and the resulting benefits differ depending on whether one’s interest is in the welfare of individual animals or conserving populations. Two examples of this dilemma include the rehabilitation of oiled sea otters following the Exxon Valdez spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska, and the rehabilitation of stranded sea otter pups in central California. In the first example, substantial financial investment resulted in little or no benefits for population conservation. In the second example, the potential for population-level benefits is context dependent: in populations near carrying capacity the conservation impacts are negligible, whereas in isolated, low-density populations rehabilitation and release can be an effective conservation tool. Wildlife rehabilitation is valued by people for various reasons, but recognizing and acknowledging the difference between individual and population welfare is an important step toward effective wildlife conservation.

  14. NASA's MERBoard: An Interactive Collaborative Workspace Platform. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Jay; Wales, Roxana; Gossweiler, Rich

    2003-01-01

    This chapter describes the ongoing process by which a multidisciplinary group at NASA's Ames Research Center is designing and implementing a large interactive work surface called the MERBoard Collaborative Workspace. A MERBoard system involves several distributed, large, touch-enabled, plasma display systems with custom MERBoard software. A centralized server and database back the system. We are continually tuning MERBoard to support over two hundred scientists and engineers during the surface operations of the Mars Exploration Rover Missions. These scientists and engineers come from various disciplines and are working both in small and large groups over a span of space and time. We describe the multidisciplinary, human-centered process by which this h4ERBoard system is being designed, the usage patterns and social interactions that we have observed, and issues we are currently facing.

  15. Chapter I: ultrafast magnetization dynamics on the nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenspach, R. [IBM Lab, Rueschlikon, (Switzerland); Back, Ch. [Universitaet Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Brune, H.; Ronnow, H. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Eisebitt, S. [BESSY - Berliner Elektronen-Speicherring - Gesellschaft fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, Berlin (Germany); Fraile Rodriguez, A.; Kenzelmann, M.; Nolting, F. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Gambardella, P. [Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia (ICN), Barcelona (Spain); Hertel, R. [Forschungszentrum, Juelich (Germany); Vaterlaus, A.; Kenzelmann, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ), Zuerich (Switzerland); Klaeui, M.; Nowak, U. [Universitaet Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    The whole report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at the scientific opportunities offered by the institute's SwissFEL X-ray Laser facility. In this third part, temporal spin behaviour in magnetic solids at short-length scales is discussed. The SwissFEL, with its coherent, high-brightness, circularly polarised X-rays at energies resonant with the 3d-transition metal ions, corresponding to nm wavelengths, is capable of single-shot lens-less imaging of nanometer-scale magnetic structures. This comprehensive chapter takes a look at time and length scales in magnetism, the ultra-fast manipulation of the magnetisation, various laser-induced phenomena as well as instabilities in low-dimensional magnetism. Various cases including the zero-dimensional case are discussed

  16. Chapter 10.3: Reliability and Durability of PV Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2017-01-07

    Each year the world invests tens of billions of dollars or euros in PV systems with the expectation that these systems will last approximately 25 years. Although the disciplines of reliability, quality, and service life prediction have been well established for numerous products, a full understanding of these is currently challenging for PV modules because the desired service lifetimes are decades, preventing direct verification of lifetime predictions. A number of excellent reviews can be found in the literature summarizing the types of failures that are commonly observed for PV modules. This chapter discusses key failure/degradation mechanisms selected to highlight how the kinetics of failure rates can and cannot be confidently predicted. For EVA-encapsulated modules, corrosion is observed to follow delamination, which then allows water droplets to directly contact the metallization. Extended test protocols such as Qualification Plus were created to address the known problems while standards groups update standard tests through the consensus process.

  17. Observations. Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground. Chapter 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, P.; Ren, J.; Alley, R.B.; Allison, I.; Carrasco, J.; Flato, G.; Fujii, Y.; Kaser, G.; Mote, P.; Thomas, R.H.; Zhang, T.

    2007-09-15

    In the climate system, the cryosphere (which consists of snow, river and lake ice, sea ice, glaciers and ice caps, ice shelves and ice sheets, and frozen ground) is intricately linked to the surface energy budget, the water cycle, sea level change and the surface gas exchange. The cryosphere integrates climate variations over a wide range of time scales, making it a natural sensor of climate variability and providing a visible expression of climate change. In the past, the cryosphere has undergone large variations on many time scales associated with ice ages and with shorter-term variations like the Younger Dryas or the Little Ice Age (see Chapter 6). Recent decreases in ice mass are correlated with rising surface air temperatures. This is especially true for the region north of 65N, where temperatures have increased by about twice the global average from 1965 to 2005.

  18. Chapter 11: Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Generation and Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard; Yu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-05-18

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) power generation is a relatively new type of renewable generation. Predecessors such as wind power generation, hydropower plant generation, geothermal generation, photovoltaic generation, and solar thermal generation have gained a lot of attention because of their successful implementation. The successful integration of renewable generation into the electric power grid has energized the power system global communities to take the lessons learned, innovations, and market structure to focus on the large potential of MHK to also contribute to the pool of renewable energy generation. This chapter covers the broad spectrum of MHK generation. The state-of-the-art power takeoff methods will be discussed. Types of electrical generators will be presented, and the options for implementation will be presented.

  19. Archiving and access systems for remote sensing: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.; Percivall, George; Baros, Shirley; Baumann, Peter; Becker, Peter H.; Behnke, J.; Benedict, Karl; Colaiacomo, Lucio; Di, Liping; Doescher, Chris; Dominguez, J.; Edberg, Roger; Ferguson, Mark; Foreman, Stephen; Giaretta, David; Hutchison, Vivian; Ip, Alex; James, N.L.; Khalsa, Siri Jodha S.; Lazorchak, B.; Lewis, Adam; Li, Fuqin; Lymburner, Leo; Lynnes, C.S.; Martens, Matt; Melrose, Rachel; Morris, Steve; Mueller, Norman; Navale, Vivek; Navulur, Kumar; Newman, D.J.; Oliver, Simon; Purss, Matthew; Ramapriyan, H.K.; Rew, Russ; Rosen, Michael; Savickas, John; Sixsmith, Joshua; Sohre, Tom; Thau, David; Uhlir, Paul; Wang, Lan-Wei; Young, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Focuses on major developments inaugurated by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites, the Group on Earth Observations System of Systems, and the International Council for Science World Data System at the global level; initiatives at national levels to create data centers (e.g. the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Distributed Active Archive Centers and other international space agency counterparts), and non-government systems (e.g. Center for International Earth Science Information Network). Other major elements focus on emerging tool sets, requirements for metadata, data storage and refresh methods, the rise of cloud computing, and questions about what and how much data should be saved. The sub-sections of the chapter address topics relevant to the science, engineering and standards used for state-of-the-art operational and experimental systems.

  20. The role of infectious disease in marine communities: chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew

    2014-01-01

    Marine ecologists recognize that infectious diseases play and important role in ocean ecosystems. This role may have increased in some host taxa over time (Ward and Lafferty 2004). We begin this chapter by introducing infectious agents and their relationships with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents with their hosts in marine systems. We then put infectious disease agents in the perspective of marine biodiversity and discuss the various factors that affect parasites. Specifically, we introduce some basin epidemiological concepts, including the effects of stress and free-living diversity on parasites. Following this, we give brief consideration to communities of parasites within their hosts, particularly as these can lead to general insights into community ecology. We also give examples of how infectious diseases affect host populations, scaling up to marine communities. Finally, we present examples of marine infectious disease that impair conservation and fisheries.

  1. Anatomy and physiology of plant conductive systems. Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, C.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models considered in the book are representations of the physical features and chemical reactions that define interactions between plants and their environment. By centering attention on equations, it is easy to lose sight of the intricate and complex nature of the problem. The particular chapter describes the anatomy of important plant features and briefly discuss some physiological principles that will help to visualize and perceive the conditions which are represented in the models. Because of the many competing interactions, the fate of chemicals in the soil/plant/air environment is not obvious. Models were thus developed to intelligently integrate available knowledge, to increase understanding of the complex interactions, to aid in presentation of plant functions, and to help make predictions about chemical fate.

  2. Chapter 3: Science and Pathways for Bending the Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Collins

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and land use are changing the radiative budget of the Earth and changing its climate. The negative impacts of this climate change on natural and human systems are already emergent. The solution is to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions altogether as soon as possible, but the rate at which these emissions can decrease is limited by human reliance on fossil fuels for energy and the infrastructural, socio-economic, and behavioral inertia of current systems around the world. In this chapter, we discuss the physical impacts as well as the many challenges and obstacles to ‘bending the curve’, and provide a framework of possible solutions.

  3. Additive and polynomial representations

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, David H; Suppes, Patrick

    1971-01-01

    Additive and Polynomial Representations deals with major representation theorems in which the qualitative structure is reflected as some polynomial function of one or more numerical functions defined on the basic entities. Examples are additive expressions of a single measure (such as the probability of disjoint events being the sum of their probabilities), and additive expressions of two measures (such as the logarithm of momentum being the sum of log mass and log velocity terms). The book describes the three basic procedures of fundamental measurement as the mathematical pivot, as the utiliz

  4. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  5. Addition of organic amendments contributes to C sequestration in trace element contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mar Montiel Rozas, María; Panettier, Marco; Madejón Rodríguez, Paula; Madejón Rodríguez, Engracia

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, the study of global C cycle and the different natural sinks of C have become especially important in a climate change context. Fluxes of C have been modified by anthropogenic activities and, presently, the global objective is the decrease of net CO2 emission. For this purpose, many studies are being conducted at local level for evaluate different C sequestration strategies. These techniques must be, in addition to safe in the long term, environmentally friendly. Restoration of contaminated and degraded areas is considered as a strategy for SOC sequestration. Our study has been carried out in the Guadiamar Green Corridor (Seville, Spain) affected by the Aznalcóllar mining accident. This accident occurred 16 years ago, due to the failure of the tailing dam which contained 4-5 million m3 of toxic tailings (slurry and acid water).The affected soils had a layer of toxic sludge containing heavy metals as As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Restoration techniques began to be applied just after the accident, including the removal of the toxic sludge and a variable layer of topsoil (10-30 cm) from the surface. In a second phase, in a specific area (experimental area) of the Green Corridor the addition of organic amendments (Biosolid compost (BC) and Leonardite (LE), a low grade coal rich in humic acids) was carried out to increase pH, organic matter and fertility in a soil which lost its richest layer during the clean-up operation. In our experimental area, half of the plots (A) received amendments for four years (2002, 2003, 2006 and 2007) whereas the other half (B) received amendments only for two years (2002-2003). To compare, plots without amendments were also established. Net balance of C was carried out using values of Water Soluble Carbon (WSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) for three years (2012, 2013 and 2015). To eliminate artificial changes carried out in the plots, amendment addition and withdrawal of biomass were taken into account to calculate balance of kg TOC

  6. The northern pike, a prized native but disastrous invasive: Chapter 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, David; Massengill, Robert L.; Sepulveda, Adam; Dunker, Kristine J.

    2018-01-01

    As the chapters in this book describe, the northern pike Esox lucius Linneaus, 1758 is a fascinating fish that plays an important ecological role in structuring aquatic communities (chapter 8), has the capacity to aid lake restoration efforts (chapter 11), and contributes substantially to local economies, both as a highlysought after sport fish (chapter 12) and as a commercial fishing resource (chapter 13). However, despite the magnificent attributes of this fish, there is another side to its story. Specifically, what happens when northern pike, a highly efficient predator, becomes established outside its natural range? To explore this question, this chapter will investigate observed consequences from many locations where northern pike (hereafter referred to as “pike”) have been introduced and discuss potential reasons why pike, under the right circumstances, can be considered an invasive species.

  7. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17. Chapter 21. Telemetry Network Standard Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Critical RF radio frequency RFC Request for Comment SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol TA test article TCP Transmission Control Protocol...IRIG 106 Chapter 27: Radio Frequency (RF) Network Access Layer This chapter defines the standard for managing the physical layer of RF links... Network Management This chapter defines the mechanisms and processes for managing RF links within the RF network . 21.2 Telemetry Network Standard

  8. Chapter A. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Strong Ground Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    1994-01-01

    (artificial fill and bay mud). These exceptional ground-motion data are used by the authors of the papers in this chapter to infer radiation characteristics of the earthquake source, identify dominant propagation characteristics of the Earth?s crust, quantify amplification characteristics of near-surface geologic deposits, develop general amplification factors for site-dependent building-code provisions, and revise earthquake-hazard assessments for the San Francisco Bay region. Interpretations of additional data recorded in well-instrumented buildings, dams, and freeway overpasses are provided in other chapters of this report.

  9. 26 CFR 31.3302(b)-1 - Additional credit against tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional credit against tax. 31.3302(b)-1...) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3302(b)-1 Additional...

  10. From additivity to synergism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Christian; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2014-01-01

    Interest in synergistic or antagonistic effects through mixture experiments has grown immensely over the past two decades, not the least within in pharmacology and toxicology. Several definitions of reference models exist; one commonly used reference model is concentration or dose addition, which...... assumes compounds, when administrated simultaneously, do not interfere with each other at the site of action. We focus on statistical modelling that allows evaluation of dose addition. We will describe several statistical approaches that are suitable for analysis mixture data where synergistic...... or antagonistic effects may be present. The statistical models are defined and explained and some of the approaches exemplified. Code in open-source software is provided....

  11. Alternative additives; Alternative additiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-15

    In this project a number of industrial and agricultural waste products have been characterised and evaluated in terms of alkali-getter performance. The intended use is for biomass-fired power stations aiming at reducing corrosion or slagging related problems. The following products have been obtained, characterised and evaluated: 1) Brewery draff 2) Danish de-gassed manure 3) Paper sludge 4) Moulding sand 5) Spent bleaching earth 6) Anorthosite 7) Sand 8) Clay-sludge. Most of the above alternative additive candidates are deemed unsuitable due to insufficient chemical effect and/or expensive requirements for pre-treatment (such as drying and transportation). 3 products were selected for full-scale testing: de-gassed manure, spent bleaching earth and clay slugde. The full scale tests were undertaken at the biomass-fired power stations in Koege, Slagelse and Ensted. Spent bleaching earth (SBE) and clay sludge were the only tested additive candidates that had a proven ability to react with KCl, to thereby reduce Cl-concentrations in deposits, and reduce the deposit flux to superheater tubes. Their performance was shown to nearly as good as commercial additives. De-gassed manure, however, did not evaluate positively due to inhibiting effects of Ca in the manure. Furthermore, de-gassed manure has a high concentration of heavy metals, which imposes a financial burden with regard to proper disposal of the ash by-products. Clay-sludge is a wet clay slurring, and drying and transportation of this product entails substantial costs. Spent bleaching does not require much pre-treatment and is therefore the most promising alternative additive. On the other hand, bleaching earth contains residual plant oil which means that a range of legislation relating to waste combustion comes into play. Not least a waste combustion fee of 330 DKK/tonne. For all alternative (and commercial) additives disposal costs of the increase ash by-products represents a significant cost. This is

  12. Alcohols as gasoline additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawetz, P.

    1982-12-01

    This paper showed that, when using alcohol octane-boosting additives to gasoline, one attains several goals at the same time: (a) there is an increased saving in petroleum crude, since the alcohol is not merely a substitute for gasoline but rather a substitute for the octane-boosting additives used in the manufacture of unleaded gasoline; and (b) the production of fermentation ethanol for a fuel purpose can help revitalize the agricultural sector in different economics systems, thus becoming a road to economic development.

  13. Additives in plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  14. Functional Additive Mixed Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheipl, Fabian; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Greven, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We propose an extensive framework for additive regression models for correlated functional responses, allowing for multiple partially nested or crossed functional random effects with flexible correlation structures for, e.g., spatial, temporal, or longitudinal functional data. Additionally, our framework includes linear and nonlinear effects of functional and scalar covariates that may vary smoothly over the index of the functional response. It accommodates densely or sparsely observed functional responses and predictors which may be observed with additional error and includes both spline-based and functional principal component-based terms. Estimation and inference in this framework is based on standard additive mixed models, allowing us to take advantage of established methods and robust, flexible algorithms. We provide easy-to-use open source software in the pffr() function for the R-package refund. Simulations show that the proposed method recovers relevant effects reliably, handles small sample sizes well and also scales to larger data sets. Applications with spatially and longitudinally observed functional data demonstrate the flexibility in modeling and interpretability of results of our approach. PMID:26347592

  15. Comparison of the ICAO Annex 16 Chapter 10 and Chapter 6 noise certification procedures on the basis of flight noise measurements of ten light propeller-driven aeroplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Helmut; Heller, Hanno

    1990-11-01

    Noise certification procedures were developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) for light propeller driven aeroplanes (with a take off mass not exceeding 9000 kg). The established procedure following ICAO Annex 16 chapter 6 requires the aeroplane to conduct four level flyers at a height of 300 m above a microphone with a maximum continuous power setting. This procedure is now replaced by a new procedure documented in Annex 16 as chapter 10 where the aircraft must conduct six take offs with maximum continuous power and fly over a microphone positioned 2.5 km past the point of brake release. In both procedures, the maximum A weighted flyover noise level is to be compared to an (aircraft mass dependent) noise limit; however, both procedures have different noise limits. A study was conducted where 10 propeller driven aeroplanes were measured according to both chapter 6 and chapter 10 in order to evaluate the relative practicability and noise stringency of both procedures.

  16. Additional Midline Biopsies of the Peripheral Zone Associated with the First Endorectal Standard Sextant Pattern Improves the Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Detection in Japanese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Norihito; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ogura, Yuji; Hayashi, Norio

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to estimate the improved accuracy of prostate cancer (PCa) detection resulting from additional midline biopsies of the peripheral zone in first standard biopsy. Patients were classified into 3 groups: 402 cases of sextant biopsies (1995-2002), 488 cases of 8-core biopsies with 2 additional midline biopsies (2003-2006), and 391 cases of 10-core biopsies with 4 additional midline biopsies (2007-2012). The positive rate of each number of biopsies and changes in positive rates associated with prostate specific antigen (PSA) ranges were estimated. The positive rate of core biopsy significantly improved with increasing numbers of core biopsies (30.1% for sextant, 43.4% for 8-core biopsies, and 53.1% for 10-core biopsies). The accuracy of biopsies for each PSA range also significantly improved (22.3% for sextant, 30.0% for 8-core biopsies, and 43.2% for 10-core biopsies in the PSA gray zone [4.01-10 ng/ml]; and 26.5% for sextant, 52.9% for 8-core biopsies, and 71.8% for 10-core biopsies in the intermediate PSA range [10.1-20 ng/ml]). In the 208 cases with positive results using the 10-core biopsy method, the distribution of Gleason scores did not differ between the sextant only group and the midline site only group. Additional midline biopsy was associated with improved accuracy of positive core biopsies in Japanese patients with a PSA range of 4.01-20 ng/ml. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. CHAPTER 6. Biomimetic Materials for Efficient Atmospheric Water Collection

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Lianbin

    2016-02-23

    Water scarcity is a severe problem in semi-arid desert regions, land-scarce countries and in countries with high levels of economic activity. In these regions, the collection of atmospheric water - for example, fog - is recognized as an important method of providing water. In nature, through millions of year evolution, some animals and plants in many of the arid regions have developed unique and highly efficient systems with delicate microstructures and composition for the purpose of fog collection to survive the harsh conditions. With the unique ability of fog collection, these creatures could readily cope with insufficient access to fresh water or lack of precipitation. These natural examples have inspired the design and fabrication of artificial fog collection materials and devices. In this chapter, we will first introduce some natural examples for their unique fog collection capability, and then give some examples of the bioinspired materials and devices that are fabricated artificially to mimic these natural creatures for the purpose of fog collection. We believe that the biomimetic strategy is one of the most promising routes for the design and fabrication of functional materials and devices for the solution of the global water crisis.

  18. Chapter 20: neurological illustration from photography to cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores iconography in neurology from the birth of photography up to the early medical applications of cinematography before 1914. The important visual part of neurological diagnosis explains why these techniques were adopted very early by neurologists. Duchenne published the first medical book illustrated with photographs of patients. The first and most famous photographic laboratory was created in Charcot's department, at the Salpêtrière in Paris, under the direction of Albert Londe. Londe published the first book dedicated to medical photography. The physiologist Marey and the photographer Muybridge, in association with neurologists, played key roles in the development of chronophotography and cinematography. Germany was the first country to welcome cinematography in a neurology department. Independently, neurologists began to film patients in other countries in Europe and in America. In 1905, Arthur Van Gehuchten (1861-1914), Belgian anatomist and neurologist, began systematically to film neurologic patients, with the intention of building up a complete neurological iconographic collection. This collection has survived and has been restored in the laboratory of the Royal Belgian Film Archive where the films are now safely stored in their vaults.

  19. Chapter 23: history of neuroendocrinology "the spring of primitive existence".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreier, Felix; Swaab, Dick F

    2010-01-01

    The history of neuroendocrinology is intimately related to one of the key questions, i.e. how does the brain manage to keep us alive and let our species survive? Neuroendocrinology, part of the answer to this question, is the discipline that studies hormone production by neurons, the sensitivity of neurons to hormones, and the dynamic, bidirectional interactions between neurons and endocrine glands. These interactions do not only occur through hormones, but are partly executed by the autonomic system that is regulated by the hypothalamus and that innervates not only the endocrine glands, but all our organs. The hypothalamus acts as a central integrator for endocrine, autonomic, and higher brain functions. The history of neuroendocrinology begins in 200 AD, with Galenus, who postulated that the brain excreted a residue from animal spirits (pituita), and continues into the last century, when researchers from different disciplines tried to understand how the brain regulates the vital functions of the body. Thanks to massive recent electronic publications of English and German scientific journals from the early 20th century we were able to rediscover fascinating articles, written in Europe before World War II, which showed that some of our most recent "innovative" concepts had in fact already been thought up some 50-100 years earlier. Apparently, World War II and the migration and exile of many researchers interrupted the development of concepts in this field and made rediscovery necessary. Our chapter gives an overview of the developments, both new and newly discovered.

  20. Chapter 48: history of neurology in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Paul B; Storey, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    In comparison with most Western countries, neurology as a recognized medical specialty has a relatively brief history in Australia: the national body for neurologists, the Australian (since 2006: and New Zealand) Association of Neurologists, was founded only in 1950. The development of neurology in both countries was heavily influenced by British neurology, and until recently a period in the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London was regarded as essential to specialist training in neurology. Nevertheless, Australians have made significant contributions to international neurology since the early 20th century, commencing with the neuroanatomical research of the colorful expatriate Grafton Elliot Smith (1871-1937). Other Australian physicians who attracted early international attention through their work in clinical neuroscience included William John Adie (1886-1935), the anatomist John Irvine Hunter (1898-1924) and the surgeon Norman Royle (1888-1944). The first Australian physician to unambiguously commit himself to neurology was Alfred Walter Campbell (1868-1938), a remarkable personality who established an imposing reputation as neurocytologist and neuropathologist. The chapter provides a concise overview of the development of neurology as a clinical and academic specialty in Australia and New Zealand.

  1. Chapter 9: Cryogenics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, S.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 9 in High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Amon...

  2. The impact of climate change on coastal ecosystems: chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Virginia; Woodroffe, Colin D.; Nicholls, Robert J.; Forbes, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we stress two important features of coasts and coastal ecosystems. First, these are dynamic systems which continually undergo adjustments, especially through erosion and re-deposition, in response to a range of processes. Many coastal ecosystems adjust naturally at a range of time scales and their potential for response is examined partly by reconstructing how such systems have coped with natural changes of climate and sea level in the geological past. Second, coasts have changed profoundly through the 20th Century due to the impacts of human development (such as urbanisation, port and industrial expansion, shore protection, and the draining and conversion of coastal wetlands), with these development-related drivers closely linked to a growing global population and economy. It remains a challenge to isolate the impacts of climate change and sea-level rise from either the natural trajectory of shoreline change, or the accelerated pathway resulting from other human-related stressors. There exists a danger of overstating the importance of climate change, or overlooking significant interactions of climate change with other drivers.

  3. Chapter 4: neurology in the Bible and the Talmud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinsod, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The Bible, a major pillar of Western Civilization consists of Hebrew Scriptures, assembled over a millennium and accepted as of divine origin. The Talmud is a compendium of Jewish laws, covering every possible aspect of life, analyzed in depth from 200 BCE to 600 CE, becoming the foundation of Jewish existence. The all-encompassing character of the books provides numerous medical problems and observations that appear in various connotations. When in need to clarify various legal dilemmas, the Talmudic sages displayed astoundingly accurate anatomical knowledge and were pioneers in clinical-pathological correlations. The descriptions of "neurological" events in the Bible are very precise but show no evidence of neurological knowledge. Those reported in the various tractates of the Talmud are evidence of a substantial medical knowledge, marked by Hellenistic influence. Subjects such as head and spinal injuries, epilepsy, handedness neuralgias aphasia tinnitus and tremor were discussed in depth. This chapter is an updated collection of the studies, extracting observations and discussions of neurological manifestations from the ancient texts.

  4. Additive manufactured serialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbitt, III, John T.

    2017-04-18

    Methods for forming an identifying mark in a structure are described. The method is used in conjunction with an additive manufacturing method and includes the alteration of a process parameter during the manufacturing process. The method can form in a unique identifying mark within or on the surface of a structure that is virtually impossible to be replicated. Methods can provide a high level of confidence that the identifying mark will remain unaltered on the formed structure.

  5. Advances in Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-14

    Manufacturing session and provide a summary of work being performed in additive manufacturing by the Army, Air Force, and academia (Penn State University...Army Research Laboratory [ARL] and Air Force Research Laboratory [AFRL]) as well as academia (Penn State University’s Applied Research Laboratory...organic to the Warfighter, unmanned systems, networks , and robotics. Many of the materials and technologies needed to accomplish these goals are still

  6. Additive monitoring and interactions during copper electroprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Dale Wade

    The electrochemical deposition of copper has been a major focus of research for decades. Renewed interest in copper electroplating is not limited to the copper producers but is also a major concern of semiconductor manufacturers. The focus on copper electrochemistry by the semiconductor manufacturers has increased since IBM's announcement in 1997 that copper will be used for metallization in high speed/power semiconductors [1--3]. The desire to use copper instead of aluminum is simply a reflection on copper's superior conductivity (lower RC time constants) and resistance to electromigration (generally proportional to the melting point). This dissertation is the compilation of the research into analytical techniques for monitoring surface-active additives in common sulfuric acid/copper sulfate plating baths. Chronopotentiometric, DC and AC voltammetry were the major analytical techniques used in this research. Several interactions between the additives will also be presented along with their apparent decline in activity. The decline in activity is well known in the industry and is also detected by these methods as presented in chapters 4 and 5. Finally, a systemic approach for monitoring the additive Galactosal, which is commonly used in electrowinning, will be outlined. The monitoring system proposed herein would have to be adjusted for each electrowinning facility because each has a unique chemistry and cell configuration.

  7. Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Pi Chapter: African American Male Identity and Fraternity Culture, 1923-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Edwin T.

    2009-01-01

    Pi Chapter of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. at Morgan State University made a significant contribution to the identity construction of college-educated African American men in the state of Maryland. The initiates of Pi Chapter constructed identities that allowed the members to see themselves as participants in mainstream American society as…

  8. 5 CFR Appendix A to 5 Cfr Chapter... - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY AND FEDERAL SERVICE IMPASSES PANEL Ch. XIV, App. A Appendix A to 5 CFR Chapter XIV—Current...

  9. Chapter 1 Evaluation & Reporting System, 1989 Update. Technical Report No. 9013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Stephen H.

    This technical report updates the Chapter 1 Evaluation and Reporting System (CHIERS) used by the Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) School District to gather and report student information related to compensatory education programs funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act of 1981, with information about 1988-89 projects.…

  10. Chapter 1 Evaluation and Reporting System (CHIERS) 1988 Update. Technical Report No. 8903.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Stephen H.; Fishman, Roger J.

    The Chapter 1 Evaluation and Reporting System (CHIERS) is an annually updated system for gathering and reporting student information regarding the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act Chapter 1 program in the Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) School District. Data elements included in the CHIERS are school location, achievement test scores, and…

  11. Data on distribution and abundance: Monitoring for research and management [Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2010-01-01

    In the first chapter of this book we identified the interdependence of method, data and theory as an important influence on the progress of science. The first several chapters focused mostly on progress in theory, in the areas of integrating spatial and temporal complexity into ecological analysis, the emergence of landscape ecology and its transformation into a multi-...

  12. Additives in swine nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinovec Zlatan J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To attain better feed utilization, longer preservation, easier manipultion and higher production and better quality of food of animal orgin as the final goal, besides raw materials, feed mixes contain numerous pronutrients (additives, added to perform different effects, in a narrower sense, the term pronutrient implies heterogenous substances, which have no diverse effects and have to be efficient in the manner of use. Basically, all pronutrients have to reach the goal of keeping optimal animal health status and to increase production of food of animal origin without adverse and negative effects. The development of biotechnology had a great part in the appearance of natural alternatives which are able to fulfil and satisfy the high demands of highly productive animals, as well as those of the consumer lobby and environmental protection movements. Growth promoters based upon physiological mechanisms and production potential of the animal have an unquestionable adventage, not only because of the lack of residues in food of animal origin; but also because of their ecological safety and decrease of envirnomental pollution by undigested materials. Demand continues to grow for "all natural", non-pharmaceutical feed additives with growth enhancing effects in food animals. Special attention is paid to minerals (anorganic and organic sources, growth stimulators (antibiotics, probiotics prebiotics, substances for better feed utilization (enzymes, acidifers adsorbents.

  13. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 4: The Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.; Michalik, D.; Butkevich, A.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter supplements the previous astrometry Chapter 3 and will only appear in Gaia DR1. In this chapter we document only those extra steps needed to implement the TGAS solution as opposed to a Gaia only solution which will form the basis of all later data releases. All the astrometric models and processing steps are the same as outlined in Chapter 3. An evaluation of the TGAS data is also to be found in Section 3.5 which represents a basic quality assessment and validation of the scientific results which have also been published in detail in Lindegren et al. (2016). A more independent catalogue consolidation and validation of the science results for Gaia DR1 was also performed and are documented in Chapter 7 and have been published in Arenou et al. (2017).

  14. Chapter 1. Impacts of the oceans on climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Philip C; Fischer, Astrid C; Lewis-Brown, Emily; Meredith, Michael P; Sparrow, Mike; Andersson, Andreas J; Antia, Avan; Bates, Nicholas R; Bathmann, Ulrich; Beaugrand, Gregory; Brix, Holger; Dye, Stephen; Edwards, Martin; Furevik, Tore; Gangstø, Reidun; Hátún, Hjálmar; Hopcroft, Russell R; Kendall, Mike; Kasten, Sabine; Keeling, Ralph; Le Quéré, Corinne; Mackenzie, Fred T; Malin, Gill; Mauritzen, Cecilie; Olafsson, Jón; Paull, Charlie; Rignot, Eric; Shimada, Koji; Vogt, Meike; Wallace, Craig; Wang, Zhaomin; Washington, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The oceans play a key role in climate regulation especially in part buffering (neutralising) the effects of increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and rising global temperatures. This chapter examines how the regulatory processes performed by the oceans alter as a response to climate change and assesses the extent to which positive feedbacks from the ocean may exacerbate climate change. There is clear evidence for rapid change in the oceans. As the main heat store for the world there has been an accelerating change in sea temperatures over the last few decades, which has contributed to rising sea-level. The oceans are also the main store of carbon dioxide (CO2), and are estimated to have taken up approximately 40% of anthropogenic-sourced CO2 from the atmosphere since the beginning of the industrial revolution. A proportion of the carbon uptake is exported via the four ocean 'carbon pumps' (Solubility, Biological, Continental Shelf and Carbonate Counter) to the deep ocean reservoir. Increases in sea temperature and changing planktonic systems and ocean currents may lead to a reduction in the uptake of CO2 by the ocean; some evidence suggests a suppression of parts of the marine carbon sink is already underway. While the oceans have buffered climate change through the uptake of CO2 produced by fossil fuel burning this has already had an impact on ocean chemistry through ocean acidification and will continue to do so. Feedbacks to climate change from acidification may result from expected impacts on marine organisms (especially corals and calcareous plankton), ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles. The polar regions of the world are showing the most rapid responses to climate change. As a result of a strong ice-ocean influence, small changes in temperature, salinity and ice cover may trigger large and sudden changes in regional climate with potential downstream feedbacks to the climate of the rest of the world. A warming Arctic Ocean may lead to

  15. Chapter 13: Mining electronic health records in the genomics era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Denny

    individuals. This chapter reviews several examples of phenotype extraction and their application to genetic research, demonstrating a viable future for genomic discovery using EHR-linked data.

  16. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  17. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  18. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 7: Catalogue consolidation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenou, F.; Babusiaux, C.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Borrachero, R.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Fabricius, C.; Findeisen, K.; Helmi, A.; Hutton, A.; Luri, X.; Marrese, P.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Robin, A.; Sordo, R.; Soria, S.; Turon, C.; Utrilla Molina, E.; Vallenari, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Gaia Catalogue does not only produce a wealth of data, it also represents a complex processing before a Catalogue can be issued. The main data processing is being handled by three DPAC Coordination Units, CU3 for the astrometric data, CU5 for the photometric data and CU6 for the spectroscopic data. Then three Coordination Units analyse the processed data, CU4 for optical or binary stars, solar system objects and extended objects, CU7 for variable stars, and CU8 for classification. Finally, CU9 takes care of the intermediate and final publication of the Gaia data. For Gaia DR1, the situation has been simplified in the sense that CU4, CU6 and CU8 did not contribute to the first Catalogue. At the last step, several data fields may have been computed by several Coordination Units (e.g., parallaxes computed by CU3, then again by CU4 with a fit of an astrometric + binary model if the star happens to have a significant binary motion; or a mean magnitude computed by CU5 may be superseded by another estimation from CU7 if the stars happens to be a periodic variable; etc.), in several Data Processing Centres, so an (a) homogeneous, (b) convenient, (c) consistent Catalogue has to be built. First, to a so-called CompleteSource is attached astrometric and photometric information, then possible variability information is integrated, producing an homogeneous Catalogue. Second, sources that do not meet some minimum astrometric or photometric quality are filtered out. The filters applied are described in Section 4 of Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016a). Third, while flat files are kept for further operations, the data is integrated inside the Gaia Archive Core System (GACS) database; crossmatch with external catalogues is also performed, providing the convenient access to the data. Fourth, the consistency of the Catalogue is obtained through a dedicated validation of its content. Sources that do not pass the validation criteria are then filtered out. This chapter describes these

  19. Ecological impacts of non-native species: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilliod, David S.; Griffiths, R.A.; Kuzmin, S.L.; Heatwole, Harold; Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    management of non-native species has only just begun but some promising results have already emerged (see below), giving hope to a very difficult conservation issue. This chapter provides an overview of the role of non-native species in amphibian declines and summarizes the current state of knowledge of non-native species that are known, or considered to be, a threat to amphibian species and populations. The biological and socio-economic issues of non-native species control are examined and brief case studies of successful eradication programmes are provided.

  20. Controlling chemical hazards. Fundamentals of the management of the toxic chemicals. Book chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, D.F.; Cote, R.P.; Wells, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    The chapter describes control strategies and technologies used to reduce environmental risk from toxic chemicals. It includes an overview of legislative infrastructure supporting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It describes the factors contributing to the complexity of the toxic control problem and the regulatory methods to establish control limits. The chapter also presents four important treatment approaches and examines the advantages and disadvantages of each. The four treatment approaches are biological degradation, chemical degradation, separation processes and containment. The chapter presents representative treatment technologies and evaluates current limitations of the treatment state-of-the-art.

  1. Advances in 3D printing & additive manufacturing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Pulak; Kumar, L

    2017-01-01

    This edited volume comprises select chapters on advanced technologies for 3D printing and additive manufacturing and how these technologies have changed the face of direct, digital technologies for rapid production of models, prototypes and patterns. Because of its wide applications, 3D printing and additive manufacturing technology has become a powerful new industrial revolution in the field of manufacturing. The evolution of 3D printing and additive manufacturing technologies has changed design, engineering and manufacturing processes across industries such as consumer products, aerospace, medical devices and automotives. The objective of this book is to help designers, R&D personnel, and practicing engineers understand the state-of-the-art developments in the field of 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing. .

  2. State of the Carbon Cycle Report 2 (SOCCR2): Highlights from the Urban Systems chapter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, K. R.; Pincetl, S.; Romero-Lankao, P.; Duren, R. M.; Marcotullio, P. J.; Hutyra, L.; Pataki, D. E.; Chester, M.; Franco, G.; Betsill, M.; Davis, K. J.; Larson, E. K.; Schafer, K. V.; Krueger, R.; Kennedy, C.; Hughes, S.; Creutzig, F.; Sailor, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this presentation we synthesize the advances that have been made since the first SOCCR report in 2007 on understanding urban carbon emissions, their drivers, and policy dimensions. This presentation represents the outcome of chapter 4 in the upcoming SOCCR2 report. We review the current state of understanding of carbon stocks and flows in cities highlighting the differing methodologies, approaches taken to studying urban carbon in addition to providing the latest list of North American cities for which carbon footprints and research have been completed in the last ten years. We review technological, socioeconomic, and physical drivers of carbon emissions, noting emerging trends, feedback, and important indicators for understanding the important role cities play within the North American carbon cycle and the globe. Finally, we consider the existing policy context at multiple governance levels in to which urban carbon decisionmaking resides. We review the many policy options available to the urban domain in managing carbon emissions, emphasizing where mitigation success has been met and why.

  3. Value of information analysis as a decision support tool for biosecurity: Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Michael C.; Rout, Tracy; Spring, Daniel; Walshe, Terry

    2017-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates the economic concept of ‘value of information’(VOI), and how biosecurity managers can use VOI analysis to decide whether or not to reduce uncertainty by collecting additional information through monitoring, experimentation, or some other form of research. We first explore how some uncertainties may be scientifically interesting to resolve, but ultimately irrelevant to decision-making. We then develop a prototype model where a manager must choose between eradication or containment of an infestation. Eradication is more cost-effective for smaller infestations, but once the extent reaches a certain size it becomes more cost-effective to contain. When choosing between eradication and containment, how much does knowing the extent of the infestation more exactly improve the outcome of the decision? We calculate the expected value of perfect information (EVPI) about the extent, which provides an upper limit for the value of reducing uncertainty. We then illustrate the approach using the example of red imported fire ant management in south-east Queensland. We calculate the EVPI for three different uncertain variables: the extent of the infestation, the sensitivity (true positive rate) of remote sensing, and the efficacy of baiting.

  4. Academic style and format of doctoral theses: The case of the disappearing discussion chapter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Hewitt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes work carried out within the sphere of analysis of university academic discourse that possibly contains an intercultural comparative element. A hypothesis was put forward that when Spanish doctoral students crafted their theses, they would pass over the Discussion chapter and progress directly on to the Conclusions. The propensity for Spanish doctoral students to miss out discussion of the results in their doctoral theses was noticed by the first author, while supervising her own doctoral students’ empirical Ph.D. theses in the field of English Studies in Spain. It was thought that this oversight may indicate intercultural variation in the preferences of format for different writing cultures. The initial corpus consisted of sixteen theses from the field of English Studies. At a second stage, an additional corpus of thirty-nine theses in the field of Spanish Studies was included. Both corpora had been defended in these two areas in Spanish universities over the last 10 years and were full-text theses from a Spanish national data base: Dialnet. The results confirmed the hypothesis in both corpora with students in Spanish universities. Nevertheless, curiously, a number of further intervening variables were also found to be essential. For the theses from the area of Spanish Studies less divergence was encountered but, on the other hand, evidence was found that may even point to a lingering influence of national or educational rhetoric.

  5. Chapter 18: Web-based Tools - NED VO Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, J. M.; NED Team

    The NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) is a thematic, web-based research facility in widespread use by scientists, educators, space missions, and observatory operations for observation planning, data analysis, discovery, and publication of research about objects beyond our Milky Way galaxy. NED is a portal into a systematic fusion of data from hundreds of sky surveys and tens of thousands of research publications. The contents and services span the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays through radio frequencies, and are continuously updated to reflect the current literature and releases of large-scale sky survey catalogs. NED has been on the Internet since 1990, growing in content, automation and services with the evolution of information technology. NED is the world's largest database of crossidentified extragalactic objects. As of December 2006, the system contains approximately 10 million objects and 15 million multi-wavelength cross-IDs. Over 4 thousand catalogs and published lists covering the entire electromagnetic spectrum have had their objects cross-identified or associated, with fundamental data parameters federated for convenient queries and retrieval. This chapter describes the interoperability of NED services with other components of the Virtual Observatory (VO). Section 1 is a brief overview of the primary NED web services. Section 2 provides a tutorial for using NED services currently available through the NVO Registry. The "name resolver" provides VO portals and related internet services with celestial coordinates for objects specified by catalog identifier (name); any alias can be queried because this service is based on the source cross-IDs established by NED. All major services have been updated to provide output in VOTable (XML) format that can be accessed directly from the NED web interface or using the NVO registry. These include access to images via SIAP, Cone- Search queries, and services providing fundamental, multi

  6. Assessment and management of ecological integrity: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Thomas J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    emphasized in this chapter, they are broadly applicable among all aquatic systems.

  7. Which criteria demand additive stenting during catheter-directed thrombolysis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Just, S; Foegh, P

    2014-01-01

    Many factors are necessary for obtaining satisfactory results after catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Selections of patients, composition of the thrombolytic fluid, anticoagulation per- and post-procedural, recognition and treatment of persistent...... obstructive lesions of the iliac veins are the most important contributors. Stenting has been known for 15 to 20 years. The first publication on CDT in 1991 was combined with ballooning the iliac vein, an additive procedure which has been abandoned as an isolated procedure. This chapter will discuss selection...

  8. Master plan study - District heating Sillamaee municipality. Estonia. Final report. Appendices for chapter 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The appendices to the final report on the master plan study on district heating in the municipality in Estonia, chapter nine, gives data related to general economic assumptions for financial and economic calculations, fuel consumption, financing, prices, fuel consumption. (ARW)

  9. Algorithms and their Impact on Integrated Vehicle Health Management - Chapter 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This chapter discussed some of the algorithmic choices one encounters when designing an IVHM system. While it would be generally desirable to be able to pick a...

  10. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1946-09-30

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  11. A move-step analysis of the concluding chapters in computer science PhD theses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Soler-Monreal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how computer science doctoral writers construct the closing chapters of their PhD theses. The data are drawn from the chapters playing a concluding role of 48 PhD theses defended at the University of Glasgow from 2008 to 2014. The analysis applied a qualitative-quantitative approach. The titles of the concluding chapters of the theses were first examined and also their divisions into sections and sub-sections. Then the chapters were subjected to a move-step analysis: Move 1 (M1 “Revisiting the study”; Move 2 (M2 “Consolidating research space”; Move 3 (M3 “Proposing practical applications and implications”, Move 4 (M4 “Recommending future work” and Move 5 (M5 “Recapitulating the study”. The results revealed that most of the computer science PhD theses have one final concluding chapter with three main moves: M1, M2 and M4. The most frequent steps are “reviewing the work carried out” and “summarizing the specific work reported in every thesis chapter” in M1, “presenting results and contributions”, “answering the initial research questions or hypotheses”, and “making claims” in M2, and “acknowledging limitations” and “suggesting further research” in M4. Movestep patterns appear in recurrent cycles throughout the concluding chapters. Several suggestions for pedagogical purposes are provided.

  12. Chapter 5. Assessing the Need for High Impact Technology Research, Development & Deployment for Mitigating Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Auston

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology is a centrally important component of all strategies to mitigate climate change. As such, it encompasses a multi-dimensional space that is far too large to be fully addressed in this brief chapter. Consequently, we have elected to focus on a subset of topics that we believe have the potential for substantial impact. As researchers, we have also narrowed our focus to address applied research, development and deployment issues and omit basic research topics that have a longer-term impact. This handful of topics also omits technologies that we deem to be relatively mature, such as solar photovoltaics and wind turbines, even though we acknowledge that additional research could further reduce costs and enhance performance. These and other mature technologies such as transportation are discussed in Chapter 6. This report and the related Summit Conference are an outgrowth of the University of California President’s Carbon Neutrality Initiative, and consequently we are strongly motivated by the special demands of this ambitious goal, as we are also motivated by the corresponding goals for the State of California, the nation and the world. The unique feature of the UC Carbon Neutrality Initiative is the quest to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 at all ten 10 campuses. It should be emphasized that a zero emission target is enormously demanding and requires careful strategic planning to arrive at a mix of technologies, policies, and behavioral measures, as well as highly effective communication – all of which are far more challenging than reducing emissions by some 40% or even 80%. Each campus has a unique set of requirements based on its current energy and emissions. Factors such as a local climate, dependence on cogeneration, access to wholesale electricity markets, and whether a medical school is included shape the specific challenges of the campuses, each of which is a “living laboratory” setting a model for others to

  13. Organogermanium Chemistry: Germacyclobutanes and digermane Additions to Acetylenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubb, Andrew Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation comprises two main research projects. The first project, presented in Chapter 1, involves the synthesis and thermochemistry of germacyclobutanes (germetanes). Four new germetanes (spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane, dichlorogermetane, and germacyclobutane) have been synthesized using a modified di-Grignard synthesis. Diallylgermetane is shown to be a useful starting material for obtaining other germetanes, particularly the parent germetane, germacyclobutane. The gas-phase thermochemistries of spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane and germacyclobutane have been explored via pulsed stirred-flow reactor (SFR) studies, showing remarkable differences in decomposition, depending on the substitution at the germanium atom. The second project investigates the thermochemical, photochemical, and catalytic additions of several digermanes to acetylenes. The first examples of thermo- and photochemical additions of Ge-Ge bonds to C{triple_bond}C are demonstrated. Mechanistic investigations are described and comparisons are made to analogous disilane addition reactions, previously studied in their group.

  14. Summary and Recommendations for Future Work. Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shavers, Mark R.; Saganti, Premkumar B.; Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The safety of astronauts is the primary concern of all space missions. Space radiation has been identified as a major concern for ISS, and minimizing radiation risks during EVA is a principle component of NASA s radiation protection program. The space suit plays a critical role in shielding astronauts from EVA radiation exposures. In cooperation with the JSC Extravehicular Activity Project Office, and the Space Radiation Health Project Office, the NASA EMU and RSA Orlan space suits were taken to the LLUPTF for a series of measurements with proton and electron beams to simulate exposures during EVA operations. Additional tests with material layouts of the EMU suit sleeve were made in collaboration with NASA LaRC at the LBNL 88-inch cyclotron and at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron.

  15. Chapter 1. Regulation of HIV-1 alternative RNA splicing and its role in virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, C Martin

    2009-01-01

    Over 40 different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mRNA species, both completely and incompletely spliced, are produced by alternative splicing of the primary viral RNA transcript. In addition, about half of the viral RNA remains unspliced and is transported to the cytoplasm where it is used both as mRNA and as genomic RNA. In general, the identities of the completely and incompletely spliced HIV-1 mRNA species are determined by the proximity of the open reading frames to the 5'-end of the mRNAs. The relative abundance of the mRNAs encoding the HIV-1 gene products is determined by the frequency of splicing at the different alternative 3'-splice sites. This chapter will highlight studies showing how HIV-1 uses exon definition to control the level of splicing at each of its 3'-splice sites through a combination of positively acting exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) elements, negatively acting exonic and intronic splicing silencer elements (ESS and ISS elements, respectively), and the 5'-splice sites of the regulated exons. Each of these splicing elements represent binding sites for cellular factors whose levels in the infected cell can determine the dominance of the positive or negative elements on HIV-1 alternative splicing. Both mutations of HIV-1 splicing elements and overexpression or inhibition of cellular splicing factors that bind to these elements have been used to show that disruption of regulated splicing inhibits HIV-1 replication. These studies have provided strong rationale for the investigation and development of antiviral drugs that specifically inhibit HIV-1 RNA splicing.

  16. Chapter 10. Trees have Already been Invented: Carbon in Woodlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna B. Hecht

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the developed world, discussions of climate change mitigation and adaptation tend to focus on technological solutions such as decarbonizing electric grids and regulating emissions of methane, black carbon, and so on. However, an often overlooked strategy for reaching greenhouse gas reduction targets in much of the developing world is rooted, not in new technologies, but in vegetation management. Trees and other vegetation absorb carbon as they grow and release carbon when they are burnt, so landscapes function as carbon sinks and carbon storage sites when forests are growing, on one hand, and as carbon sources when forests are cleared, on the other. Since greenhouse gas emissions from such land use changes rival emissions from the entire transport sector, trees and vegetation are essential to efforts to slow and adapt to climate change. Under the right circumstances, vegetation recovery and its carbon uptake occur quickly. Moreover, carbon uptake can be strongly affected by human management of forests; the right kinds of management can improve rates of recovery and carbon sequestration substantially. This chapter reviews carbon dynamics in mature forests, secondary forests, agroforests and tree landscapes in urban areas to point out the variability of these systems and the potential for enhancing carbon uptake and storage. Furthermore, vegetation systems have many additional benefits in the form of other environmental services, such as improving livelihoods, subsistence insurance habitat, microclimates, and water systems. Finally, by managing forests better, we can also make significant contributions to climate justice because most global forests and forested landscapes are under the stewardship of small holders.

  17. effects of sulphur addition on addition on and mechanical properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    234-8034714355. 8034714355. 1. EFFECTS OF SULPHUR ADDITION ON. ADDITION ON. 2. AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES O. 3. 4. C. W. Onyia. 5. 1DEPT. OF METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS. 6. 2, 4DEPT. OF METALLURGICAL ...

  18. LTC vacuum blasting maching (concrete): Baseline report: Greenbook (Chapter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjuction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.

  19. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  20. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolder, U.; Ebener, C.; Hauner, H.; Jauch, K. W.; Kreymann, G.; Ockenga, J.; Traeger, K.

    2009-01-01

    The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition) in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min). In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy) an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day) or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important. PMID:20049080

  1. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min. In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important.

  2. F-16XL Geometry and Grids. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Okko J.; Goertz,Stefan; Fritz, Willy; Karman, Steve L., Jr.; Michal, Todd R.; Lamar, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International (CAWAPI) was to allow a comprehensive validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics methods against the CAWAP flight database. A major part of this work involved the generation of high-quality computational grids. Prior to the grid generation an IGES file containing the air-tight geometry of the F-16XL aircraft was generated by a cooperation of some of the CAWAPI partners. Based on this geometry description both structured and unstructured grids have been generated. The baseline structured (multi-block) grid (and a family of derived grids) has been generated by the National Aerospace Laboratory (NLR). The baseline all-tetrahedral and hybrid unstructured grids were generated at the NASA Langley Research Center and the U.S. Air Force Academy, respectively. To provide more geometrical resolution, additional unstructured grids were generated at EADS-MAS, the UTSimCenter, and Boeing Phantom Works. All the grids generated within the framework of CAWAPI will be discussed.

  3. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 2: Astrometric and photometric pre-processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, D.; Fabricius, C.; Bastian, U.; Portell, J.; Smart, R.; Altmann, M.; Davidson, M.; Lindegren, L.; Hambly, N.; Castañeda, J.; Mora, A.; Biermann, M.; Brown, A. G. A.; Busonero, D.; Riva, A.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter presents the models and processing steps used for pre-processing the raw Gaia data before the basic observables (or astrometric elementaries) can be generated and passed on to the Gaia core astrometric solution which is discussed in Chapter 3. The input to the Gaia data processing is the raw satellite telemetry; the initial Gaia source and ecliptic poles catalogues based on compilations of other catalogues to aid in the initial crossmatches; an attitude star catalogue to allow a first reconstruction of the attitude of Gaia. The astrometric calibration models are outlined in Section 2.3 including PSF/LSF models and discussions of CCD calibration challenges followed by the details of the daily and cyclic processing steps in Section 2.4. The final Section 2.5 discusses both the daily and cyclic monitoring and validation that is performed before data products are passed on to the core astrometric solution described in Chapter 3.

  4. Population connectivity of deep-sea corals: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Cheryl L.; Baco, Amy; Nizinski, Martha S.; Coykendall, Dolly K.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Cho, Walter; Shank, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the scale of dispersal among habitats has been a challenge in marine ecology for decades (Grantham et al., 2003; Kinlan & Gaines, 2003; Hixon, 2011). Unlike terrestrial habitats in which barriers to dispersal may be obvious (e.g. mountain ranges, rivers), few absolute barriers to dispersal are recognizable in the sea. Additionally, most marine species have complex life cycles in which juveniles are more mobile than adults. As such, the dynamics of populations may involve processes in distant habitats that are coupled by a transport mechanism. Studies of population connectivity try to quantify the transport, or dispersal of individuals, among geographically separated populations. For benthic marine species, such as corals and demersal fishes, colonization of new populations occurs primarily by dispersal of larvae (Figure 1; Shank, 2010). Successful dispersal and recruitment, followed by maturation and reproduction of these new migrants ensures individuals contribute to the gene pool (Hedgecock, 2007). Thus, successful dispersal links and cohesively maintains spatially separated sub-populations. At shorter time scales (10-100s years), connectivity regulates community structure by influencing the genetic composition, diversity and demographic stability of the population, whereas at longer time scales (1000s years), geographic distributions are affected (McClain and Hardy, 2010). Alternatively, populations may become extinct or speciation may occur if connectivity ceases (Cowen et al., 2007). Therefore, the genetic exchange of individuals between populations is fundamental to the short-term resilience and long-term maintenance of the species. However, for the vast majority of marine species, population connectivity remains poorly understood.

  5. Gastroenterology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz, R. J.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis parenteral nutrition (PN is indicated when enteral nutrition is not possible or should be avoided for medical reasons. In Crohn's patients PN is indicated when there are signs/symptoms of ileus or subileus in the small intestine, scars or intestinal fistulae. PN requires no specific compounding for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In both diseases it should be composed of 55–60% carbohydrates, 25–30% lipids and 10–15% amino acids. PN helps in the correction of malnutrition, particularly the intake of energy, minerals, trace elements, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, vitamin B12, and zinc. Enteral nutrition is clearly superior to PN in severe, acute pancreatitis. An intolerance to enteral nutrition results in an indication for total PN in complications such as pseudocysts, intestinal and pancreatic fistulae, and pancreatic abscesses or pancreatic ascites. If enteral nutrition is not possible, PN is recommended, at the earliest, 5 days after admission to the hospital. TPN should not be routinely administered in mild acute pancreatitis or nil by moth status <7 days, due to high costs and an increased risk of infection. The energy requirements are between 25 and 35 kcal/kg body weight/day. A standard solution including lipids (monitoring triglyceride levels! can be administered in acute pancreatitis. Glucose (max. 4–5 g/kg body weight/day and amino acids (about 1.2–1.5 g/kg body weight/day should be administered and the additional enrichment of TPN with glutamine should be considered in severe, progressive forms of pancreatitis.

  6. ADDITIVES USED TO OBTAIN FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Ardelean

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of food additives in food is determined by the growth of contemporary food needs of the world population. Additives used in food, both natural and artificial ones, contribute to: improving the organoleptic characteristics and to preserve the food longer, but we must not forget that all these additives should not be found naturally in food products. Some of these additives are not harmful and human pests in small quantities, but others may have harmful effects on health.

  7. ADDITIVES USED TO OBTAIN FOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Dorina Ardelean; Daniela Popa

    2012-01-01

    Use of food additives in food is determined by the growth of contemporary food needs of the world population. Additives used in food, both natural and artificial ones, contribute to: improving the organoleptic characteristics and to preserve the food longer, but we must not forget that all these additives should not be found naturally in food products. Some of these additives are not harmful and human pests in small quantities, but others may have harmful effects on health.

  8. Chapter 7: Renewable Energy Options and Considerations for Net Zero Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Samuel

    2017-03-15

    This chapter focuses on renewable energy options for military installations. It discusses typical renewable technologies, project development, and gives examples. Renewable energy can be combined with conventional energy sources to provide part or all of the energy demand at an installation. The appropriate technology mix for an installation will depend on site-specific factors such as renewable resources, energy costs, local energy policies and incentives, available land, mission compatibility, and other factors. The objective of this chapter is to provide basic background information and resources on renewable energy options for NATO leaders and energy personnel.

  9. Chapter A10. Lakes and reservoirs: Guidelines for study design and sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, William R.; Robertson, Dale M.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2015-09-29

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual, NFM) is an online report with separately published chapters that provides the protocols and guidelines by which U.S. Geological Survey personnel obtain the data used to assess the quality of the Nation’s surface-water and groundwater resources. Chapter 10 reviews limnological principles, describes the characteristics that distinguish lakes from reservoirs, and provides guidance for developing temporal and spatial sampling strategies and data-collection approaches to be used in lake and reservoir environmental investigations.

  10. Chapter 1: Assessing pollinator habitat services to optimize conservation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanna, Richard; Ando , Amy W.; Swinton, Scott; Hellerstein, Daniel; Kagan, Jimmy; Mushet, David M.; Otto, Clint R.; Rewa, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    Pollination services have received increased attention over the past several years, and protecting foraging area is beginning to be reflected in conservation policy. This case study considers the prospects for doing so in a more analytically rigorous manner, by quantifying the pollination services for sites being considered for ecological restoration. The specific policy context is the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which offers financial and technical assistance to landowners seeking to convert sensitive cropland back to some semblance of the prairie (or, to a lesser extent, forest or wetland) ecosystem that preceded it. Depending on the mix of grasses and wildflowers that are established, CRP enrollments can provide pollinator habitat. Further, depending on their location, they will generate related services, such as biological control of crop pests, recreation, and aesthetics. While offers to enroll in CRP compete based on cost and some anticipated benefits, the eligibility and ranking criteria do not reflect these services to a meaningful degree. Therefore, we develop a conceptual value diagram to identify the sequence of steps and associated models and data necessary to quantify the full range of services, and find that critical data gaps, some of which are artifacts of policy, preclude the application of benefit-relevant indicators (BRIs) or monetization. However, we also find that there is considerable research activity underway to fill these gaps. In addition, a modeling framework has been developed that can estimate field-level effects on services as a function of landscape context. The approach is inherently scalable and not limited in geographic scope, which is essential for a program with a national footprint. The parameters in this framework are sufficiently straightforward that expert judgment could be applied as a stopgap approach until empirically derived estimates are available. While monetization of benefit-relevant indicators of yield

  11. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  12. Physical activity among cancer survivors and those with no history of cancer- a report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Nolan, Vikki G; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2011-08-15

    Cancer survivors are at greater risk for chronic diseases that make regular physical activity a challenge. The purpose of this manuscript was to compare physical activity levels among five-year cancer survivors and those with no history of cancer, and to determine risk factors for physical inactivity. Participants who completed the physical activity monitoring portion of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003-04 and 2005-06 were included in these analyses. Physical activity collected via accelerometer was used to determine who completed recommended amounts of physical activity according to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines. Associations between physical activity and cancer status were evaluated with multiple logistic regressions. 95.5% of five-year cancer survivors and 87.3% of those with no cancer history did not meet the CDC guidelines. After adjusting for sex, age, race, education and chronic conditions, cancer survivors were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.0, 2.9) times more likely than those with no cancer history to fail to meet CDC guidelines for physical activity. Neither the general population nor cancer survivors met the CDC guidelines for physical activity. Cancer survivors were less likely to meet recommendations and may need tailored interventions designed to take into account comorbid conditions to increase their physical activity levels.

  13. Physical activity among cancer survivors and those with no history of cancer— a report from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Nolan, Vikki G; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cancer survivors are at greater risk for chronic diseases that make regular physical activity a challenge. The purpose of this manuscript was to compare physical activity levels among five-year cancer survivors and those with no history of cancer, and to determine risk factors for physical inactivity. Methods: Participants who completed the physical activity monitoring portion of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003-04 and 2005-06 were included in these analyses. Physical activity collected via accelerometer was used to determine who completed recommended amounts of physical activity according to Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines. Associations between physical activity and cancer status were evaluated with multiple logistic regressions. Results: 95.5% of five-year cancer survivors and 87.3% of those with no cancer history did not meet the CDC guidelines. After adjusting for sex, age, race, education and chronic conditions, cancer survivors were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.0, 2.9) times more likely than those with no cancer history to fail to meet CDC guidelines for physical activity. Conclusions: Neither the general population nor cancer survivors met the CDC guidelines for physical activity. Cancer survivors were less likely to meet recommendations and may need tailored interventions designed to take into account comorbid conditions to increase their physical activity levels. PMID:21904654

  14. Effect of physical activity and sedentary behavior on serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Kohli, Manish

    2013-01-01

    To examine the association between accelerometer-derived sedentary and physical activity and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a nationally representative sample of men in the United States. Data from the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cycles were used in the present study, with data from 1672 adult male participants used in the analyses. The manuscript was prepared between July 7, 2012, and September 26, 2012. Sedentary and physical activity was objectively measured using an accelerometer. Covariates included various demographic, dietary, biological, and immunologic variables including age, height, weight, body mass index, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, and poverty-income ratio; dietary fiber, fat, protein, and carbohydrate intake and total energy intake; vitamin C and vitamin E; alcohol intake; medication use; concentrations of cotinine, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; blood pressure (elevated or not elevated); diabetes; C-reactive protein; and white blood cell count and number of basophils and eosinophils. Only after controlling for all covariates, for every 1-hour increase in sedentary behavior, participants were 16% more likely to have an elevated PSA concentration (odds ratio, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.06-1.27]; P=.001). For every 1-hour increase in light physical activity, participants were 18% less likely to have an elevated PSA concentration (odds ratio, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.68-1.00]; P=.05). Individuals who engage in more sedentary behavior and lower levels of light physical activity have higher PSA concentrations. Future studies are needed to better identify the potential underlying mechanisms delineating the association between sedentary and physical activity and PSA concentration. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A descriptive analysis of the antimicrobial susceptibility of mastitis-causing bacteria isolated from samples submitted to commercial diagnostic laboratories in New Zealand (2003-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, K R; Laven, R A; Lopez-Villalobos, N

    2011-03-01

    To describe the antimicrobial susceptibility of mastitis-causing bacteria isolated from milk samples submitted to commercial laboratories over a period of 40 months. The records of reported results of milk samples submitted by veterinary practitioners to five commercial veterinary laboratories in the North and South Islands of New Zealand, between August 2003 and December 2006 were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to analyse the effect of year, island, and the interaction of year and antimicrobial on the probability of antimicrobial susceptibility for each pathogen and antimicrobial combination, where the causative bacteria had >1,000 susceptibility tests in total and the antimicrobials was tested on >500 isolates. A total of 9,262 isolates were included in this study, with an average of nearly seven susceptibility tests per isolate, totalling 62,918 tests. Streptococcus uberis isolates demonstrated high overall susceptibility (>90.0%) to the majority of antimicrobial agents except ampicillin (81.7%), lincomycin (85.3%), trimethoprim/sulphonamide combination (88.6%), and, as expected, aminoglycosides (penicillin (73.1%), and streptomycin (71.7%). No antimicrobial was effective against all Staph. aureus isolates. Minor changes were found in the overall susceptibility of the main mastitis-causing bacteria between 2003 and 2006. The antimicrobial agents intended for treatment of bovine mastitis currently available in New Zealand generally demonstrated good in-vitro efficacy against streptococci and staphylococci, with the exception of aminoglycosides. Analysis of the results of antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from milk samples from dairy cows in New Zealand provides useful data for surveillance purposes, and a baseline for identifying changes in antimicrobial sensitivity in this population. However, the variation in antimicrobial susceptibility between individual isolates means that these data are of limited value when determining treatment of mastitis at the farm level.

  16. Risk of venous thromboembolism after total hip and knee replacement in older adults with comorbidity and co-occurring comorbidities in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Jeffrey N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism is a common, fatal, and costly injury which complicates major surgery in older adults. The American College of Chest Physicians recommends high potency prophylaxis regimens for individuals undergoing total hip or knee replacement (THR or TKR, but surgeons are reluctant to prescribe them due to fear of excess bleeding. Identifying a high risk cohort such as older adults with comorbidities and co-occurring comorbidities who might benefit most from high potency prophylaxis would improve how we currently perform preoperative assessment. Methods Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we identified older adults who underwent THR or TKR in the U.S. between 2003 and 2006. Our outcome was VTE, including any pulmonary embolus or deep venous thrombosis. We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the effects of comorbidities on VTE occurrence. Comorbidities under consideration included coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure (CHF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, diabetes, and cerebrovascular disease. We also examined the impact of co-occurring comorbidities on VTE rates. Results CHF increased odds of VTE in both the THR cohort (OR = 3.08 95% CI 2.05-4.65 and TKR cohort (OR = 2.47 95% CI 1.95-3.14. COPD led to a 50% increase in odds in the TKR cohort (OR = 1.49 95% CI 1.31-1.70. The data did not support synergistic effect of co-occurring comorbidities with respect to VTE occurrence. Conclusions Older adults with CHF undergoing THR or TKR and with COPD undergoing TKR are at increased risk of VTE. If confirmed in other datasets, these older adults may benefit from higher potency prophylaxis.

  17. Changes in seabed morphology, mud temperature and free gas venting at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano, offshore northern Norway, over the time period 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Jean-Paul; Dupré, Stéphanie; Scalabrin, Carla; Feseker, Tomas; Harmegnies, François; Nouzé, Hervé

    2010-06-01

    The Håkon Mosby mud volcano is a 1.5-km-diameter geological structure located on the Southwest Barents Sea slope at a water depth of 1,270 m. High-definition seabed mapping of the mud volcano has been carried out in 2003 and 2006. A comparative analysis of the bathymetry and backscatter maps produced from the two surveys shows subtle morphological changes over the entire crater of the mud volcano, interpreted to be the consequence of mud eruption events. Mud temperature measurements point to a persistently warm mud at shallow depth in the crater. This is explained by upward fluid advection, rather than conductive cooling of mud flows. The small-scale spatial variability in the temperature distribution may be related to mud outflows or changes in the fluid flow regime. Furthermore, the locations of free gas venting observed in 2006 were found to differ from those of 2003. Our observations of overall similar topographic profiles across the mud volcano in 2003 and 2006 suggest that eruption events would have been modest. Nevertheless, the data bring evidence of significant change in activity even over short time intervals of only 3 years. This may be a characteristic shared by other submarine mud volcanoes, notably those considered to be in a quiescent stage.

  18. The role of aeolian sediment in the preservation of archaeological sites in the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona: final report on research activities, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Rubin, David M.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes a three-year study of aeolian sedimentary processes in the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona, and discusses the relevance of those processes to the preservation of archaeological sites. Findings are based upon detailed sedimentary and geomorphic investigations conducted in three areas of the river corridor, continuous measurements of wind, precipitation, and aeolian sediment transport at six locations for up to 26 months, short-term field study at 35 other sites, examination of historical aerial photographs, and review of data collected and analyzed by previous studies. Detailed results of this study, which involved collaboration with scientists at the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, National Park Service, Northern Arizona University, the Hopi Tribe, and GeoArch, Inc., have been published previously in topical USGS Open-File Reports (Draut and Rubin, 2005, 2006), a USGS Scientific Investigations Report (Draut and others, 2005), and will be discussed in two forthcoming journal articles. This report serves as an overview of the results and contains new conclusions regarding aeolian sedimentary processes in the Colorado River Ecosystem and their relevance to many archaeological sites.

  19. Effects of Canals and Roads on Hydrologic Conditions and Health of Atlantic White Cedar at Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve, North Carolina, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Gloria M.; Strickland, A. Gerald; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of canals and roads on hydrologic conditions and on the health of Atlantic white cedar at the Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve in North Carolina were evaluated by using data collected from the 1980s to 2006. Water levels were monitored along two transects established perpendicular to roads and canals in areas of healthy and unhealthy Atlantic white cedar as part of a study conducted from February 2003 through March 2006. Because of the low hydraulic gradient at the Reserve, the rate and direction of water movement are sensitive to disturbance. Canals increased drainage and contributed to lower water levels in some parts of the Reserve, whereas roads, depending on orientation, impeded drainage. Canals also appeared to facilitate movement of brackish water from the Alligator River into the interior of the Reserve during storms and wind tides. Data indicate that an influx of brackish water occurred in mid-September 2005 several days after the passage of Hurricane Ophelia. Although precipitation amounts and wind speeds associated with Hurricane Ophelia were not large, substantial changes in specific conductance occurred at the canal site on the unhealthy Atlantic white cedar transect. No corresponding increase in specific conductance was observed at the canal site on the healthy Atlantic white cedar transect. The specific conductance of water samples from canals and piezometers was highly correlated with concentrations of chloride and sodium. Ion ratios of some of the water samples, particularly samples with high specific conductance, were similar to those of seawater. Thermal and chemical stratification of water in the canals occurred during summer and winter months, and turnover and mixing occurred in the spring and fall. Upwelling of ground water as a result of excavation for roads did not appear to have a significant effect on the water quality of samples from the canals or piezometers. The specific conductance of water samples from piezometers installed in the root zone of healthy stands of Atlantic white cedar generally was lower than in water samples from unhealthy stands. This pattern also was observed in samples from piezometers installed on the transects and in other areas of the Reserve. Roads appear to have isolated some areas of the Reserve from the high-conductivity water in nearby canals. The paths by which brackish water entered the Reserve cannot be determined from the data obtained during this investigation. It appears that water can enter the Reserve from various directions, depending on wind patterns and water levels in the Alligator River.

  20. Daily patterns of physical activity by type 2 diabetes definition: Comparing diabetes, prediabetes, and participants with normal glucose levels in NHANES 2003?2006 ?

    OpenAIRE

    Steeves, Jeremy A.; Murphy, Rachel A.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Van Domelen, Dane R.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Diabetes is associated with low levels of physical activity (PA), but detailed objective information about how PA patterns vary by diabetes definition is lacking. Methods: PA was measured with ActiGraph accelerometers in older (60+) adults from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 1,043) and analyzed in 2014. Diabetes definition (normal glucose levels, prediabetes, and diabetes) was assessed (fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C, and self-report). Accel...

  1. Evaluando el bienestar de los colombianos a través del índice de progreso genuino –IPG–: 1976-2003 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Holmes; Gómez Olaya, Álvaro Pío; Herrera, Andrés; Ángel, Leydi Viviana; Llanos, Maribel

    2006-01-01

    El IPG es un indicador que busca medir el bienestar económico desde una perspectiva contable. Su comparación con el PIB, actualmente el indicador más usado para medir el crecimiento y el bienestar económico, arroja como resultado que el nivel de bienestar está sobrestimado y por tanto el PIB no da cuenta del verdadero nivel de aquel. La estimación del IPG y para Colombia (1976-2003), al igual que en los otros trabajos internacionales, evidencia una brecha entre el IPG y el PIB. Este resultado...

  2. Queering Chapter Books with LGBT Characters for Young Readers: Recognizing and Complicating Representations of Homonormativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann-Wilmarth, Jill M.; Ryan, Caitlin L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the limited chapter book options with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) characters available for upper elementary readers. While these texts all include one or more LGBT character(s), the overall representations of LGBT people and issues highlight particular normative identities and silence others. We are…

  3. Preserving heritage resources through responsible use of southern Nevada’s lands [Chapter 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol B. Raish

    2013-01-01

    Southern Nevada’s cultural resources (heritage resources) include archeological remains, sacred sites, historic sites, and cultural landscapes of significance to Native Americans and many other groups. Locating, maintaining, and protecting these special places are part of the mandate of Nevada’s Federal and state agencies. This chapter addresses Sub-goal 2.2 in the...

  4. Animal movement data: GPS telemetry, autocorrelation and the need for path-level analysis [chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    In the previous chapter we presented the idea of a multi-layer, multi-scale, spatially referenced data-cube as the foundation for monitoring and for implementing flexible modeling of ecological pattern-process relationships in particulate, in context and to integrate these across large spatial extents at the grain of the strongest linkage between response and driving...

  5. 26 CFR 55.6091-1 - Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) EXCISE TAX ON REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS AND REGULATED INVESTMENT COMPANIES Procedure and Administration § 55.6091-1 Place for filing Chapter 44 tax returns. Except... estate investment trust or regulated investment company. (b) Returns filed with service centers or by...

  6. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, J.L.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 1 contains the Executive Summary and the summaries of the reports of the nine working groups.

  7. Space and time in ecology: Noise or fundamental driver? [chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter I frame the central issue of the book, namely is spatial and temporal complexity in ecological systems merely noise around the predictions of non-spatial, equilibrium processes? Or, alternatively, do spatial and temporal variability in the environment and autogenic space­time processes in populations fundamentally alter system behavior such that ideal...

  8. Opportunities and uses of biochar on forest sites in North America [Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Mark D. Coleman; Sean C. Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Biochar may be useful for restoring or revitalizing degraded forest soils and help with carbon sequestration, nutrient leaching losses, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, biochar is not currently widely used on forested lands across North America. This chapter provides an overview of several biochar experiments conducted in North America and discusses the...

  9. Chapter 9 : Photocatalytic CO2 conversion to fuels by novel green photocatalytic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maza, W. A.; Morris, Amanda J.; Mul, Guido; Nuraje, Nurxat; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the necessity of solar energy storage is explained first, followed by a calculation of the photocatalytic rates necessary for practical application of artificial photosynthesis systems to achieve effective solar energy storage. Next, we introduce TiO2 as an active CO2 and H2O

  10. Applications of landscape genetics to connectivity research in terrestrial animals [Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisette P. Waits; Samuel A. Cushman; Steve F. Spear

    2016-01-01

    Landscape genetic studies have focused on terrestrial animals more than any other taxonomic group. This chapter focuses on applications of landscape genetics for understanding connectivity of terrestrial animal populations. It starts with a general introduction covering unique characteristics and challenges of the terrestrial study system. This is followed by...

  11. Long-term monitoring sites and trends at the Marcell Experimental Forest. Chapter 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Sebestyen; Carrie Dorrance; Donna M. Olson; Elon S. Verry; Randall K. Kolka; Art E. Elling; Richard. Kyllander

    2011-01-01

    The MEF is one of few long-term research programs on the hydrology and ecology of undrained peatlands in boreal forests. No other site in the Experimental Forest and Range Network of the Forest Service and few sites around the globe have studied the hydrology and biogeochemistry of peatland watersheds with the intensity or longevity as on the MEF. In this chapter, we...

  12. Exotic annual Bromus invasions: Comparisons among species and ecoregions in the western United States [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew L. Brooks; Cynthia S. Brown; Jeanne C. Chambers; Carla M. D' Antonio; Jon E. Keeley; Jayne Belnap

    2016-01-01

    Exotic annual Bromus species are widely recognized for their potential to invade, dominate, and alter the structure and function of ecosystems. In this chapter, we summarize the invasion potential, ecosystem threats, and management strategies for different Bromus species within each of five ecoregions of the western United States. We characterize invasion...

  13. Synthesis Gas Demonstration Plant, Baskett, Kentucky: environmental report. [Contains chapter 4 and appendix 4A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains chapter 4 and Appendix 4A which include descriptions of use of adjacent land and water (within miles of the proposed site), baseline ecology, air quality, meteorology, noise, hydrology, water quality, geology, soils and socio-economic factors. Appendix 4A includes detailed ecological surveys made in the area including the methods used. (LTN)

  14. 38 CFR 21.4232 - Specialized vocational training-38 U.S.C. Chapter 35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Assistance Programs Programs of Education § 21.4232 Specialized vocational training—38 U.S.C. Chapter 35. (a) Eligibility requirements for specialized vocational training. (1) The Department of Veterans Affairs may provide a program of a specialized course of vocational training to an eligible person who: (i) Is not in...

  15. Chapter 9:Red maple lumber resources for glued-laminated timber beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Janowiak; Harvey B. Manbeck; Roland Hernandez; Russell C. Moody

    2005-01-01

    This chapter evaluates the performance of red maple glulam beams made from two distinctly different lumber resources: 1. logs sawn using practices normally used for hardwood appearance lumber recovery; and 2. lower-grade, smaller-dimension lumber primarily obtained from residual log cants.

  16. Elements of Mathematics, Book O: Intuitive Background. Chapter 16, Introduction to Computer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, Robert; And Others

    The sixteen chapters of this book provide the core material for the Elements of Mathematics Program, a secondary sequence developed for highly motivated students with strong verbal abilities. The sequence is based on a functional-relational approach to mathematics teaching, and emphasizes teaching by analysis of real-life situations. This text is…

  17. Chapter 21. Intelligent light therapy for older adults: Ambient assisted living.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B.C. Aries; J. van Hoof; M.P.J. Aarts; B. Schrader; MD E.J.M. Wouters; A.C. Westerlaken; H.T.G. Weffers

    2013-01-01

    van Hoof, J., Wouters, E.J.M., Schräder, B, Weffers, H.T.G., Aarts, M.P.J., Aries, M.B.C., Westerlaken, A.C. (2013) Chapter 21. Intelligent light therapy for older adults: Ambient assisted living. In: Agah, A. (ed.) Medical Applications of Artificial Intelligence. CRC Press/Taylor & Francis Group,

  18. Telemetry Standards, RCC Standard 106-17. Chapter 3. Frequency Division Multiplexing Telemetry Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    superseded by digital data to a large extent. Therefore, while the standards in this chapter are valid for any and all FM data still in use, further...of the discriminator outputs with the receiver input near RF threshold. Intermodulation, caused by the radio- link components carrying the composite

  19. 24 CFR 1710.5 - Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statutory exemptions from the provisions of this chapter. 1710.5 Section 1710.5 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  20. 106-17 Telemetry Standards Digitized Audio Telemetry Standard Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    17 Chapter 5, July 2017 5-iii Acronyms µs microsecond CVSD continuously variable slope delta dB decibel Hz hertz kbps kilobit per second lsb...100 and 2300 hertz (Hz) is adequate. Continuously Variable Slope Delta Modulation: The CVSD modulation is a method of digitizing a band-limited

  1. 76 FR 77893 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31-Vocational Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Request for Supplies (Chapter 31- Vocational Rehabilitation... expected cost and burden; it includes the actual data collection instrument. DATES: Comments must be..., New Executive Office Building, Room 10235, Washington, DC 20503 (202) 395-7316. Please refer to ``OMB...

  2. The Missing Psychological Behaviorism Chapter in "A History of the Behavioral Therapies."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Arthur W.

    2003-01-01

    "A History of the Behavioral Therapies" (O'Donohue, et al., 2001) contains no description of psychological behaviorism (PB) and the role it played as one of the foundations of behavior therapy. This article indicates some of the contributions made by PB that make the missing chapter and related phenomena a major aberration in science. (Contains 39…

  3. Chapter 7: Selecting tree species for reforestation of Appalachian mined lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. Davis; J.A. Burger; R. Rathfon; C.E. Zipper

    2017-01-01

    The Forestry Reclamation Approach (FRA) is a method for reclaiming coal-mined land to forested postmining land uses under the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) (Chapter 2, this volume). Step 4 of the FRA is to plant native trees for commercial timber value, wildlife habitat, soil stability, watershed protection, and other environmental...

  4. Schooling for the Future in Asia-Pacific Societies: Six Cases, Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, John J.; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter overviews the schooling for the future (SFF) study in its entirety including both the survey, Phase 1, and the interviews, Phase 2. It develops the historical background of how this SFF study grew out of and interfaces with the larger OECD/CERI schooling for tomorrow (SFT) project directed from Paris. Further, it details how the six…

  5. Implementing United States Pharmacopeia Chapter quality assurance in pharmaceutical compounding, Part 5: Outsourcing and responsible personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Loyd V

    2012-01-01

    This final installment of a five-part series relating to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter provides the pros and cons of outsourcing, an extremely important topic because of the many drug shortages and discontinued drugs being experienced, and provides a brief discussion of the importance of having a responsible employee in charge of the quality-assurance program.

  6. Charcterization of meadow ecosystems based on watershed and valley segment/reach scale characteristics [chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy Trowbridge; Jeanne C. Chambers; Dru Germanoski; Mark L. Lord; Jerry R. Miller; David G. Jewett

    2011-01-01

    Great Basin riparian meadows are highly sensitive to both natural and anthropogenic disturbance. As detailed in earlier chapters, streams in the central Great Basin have a natural tendency to incise due to their geomorphic history (Miller and others 2001, 2004). Anthropogenic disturbances, including overgrazing by livestock, mining activities, and roads in the valley...

  7. Chapter 24: the coming of molecular biology and its impact on clinical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher U M

    2010-01-01

    Although the chemical study of the nervous system dates back well into the 19th century, molecular biology and especially molecular neurobiology only began to be established in the second half of the 20th century. This chapter reviews their impact on clinical neuroscience during the 50 years since Watson and Crick published their seminal paper. After a short review of the part played by F.O. Schmitt in establishing molecular neuroscience the chapter outlines work that led to a detailed understanding of the biochemical structure and function of nerve cell membranes and their embedded channel proteins, receptors, and other molecules. The chapter then turns to the numerous pathologies that result from disorders of these elements: the various channel and gap-junction pathologies. The chapter continues with a discussion of some of the diseases caused by defective DNA, especially the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases (TREDs) and ends with a short account of the development of molecular approaches to prion diseases, myasthenia gravis, and the neurodegenerative diseases of old age. Francis Bacon said long ago that "knowledge is power." The hope is that increasing molecular knowledge will help cure some of the human suffering seen in the neurological ward and clinic.

  8. Chapter 6: Above Ground Deterioration of Wood and Wood-Based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Kirker; Jerrold Winandy

    2014-01-01

    Wood as a material has unique properties that make it ideal for above ground exposure in a wide range of structural and non-strucutral applications. However, no material is without limitations. Wood is a bio-polymer which is subject to degradative processes, both abiotic and biotic. This chapter is a general summary of the abiotic and biotic factors that impact service...

  9. Chapter 6: Ecotoxicology, Environmental Risk Assessment & Potential Impact on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter examines potential risks posed by pharmaceuticals present in the aquatic environment to humans and aquatic life. We begin by describing the mechanisms by which pharmaceuticals enter the vertebrate body, produce effects and leave the body. Then we describe theoretical...

  10. Grief, Anger, Social Action: Experiences of the Windsor Chapter, Mothers against Drunk Driving (MADD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, B. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The experiences of the Windsor, Ontario, Canada, chapter of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), in its development and progress through the grief-anger-social action continuum, are described. This article also portrays a model for problem resolution which emphasizes incorporating the respective strengths and efficiencies of self-help groups and…

  11. Student Self-Perceptions of Leadership in Two Missouri FFA Chapters: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagay, Rachel Bartholomew; Marx, Adam A.; Simonsen, Jon C.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study is the self-perceptions of leadership engagement of FFA members in two FFA chapters in Missouri. This multiple case study used documentation of student self-perceptions, researcher observations, and focus groups. The two cases included 24 high school students comprised of FFA officers and members, who provided their…

  12. Chapter 6: Implementation of Model-Based Instruction--The Induction Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitch, Rachel; Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2008-01-01

    In previous chapters, student teachers' views and the use of model-based instruction (MBI) were determined to be largely positive. But do these positive attitudes and the actual use of MBI continue after completing a teacher education program? Many novice teachers experience "washout" when the attitudes and instructional practices they…

  13. Large-scale diversity patterns in spore communities of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier Alvarez-Sanchez; Nancy C. Johnson; Anita Antoninka; V. Bala Chaudhary; Matthew K. Lau; Suzanne M. Owen; Patricia Gauadarrama; Silvia. Castillo

    2010-01-01

    Surprising little is known about the factors controlling Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungal diversity and distribution patterns. A better understanding of these factors is necessary before mycorrhizas can be effectively managed for their benefits in ecosystem restoration and agriculture. The goal of this chapter is to examine the relationships between AM fungal...

  14. Chapter 2. General theoretical perspectives of narrative analysis of substance use-related dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Sam; Lilja, John; von Braun, Therese; Sjöblom, Yvonne

    2013-11-01

    This chapter provides a short introduction to, and an overview for, using narrative analysis in the understanding of the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs. Important theoretical and methodological dimensions are discussed. Some tentative conclusions, limitations, and unresolved critical issues concerning the use of narrative research methods in the analysis of substance use-related dependency problems are also presented.

  15. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide

  16. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 7: Underground Laboratory Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Gilchriese, M G; Heeger, K; Klein, J; Scholberg, K; Sobel, H; Witherell, M

    2014-01-01

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 7, on Underground Laboratory Capabilities, discusses the prospects and requirements for large underground experiments such as those for neutrino physics, proton decay, and dark matter.

  17. Academic Entrepreneurialism vs. Changing Governance and Institutional Management Structures in European Universities (Chapter 5)

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiek, Marek

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we will discuss a historically relatively new phenomenon in European higher education systems: academic entrepreneurialism – especially with regard to governance and management. Entrepreneurial universities seem to be increasingly important points of reference for international and European-level policy discussions about the future of higher education. Entrepreneurial institutions, functionally similar although variously termed, currently seem to be an almost natur...

  18. A Comparison of Preschool Children's Discussions with Parents during Picture Book and Chapter Book Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Kathryn A.; Rowe, Meredith L.

    2014-01-01

    Discussions that occur during book reading between parents and preschool children relate to children's language development, especially discussions during picture books that include extended discourse, a form of abstract language. While a recent report shows increased chapter book reading among families with preschool children, it is unknown…

  19. Chapter 9: Planting hardwood tree seedlings on reclaimed mine land in the Appalachian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. Davis; J. Franklin; C. Zipper; P. Angel

    2017-01-01

    The Forestry Reclamation Approach (FRA) is a method of reclaiming surface coal mines to forested postmining land use (Chapter 2, this volume). "Use proper tree planting techniques" is Step 5 of the FRA; when used with the other FRA steps, proper tree planting can help to ensure successful reforestation. Proper care and planting of tree seedlings is essential...

  20. 77 FR 60170 - Americans With Disabilities Act: Proposed Circular Chapter, Vehicle Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... specifically. The chapter is designed to be a reference document for public entities acquiring vehicles to..., explaining that 49 CFR part 38 sets the technical design specifications for accessible vehicles, while Part..., it cannot contract away its ADA responsibility; the contractor ``stands in the shoes'' of the public...

  1. 41 CFR Appendix C to Chapter 301 - Standard Data Elements for Federal Travel [Traveler Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... according to method of payment. Signature/Date Fields Claimant Signature Traveler's signature, or digital... signature, or digital representation. The signature signifies the travel claim is approved for payment based... Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES Ch. 301, App. C Appendix C to Chapter 301—Standard...

  2. Water and water use in southern Nevada [Chapter 3] (Executive Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne R. Belcher; Michael J. Moran; Megan E.. Rogers

    2013-01-01

    Water and water use in southern Nevada is an important issue. The scarcity of water resources for both human and biologic communities often leads to intense competition for both surface and ground waters. Anthropogenic and climate change impacts on scarce water resources need to be understood to assess human and ecosystem health for southern Nevada. Chapter 3 outlines...

  3. Oklo: The fossil nuclear reactors. Physics study - Translation of chapters 6, 13 and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudet, R. [CEA, Paris (France)

    1996-09-01

    Three parts of the 1991 book `Oklo: reacteurs nucleaires fossiles. Etude physique` have been translated in this report. The chapters bear the titles `Study of criticality`(45 p.), `Some problems with the overall functioning of the reactor zones`(45 p.) and `Conclusions` (15 p.), respectively.

  4. Capturing spatiotemporal variation in wildfires for improving postwildfire debris‐flow hazard assessments [Chapter 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica Haas; Matthew Thompson; Anne Tillery; Joe H. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires can increase the frequency and magnitude of catastrophic debris flows. Integrated, proactive naturalhazard assessment would therefore characterize landscapes based on the potential for the occurrence and interactions of wildfires and postwildfire debris flows. This chapter presents a new modeling effort that can quantify the variability surrounding a key...

  5. Historical and pictorial perspective of the Upper Verde River [Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvin L. Medina; Daniel G. Neary

    2012-01-01

    The UVR corridor is a diverse riverine ecosystem in central Arizona (see Chapter 1). Since European settlement, it has witnessed many events such as droughts, floods, construction of Sullivan Dam, groundwater withdrawals, cattle grazing, mining, nonnative fish introductions, native fish extinctions, and urbanization that are not fully understood. Geologically, the UVR...

  6. 22 CFR Appendix A to Chapter Xiv - Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Current Addresses and Geographic Jurisdictions A Appendix A to Chapter XIV Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE IMPASSE...

  7. Healthy outdoor recreation: An integrated approach to linking physical activity with wellness goals. Chapter 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster; David M. Buchner

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the shared interest of the public health and leisure fields in promoting outdoor recreation. We describe how trans disciplinary integration of research efforts across these fields can lead to a better understanding of how outdoor recreation facilities and programs can help realize a full range of health and wellness benefits....

  8. Chapter 3: Selecting materials for mine soil construction when establishing forests on Appalachian mined lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff Skousen; Carl Zipper; Jim Burger; Christopher Barton; Patrick. Angel

    2017-01-01

    The Forestry Reclamation Approach (FRA), a method for reclaiming coal-mined land to forest (Chapter 2, this volume), is based on research, knowledge, and experience of forest soil scientists and reclamation practitioners. Step 1 of the FRA is to create a suitable rooting medium for good tree growth that is no less than 4 feet deep and consists of topsoil, weathered...

  9. Page 1 iy THE NEW PHYSIOLOGY OF VISION Chapter VI. Vision in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    fresh lines of approach to the basic problems which confront us in the ris logy of vision. In the present chapter, we shall make use cf sense cfth findings to elucidate the nature and origin of the differences between is sensations at low and at high levels of illumination. We may begin by mention- ing Some facts of observation ...

  10. Chapter 3: Omics Advances of Biosynthetic Pathways of Isoprenoid Production in Microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua-Michel, J.; Subramanian, Venkataramanan

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the current status of microalgal isoprenoids and the role of omics technologies, or otherwise specified, in bioproducts optimization and applications are reviewed. Emphasis is focused in the metabolic pathways of microalgae involved in the production of commercially important products, namely, hydrocarbons and biofuels, nutraceuticals, and pharmaceuticals.

  11. Chapter 05: Basic characters used in the identification of wood with a hand lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    The characters presented in this chapter represent the minimal set of terms and concepts necessary to build skill and proficiency in wood identification with a hand lens. This list is not exhaustive, nor is it in complete agreement with the characters used by other authors, in other references, or in traditional microscopic wood anatomy.

  12. Human interactions with the environment through time in southern Nevada [Chapter 8] (Executive Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol B. Raish

    2013-01-01

    Southern Nevada is rich in irreplaceable cultural resources that include archeological remains, historic sites, cultural landscapes, and other areas of significance to Native Americans and other cultural groups. This chapter provides information related to Goal 2 in the SNAP Science Research Strategy, which is to “Provide for responsible use of Southern Nevada’s lands...

  13. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  14. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  15. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  16. Chapter Five

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    (11) If you are going to London, I can give you the address of a good hotel there. We analyze (10) & (11) as describing other uncommon dimensions of anaphoric relations. May we note that the analysis of an advertisement copy on 'Nylon' by Cook (151) shows cohesive devices like the ones exemplified above and others:.

  17. Chapter Six

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    in pinyin and character writing and essay writing were the data used. The scripts were randomly selected and analysed. Findings from the analysis, it showed that the students commit grammatical errors and other errors. Mother tongue interference and inadequate exposure to the Chinese language environment were ...

  18. Chapter One

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alemayehu

    thematic classification, categorical analysis, and contextualization. Simple descriptive .... cycle. Empirical research has also revealed that over-age learners accounted for 60% of the total primary school dropout (Hunt,. 2008: 2). In sum, causes that lead to early school leaving have .... a composite summary was carried out.

  19. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    plasma sodium (p<0.05) and potassium (p<0.01) were significantly decreased in depressed patients when compared with corresponding normal controls while the mean plasma calcium (p<0.05) and urea (p<0.01) were significantly increased in depressed subjects in ... depolarization of the cell membrane. There are.

  20. Chapter Twelve

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    elements, psychological and linguistic, are essential: they combine to produce a single 'brand image' of a product. Since advertisements rely almost totally on the ... response. The sender encodes the message and sends it through a channel · This channel is nothing but the language used – words, actions, signs, objects, ...

  1. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    68(9), 4865–4871. Rice, K., Peralta, R., Bast, D., de Azavedo, J. and. McGavin, M. J. (2001): Description of staphylococcus serine protease (ssp) operon in Staphylococcus aureus and nonpolar inactivation of sspA-encoded serine protease. Infect. Immun 69, 159–169. Rupp, M. E. and Archer, G. L. (1992): Hemagglutination.

  2. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    predictors of under-five mortality were; age, religion, wealth index, cooking fuel type, preceding birth interval, type of toilet facility ... identified predictors of childhood mortality when designing childhood mortality reduction strategies in Nigeria. Keywords: Child ..... Determinants of Child Mortality in Rural China: A Competing.

  3. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    (Fountain et al.,2008). The skewing of more male offspring in this study could be because of the oleic acid exposure, or because of the dose of the exposure of the dams to the oleic acid or because of the type of animal species used. The fat composition of diets, especially the fatty acids, could influence several events in the ...

  4. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Research Paper. Estimation of Indoor Radon from Concrete Blocks Used In. Construction of Wall in Typical Nigerian Dwellings. Janet A. Ademola. Department of Physics ... gamma ray spectroscopy measurements of radium concentration using generic equation. ... emanation rate (i.e. the rate at which the atoms are.

  5. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Background: Uvaria chamae is a medicinal plant that is used in many parts of the world in the treatment of diabetes, and other diseases. However, research is needed to ascertain the beneficial and adverse effects of the consumption of the extract. In this study, we evaluated the acute and subchronic oral toxicity ...

  6. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ETBAY

    2011). Research, ethic and law. Workshop organised by faculty of Arts. Empangeni: University of Zululand. Tylor, R. S. (2010).The process of asking question. Journal of the American Society of. Information Science and Technology. 13: 391-396.

  7. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    bacterial Activity of Methanolic Leaf Extract of Plukenetia conophora Mull. arg. against. Selected Bacteria Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection, International Journal of. Microbiology and Application, 1(1): 1-10. Falconer, E. (1933). Treatment of Polycythemia, the reticulocyte response to venesection phenylhydrazin and.

  8. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Wistar rats were randomly divided into groups (n=6) receiving different oral treatments consisting of vehicle, aqueous ginger extract (250 and 500 mg/kg), ethanol ginger extract (250 and 500 mg). The ... temperature before being pulverized with an electric grinder. The powdered ginger was extracted with distilled water and ...

  9. Chapter Ten

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Introduction. There are many goals of cultural psychology. Research with a focus on culture itself is concerned with thought processes within members of a particular culture and how those thought processes are similar and different between cultures. For this research, culture is a crucial variable because culture itself is the ...

  10. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a_wolf

    conflict in Africa is limited to the legacy of colonialism, but Williams dismisses this notion. He highlights that, while social and economic inequalities and ethnicity are but just some of the causes, the nature of conflict in Africa is the result of a complex dynamic system. In support of the complexities, one can draw from the ...

  11. CHAPTER 16

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    micronutrients in Africa, such as iron, zinc, and vitamin A. Because it is an ... crops, there was widespread skepticism in the agriculture sector that farmer preferences ... prevalence and an agro-ecological environment suitable for growing sweet.

  12. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Early childhood mortality remains a major public health problem in developing countries. Under-five mortality rate of 157 per. 1000 live birth currently observed in Nigeria is one of the highest worldwide. Against the backdrop of limited childhood mortality research in Nigeria, this study identified predictors of ...

  13. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    C. tropicalis > C. krusei. It is concluded that broncho-oro-pharyngeal Candida and other yeast-like species existed in about one third of the HIV and AIDS patients studied; in which C. albicans was the most prevalent, while about ten percent of all the Candida isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The reliability of germ tube ...

  14. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    were screened for (i) antibiotic-susceptibility over a range of 11 classes of antibiotics, (ii) β-lactamase production, (iii) ESBL production and (iv) Efflux pump .... Strains showing the colour change after 10 min were considered as inducible ..... clinical doses of an antibiotic will be present as a sub-clinical dose in vivo which will ...

  15. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT: The fruit bodies of three Ganoderma species namely G. lucidium, G. applanatum and G. australe were collected from the decaying logs within the University of Ibadan Botanical Gardens .Invitro antagonistic effect of the ethanol, methanol and distilled water extracts of these macro fungi were tested against some ...

  16. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Understanding female adolescents' acceptance of HPV vaccine is important as it is not well documented across secondary schools in Nigeria. Since adolescents are within the target age group for HPV vaccination there is need to determine their perception and readiness for this vaccination and document the level of use.

  17. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    prevalence among filling stations attendants who are perceived to belong to the group that are exposed to high occupational risk. .... treatment. Known occupational risk factors such as heavy lifting, twisting, pulling, pushing, bending, stooping, prolonged standing and awkward postures at work are ..... associated with aging.

  18. Chapter Three

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    under God dedicated to the promotion of inter-African solidarity, world peace, international co-operation and understanding: AND TO PROVIDE for a constitution for the purpose of promoting the good government and welfare of all persons in our country on the principles of Freedom,. Equality and Justice, and for the purpose ...

  19. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    None of the WKY rats had the vascular disease (n=373). Arterial lesions were ... disease. In most studies, vasculitis is more prevalent in women but there is great variation with respect to the type or classification of the vasculitis (giant cell, periateritis nodosa ... of the celiac trunk and the vasculature was flushed with. 200 ml of ...

  20. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    hydro-methanolic extract of this plant as it affects gastric mucosal integrity and basal gastric secretions using the ethanol-induced ulcer model. ... of gastric juice, titratable acidity and acid output were assessed for basal gastric secretions. The result showed a .... humidity, temperature and light/dark cycle respectively and.

  1. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    This study investigated the role of gastric acid, neutrophil infiltration and oxidative stress in the ... Indomethacin caused gastric ulcer with an index of 7.50 ± 0.23, increase in MDA concentration and reduction in the concentration. SOD and CAT .... dried at room temperature and pulverized to fine powder. The extraction was ...

  2. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    2014-03-28

    Mar 28, 2014 ... (160 – 200g) were used. They were divided into four groups viz: control, thyroidectomised, thyroidectomised with thyroxine treatment (100µg/kg/day) and Sham operated animals treated with thyroxine. After 35 days of drug treatment and surgery, ulcer was induced in stomach of animals using acetic acid ...

  3. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Full Length Research Paper. Mathematical Modeling of Sickle Cell Anaemia in ... Department of Mathematics, School of Science and Science Education, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University,. P.M.B. 0248 Bauchi, Nigeria. ... Bioline International, African Journals online (AJOL), Index. Copernicus, African Index Medicus ...

  4. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    easily transmitted to young children by contaminated water, hands, and food. As a result, infants in less developed countries suffer on the average six to eight separate episodes of diarrhoeal disease per child (1). In an extremely conservative estimate, investigators calculated that there are at least 750 million to 1 billion ...

  5. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    cell disease in some cell types and organs of the body are examined in this review. INTRODUCTION ..... Stem cell transplantation (Piel et al, 2013) and gene therapy (Townes ... of fetal hemoglobin: raising the therapeutic bar in sickle cell ...

  6. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    www.jaaps.aapsnet.org. Research Article. Circadian changes in urinary Na+/K+ ratio in humans: is there a role for aldosterone? E.O. Asowata*, B.P. Ilenwabor and L.F.O. Obika. Department of Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, ...

  7. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    insulin and its combination with resveratrol or curcumin in attenuation of diabetic neuropathic pain: participation of nitric oxide and TNF-alpha. Phytother. Res., 21: 278-283. Reaven GM, (2003). Insulin resistance/compensatory hyperinsulinemia, essential hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.

  8. Chapter Ten

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    individual differences in psychological processing that may be hard to observe when studying individuals from only a single culture. To be clear, this aim is very different from other subfields in psychology. Much of psychology (and particularly cognitive psychology) focuses on typical behavior. Data are described by ...

  9. CHAPTER 8

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nutritional and consumer backgrounds, the crop development and release of orange maize varieties, the ... most important staple crop in Zambia, both in terms of production and consumption. Zambian hybrid maize ..... varieties are also being tested in Brazil, China, Colombia, India, Mozambique, and. Panama. Released ...

  10. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    cystatin C was superior to serum uric acid and serum creatinine in detection of pre-eclampsia but not a ... The syndrome is characterized by vasospasm, haemo- ..... (1970). Structural-functional correlations in renal disease. II. The correlations. Hum Pathol1(4):631-41. Sheen Y.J., Sheu W.H. (2011). Metabolic syndrome.

  11. CHAPTER 7

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    James Sales

    ostriches reared under similar conditions does influence the overall fatty acid profiles of ... (Hoffman et al., 2007) without adversely influencing quality (lipid, protein, ... programming was linear at 4 ºC/min, with an initial temperature of 140 ºC, ...

  12. CHAPTER TWO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KOSTER

    In order to use classical PCR, the exact sequence of nucleotides that flank (are ... direction and synthesizes a new complementary template in the 5´-3´ direction, ... genome; the technique is suitable for use with various DNA markers such as Variable ... Depending on the primer/template combination and ratios, amplified.

  13. Chapter Two

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    space. The novel continues to yield new meanings at each reading. A work written to set the score right about ... (227). The heroism or otherwise of. Department of English, University of Lagos, Akoka – Lagos. 14 ..... He goes on to opine that he shuts out aesthetic pleasure because his father was a flutist, and opens the door ...

  14. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Oral treatment with WAP elicited inhibitory activity in hot plate test. Abdominal writhing was significantly reduced by .... Test Substance: WAP is finely ground polyherbal extract containing leaves and roots of Plumbago .... of cell free exudates was mixed with 2.8 mL of Biuret reagent and allowed to incubate in the dark for 30 ...

  15. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Department of Restorative Dentistry College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. We report a case of a girl with a perplexing clinical feature of simultaneous occurrence of periodontal and skin abscesses that resolved following periodontal therapy. Infections and inflammations have the capacity to ...

  16. Chapter Thirty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    the existence of Nigerian English (see Jowitt, Bamgbose and Ubahakwe), and this recognition imposes a burden on the scholar ... is the “character” aspect which is a conscious attempt to capture Igbo speech nuances in a linguistic framework that is ..... The idioms are not as deep and complex as the proverbs, and so they ...

  17. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BRIAN PC

    Taking coffee/short break during working hours. Male. Female. 2.2. 2.0. Going on vacation/sabbatical leave. Male. Female. 2.3. 2.4. Altering the way I perceive the situation. Male. Female. 2.4. 2.3. Positive self esteem/optimism. Male. Female. 2.3. 2.4. Physical exercise/fitness. Male. Female. 2.2. 2.4. Developing healthy life.

  18. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    There is general consensus that PBL engages more student involvement and challenges self-directed .... input in organising the lecture session is also taken into account when they make representations at the weekly ... found to be extremely difficult for the students to appreciate, then seminars are organised which is made.

  19. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    that in the United States, agrochemicals' contacts with skins result in several skin disorders which are among the occupational health hazards frequently reported with more than. $1 billion estimated cost implications to the United States economy. .... being 73.38%, while the overall variance inflation factor (VIF) was 1.20.

  20. CHAPTER 4

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aurelie Bechoff

    also occurs during the storage of dried products (e.g. from sweet potato, maize, cassava) ... compared to those dried using solar or sun drying (up to 24%). ..... vegetables. Plant Food Hum. Nutr. 2003; 58(3): 1-15. 10. Hagenimana V, Carey E, Gichuki ST, Oyunga MA and JK Imungi. Carotenoid contents in fresh, dried and ...

  1. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    distemper virus (PDV) and dolphin and porpoise morbillivirus. (DMV) (Barrett et al., 1993). In Nigeria, Livestock production makes a major contribution to the Agrarian sector of the economy (Adeleye,. 1998). Goat which is referred to as the poor man's cow (Odunsi et al, 2005) has some advantages over the cow in terms of its.

  2. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    producing (ATCC 700603) were included at every stage for quality control. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were carried out on each of the isolates as described by .... water/buffer µl. Broth culture µl. Total Volume µl. Final drug concentrations µg/ml. Drug Stock solution. µg/ml. 500. 250. 125. 62.5. 31.25. 15.625. 7.813. 3.9065.

  3. CHAPTER IV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-11-13

    Nov 13, 2014 ... known to cause salmonellosis in broiler chickens (Ribeiro et al., 2007; Van Immerseel et al., 2009). Growth performance parameters in broilers may be regarded as indication of the severity of S. Typhimurium infection. Body weight gain was found to decrease from 14% to 33%, and feed conversion ratio to ...

  4. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chipo P Mubaya

    in semi arid areas of Tanzania: A case of. Nzega District in Tabora region. Majule ... research program to study the implications of climate change on natural and social systems in three agro ecolocilal zones in Tanzania. ... resulted in loss on various crop yields ranging from 46 to 80%. Most crops affected are in the order.

  5. CHAPTER 7

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    James Sales

    genotype on the fatty acid composition of the musculus gastrocnemius and musculus iliofibularis, and abdominal ... Ostrich meat contains a relatively high concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids (Sales, 1998;. Girolami et ...... meat: physico-chemical characteristics and comparison with turkey and bovine meat. Meat Sci.

  6. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    cells cannot produce other important fatty acids, and fatty acid derivatives. Beef and poultry contain 30-45% of oleic acid while oils like grape seed, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower contain 25-49% oleic acid. (Waterman and Lockwood, 2007). Oleic acid also forms a large percentage of olive oil which is the staple fat of ...

  7. Chapter 5

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN OTHER

    Abstract. The development of low erucic acid, low glucosinolate cultivars of canola seed has led to the availability of a feed ingredient with considerable potential to replace soyabean meal in diets for all classes of farm animals. The sinapine and glucosinolate content of various canola cultivars cultivated in two areas of.

  8. Chapter Nineteen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    English Language and Literature, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, the paper observed the total lack of knowledge of this ... Metaphors We Live By. Metaphor is seen as ubiquitous in the representation of human ... lexicogrammatical features of Transitivity (clause as representation of doings, happenings, being, having ...

  9. Chapter Four

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    also showed that all the teachers in the private schools would prefer to teach their pupils in English. Language. ... further to describe mother tongue as the language that fully identifies with the personal or native culture of ... tertiary to the key process of intergenerational mother tongue transmission, which must be carried out ...

  10. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    0.05) of Normal Protein-energy diet-Carbendazim- and ... to Carbendazim. Key words: Carbendazim Effects, Protein-energy Malnutrition, Testis Structure, Testosterone, Quails ..... Kamala K (1987) Drug/Xenobiotic-Metabolism, Disposition.

  11. CHAPTER SEVEN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Uli symbols derived from the traditional body and wall paintings, and wood carving became veritable sources of design ideas and motifs. Some elemental forces like thunder, lightening and the Moon and Sun provide sources for this iconography. Some aspects and materials of the Igbo culture like the masquerade tradition, ...

  12. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    (P<0.05). The results also showed that lead acetate significantly decreased the relaxation response induced by Ach after PE pre- ... poisoning and hypertension is related, at least in part, to enhanced vasocontractile response to phenylephrine as well as attenuated ... lead in drinking water increases vascular reactivity to PE.

  13. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The disability caused by stroke could lead to significant decline in the level of functioning and deterioration of quality of life. (QoL). QoL assessment ... severity, disability and depression are the important predictors of QoL among Nigerian stroke survivors. .... cognitive impairment and previous psychiatric illness. (Fatoye et al ...

  14. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    mg/kg) significantly reduced exudate volume (37.2 and 44.1%), protein (42.0 and 54.1%), total leucocytes (59.1 and 60.2) and neutrophils count (57.3 and ..... glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays. Estimation of ... of cell free exudates was mixed with 2.8 mL of Biuret reagent and allowed to incubate in the ...

  15. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Background: Maternal treatment with dexamethasone during development altered glucocorticoid activity in Wistar rat offspring. Increased glucocorticoid levels may affect serum electrolyte levels and the architecture of the adrenal cortex. This study was designed to investigate the effects of maternal treatment ...

  16. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    plethysmography showed that the blood pressure elevating effect of a high salt diet set in around the second week of salt loading, and by the third week the intact and high salt group had developed hypertension. Orchidectomy delayed the onset of hypertension following a high salt diet till about the fifth week of salt loading.

  17. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Changing the malaria epidemiology will affect the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum. We studied the association between diversity at ... resistance in many countries, it is therefore important for drug surveillance studies using ... a median age of 32 months. Based on the criteria of the World Health Organization, 115.

  18. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    aim of this study, was to assess and compare the anaesthetic indices and vital parameters of West African Dwarf (WAD) goats naturally infected with PPR before and after epidural anaesthesia with plain lignocaine and also to compare the measured .... calculated amount of local anaesthetic agent was attached to the.

  19. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Teaching Hospital. Fadupin G.Ta, Fagbola B, Ogunkunle M.O. aDepartment of Human Nutrition. Faculty of Public Health, University of Ibadan. Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT ... None reported to have a family history of breast cancer and none had ever smoked cigarette .... Landa et al (1994), in a Spanish study showed that.

  20. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Abstracted by: Bioline International, African Journals online (AJOL), Index Copernicus, African Index Medicus (WHO), Excerpta medica. (EMBASE), CAB Abstracts, SCOPUS, Global Health Abstracts, Asian Science Index, Index Veterinarius. INTRODUCTION. In Homo sapiens, reproduction is initiated by the mating of a.

  1. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    PDCD1 (2016): PDCD1 programmed cell death 1 [Homo sapiens. (human)] Gene ID: 5133, updated on 23-Oct-2016 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gene/5133. Taube JM, Anders RA, Young GD, Xu H, Sharma R, McMiller. TL, et al. (2012): Colocalization of inflammatory response with B7- h1 expression in human melanocytic ...

  2. CHAPTER 6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4 International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), CIMMYT Research. Station, El Batan ... Plasma-Mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) require sample digestion prior to analysis and highly pure reagents and ... HarvestPlus program, carotenoid analysis is essential for sweet potato, cassava and maize. Each of these ...

  3. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    range, chronic administration of the extract of C. sordidum may lead to infertility and further progress to sterility. It is therefore recommended that C. sordidum should not be administered at doses exceeding 200mg/kg and chronic exposure should be avoided in males with reproductive potentials. Keywords: Toxicology, Male ...

  4. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    thirst mechanisms can only be appreciated in human subjects as animals can neither report the sensation for water nor indicate the motive for its intake. ... extremes zero thirst at the bottom and very thirsty at the. 10cm mark. It was however emphasized to each subject that any mark above 0cm is a positive manifestation of.

  5. Chapter Thirty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    verbalization, in metaphor, of an important aspect of Igbo value system. The English language, in which the proverb is expressed, now becomes the medium of expression some. Igbo cultural values – system. In Arrow of God .... will teach Obu “how water got into the pumpkin”(131) (otu mmiri siri baa n'opi ụgbọgụrụ); an Igbo ...

  6. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chuka

    over the internet protocols (VOIP), live chats, web portals and many of such components that make up the global village. Keeping watch over valuable property, homes, and industries from any part of the world could be achievable via the internet, the concept provides a system for detecting an event within a premises and ...

  7. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    2001-02-01

    Feb 1, 2001 ... sciences teaching in that even though they are topic authorities and experts in a field of research, they may be unlikely discipline loyalists and possibly lack the preservation instinct of discipline authorities. The interdisciplinary move in science graduate programs is an evolution from interdisciplinary move in ...

  8. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    implicated in regulating processes such as glial cell function, neuronal cell development and apoptosis. (Ndong, Landry et al. 2012). Similarly, decreased. MKP-1 levels have been reported in some neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease, cerebral hypoxia and ischemia (Taylor, Moser et al.

  9. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. The study was conducted at the dental clinic of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-. Ife. A total of 100 carious samples were collected from children of varying age and sexes. The bacteria isolated were S. mutans: 45.6%, Lactobacillus spp: 41.2% and S. aureus: 13.2%. Out of the 100 ...

  10. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Exposure of school children to lead from various sources, including the school environment, is perilous to their health. In this study, teachers' knowledge of Lead Poisoning (LP) was assessed and the effects of training on their knowledge, perceptions and self-efficacy for preventing childhood LP in Ido Local ...

  11. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GEORGE

    collected with the aid of structured questionnaire, measurement and observation; and from the Abia. State Ministry of housing and urban planning handbooks respectively. The sample size of 400 respondents was determined from the study population of 125,257 using the Taro Yamane model for sample size determination.

  12. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    and pollution on the antioxidant defenses of the cichlid fish acará (Geophagus brasiliensis). Brazilian Journal of Medical. Biology and Research, 34: 719-726. Woldemichael, G. M. and Wink, M. (2001). Identification and biological activities of triterpenoid saponins from. Chenopodium quinoa. Journal of Agriculture Food.

  13. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    hypertension in CKD patients. FGF-23 induced alterations in intracellular calcium is hypothesized to be a .... intracellular calcium concentration (Klee et al., 1998;. Dolmetsch et al., 1997). As a phosphatase, activated .... it is plausible that excess FGF-23 in CKD causes oxidative stress, which then affect the bioavailability of.

  14. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Availability of more calcium for absorption could help patients with CRF to prevent renal osteodystrophy; a condition whereby abnormal amounts of calcium are released from the bone as a result of low serum calcium (Mitch and Klahrs,. 2002). It is essential to control sodium and potassium content of the diets of individuals ...

  15. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    inflammation, edema and hemorrhage. In diabetic control animals (Plate B - left), histological examination revealed moderate to severe infiltration of the gastric mucosa and submucosa by eosinophils. Limited surface mucin production of mucous epithelial cells was also observed. In the magnesium treated diabetic animals.

  16. CHAPTER ONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chipo P Mubaya

    to be viable on adaptation. To strengthen adaptation rural-urban, urban-rural and rural-rural linkages needs to be facilitated so that products and information can flow from all ends. Key words: Adaptation, climate change, Mbogwe, Upungu, linkages. INTRODUCTION. Global change, especially climate change, is one of the.

  17. Chapter Three

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TonukariJ

    104:1113-1118. Wegener S, Ransom RF, Walton JD (1999). A unique eukaryotic b- xylosidase gene from the phytopathogenic fungus Cochliobolus carbonum. Microbiology 145:1089-1095. Zeilinger S, Mach RL, Schindler M, Herzog P, Kubicek CP (1996). Different inducibility of expression of the two xylanase genes xyn1.

  18. CHAPTER VI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHIMEREZE

    Nigerian reality without imitating European styles” Enwonwu, as an artist sought to resolve this problem by incorporating African forms into his paintings. .... specific time periods and societal contexts on the creation and manipulation of images in the production of art. The time period of Ben Enwonwu was different from that ...

  19. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The Counter drugs [OTC] that Nigerian regulatory authorities, such as Pharmacy Council of Nigeria, consider safe for unsupervised public use, as long as they are sold in their original manufacturer packages. (Brieger, Unwin, Greer and Meek, 2005). Despite this restriction, several studies confirm that. PMVs in Nigeria not ...

  20. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bouis, Howarth (HarvestPlus)

    Mineral and vitamin deficiencies are a serious public health problem in Africa. The ... In non-emergency situations, poverty is a major factor that limits intake of adequate, nutritious food, which must be available, accessible, and affordable to the poor. ...... European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) Scientific Opinion on Dietary.

  1. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    In the article “Protective effects of aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis on mercury-induced histological and oxidative changes in the Rat hippocampus and cerebellum” by Owoeye O and Gabriel M.O, which appeared on pages 241-247 of the. September 2016 issue, Plate 3 was missed out at the last stage of production.

  2. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ¹Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medical Sciences,. University of Benin ... biochemical and histological support to the ethno medicinal uses of the plant in the management and/or control of diabetes mellitus. Keywords: ... Diabetes Association of Nigeria (DAN) had put the diabetic's ...

  3. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    exercise and post exercise cortisol levels were significantly higher than at the basal state in both male and female athletes. Also, ... before the exercise. They were then subjected to strenuous exercise for 30 minutes done at their own choice of intensity, and their blood samples were collected again immediately after the ...

  4. Chapter Seventeen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    In his analysis, John Locke (Omoregbe 59) makes a link between language and national development. He states that there are interrelationships in-between language, words, ideas and knowledge; in other words, that they are closely related. According to his explanation, language is the means of human communication ...

  5. Chapter Twenty

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    pictures of destitute, starving children, raped and battered women and cases of pollution. This is an indication that crime has taken over the society due to the economic situation of Delta state of Nigeria. ..... embark on education of his children so that they will not just have good jobs, but penetrate the oil companies in which ...

  6. Chapter 4

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sun Botha

    Ca2+ ions from the sarcotubular system (Whiting, 1980; Hertzman et al., 1993). Simultaneously, the rate of anaerobic glycolysis and therefore the production of ATP and lactic acid was slower, leading to lower levels of ATP than in the muscle strips at 37 °C. This resulted in tension due to the binding between actin and.

  7. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Treatment, with aqueous extract of CP reduced the damage caused by irradiation when compared with vitamins .... freely ventilated and naturally illuminated (12 hour light/dark cycle) animal house of the Department of ..... and glycated hemoglobin in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia with and without superimposed Type II ...

  8. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    4. whose consumption was not affected by ill- health, fasting, national ... intake. It was conducted by trained interviewers at the home of the subjects. Subjects were asked to recall all foods eaten and beverages taken in the previous twenty-four hours prior to ... derived using the FAO guidelines for measuring household and ...

  9. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    As this is a direct violation of copyright, plagiarism, and ethical norms, we therefore wish to retract this paper from the published archive of the African Journal of Biomedical Research. The authors of the paper were duly communicated on this decision. We apologise to the peer reviewers of this paper on the valuable time.

  10. Chapter Eight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Span. atender (to pay attention). Engl. (to) attend to = Span. ocuparse de. ≠ Span. atender (a shop assistant). In type 3 the semantic constituent is introduced as a part of a component in the classification of cognate words, and the partial variable refers to the characteristic. Partial false friends have one main meaning in one ...

  11. Chapter Nine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    attention span may impede the communication process. Conclusion. The human elements in the communication process must strive to achieve by all means competence in the use of language in communication. First is what Chomsky described as linguistic competence and the other is Searle's communicative competence.

  12. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The data obtained were fed into SPSS version 16.0 package and analyzed using descriptive statistics of mean ... and internal medicine units had the largest physiotherapy services utilization across the 4-year period studied while the Obstetrics and gynaecology .... incorrect have been recorded in previous studies. (Balogun ...

  13. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT: The development of a video titled “Itoju Eyin” (meaning care of the teeth) was prompted by research findings which revealed poor oral hygiene among Nigerian children from the lower socioeconomic class. Videos have been employed as a medium of dental health education and research has shown them to be ...

  14. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. Background: The involvement of hypercholesterolemia in cardiovascular disorders has been widely researched but the impact on the specific cardiovascular (CV) indices following remodeling and cardiac malfunction remain to be fully elucidated. The aim this research is intended to further the understanding of ...

  15. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    instance, Tomisato et al (2004) reported that guinea pig gastric mucosal cells in primary culture treated with ... the increased oxidative stress by pro-ulcerative factors in the gut such as Helicobater pylori (Uemura et al,. 2001) ... optical density compared with the control cells provided a quantitative assessment of cell death.

  16. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    hypothesised the development of auto-immune disease in long term alcohol- and cigarette-users. Key Words: Immune-responses, cigarettes, alcohol, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION1. Immune responses and resistance to opportunistic infections are affected by tobacco smoke. The precise mechanism(s) by which smoking affects ...

  17. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    2017-08-20

    Aug 20, 2017 ... the community. In South Africa for example majority of the citizens are poor and unemployed with almost 60% of poor households living in rural areas with limited access to decent healthcare ... Whittaker, 2012), scalable architecture, which would enable programmes ..... Journal of Community Psychology,.

  18. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    partitioning in a biphasic medium (International Union of Pure and applied Chemistry, 1997). ... (Mannhold et al, 2009); potentiometric titration techniques, www.ajbrui.org ..... European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 65(5):435-42. Serda, M.

  19. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    for early detection of the disease among them is not a common practice in Nigeria. This study therefore ... in Ondo town. A validated interviewer administered questionnaire was used to solicit information on CC-related knowledge and ..... service in areas inaccessible to public transport creates barriers to the attendance of ...

  20. CHAPTER IV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-10-29

    Oct 29, 2015 ... TechnoMos (prebiotic), GalliPro (probiotic) and a mixture of TechnoMos and GalliPro (symbiotic) on growth .... Enterobacteriaceae was isolated on MacConkey agar (Oxoid CM7) after an ..... cell wall product prepared from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, particularly in the first week of the chicken's life.