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Sample records for adaptor molecule grb2

  1. The adaptor protein Grb2 is not essential for the establishment of the glomerular filtration barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bisson

    Full Text Available The kidney filtration barrier is formed by the combination of endothelial cells, basement membrane and epithelial cells called podocytes. These specialized actin-rich cells form long and dynamic protrusions, the foot processes, which surround glomerular capillaries and are connected by specialized intercellular junctions, the slit diaphragms. Failure to maintain the filtration barrier leads to massive proteinuria and nephrosis. A number of proteins reside in the slit diaphragm, notably the transmembrane proteins Nephrin and Neph1, which are both able to act as tyrosine phosphorylated scaffolds that recruit cytoplasmic effectors to initiate downstream signaling. While association between tyrosine-phosphorylated Neph1 and the SH2/SH3 adaptor Grb2 was shown in vitro to be sufficient to induce actin polymerization, in vivo evidence supporting this finding is still lacking. To test this hypothesis, we generated two independent mouse lines bearing a podocyte-specific constitutive inactivation of the Grb2 locus. Surprisingly, we show that mice lacking Grb2 in podocytes display normal renal ultra-structure and function, thus demonstrating that Grb2 is not required for the establishment of the glomerular filtration barrier in vivo. Moreover, our data indicate that Grb2 is not required to restore podocyte function following kidney injury. Therefore, although in vitro experiments suggested that Grb2 is important for the regulation of actin dynamics, our data clearly shows that its function is not essential in podocytes in vivo, thus suggesting that Grb2 rather plays a secondary role in this process.

  2. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine......-phosphorylated and associated in vivo with the Grb2 protein. This association can be reproduced in stably and transiently transfected cells, as well as in vitro using recombinant Grb2 protein. Association requires the presence of an intact SH2 domain in Grb2, as well as tyrosine phosphorylation of R-PTP-alpha. This observation...... links a receptor tyrosine phosphatase with a key component of a central cellular signalling pathway and provides a basis for addressing R-PTP-alpha function....

  3. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-alpha is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the adaptor protein Grb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Batzer, A; Sap, J

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) have generated interest because of their suspected involvement in cellular signal transduction. The adaptor protein Grb2 has been implicated in coupling receptor tyrosine kinases to Ras. We report that a ubiquitous R-PTPase, R-PTP-alpha, is tyrosine-phos...

  4. Association between receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha and the Grb2 adaptor. Dual Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain requirement and functional consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Yang, L T; Sap, J

    1996-01-01

    binding site in RPTPalpha was studied further by expression of wild type or mutant RPTPalpha proteins in PC12 cells. In these cells, wild type RPTPalpha interferes with acidic fibroblast growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth; this effect requires both the catalytic activity and the Grb2 binding Tyr798...

  5. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated stable silencing of Grb2 impairs cell growth and DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Henkels, Karen M.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2007-01-01

    Grb2 is an SH2-SH3 protein adaptor responsible for linking growth factor receptors with intracellular signaling cascades. To study the role of Grb2 in cell growth, we have generated a new COS7 cell line (COS7 shGrb2 ), based on RNAi technology, as null mutations in mammalian Grb2 genes are lethal in early development. This novel cell line continuously expresses a short hairpin RNA that targets endogenous Grb2. Stable COS7 shGrb2 cells had the shGrb2 integrated into the genomic DNA and carried on SiL construct (made refractory to the shRNA-mediated interference), but not with an SH2-deficient mutant (R86K). Thus, a viable knock-down and rescue protocol has demonstrated that Grb2 is crucial for cell proliferation

  6. GRB2 nucleates T cell receptor–mediated LAT clusters that control PLC-γ1 activation and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Yousif Bilal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of LAT signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2 but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  7. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types....

  8. Grb2 and GRAP connect the B cell antigen receptor to Erk MAP kinase activation in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanshylla, Kanika; Bartsch, Caren; Hitzing, Christoffer; Krümpelmann, Laura; Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2018-03-09

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) employs enzymatically inactive adaptor proteins to facilitate activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In animal model systems, adaptor proteins of the growth factor receptor-bound 2 (Grb2) family have been shown to serve critical functions in lymphocytes. However, the roles of Grb2 and the Grb2-related adaptor protein (GRAP) in human B lymphocytes remain unclear. Using TALEN-mediated gene targeting, we show that in human B cells Grb2 and GRAP amplify signaling by the immunoglobulin tail tyrosine (ITT) motif of mIgE-containing BCRs and furthermore connect immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling to activation of the Ras-controlled Erk MAP kinase pathway. In contrast to mouse B cells, BCR-induced activation of Erk in human B cells is largely independent of phospholipase C-ɣ activity and diacylglycerol-responsive members of Ras guanine nucleotide releasing proteins. Together, our results demonstrate that Grb2 family adaptors are critical regulators of ITAM and ITT signaling in naïve and IgE-switched human B cells.

  9. The adaptor molecule SAP plays essential roles during invariant NKT cell cytotoxicity and lytic synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid; Guan, Peng; Wiener, Susan; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André; Orange, Jordan S; Nichols, Kim E

    2013-04-25

    The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) plays critical roles during invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cell ontogeny. As a result, SAP-deficient humans and mice lack iNKT cells. The strict developmental requirement for SAP has made it difficult to discern its possible involvement in mature iNKT cell functions. By using temporal Cre recombinase-mediated gene deletion to ablate SAP expression after completion of iNKT cell development, we demonstrate that SAP is essential for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced iNKT cell cytotoxicity against T-cell and B-cell leukemia targets in vitro and iNKT-cell-mediated control of T-cell leukemia growth in vivo. These findings are not restricted to the murine system: silencing RNA-mediated suppression of SAP expression in human iNKT cells also significantly impairs TCR-induced cytolysis. Mechanistic studies reveal that iNKT cell killing requires the tyrosine kinase Fyn, a known SAP-binding protein. Furthermore, SAP expression is required within iNKT cells to facilitate their interaction with T-cell targets and induce reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center to the immunologic synapse (IS). Collectively, these studies highlight a novel and essential role for SAP during iNKT cell cytotoxicity and formation of a functional IS.

  10. The adaptor molecule Nck localizes the WAVE complex to promote actin polymerization during CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis of bacteria.

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    Stefan Pils

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CEACAM3 is a granulocyte receptor mediating the opsonin-independent recognition and phagocytosis of human-restricted CEACAM-binding bacteria. CEACAM3 function depends on an intracellular immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM-like sequence that is tyrosine phosphorylated by Src family kinases upon receptor engagement. The phosphorylated ITAM-like sequence triggers GTP-loading of Rac by directly associating with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF Vav. Rac stimulation in turn is critical for actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that generate lamellipodial protrusions and lead to bacterial uptake. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our present study we provide biochemical and microscopic evidence that the adaptor proteins Nck1 and Nck2, but not CrkL, Grb2 or SLP-76, bind to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. The association is phosphorylation-dependent and requires the Nck SH2 domain. Overexpression of the isolated Nck1 SH2 domain, RNAi-mediated knock-down of Nck1, or genetic deletion of Nck1 and Nck2 interfere with CEACAM3-mediated bacterial internalization and with the formation of lamellipodial protrusions. Nck is constitutively associated with WAVE2 and directs the actin nucleation promoting WAVE complex to tyrosine phosphorylated CEACAM3. In turn, dominant-negative WAVE2 as well as shRNA-mediated knock-down of WAVE2 or the WAVE-complex component Nap1 reduce internalization of bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide novel mechanistic insight into CEACAM3-initiated phagocytosis. We suggest that the CEACAM3 ITAM-like sequence is optimized to co-ordinate a minimal set of cellular factors needed to efficiently trigger actin-based lamellipodial protrusions and rapid pathogen engulfment.

  11. APS, an adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains, has a negative regulatory role in B cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Masanori; Kubo-Akashi, Chiyomi; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains (APS) is an intracellular adaptor protein that forms part of an adaptor family along with Lnk and SH2-B. APS transcripts are expressed in various tissues including brain, kidney, and muscle, as well as in splenic B cells but not in T cells. We investigated the functions of APS in B cell development and activation by generating APS-transgenic (APS-Tg) mice that overexpressed APS in lymphocytes. The number of B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity was reduced in APS-Tg mice, as were B-2 cells in the spleen. B cell development in the bone marrow was partially impaired at the transition stage from proliferating large pre-B to small pre-B cells. B cell proliferation induced by B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking but not by other B cell mitogens was also impaired in APS-Tg mice. APS co-localized with BCR complexes and filamentous actin in activated APS-Tg B cells. Thus, APS appears to play novel negative regulatory roles in BCR signaling, actin reorganization pathways, and control of compartment sizes of B-lineage cells

  12. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O

    2017-01-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand...... the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hours. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage...... marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. RESULTS: iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep...

  13. Adaptor Protein Complexes AP-1 and AP-3 Are Required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for Rerouting of Class I MHC Molecules to the Lysosomal Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpler, Lisa A.; Glosson, Nicole L.; Downs, Deanna; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Hudson, Amy W.

    2014-01-01

    The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s) is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes. PMID:24901711

  14. CEACAM3-mediated phagocytosis of human-specific bacterial pathogens involves the adaptor molecule Nck

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are exploited by human-specific pathogens to anchor themselves to or invade host cells. Interestingly, human granulocytes express a specific isoform, CEACAM3, that can direct efficient, opsonin-independent phagocytosis of CEACAM-binding Neisseria, Moraxella and Haemophilus species. As opsonin-independent phagocytosis of CEACAM-binding Neisseria depends on Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) phosphorylation of the CEACAM3 ...

  15. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    -human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...... hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types.......Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...

  16. The endothelial adaptor molecule TSAd is required for VEGF-induced angiogenic sprouting through junctional c-Src activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, Emma J; Fukuhara, Daisuke; Weström, Simone; Padhan, Narendra; Sjöström, Elisabet O; van Meeteren, Laurens; He, Liqun; Orsenigo, Fabrizio; Dejana, Elisabetta; Bentley, Katie; Spurkland, Anne; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) by VEGF binding is critical for vascular morphogenesis. In addition, VEGF disrupts the endothelial barrier by triggering the phosphorylation and turnover of the junctional molecule VE-cadherin, a process mediated by the

  17. Identification of GRB2 and GAB1 coexpression as an unfavorable prognostic factor for hepatocellular carcinoma by a combination of expression profile and network analysis.

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    Yanqiong Zhang

    Full Text Available AIM: To screen novel markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC by a combination of expression profile, interaction network analysis and clinical validation. METHODS: HCC significant molecules which are differentially expressed or had genetic variations in HCC tissues were obtained from five existing HCC related databases (OncoDB.HCC, HCC.net, dbHCCvar, EHCO and Liverome. Then, the protein-protein interaction (PPI network of these molecules was constructed. Three topological features of the network ('Degree', 'Betweenness', and 'Closeness' and the k-core algorithm were used to screen candidate HCC markers which play crucial roles in tumorigenesis of HCC. Furthermore, the clinical significance of two candidate HCC markers growth factor receptor-bound 2 (GRB2 and GRB2-associated-binding protein 1 (GAB1 was validated. RESULTS: In total, 6179 HCC significant genes and 977 HCC significant proteins were collected from existing HCC related databases. After network analysis, 331 candidate HCC markers were identified. Especially, GAB1 has the highest k-coreness suggesting its central localization in HCC related network, and the interaction between GRB2 and GAB1 has the largest edge-betweenness implying it may be biologically important to the function of HCC related network. As the results of clinical validation, the expression levels of both GRB2 and GAB1 proteins were significantly higher in HCC tissues than those in their adjacent nonneoplastic tissues. More importantly, the combined GRB2 and GAB1 protein expression was significantly associated with aggressive tumor progression and poor prognosis in patients with HCC. CONCLUSION: This study provided an integrative analysis by combining expression profile and interaction network analysis to identify a list of biologically significant HCC related markers and pathways. Further experimental validation indicated that the aberrant expression of GRB2 and GAB1 proteins may be strongly related to tumor

  18. An Adaptor Molecule Afadin Regulates Lymphangiogenesis by Modulating RhoA Activity in the Developing Mouse Embryo.

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    Takashi Majima

    Full Text Available Afadin is an intracellular binding partner of nectins, cell-cell adhesion molecules, and plays important roles in the formation of cell-cell junctions. Afadin-knockout mice show early embryonic lethality, therefore little is known about the function of afadin during organ development. In this study, we generated mice lacking afadin expression in endothelial cells, and found that the majority of these mice were embryonically lethal as a result of severe subcutaneous edema. Defects in the lymphatic vessels of the skin were observed, although the morphology in the blood vessels was almost normal. Severe disruption of VE-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions occurred only in lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in blood endothelial cells. Knockout of afadin did not affect the differentiation and proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cells. Using in vitro assays with blood and lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs and LMVECs, respectively, knockdown of afadin caused elongated cell shapes and disruption of cell-cell junctions among LMVECs, but not BMVECs. In afadin-knockdown LMVECs, enhanced F-actin bundles at the cell periphery and reduced VE-cadherin immunostaining were found, and activation of RhoA was strongly increased compared with that in afadin-knockdown BMVECs. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activation in afadin-knockdown LMVECs restored the cell morphology. These results indicate that afadin has different effects on blood and lymphatic endothelial cells by controlling the levels of RhoA activation, which may critically regulate the lymphangiogenesis of mouse embryos.

  19. Grb2 is regulated by foxd3 and has roles in preventing accumulation and aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

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    Shounak Baksi

    Full Text Available Growth factor receptor protein binding protein 2 (Grb2 is known to be associated with intracellular growth and proliferation related signaling cascades. Huntingtin (Htt, a ubiquitously expressed protein, when mutated, forms toxic intracellular aggregates - the hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD. We observed an elevated expression of Grb2 in neuronal cells in animal and cell models of HD. Grb2 overexpression was predominantly regulated by the transcription factor Forkhead Box D3 (Foxd3. Exogenous expression of Grb2 also reduced aggregation of mutant Htt in Neuro2A cells. Grb2 is also known to interact with Htt, depending on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activation. Grb2- mutant Htt interaction in the contrary, took place in vesicular structures, independent of EGFR activation that eventually merged with autophagosomes and activated the autophagy machinery helping in autophagosome and lysosome fusion. Grb2, with its emerging dual role, holds promise for a survival mechanism for HD.

  20. Kit- and Fc epsilonRI-induced differential phosphorylation of the transmembrane adaptor molecule NTAL/LAB/LAT2 allows flexibility in its scaffolding function in mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaki, Shoko; Spicka, Jiri; Tkaczyk, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP), NTAL, is phosphorylated in mast cells following FcvarepsilonRI aggregation whereby it cooperates with LAT to induce degranulation. The Kit ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), enhances antigen-induced degranulation and this also appears to be NTAL-dependent. H...

  1. A novel conserved phosphotyrosine motif in the Drosophila fibroblast growth factor signaling adaptor Dof with a redundant role in signal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Agnes; Vogelsang, Elisabeth; Beug, Hartmut; Leptin, Maria

    2010-04-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signals through adaptors constitutively associated with the receptor. In Drosophila melanogaster, the FGFR-specific adaptor protein Downstream-of-FGFR (Dof) becomes phosphorylated upon receptor activation at several tyrosine residues, one of which recruits Corkscrew (Csw), the Drosophila homolog of SHP2, which provides a molecular link to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. However, the Csw pathway is not the only link from Dof to MAPK. In this study, we identify a novel phosphotyrosine motif present in four copies in Dof and also found in other insect and vertebrate signaling molecules. We show that these motifs are phosphorylated and contribute to FGF signal transduction. They constitute one of three sets of phosphotyrosines that act redundantly in signal transmission: (i) a Csw binding site, (ii) four consensus Grb2 recognition sites, and (iii) four novel tyrosine motifs. We show that Src64B binds to Dof and that Src kinases contribute to FGFR-dependent MAPK activation. Phosphorylation of the novel tyrosine motifs is required for the interaction of Dof with Src64B. Thus, Src64B recruitment to Dof through the novel phosphosites can provide a new link to MAPK activation and other cellular responses. This may give a molecular explanation for the involvement of Src kinases in FGF-dependent developmental events.

  2. The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is essential in mechanisms involving the Fyn tyrosine kinase for induction and progression of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-11-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is an Src homology 2 domain-only adaptor involved in multiple immune cell functions. It has also been linked to immunodeficiencies and autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we examined the role and mechanism of action of SAP in autoimmunity using a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that SAP was essential for development of CIA in response to collagen immunization. It was also required for production of collagen-specific antibodies, which play a key role in disease pathogenesis. These effects required SAP expression in T cells, not in B cells. In mice immunized with a high dose of collagen, the activity of SAP was nearly independent of its ability to bind the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and correlated with the capacity of SAP to promote full differentiation of follicular T helper (TFH) cells. However, with a lower dose of collagen, the role of SAP was more dependent on Fyn binding, suggesting that additional mechanisms other than TFH cell differentiation were involved. Further studies suggested that this might be due to a role of the SAP-Fyn interaction in natural killer T cell development through the ability of SAP-Fyn to promote Vav-1 activation. We also found that removal of SAP expression during progression of CIA attenuated disease severity. However, it had no effect on disease when CIA was clinically established. Together, these results indicate that SAP plays an essential role in CIA because of Fyn-independent and Fyn-dependent effects on TFH cells and, possibly, other T cell types.

  3. Association between GRB2/Sos and insulin receptor substrate 1 is not sufficient for activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases by interleukin-4: implications for Ras activation by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, W; Yuan, Y; Rose, E; Batzer, A G; Harada, N; Skolnik, E Y

    1995-03-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) mediates the activation of a variety of signaling pathways by the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors by serving as a docking protein for signaling molecules with SH2 domains. We and others have shown that in response to insulin stimulation IRS-1 binds GRB2/Sos and have proposed that this interaction is important in mediating Ras activation by the insulin receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the interleukin (IL)-4 receptor also phosphorylates IRS-1 and an IRS-1-related molecule, 4PS. Unlike insulin, however, IL-4 fails to activate Ras, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), or mitogen-activated protein kinases. We have reconstituted the IL-4 receptor into an insulin-responsive L6 myoblast cell line and have shown that IRS-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated to similar degrees in response to insulin and IL-4 stimulation in this cell line. In agreement with previous findings, IL-4 failed to activate the ERKs in this cell line or to stimulate DNA synthesis, whereas the same responses were activated by insulin. Surprisingly, IL-4's failure to activate ERKs was not due to a failure to stimulate the association of tyrosine-phosphorylated IRS-1 with GRB2/Sos; the amounts of GRB2/Sos associated with IRS-1 were similar in insulin- and IL-4-stimulated cells. Moreover, the amounts of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity associated with IRS-1 were similar in insulin- and IL-4-stimulated cells. In contrast to insulin, however, IL-4 failed to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc or association of Shc with GRB2. Thus, ERK activation correlates with Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and formation of an Shc/GRB2 complex. Thus, ERK activation correlates with Shc tyrosine phosphorylation and formation of an Shc/GRB2 complex. Previous studies have indicated that activation of ERks in this cell line is dependent upon Ras since a dominant-negative Ras (Asn-17) blocks ERK activation by insulin. Our findings, taken in the context

  4. miR-411-5p inhibits proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer cell via targeting GRB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yunda [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Xu, Guoxing [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Liu, Gang; Ye, Yongzhi [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Zhang, Chuankai [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Fan, Chuannan [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, Innovation Center for Cell Signaling Network, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102 (China); Wang, Haibin; Cai, Huali; Xiao, Rui [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Huang, Zhengjie, E-mail: huangzhengjie@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Luo, Qi, E-mail: luoqixmzsh@126.com [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, First Clinical Medical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350005 (China)

    2016-08-05

    miR-411-5p (previously called miR-411) is severely involved in human diseases, however, the relationship between miR-411-5p and breast cancer has not been investigated thoroughly. Here, we found that the expression of miR-411-5p was downregulated in breast cancer tissues compared with their matched adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. In addition, the expression of miR-411-5p was also lower in breast cancer cell lines in contrast with MCF-10A. Moreover, we investigated the target and mechanism of miR-411-5p in breast cancer using mimic and inhibitor, and demonstrated the involvement of GRB2 and Ras activation. Ectopic expression of miR-411-5p suppressed the breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion while low expression of miR-411-5p exhibited the opposite effect. Furthermore, GRB2 was demonstrated to be significantly overexpressed in breast cancer tissues compared with normal tissues, and low expression of GRB2 had a longer overall survival compared with high expression of GRB2 in breast cancer. In general, our study shed light on the miR-411-5p related mechanism in the progression of breast cancer and, miR-411-5p/GRB2/Ras axis is potential to be molecular target for breast cancer therapy. - Highlights: • miR-411-5p is downregulated in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. • miR-411-5p inhibits breast cancer cells growth, migration and invasion in vitro. • GRB2 is a direct target of miR-411-5p in breast cancer. • GRB2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and associates with disease outcome. • miR-411-5p suppresses breast cancer progression though GRB2-SOS-Ras pathway.

  5. ShcA regulates neurite outgrowth stimulated by neural cell adhesion molecule but not by fibroblast growth factor 2: evidence for a distinct fibroblast growth factor receptor response to neural cell adhesion molecule activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Anders M; Lundfald, Line; Ditlevsen, Dorte K

    2004-01-01

    Homophilic binding in trans of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates adhesion between cells and leads, via activation of intracellular signaling cascades, to neurite outgrowth in primary neurons as well as in the neuronal cell line PC12. NCAM mediates neurite extension in PC12 cells....... Here, we investigated the involvement of adaptor proteins in NCAM and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-mediated neurite outgrowth in the PC12-E2 cell line. We found that both FGFR substrate-2 and Grb2 play important roles in NCAM as well as in FGF2-stimulated events. In contrast, the docking protein...... ShcA was pivotal to neurite outgrowth induced by NCAM, but not by FGF2, in PC12 cells. Moreover, in rat cerebellar granule neurons, phosphorylation of ShcA was stimulated by an NCAM mimicking peptide, but not by FGF2. This activation was blocked by inhibitors of both FGFR and Fyn, indicating that NCAM...

  6. Cell-surface metalloprotease ADAM12 is internalized by a clathrin- and Grb2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Stautz; Leyme, Anthony; Grandal, Michael Vibo

    2012-01-01

    ADAM12 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 12), a member of the ADAMs family of transmembrane proteins, is involved in ectodomain shedding, cell-adhesion and signaling, with important implications in cancer. Therefore, mechanisms that regulate the levels and activity of ADAM12 at the cell...... that regulates ADAM cell surface levels and show that ADAM12 internalization involves the clathrin-dependent pathway and Grb2.......-surface are possibly crucial in these contexts. We here investigated internalization and subsequent recycling or degradation of ADAM12 as a potentially important regulatory mechanism. Our results show that ADAM12 is constitutively internalized primarily via the clathrin-dependent pathway and is subsequently detected...

  7. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin

  8. Pivotal role of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, its adaptor molecule MyD88, and inflammasome complex in experimental tubule-interstitial nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Correa-Costa

    Full Text Available Tubule-interstitial nephritis (TIN results in decreased renal function and interstitial inflammation, which ultimately leads to fibrosis. Excessive adenine intake can cause TIN because xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH can convert this purine into an insoluble compound, which precipitates in the tubuli. Innate immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR and inflammasome complex, play a crucial role in the initiation of inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of TLR-2 and -4, Myd88 and inflammasome complex in an experimental model of TIN. Here, we show that wild-type (WT mice fed adenine-enriched food exhibited significant renal dysfunction and enhanced cellular infiltration accompanied by collagen deposition. They also presented higher gene and protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, TLR-2, -4, MyD88, ASC and Caspase-1 KO mice showed renoprotection associated with expression of inflammatory molecules at levels comparable to controls. Furthermore, treatment of WT animals with allopurinol, an XDH inhibitor, led to reduced levels of uric acid, oxidative stress, collagen deposition and a downregulation of the NF-kB signaling pathway. We concluded that MyD88 signaling and inflammasome participate in the development of TIN. Furthermore, inhibition of XDH seems to be a promising way to therapeutically target the developing inflammatory process.

  9. Formation of Shc-Grb2 complexes is necessary to induce neoplastic transformation by overexpression of Shc proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; McGlade, J; Pelicci, G

    1994-01-01

    is implicated in the regulation of Ras, suggesting that Shc is involved in the intracellular transmission of growth signals from activated tyrosine kinases to Ras. Overexpression of Shc proteins in cultured fibroblasts induces a transformed phenotype. We now report that, in vitro, the high affinity binding...... aminoterminal deletion, but retain the Tyr317 site and the SH2 domain conserve the capacity to be phosphorylated, to bind to Grb2 and to induce cell transformation. These data indicate that the formation of the Shc-Grb2 complex is a crucial event in the transformation induced by overexpression of Shc...

  10. Differential Roles of Grb2 and AP-2 in p38 MAPK- and EGF-Induced EGFR Internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandal, Michael V; Grøvdal, Lene M; Henriksen, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced EGFR internalization also required Grb2, p38 MAPK-induced internalization did not. Interestingly, AP-2 knock down blocked p38 MAPK-induced EGFR internalization, but only mildly affected EGF-induced internalization. In line with this, simultaneously mutating two AP-2...

  11. Suppression of Grb2 expression improved hepatic steatosis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis induced by palmitic acid in vitro partly through insulin signaling alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiangxiang; Miao, Yufeng; Fan, Rengen; Song, Changzhi; Wu, Guangzhou; Wan, Zhengqiang; Zhu, Jian; Sun, Guan; Zha, Wenzhang; Mu, Xiangming; Zhou, Guangjun; Chen, Yan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to study the role of growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) in palmitic acid-induced steatosis and other "fatty liver" symptoms in vitro. HepG2 cells, with or without stably suppressed Grb2 expression, were incubated with palmitic acid for 24 h to induce typical clinical "fatty liver" features, including steatosis, impaired glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. MTT and Oil Red O assays were applied to test cell viability and fat deposition, respectively. Glucose uptake assay was used to evaluate the glucose utilization of cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were used to measure expressional changes of key markers of insulin signaling, lipid/glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. After 24-h palmitic acid induction, increased fat accumulation, reduced glucose uptake, impaired insulin signaling, enhanced oxidative stress, and increased apoptosis were observed in HepG2 cells. Suppression of Grb2 in HepG2 significantly reduced fat accumulation, improved glucose metabolism, ameliorated oxidative stress, and restored the activity of insulin receptor substrate-1/Akt and MEK/ERK pathways. In addition, Grb2 deficiency attenuated hepatic apoptosis shown by reduced activation of caspase-3 and fluorescent staining. Modulation of Bcl-2 and Bak1 also contributed to reduced apoptosis. In conclusion, suppression of Grb2 expression in HepG2 cells improved hepatic steatosis, glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, and apoptosis induced by palmitic acid incubation partly though modulating the insulin signaling pathway.

  12. Grb2 and the non-T cell activation linker NTAL constitute a Ca(2+)-regulating signal circuit in B lymphocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stork, B.; Engelke, M.; Frey, J.; Hořejší, Václav; Hamm-Baarke, A.; Schraven, B.; Kurosaki, T.; Wienands, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 5 (2004), s. 681-691 ISSN 1074-7613 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : NTAL * Grb2 * lymphocyte Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 15.448, year: 2004

  13. Surface plasmon resonance thermodynamic and kinetic analysis as a strategic tool in drug design. Distinct ways for phosphopeptides to plug into Src- and Grb2 SH2 domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Nico J; Dekker, Frank J; Broutin, Isabel; Fischer, Marcel J E; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of biomolecular interactions give insight into specificity of molecular recognition processes and advance rational drug design. Binding of phosphotyrosine (pY)-containing peptides to Src- and Grb2-SH2 domains was investigated using a surface plasmon resonance

  14. Styles of Creativity: Adaptors and Innovators in a Singapore Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Jessie; Seng, Tan Oon; Kwang, Ng Aik

    2007-01-01

    Kirton (1976) described two creative styles, namely adaptors and innovators. Adaptors prefer to "do things better" whilst, innovators prefer to "do things differently". This study explored the relationship between two creative styles (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness,…

  15. 21 CFR 870.3620 - Pacemaker lead adaptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker lead adaptor. 870.3620 Section 870.3620...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3620 Pacemaker lead adaptor. (a) Identification. A pacemaker lead adaptor is a device used to adapt a pacemaker lead so that it...

  16. Palmitoylated transmembrane adaptor proteins in leukocyte signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpánek, Ondřej; Dráber, Peter; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2014), s. 895-902 ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Leukocyte * Adaptor * Palmitoylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.315, year: 2014

  17. PAG - a multipurpose transmembrane adaptor protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Hořejší, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 41 (2014), s. 4881-4892 ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PAG * adaptor protein * membrane raft Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.459, year: 2014

  18. Sequence analysis of the Ras-MAPK pathway genes SOS1, EGFR & GRB2 in silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes): candidate genes for hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jo-Anna B J; Tully, Sara J; Dawn Marshall, H

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary hyperplastic gingivitis (HHG) is an autosomal recessive disease that presents with progressive gingival proliferation in farmed silver foxes. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is an analogous condition in humans that is genetically heterogeneous with several known autosomal dominant loci. For one locus the causative mutation is in the Son of sevenless homologue 1 (SOS1) gene. For the remaining loci, the molecular mechanisms are unknown but Ras pathway involvement is suspected. Here we compare sequences for the SOS1 gene, and two adjacent genes in the Ras pathway, growth receptor bound protein 2 (GRB2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), between HHG-affected and unaffected foxes. We conclude that the known HGF causative mutation does not cause HHG in foxes, nor do the coding regions or intron-exon boundaries of these three genes contain any candidate mutations for fox gum disease. Patterns of molecular evolution among foxes and other mammals reflect high conservation and strong functional constraints for SOS1 and GRB2 but reveal a lineage-specific pattern of variability in EGFR consistent with mutational rate differences, relaxed functional constraints, and possibly positive selection.

  19. Gi-mediated activation of the Ras/MAP kinase pathway involves a 100 kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated Grb2 SH3 binding protein, but not Src nor Shc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, O.; Verlaan, I.; Hordijk, P. L.; Moolenaar, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mitogenic G protein-coupled receptors, such as those for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and thrombin, activate the Ras/MAP kinase pathway via pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive Gi, tyrosine kinase activity and recruitment of Grb2, which targets guanine nucleotide exchange activity to Ras. Little is known

  20. The Lnk adaptor protein: a key regulator of normal and pathological hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Laura

    2012-12-01

    The development and function of blood cells are regulated by specific growth factors/cytokines and their receptors' signaling pathways. In this way, these factors influence cell survival, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. Central to this positive and/or negative control are the adaptor proteins. Since their identification 10 years ago, members of the Lnk adaptor protein family have proved to be important activators and/or inhibitors in the hematopoietic, immune and vascular system. In particular, the generation of animal and cellular models for the Lnk and APS proteins has helped establish the physiological role of these molecules through the identification of their specific signaling pathways and the characterization of their binding partners. Moreover, the recent identification of mutations in the LNK gene in myeloproliferative disorders, as well as the correlation of a single nucleotide polymorphism on LNK with hematological, immune and vascular diseases have suggested its involvement in the pathophysiology of these malignancies. The latter findings have thus raised the possibility of addressing Lnk signaling for the treatment of certain human diseases. This review therefore describes the pathophysiological role of this adaptor protein in hematological malignancies and the potential benefits of Lnk therapeutic targeting.

  1. A role for cargo in Arf-dependent adaptor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Amanda H; Sztul, Elizabeth; Kahn, Richard A

    2013-05-24

    Membrane traffic requires the specific concentration of protein cargos and exclusion of other proteins into nascent carriers. Critical components of this selectivity are the protein adaptors that bind to short, linear motifs in the cytoplasmic tails of transmembrane protein cargos and sequester them into nascent carriers. The recruitment of the adaptors is mediated by activated Arf GTPases, and the Arf-adaptor complexes mark sites of carrier formation. However, the nature of the signal(s) that initiates carrier biogenesis remains unknown. We examined the specificity and initial sites of recruitment of Arf-dependent adaptors (AP-1 and GGAs) in response to the Golgi or endosomal localization of specific cargo proteins (furin, mannose-6-phosphate receptor (M6PR), and M6PR lacking a C-terminal domain M6PRΔC). We find that cargo promotes the recruitment of specific adaptors, suggesting that it is part of an upstream signaling event. Cargos do not promote adaptor recruitment to all compartments in which they reside, and thus additional factors regulate the cargo's ability to promote Arf activation and adaptor recruitment. We document that within a given compartment different cargos recruit different adaptors, suggesting that there is little or no free, activated Arf at the membrane and that Arf activation is spatially and temporally coupled to the cargo and the adaptor. Using temperature block, brefeldin A, and recovery from each, we found that the cytoplasmic tail of M6PR causes the recruitment of AP-1 and GGAs to recycling endosomes and not at the Golgi, as predicted by steady state staining profiles. These results are discussed with respect to the generation of novel models for cargo-dependent regulation of membrane traffic.

  2. A Role for Cargo in Arf-dependent Adaptor Recruitment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Amanda H.; Sztul, Elizabeth; Kahn, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane traffic requires the specific concentration of protein cargos and exclusion of other proteins into nascent carriers. Critical components of this selectivity are the protein adaptors that bind to short, linear motifs in the cytoplasmic tails of transmembrane protein cargos and sequester them into nascent carriers. The recruitment of the adaptors is mediated by activated Arf GTPases, and the Arf-adaptor complexes mark sites of carrier formation. However, the nature of the signal(s) that initiates carrier biogenesis remains unknown. We examined the specificity and initial sites of recruitment of Arf-dependent adaptors (AP-1 and GGAs) in response to the Golgi or endosomal localization of specific cargo proteins (furin, mannose-6-phosphate receptor (M6PR), and M6PR lacking a C-terminal domain M6PRΔC). We find that cargo promotes the recruitment of specific adaptors, suggesting that it is part of an upstream signaling event. Cargos do not promote adaptor recruitment to all compartments in which they reside, and thus additional factors regulate the cargo's ability to promote Arf activation and adaptor recruitment. We document that within a given compartment different cargos recruit different adaptors, suggesting that there is little or no free, activated Arf at the membrane and that Arf activation is spatially and temporally coupled to the cargo and the adaptor. Using temperature block, brefeldin A, and recovery from each, we found that the cytoplasmic tail of M6PR causes the recruitment of AP-1 and GGAs to recycling endosomes and not at the Golgi, as predicted by steady state staining profiles. These results are discussed with respect to the generation of novel models for cargo-dependent regulation of membrane traffic. PMID:23572528

  3. p56Lck and p59Fyn Regulate CD28 Binding to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Growth Factor Receptor-Bound Protein GRB-2, and T Cell-Specific Protein-Tyrosine Kinase ITK: Implications for T-Cell Costimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Monika; Cai, Yun-Cai; Bunnell, Stephen C.; Heyeck, Stephanie D.; Berg, Leslie J.; Rudd, Christopher E.

    1995-09-01

    T-cell activation requires cooperative signals generated by the T-cell antigen receptor ξ-chain complex (TCRξ-CD3) and the costimulatory antigen CD28. CD28 interacts with three intracellular proteins-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), T cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase ITK (formerly TSK or EMT), and the complex between growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 and son of sevenless guanine nucleotide exchange protein (GRB-2-SOS). PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 bind to the CD28 phosphotyrosine-based Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif by means of intrinsic Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains. The requirement for tyrosine phosphorylation of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif for SH2 domain binding implicates an intervening protein-tyrosine kinase in the recruitment of PI 3-kinase and GRB-2 by CD28. Candidate kinases include p56Lck, p59Fyn, ξ-chain-associated 70-kDa protein (ZAP-70), and ITK. In this study, we demonstrate in coexpression studies that p56Lck and p59Fyn phosphorylate CD28 primarily at Tyr-191 of the Tyr-Met-Asn-Met motif, inducing a 3- to 8-fold increase in p85 (subunit of PI 3-kinase) and GRB-2 SH2 binding to CD28. Phosphatase digestion of CD28 eliminated binding. In contrast to Src kinases, ZAP-70 and ITK failed to induce these events. Further, ITK binding to CD28 was dependent on the presence of p56Lck and is thus likely to act downstream of p56Lck/p59Fyn in a signaling cascade. p56Lck is therefore likely to be a central switch in T-cell activation, with the dual function of regulating CD28-mediated costimulation as well as TCR-CD3-CD4 signaling.

  4. Autologous antibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 specifically increases in the sera of patients with low-grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsutani Tomoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioma is the most common primary malignant central nervous system tumor in adult, and is usually not curable in spite of various therapeutic approaches. Clarification of the oncogenic process in its early stage is important for the diagnosis and effective therapy. Methods In the present study, we used the serological identification of antigens by recombinant cDNA expression cloning (SEREX to explore the subtle changes of the protein expression in low-grade glioma. The levels of serum autoantibodies to the SEREX-identified glioma-related antigens were analyzed by ELISA, and the epitope site was identified using deletion mutants and overlap peptide array. Changes in the serum autoantibody levels were examined in the rat glioma model using C6 and 9 L glioma cell lines. Results We identified 31 glioma-related antigens by SEREX. Among them, the serum level of autoantibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 (SH3GL1 was significantly higher in patients with low-grade glioma than healthy volunteers or high-grade gliomas. The 10 amino-acids at the C-terminal were identified as the epitope site by the overlap peptide array and the ELISA using deletion mutants. The tissue expression of SH3GL1 protein increased in proportion to glioma progression. The rat glioma models confirmed the increase of anti-SH3GL1 autoantibody level in the early stage and the suppression in the late stage. Conclusion SH3GL1 may be involved in the oncogenic process of gliomas and effectively elicit an autologous antibody response in low-grade gliomas. The immunological reaction to SH3GL1 would contribute to the establishment of a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for gliomas.

  5. The motogenic and mitogenic responses to HGF are amplified by the Shc adaptor protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelicci, G; Giordano, S; Zhen, Z

    1995-01-01

    that phosphotyrosines Y1349VHV and Y1356VNV can work as docking sites for Shc. The Kd of this interaction, measured in real time using synthetic phosphopeptides and recombinant Shc on a BIAcore biosensor, is 150 nm for both sites. After stimulation of the HGF receptor, Shc is phosphorylated on Y317VNV, generating......-type Shc, but not of the Y317-->F mutant, enhances cell migration and growth in response to HGF. These data show that Shc is a relevant substrate of the HGF receptor, and works as an 'amplifier' of the motogenic as well as of the mitogenic response....... an high affinity binding site for Grb2 (Kd = 15 nM). This duplicates the high affinity binding site for Grb2 present on the HGF receptor (Y1356VNV). Thus HGF stimulation can trigger the Ras pathway by recruiting Grb2 both directly through the receptor, and indirectly, through Shc. Overexpression of wild...

  6. DMPD: The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15541655 The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Latour S, Veillette A. Se...min Immunol. 2004 Dec;16(6):409-19. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The SAP family of adaptors in immune ...regulation. PubmedID 15541655 Title The SAP family of adaptors in immune regulation. Authors Latour S, Veill

  7. A dimer of the Toll-like receptor 4 cytoplasmic domain provides a specific scaffold for the recruitment of signalling adaptor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Núñez Miguel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a class I transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of immune system cells. TLR4 is activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharides derived from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and forms part of the innate immune response in mammals. Like other class 1 receptors, TLR4 is activated by ligand induced dimerization, and recent studies suggest that this causes concerted conformational changes in the receptor leading to self association of the cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR signalling domain. This homodimerization event is proposed to provide a new scaffold that is able to bind downstream signalling adaptor proteins. TLR4 uses two different sets of adaptors; TRAM and TRIF, and Mal and MyD88. These adaptor pairs couple two distinct signalling pathways leading to the activation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF-3 and nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB respectively. In this paper we have generated a structural model of the TLR4 TIR dimer and used molecular docking to probe for potential sites of interaction between the receptor homodimer and the adaptor molecules. Remarkably, both the Mal and TRAM adaptors are strongly predicted to bind at two symmetry-related sites at the homodimer interface. This model of TLR4 activation is supported by extensive functional studies involving site directed mutagenesis, inhibition by cell permeable peptides and stable protein phosphorylation of receptor and adaptor TIR domains. Our results also suggest a molecular mechanism for two recent findings, the caspase 1 dependence of Mal signalling and the protective effects conferred by the Mal polymorphism Ser180Leu.

  8. Spiral biasing adaptor for use in Si drift detectors and Si drift detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-05

    A drift detector array, preferably a silicon drift detector (SDD) array, that uses a low current biasing adaptor is disclosed. The biasing adaptor is customizable for any desired geometry of the drift detector single cell with minimum drift time of carriers. The biasing adaptor has spiral shaped ion-implants that generate the desired voltage profile. The biasing adaptor can be processed on the same wafer as the drift detector array and only one biasing adaptor chip/side is needed for one drift detector array to generate the voltage profiles on the front side and back side of the detector array.

  9. Role of adaptor proteins in secretory granule biogenesis and maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde L Bonnemaison

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the regulated secretory pathway, secretory granules (SGs store peptide hormones that are released on demand. SGs are formed at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and must undergo a maturation process to become responsive to secretagogues. The production of mature SGs requires concentrating newly synthesized soluble content proteins in granules whose membranes contain the appropriate integral membrane proteins. The mechanisms underlying the sorting of soluble and integral membrane proteins destined for SGs from other proteins are not yet well understood. For soluble proteins, luminal pH and divalent metals can affect aggregation and interaction with surrounding membranes. The trafficking of granule membrane proteins can be controlled by both luminal and cytosolic factors. Cytosolic adaptor proteins, which recognize the cytosolic domains of proteins that span the SG membrane, have been shown to play essential roles in the assembly of functional SGs. Adaptor protein 1A (AP-1A is known to interact with specific motifs in its cargo proteins and with the clathrin heavy chain, contributing to the formation of a clathrin coat. AP-1A is present in patches on immature SG membranes, where it removes cargo and facilitates SG maturation. AP-1A recruitment to membranes can be modulated by PACS-1 (Phosphofurin Acidic Cluster Sorting protein 1, a cytosolic protein which interacts with both AP-1A and cargo that has been phosphorylated by casein kinase II. A cargo/PACS-1/AP-1A complex is necessary to drive the appropriate transport of several cargo proteins within the regulated secretory pathway. The GGA (Golgi-localized, -ear containing, ADP-ribosylation factor binding family of adaptor proteins serve a similar role. We review the functions of AP-1A, PACS-1 and GGAs in facilitating the retrieval of proteins from immature SGs and review examples of cargo proteins whose trafficking within the regulated secretory pathway is governed by adaptor proteins.

  10. Targeting 14-3-3 adaptor protein-protein interactions to stimulate central nervous system repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Kaplan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of developing treatments for central nervous system (CNS injuries is becoming more attainable with the recent identification of various drugs that can repair damaged axons. These discoveries have stemmed from screening efforts, large expression datasets and an improved understanding of the cellular and molecular biology underlying axon growth. It will be important to continue searching for new compounds that can induce axon repair. Here we describe how a family of adaptor proteins called 14-3-3s can be targeted using small molecule drugs to enhance axon outgrowth and regeneration. 14-3-3s bind to many functionally diverse client proteins to regulate their functions. We highlight the recent discovery of the axon-growth promoting activity of fusicoccin-A, a fungus-derived small molecule that stabilizes 14-3-3 interactions with their client proteins. Here we discuss how fusicoccin-A could serve as a starting point for the development of drugs to induce CNS repair.

  11. A Big-Five Personality Profile of the Adaptor and Innovator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang, Ng Aik; Rodrigues, Daphne

    2002-01-01

    A study explored the relationship between two creative types (adaptor and innovator) and the Big Five personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience), in 164 teachers in Singapore. Adaptors were significantly more conscientious than innovators, while innovators were significantly more…

  12. 21 CFR 870.4290 - Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., or fitting. 870.4290 Section 870.4290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4290 Cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass adaptor, stopcock, manifold, or fitting is a device used in cardiovascular diagnostic...

  13. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins

  14. Arabidopsis adaptor protein 1G is critical for pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chong; Wang, Jia-Gang; Liu, Hai-Hong; Li, Sha; Zhang, Yan

    2017-09-01

    Pollen development is a pre-requisite for sexual reproduction of angiosperms, during which various cellular activities are involved. Pollen development accompanies dynamic remodeling of vacuoles through fission and fusion, disruption of which often compromises pollen viability. We previously reported that the Y subunit of adaptor protein 1 (AP1G) mediates synergid degeneration during pollen tube reception. Here, we demonstrate that AP1G is essential for pollen development. AP1G loss-of-function resulted in male gametophytic lethality due to defective pollen development. By ultrastructural analysis and fluorescence labeling, we demonstrate that AP1G loss-of-function compromised dynamic vacuolar remodeling during pollen development and impaired vacuolar acidification of pollen. Results presented here support a key role of vacuoles in gametophytic pollen development. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Seneca Valley Virus Suppresses Host Type I Interferon Production by Targeting Adaptor Proteins MAVS, TRIF, and TANK for Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Suhong; Fan, Wenchun; Liu, Tingting; Wu, Mengge; Zhang, Huawei; Cui, Xiaofang; Zhou, Yun; Hu, Junjie; Wei, Shaozhong; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin; Qian, Ping

    2017-08-15

    Seneca Valley virus (SVV) is an oncolytic RNA virus belonging to the Picornaviridae family. Its nucleotide sequence is highly similar to those of members of the Cardiovirus genus. SVV is also a neuroendocrine cancer-selective oncolytic picornavirus that can be used for anticancer therapy. However, the interaction between SVV and its host is yet to be fully characterized. In this study, SVV inhibited antiviral type I interferon (IFN) responses by targeting different host adaptors, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS), Toll/interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), and TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK), via viral 3C protease (3C pro ). SVV 3C pro mediated the cleavage of MAVS, TRIF, and TANK at specific sites, which required its protease activity. The cleaved MAVS, TRIF, and TANK lost the ability to regulate pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-mediated IFN production. The cleavage of TANK also facilitated TRAF6-induced NF-κB activation. SVV was also found to be sensitive to IFN-β. Therefore, SVV suppressed antiviral IFN production to escape host antiviral innate immune responses by cleaving host adaptor molecules. IMPORTANCE Host cells have developed various defenses against microbial pathogen infection. The production of IFN is the first line of defense against microbial infection. However, viruses have evolved many strategies to disrupt this host defense. SVV, a member of the Picornavirus genus, is an oncolytic virus that shows potential functions in anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that IFN can be used in anticancer therapy for certain tumors. However, the relationship between oncolytic virus and innate immune response in anticancer therapy is still not well known. In this study, we showed that SVV has evolved as an effective mechanism to inhibit host type I IFN production by using its 3C pro to cleave the molecules MAVS, TRIF, and TANK directly. These molecules are crucial for

  16. The Role of the Clathrin Adaptor AP-1: Polarized Sorting and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fubito Nakatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The selective transport of proteins or lipids by vesicular transport is a fundamental process supporting cellular physiology. The budding process involves cargo sorting and vesicle formation at the donor membrane and constitutes an important process in vesicular transport. This process is particularly important for the polarized sorting in epithelial cells, in which the cargo molecules need to be selectively sorted and transported to two distinct destinations, the apical or basolateral plasma membrane. Adaptor protein (AP-1, a member of the AP complex family, which includes the ubiquitously expressed AP-1A and the epithelium-specific AP-1B, regulates polarized sorting at the trans-Golgi network and/or at the recycling endosomes. A growing body of evidence, especially from studies using model organisms and animals, demonstrates that the AP-1-mediated polarized sorting supports the development and physiology of multi-cellular units as functional organs and tissues (e.g., cell fate determination, inflammation and gut immune homeostasis. Furthermore, a possible involvement of AP-1B in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as Crohn’s disease and cancer, is now becoming evident. These data highlight the significant contribution of AP-1 complexes to the physiology of multicellular organisms, as master regulators of polarized sorting in epithelial cells.

  17. Study on the isothermal forging process of MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wenchen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The isothermal forging process is an effective method to manufacture complex-shaped components of hard-to-work materials, such as magnesium alloys. This study investigates the isothermal forging process of an MB26 magnesium alloy adaptor with three branches. The results show that two-step forging process is appropriate to form the adaptor forging, which not only improves the filling quality but also reduces the forging load compared with one-step forging process. Moreover, the flow line is distributed along the contour of the complex-shaped adaptor forging.

  18. TIRAP, an Adaptor Protein for TLR2/4, Transduces a Signal from RAGE Phosphorylated upon Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Murata, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Ono, Tomoyuki; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Motoyama, Akira; Hibino, Toshihiko; Kataoka, Ken; Huh, Nam-ho

    2011-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of a broad range of inflammatory, degenerative and hyperproliferative diseases. It binds to diverse ligands and activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways. Despite these pivotal functions, molecular events just downstream of ligand-activated RAGE have been surprisingly unknown. Here we show that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE is phosphorylated at Ser391 by PKCζ upon binding of ligands. TIRAP and MyD88, which are known to be adaptor proteins for Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 (TLR2/4), bound to the phosphorylated RAGE and transduced a signal to downstream molecules. Blocking of the function of TIRAP and MyD88 largely abrogated intracellular signaling from ligand-activated RAGE. Our findings indicate that functional interaction between RAGE and TLRs coordinately regulates inflammation, immune response and other cellular functions. PMID:21829704

  19. The structure and polymerase-recognition mechanism of the crucial adaptor protein AND-1 in the human replisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Chengcheng; Li, Jun; Sun, Dapeng; Liu, Yingfang; Liang, Huanhuan

    2017-06-09

    DNA replication in eukaryotic cells is performed by a multiprotein complex called the replisome, which consists of helicases, polymerases, and adaptor molecules. Human a cidic n ucleoplasmic D NA-binding protein 1 (AND-1), also known as WD repeat and high mobility group (HMG)-box DNA-binding protein 1 (WDHD1), is an adaptor molecule crucial for DNA replication. Although structural information for the AND-1 yeast ortholog is available, the mechanistic details for how human AND-1 protein anchors the lagging-strand DNA polymerase α (pol α) to the DNA helicase complex ( C dc45- M CM2-7- G INS, CMG) await elucidation. Here, we report the structures of the N-terminal WD40 and SepB domains of human AND-1, as well as a biochemical analysis of the C-terminal HMG domain. We show that AND-1 exists as a homotrimer mediated by the SepB domain. Mutant study results suggested that a positively charged groove within the SepB domain provides binding sites for pol α. Different from its ortholog protein in budding yeast, human AND-1 is recruited to the CMG complex, mediated by unknown participants other than Go Ichi Ni San. In addition, we show that AND-1 binds to DNA in vitro , using its C-terminal HMG domain. In conclusion, our findings provide important insights into the mechanistic details of human AND-1 function, advancing our understanding of replisome formation during eukaryotic replication. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Cellular Migration and Invasion in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fathers, Kelly E

    2007-01-01

    The Crk adaptor proteins (CrkI, CrkII and CrkL) play an important role during cellular signalling by mediating the formation of protein-protein complexes and are involved in cellular migration, invasion, and adhesion...

  1. Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Cellular Migration and Invasion in Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fathers, Kelly E

    2008-01-01

    The Crk adaptor proteins (CrkI, CrkII and CrkL) play an important role during cellular signalling by mediating the formation of protein-protein complexes and are involved in cellular migration, invasion, and adhesion...

  2. Eps15: a multifunctional adaptor protein regulating intracellular trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bergen en Henegouwen Paul MP

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over expression of receptor tyrosine kinases is responsible for the development of a wide variety of malignancies. Termination of growth factor signaling is primarily determined by the down regulation of active growth factor/receptor complexes. In recent years, considerable insight has been gained in the endocytosis and degradation of growth factor receptors. A crucial player in this process is the EGFR Protein tyrosine kinase Substrate #15, or Eps15. This protein functions as a scaffolding adaptor protein and is involved both in secretion and endocytosis. Eps15 has been shown to bind to AP-1 and AP-2 complexes, to bind to inositol lipids and to several other proteins involved in the regulation of intracellular trafficking. In addition, Eps15 has been detected in the nucleus of mammalian cells. Activation of growth factor receptors induces tyrosine phosphorylation and mono-ubiquitination of Eps15. The role of these post translational modifications of Eps15 is still a mystery. It is proposed that Eps15 and its family members Eps15R and Eps15b are involved in the regulation of membrane morphology, which is required for intracellular vesicle formation and trafficking.

  3. Insight into Phosphatidylinositol-Dependent Membrane Localization of the Innate Immune Adaptor Protein Toll/Interleukin 1 Receptor Domain-Containing Adaptor Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Choi, Sangdun

    2018-01-01

    The toll/interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) plays an important role in the toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, TLR7, and TLR9 signaling pathways. TIRAP anchors to phosphatidylinositol (PI) 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) on the plasma membrane and PI (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) on the endosomal membrane and assists in recruitment of the myeloid differentiation primary response 88 protein to activated TLRs. To date, the structure and mechanism of TIRAP’s membrane association are only partially understood. Here, we modeled an all-residue TIRAP dimer using homology modeling, threading, and protein–protein docking strategies. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that PIP2 creates a stable microdomain in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer, providing TIRAP with its physiologically relevant orientation. Computed binding free energy values suggest that the affinity of PI-binding domain (PBD) for PIP2 is stronger than that of TIRAP as a whole for PIP2 and that the short PI-binding motif (PBM) contributes to the affinity between PBD and PIP2. Four PIP2 molecules can be accommodated by distinct lysine-rich surfaces on the dimeric PBM. Along with the known PI-binding residues (K15, K16, K31, and K32), additional positively charged residues (K34, K35, and R36) showed strong affinity toward PIP2. Lysine-to-alanine mutations at the PI-binding residues abolished TIRAP’s affinity for PIP2; however, K34, K35, and R36 consistently interacted with PIP2 headgroups through hydrogen bond (H-bond) and electrostatic interactions. TIRAP exhibited a PIP2-analogous intermolecular contact and binding affinity toward PIP3, aided by an H-bond network involving K34, K35, and R36. The present study extends our understanding of TIRAP’s membrane association, which could be helpful in designing peptide decoys to block TLR2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, and TLR9-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:29434596

  4. Insight into Phosphatidylinositol-Dependent Membrane Localization of the Innate Immune Adaptor Protein Toll/Interleukin 1 Receptor Domain-Containing Adaptor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Chandra Patra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The toll/interleukin 1 receptor (TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP plays an important role in the toll-like receptor (TLR 2, TLR4, TLR7, and TLR9 signaling pathways. TIRAP anchors to phosphatidylinositol (PI 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 on the plasma membrane and PI (3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3 on the endosomal membrane and assists in recruitment of the myeloid differentiation primary response 88 protein to activated TLRs. To date, the structure and mechanism of TIRAP’s membrane association are only partially understood. Here, we modeled an all-residue TIRAP dimer using homology modeling, threading, and protein–protein docking strategies. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that PIP2 creates a stable microdomain in a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer, providing TIRAP with its physiologically relevant orientation. Computed binding free energy values suggest that the affinity of PI-binding domain (PBD for PIP2 is stronger than that of TIRAP as a whole for PIP2 and that the short PI-binding motif (PBM contributes to the affinity between PBD and PIP2. Four PIP2 molecules can be accommodated by distinct lysine-rich surfaces on the dimeric PBM. Along with the known PI-binding residues (K15, K16, K31, and K32, additional positively charged residues (K34, K35, and R36 showed strong affinity toward PIP2. Lysine-to-alanine mutations at the PI-binding residues abolished TIRAP’s affinity for PIP2; however, K34, K35, and R36 consistently interacted with PIP2 headgroups through hydrogen bond (H-bond and electrostatic interactions. TIRAP exhibited a PIP2-analogous intermolecular contact and binding affinity toward PIP3, aided by an H-bond network involving K34, K35, and R36. The present study extends our understanding of TIRAP’s membrane association, which could be helpful in designing peptide decoys to block TLR2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, and TLR9-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  5. The TIR-domain containing adaptor TRAM is required for TLR7 mediated RANTES production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enda Shevlin

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7 plays a vital role in the immune response to ssRNA viruses such as human rhinovirus (HRV and Influenza, against which there are currently no treatments or vaccines with long term efficacy available. Clearly, a more comprehensive understanding of the TLR7 signaling axis will contribute to its molecular targeting. TRIF related adaptor molecule (TRAM plays a vital role in TLR4 signaling by recruiting TRIF to TLR4, followed by endosomal trafficking of the complex and initiation of IRF3 dependent type I interferon production as well as NF-κB dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Towards understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate TLR7 functionality, we found that TRAM(-/- murine macrophages exhibited a transcriptional and translational impairment in TLR7 mediated RANTES, but not TNFα, production. Suppression of TRAM expression in human macrophages also resulted in an impairment in TLR7 mediated CCL5 and IFN-β, but not TNFα, gene induction. Furthermore, suppression of endogenous human TRAM expression in human macrophages significantly impaired RV16 induced CCL5 and IFNβ, but not TNFα gene induction. Additionally, TRAM-G2A dose-dependently inhibited TLR7 mediated activation of CCL5, IFNβ and IFNα reporter genes. TLR7-mediated phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 was impaired in TRAM(-/- cells. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that TRAM physically interacts with MyD88 upon TLR7 stimulation, but not under basal conditions. Our results clearly demonstrate that TRAM plays a, hitherto unappreciated, role in TLR7 signaling through a novel signaling axis containing, but not limited to, MyD88, TRAM and IRF3 towards the activation of anti-viral immunity.

  6. Stepping motor adaptor actuator for a commercial uhv linear motion feedthrough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iarocci, M.; Oversluizen, T.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptor coupling has been developed that will allow the attachment of a standard stepping motor to a precision commercial (Varian) uhv linear motion feedthrough. The assembly, consisting of the motor, motor adaptor, limit switches, etc. is clamped to the feedthrough body which can be done under vacuum conditions if necessary. With a 500 step/rev. stepping motor the resolution is 1.27 μm per step. We presently use this assembly in a remote location for the precise positioning of a beam sensing monitor. 2 refs., 3 figs

  7. Glucose regulates clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoh, Quyen L.; Graves, Lee M.; Duncan, Mara C.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is a rich source of energy and the raw material for biomass increase. Many eukaryotic cells remodel their physiology in the presence and absence of glucose. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes changes in transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell polarity in response to glucose availability. Upon glucose starvation, translation initiation and cell polarity are immediately inhibited, and then gradually recover. In this paper, we provide evidence that, as in cell polarity and translation, traffic at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes is regulated by glucose via an unknown mechanism that depends on protein kinase A (PKA). Upon glucose withdrawal, clathrin adaptors exhibit a biphasic change in localization: they initially delocalize from the membrane within minutes and later partially recover onto membranes. Additionally, the removal of glucose induces changes in posttranslational modifications of adaptors. Ras and Gpr1 signaling pathways, which converge on PKA, are required for changes in adaptor localization and changes in posttranslational modifications. Acute inhibition of PKA demonstrates that inhibition of PKA prior to glucose withdrawal prevents several adaptor responses to starvation. This study demonstrates that PKA activity prior to glucose starvation primes membrane traffic at the TGN and endosomes in response to glucose starvation. PMID:21832155

  8. SCIMP, a transmembrane adaptor protein involved in major histocompatibility complex class II signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Peter; Vonková, Ivana; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Hrdinka, Matouš; Kucová, Markéta; Skopcová, Tereza; Otáhal, Pavel; Angelisová, Pavla; Hořejší, Václav; Yeung, M.; Weiss, A.; Brdička, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 22 (2011), s. 4550-4562 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : SCIMP * transmembrane adaptor protein * MHC II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.527, year: 2011

  9. NTAL (non-T cell activation linker):a transmembrane adaptor protein involved in immunoreceptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brdička, Tomáš; Imrich, Martin; Angelisová, Pavla; Brdičková, Naděžda; Horváth, Ondřej; Špička, Jiří; Hilgert, Ivan; Lusková, Petra; Dráber, Petr; Novák, P.; Engels, N.; Wienands, J.; Simeoni, L.; Osterreicher, J.; Aguado, E.; Malissen, M.; Schraven, B.; Hořejší, Václav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 196, č. 12 (2002), s. 16180-16185 ISSN 0022-1007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Keywords : NTAL * transmembrane adaptor * immunoreceptor signaling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 15.838, year: 2002

  10. Deletion of the LIME adaptor protein minimally affects T and B cell development and function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grégoire, C.; Šímová, Šárka; Wang, Y.; Sansoni, A.; Richelme, S.; Schmidr-Giese, A.; Simeoni, L.; Angelisová, Pavla; Reinhold, D.; Burkhart, S.; Hořejší, Václav; Malissen, B.; Malissen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 11 (2007), s. 3259-3269 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : LIME * adaptor protein * receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.662, year: 2007

  11. EAT-2, a SAP-like adaptor, controls NK cell activation through phospholipase Cγ, Ca++, and Erk, leading to granule polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Quintero, Luis-Alberto; Roncagalli, Romain; Guo, Huaijian; Latour, Sylvain; Davidson, Dominique; Veillette, André

    2014-04-07

    Ewing's sarcoma-associated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is an Src homology 2 domain-containing intracellular adaptor related to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP), the X-linked lymphoproliferative gene product. Both EAT-2 and SAP are expressed in natural killer (NK) cells, and their combined expression is essential for NK cells to kill abnormal hematopoietic cells. SAP mediates this function by coupling SLAM family receptors to the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and the exchange factor Vav, thereby promoting conjugate formation between NK cells and target cells. We used a variety of genetic, biochemical, and imaging approaches to define the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which EAT-2 controls NK cell activation. We found that EAT-2 mediates its effects in NK cells by linking SLAM family receptors to phospholipase Cγ, calcium fluxes, and Erk kinase. These signals are triggered by one or two tyrosines located in the carboxyl-terminal tail of EAT-2 but not found in SAP. Unlike SAP, EAT-2 does not enhance conjugate formation. Rather, it accelerates polarization and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules toward hematopoietic target cells. Hence, EAT-2 promotes NK cell activation by molecular and cellular mechanisms distinct from those of SAP. These findings explain the cooperative and essential function of these two adaptors in NK cell activation.

  12. MEX3C interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 2 and involves in miR-451a exosomal sorting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Lu

    Full Text Available Some RNA species, especially microRNAs, are non-randomly sorted into exosomes, but how selectivity of RNA exosomal sorting is achieved is unknown. We found that all three variants of RNA-binding ubiquitin E3 ligase (MEX3C-MEX3C-1, MEX3C-2, and MEX3C-3 -interact with adaptor-related protein complex 2 (AP-2, a cargo adaptor in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. MEX3C's C-terminal RING finger domain and the hnRNP K homology (KH domain shared by the three MEX3C variants are both necessary for MEX3C/AP-2 interaction. MEX3C associates with the endolysosomal compartment through an endocytosis-like process. siRNA-mediated inhibition of the MEX3C or AP-2 complex substantially decreased exosomal but not cellular microRNA miR-451a expression. Exosomal sorting is ceramide-dependent but not ESCRT-dependent in microRNA miR-451a. That RNA-binding protein associates with membrane trafficking machinery, and that its involvement in exosomal microRNA expression, suggest the existence of a mechanism for specific recruiting of RNA molecules to endosomes for subsequent exosomal sorting.

  13. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  14. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a very stable and inert molecule due to the formation of a triple bond between the two atoms. Surpris- ingly isoelectronic molecules are quite reactive making dinitrogen very useful and unique. Dinitrogen (N. 2. ) is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for.

  15. Nuclear adaptor Ldb1 regulates a transcriptional program essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, LiQi; Jothi, Raja; Cui, Kairong; Lee, Jan Y; Cohen, Tsadok; Gorivodsky, Marat; Tzchori, Itai; Zhao, Yangu; Hayes, Sandra M; Bresnick, Emery H; Zhao, Keji; Westphal, Heiner; Love, Paul E

    2011-02-01

    The nuclear adaptor Ldb1 functions as a core component of multiprotein transcription complexes that regulate differentiation in diverse cell types. In the hematopoietic lineage, Ldb1 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding adaptor Lmo2 and the transcription factors E2A, Scl and GATA-1 (or GATA-2). Here we demonstrate a critical and continuous requirement for Ldb1 in the maintenance of both fetal and adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Deletion of Ldb1 in hematopoietic progenitors resulted in the downregulation of many transcripts required for HSC maintenance. Genome-wide profiling by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified Ldb1 complex-binding sites at highly conserved regions in the promoters of genes involved in HSC maintenance. Our results identify a central role for Ldb1 in regulating the transcriptional program responsible for the maintenance of HSCs.

  16. Role of the epithelial cell-specific clathrin adaptor complex AP-1B in cell polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölsch, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells are important for organ development and function. To this end, they polarize their plasma membrane into biochemically and physically distinct membrane domains. The apical membrane faces the luminal site of an organ and the basolateral domain is in contact with the basement membrane and neighboring cells. To establish and maintain this polarity it is important that newly synthesized and endocytic cargos are correctly sorted according to their final destinations at either membrane. Sorting takes place at one of 2 major sorting stations in the cells, the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes (REs). Polarized sorting may involve epithelial cell-specific sorting adaptors like the AP-1B clathrin adaptor complex. AP-1B facilitates basolateral sorting from REs. This review will discuss various aspects of basolateral sorting in epithelial cells with a special emphasis on AP-1B. PMID:27057418

  17. SR proteins are NXF1 adaptors that link alternative RNA processing to mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Botti, Valentina; de Jesus Domingues, Antonio M; Brandl, Holger; Schwich, Oliver D; Steiner, Michaela C; Curk, Tomaz; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) exports mRNA to the cytoplasm after recruitment to mRNA by specific adaptor proteins. How and why cells use numerous different export adaptors is poorly understood. Here we critically evaluate members of the SR protein family (SRSF1-7) for their potential to act as NXF1 adaptors that couple pre-mRNA processing to mRNA export. Consistent with this proposal, >1000 endogenous mRNAs required individual SR proteins for nuclear export in vivo. To address the mechanism, transcriptome-wide RNA-binding profiles of NXF1 and SRSF1-7 were determined in parallel by individual-nucleotide-resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP). Quantitative comparisons of RNA-binding sites showed that NXF1 and SR proteins bind mRNA targets at adjacent sites, indicative of cobinding. SRSF3 emerged as the most potent NXF1 adaptor, conferring sequence specificity to RNA binding by NXF1 in last exons. Interestingly, SRSF3 and SRSF7 were shown to bind different sites in last exons and regulate 3' untranslated region length in an opposing manner. Both SRSF3 and SRSF7 promoted NXF1 recruitment to mRNA. Thus, SRSF3 and SRSF7 couple alternative splicing and polyadenylation to NXF1-mediated mRNA export, thereby controlling the cytoplasmic abundance of transcripts with alternative 3' ends. © 2016 Müller-McNicoll et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Enhanced Toll-like receptor responses in the absence of signaling adaptor DAP12.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamerman, Jessica A; Tchao, Nadia K; Lowell, Clifford A; Lanier, Lewis L

    2005-01-01

    DAP12 is a signaling adaptor containing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) that pairs with receptors on myeloid cells and natural killer cells. We examine here the responses of mice lacking DAP12 to stimulation through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Unexpectedly, DAP12-deficient macrophages produced higher concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli. Additionally, macrophages deficient in spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), which signal...

  19. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  20. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  1. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E

    1996-01-01

    of the thrombin receptor in growth-responsive CCL39 fibroblasts. Shc phosphorylation by thrombin or the thrombin receptor agonist peptide is maximal by 15 min and persists for > or = 2 h. Following thrombin stimulation, phosphorylated Shc is recruited to Grb2 complexes. One or more pertussis toxin......-insensitive proteins appear to mediate this effect, since (i) pertussis toxin pre-treatment of cells does not blunt the action of thrombin and (ii) Shc phosphorylation on tyrosine can be stimulated by the muscarinic m1 receptor. Shc phosphorylation does not appear to involve protein kinase C, since the addition of 4...

  2. Bias in ligation-based small RNA sequencing library construction is determined by adaptor and RNA structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T Fuchs

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing (HTS has become a powerful tool for the detection of and sequence characterization of microRNAs (miRNA and other small RNAs (sRNA. Unfortunately, the use of HTS data to determine the relative quantity of different miRNAs in a sample has been shown to be inconsistent with quantitative PCR and Northern Blot results. Several recent studies have concluded that the major contributor to this inconsistency is bias introduced during the construction of sRNA libraries for HTS and that the bias is primarily derived from the adaptor ligation steps, specifically where single stranded adaptors are sequentially ligated to the 3' and 5'-end of sRNAs using T4 RNA ligases. In this study we investigated the effects of ligation bias by using a pool of randomized ligation substrates, defined mixtures of miRNA sequences and several combinations of adaptors in HTS library construction. We show that like the 3' adaptor ligation step, the 5' adaptor ligation is also biased, not because of primary sequence, but instead due to secondary structures of the two ligation substrates. We find that multiple secondary structural factors influence final representation in HTS results. Our results provide insight about the nature of ligation bias and allowed us to design adaptors that reduce ligation bias and produce HTS results that more accurately reflect the actual concentrations of miRNAs in the defined starting material.

  3. Loss of the adaptor protein ShcA in endothelial cells protects against monocyte macrophage adhesion, LDL-oxydation, and atherosclerotic lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaoude, Antoine Abou; Badiqué, Lise; Mlih, Mohamed; Awan, Sara; Guo, Sunning; Lemle, Alexandre; Abboud, Clauda; Foppolo, Sophie; Host, Lionel; Terrand, Jérôme; Justiniano, Hélène; Herz, Joachim; Matz, Rachel L; Boucher, Philippe

    2018-03-14

    ShcA is an adaptor protein that binds to the cytoplasmic tail of receptor tyrosine kinases and of the Low Density Lipoprotein-related receptor 1 (LRP1), a trans-membrane receptor that protects against atherosclerosis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial ShcA in atherosclerotic lesion formation. We found that atherosclerosis progression was markedly attenuated in mice deleted for ShcA in endothelial cells, that macrophage content was reduced at the sites of lesions, and that adhesion molecules such as the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were severely reduced. Our data indicate that transcriptional regulation of ShcA by the zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) and the Hippo pathway effector YAP, promotes ICAM-1 expression independently of p-NF-κB, the primary driver of adhesion molecules expressions. In addition, ShcA suppresses endothelial Akt and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressions. Thus, through down regulation of eNOS and ZEB1-mediated ICAM-1 up regulation, endothelial ShcA promotes monocyte-macrophage adhesion and atherosclerotic lesion formation. Reducing ShcA expression in endothelial cells may represent an obvious therapeutic approach to prevent atherosclerosis.

  4. U1 Adaptor Oligonucleotides Targeting BCL2 and GRM1 Suppress Growth of Human Melanoma Xenografts In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Goraczniak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available U1 Adaptor is a recently discovered oligonucleotide-based gene-silencing technology with a unique mechanism of action that targets nuclear pre-mRNA processing. U1 Adaptors have two distinct functional domains, both of which must be present on the same oligonucleotide to exert their gene-silencing function. Here, we present the first in vivo use of U1 Adaptors by targeting two different human genes implicated in melanomagenesis, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2 and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1, in a human melanoma cell xenograft mouse model system. Using a newly developed dendrimer delivery system, anti-BCL2 U1 Adaptors were very potent and suppressed tumor growth at doses as low as 34 µg/kg with twice weekly intravenous (iv administration. Anti-GRM1 U1 Adaptors suppressed tumor xenograft growth with similar potency. Mechanism of action was demonstrated by showing target gene suppression in tumors and by observing that negative control U1 Adaptors with just one functional domain show no tumor suppression activity. The anti-BCL2 and anti-GRM1 treatments were equally effective against cell lines harboring either wild-type or a mutant V600E B-RAF allele, the most common mutation in melanoma. Treatment of normal immune-competent mice (C57BL6 indicated no organ toxicity or immune stimulation. These proof-of-concept studies represent an in-depth (over 800 mice in ~108 treatment groups validation that U1 Adaptors are a highly potent gene-silencing therapeutic and open the way for their further development to treat other human diseases.

  5. TRAM is involved in IL-18 signaling and functions as a sorting adaptor for MyD88.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Ohnishi

    Full Text Available MyD88, a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor homology (TIR domain-containing adaptor protein, mediates signals from the Toll-like receptors (TLR or IL-1/IL-18 receptors to downstream kinases. In MyD88-dependent TLR4 signaling, the function of MyD88 is enhanced by another TIR domain-containing adaptor, Mal/TIRAP, which brings MyD88 to the plasma membrane and promotes its interaction with the cytosolic region of TLR4. Hence, Mal is recognized as the "sorting adaptor" for MyD88. In this study, a direct interaction between MyD88-TIR and another membrane-sorting adaptor, TRAM/TICAM-2, was demonstrated in vitro. Cell-based assays including RNA interference experiments and TRAM deficient mice revealed that the interplay between MyD88 and TRAM in cells is important in mediating IL-18 signal transduction. Live cell imaging further demonstrated the co-localized accumulation of MyD88 and TRAM in the membrane regions in HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that TRAM serves as the sorting adaptor for MyD88 in IL-18 signaling, which then facilitates the signal transduction. The binding sites for TRAM are located in the TIR domain of MyD88 and actually overlap with the binding sites for Mal. MyD88, the multifunctional signaling adaptor that works together with most of the TLR members and with the IL-1/IL-18 receptors, can interact with two distinct sorting adaptors, TRAM and Mal, in a conserved manner in a distinct context.

  6. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  7. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  8. A signaling polypeptide derived from an innate immune adaptor molecule can be harnessed as a new class of vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Ishii, Ken J; Koyama, Shohei; Aoshi, Taiki; Akira, Shizuo; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Suzuki, Koichi; Okuda, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Modulation of intracellular signaling using cell-permeable polypeptides is a promising technology for future clinical applications. To develop a novel approach to activate innate immune signaling by synthetic polypeptides, we characterized several different polypeptides derived from the caspase recruitment domain (CARD) of IFN-beta promoter stimulator 1, each of which localizes to a different subcellular compartment. Of particular interest was, N'-CARD, which consisted of the nuclear localization signal of histone H2B and the IFN-beta promoter stimulator 1CARD and which localized to the nucleus. This polypeptide led to a strong production of type I IFNs and molecular and genetic analyses showed that nuclear DNA helicase II is critically involved in this response. N'-CARD polypeptide fused to a protein transduction domain (N'-CARD-PTD) readily transmigrated from the outside to the inside of the cell and triggered innate immune signaling. Administration of N'-CARD-PTD polypeptide elicited production of type I IFNs, maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, and promotion of vaccine immunogenicity by enhancing Ag-specific Th1-type immune responses, thereby protecting mice from lethal influenza infection and from outgrowth of transplanted tumors in vivo. Thus, our results indicate that the N'-CARD-PTD polypeptide belongs to a new class of vaccine adjuvant that directly triggers intracellular signal transduction by a distinct mechanism from those engaged by conventional vaccine adjuvants, such as TLR ligands.

  9. The Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in Breast Tumorigenesis and Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    points indicated. Treatments included DMSO control or inhibition of Met (0.2uM PHA-665752), Abl (4uM Imatinib ), PI3K (20uM LY-294002), mTOR (0.1uM...CrkL over CrkII, Nat Chem Biol 8, 590–596 (2012). RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Crk adaptor proteins act as key signaling integrators for breast...R74 http://breast-cancer-research.com/content/14/3/R74 © 2012 Fathers et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed

  10. Transmembrane adaptor proteins in the high-affinity IgE receptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Dráberová, Lubica

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, 11.1. (2012), s. 95 ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA ČR GA301/09/1826; GA ČR GAP302/10/1759; GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200520901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : IgE receptor * LAT/LAT1 * LAX * NTAL/Lab/LAT2 * PAG/Cbp * mast cells * plasma membrane * transmembrane adaptor proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  12. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  13. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  14. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signalingr driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-03-08

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology.

  15. The adaptor protein SAP directly associates with PECAM-1 and regulates PECAM-1-mediated-cell adhesion in T-like cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Richard; Crouin, Catherine; Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2014-04-01

    SAP is a small cytosolic adaptor protein expressed in hematopoietic lineages whose main function is to regulate intracellular signaling pathways induced by the triggering of members of the SLAM receptor family. In this paper, we have identified the adhesion molecule PECAM-1 as a new partner for SAP in a conditional yeast two-hybrid screen. PECAM-1 is an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by endothelial cells and leukocytes, which possesses both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about PECAM-1 functions in T cells. We show that SAP directly and specifically interacts with the cytosolic tyrosine 686 of PECAM-1. We generated different T-like cell lines in which SAP or PECAM-1 are expressed or down modulated and we demonstrate that a diminished SAP expression correlates with a diminished PECAM-1-mediated adhesion. Although SAP has mainly been shown to associate with SLAM receptors, we evidence here that SAP is a new actor downstream of PECAM-1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of autoimmune hepatitis with Src homology 2 adaptor protein 3 gene polymorphisms in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Takeji; Joshita, Satoru; Hamano, Hideaki; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Eiji; Ota, Masao

    2017-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease characterized by an autoimmune reaction to hepatocytes. The Src homology 2 adaptor protein 3 (SH2B3) gene is a member of the SH2B family of adaptor proteins that has been implicated in the integration and regulation of multiple signaling events. SH2B3 is involved in cytokine signaling pathways and serves as a negative mediator of T-cell receptor signaling. Genome-wide association analyses in Caucasians have linked a missense mutation at rs3184504 in SH2B3 with AIH. Accordingly, four selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SH2B3 gene were genotyped in 158 patients with AIH, 327 patients with primary biliary cholangitis, 160 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, and 325 healthy subjects of Japanese descent. Although the functional rs3184504 was non-polymorphic in 952 subjects, the frequency of the minor rs11065904 T allele was significantly decreased in AIH patients compared with healthy controls (odds ratio (OR)=0.68; corrected P=0.025). Haplotype 2 (rs2238154 A, rs11065904 T and rs739496 G) was associated with resistance to AIH (OR 0.67, P=0.021) as well as to autoimmune pancreatitis (OR=0.70, P=0.035). Our findings suggest that an SNP and haplotype in SH2B3 are associated with AIH.

  17. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  18. ROS Control Mitochondrial Motility through p38 and the Motor Adaptor Miro/Trak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Debattisti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial distribution and motility are recognized as central to many cellular functions, but their regulation by signaling mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that reactive oxygen species (ROS, either derived from an extracellular source or intracellularly generated, control mitochondrial distribution and function by dose-dependently, specifically, and reversibly decreasing mitochondrial motility in both rat hippocampal primary cultured neurons and cell lines. ROS decrease motility independently of cytoplasmic [Ca2+], mitochondrial membrane potential, or permeability transition pore opening, known effectors of oxidative stress. However, multiple lines of genetic and pharmacological evidence support that a ROS-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, p38α, is required for the motility inhibition. Furthermore, anchoring mitochondria directly to kinesins without involvement of the physiological adaptors between the organelles and the motor protein prevents the H2O2-induced decrease in mitochondrial motility. Thus, ROS engage p38α and the motor adaptor complex to exert changes in mitochondrial motility, which likely has both physiological and pathophysiological relevance.

  19. The Adaptor Protein Rai/ShcC Promotes Astrocyte-Dependent Inflammation during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Savino, Maria Teresa; Luccarini, Ilaria; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Benagiano, Marisa; Ortensi, Barbara; Pelicci, Giuliana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Ballerini, Clara; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana

    2016-07-15

    Th17 cells have been casually associated to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We have previously demonstrated that Rai/ShcC, a member of the Shc family of adaptor proteins, negatively regulates Th17 cell differentiation and lupus autoimmunity. In this study, we have investigated the pathogenic outcome of the Th17 bias associated with Rai deficiency on multiple sclerosis development, using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model. We found that, unexpectedly, EAE was less severe in Rai(-/-) mice compared with their wild-type counterparts despite an enhanced generation of myelin-specific Th17 cells that infiltrated into the CNS. Nevertheless, when adoptively transferred into immunodeficient Rai(+/+) mice, these cells promoted a more severe disease compared with wild-type encephalitogenic Th17 cells. This paradoxical phenotype was caused by a dampened inflammatory response of astrocytes, which were found to express Rai, to IL-17. The results provide evidence that Rai plays opposite roles in Th17 cell differentiation and astrocyte activation, with the latter dominant over the former in EAE, highlighting this adaptor as a potential novel target for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Koji

    2015-12-03

    Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as "adaptor" molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA) can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3' terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. "Why CCA?" is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  1. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  2. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  3. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Design and Calibration of a Dispersive Imaging Spectrometer Adaptor for a Fast IR Camera on NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reksoatmodjo, Richard; Gray, Travis; Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Team

    2017-10-01

    A dispersive spectrometer adaptor was designed, constructed and calibrated for use on a fast infrared camera employed to measure temperatures on the lower divertor tiles of the NSTX-U tokamak. This adaptor efficiently and evenly filters and distributes long-wavelength infrared photons between 8.0 and 12.0 microns across the 128x128 pixel detector of the fast IR camera. By determining the width of these separated wavelength bands across the camera detector, and then determining the corresponding average photon count for each photon wavelength, a very accurate measurement of the temperature, and thus heat flux, of the divertor tiles can be calculated using Plank's law. This approach of designing an exterior dispersive adaptor for the fast IR camera allows accurate temperature measurements to be made of materials with unknown emissivity. Further, the relative simplicity and affordability of this adaptor design provides an attractive option over more expensive, slower, dispersive IR camera systems. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Alternatively spliced short and long isoforms of adaptor protein intersectin 1 form complexes in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rynditch A. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 is an adaptor protein involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 (ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S are produced by alternative splicing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S could interact in mammalian cells. Methods. During this study we employed immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Results. We have shown that endogenous ITSN1-S co-precipitates with overexpressed ITSN1-L in PC12, 293 and 293T cells. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 also co-localize in 293T cells. Conclusions. ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S form complexes in mammalian cells.

  7. Effectiveness of Needles Vial Adaptors and Blunt Cannulas for Drug Administration in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, Melinda; Bayuse, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The need for a new system of injectable medications aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was identified. It is desired that this system fly medications in their original manufacturer's packaging, allowing the system to comply with United States Pharmacopeia (USP) guidelines while minimizing the resupply frequency due to medication expiration. Pre-filled syringes are desired, however, the evolving nature of the healthcare marketplace requires flexibility in the redesign. If medications must be supplied in a vial, a system is required that allows for the safe withdrawal of medication from the vial into a syringe for administration in microgravity. During two reduced gravity flights, the effectiveness of two versions of a blunt cannula and needleless vial adaptors was evaluated to facilitate the withdrawal of liquid medication from a vial into a syringe for injection. Other parameters assessed included the ability to withdraw the required amount of medication and whether this is dependent on vial size, liquid, or the total volume of fluid within the vial. Injectable medications proposed for flight on ISS were used for this evaluation. Due to differing sizes of vials and the fluid properties of the medications, the needleless vial adaptors proved to be too cumbersome to recommend for use on the ISS. The blunt cannula, specifically the plastic version, proved to be more effective at removing medication from the various sizes of vials and are the recommended hardware for ISS. Fluid isolation within the vials and syringes is an important step in preparing medication for injection regardless of the hardware used. Although isolation is a challenge in the relatively short parabolas during flight, it is not an obstacle for sustained microgravity. This presentation will provide an overview of the products tested as well as the challenges identified during the microgravity flights.

  8. Signal-transducing adaptor protein-2 promotes generation of functional long-term memory CD8+ T cells by preventing terminal effector differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Daisuke; Seo, Naohiro; Hayashi, Tae; Hyuga-Amaike, Chisaki; Okamori, Kana; Tawara, Isao; Harada, Naozumi; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2017-05-09

    Long-surviving memory CD8+ T cells generated by stimulation with appropriate tumor-associated antigens are the most aggressive and persistent tumoricidal effectors. In this event of memory CD8+ T cell development, the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins function as the crucial intracellular signaling molecules, but the regulatory mechanism of STATs in CD8+ T cells is not fully understood. In this study, we report for the first time, by using murine vaccination models, that signal-transducing adaptor protein-2 (STAP2) maintains the cytotoxicity of long-lived memory CD8+ T cells by controlling a STAT3/suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) cascade. Following T cell activation, STAP2 expression was transiently reduced but was subsequently recovered and augmented. Analysis using small-interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated that restored STAP2 expression was associated with the activation of STAT3/SOCS3 signals and maintenance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) secondary responses by preventing their differentiation into terminal effector cells. Notably, this STAP2-dependent memory differentiation was observed in the spleen, but not in the lymph nodes (LNs). These findings indicate an essential role for STAP2 in the generation of a high-quality memory CD8+ CTLs periphery, and suggest the therapeutic potential of STAP2 in cancer patients.

  9. Small molecules targeting heterotrimeric G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2018-05-05

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface receptors regulating many human and animal physiological functions. Their implication in human pathophysiology is obvious with almost 30-40% medical drugs commercialized today directly targeting GPCRs as molecular entities. However, upon ligand binding GPCRs signal inside the cell through many key signaling, adaptor and regulatory proteins, including various classes of heterotrimeric G proteins. Therefore, G proteins are considered interesting targets for the development of pharmacological tools that are able to modulate their interaction with the receptors, as well as their activation/deactivation processes. In this review, old attempts and recent advances in the development of small molecules that directly target G proteins will be described with an emphasis on their utilization as pharmacological tools to dissect the mechanisms of activation of GPCR-G protein complexes. These molecules constitute a further asset for research in the "hot" areas of GPCR biology, areas such as multiple G protein coupling/signaling, GPCR-G protein preassembly, and GPCR functional selectivity or bias. Moreover, this review gives a particular focus on studies in vitro and in vivo supporting the potential applications of such small molecules in various GPCR/G protein-related diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. G protein-coupled receptors regulate Na+,K+-ATPase activity and endocytosis by modulating the recruitment of adaptor protein 2 and clathrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogimoto, Goichi; Yudowski, Guillermo A.; Barker, Christopher J.; Köhler, Martin; Katz, Adrian I.; Féraille, Eric; Pedemonte, Carlos H.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bertorello, Alejandro M.

    2000-01-01

    Inhibition of Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity in renal epithelial cells by activation of G protein-coupled receptors is mediated by phosphorylation of the catalytic α-subunit followed by endocytosis of active molecules. We examined whether agonists that counteract this effect do so by dephosphorylation of the α-subunit or by preventing its internalization through a direct interaction with the endocytic network. Oxymetazoline counteracted the action of dopamine on NKA activity, and this effect was achieved not by preventing α-subunit phosphorylation, but by impaired endocytosis of α-subunits into clathrin vesicles and early and late endosomes. Dopamine-induced inhibition of NKA activity and α-subunit endocytosis required the interaction of adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) with the catalytic α-subunit. Phosphorylation of the α-subunit is essential because dopamine failed to promote such interaction in cells lacking the protein kinase C phosphorylation residue (S18A). Confocal microscopy confirmed that oxymetazoline prevents incorporation of NKA molecules into clathrin vesicles by inhibiting the ability of dopamine to recruit clathrin to the plasma membrane. Dopamine decreased the basal levels of inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6), whereas oxymetazoline prevented this effect. Similar increments (above basal) in the concentration of InsP6 induced by oxymetazoline prevented AP-2 binding to the NKA α-subunit in response to dopamine. In conclusion, inhibition of NKA activity can be reversed by preventing its endocytosis without altering the state of α-subunit phosphorylation; increased InsP6 in response to G protein-coupled receptor signals blocks the recruitment of AP-2 and thereby clathrin-dependent endocytosis of NKA. PMID:10716725

  11. Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus nucleoprotein interacts with TREX complex adaptor protein Aly/REF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod R M T Balasubramaniam

    Full Text Available We constructed a novel chicken (Gallus gallus lung cDNA library fused inside yeast acting domain vector (pGADT7. Using yeast two-hybrid screening with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI nucleoprotein (NP from the strain (A/chicken/Malaysia/5858/2004(H5N1 as bait, and the Gallus gallus lung cDNA library as prey, a novel interaction between the Gallus gallus cellular RNA export adaptor protein Aly/REF and the viral NP was identified. This interaction was confirmed and validated with mammalian two hybrid studies and co-immunoprecipitation assay. Cellular localization studies using confocal microscopy showed that NP and Aly/REF co-localize primarily in the nucleus. Further investigations by mammalian two hybrid studies into the binding of NP of other subtypes of influenza virus such as the swine A/New Jersey/1976/H1N1 and pandemic A/Malaysia/854/2009(H1N1 to human Aly/REF, also showed that the NP of these viruses interacts with human Aly/REF. Our findings are also supported by docking studies which showed tight and favorable binding between H5N1 NP and human Aly/REF, using crystal structures from Protein Data Bank. siRNA knockdown of Aly/REF had little effect on the export of HPAI NP and other viral RNA as it showed no significant reduction in virus titer. However, UAP56, another component of the TREX complex, which recruits Aly/REF to mRNA was found to interact even better with H5N1 NP through molecular docking studies. Both these proteins also co-localizes in the nucleus at early infection similar to Aly/REF. Intriguingly, knockdown of UAP56 in A549 infected cells shows significant reduction in viral titer (close to 10 fold reduction. Conclusively, our study have opened new avenues for research of other cellular RNA export adaptors crucial in aiding viral RNA export such as the SRSF3, 9G8 and ASF/SF2 that may play role in influenza virus RNA nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  13. LIME: a new membrane raft-associated adaptor protein involved in CD4 and CD8 coreceptor signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brdičková, Naděžda; Brdička, Tomáš; Angelisová, Pavla; Horváth, Ondřej; Špička, Jiří; Hilgert, Ivan; Pačes, Jan; Simeoni, L.; Kliche, S.; Merten, C.; Schraven, B.; Hořejší, Václav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 10 (2003), s. 1453-1462 ISSN 0022-1007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA MŠk LN00A026 Grant - others:Wellcome Trust(GB) J1116W24Z Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : immunology * T-lymphocyte * adaptor protein Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 15.302, year: 2003

  14. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  15. The non-motor adaptor HMMR dampens Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Mei, Lin; Reid, Gregor S D; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2018-01-31

    Mitotic spindle assembly and organization require forces generated by motor proteins. The activity of these motors is regulated by non-motor adaptor proteins. However, there are limited studies reporting the functional importance of adaptors on the balance of motor forces and the promotion of faithful and timely cell division. Here, we show that genomic deletion or siRNA silencing of the non-motor adaptor Hmmr/ HMMR disturbs spindle microtubule organization and bipolar chromosome-kinetochore attachments with a consequent elevated occurrence of aneuploidy. Rescue experiments show a conserved motif in HMMR is required to generate inter-kinetochore tension and promote anaphase entry. This motif bears high homology with the kinesin Kif15 and is known to interact with TPX2, a spindle assembly factor. We find that HMMR is required to dampen kinesin Eg5-mediated forces through localizing TPX2 and promoting the formation of inhibitory TPX2-Eg5 complexes. In HMMR-silenced cells, K-fiber stability is reduced while the frequency of unattached chromosomes and the time needed for chromosome segregation are both increased. These defects can be alleviated in HMMR-silenced cells with chemical inhibition of Eg5, but not through the silencing of Kif15. Together, our findings indicate that HMMR balances Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation. © 2018 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  16. Recruitment of the Mint3 adaptor is necessary for export of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) from the Golgi complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Amanda H; Kahn, Richard A

    2013-10-04

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a ubiquitously expressed single-pass transmembrane protein that undergoes proteolytic processing by secretases to generate the pathogenic amyloid-β peptide, the major component in Alzheimer plaques. The traffic of APP through the cell determines its exposure to secretases and consequently the cleavages that generate the pathogenic or nonpathogenic peptide fragments. Despite the likely importance of APP traffic to Alzheimer disease, we still lack clear models for the routing and regulation of APP in cells. Like the traffic of most transmembrane proteins, the binding of adaptors to its cytoplasmic tail, which is 47 residues long and contains at least four distinct sorting motifs, regulates that of APP. We tested each of these for effects on the traffic of APP from the Golgi by mutating key residues within them and examining adaptor recruitment at the Golgi and traffic to post-Golgi site(s). We demonstrate strict specificity for recruitment of the Mint3 adaptor by APP at the Golgi, a critical role for Tyr-682 (within the YENPTY motif) in Mint3 recruitment and export of APP from the Golgi, and we identify LAMP1(+) structures as the proximal destination of APP after leaving the Golgi. Together, these data provide a detailed view of the first sorting step in its route to the cell surface and processing by secretases and further highlight the critical role played by Mint3.

  17. Recruitment of the Mint3 Adaptor Is Necessary for Export of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) from the Golgi Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Amanda H.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a ubiquitously expressed single-pass transmembrane protein that undergoes proteolytic processing by secretases to generate the pathogenic amyloid-β peptide, the major component in Alzheimer plaques. The traffic of APP through the cell determines its exposure to secretases and consequently the cleavages that generate the pathogenic or nonpathogenic peptide fragments. Despite the likely importance of APP traffic to Alzheimer disease, we still lack clear models for the routing and regulation of APP in cells. Like the traffic of most transmembrane proteins, the binding of adaptors to its cytoplasmic tail, which is 47 residues long and contains at least four distinct sorting motifs, regulates that of APP. We tested each of these for effects on the traffic of APP from the Golgi by mutating key residues within them and examining adaptor recruitment at the Golgi and traffic to post-Golgi site(s). We demonstrate strict specificity for recruitment of the Mint3 adaptor by APP at the Golgi, a critical role for Tyr-682 (within the YENPTY motif) in Mint3 recruitment and export of APP from the Golgi, and we identify LAMP1+ structures as the proximal destination of APP after leaving the Golgi. Together, these data provide a detailed view of the first sorting step in its route to the cell surface and processing by secretases and further highlight the critical role played by Mint3. PMID:23965993

  18. Nrf2 reduces levels of phosphorylated tau protein by inducing autophagy adaptor protein NDP52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Chulman; Gundemir, Soner; Pritchard, Susanne; Jin, Youngnam N.; Rahman, Irfan; Johnson, Gail V. W.

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a pivotal transcription factor in the defence against oxidative stress. Here we provide evidence that activation of the Nrf2 pathway reduces the levels of phosphorylated tau by induction of an autophagy adaptor protein NDP52 (also known as CALCOCO2) in neurons. The expression of NDP52, which we show has three antioxidant response elements (AREs) in its promoter region, is strongly induced by Nrf2, and its overexpression facilitates clearance of phosphorylated tau in the presence of an autophagy stimulator. In Nrf2-knockout mice, phosphorylated and sarkosyl-insoluble tau accumulates in the brains concurrent with decreased levels of NDP52. Moreover, NDP52 associates with phosphorylated tau from brain cortical samples of Alzheimer disease cases, and the amount of phosphorylated tau in sarkosyl-insoluble fractions is inversely proportional to that of NDP52. These results suggest that NDP52 plays a key role in autophagy-mediated degradation of phosphorylated tau in vivo.

  19. The Kinesin Adaptor Calsyntenin-1 Organizes Microtubule Polarity and Regulates Dynamics during Sensory Axon Arbor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C. Halloran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and branching, and development of neuronal polarity are critically dependent on proper organization and dynamics of the microtubule (MT cytoskeleton. MTs must organize with correct polarity for delivery of diverse cargos to appropriate subcellular locations, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating MT polarity remain poorly understood. Moreover, how an actively branching axon reorganizes MTs to direct their plus ends distally at branch points is unknown. We used high-speed, in vivo imaging of polymerizing MT plus ends to characterize MT dynamics in developing sensory axon arbors in zebrafish embryos. We find that axonal MTs are highly dynamic throughout development, and that the peripheral and central axons of sensory neurons show differences in MT behaviors. Furthermore, we show that Calsyntenin-1 (Clstn-1, a kinesin adaptor required for sensory axon branching, also regulates MT polarity in developing axon arbors. In wild type neurons the vast majority of MTs are directed in the correct plus-end-distal orientation from early stages of development. Loss of Clstn-1 causes an increase in MTs polymerizing in the retrograde direction. These misoriented MTs most often are found near growth cones and branch points, suggesting Clstn-1 is particularly important for organizing MT polarity at these locations. Together, our results suggest that Clstn-1, in addition to regulating kinesin-mediated cargo transport, also organizes the underlying MT highway during axon arbor development.

  20. Neuronal adaptor FE65 stimulates Rac1-mediated neurite outgrowth by recruiting and activating ELMO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Tam, Ka Ming Vincent; Chan, Wai Wan Ray; Koon, Alex Chun; Ngo, Jacky Chi Ki; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2018-04-03

    Neurite outgrowth is a crucial process in developing neurons for neural network formation. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of neurite outgrowth is essential for developing strategies to stimulate neurite regeneration after nerve injury and in neurodegenerative disorders. FE65 is a brain-enriched adaptor that stimulates Rac1-mediated neurite elongation. However, the precise mechanism by which FE65 promotes the process remains elusive. Here, we show that ELMO1, a subunit of ELMO1-DOCK180 bipartite Rac1 GEF, interacts with the FE65 N-terminal region. Overexpression of FE65 and/or ELMO1 enhances whereas knockdown of FE65 or ELMO1 inhibits neurite outgrowth and Rac1 activation. The effect of FE65 alone or together with ELMO1 is attenuated by an FE65 double mutation that disrupts FE65-ELMO1 interaction. Notably, FE65 is found to activate ELMO1 by diminishing ELMO1 intramolecular autoinhibitory interaction and to promote the targeting of ELMO1 to the plasma membrane where Rac1 is activated. We also show that FE65, ELMO1 and DOCK180 form a tripartite complex. Knockdown of DOCK180 reduces the stimulatory effect of FE65-ELMO1 on Rac1 activation and neurite outgrowth. Thus, we identify a novel mechanism that FE65 stimulates Rac1-mediated neurite outgrowth by recruiting and activating of ELMO1. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Development of STEP-NC Adaptor for Advanced Web Manufacturing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay Konapala, Mr.; Koona, Ramji, Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Information systems play a key role in the modern era of Information Technology. Rapid developments in IT & global competition calls for many changes in basic CAD/CAM/CAPP/CNC manufacturing chain of operations. ‘STEP-NC’ an enhancement to STEP for operating CNC machines, creating new opportunities for collaborative, concurrent, adaptive works across the manufacturing chain of operations. Schemas and data models defined by ISO14649 in liaison with ISO10303 standards made STEP-NC file rich with feature based, rather than mere point to point information of G/M Code format. But one needs to have a suitable information system to understand and modify these files. Various STEP-NC information systems are reviewed to understand the suitability of STEP-NC for web manufacturing. Present work also deals with the development of an adaptor which imports STEP-NC file, organizes its information, allowing modifications to entity values and finally generates a new STEP-NC file to export. The system is designed and developed to work on web to avail additional benefits through the web and also to be part of a proposed ‘Web based STEP-NC manufacturing platform’ which is under development and explained as future scope.

  2. Dengue Virus Targets the Adaptor Protein MITA to Subvert Host Innate Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Yi; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Liang, Jian-Jong; Chiang, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Yi-Ling; Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important arboviral diseases caused by infection of four serotypes of dengue virus (DEN). We found that activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) triggered by viral infection and by foreign DNA and RNA stimulation was blocked by DEN-encoded NS2B3 through a protease-dependent mechanism. The key adaptor protein in type I interferon pathway, human mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA) but not the murine homologue MPYS, was cleaved in cells infected with DEN-1 or DEN-2 and with expression of the enzymatically active protease NS2B3. The cleavage site of MITA was mapped to LRR↓96G and the function of MITA was suppressed by dengue protease. DEN replication was reduced with overexpression of MPYS but not with MITA, while DEN replication was enhanced by MPYS knockdown, indicating an antiviral role of MITA/MPYS against DEN infection. The involvement of MITA in DEN-triggered innate immune response was evidenced by reduction of IRF3 activation and IFN induction in cells with MITA knockdown upon DEN-2 infection. NS2B3 physically interacted with MITA, and the interaction and cleavage of MITA could be further enhanced by poly(dA:dT) stimulation. Thus, we identified MITA as a novel host target of DEN protease and provide the molecular mechanism of how DEN subverts the host innate immunity. PMID:22761576

  3. Artificial Neural Network for the Prediction of Tyrosine-Based Sorting Signal Recognition by Adaptor Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Mukherjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sorting of transmembrane proteins to various intracellular compartments depends on specific signals present within their cytosolic domains. Among these sorting signals, the tyrosine-based motif (YXXØ is one of the best characterized and is recognized by μ-subunits of the four clathrin-associated adaptor complexes (AP-1 to AP-4. Despite their overlap in specificity, each μ-subunit has a distinct sequence preference dependent on the nature of the X-residues. Moreover, combinations of these residues exert cooperative or inhibitory effects towards interaction with the various APs. This complexity makes it impossible to predict a priori, the specificity of a given tyrosine-signal for a particular μ-subunit. Here, we describe the results obtained with a computational approach based on the Artificial Neural Network (ANN paradigm that addresses the issue of tyrosine-signal specificity, enabling the prediction of YXXØ-μ interactions with accuracies over 90%. Therefore, this approach constitutes a powerful tool to help predict mechanisms of intracellular protein sorting.

  4. Role of the AP-5 adaptor protein complex in late endosome-to-Golgi retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Jennifer; Itzhak, Daniel N; Antrobus, Robin; Borner, Georg H H; Robinson, Margaret S

    2018-01-01

    The AP-5 adaptor protein complex is presumed to function in membrane traffic, but so far nothing is known about its pathway or its cargo. We have used CRISPR-Cas9 to knock out the AP-5 ζ subunit gene, AP5Z1, in HeLa cells, and then analysed the phenotype by subcellular fractionation profiling and quantitative mass spectrometry. The retromer complex had an altered steady-state distribution in the knockout cells, and several Golgi proteins, including GOLIM4 and GOLM1, were depleted from vesicle-enriched fractions. Immunolocalisation showed that loss of AP-5 led to impaired retrieval of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CIMPR), GOLIM4, and GOLM1 from endosomes back to the Golgi region. Knocking down the retromer complex exacerbated this phenotype. Both the CIMPR and sortilin interacted with the AP-5-associated protein SPG15 in pull-down assays, and we propose that sortilin may act as a link between Golgi proteins and the AP-5/SPG11/SPG15 complex. Together, our findings suggest that AP-5 functions in a novel sorting step out of late endosomes, acting as a backup pathway for retromer. This provides a mechanistic explanation for why mutations in AP-5/SPG11/SPG15 cause cells to accumulate aberrant endolysosomes, and highlights the role of endosome/lysosome dysfunction in the pathology of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Dengue virus targets the adaptor protein MITA to subvert host innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Yi; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Liang, Jian-Jong; Chiang, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Yi-Ling; Liao, Ching-Len; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most important arboviral diseases caused by infection of four serotypes of dengue virus (DEN). We found that activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) triggered by viral infection and by foreign DNA and RNA stimulation was blocked by DEN-encoded NS2B3 through a protease-dependent mechanism. The key adaptor protein in type I interferon pathway, human mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA) but not the murine homologue MPYS, was cleaved in cells infected with DEN-1 or DEN-2 and with expression of the enzymatically active protease NS2B3. The cleavage site of MITA was mapped to LRR↓(96)G and the function of MITA was suppressed by dengue protease. DEN replication was reduced with overexpression of MPYS but not with MITA, while DEN replication was enhanced by MPYS knockdown, indicating an antiviral role of MITA/MPYS against DEN infection. The involvement of MITA in DEN-triggered innate immune response was evidenced by reduction of IRF3 activation and IFN induction in cells with MITA knockdown upon DEN-2 infection. NS2B3 physically interacted with MITA, and the interaction and cleavage of MITA could be further enhanced by poly(dA:dT) stimulation. Thus, we identified MITA as a novel host target of DEN protease and provide the molecular mechanism of how DEN subverts the host innate immunity.

  6. The ubiquitin ligase RNF5 regulates antiviral responses by mediating degradation of the adaptor protein MITA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Lu; Lei, Caoqi; Li, Ying; Mao, Ai-Ping; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Lian; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2009-03-20

    Viral infection activates transcription factors NF-kappaB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. MITA (also known as STING) has recently been identified as an adaptor that links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 activation. Here, we showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF5 interacted with MITA in a viral-infection-dependent manner. Overexpression of RNF5 inhibited virus-triggered IRF3 activation, IFNB1 expression, and cellular antiviral response, whereas knockdown of RNF5 had opposite effects. RNF5 targeted MITA at Lys150 for ubiquitination and degradation after viral infection. Both MITA and RNF5 were located at the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and viral infection caused their redistribution to the ER and mitochondria, respectively. We further found that virus-induced ubiquitination and degradation of MITA by RNF5 occurred at the mitochondria. These findings suggest that RNF5 negatively regulates virus-triggered signaling by targeting MITA for ubiquitination and degradation at the mitochondria.

  7. Dengue virus targets the adaptor protein MITA to subvert host innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Yu

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the most important arboviral diseases caused by infection of four serotypes of dengue virus (DEN. We found that activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 triggered by viral infection and by foreign DNA and RNA stimulation was blocked by DEN-encoded NS2B3 through a protease-dependent mechanism. The key adaptor protein in type I interferon pathway, human mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA but not the murine homologue MPYS, was cleaved in cells infected with DEN-1 or DEN-2 and with expression of the enzymatically active protease NS2B3. The cleavage site of MITA was mapped to LRR↓(96G and the function of MITA was suppressed by dengue protease. DEN replication was reduced with overexpression of MPYS but not with MITA, while DEN replication was enhanced by MPYS knockdown, indicating an antiviral role of MITA/MPYS against DEN infection. The involvement of MITA in DEN-triggered innate immune response was evidenced by reduction of IRF3 activation and IFN induction in cells with MITA knockdown upon DEN-2 infection. NS2B3 physically interacted with MITA, and the interaction and cleavage of MITA could be further enhanced by poly(dA:dT stimulation. Thus, we identified MITA as a novel host target of DEN protease and provide the molecular mechanism of how DEN subverts the host innate immunity.

  8. The adaptor protein MITA links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Yang, Yan; Li, Shu; Wang, Yan-Yi; Li, Ying; Diao, Feici; Lei, Caoqi; He, Xiao; Zhang, Lu; Tien, Po; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2008-10-17

    Viral infection triggers activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. Here, we identified MITA as a critical mediator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling by expression cloning. Overexpression of MITA activated IRF3, whereas knockdown of MITA inhibited virus-triggered activation of IRF3, expression of type I IFNs, and cellular antiviral response. MITA was found to localize to the outer membrane of mitochondria and to be associated with VISA, a mitochondrial protein that acts as an adaptor in virus-triggered signaling. MITA also interacted with IRF3 and recruited the kinase TBK1 to the VISA-associated complex. MITA was phosphorylated by TBK1, which is required for MITA-mediated activation of IRF3. Our results suggest that MITA is a critical mediator of virus-triggered IRF3 activation and IFN expression and further demonstrate the importance of certain mitochondrial proteins in innate antiviral immunity.

  9. Role of the AP-5 adaptor protein complex in late endosome-to-Golgi retrieval.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hirst

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The AP-5 adaptor protein complex is presumed to function in membrane traffic, but so far nothing is known about its pathway or its cargo. We have used CRISPR-Cas9 to knock out the AP-5 ζ subunit gene, AP5Z1, in HeLa cells, and then analysed the phenotype by subcellular fractionation profiling and quantitative mass spectrometry. The retromer complex had an altered steady-state distribution in the knockout cells, and several Golgi proteins, including GOLIM4 and GOLM1, were depleted from vesicle-enriched fractions. Immunolocalisation showed that loss of AP-5 led to impaired retrieval of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CIMPR, GOLIM4, and GOLM1 from endosomes back to the Golgi region. Knocking down the retromer complex exacerbated this phenotype. Both the CIMPR and sortilin interacted with the AP-5-associated protein SPG15 in pull-down assays, and we propose that sortilin may act as a link between Golgi proteins and the AP-5/SPG11/SPG15 complex. Together, our findings suggest that AP-5 functions in a novel sorting step out of late endosomes, acting as a backup pathway for retromer. This provides a mechanistic explanation for why mutations in AP-5/SPG11/SPG15 cause cells to accumulate aberrant endolysosomes, and highlights the role of endosome/lysosome dysfunction in the pathology of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Expression of the Rai (Shc C) adaptor protein in the human enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanacci, V; Bassotti, G; Ortensi, B; Fisogni, S; Cathomas, G; Maurer, C A; Galletti, A; Salerni, B; Pelicci, G

    2008-03-01

    The adaptor protein Rai (ShcC/N-Shc) is almost exclusively present in the nervous system, although little is documented about its expression in the gut and the enteric nervous system (ENS). As Rai is a physiological substrate of Ret, an important factor for the development of ENS, we have evaluated the expression of Rai in the ENS in various segments of the human gastrointestinal tract. The expression of Rai was assessed by immunohistochemistry in disease-free human gut samples (oesophagus, stomach, small bowel and colon) obtained from subjects undergoing surgical procedures. Rai was not expressed in the epithelia or lymphoid tissue, whereas a moderate level of expression was observed in the endothelial cells of blood vessels and on the outer membrane of smooth muscle cells in both the muscularis mucosae and the muscularis propria. In the ENS, strong positivity was observed only in enteric glial cells, overlapping with GFAP and S100. In conclusion, Rai is expressed in the human gut, especially in the enteric glial cells. We conclude that Rai may provide an additional marker for this cell type.

  11. Histone locus regulation by the Drosophila dosage compensation adaptor protein CLAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Leila E; Koreski, Kaitlin P; Boltz, Kara A; Kuzu, Guray; Urban, Jennifer A; Bowman, Sarah K; Zeidman, Anna; Jordan, William T; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J; Larschan, Erica N

    2017-07-15

    The conserved histone locus body (HLB) assembles prior to zygotic gene activation early during development and concentrates factors into a nuclear domain of coordinated histone gene regulation. Although HLBs form specifically at replication-dependent histone loci, the cis and trans factors that target HLB components to histone genes remained unknown. Here we report that conserved GA repeat cis elements within the bidirectional histone3-histone4 promoter direct HLB formation in Drosophila In addition, the CLAMP (chromatin-linked adaptor for male-specific lethal [MSL] proteins) zinc finger protein binds these GA repeat motifs, increases chromatin accessibility, enhances histone gene transcription, and promotes HLB formation. We demonstrated previously that CLAMP also promotes the formation of another domain of coordinated gene regulation: the dosage-compensated male X chromosome. Therefore, CLAMP binding to GA repeat motifs promotes the formation of two distinct domains of coordinated gene activation located at different places in the genome. © 2017 Rieder et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Interactions between the Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural 2 Protein and Host Adaptor Proteins 1 and 4 Orchestrate Virus Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Stanley; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Neveu, Gregory; Pu, Szuyuan; Beer, Melanie; Schor, Stanford; Kumar, Sathish; Nicolaescu, Vlad; Lindenbach, Brett D; Randall, Glenn; Einav, Shirit

    2018-03-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads via secreted cell-free particles or direct cell-to-cell transmission. Yet, virus-host determinants governing differential intracellular trafficking of cell-free- and cell-to-cell-transmitted virus remain unknown. The host adaptor proteins (APs) AP-1A, AP-1B, and AP-4 traffic in post-Golgi compartments, and the latter two are implicated in basolateral sorting. We reported that AP-1A mediates HCV trafficking during release, whereas the endocytic adaptor AP-2 mediates entry and assembly. We demonstrated that the host kinases AAK1 and GAK regulate HCV infection by controlling these clathrin-associated APs. Here, we sought to define the roles of AP-4, a clathrin-independent adaptor; AP-1A; and AP-1B in HCV infection. We screened for interactions between HCV proteins and the μ subunits of AP-1A, AP-1B, and AP-4 by mammalian cell-based protein fragment complementation assays. The nonstructural 2 (NS2) protein emerged as an interactor of these adaptors in this screening and by coimmunoprecipitations in HCV-infected cells. Two previously unrecognized dileucine-based motifs in the NS2 C terminus mediated AP binding and HCV release. Infectivity and coculture assays demonstrated that while all three adaptors mediate HCV release and cell-free spread, AP-1B and AP-4, but not AP-1A, mediate cell-to-cell spread. Live-cell imaging revealed HCV cotrafficking with AP-1A, AP-1B, and AP-4 and that AP-4 mediates HCV trafficking in a post-Golgi compartment. Lastly, HCV cell-to-cell spread was regulated by AAK1 and GAK and thus susceptible to treatment with AAK1 and GAK inhibitors. These data provide a mechanistic understanding of HCV trafficking in distinct release pathways and reveal a requirement for APs in cell-to-cell viral spread. IMPORTANCE HCV spreads via cell-free infection or cell-to-cell contact that shields it from antibody neutralization, thereby facilitating viral persistence. Yet, factors governing this differential sorting remain unknown

  13. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall R Walker

    Full Text Available Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3 is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1, which is required for production of the Alzheimer's disease (AD-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC. Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates.

  14. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Modgil, Amit; Albrecht, David; Lomoio, Selene; Haydon, Philip G; Moss, Stephen J; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is required for production of the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC). Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates.

  15. A potential role for the clathrin adaptor GGA in Drosophila spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmichael Jenny

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GGAs (Golgi-localised, γ-ear containing, ADP ribosylation factor-binding are a family of clathrin adaptors that sort a number of biologically important transmembrane proteins into clathrin-coated vesicles. Knockout and knockdown studies to determine GGA function are confounded by the fact that there are 3 GGA genes in mammalian cells. Thus Drosophila melanogaster is a useful model system to study tissue expression profiles and knockdown phenotypes as there is a single GGA ortholog. Results Here we have quantified protein expression in Drosophila and show that there is >3-fold higher expression of GGA in male flies relative to female flies. In female flies the majority of GGA expression is in the head. In male flies GGA is not only expressed at high levels in the head but there is a gender specific increased expression which is due to the abundant expression of GGA in the testes. Using a highly specific antibody we have localised endogenous GGA protein in testes squashes, and visualised it in somatic and germ line cells. We show that GGA is expressed during multiple stages of sperm development, and co-stains with a marker of the trans-Golgi Network. This is most striking at the acroblast of early spermatids. In spite of the high expression of GGA in testes, knocking down its expression by >95% using transgenic RNAi fly lines did not affect male fertility. Therefore spermatogenesis in the male flies appears to progress normally with Conclusion In Drosophila we have uncovered a potential role for GGA in the testes of male flies. The gender specific higher expression of GGA, its specific enrichment in testes and its localisation to developing spermatocytes and at the acroblast of spermatids supports a role for GGA function in Drosophila spermatogenesis, even though spermatogenesis still occurs when GGA expression is depleted to

  16. Hydrological Modeling Reproducibility Through Data Management and Adaptors for Model Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of a lack of centralized planning and no widely-adopted standards among hydrological modeling research groups, research communities, and the data management teams meant to support research, there is chaos when it comes to data formats, spatio-temporal resolutions, ontologies, and data availability. All this makes true scientific reproducibility and collaborative integrated modeling impossible without some glue to piece it all together. Our Virtual Watershed Integrated Modeling System provides the tools and modeling framework hydrologists need to accelerate and fortify new scientific investigations by tracking provenance and providing adaptors for integrated, collaborative hydrologic modeling and data management. Under global warming trends where water resources are under increasing stress, reproducible hydrological modeling will be increasingly important to improve transparency and understanding of the scientific facts revealed through modeling. The Virtual Watershed Data Engine is capable of ingesting a wide variety of heterogeneous model inputs, outputs, model configurations, and metadata. We will demonstrate one example, starting from real-time raw weather station data packaged with station metadata. Our integrated modeling system will then create gridded input data via geostatistical methods along with error and uncertainty estimates. These gridded data are then used as input to hydrological models, all of which are available as web services wherever feasible. Models may be integrated in a data-centric way where the outputs too are tracked and used as inputs to "downstream" models. This work is part of an ongoing collaborative Tri-state (New Mexico, Nevada, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR Project, WC-WAVE, comprised of researchers from multiple universities in each of the three states. The tools produced and presented here have been developed collaboratively alongside watershed scientists to address specific modeling problems with an eye on the bigger picture of

  17. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  18. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions--which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes-to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated in

  19. The Shc Family Protein Adaptor, Rai, Negatively Regulates T Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling by Inhibiting ZAP-70 Recruitment and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neuro...

  20. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  2. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  3. A Dictyostelium SH2 adaptor protein required for correct DIF-1 signaling and pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Christopher; Ross, Susan; Annesley, Sarah J; Cole, Christian; Bloomfield, Gareth; Ivens, Alasdair; Skelton, Jason; Fisher, Paul R; Barton, Geoffrey; Williams, Jeffrey G

    2011-05-15

    phototaxis defect, implying that the early and late functions of LrrB are affected in different ways. These observations, coupled with its domain structure, suggest that LrrB is an SH2 adaptor protein active in diverse developmental signaling pathways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  5. Characterization of Toll-like receptors in primary lung epithelial cells: strong impact of the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C on the regulation of Toll-like receptors, adaptor proteins and inflammatory response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weith Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral exacerbations play a crucial role in a variety of lung diseases including COPD or asthma. Since the lung epithelium is a major source of various inflammatory mediators that affect the immune response, we analyzed the inflammatory reaction of primary lung epithelial cells to different microbial molecules that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR. Methods The effects of TLR ligands on primary small airway epithelial cells were analyzed in detail with respect to cytokine, chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion. In addition, the regulation of the expression of TLRs and their adaptor proteins in small airway epithelial cells was investigated. Results Our data demonstrate that poly(I:C, a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA, mediated the strongest proinflammatory effects among the tested ligands, including an increased secretion of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, GRO-α, TARC, MCP-1, MIP-3α, RANTES, IFN-β, IP-10 and ITAC as well as an increased release of MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10 and MMP-13. Furthermore, our data show that poly(I:C as well as type-1 and type-2 cytokines have a pronounced effect on the expression of TLRs and molecules involved in TLR signaling in small airway epithelial cells. Poly(I:C induced an elevated expression of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR3 and increased the gene expression of the general TLR adaptor MyD88 and IRAK-2. Simultaneously, poly(I:C decreased the expression of TLR5, TLR6 and TOLLIP. Conclusion Poly(I:C, an analog of viral dsRNA and a TLR3 ligand, triggers a strong inflammatory response in small airway epithelial cells that is likely to contribute to viral exacerbations of pulmonary diseases like asthma or COPD. The pronounced effects of poly(I:C on the expression of Toll-like receptors and molecules involved in TLR signaling is assumed to influence the immune response of the lung epithelium to viral and bacterial infections. Likewise, the regulation of TLR expression by type

  6. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  7. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Corannulene - A Bucky Bowl. H Surya Prakash Rao. The structure, properties and synthesis of a bowl shaped molecule, which resembles a fragment of fullerene, are described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have ...

  8. Transmembrane adaptor protein TRIM regulates T cell receptor (TCR) expression and TCR-mediated signaling via an association with the TCR zeta chain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kirchgesser, H.; Dietrich, J.; Scherer, J.; Isomaki, P.; Kořínek, Vladimír; Hilgert, Ivan; Bruyns, E.; Leo, A.; Cope, A. P.; Schraven, B.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 193, č. 11 (2001), s. 1269-1283 ISSN 0022-1007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/99/0367 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : receptor * adaptor protein * signaling Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 15.340, year: 2001

  9. LAT--an important raft-associated transmembrane adaptor protein. Delivered on 6 July 2009 at the 34th FEBS Congress in Prague, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hořejší, Václav; Otáhal, Pavel; Brdička, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 21 (2010), s. 4383-4397 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : LAT * transmembrane adaptor protein * membrane rafts Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.129, year: 2010

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation of Kv1.3 channel is disregulated by adaptor proteins Grb10 and nShc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks David R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are important regulators of growth and regeneration, and acutely, they can modulate the activity of voltage-gated ion channels. Previously we have shown that acute brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF activation of neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB suppresses the Shaker voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv1.3 via phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues in the N and C terminal aspects of the channel protein. It is not known how adaptor proteins, which lack catalytic activity, but interact with members of the neurotrophic signaling pathway, might scaffold with ion channels or modulate channel activity. Results We report the co-localization of two adaptor proteins, neuronal Src homology and collagen (nShc and growth factor receptor-binding protein 10 (Grb10, with Kv1.3 channel as demonstrated through immunocytochemical approaches in the olfactory bulb (OB neural lamina. To further explore the specificity and functional ramification of adaptor/channel co-localization, we performed immunoprecipitation and Western analysis of channel, kinase, and adaptor transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK 293. nShc formed a direct protein-protein interaction with Kv1.3 that was independent of BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3, whereas Grb10 did not complex with Kv1.3 in HEK 293 cells. Both adaptors, however, co-immunoprecipitated with Kv1.3 in native OB. Grb10 was interestingly able to decrease the total expression of Kv1.3, particularly at the membrane surface, and subsequently eliminated the BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Kv1.3. To examine the possibility that the Src homology 2 (SH2 domains of Grb10 were directly binding to basally phosphorylated tyrosines in Kv1.3, we utilized point mutations to substitute multiple tyrosine residues with phenylalanine. Removal of the tyrosines 111–113 and 449 prevented Grb10 from decreasing Kv1.3 expression. In the absence of either adaptor protein

  11. Shc adaptor proteins are key transducers of mitogenic signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled thrombin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Grall, D; Salcini, A E

    1996-01-01

    The serine protease thrombin activates G protein signaling systems that lead to Ras activation and, in certain cells, proliferation. Whereas the steps leading to Ras activation by G protein-coupled receptors are not well defined, the mechanisms of Ras activation by receptor tyrosine kinases have...... kinase activation, gene induction and cell growth. From these data, we conclude that Shc represents a crucial point of convergence between signaling pathways activated by receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors....... recently been elucidated biochemically and genetically. The present study was undertaken to determine whether common signaling components are used by these two distinct classes of receptors. Here we report that the adaptor protein Shc, is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following stimulation...

  12. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3 Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imilce A Rodriguez-Fernandez

    Full Text Available The Adaptor Protein (AP-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions--which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes-to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with

  13. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons are summarized. A brief history of the subject is given, and a few good candidates are discussed. Some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states are studied. It is shown that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches. A few more recent molecule candidates which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures are also discussed. (author). 50 refs

  14. Probing the Energetics of Dynactin Filament Assembly and the Binding of Cargo Adaptor Proteins Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Electrostatics-Based Structural Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2017-01-10

    Dynactin, a large multiprotein complex, binds with the cytoplasmic dynein-1 motor and various adaptor proteins to allow recruitment and transportation of cellular cargoes toward the minus end of microtubules. The structure of the dynactin complex is built around an actin-like minifilament with a defined length, which has been visualized in a high-resolution structure of the dynactin filament determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). To understand the energetic basis of dynactin filament assembly, we used molecular dynamics simulation to probe the intersubunit interactions among the actin-like proteins, various capping proteins, and four extended regions of the dynactin shoulder. Our simulations revealed stronger intersubunit interactions at the barbed and pointed ends of the filament and involving the extended regions (compared with the interactions within the filament), which may energetically drive filament termination by the capping proteins and recruitment of the actin-like proteins by the extended regions, two key features of the dynactin filament assembly process. Next, we modeled the unknown binding configuration among dynactin, dynein tails, and a number of coiled-coil adaptor proteins (including several Bicaudal-D and related proteins and three HOOK proteins), and predicted a key set of charged residues involved in their electrostatic interactions. Our modeling is consistent with previous findings of conserved regions, functional sites, and disease mutations in the adaptor proteins and will provide a structural framework for future functional and mutational studies of these adaptor proteins. In sum, this study yielded rich structural and energetic information about dynactin and associated adaptor proteins that cannot be directly obtained from the cryo-EM structures with limited resolutions.

  15. Origins and Early Evolution of the tRNA Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Tamura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern transfer RNAs (tRNAs are composed of ~76 nucleotides and play an important role as “adaptor” molecules that mediate the translation of information from messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Many studies suggest that the contemporary full-length tRNA was formed by the ligation of half-sized hairpin-like RNAs. A minihelix (a coaxial stack of the acceptor stem on the T-stem of tRNA can function both in aminoacylation by aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and in peptide bond formation on the ribosome, indicating that it may be a vestige of the ancestral tRNA. The universal CCA-3′ terminus of tRNA is also a typical characteristic of the molecule. “Why CCA?” is the fundamental unanswered question, but several findings give a comprehensive picture of its origin. Here, the origins and early evolution of tRNA are discussed in terms of various perspectives, including nucleotide ligation, chiral selectivity of amino acids, genetic code evolution, and the organization of the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC. The proto-tRNA molecules may have evolved not only as adaptors but also as contributors to the composition of the ribosome.

  16. Kit- and FceRI-induced differential phosphorylation of the transmembrane adaptor molecule NTAL/LAB/LAT2 allows flexibility in its scaffolding function in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Iwaki, S.; Špička, Jiří; Tkaczyk, C.; Jensen, B.M.; Furumoto, Y.; Charles, N.; Kovarova, M.; Rivera, J.; Hořejší, Václav; Metcalfe, D. D.; Gilfillan, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2008), s. 195-205 ISSN 0898-6568 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : NTAL * adaptorový protein * receptor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.305, year: 2008

  17. Differences in C-type lectin receptors and their adaptor molecules in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis and gynecologic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Geun; Won, Yong Sung; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Choon

    2018-01-01

    Endometriosis, although not malignant, has clinically demonstrated properties of invasiveness and metastasis. The pathogenesis of endometriosis, however, has not yet been elucidated. The immunological differences between endometriosis and malignant gynecologic tumors were analyzed by assessing C-type lectin receptors, which are associated with innate immunity, and immunoglobulin secretion, which is associated with B cell adaptive immunity, in the peritoneal fluid of these patients. Peritoneal fluid samples were obtained from 42 patients with benign masses (control group), 38 with endometriosis, and 43 with gynecologic (ovarian, uterine, and cervical) cancers. The levels of expression in these samples of mRNAs encoding the C-type lectin receptors Dectin-1, MR1, MR2, DC-SIGN, Syk, Card 9, Bcl 10, Malt 1, src, Dec 205, Galectin, Tim 3, Trem 1, and DAP 12, were measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the concentrations of IgG, IgA and IgM were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Findings in the three groups were compared. The level of galectin mRNA was significantly lower, and the levels of MR2 and DAP 12 mRNAs significantly higher, in the endometriosis than in the control group (pgynecologic cancer group, the level of Bcl 10 mRNA was significantly lower, and the levels of MR1, MR2, Syk, Card 9, Malt 1, Dec 205, Tim 3, and DAP 12 mRNAs significantly higher, in the endometriosis group (pcontrol group (pgynecologic cancer groups. IgA and IgG concentrations in peritoneal fluid were significantly lower in the gynecologic cancer than in the control group (p0.05). C-type lectin receptors and immunoglobulins act cooperatively and are closely associated in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. The decreased expression of galectin mRNA in the peritoneal fluid of the endometriosis group suggests that endometriosis and gynecologic cancers have similar immunologic characteristics.

  18. Small-Molecule Stabilization of 14-3-3 Protein-Protein Interactions Stimulates Axon Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Andrew; Morquette, Barbara; Kroner, Antje; Leong, SooYuen; Madwar, Carolin; Sanz, Ricardo; Banerjee, Sara L; Antel, Jack; Bisson, Nicolas; David, Samuel; Fournier, Alyson E

    2017-03-08

    Damaged central nervous system (CNS) neurons have a poor ability to spontaneously regenerate, causing persistent functional deficits after injury. Therapies that stimulate axon growth are needed to repair CNS damage. 14-3-3 adaptors are hub proteins that are attractive targets to manipulate cell signaling. We identify a positive role for 14-3-3s in axon growth and uncover a developmental regulation of the phosphorylation and function of 14-3-3s. We show that fusicoccin-A (FC-A), a small-molecule stabilizer of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions, stimulates axon growth in vitro and regeneration in vivo. We show that FC-A stabilizes a complex between 14-3-3 and the stress response regulator GCN1, inducing GCN1 turnover and neurite outgrowth. These findings show that 14-3-3 adaptor protein complexes are druggable targets and identify a new class of small molecules that may be further optimized for the repair of CNS damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  20. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  1. A small-molecule activator of kinesin-1 drives remodeling of the microtubule network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Thomas S; Yip, Yan Y; Wallock-Richards, Daynea J; Pfisterer, Karin; Sanger, Anneri; Ficek, Weronika; Steiner, Roberto A; Beavil, Andrew J; Parsons, Maddy; Dodding, Mark P

    2017-12-26

    The microtubule motor kinesin-1 interacts via its cargo-binding domain with both microtubules and organelles, and hence plays an important role in controlling organelle transport and microtubule dynamics. In the absence of cargo, kinesin-1 is found in an autoinhibited conformation. The molecular basis of how cargo engagement affects the balance between kinesin-1's active and inactive conformations and roles in microtubule dynamics and organelle transport is not well understood. Here we describe the discovery of kinesore, a small molecule that in vitro inhibits kinesin-1 interactions with short linear peptide motifs found in organelle-specific cargo adaptors, yet activates kinesin-1's function of controlling microtubule dynamics in cells, demonstrating that these functions are mechanistically coupled. We establish a proof-of-concept that a microtubule motor-cargo interface and associated autoregulatory mechanism can be manipulated using a small molecule, and define a target for the modulation of microtubule dynamics.

  2. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  3. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  4. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  5. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D)> HBr (0.83 D) > HI (0.45 D) [8]. Hence, these molecules can and do induce a dipole moment in the rare gas atoms when the two interact. The induced dipole moment is proportional to the inducing field E and the proportionality constant is the polariz- ability, i.e., μ i. = αE. However, as mentioned above, dispersion.

  6. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  7. PRR7 Is a transmembrane adaptor protein expressed in activated T cells involved in regulation of T cell receptor signaling and apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdinka, Matouš; Dráber, Peter; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ormsby, Tereza; Otáhal, Pavel; Angelisová, Pavla; Brdička, Tomáš; Pačes, Jan; Hořejší, Václav; Drbal, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 22 (2011), s. 19617-19629 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506 Grant - others:GAČR(CZ) MEM/09/E011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PRR7 * transmembrane adaptor protein * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  8. LST1/A is a myeloid leukocyte-specific transmembrane adaptor protein recruiting protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 to the plasma membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Peter; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Hrdinka, Matouš; Drobek, Aleš; Chmátal, Lukáš; Malá, Linda; Ormsby, Tereza; Angelisová, Pavla; Hořejší, Václav; Brdička, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 27 (2012), s. 22812-228221 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GEMEM/09/E011; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA MŠk 1M0506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : adaptor proteins * myeloid cell * signal transduction * tetraspanins * LST1/A Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  9. Phospho-dependent binding of the clathrin AP2 adaptor complex to GABAA receptors regulates the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Kittler, Josef T.; Chen, Guojun; Honing, Stephan; Bogdanov, Yury; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I. Lorena; Jovanovic, Jasmina N.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The efficacy of synaptic inhibition depends on the number of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) expressed on the cell surface of neurons. The clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex is a critical regulator of GABAAR endocytosis and, hence, surface receptor number. Here, we identify a previously uncharacterized atypical AP2 binding motif conserved within the intracellular domains of all GABAAR β subunit isoforms. This AP2 binding motif (KTHLRRRSSQLK in the β3 subunit) incorporates...

  10. Downregulation of the NHE3-binding PDZ-adaptor protein PDZK1 expression during cytokine-induced inflammation in interleukin-10-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Lenzen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired salt and water absorption is an important feature in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. We analyzed the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the infiltrating immune cells and the function and expression of the Na(+/H(+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3 and its regulatory PDZ-adaptor proteins NHERF1, NHERF2, and PDZK1 in the colon of interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/- mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene and protein expression were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, in situ RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. NHE3 activity was measured fluorometrically in apical enterocytes within isolated colonic crypts. Mice developed chronic colitis characterized by a typical immune cell infiltration composed of T-lymphocytes and macrophages, with high levels of gene and protein expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. In parallel, inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was increased while procaspase 3 expression was unaffected. Interferon-γ expression remained low. Although acid-activated NHE3 activity was significantly decreased, the inflammatory process did not affect its gene and protein expression or its abundance and localization in the apical membrane. However, expression of the PDZ-adaptor proteins NHERF2 and PDZK1 was downregulated. NHERF1 expression was unchanged. In a comparative analysis we observed the PDZK1 downregulation also in the DSS (dextran sulphate sodium model of colitis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The impairment of the absorptive function of the inflamed colon in the IL-10(-/- mouse, in spite of unaltered NHE3 expression and localization, is accompanied by the downregulation of the NHE3-regulatory PDZ adaptors NHERF2 and PDZK1. We propose that the downregulation of PDZ-adaptor proteins may be an important factor leading to NHE3 dysfunction and diarrhea in the course of the cytokine

  11. Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB/Btp1 specifically targets the host adaptor protein MAL/TIRAP to promote infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenna; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Yang, Mingjuan; Gao, Junguang; Zhan, Shaoxia; Xinying, Du; Huang, Liuyu; Li, Wenfeng; Chen, Zeliang; Li, Juan

    2016-08-26

    Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-κB activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Basolateral sorting of the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor through interaction of a canonical YXXPhi motif with the clathrin adaptors AP-1A and AP-1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Gravotta, Diego; Mattera, Rafael; Diaz, Fernando; Perez Bay, Andres; Roman, Angel C; Schreiner, Ryan P; Thuenauer, Roland; Bonifacino, Juan S; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2012-03-06

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) plays key roles in epithelial barrier function at the tight junction, a localization guided in part by a tyrosine-based basolateral sorting signal, (318)YNQV(321). Sorting motifs of this type are known to route surface receptors into clathrin-mediated endocytosis through interaction with the medium subunit (μ2) of the clathrin adaptor AP-2, but how they guide new and recycling membrane proteins basolaterally is unknown. Here, we show that YNQV functions as a canonical YxxΦ motif, with both Y318 and V321 required for the correct basolateral localization and biosynthetic sorting of CAR, and for interaction with a highly conserved pocket in the medium subunits (μ1A and μ1B) of the clathrin adaptors AP-1A and AP-1B. Knock-down experiments demonstrate that AP-1A plays a role in the biosynthetic sorting of CAR, complementary to the role of AP-1B in basolateral recycling of this receptor. Our study illustrates how two clathrin adaptors direct basolateral trafficking of a plasma membrane protein through interaction with a canonical YxxΦ motif.

  13. The adaptor protein alpha-syntrophin is reduced in human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis but is unchanged in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein-Fischboeck, Lisa; Pohl, Rebekka; Haberl, Elisabeth M; Weiss, Thomas S; Buechler, Christa

    2017-10-01

    The adaptor protein alpha-syntrophin (SNTA) is differentially expressed in varying types of cancer and affects triglyceride levels, inflammatory response and cell proliferation. However, little is known about the expression of SNTA in liver diseases. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by hepatic steatosis, inflammation and eventually fibrosis, and may progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, SNTA mRNA was analyzed in liver tissues from 71 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients and 32 controls to assess associations with disease characteristics. SNTA mRNA expression was reduced in NASH liver and negatively correlated with steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis and NASH scores. In the NASH patients, those with type 2 diabetes had a higher fibrosis score, reduced inflammation and increased hepatic SNTA mRNA levels demonstrating a strong association of SNTA mRNA levels with inflammation. Recently, we have shown diminished expression of the high-density lipoprotein scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) in the liver of syntrophin-deficient mice. Indeed, hepatic SNTA and SR-BI mRNA were positively correlated. SNTA protein was further determined in tumor and non-tumorous tissues of 21 HCC patients. Protein expression was unchanged in the tumor and not related to staging and grading. Present study identified associations of hepatic SNTA mRNA levels with SR-BI and features of NASH assuming a function of this protein in chronic liver disease and cholesterol metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Matrilin-2, an extracellular adaptor protein, is needed for the regeneration of muscle, nerve and other tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Korpos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM performs essential functions in the differentiation, maintenance and remodeling of tissues during development and regeneration, and it undergoes dynamic changes during remodeling concomitant to alterations in the cell-ECM interactions. Here we discuss recent data addressing the critical role of the widely expressed ECM protein, matrilin-2 (Matn2 in the timely onset of differentiation and regeneration processes in myogenic, neural and other tissues and in tumorigenesis. As a multiadhesion adaptor protein, it interacts with other ECM proteins and integrins. Matn2 promotes neurite outgrowth, Schwann cell migration, neuromuscular junction formation, skeletal muscle and liver regeneration and skin wound healing. Matn2 deposition by myoblasts is crucial for the timely induction of the global switch toward terminal myogenic differentiation during muscle regeneration by affecting transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein 7/Smad and other signal transduction pathways. Depending on the type of tissue and the pathomechanism, Matn2 can also promote or suppress tumor growth.

  15. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  16. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  17. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  19. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have been isolated or made in the laboratory over the years. These are called polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH for short). ... a bowl like symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of the.

  20. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  1. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  2. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  3. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nature is an excellent synthetic organic chemist. Using mild reaction conditions and a few elemental combinations, a large variety of complex molecules are made in and around us. The atoms are put together in precise arrangements to enable the molecules to carry out different tasks with remarkable specificity.

  4. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  5. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  6. Structure of a putative ClpS N-end rule adaptor protein from the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Vizcarra, Christina L; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2016-03-01

    The N-end rule pathway uses an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in bacteria and eukaryotes that marks proteins for degradation by ATP-dependent chaperones and proteases such as the Clp chaperones and proteases. Specific N-terminal amino acids (N-degrons) are sufficient to target substrates for degradation. In bacteria, the ClpS adaptor binds and delivers N-end rule substrates for their degradation upon association with the ClpA/P chaperone/protease. Here, we report the first crystal structure, solved at 2.7 Å resolution, of a eukaryotic homolog of bacterial ClpS from the malaria apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pfal). Despite limited sequence identity, Plasmodium ClpS is very similar to bacterial ClpS. Akin to its bacterial orthologs, plasmodial ClpS harbors a preformed hydrophobic pocket whose geometry and chemical properties are compatible with the binding of N-degrons. However, while the N-degron binding pocket in bacterial ClpS structures is open and accessible, the corresponding pocket in Plasmodium ClpS is occluded by a conserved surface loop that acts as a latch. Despite the closed conformation observed in the crystal, we show that, in solution, Pfal-ClpS binds and discriminates peptides mimicking bona fide N-end rule substrates. The presence of an apicoplast targeting peptide suggests that Pfal-ClpS localizes to this plastid-like organelle characteristic of all Apicomplexa and hosting most of its Clp machinery. By analogy with the related ClpS1 from plant chloroplasts and cyanobacteria, Plasmodium ClpS likely functions in association with ClpC in the apicoplast. Our findings open new venues for the design of novel anti-malarial drugs aimed at disrupting parasite-specific protein quality control pathways. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  7. The Adaptor Protein SAP Directly Associates with CD3ζ Chain and Regulates T Cell Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Richard; Bertoglio, Jacques; Gesbert, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Mutations altering the gene encoding the SLAM associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease or XLP1. Its absence is correlated with a defective NKT cells development, a decrease in B cell functions and a reduced T cells and NK cells cytotoxic activities, thus leading to an immunodeficiency syndrome. SAP is a small 128 amino-acid long protein that is almost exclusively composed of an SH2 domain. It has been shown to interact with the CD150/SLAM family of receptors, and in a non-canonical manner with SH3 containing proteins such as Fyn, βPIX, PKCθ and Nck1. It would thus play the role of a minimal adaptor protein. It has been shown that SAP plays an important function in the activation of T cells through its interaction with the SLAM family of receptors. Therefore SAP defective T cells display a reduced activation of signaling events downstream of the TCR-CD3 complex triggering. In the present work, we evidence that SAP is a direct interactor of the CD3ζ chain. This direct interaction occurs through the first ITAM of CD3ζ, proximal to the membrane. Additionally, we show that, in the context of the TCR-CD3 signaling, an Sh-RNA mediated silencing of SAP is responsible for a decrease of several canonical T cell signaling pathways including Erk, Akt and PLCγ1 and to a reduced induction of IL-2 and IL-4 mRNA. Altogether, we show that SAP plays a central function in the T cell activation processes through a direct association with the CD3 complex. PMID:22912825

  8. The Adaptor Protein SH2B3 (Lnk) Negatively Regulates Neurite Outgrowth of PC12 Cells and Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tien-Cheng; Chiu, Hsun; Chang, Yu-Jung; Hsu, Tai-Yu; Chiu, Ing-Ming; Chen, Linyi

    2011-01-01

    SH2B adaptor protein family members (SH2B1-3) regulate various physiological responses through affecting signaling, gene expression, and cell adhesion. SH2B1 and SH2B2 were reported to enhance nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuronal differentiation in PC12 cells, a well-established neuronal model system. In contrast, SH2B3 was reported to inhibit cell proliferation during the development of immune system. No study so far addresses the role of SH2B3 in the nervous system. In this study, we provide evidence suggesting that SH2B3 is expressed in the cortex of embryonic rat brain. Overexpression of SH2B3 not only inhibits NGF-induced differentiation of PC12 cells but also reduces neurite outgrowth of primary cortical neurons. SH2B3 does so by repressing NGF-induced activation of PLCγ, MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT pathways and the expression of Egr-1. SH2B3 is capable of binding to phosphorylated NGF receptor, TrkA, as well as SH2B1β. Our data further demonstrate that overexpression of SH2B3 reduces the interaction between SH2B1β and TrkA. Consistent with this finding, overexpressing the SH2 domain of SH2B3 is sufficient to inhibit NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Together, our data demonstrate that SH2B3, unlike the other two family members, inhibits neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells and primary cortical neurons. Its inhibitory mechanism is likely through the competition of TrkA binding with the positive-acting SH2B1 and SH2B2. PMID:22028877

  9. Impact of the adaptor protein GIPC1/Synectin on radioresistance and survival after irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, A. [University Hospital Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deuse, Y.; Koch, U. [University Hospital Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (Germany)] [and others

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that GIPC1/Synectin is an essential adaptor protein of receptors that play an important role in cancer progression and therapy resistance. This is the first study to explore the role of GIPC1/Synectin in radioresistance of prostate cancer and as a possible predictive marker for outcome of primary radiation therapy. Materials and methods: The effect of RNA interference-mediated GIPC1/Synectin depletion on clonogenic cell survival after irradiation with 0, 2, 4, or 6 Gy was assayed in two different GIPC1/Synectin-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines. The clinical outcome data of 358 men who underwent radiotherapy of prostate cancer with a curative intention were analyzed retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis was performed of prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival and overall survival in correlation with protein expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens. Protein expression was evaluated by standard immunohistochemistry methods. Results: In cell culture experiments, no change was detected in radiosensitivity after depletion of GIPC1/Synectin in GIPC1/Synectin-expressing prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, there was no correlation between GIPC1/Synectin expression in human pretreatment biopsy samples and overall or biochemical recurrence-free survival after radiotherapy in a retrospective analysis of the study cohort. Conclusion: Our results do not show a predictive or prognostic function of GIPC1/Synectin expression for the outcome of radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Furthermore, our in vitro results do not support a role of GIPC1 in the cellular radiation response. However, the role of GIPC1 in the progression of prostate cancer and its precursors should be subject to further research. (orig.)

  10. Multiple regulatory roles of the mouse transmembrane adaptor protein NTAL in gene transcription and mast cell physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Polakovicova

    Full Text Available Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL; also called LAB or LAT2 is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, including mast cells. There are conflicting reports on the role of NTAL in the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI signaling. Studies carried out on mast cells derived from mice with NTAL knock out (KO and wild type mice suggested that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, while experiments with RNAi-mediated NTAL knockdown (KD in human mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells suggested its positive regulatory role. To determine whether different methodologies of NTAL ablation (KO vs KD have different physiological consequences, we compared under well defined conditions FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs with NTAL KO or KD. BMMCs with both NTAL KO and KD exhibited enhanced degranulation, calcium mobilization, chemotaxis, tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT and ERK, and depolymerization of filamentous actin. These data provide clear evidence that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI activation events in murine BMMCs, independently of possible compensatory developmental alterations. To gain further insight into the role of NTAL in mast cells, we examined the transcriptome profiles of resting and antigen-activated NTAL KO, NTAL KD, and corresponding control BMMCs. Through this analysis we identified several genes that were differentially regulated in nonactivated and antigen-activated NTAL-deficient cells, when compared to the corresponding control cells. Some of the genes seem to be involved in regulation of cholesterol-dependent events in antigen-mediated chemotaxis. The combined data indicate multiple regulatory roles of NTAL in gene expression and mast cell physiology.

  11. Pertussis toxin targets the innate immunity through DAP12, FcRγ, and MyD88 adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Hara, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    Activation of the innate immunity by adjuvants, such as pertussis toxin (PTX), in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes and antigen mimicry is sufficient to trigger autoimmunity. Toll-like, C-type lectin, and immunglobulin-like receptors play an important role in the innate immunity by sensing a variety of microbial products through several adaptor proteins, including MyD88, DAP12, and FcRγ. This study investigated the interaction between PTX and innate immune components. The direct interactions between coated PTX and receptor-fusion proteins were examined using ELISA-based binding assays. Functionally, PTX-binding receptors could be classified into two groups: inhibition (DAP12-coupled TREM2, ITIM-bearing SIRPα, SIGNR1/SIGNR3/DCSIGN) and activation (MyD88-associated TLR4, DAP12-coupled LMIR5/CD300b, FcRγ-coupled LMIR8/CD300c, CLEC9A, MGL-1). DAP12, MyD88, and FcRγ were selected for further investigation. A comprehensive analysis of gene transcription showed that PTX up-regulated the expression of various inflammatory mediators. DAP12 deficiency resulted in reduction or enhancement of inflammatory responses in a cytokine-specific manner. PTX was able to activate the TREM2-DAP12 signalling pathway. PTX induced lower expression of inflammatory mediators in the absence of FcRγ alone and substantially lost its inflammatory capacity in the absence of both FcRγ and MyD88. PTX was able to activate the MyD88-NF-κB signalling pathway in the presence of TLR2 or TLR4. The inflammatory activity of PTX was completely lost by heating. These results demonstrate that PTX targets the innate immunity through DAP12, FcRγ, and MyD88 providing new insights into the immunobiology of PTX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. The Shc family protein adaptor, Rai, negatively regulates T cell antigen receptor signaling by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment and activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Ferro

    Full Text Available Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps--recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade.

  13. The Shc family protein adaptor, Rai, negatively regulates T cell antigen receptor signaling by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps--recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol) or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction) prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade.

  14. The Shc Family Protein Adaptor, Rai, Negatively Regulates T Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling by Inhibiting ZAP-70 Recruitment and Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Micol; Savino, Maria Teresa; Ortensi, Barbara; Finetti, Francesca; Genovese, Luca; Masi, Giulia; Ulivieri, Cristina; Benati, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2011-01-01

    Rai/ShcC is a member of the Shc family of protein adaptors expressed with the highest abundance in the central nervous system, where it exerts a protective function by coupling neurotrophic receptors to the PI3K/Akt survival pathway. Rai is also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in other cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. We have previously reported that in these cells Rai attenuates antigen receptor signaling, thereby impairing not only cell proliferation but also, opposite to neurons, cell survival. Here we have addressed the mechanism underlying the inhibitory activity of Rai on TCR signaling. We show that Rai interferes with the TCR signaling cascade one of the earliest steps –recruitment of the initiating kinase ZAP-70 to the phosphorylated subunit of the TCR/CD3 complex, which results in a generalized dampening of the downstream signaling events. The inhibitory activity of Rai is associated to its inducible recruitment to phosphorylated CD3, which occurs in the physiological signaling context of the immune synapse. Rai is moreover found as a pre-assembled complex with ZAP-70 and also constitutively interacts with the regulatory p85 subunit of PI3K, similar to neuronal cells, notwithstanding the opposite biological outcome, i.e. impairment of PI-3K/Akt activation. The data highlight the ability of Rai to establish interactions with the TCR and key signaling mediators which, either directly (e.g. by inhibiting ZAP-70 recruitment to the TCR or sequestering ZAP-70/PI3K in the cytosol) or indirectly (e.g. by promoting the recruitment of effectors responsible for signal extinction) prevent full triggering of the TCR signaling cascade. PMID:22242145

  15. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  16. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  17. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  18. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Kerbrat

    Full Text Available TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4(+ T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15 kDa is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4(+ T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+ T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+ T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4(+ CD62L(+ PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response.

  19. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbrat, Stéphane; Vingert, Benoit; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Castellano, Flavia; Renault-Mihara, François; Dos Reis Tavares, Silvina; Surenaud, Mathieu; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Boczkowski, Jorge; Guellaën, Georges; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Le Gouvello, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4(+) T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15 kDa) is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4(+) T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+) T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+) T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4(+) CD62L(+) PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response.

  20. Adaptor Protein Complex-2 (AP-2) and Epsin-1 Mediate Protease-activated Receptor-1 Internalization via Phosphorylation- and Ubiquitination-dependent Sorting Signals*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Dores, Michael R.; Grimsey, Neil; Canto, Isabel; Barker, Breann L.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2011-01-01

    Signaling by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin, is regulated by desensitization and internalization. PAR1 desensitization is mediated by β-arrestins, like most classic GPCRs. In contrast, internalization of PAR1 occurs through a clathrin- and dynamin-dependent pathway independent of β-arrestins. PAR1 displays two modes of internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), where the μ2-adaptin subunit binds directly to a tyrosine-based motif localized within the receptor C-tail domain. However, AP-2 depletion only partially inhibits agonist-induced internalization of PAR1, suggesting a function for other clathrin adaptors in this process. Here, we now report that AP-2 and epsin-1 are both critical mediators of agonist-stimulated PAR1 internalization. We show that ubiquitination of PAR1 and the ubiquitin-interacting motifs of epsin-1 are required for epsin-1-dependent internalization of activated PAR1. In addition, activation of PAR1 promotes epsin-1 de-ubiquitination, which may increase its endocytic adaptor activity to facilitate receptor internalization. AP-2 also regulates activated PAR1 internalization via recognition of distal C-tail phosphorylation sites rather than the canonical tyrosine-based motif. Thus, AP-2 and epsin-1 are both required to promote efficient internalization of activated PAR1 and recognize discrete receptor sorting signals. This study defines a new pathway for internalization of mammalian GPCRs. PMID:21965661

  1. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  2. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  3. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  4. Hadron Molecules Revisted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Hadron Molecules are particles made out of hadrons that are held together by self interactions. In this report we discuss seven such molecules and their self interactions. The f0(980), a0(980), f1(1400), ΔN(2150) and π1(1400) molecular structure is given. We predict that two more states the $K\\bar{K}K$(1500) and a1(1400) should be found.

  5. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  6. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UV/Vis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism. The phenomenon has its origins in intermolecular solute–solvent interactions, such as ...

  7. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Dicopper (II) Complex Hydrolyzes the Phosphate Diester Bond! R N Mukherjee is with the Department of. Chemistry at Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur. 1 DNA: Deoxyribonucleic Acid;. RNA: Ribonucleic Acid; HPNP: 2-Hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate; Phosphodiester: Di- ester of ...

  9. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of ...

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Faraday opened up a new chapter in chemistry when he isolated benzene from the distillate of coal tar. The deceptively simple molecule with the formula C6H6 has triggered many experiments and theoretical proposals. The correct ring struc- ture, shown in 1 (see Figure 1), was assigned by Kekule after his.

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordination polymers and molecular systems in which metal ions serve as the source of the ... cobalt, nickel and gadolinium which are themselves ferromagnetic in their bulk state (Box 1). ... their complexes, organic free and ion radicals and molecules such as 02 and NO are good examples of paramagnetic systems.

  13. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  14. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    C60, the third allotropic form of carbon was discovered in 1985 by Kroto and colleagues. These carbon mole- cules have a structure of a truncated icosahedron (see. Figure 5). The truncated icosahedron has 12 pentagon and 20 hexagon rings and has 60 vertices { the shape of a soccer ball. These molecules have been ...

  15. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Molecules to Materials Liquid Crystals and Molecular Conductors. T P Radhakrishnan. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 6-23. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  18. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  19. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  2. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  3. The murine Nck SH2/SH3 adaptors are important for the development of mesoderm-derived embryonic structures and for regulating the cellular actin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladt, Friedhelm; Aippersbach, Elke; Gelkop, Sigal; Strasser, Geraldine A; Nash, Piers; Tafuri, Anna; Gertler, Frank B; Pawson, Tony

    2003-07-01

    Mammalian Nck1 and Nck2 are closely related adaptor proteins that possess three SH3 domains, followed by an SH2 domain, and are implicated in coupling phosphotyrosine signals to polypeptides that regulate the actin cytoskeleton. However, the in vivo functions of Nck1 and Nck2 have not been defined. We have mutated the murine Nck1 and Nck2 genes and incorporated beta-galactosidase reporters into the mutant loci. In mouse embryos, the two Nck genes have broad and overlapping expression patterns. They are functionally redundant in the sense that mice deficient for either Nck1 or Nck2 are viable, whereas inactivation of both Nck1 and Nck2 results in profound defects in mesoderm-derived notochord and embryonic lethality at embryonic day 9.5. Fibroblast cell lines derived from Nck1(-/-) Nck2(-/-) embryos have defects in cell motility and in the organization of the lamellipodial actin network. These data suggest that the Nck SH2/SH3 adaptors have important functions in the development of mesodermal structures during embryogenesis, potentially linked to a role in cell movement and cytoskeletal organization.

  4. Discovery of a Unique Clp Component, ClpF, in Chloroplasts: A Proposed Binary ClpF-ClpS1 Adaptor Complex Functions in Substrate Recognition and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kenji; Apitz, Janina; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Ponnala, Lalit; Grimm, Bernhard; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-10-01

    Clp proteases are found in prokaryotes, mitochondria, and plastids where they play crucial roles in maintaining protein homeostasis (proteostasis). The plant plastid Clp machinery comprises a hetero-oligomeric ClpPRT proteolytic core, ATP-dependent chaperones ClpC and ClpD, and an adaptor protein, ClpS1. ClpS1 selects substrates to the ClpPR protease-ClpC chaperone complex for degradation, but the underlying substrate recognition and delivery mechanisms are currently unclear. Here, we characterize a ClpS1-interacting protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpF, which can interact with the Clp substrate glutamyl-tRNA reductase. ClpF and ClpS1 mutually stimulate their association with ClpC. ClpF, which is only found in photosynthetic eukaryotes, contains bacterial uvrB/C and YccV protein domains and a unique N-terminal domain. We propose a testable model in which ClpS1 and ClpF form a binary adaptor for selective substrate recognition and delivery to ClpC, reflecting an evolutionary adaptation of the Clp system to the plastid proteome. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. An Interaction between KSHV ORF57 and UIF Provides mRNA-Adaptor Redundancy in Herpesvirus Intronless mRNA Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian R.; Boyne, James R.; Noerenberg, Marko; Taylor, Adam; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Walsh, Matthew J.; Wheat, Rachel; Blackbourn, David J.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The hTREX complex mediates cellular bulk mRNA nuclear export by recruiting the nuclear export factor, TAP, via a direct interaction with the export adaptor, Aly. Intriguingly however, depletion of Aly only leads to a modest reduction in cellular mRNA nuclear export, suggesting the existence of additional mRNA nuclear export adaptor proteins. In order to efficiently export Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) intronless mRNAs from the nucleus, the KSHV ORF57 protein recruits hTREX onto viral intronless mRNAs allowing access to the TAP-mediated export pathway. Similarly however, depletion of Aly only leads to a modest reduction in the nuclear export of KSHV intronless mRNAs. Herein, we identify a novel interaction between ORF57 and the cellular protein, UIF. We provide the first evidence that the ORF57-UIF interaction enables the recruitment of hTREX and TAP to KSHV intronless mRNAs in Aly-depleted cells. Strikingly, depletion of both Aly and UIF inhibits the formation of an ORF57-mediated nuclear export competent ribonucleoprotein particle and consequently prevents ORF57-mediated mRNA nuclear export and KSHV protein production. Importantly, these findings highlight that redundancy exists in the eukaryotic system for certain hTREX components involved in the mRNA nuclear export of intronless KSHV mRNAs. PMID:21814512

  6. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  7. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  8. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  9. RHEX, a novel regulator of human erythroid progenitor cell expansion and erythroblast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rakesh; Su, Su; McCrann, Donald J; Green, Jennifer M; Leu, Karen; Young, Peter R; Schatz, Peter J; Silva, Jeffrey C; Stokes, Matthew P; Wojchowski, Don M

    2014-08-25

    Ligation of erythropoietin (EPO) receptor (EPOR) JAK2 kinase complexes propagates signals within erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) that are essential for red blood cell production. To reveal hypothesized novel EPOR/JAK2 targets, a phosphotyrosine (PY) phosphoproteomics approach was applied. Beyond known signal transduction factors, 32 new targets of EPO-modulated tyrosine phosphorylation were defined. Molecular adaptors comprised one major set including growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2)-associated binding proteins 1-3 (GAB1-3), insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), docking protein 1 (DOK1), Src homology 2 domain containing transforming protein 1 (SHC1), and sprouty homologue 1 (SPRY1) as validating targets, and SPRY2, SH2 domain containing 2A (SH2D2A), and signal transducing adaptor molecule 2 (STAM2) as novel candidate adaptors together with an ORF factor designated as regulator of human erythroid cell expansion (RHEX). RHEX is well conserved in Homo sapiens and primates but absent from mouse, rat, and lower vertebrate genomes. Among tissues and lineages, RHEX was elevated in EPCs, occurred as a plasma membrane protein, was rapidly PY-phosphorylated >20-fold upon EPO exposure, and coimmunoprecipitated with the EPOR. In UT7epo cells, knockdown of RHEX inhibited EPO-dependent growth. This was associated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1,2 (ERK1,2) modulation, and RHEX coupling to GRB2. In primary human EPCs, shRNA knockdown studies confirmed RHEX regulation of erythroid progenitor expansion and further revealed roles in promoting the formation of hemoglobinizing erythroblasts. RHEX therefore comprises a new EPO/EPOR target and regulator of human erythroid cell expansion that additionally acts to support late-stage erythroblast development. © 2014 Verma et al.

  10. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, LG.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules are discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to hot molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules (electron affinity), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies

  11. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  12. ProSAP/Shank proteins - a family of higher order organizing molecules of the postsynaptic density with an emerging role in human neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckers, Tobias M; Bockmann, Jürgen; Kreutz, Michael R; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2002-06-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a specialized electron-dense structure underneath the postsynaptic plasmamembrane of excitatory synapses. It is thought to anchor and cluster glutamate receptors exactly opposite to the presynaptic neurotransmitter release site. Various efforts to study the molecular structure of the PSD identified several new proteins including membrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, components of signalling cascades, cytoskeletal elements and adaptor proteins with scaffolding functions to interconnect these PSD components. The characterization of a novel adaptor protein family, the ProSAPs or Shanks, sheds new light on the basic structural organization of the PSD. ProSAPs/Shanks are multidomain proteins that interact directly or indirectly with receptors of the postsynaptic membrane including NMDA-type and metabotropic glutamate receptors, and the actin-based cytoskeleton. These interactions suggest that ProSAP/Shanks may be important scaffolding molecules of the PSD with a crucial role in the assembly of the PSD during synaptogenesis, in synaptic plasticity and in the regulation of dendritic spine morphology. Moreover the analysis of a patient with 22q13.3 distal deletion syndrome revealed a balanced translocation with a breakpoint in the human ProSAP2/Shank3 gene. This ProSAP2/Shank3 haploinsufficiency may cause a syndrome that is characterized by severe expressive language delay, mild mental retardation and minor facial dysmorphisms.

  13. Sub-cellular distribution of UNC-104(KIF1A) upon binding to adaptors as UNC-16(JIP3), DNC-1(DCTN1/Glued) and SYD-2(Liprin-α) in C. elegans neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C-C; Moncaleano, J D; Wagner, O I

    2011-03-10

    The accumulation of cargo (tau, amyloid precursor protein, neurofilaments etc.) in neurons is a hallmark of various neurodegenerative diseases while we have only little knowledge how axonal transport is regulated. Kinesin-3 UNC-104(KIF1A) is the major transporter of synaptic vesicles and recent reports suggest that a cargo itself can affect the motor's activity. Inspecting an interactome map, we identify three putative UNC-104 interactors, namely UNC-16(JIP3), DNC-1(DCTN1/Glued) and SYD-2(Liprin-α), known to be adaptors in essential neuronal protein complexes. We then employed the novel method bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay to visualize motor-adaptor complexes in the nervous system of living C. elegans. Interestingly, the binding of UNC-104 to each adaptor protein results in different sub-cellular distributions and has distinctive effects on the motor's motility. Specifically, if UNC-104 bound to UNC-16, the motor is primarily localized in the soma of neurons while bound to DNC-1, the motor is basically found in axonal termini. On the other hand, if UNC-104 is bound to SYD-2 we identify motor populations mostly along axons. Therefore, these three adaptors inherit different functions in steering the motor to specific sub-cellular locations in the neuron. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  15. Gab Adapter Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Hematologic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Grb-2 associated binder (Gab family of scaffolding/adaptor/docking proteins is a group of three molecules with significant roles in cytokine receptor signaling. Gabs possess structural motifs for phosphorylation-dependent receptor recruitment, Grb2 binding, and activation of downstream signaling pathways through p85 and SHP-2. In addition, Gabs participate in hematopoiesis and regulation of immune response which can be aberrantly activated in cancer and inflammation. The multifunctionality of Gab adapters might suggest that they would be too difficult to consider as candidates for “targeted” therapy. However, the one drug/one target approach is giving way to the concept of one drug/multiple target approach since few cancers are addicted to a single signaling molecule for survival and combination drug therapies can be problematic. In this paper, we cover recent findings on Gab multi-functionality, binding partners, and their role in hematological malignancy and examine the concept of Gab-targeted therapy.

  16. Playing with molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Recent philosophy of science has seen a number of attempts to understand scientific models by looking to theories of fiction. In previous work, I have offered an account of models that draws on Kendall Walton's 'make-believe' theory of art. According to this account, models function as 'props' in games of make-believe, like children's dolls or toy trucks. In this paper, I assess the make-believe view through an empirical study of molecular models. I suggest that the view gains support when we look at the way that these models are used and the attitude that users take towards them. Users' interaction with molecular models suggests that they do imagine the models to be molecules, in much the same way that children imagine a doll to be a baby. Furthermore, I argue, users of molecular models imagine themselves viewing and manipulating molecules, just as children playing with a doll might imagine themselves looking at a baby or feeding it. Recognising this 'participation' in modelling, I suggest, points towards a new account of how models are used to learn about the world, and helps us to understand the value that scientists sometimes place on three-dimensional, physical models over other forms of representation.

  17. RECOMBINANT FLUORESCENT SENSOR OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE HyPer FUSED WITH ADAPTOR PROTEIN Ruk/CIN85: DESIGNING OF EXPRESSION VECTOR AND ITS FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Bazalii

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design the expression vector encoding fluorescent sensor of hydrogen peroxide HyPer fused with adaptor protein Ruk/CIN85 as well as to check its subcellular distribution and ability to sense hydrogen peroxide. It was demonstrated that in transiently transfected HEK293 and MCF-7 cells Ruk/CIN85-HyPer is concentrated in dot-like vesicular structures of different size while HyPer is diffusely distributed throughout the cell. Using live cell fluorescence microscopy we observed gradual increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in representative vesicular structures during the time of experiment. Thus, the developed genetic construction encoding the chimeric Ruk/CIN85-HyPer fluorescent protein represents a new tool to study localized H2O2 production in living cells.

  18. Expression of the neuronal adaptor protein X11alpha protects against memory dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2010-01-01

    X11alpha is a neuronal-specific adaptor protein that binds to the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Overexpression of X11alpha reduces Abeta production but whether X11alpha also protects against Abeta-related memory dysfunction is not known. To test this possibility, we crossed X11alpha transgenic mice with AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice. AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice produce high levels of brain Abeta and develop age-related defects in memory function that correlate with increasing Abeta load. Overexpression of X11alpha alone had no detectable adverse effect upon behavior. However, X11alpha reduced brain Abeta levels and corrected spatial reference memory defects in aged X11alpha\\/AbetaPP double transgenics. Thus, X11alpha may be a therapeutic target for Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  19. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  20. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  1. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  2. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  3. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  4. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  5. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce [Pullman, WA; Burke, Charles Cullen [Moscow, ID

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  6. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  7. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  8. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  9. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  10. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  11. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Orellana, P. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  12. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Junking, Mutita; Ngaojanlar, Piengpaga; Sukomon, Nattakan; Ungsupravate, Duangporn; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Noisakran, Sansanee; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Trafficking defect of kAE1 is a cause of dRTA but trafficking pathway of kAE1 has not been clearly described. → Adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) was firstly reported to interact with kAE1. → The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. → AP-1 mu1A knockdown showed a marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane and its accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum. → AP-1 mu1A has a critical role in kAE1 trafficking to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates chloride (Cl - ) and bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ) exchange at the basolateral membrane of kidney α-intercalated cells. Impaired trafficking of kAE1 leads to defect of the Cl - /HCO 3 - exchange at the basolateral membrane and failure of proton (H + ) secretion at the apical membrane, causing a kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). To gain a better insight into kAE1 trafficking, we searched for proteins physically interacting with the C-terminal region of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1), which contains motifs crucial for intracellular trafficking, by a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system. An adaptor-related protein complex 1 μ1A (AP-1 mu1A) subunit was found to interact with Ct-kAE1. The interaction between either Ct-kAE1 or full-length kAE1 and AP-1 mu1A were confirmed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T by co-immunoprecipitation, affinity co-purification, co-localization, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA) and GST pull-down assay. The interacting site for AP-1 mu1A on Ct-kAE1 was found to be Y904DEV907, a subset of YXXO motif. Interestingly, suppression of endogenous AP-1 mu1A in HEK 293T by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased membrane localization of kAE1 and increased its intracellular accumulation, suggesting for the first time that AP-1 mu1A is involved in the kAE1 trafficking of kidney α-intercalated cells.

  13. Molecule of the Month -92 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reason, anandamide and other similar endogenous molecules are referred to as endocannabinoids, although structurally they do not have any resemblance to the cannabinoids such as THC and similar molecules isolated from the Cannabis plant. Since they mimic the activity ofTHC) which is a cannabinoid, they are said.

  14. Quantum transport through single molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio Oliveros, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes three-terminal transport measurements through single molecules. The interest in this field stems from the dream that single molecules will form the building blocks for future nanoscale electronic devices. The advantages are their small size -nanometers-, and their synthetic

  15. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  16. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  17. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  18. The Adaptor Protein SAP Regulates Type II NKT Cell Development, Cytokine Production and Cytotoxicity Against Lymphoma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L.; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT cell TCR transgenic mouse model (24αβTg), we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells but not thymic epithelial cells meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Further, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT cell development by controlling Egr2 and PLZF expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IRF4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. PMID:25236978

  19. Identification and isolation of stimulator of interferon genes (STING): an innate immune sensory and adaptor gene from camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premraj, A; Aleyas, A G; Nautiyal, B; Rasool, T J

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism by which type I interferon-mediated antiviral response is mounted by hosts against invading pathogen is an intriguing one. Of late, an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein encoded by a gene called stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is implicated in the innate signalling pathways and has been identified and cloned in few mammalian species including human, mouse and pig. In this article, we report the identification of STING from three different species of a highly conserved family of mammals - the camelids. cDNAs encoding the STING of Old World camels - dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and a New World camel - llama (Llama glama) were amplified using conserved primers and RACE. The complete STING cDNA of dromedary camel is 2171 bp long with a 706-bp 5' untranslated regions (UTR), an 1137-bp open reading frame (ORF) and a 328-bp 3' UTR. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the ORF of STING from these three camelids indicate high level of similarity among camelids and conservation of critical amino acid residues across different species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed high levels of STING mRNA expression in blood, spleen, lymph node and lung. The identification of camelid STING will help in better understanding of the role of this molecule in the innate immunity of the camelids and other mammals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  1. A Stretch of Negatively Charged Amino Acids of Linker for Activation of T-Cell Adaptor Has a Dual Role in T-Cell Antigen Receptor Intracellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel M. Arbulo-Echevarria

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The adaptor protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT has an essential role transducing activatory intracellular signals coming from the TCR/CD3 complex. Previous reports have shown that upon T-cell activation, LAT interacts with the tyrosine kinase Lck, leading to the inhibition of its kinase activity. LAT–Lck interaction seemed to depend on a stretch of negatively charged amino acids in LAT. Here, we have substituted this segment of LAT between amino acids 113 and 126 with a non-charged segment and expressed the mutant LAT (LAT-NIL in J.CaM2 cells in order to analyze TCR signaling. Substitution of this segment in LAT prevented the activation-induced interaction with Lck. Moreover, cells expressing this mutant form of LAT showed a statistically significant increase of proximal intracellular signals such as phosphorylation of LAT in tyrosine residues 171 and 191, and also enhanced ZAP70 phosphorylation approaching borderline statistical significance (p = 0.051. Nevertheless, downstream signals such as Ca2+ influx or MAPK pathways were partially inhibited. Overall, our data reveal that LAT–Lck interaction constitutes a key element regulating proximal intracellular signals coming from the TCR/CD3 complex.

  2. The adaptor-like protein ROG-1 is required for activation of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway and meiotic cell cycle progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Urushiyama, Seiichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Shirakata, Masaki; Iino, Yuichi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2007-03-01

    The Ras-MAP kinase pathway regulates varieties of fundamental cellular events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this pathway is required for oocyte development; however, the nature of its up-stream regulators has remained elusive. Here, we identified a C. elegans gene, rog-1, which encodes the only protein having the IRS-type phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain in the worms. ROG-1 has no obvious domain structure aside from the PTB domain, suggesting that it could serve as an adaptor down-stream of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of rog-1 mRNA significantly decreased brood size. rog-1(tm1031) truncation mutants showed a severe disruption in progression of developing oocytes from pachytene to diakinesis, as was seen in worms carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras or mpk-1 MAP kinase gene. Furthermore, let-60 Ras-regulated activation of MPK-1 in the gonad is undetectable in rog-1(tm1031) mutants. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras gene rescues the brood size reduction and germ cell abnormality in rog-1(tm1031) worms. Consistently, rog-1 is preferentially expressed in the germ cells and its expression in the gonad is essential for oocyte development. Thus, ROG-1 is a key positive regulator of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway that permits germ cells to exit from pachytene.

  3. Myelin protein zero/P0 phosphorylation and function require an adaptor protein linking it to RACK1 and PKC alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboreanu, Ana-Maria; Hrstka, Ronald; Xu, Wenbo; Shy, Michael; Kamholz, John; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-05-21

    Point mutations in the cytoplasmic domain of myelin protein zero (P0; the major myelin protein in the peripheral nervous system) that alter a protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) substrate motif (198HRSTK201) or alter serines 199 and/or 204 eliminate P0-mediated adhesion. Mutation in the PKCalpha substrate motif (R198S) also causes a form of inherited peripheral neuropathy (Charcot Marie Tooth disease [CMT] 1B), indicating that PKCalpha-mediated phosphorylation of P0 is important for myelination. We have now identified a 65-kD adaptor protein that links P0 with the receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1). The interaction of p65 with P0 maps to residues 179-197 within the cytoplasmic tail of P0. Mutations or deletions that abolish p65 binding reduce P0 phosphorylation and adhesion, which can be rescued by the substitution of serines 199 and 204 with glutamic acid. A mutation in the p65-binding sequence G184R occurs in two families with CMT, and mutation of this residue results in the loss of both p65 binding and adhesion function.

  4. Phospho-dependent binding of the clathrin AP2 adaptor complex to GABAA receptors regulates the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, Josef T; Chen, Guojun; Honing, Stephan; Bogdanov, Yury; McAinsh, Kristina; Arancibia-Carcamo, I Lorena; Jovanovic, Jasmina N; Pangalos, Menelas N; Haucke, Volker; Yan, Zhen; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-10-11

    The efficacy of synaptic inhibition depends on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs) expressed on the cell surface of neurons. The clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex is a critical regulator of GABA(A)R endocytosis and, hence, surface receptor number. Here, we identify a previously uncharacterized atypical AP2 binding motif conserved within the intracellular domains of all GABA(A)R beta subunit isoforms. This AP2 binding motif (KTHLRRRSSQLK in the beta3 subunit) incorporates the major sites of serine phosphorylation within receptor beta subunits, and phosphorylation within this site inhibits AP2 binding. Furthermore, by using surface plasmon resonance, we establish that a peptide (pepbeta3) corresponding to the AP2 binding motif in the GABA(A)R beta3 subunit binds to AP2 with high affinity only when dephosphorylated. Moreover, the pepbeta3 peptide, but not its phosphorylated equivalent (pepbeta3-phos), enhanced the amplitude of miniature inhibitory synaptic current and whole cell GABA(A)R current. These effects of pepbeta3 on GABA(A)R current were occluded by inhibitors of dynamin-dependent endocytosis supporting an action of pepbeta3 on GABA(A)R endocytosis. Therefore phospho-dependent regulation of AP2 binding to GABA(A)Rs provides a mechanism to specify receptor cell surface number and the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  5. Skb5, an SH3 adaptor protein, regulates Pmk1 MAPK signaling by controlling the intracellular localization of the MAPKKK Mkh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Yuki; Satoh, Ryosuke; Matsumoto, Saki; Ikeda, Chisato; Inutsuka, Natsumi; Hagihara, Kanako; Matzno, Sumio; Tsujimoto, Sho; Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko

    2016-08-15

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is a highly conserved signaling module composed of MAPK kinase kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKK) and MAPKs. The MAPKKK Mkh1 is an initiating kinase in Pmk1 MAPK signaling, which regulates cell integrity in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). Our genetic screen for regulators of Pmk1 signaling identified Shk1 kinase binding protein 5 (Skb5), an SH3-domain-containing adaptor protein. Here, we show that Skb5 serves as an inhibitor of Pmk1 MAPK signaling activation by downregulating Mkh1 localization to cell tips through its interaction with the SH3 domain. Consistent with this, the Mkh1(3PA) mutant protein, with impaired Skb5 binding, remained in the cell tips, even when Skb5 was overproduced. Intriguingly, Skb5 needs Mkh1 to localize to the growing ends as Mkh1 deletion and disruption of Mkh1 binding impairs Skb5 localization. Deletion of Pck2, an upstream activator of Mkh1, impaired the cell tip localization of Mkh1 and Skb5 as well as the Mkh1-Skb5 interaction. Interestingly, both Pck2 and Mkh1 localized to the cell tips at the G1/S phase, which coincided with Pmk1 MAPK activation. Taken together, Mkh1 localization to cell tips is important for transmitting upstream signaling to Pmk1, and Skb5 spatially regulates this process. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Characterization of the liver kinase B1-mouse protein-25 -Ste-20-related adaptor protein complex in adult mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cody D; Compton, Richard A; Bowler, Joshua S; Kemp, Jonathan T; Sudweeks, Sterling N; Thomson, David M; Winder, William W

    2011-12-01

    In liver, the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) complex was identified as the association of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), mouse protein 25 (MO25α/β), and Ste-20-related adaptor protein (STRADα/β); however, this complex has yet to be characterized in skeletal muscle. We demonstrate the expression of the LKB1-MO25-STRAD complex in skeletal muscle, confirm the absence of mRNA splice variants, and report the relative mRNA expression levels of these proteins in control and muscle-specific LKB1 knockout (LKB1(-/-)) mouse muscle. LKB1 detection in untreated control and LKB1(-/-) muscle lysates revealed two protein bands (50 and 60 kDa), although only the heavier band was diminished in LKB1(-/-) samples [55 ± 2.5 and 13 ± 1.5 arbitrary units (AU) in control and LKB1(-/-), respectively, P protein liquid chromatography. Mass spectrometry confirmed LKB1 protein detection in the 60-kDa protein band, while none was detected in the 50-kDa band. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated LKB1-MO25-STRAD complex formation. Quantitative PCR revealed significantly reduced LKB1, MO25α, and STRADβ mRNA in LKB1(-/-) muscle. These findings demonstrate that the LKB1-MO25-STRAD complex is the principal AMPKK in skeletal muscle.

  7. Identification and Characterization of KCASH2 and KCASH3, 2 Novel Cullin3 Adaptors Suppressing Histone Deacetylase and Hedgehog Activity in Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico De Smaele

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor, arising from aberrant cerebellar precursors' development, a process mainly controlled by Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway. Histone deacetylase HDAC1 has been recently shown to modulate Hh signaling, deacetylating its effectors Gli1/2 and enhancing their transcriptional activity. Therefore, HDAC may represent a potential therapeutic target for Hh-dependent tumors, but still little information is available on the physiological mechanisms of HDAC regulation. The putative tumor suppressor RENKCTD11 acts through ubiquitination-dependent degradation of HDAC1, thereby affecting Hh activity and medulloblastoma growth. We identify and characterize here two RENKCTD11 homologues, defining a new family of proteins named KCASH, as “KCTD containing, Cullin3 adaptor, suppressor of Hedgehog.” Indeed, the novel genes (KCASH2KCTD21 and KCASH3KCTD6 share with RENKCTD11 a number of features, such as a BTB domain required for the formation of a Cullin3 ubiquitin ligase complex and HDAC1 ubiquitination and degradation capability, suppressing the acetylation-dependent Hh/Gli signaling. Expression of KCASH2 and -3 is observed in cerebellum, whereas epigenetic silencing and allelic deletion are observed in human medulloblastoma. Rescuing KCASHs expression reduces the Hedgehog-dependent medulloblastoma growth, suggesting that loss of members of this novel family of native HDAC inhibitors is crucial in sustaining Hh pathway-mediated tumorigenesis. Accordingly, they might represent a promising class of endogenous “agents” through which this pathway may be targeted.

  8. The adaptor protein SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity against lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L; Stein, Paul L; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT-cell TCR transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells, but not thymic epithelial cells, meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Furthermore, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development by controlling early growth response 2 protein and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IFN regulatory factor 4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  10. Electron attachment to excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Datskos, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Studies on electron attachment to molecules rotationally/vibrationally excited thermally or via infrared-laser excitation showed that the effect of internal energy of a molecule on its electron attachment properties depends on the mode--dissociative or nondissociative--of electron attachment. They quantified the effect of the internal energy of the molecule on the rate of destruction (by autodissociation or by autodetachment) of its parent transient anion. Generally, increases in ro-vibrational molecular energy increase the cross section for dissociative electron attachment and decrease the effective cross section for parent anion formation due mainly to increased autodetachment. These findings and their understanding are discussed. A discussion is given, also, of recent investigations of electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, especially photoenhanced dissociative electron attachment to long- and short-lived excited electronic states of molecules produced directly or indirectly by laser irradiation. These studies showed that the cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to electronically excited molecules usually are many orders of magnitude larger than those for the ground-state molecules. The new techniques that have been developed for such studies are briefly described also

  11. Small-Molecule Stabilization of the 14-3-3/Gab2 Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Bartel, Maria; Sies, Katharina; Halbach, Sebastian; Higuchi, Yusuke; Haranosono, Yu; Brummer, Tilman; Kato, Nobuo; Ottmann, Christian

    2016-04-19

    Small-molecule modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is one of the most promising new areas in drug discovery. In the vast majority of cases only inhibition or disruption of PPIs is realized, whereas the complementary strategy of targeted stabilization of PPIs is clearly under-represented. Here, we report the example of a semi-synthetic natural product derivative--ISIR-005--that stabilizes the cancer-relevant interaction of the adaptor protein 14-3-3 and Gab2. The crystal structure of ISIR-005 in complex with 14-3-3 and the binding motif of Gab2 comprising two phosphorylation sites (Gab2pS210pT391) showed how the stabilizing molecule binds to the rim-of-the-interface of the protein complex. Only in the direct vicinity of 14-3-3/Gab2pT391 site is a pre-formed pocket occupied by ISIR-005; binding of the Gab2pS210 motif to 14-3-3 does not create an interface pocket suitable for the molecule. Accordingly, ISIR-005 only stabilizes the binding of the Gab2pT391 but not the Gab2pS210 site. This study represents structural and biochemical proof of the druggability of the 14-3-3/Gab2 PPI interface with important implications for the development of PPI stabilizers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Escuela de Física, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Rey-González, R. R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  13. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rich molecules as an energy sourceobtained from host cell debris remains interesting. Additionally, the potential of M. tuberculosis to survive under differentstress conditions leading to its dormant state in pathogenesis remains elusive. The exact ...

  14. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  15. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  16. Photoionization of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed

  17. Low pressure tritiation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.F.; Powers, J.C.; Lively, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of tritiating sensitive biological molecules by depositing molecules of the substance to be tritiated on a supporting substrate in an evacuated vacuum chamber near, but not in the path of, an electron beam which traverses the chamber, admitting tritium gas into the chamber, and subjecting the tritium to the electron beam. Vibrationally excited tritium gas species are generated which collide and react with the substance thus incorporating tritium atoms into the substance. (U.K.)

  18. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  19. Stimulation through the T cell receptor leads to interactions between SHB and several signaling proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welsh, M.; Songyang, Z.; Frantz, J. D.; Trüb, T.; Reedquist, K. A.; Karlsson, T.; Miyazaki, M.; Cantley, L. C.; Band, H.; Shoelson, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    Shb is a recently described Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing adaptor protein. Here we show that Shb is expressed in lymphoid tissues, and is recruited into signaling complexes upon activation of Jurkat T cells. Grb2 binds proline-rich motifs in Shb via its SH3 domains. As a result, a number of

  20. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  1. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Rohde, Bernhard

    2012-07-06

    Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach "Molecule Cloud". The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using

  2. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  3. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecA triggers host cell signalling by glycosphingolipid-dependent phosphorylation of the adaptor protein CrkII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuangshuang; Eierhoff, Thorsten; Aigal, Sahaja; Brandel, Annette; Thuenauer, Roland; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Imberty, Anne; Römer, Winfried

    2017-07-01

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces phosphorylation of the adaptor protein CrkII by activating the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abl to promote its uptake into host cells. So far, specific factors of P. aeruginosa, which induce Abl/CrkII signalling, are entirely unknown. In this research, we employed human lung epithelial cells H1299, Chinese hamster ovary cells and P. aeruginosa wild type strain PAO1 to study the invasion process of P. aeruginosa into host cells by using microbiological, biochemical and cell biological approaches such as Western Blot, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Here, we demonstrate that the host glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide, also termed Gb3, represents a signalling receptor for the P. aeruginosa lectin LecA to induce CrkII phosphorylation at tyrosine 221. Alterations in Gb3 expression and LecA function correlate with CrkII phosphorylation. Interestingly, phosphorylation of CrkII Y221 occurs independently of Abl kinase. We further show that Src family kinases transduce the signal induced by LecA binding to Gb3, leading to Crk Y221 phosphorylation. In summary, we identified LecA as a bacterial factor, which utilizes a so far unrecognized mechanism for phospho-CrkII Y221 induction by binding to the host glycosphingolipid receptor Gb3. The LecA/Gb3 interaction highlights the potential of glycolipids to mediate signalling processes across the plasma membrane and should be further elucidated to gain deeper insights into this non-canonical mechanism of activating host cell processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fit-to-Flow (F2F) interconnects: universal reversible adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors for lab-on-a-chip systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Arnold; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-02-21

    World-to-chip (macro-to-micro) interface continues to be one of the most complicated, ineffective, and unreliable components in the development of emerging lab-on-a-chip systems involving integrated microfluidic operations. A number of irreversible (e.g., adhesive gluing) and reversible techniques (e.g., press fitting) have attempted to provide dedicated fluidic passage from standard tubing to miniature on-chip devices, none of which completely addresses the above concerns. In this paper, we present standardized adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors, referred to as Fit-to-Flow (F2F) Interconnects, to achieve reliable hermetic seal, high-density tube packing, self-aligned plug-in, reworkable connectivity, straightforward scalability and expandability, and applicability to broad lab-on-a-chip platforms; analogous to the modular plug-and-play USB architecture employed in modern electronics. Specifically, two distinct physical packaging mechanisms are applied, with one utilizing induced tensile stress in elastomeric socket to establish reversible seal and the other using negative pressure to provide on demand vacuum shield, both of which can be adapted to a variety of experimental configurations. The non-leaking performance (up to 336 kPa) along with high tube-packing density (of 1 tube/mm(2)) and accurate self-guided alignment (of 10 μm) have been characterized. In addition, a 3D microfluidic mixer and a 6-level chemical gradient generator paired with the corresponding F2F Interconnects have been devised to illustrate the applicability of the universal fluidic connections to classic lab-on-a-chip operations.

  6. Regulation of protease-activated receptor 1 signaling by the adaptor protein complex 2 and R4 subfamily of regulator of G protein signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Siderovski, David P; Neubig, Richard R; Lawson, Mark A; Trejo, Joann

    2014-01-17

    The G protein-coupled protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is irreversibly proteolytically activated by thrombin. Hence, the precise regulation of PAR1 signaling is important for proper cellular responses. In addition to desensitization, internalization and lysosomal sorting of activated PAR1 are critical for the termination of signaling. Unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 internalization is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex 2 (AP-2) and epsin-1, rather than β-arrestins. However, the function of AP-2 and epsin-1 in the regulation of PAR1 signaling is not known. Here, we report that AP-2, and not epsin-1, regulates activated PAR1-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis via two different mechanisms that involve, in part, a subset of R4 subfamily of "regulator of G protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. A significantly greater increase in activated PAR1 signaling was observed in cells depleted of AP-2 using siRNA or in cells expressing a PAR1 (420)AKKAA(424) mutant with defective AP-2 binding. This effect was attributed to AP-2 modulation of PAR1 surface expression and efficiency of G protein coupling. We further found that ectopic expression of R4 subfamily members RGS2, RGS3, RGS4, and RGS5 reduced activated PAR1 wild-type signaling, whereas signaling by the PAR1 AKKAA mutant was minimally affected. Intriguingly, siRNA-mediated depletion analysis revealed a function for RGS5 in the regulation of signaling by the PAR1 wild type but not the AKKAA mutant. Moreover, activation of the PAR1 wild type, and not the AKKAA mutant, induced Gαq association with RGS3 via an AP-2-dependent mechanism. Thus, AP-2 regulates activated PAR1 signaling by altering receptor surface expression and through recruitment of RGS proteins.

  7. Nck adaptors, besides promoting N-WASP mediated actin-nucleation activity at pedestals, influence the cellular levels of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Pelegrin, Elvira; Kenny, Brendan; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) binding to human intestinal cells triggers the formation of disease-associated actin rich structures called pedestals. The latter process requires the delivery, via a Type 3 secretion system, of the translocated Intimin receptor (Tir) protein into the host plasma membrane where binding of a host kinase-modified form to the bacterial surface protein Intimin triggers pedestal formation. Tir-Intimin interaction recruits the Nck adaptor to a Tir tyrosine phosphorylated residue where it activates neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP); initiating the major pathway to actin polymerization mediated by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. Previous studies with Nck-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) identified a key role for Nck in pedestal formation, presumed to reflect a lack of N-WASP activation. Here, we show the defect relates to reduced amounts of Tir within Nck-deficient cells. Indeed, Tir delivery and, thus, pedestal formation defects were much greater for MEFs than HeLa (human epithelial) cells. Crucially, the levels of two other effectors (EspB/EspF) within Nck-deficient MEFs were not reduced unlike that of Map (Mitochondrial associated protein) which, like Tir, requires CesT chaperone function for efficient delivery. Interestingly, drugs blocking various host protein degradation pathways failed to increase Tir cellular levels unlike an inhibitor of deacetylase activity (Trichostatin A; TSA). Treatments with TSA resulted in significant recovery of Tir levels, potentiation of actin polymerization and improvement in bacterial attachment to cells. Our findings have important implications for the current model of Tir-mediated actin polymerization and opens new lines of research in this area.

  8. Dual role of the Toxoplasma gondii clathrin adaptor AP1 in the sorting of rhoptry and microneme proteins and in parasite division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Venugopal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii possesses a highly polarized secretory system, which efficiently assembles de novo micronemes and rhoptries during parasite replication. These apical secretory organelles release their contents into host cells promoting parasite invasion and survival. Using a CreLox-based inducible knock-out strategy and the ddFKBP over-expression system, we unraveled novel functions of the clathrin adaptor complex TgAP1. First, our data indicate that AP1 in T. gondii likely functions as a conserved heterotetrameric complex composed of the four subunits γ, β, μ1, σ1 and interacts with known regulators of clathrin-mediated vesicular budding such as the unique ENTH-domain containing protein, which we named Epsin-like protein (TgEpsL. Disruption of the μ1 subunit resulted in the mis-sorting of microneme proteins at the level of the Trans-Golgi-Network (TGN. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TgAP1 regulates rhoptry biogenesis by activating rhoptry protein exit from the TGN, but also participates in the post-Golgi maturation process of preROP compartments into apically anchored club-shaped mature organelles. For this latter activity, our data indicate a specific functional relationship between TgAP1 and the Rab5A-positive endosome-like compartment. In addition, we unraveled an original role for TgAP1 in the regulation of parasite division. APμ1-depleted parasites undergo normal daughter cell budding and basal complex assembly but fail to segregate at the end of cytokinesis.

  9. Disruption of the podosome adaptor protein TKS4 (SH3PXD2B) causes the skeletal dysplasia, eye, and cardiac abnormalities of Frank-Ter Haar Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; de Brouwer, Arjan; van der Zwaag, Bert; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Scimia, M Cecilia; Lindsey, James D; Weinreb, Robert; Albrecht, Beate; Megarbane, Andre; Alanay, Yasemin; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Amenduni, Mariangela; Artuso, Rosangela; Veltman, Joris A; van Beusekom, Ellen; Oudakker, Astrid; Millán, José Luis; Hennekam, Raoul; Hamel, Ben; Courtneidge, Sara A; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2010-02-12

    Frank-Ter Haar syndrome (FTHS), also known as Ter Haar syndrome, is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by skeletal, cardiovascular, and eye abnormalities, such as increased intraocular pressure, prominent eyes, and hypertelorism. We have conducted homozygosity mapping on patients representing 12 FTHS families. A locus on chromosome 5q35.1 was identified for which patients from nine families shared homozygosity. For one family, a homozygous deletion mapped exactly to the smallest region of overlapping homozygosity, which contains a single gene, SH3PXD2B. This gene encodes the TKS4 protein, a phox homology (PX) and Src homology 3 (SH3) domain-containing adaptor protein and Src substrate. This protein was recently shown to be involved in the formation of actin-rich membrane protrusions called podosomes or invadopodia, which coordinate pericellular proteolysis with cell migration. Mice lacking Tks4 also showed pronounced skeletal, eye, and cardiac abnormalities and phenocopied the majority of the defects associated with FTHS. These findings establish a role for TKS4 in FTHS and embryonic development. Mutation analysis revealed five different homozygous mutations in SH3PXD2B in seven FTHS families. No SH3PXD2B mutations were detected in six other FTHS families, demonstrating the genetic heterogeneity of this condition. Interestingly however, dermal fibroblasts from one of the individuals without an SH3PXD2B mutation nevertheless expressed lower levels of the TKS4 protein, suggesting a common mechanism underlying disease causation. Copyright (c) 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lentiviral Vpx accessory factor targets VprBP/DCAF1 substrate adaptor for cullin 4 E3 ubiquitin ligase to enable macrophage infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Srivastava

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Vpx is a small virion-associated adaptor protein encoded by viruses of the HIV-2/SIVsm lineage of primate lentiviruses that enables these viruses to transduce monocyte-derived cells. This probably reflects the ability of Vpx to overcome an as yet uncharacterized block to an early event in the virus life cycle in these cells, but the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches, we have found that Vpx protein of the pathogenic SIVmac 239 strain associates with a ternary protein complex comprising DDB1 and VprBP subunits of Cullin 4-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and DDA1, which has been implicated in the regulation of E3 catalytic activity, and that Vpx participates in the Cullin 4 E3 complex comprising VprBP. We further demonstrate that the ability of SIVmac as well as HIV-2 Vpx to interact with VprBP and its associated Cullin 4 complex is required for efficient reverse transcription of SIVmac RNA genome in primary macrophages. Strikingly, macrophages in which VprBP levels are depleted by RNA interference resist SIVmac infection. Thus, our observations reveal that Vpx interacts with both catalytic and regulatory components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and demonstrate that these interactions are critical for Vpx ability to enable efficient SIVmac replication in primary macrophages. Furthermore, they identify VprBP/DCAF1 substrate receptor for Cullin 4 E3 ubiquitin ligase and its associated protein complex as immediate downstream effector of Vpx for this function. Together, our findings suggest a model in which Vpx usurps VprBP-associated Cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase to enable efficient reverse transcription and thereby overcome a block to lentivirus replication in monocyte-derived cells, and thus provide novel insights into the underlying molecular mechanism.

  11. Role of adaptor proteins and clathrin in the trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Duangtum, Natapol; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2014-07-01

    Kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) plays an important role in acid-base homeostasis by mediating chloride/bicarbornate (Cl-/HCO3-) exchange at the basolateral membrane of α-intercalated cells in the distal nephron. Impaired intracellular trafficking of kAE1 caused by mutations of SLC4A1 encoding kAE1 results in kidney disease - distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). However, it is not known how the intracellular sorting and trafficking of kAE1 from trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the basolateral membrane occurs. Here, we studied the role of basolateral-related sorting proteins, including the mu1 subunit of adaptor protein (AP) complexes, clathrin and protein kinase D, on kAE1 trafficking in polarized and non-polarized kidney cells. By using RNA interference, co-immunoprecipitation, yellow fluorescent protein-based protein fragment complementation assays and immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated that AP-1 mu1A, AP-3 mu1, AP-4 mu1 and clathrin (but not AP-1 mu1B, PKD1 or PKD2) play crucial roles in intracellular sorting and trafficking of kAE1. We also demonstrated colocalization of kAE1 and basolateral-related sorting proteins in human kidney tissues by double immunofluorescence staining. These findings indicate that AP-1 mu1A, AP-3 mu1, AP-4 mu1 and clathrin are required for kAE1 sorting and trafficking from TGN to the basolateral membrane of acid-secreting α-intercalated cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Adaptor Protein p62 Mediates Nuclear Factor κB Activation in Response to Inflammation and Facilitates the Formation of Prolabor Mediators in Human Myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappas, Martha

    2017-05-01

    Preventing spontaneous preterm birth is one of the most important issues facing perinatal medicine today. The pathophysiology of preterm labor, the single biggest cause of preterm birth, is poorly understood. Inflammation, however, plays a significant role in the terminal processes of human labor, which include myometrial contractions. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) drives the transcription of proinflammatory mediators involved in the terminal effector pathways of human labor and delivery. Recent studies in nongestational tissues have shown that the adaptor protein p62 interacts with NF-κB to induce inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine the role of p62 in the genesis of NF-κB-induced proinflammatory and prolabur mediators. Human spontaneous term labor was associated with increased p62 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in myometrium. Myometrial cells treated with proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) also significantly increased p62 mRNA and protein expression. Functional studies using p62 small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated a significant attenuation of TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1]) mRNA expression and secretion, expression of cyclooxygenase 2, release of prostaglandin F 2α (PGF 2α ), and expression of the prostaglandin F receptor (FP). In addition, siRNA knockdown of p62 significantly suppressed IL-1β- and TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation. Collectively, these studies suggest that p62 is involved in the genesis of NF-κB-induced proinflammatory and prolabor mediators.

  13. Physics of Complex Polymeric Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Joshua Walter

    The statistical physics of complex polymers with branches and circuits is the topic of this dissertation. An important motivation are large, single-stranded (ss) RNA molecules. Such molecules form complex ``secondary" and ``tertiary" structures that can be represented as branched polymers with circuits. Such structures are in part directly determined by the nucleotide sequence and in part subject to thermal fluctuations. The polymer physics literature on molecules in this class has mostly focused on randomly branched polymers without circuits while there has been minimal research on polymers with specific structures and on polymers that contain circuits. The dissertation is composed of three parts: Part I studies branched polymers with thermally fluctuating structure confined to a potential well as a simple model for the encapsidation of viral RNA. Excluded volume interactions were ignored. In Part II, I apply Flory theory to the study of the encapsidation of viral ss RNA molecules with specific branched structures, but without circuits, in the presence of excluded volume interaction. In Part III, I expand on Part II and consider complex polymers with specific structure including both branching and circuits. I introduce a method based on the mathematics of Laplacian matrices that allows me to calculate density profiles for such molecules, which was not possible within Flory theory.

  14. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  15. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  16. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  17. Single-molecule nanopore enzymology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wloka, Carsten; Maglia, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Biological nanopores are a class of membrane proteins that open nanoscale water-conduits in biological membranes. When they are reconstituted in artificial membranes and a bias voltage is applied across the membrane, the ionic current passing through individual nanopores can be used to monitor chemical reactions, to recognize individual molecules and, of most interest, to sequence DNA. More recently, proteins and enzymes have started being analysed with nanopores. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with nanopores, i.e. nanopore enzymology, has the unique advantage that it allows long-timescale observations of native proteins at the single-molecule level. Here we describe the approaches and challenges in nanopore enzymology. PMID:28630164

  18. Teaching lasers to control molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Rabitz, H.

    1992-01-01

    We simulate a method to teach a laser pulse sequences to excite specified molecular states. We use a learning procedure to direct the production of pulses based on ''fitness'' information provided by a laboratory measurement device. Over a series of pulses the algorithm learns an optimal sequence. The experimental apparatus, which consists of a laser, a sample of molecules and a measurement device, acts as an analog computer that solves Schroedinger's equation n/Iexactly, in real time. We simulate an apparatus that learns to excite specified rotational states in a diatomic molecule

  19. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  20. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  1. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  2. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 10. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Some Exotic Red Pigments of Plant Origin. N R Krishnaswamy C N ... Keywords. Pigments of red sandalwood; Safflower; chica red; Brazil wood; Dragon's blood; Miro wood and Kamala dye.

  3. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...

  4. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  5. Molecule of the Month -66 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar is with the Department of. Organic Chemistry, Indian. Institute of Science,. Banga1ore. (1). The challenging goal of making other substances with all the properties of diamond continues to be pursued, with some success. J Chandrasekhar.

  6. Microbes, molecules, maladies and man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbes, molecules, maladies and man. Adriano G Duse. Dedication: To Professor Hendrik J Koornhof, mentor, friend and man with immense knowledge, insight, wisdom and compassion, who has been a true inspiration to all those who have had the privilege to know him. The planet Earth was formed, in a molten state, ...

  7. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule. Kushal Chakraborty is a doctoral student at. Department of Life. Sciences and Biology at. Jadavpur University. Presently he is working on the stimulatory effects of various kinds of NSAIDs on different kinds of cells and isolation of that protein from those cells. Keywords. Nitric oxide ...

  8. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  9. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Sweet Stimulants of the Olfactory Nerves - Muscone, Civetone and Related Compounds. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 7 July 2013 pp 673-683 ...

  10. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 3. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Hunting with Poisoned Arrows: Story of Curare. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 3 March 2013 pp 218-225 ...

  11. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  12. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Using a Natural Product to Catch Fish! The Chemistry of Rotenoids. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 5 May 2013 pp 428-439 ...

  13. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  14. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 1. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Colours in Flight - Pigments from Bird Feathers and Butterfly Wings. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 12-21 ...

  15. Molecule of the Month -92 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anandamide is the trivial name given to the molecule N- arachidonylethanolamine or arachidonylethanolamide (Struc- ture 1). It is the amide formed by the condensation reaction of arachidonic acid - a 20-carbon linear-chain fatty acid contain- ing 4 unconjugated double bonds - with the amino group of 2- ethanolamine.

  16. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  17. Dialkylresorcinols as bacterial signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-13

    It is well recognized that bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules, a process termed quorum sensing. The best understood quorum sensing systems are those that use acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) for communication. The prototype of those systems consists of a LuxI-like AHL synthase and a cognate LuxR receptor that detects the signal. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR receptors, yet lack any LuxI-type synthase, and thus these receptors are referred to as LuxR orphans or solos. In addition to the well-known AHLs, little is known about the signaling molecules that are sensed by LuxR solos. Here, we describe a novel cell-cell communication system in the insect and human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica. We identified the LuxR homolog PauR to sense dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs) instead of AHLs as signals. The DarABC synthesis pathway produces the molecules, and the entire system emerged as important for virulence. Moreover, we have analyzed more than 90 different Photorhabdus strains by HPLC/MS and showed that these DARs and CHDs are specific to the human pathogen P. asymbiotica. On the basis of genomic evidence, 116 other bacterial species are putative DAR producers, among them many human pathogens. Therefore, we discuss the possibility of DARs as novel and widespread bacterial signaling molecules and show that bacterial cell-cell communication goes far beyond AHL signaling in nature.

  18. Lighting the World with Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 8. Lighting the World with Molecules. S Ramasesha. General Article Volume 14 Issue 8 August 2009 pp 782-798. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/014/08/0782-0798. Keywords.

  19. DNA molecules and human therapeutics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors ...

  20. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  1. Thy-1/CD3 coengagement promotes TCR signaling and enhances particularly tyrosine phosphorylation of the raft molecule LAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, L; Quest, A F; Bron, C

    1999-08-01

    Clustering of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein Thy-1 on the cell surface leads to T cell activation. However, despite the similarity to TCR-mediated events, cell signaling triggered by Thy-1 crosslinking, reportedly occurs in a manner independent of the TCR/CD3 complex. To investigate the relationship between responses resulting from Thy-1 or TCR engagement, a biochemically well defined system employing only affinity purified antibodies was used to crosslink these surface molecules and activation was assessed by monitoring tyrosine phosphorylation, intracellular calcium influx and IL-2 production. By these criteria, anti-CD3 mAbs moderately activated EL-4 thymoma or 2B4 hybridoma cell lines, while costimulation with anti-Thy-1-mAb strongly enhanced TCR signaling. Furthermore, a Thy-1 loss mutant cell line, did not respond to stimulation through CD3 despite expressing all essential signaling molecules. Together these results emphasized the existence of a poorly appreciated mutual interdependence between Thy-1 and CD3 for efficient cellular signaling. Thy-1/CD3-mediated activation enhanced mostly tyrosine phosphorylation of a 40 kDa protein which was identified as a transmembrane protein lacking N-linked oligosaccharides. These biochemical properties are identical to those described for a recently cloned adaptor protein called 'Linker for Activation of T cells' (LAT). Indeed, polyclonal Abs raised against a LAT-peptide (amino acids 103-131) specifically recognized the 40 kDa protein. LAT is present in microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol, GPI-anchored proteins and a variety of signaling molecules. By contrast, the TCR/CD3 complex is excluded from these domains at least until stimulation takes place. Hence, we propose that Thy-1 promotes TCR/CD3 dependent signaling by facilitating LAT phosphorylation on tyrosine and the subsequent recruitment of downstream effector molecules.

  2. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    Tailoring the specific magnetic properties of any material relies on the topological control of the constituent metal ion building blocks. Although this general approach does not seem to be easily applied to traditional inorganic bulk magnets, coordination chemistry offers a unique tool...... to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal is...

  3. Physics of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Joachain, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a unified account of the physics of atoms and molecules at a level suitable for second- and third-year undergraduate students of physics and physical chemistry. Following a brief historical introduction to the subject the authors outline the ideas and approximation methods of quantum mechanics to be used later in the book. Six chapters look at the structure of atoms and the interactions between atoms and electromagnetic radiation. The authors then move on to describe the structure of molecules and molecular spectra. Three chapters deal with atomic collisions, the scattering of electrons by atoms and the scattering of atoms by atoms. The concluding chapter considers a few of the many important applications of atomic physics within astrophysics, laser technology, and nuclear fusion. Problems are given at the end of each chapter, with hints at the solutions in an appendix. Other appendices include various special topics and derivations together with useful tables of units. (author)

  4. Photoionization bands of rubidium molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, M.; Pichler, G.

    2018-03-01

    We studied the absorption spectrum of dense rubidium vapor generated in a T-type sapphire cell with a special emphasis on the structured photoionization continuum observed in the 200-300 nm spectral region. The photoionization spectrum has a continuous atomic contribution with a pronounced Seaton-Cooper minimum at about 250 nm and a molecular photoionization contribution with many broad bands. We discuss the possible origin of the photoionization bands as stemming from the absorption from the ground state of the Rb2 molecule to excited states of Rb2+* and to doubly excited autoionizing states of Rb2** molecule. All these photoionization bands are located above the Rb+ and Rb2+ ionization limits.

  5. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  6. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  7. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  8. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intersystem crossing in complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappalardo, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The general question of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing is addressed in the context of large organic molecules, i.e., ''complex'' molecules capable of self-relaxation in the absence of collisions. Examples of spectral properties of such molecules in the vapor phase are discussed, relying on extensive Russian literature in this area. Formal expressions for the relaxation rate in the electronic excited states are derived on the basis of the formalism of collision theory, and are applied to the specific case of intersystem crossing. The derivation of the ''energy-gap'' law for triplet-singlet conversion in aromatic hydrocarbons is briefly outlined. The steep rise of internal conversion rates as a function of excess excitation energy, and its competition with the intersystem crossing process, are reviewed for the case of naphthalene vapor. A general expression for the spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian in molecular systems is outlined. Experimental observations on singlet-triplet conversion rates and the factors that can drastically affect such rates are discussed, with emphasis on the ''in- ternal'' and ''external'' heavy-atom effects. Basic relations of ESR spectroscopy and magnetophotoselection are reviewed. Technological implications of the singlet-triplet crossing in complex molecules are discussed in the context of chelate lasers, dye lasers and luminescent displays. Effects related to singlet-triplet crossing, and generally to excited-state energy-transfer in biological systems, are exemplified by the role of aromatic amino-acids in the phosphorescence of proteins, by some recent studies of energy-transfer in models of biomembranes, and by the clustering of triplet-energy donor-acceptor pairs in micelles

  10. Electrocatalytic activation of small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, YuPing

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemsitry and electrocatalysis are useful techniques for energy conversion and energy storage applications. In this project, the electrocatalytic activation of small molecules, H₂O, methanol and ethanol, and CO₂, has been studied as potential methods for energy storage and conversion. A hexaniobate Lindqvist ion assisted Co and Ni nanostructure deposition method has been developed. Efficient catalytic activity towards water oxidation has been observed with high TOF values obtained ...

  11. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  12. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  13. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  14. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  15. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Molecule of the Month section of the RCSB Protein Data Bank . (http://www.pdb.org) Molecule of the Month ... helices and beta sheets. Image courtesy of RCSB Protein Data Bank ( http://www.pdb.org ) Click for larger image ...

  16. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  17. Controlled contact to a C-60 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neel, N.; Kröger, J.; Limot, L.

    2007-01-01

    The tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope is approached towards a C-60 molecule adsorbed at a pentagon-hexagon bond on Cu(100) to form a tip-molecule contact. The conductance rapidly increases to approximate to 0.25 conductance quanta in the transition region from tunneling...... the tip-molecule distance....

  18. TLR accessory molecule RP105 (CD180 is involved in post-interventional vascular remodeling and soluble RP105 modulates neointima formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco C Karper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RP105 (CD180 is TLR4 homologue lacking the intracellular TLR4 signaling domain and acts a TLR accessory molecule and physiological inhibitor of TLR4-signaling. The role of RP105 in vascular remodeling, in particular post-interventional remodeling is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: TLR4 and RP105 are expressed on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC as well as in the media of murine femoral artery segments as detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the response to the TLR4 ligand LPS was stronger in VSMC from RP105(-/- mice resulting in a higher proliferation rate. In RP105(-/- mice femoral artery cuff placement resulted in an increase in neointima formation as compared to WT mice (4982 ± 974 µm(2 vs.1947 ± 278 µm(2,p = 0.0014. Local LPS application augmented neointima formation in both groups, but in RP105(-/- mice this effect was more pronounced (10316±1243 µm(2 vs.4208 ± 555 µm(2,p = 0.0002, suggesting a functional role for RP105. For additional functional studies, the extracellular domain of murine RP105 was expressed with or without its adaptor protein MD1 and purified. SEC-MALSanalysis showed a functional 2∶2 homodimer formation of the RP105-MD1 complex. This protein complex was able to block the TLR4 response in whole blood ex-vivo. In vivo gene transfer of plasmid vectors encoding the extracellular part of RP105 and its adaptor protein MD1 were performed to initiate a stable endogenous soluble protein production. Expression of soluble RP105-MD1 resulted in a significant reduction in neointima formation in hypercholesterolemic mice (2500 ± 573 vs.6581 ± 1894 µm(2,p<0.05, whereas expression of the single factors RP105 or MD1 had no effect. CONCLUSION: RP105 is a potent inhibitor of post-interventional neointima formation.

  19. Optoelectronics of Molecules and Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices are being developed at an extraordinary rate. Organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and electro-optical modulators are pivotal to the future of displays, photosensors and solar cells, and communication technologies. This book details the theories underlying the relevant mechanisms in organic materials and covers, at a basic level, how the organic components are made. The first part of this book introduces the fundamental theories used to detail ordered solids and localised energy levels. The methods used to determine energy levels in perfectly ordered molecular and macromolecular systems are discussed, making sure that the effects of quasi-particles are not missed. The function of excitons and their transfer between two molecules are studied, and the problems associated with interfaces and charge injection into resistive media are presented. The second part details technological aspects such as the fabrication of devices based on organic materials by dry etching. The princ...

  20. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qun-Chao, Fan; Wei-Guo, Sun

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7 LiD, 7 LiH, 6 LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy–Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies D e theory , which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies D e expt . (atomic and molecular physics)

  1. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  2. Nonadiabatic calculations on hydrogen molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Since its infancy quantum mechanics has treated hydrogen molecule as a test bed. Contemporary spectroscopy is able to supply the dissociation energy (D0) of H2 with the accuracy of 3 . 7 .10-4cm-1 , while current theoretical predictions are 10-3cm-1 in error. Both the uncertainties are already smaller than the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects contributing to D0, which poses a particular challenge to theoreticians. Undoubtedly, in order to increase the predictive power of theory one has to not only account for the multitude of the tiny relativistic and QED effects but, especially, significantly increase precision of the largest component of D0--the nonrelativistic contribution. We approach the problem of solving the Schroedinger equation, equipped with new methodology, with the target precision of D0 set at the level of 10-7cm-1 .

  3. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  4. A Mott-like State of Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, S.; Volz, T.; Syassen, N.; Bauer, D. M.; Hansis, E.; Rempe, G.

    2006-01-01

    We prepare a quantum state where each site of an optical lattice is occupied by exactly one molecule. This is the same quantum state as in a Mott insulator of molecules in the limit of negligible tunneling. Unlike previous Mott insulators, our system consists of molecules which can collide inelastically. In the absence of the optical lattice these collisions would lead to fast loss of the molecules from the sample. To prepare the state, we start from a Mott insulator of atomic 87Rb with a central region, where each lattice site is occupied by exactly two atoms. We then associate molecules using a Feshbach resonance. Remaining atoms can be removed using blast light. Our method does not rely on the molecule-molecule interaction properties and is therefore applicable to many systems

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of GhAPm, a gene encoding the μ subunit of the clathrin-associated adaptor protein complex that is associated with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Dawei; Guo, Sandui

    2011-06-01

    The clathrin-associated adaptor protein (AP) complexes are the primary clathrin adaptors that contribute to the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The GhAPm gene (GenBank accession number: GU359054), which encodes the medium subunit of the AP complexes, was cloned from cotton by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR). The full-length cDNA was 1590 bp in size and encoded an open reading frame (ORF) of 416 amino acids with a molecular weight of 46 kDa. The GhAPm protein shared 81-85% identity at the amino acid level with the AP complex μ subunits isolated from Vitis vinifera, Glycine max, Populus trichocarpa, Ricinus communis and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. The corresponding genomic DNA, containing eight exons and seven introns, was isolated and analyzed. Also, a 5'-flanking region was analyzed, and a group of putative cis-acting elements were identified. DNA gel blot analysis showed that there is only one GhAPm gene in the cotton genome. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that GhAPm is expressed in the root, stem, leaf, petal, ovule, and fiber. However, the interesting finding is that GhAPm expression level was shown to increase steadily as the cotton fiber develops. In 30 DPA fibers, expression increases sharply and arrives at a peak then the expression levels decrease rapidly. Based on these data, we propose that GhAPm has a critical role in cotton membrane trafficking and fiber development.

  6. NMR of dielectrically oriented molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruessink, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    General information on experimental aspects of EFNMR is given. It is shown that the complete 14 N quadrupole tensor (qct) of pyridine and pyrimidine in the liquid state is accessible to EFNMR. Information obtained about 17 O qct in liquid nitromethane, is compared with results from other techniques. The 33 S qct in liquid sulfolane is investigated. The EFNMR results, combined with those from spin-lattice relaxation time measurements and from Hartree-Fock-Slater MO calculations, allowed the complete assignment of the 33 S qct. The quadrupole coupling of both 10 B and 11 B in a carborane compound is investigated and, together with the results of spin-lattice relaxation time measurements, detailed information about the assignment of the boron qct's could be derived. EFNMR studies of apolar molecules are described. A limitation in EFNMR is the inhomogeneity (delta B) of the magnetic field, which is introduced by the use of non-spinning sample cells. A way out is the detection of zero quantum transitions, their widths being independent of delta B. The results and prospectives of this approach are shown for the simple three spin 1/2 system of acrylonitrile in which the small dipolar proton-proton couplings could be revealed via zero quantum transitions. (Auth.)

  7. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  8. Magnetism: Molecules to Materials IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joel S.; Drillon, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic phenomena and materials are everywhere. Our understanding of magnetic behavior, once thought to be mature, has enjoyed new impetus from contributions ranging from molecular chemistry, materials chemistry and sciences to solid state physics. New phenomena are explored that open promising perspectives for commercial applications in future - carrying out chemical reactions in magnetic fields is just one of those. The spectrum spans molecule-based - organic, (bio)inorganic, and hybrid - compounds, metallic materials as well as their oxides forming thin films, nanoparticles, wires etc. Reflecting contemporary knowledge, this open series of volumes provides a much-needed comprehensive overview of this growing interdisciplinary field. Topical reviews written by foremost scientists explain the trends and latest advances in a clear and detailed way. By maintaining the balance between theory and experiment, the book provides a guide for both advanced students and specialists to this research area. It will help evaluate their own experimental observations and serve as a basis for the design of new magnetic materials. A unique reference work, indispensable for everyone concerned with the phenomena of magnetism!

  9. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  10. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  11. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  12. Stability of two-electron diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, Alejandro; Serra, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the ground state behaviour of two-electron diatomic molecules. The ground state stability diagram for diatomic molecules in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is obtained and the behaviour of the ground state near the stability line is studied. Two different cases are analysed: the homonuclear two-centre two-electron molecule with the internuclear distance as a free parameter and the diatomic two-electron molecule (in this case, the internuclear distance is determined by equilibrium conditions). Analytical and numerical results for these systems are presented

  13. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. High harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dian; Zhu, Xiaosong; Liu, Xi; Li, Liang; Zhang, Xiaofan; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-09-18

    Axial chiral molecules, whose stereogenic element is an axis rather than a chiral center, have attracted widespread interest due to their important application, such as asymmetric synthesis and chirality transfer. We investigate high harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules with bichromatic counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields. High harmonic generation from three typical molecules: (Sa)-3-chloropropa-1,2-dien-1-ol, propadiene, and (Ra)-2,3-pentadiene is simulated with time-dependent density-functional theory and strong field approximation. We found that harmonic spectra for 3D oriented axial chiral molecules exhibit obvious circular dichroism. However, the circular dichroism of High harmonic generation from an achiral molecule is much trivial. Moreover, the dichroism of high harmonic generation still exists when axial chiral molecules are 1D oriented,such as (Sa) -3-chloropropa-1,2-dien-1-ol. For a special form of axial chiral molecules with the formula abC=C=Cab (a, b are different substituents), like (Ra)-2,3-pentadiene, the dichroism discriminations disappear when the molecules are only in 1D orientation. The circular dichroism of high harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules is well explained by the trajectory analysis based on the semiclassical three-step mechanism.

  15. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  16. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  17. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, E S; Barry, J F; Demille, D

    2010-10-14

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a wide array of fields. Laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for a wide range of applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments that lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures makes ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulations of condensed-matter systems and in quantum computation. Also, ultracold molecules could provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the polar molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme requiring only three lasers, we have observed both Sisyphus and Doppler cooling forces that reduce the transverse temperature of a SrF molecular beam substantially, to a few millikelvin or less. At present, the only technique for producing ultracold molecules is to bind together ultracold alkali atoms through Feshbach resonance or photoassociation. However, proposed applications for ultracold molecules require a variety of molecular energy-level structures (for example unpaired electronic spin, Omega doublets and so on). Our method provides an alternative route to ultracold molecules. In particular, it bridges the gap between ultracold (submillikelvin) temperatures and the ∼1-K temperatures attainable with directly cooled molecules (for example with cryogenic buffer-gas cooling or decelerated supersonic beams). Ultimately, our technique should allow the production of large samples of molecules at ultracold temperatures for species that are chemically

  18. Transport through a Single Octanethiol Molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kockmann, D.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Octanethiol molecules adsorbed on Pt chains are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 77 K. The head of the octanethiol binds to a Pt atom and the tail is lying flat down on the chain. Open-loop current time traces reveal that the molecule wags its tail and attaches to the

  19. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation

  20. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  1. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  2. Infrared emission from electronically excited biacetyl molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, E.; Kommandeur, J.

    1971-01-01

    The infrared emission of electronically excited biacetyl molecules in the gas phase at low pressure was observed. Some experimental details are given, and it is shown that the emission derives from biacetyl molecules in their triplet state. The emission is dependent on the wavelength of excitation.

  3. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. linked by α-(1- 4) glycosidic bonds into chains and chains. branch via α-(1- 6) linkage. Branching points are about every fourth residue – allows. glucose ...

  4. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    with a kinetic energy proportional to the excess energy of that particle, subsequently called a photon. After one has recognized the quantum laws of nature, or the ... think of molecules as static entities, but Clausius had proposed a dynamic model in which molecules vibrated and rotated, in accordance with the recognition by ...

  5. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In 1912, Bjerrum published the first quantum theory of molecules, to treat the vibrational and rotational energies of diatomic molecules. That theory was incorrect but prepared the next stages of development of quantum mechanics. The first quantum theory, which appeared in 1900, is considered to involve the derivation of a ...

  6. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F. M. H.; Bethlem, H. L.; Jongma, R.T.; Meijer, G.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by

  7. A storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields can be used to manipulate the motion of neutral molecules in phase-space, i.e., position-momentum space, via their electric dipole moment. A theoretical background is given on the motion of the molecules in phase-space. As the forces exerted on the

  8. Multiple photon infrared processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Butcher, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current understanding of the process of multiple photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules, whereby in the presence of an intense infrared laser field a molecule may absorb upwards of 30 photons. The application of this process to new photochemistry and in particular laser isotope separation is also discussed. (author)

  9. Oscillator strength of instantaneous diatomic sodium molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perny, G.

    1991-10-01

    We introduce definitely the notion of instantaneous molecules, real or fictitious, in spite of its utilization in certain fields of the supraconductivity, genetics and advanced medical research. Calculation of the oscillator strength of instantaneous sodium diatomic molecules gives (f{sub mol})sup(Na{sub 2(i)})=6,86. This method is transposable at lithium and other Ia elements. (orig.).

  10. Oscillator strength of instantaneous diatomic sodium molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perny, G.

    1991-12-01

    We introduce definitely the notion of instantaneous molecules, real or fictitious, in spite of its utilization in certain fields of the supraconductivity, genetics and advanced medical research. Calculation of the oscillator strength of instantaneous sodium diatomic molecules gives [ f mol]Na 2( i)=6,86. This method is transposable at lithium and other Ia elements.

  11. Quantum transport of the single metallocene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Chang, Jing; Wei, Rong-Kai; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    The Quantum transport of three single metallocene molecule is investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. We find that the three metallocen molecules structure become stretched along the transport direction, the distance between two Cp rings longer than the other theory and experiment results. The lager conductance is found in nickelocene molecule, the main transmission channel is the electron coupling between molecule and the electrodes is through the Ni dxz and dyz orbitals and the s, dxz, dyz of gold. This is also confirmed by the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance at Fermi level. In addition, negative differential resistance effect is found in the ferrocene, cobaltocene molecules, this is also closely related with the evolution of the transmission spectrum under applied bias.

  12. Molecules cooled below the Doppler limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Hambach, M.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical trapping and sub-Doppler cooling have been essential to most experiments with quantum degenerate gases, optical lattices, atomic fountains and many other applications. A broad set of new applications await ultracold molecules, and the extension of laser cooling to molecules has begun. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been demonstrated for a single molecular species, SrF, but the sub-Doppler temperatures required for many applications have not yet been reached. Here we demonstrate a MOT of a second species, CaF, and we show how to cool these molecules to 50 μK, well below the Doppler limit, using a three-dimensional optical molasses. These ultracold molecules could be loaded into optical tweezers to trap arbitrary arrays for quantum simulation, launched into a molecular fountain for testing fundamental physics, and used to study collisions and chemistry between atoms and molecules at ultracold temperatures.

  13. Towards witnessing quantum effects in complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, T; Taylor, R A; Vedral, V

    2015-01-01

    Whether many-body objects like organic molecules can exhibit full quantum behaviour, including entanglement, is an open fundamental question. We present a generic theoretical protocol for entangling two organic molecules, such as dibenzoterrylene in anthracene. The availability of organic dye molecules with two-level energy structures characterised by sharp and intense emission lines are characteristics that position them favourably as candidates for quantum information processing technologies involving single-photons. Quantum entanglement can in principle be generated between several organic molecules by carefully interfering their photoluminescence spectra. Major milestones have been achieved in the last 10 years showcasing entanglement in diverse systems including ions, cold atoms, superconductors, photons, quantum dots and NV-centres in diamond, but not yet in molecules.

  14. Visualizing Chemical Bonds in Synthetic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Laura C.; Ruth, Anthony; Green, David B.; Janko, Boldizsar; Gomes, Kenjiro K.

    The use of synthetic quantum systems makes it possible to study phenomena that cannot be probed by conventional experiments. We created synthetic molecules using atomic manipulation and directly imaged the chemical bonds using tunneling spectroscopy. These synthetic systems allow us to probe the structure and electronic properties of chemical bonds in molecules, including those that would be unstable in nature, with unprecedented detail. The experimental images of electronic states in our synthetic molecules show a remarkable match to the charge distribution predicted by density functional theory calculations. The statistical analysis of the spectroscopy of these molecules can be adapted in the future to quantify aromaticity, which has been difficult to quantify universally thus far due to vague definitions. We can also study anti-aromatic molecules which are unstable naturally, to illuminate the electronic consequences of antiaromaticity.

  15. Cold guided beams of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motsch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experiments characterizing cold guided beams of polar molecules which are produced by electrostatic velocity filtering. This filtering method exploits the interaction between the polar molecules and the electric field provided by an electrostatic quadrupole guide to extract efficiently the slow molecules from a thermal reservoir. For molecules with large and linear Stark shifts such as deuterated ammonia (ND 3 ) or formaldehyde (H 2 CO), fluxes of guided molecules of 10 10 -10 11 molecules/s are produced. The velocities of the molecules in these beams are in the range of 10-200 m/s and correspond to typical translational temperatures of a few Kelvin. The maximum velocity of the guided molecules depends on the Stark shift, the molecular mass, the geometry of the guide, and the applied electrode voltage. Although the source is operated in the near-effusive regime, the number density of the slowest molecules is sensitive to collisions. A theoretical model, taking into account this velocity-dependent collisional loss of molecules in the vicinity of the nozzle, reproduces the density of the guided molecules over a wide pressure range. A careful adjustment of pressure allows an increase in the total number of molecules, whilst yet minimizing losses due to collisions of the sought-for slow molecules. This is an important issue for future applications. Electrostatic velocity filtering is suited for different molecular species. This is demonstrated by producing cold guided beams of the water isotopologs H 2 O, D 2 O, and HDO. Although these are chemically similar, they show linear and quadratic Stark shifts, respectively, when exposed to external electric fields. As a result, the flux of HDO is larger by one order of magnitude, and the flux of the individual isotopologs shows a characteristic dependence on the guiding electric field. The internal-state distribution of guided molecules is studied with a newly developed diagnostic method: depletion

  16. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  17. Lactoferrin binding molecules in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, C J; Vanderpuye, O A; McIntyre, J A; Faulk, W P

    1990-10-01

    During ejaculation, the iron binding protein lactoferrin binds to sperm and forms a major component of sperm-coating antigens. Physicochemical properties of lactoferrin in seminal plasma (SP) and on sperm differ from those of purified lactoferrin. These differences have been attributed to the binding of unknown seminal macromolecules to lactoferrin. We have studied lactoferrin binding molecules in SP. The SP samples were coated onto microtiter plates and tested for binding of biotinylated lactoferrin. SP was found to specifically bind biotinylated lactoferrin. This binding was competitively inhibited by coincubation with unlabeled lactoferrin but was not affected by control incubations done with human IgG or transferrin. Lactoferrin binding molecules in SP were biochemically characterized by using SDS-PAGE and ligand blotting. Biotinylated lactoferrin bound to SP molecules of approximately 120, 60 and 30 kDa. No binding was observed with biotinylated transferrin. The presence of molecules that associate with lactoferrin in SP was further studied by using crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Lactoferrin in SP immunoprecipitated as two peaks, one of which corresponded to purified lactoferrin. These results suggest that some lactoferrin molecules in SP are free and that others are associated with lactoferrin binding molecules. Binding of lactoferrin to lactoferrin binding molecules appears to change its physicochemical properties and thus could influence its biologic activity and its affinity to sperm.

  18. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  19. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  20. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  1. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-07-13

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  2. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  3. Nanopore analytics: sensing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2009-08-01

    In nanopore analytics, individual molecules pass through a single nanopore giving rise to detectable temporary blockades in ionic pore current. Reflecting its simplicity, nanopore analytics has gained popularity and can be conducted with natural protein as well as man-made polymeric and inorganic pores. The spectrum of detectable analytes ranges from nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and biomolecular complexes to organic polymers and small molecules. Apart from being an analytical tool, nanopores have developed into a general platform technology to investigate the biophysics, physicochemistry, and chemistry of individual molecules (critical review, 310 references).

  4. Molecular Wring Resonances in Chain Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the eigenfrequency of collective twist excitations in chain molecules can be in the megahertz and gigahertz range. Accordingly, resonance states can be obtained at specific frequencies, and phenomena that involve structural properties can take place. Chain molecules can alter...... their conformation and their ability to function, and a breaking of the chain can result. It is suggested that this phenomenon forms the basis for effects caused by the interaction of microwaves and biomolecules, e.g. microwave assisted hydrolysis of chain molecules....

  5. Aligning molecules with intense nonresonant laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Safvan, C.P.; Sakai, H.

    1999-01-01

    Molecules in a seeded supersonic beam are aligned by the interaction between an intense nonresonant linearly polarized laser field and the molecular polarizability. We demonstrate the general applicability of the scheme by aligning I2, ICl, CS2, CH3I, and C6H5I molecules. The alignment is probed...... by mass selective two dimensional imaging of the photofragment ions produced by femtosecond laser pulses. Calculations on the degree of alignment of I2 are in good agreement with the experiments. We discuss some future applications of laser aligned molecules....

  6. Electron attachment to Van der Waals molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of recent experimental studies of low-energy electron attachment to O 2 , N 2 O and other molecules in dense gases and in sonic nozzle beams with emphasis on the important role of pre-existing van der Waals molecules in the attachment mechanism. The experimental results particularly for O 2 are compared with recent theories. A survey is also given briefly of recent studies on electron solvation and localization in the condensed phase from the viewpoint of the studies on electron interaction with van der Waals molecules. (Auth.)

  7. Nano-manipulation of single DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ., Shanghai; Lv Junhong; Wang Guohua; Wang Ying; Li Minqian; Zhang Yi; Li Bin; Li Haikuo; An Hongjie

    2004-01-01

    Nano-manipulation of single atoms and molecules is a critical technique in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This review paper will focus on the recent development of the manipulation of single DNA molecules based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Precise manipulation has been realized including varied manipulating modes such as 'cutting', 'pushing', 'folding', 'kneading', 'picking up', 'dipping', etc. The cutting accuracy is dominated by the size of the AFM tip, which is usually 10 nm or less. Single DNA fragments can be cut and picked up and then amplified by single molecule PCR. Thus positioning isolation and sequencing can be performed. (authors)

  8. Conformational States of the Spiropyran Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The form of the potential surface of the ground state was investigated on the basis of indoline spiropyran. As a result of this work the rotamers of an open-ring form of the spiropyran molecule were discovered, and the existence of the most probable rotamers was justified. The 3D potential surface of the ground state of the spiropyran molecule was built. The route of the isomerization of the molecule was discovered and values of barriers for this reaction were found. The part of the isomerization route that is responsible for changing the hybridization of spiroatom from sp3 to sp2 was found.

  9. Activation of human γδ T cells by cytosolic interactions of BTN3A1 with soluble phosphoantigens and the cytoskeletal adaptor periplakin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, David A; Chen, Hung-Chang; Price, Amanda J; Keeble, Anthony H; Davey, Martin S; James, Leo C; Eberl, Matthias; Trowsdale, John

    2015-03-01

    The three butyrophilin BTN3A molecules, BTN3A1, BTN3A2, and BTN3A3, are members of the B7/butyrophilin-like group of Ig superfamily receptors, which modulate the function of T cells. BTN3A1 controls activation of human Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells by direct or indirect presentation of self and nonself phosphoantigens (pAg). We show that the microbial metabolite (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate binds to the intracellular B30.2 domain of BTN3A1 with an affinity of 1.1 μM, whereas the endogenous pAg isopentenyl pyrophosphate binds with an affinity of 627 μM. Coculture experiments using knockdown cell lines showed that in addition to BTN3A1, BTN3A2 and BTN3A3 transmit activation signals to human γδ T cells in response to (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and the aminobisphosphonate drug zoledronate that causes intracellular accumulation of isopentenyl pyrophosphate. The plakin family member periplakin, identified in yeast two-hybrid assays, interacted with a membrane-proximal di-leucine motif, located proximal to the B30.2 domain in the BTN3A1 cytoplasmic tail. Periplakin did not interact with BTN3A2 or BTN3A3, which do not contain the di-leucine motif. Re-expression into a BTN3A1 knockdown line of wild-type BTN3A1, but not of a variant lacking the periplakin binding motif, BTN3A1Δexon5, restored γδ T cell responses, demonstrating a functional role for periplakin interaction. These data, together with the widespread expression in epithelial cells, tumor tissues, and macrophages detected using BTN3A antiserum, are consistent with complex functions for BTN3A molecules in tissue immune surveillance and infection, linking the cell cytoskeleton to γδ T cell activation by indirectly presenting pAg to the Vγ9/Vδ2 TCR. Copyright © 2015 The Authors.

  10. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  11. Biological mechanisms, one molecule at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed the development of tools that allow the observation and manipulation of single molecules. The rapidly expanding application of these technologies for investigating biological systems of ever-increasing complexity is revolutionizing our ability to probe the mechanisms of biological reactions. Here, we compare the mechanistic information available from single-molecule experiments with the information typically obtained from ensemble studies and show how these two experimental approaches interface with each other. We next present a basic overview of the toolkit for observing and manipulating biology one molecule at a time. We close by presenting a case study demonstrating the impact that single-molecule approaches have had on our understanding of one of life's most fundamental biochemical reactions: the translation of a messenger RNA into its encoded protein by the ribosome. PMID:21685361

  12. Glycerine associated molecules with herbicide for controlling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycerine associated molecules with herbicide for controlling Adenocalymma peregrinum in cultivated pastures. Rejanne Lima Arruda, Melquezedeque do Vale Nunes, Paulo Roberto da Silva, Fernando Ferreira Leao, Renato de Almeida Sarmento, Thomas Viera Nunes, Eduardo Andrea Lemus Erasmo ...

  13. Small molecule probes for cellular death machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qian, Lihui; Yuan, Junying

    2017-08-01

    The past decade has witnessed a significant expansion of our understanding about the regulated cell death mechanisms beyond apoptosis. The application of chemical biological approaches had played a major role in driving these exciting discoveries. The discovery and use of small molecule probes in cell death research has not only revealed significant insights into the regulatory mechanism of cell death but also provided new drug targets and lead drug candidates for developing therapeutics of human diseases with huge unmet need. Here, we provide an overview of small molecule modulators for necroptosis and ferroptosis, two non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms, and discuss the molecular pathways and relevant pathophysiological mechanisms revealed by the judicial applications of such small molecule probes. We suggest that the development and applications of small molecule probes for non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms provide an outstanding example showcasing the power of chemical biology in exploring novel biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    (NCS1). The NMR solution structure of NCS1, in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy and mutational analysis, suggested a novel role for the C-terminal tail in regulating conformational stability. On the single-molecule level, the C-domain folded through a partially folded intermediate state....... This knowledge-gap is partly due to our inability to unveil the details of folding mechanisms that can be buried in the ensemble-averaged output of traditional bulk methods. Single-molecule techniques have provided a perspective beyond the ensemble average and enable studying the folding trajectories of protein...... molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical...

  15. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  16. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  17. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    . This knowledge-gap is partly due to our inability to unveil the details of folding mechanisms that can be buried in the ensemble-averaged output of traditional bulk methods. Single-molecule techniques have provided a perspective beyond the ensemble average and enable studying the folding trajectories of protein...... molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical......, with transition states located almost halfway between the native and unfolded states. When pulled from the N- and C-termini, both experiments and simulations suggested that the molecule populates a transition state that resembles that observed during chemical denaturation, with respect to structure and position...

  18. nourishing molecule in endurance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pratap C Mali

    2018-01-24

    rich molecules as an energy source obtained from host cell debris remains interesting. Additionally, the potential of M. tuberculosis to survive under different stress conditions leading to its dormant state in pathogenesis remains ...

  19. Kinematic anharmonicity of internal rotation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataev, V.A.; Pupyshev, V.I.; Godunov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The methods of analysis the strongly coupled vibrations are proposed for a number of molecules of aromatic and heterocyclic carbonyl (and some others) compounds. The qualitative principles are formulated for molecular systems with a significant kinematic anharmonicity.

  20. Coherent Bichromatic Force Deflection of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Aldridge, Leland; Yu, Phelan; Eyler, Edward E.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the effect of the coherent optical bichromatic force on a molecule, the polar free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). A dual-frequency retroreflected laser beam addressing the X˜2Σ+↔A˜2Π1 /2 electronic transition coherently imparts momentum onto a cryogenic beam of SrOH. This directional photon exchange creates a bichromatic force that transversely deflects the molecules. By adjusting the relative phase between the forward and counterpropagating laser beams we reverse the direction of the applied force. A momentum transfer of 70 ℏk is achieved with minimal loss of molecules to dark states. Modeling of the bichromatic force is performed via direct numerical solution of the time-dependent density matrix and is compared with experimental observations. Our results open the door to further coherent manipulation of molecular motion, including the efficient optical deceleration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules with complex level structures.

  1. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    , the adult frog Xenopus has a vigorous immune system with many similarities to mammals, a ubiquitous class I molecule, but a much wider class II tissue distribution than human, mouse and chicken. The Xenopus tadpole has a much more restricted immune response, no cell surface class I molecules and a mammalian...... chain on the surface of erythrocytes, those in association with beta 2m and those in association with a disulfide-linked homodimer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Udgivelsesdato: 1990-Feb...

  2. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows:...... experiments held together with the prospects in localization microscopy and single molecule manipulation experiments gave QDs a promising future in single molecule research....

  3. Relaxation dynamics of a single DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshen, E.; Zhao, W. Z.; Carmon, G.; Rosen, S.; Granek, R.; Feingold, M.

    2005-06-01

    The relaxation of a single DNA molecule is studied. The experimental system consists of optical tweezers and a micron-sized bead that is tethered to the bottom of the sample by a single double-stranded DNA molecule. The bead slows down the DNA relaxation from a strongly stretched configuration such that it is passing through stretched equilibrium states. This allows for a theoretical description of the relaxation trajectory, which is in good agreement with experiment.

  4. High pressure structural studies of conjugated molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, Matti; Torkkeli, Mika; Scherf, Ullrich

    2018-01-01

    This chapter highlights high pressure GPa level structural studies of conjugated polymers and their analogues: conjugated oligomers and molecules, and rigid rod polymers. Attention is placed on our recent studies of polyfluorenes.......This chapter highlights high pressure GPa level structural studies of conjugated polymers and their analogues: conjugated oligomers and molecules, and rigid rod polymers. Attention is placed on our recent studies of polyfluorenes....

  5. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C 6 H 5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH 3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Electron affinities of atoms, molecules, and radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, A.A.; McCorkle, D.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    We review briefly but comprehensively the theoretical, semiempirical and experimental methods employed to determine electron affinities (EAs) of atoms, molecules and radicals, and summarize the EA data obtained by these methods. The detailed processes underlying the principles of the experimental methods are discussed very briefly. It is, nonetheless, instructive to recapitulate the definition of EA and those of the related quantities, namely, the vertical detachment energy, VDE, and the vertical attachment energy, VAE. The EA of an atom is defined as the difference in total energy between the ground state of the neutral atom (plus the electron at rest at infinity) and its negative ion. The EA of a molecule is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion when both, the neutral molecules and the negative ion, are in their ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states. The VDE is defined as the minimum energy required to eject the electron from the negative ion (in its ground electronic and nuclear state) without changing the internuclear separation; since the vertical transition may leave the neutral molecule in an excited vibrational/rotational state, the VDE, although the same as the EA for atoms is, in general, different (larger than), from the EA for molecules. Similarly, the VAE is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule in its ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion formed by addition of an electron to the neutral molecule without allowing a change in the intermolecular separation of the constituent nuclei; it is a quantity appropriate to those cases where the lowest negative ion state lies above the ground states of the neutral species and is less or equal to EA

  7. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the CO, HB, HF and LiH molecules are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. The possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment is discussed. (Author) [pt

  8. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the molecules CO, HB, HF and LiH are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. It is discussed the possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment. (Author) [pt

  9. Bitter and sweet tasting molecules: it's complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Ben Shoshan-Galeczki, Yaron; Hayes, John E; Niv, Masha Y

    2018-04-18

    "Bitter" and "sweet" are frequently framed in opposition, both functionally and metaphorically, in regard to affective responses, emotion, and nutrition. This oppositional relationship is complicated by the fact that some molecules are simultaneously bitter and sweet. In some cases, a small chemical modification, or a chirality switch, flips the taste from sweet to bitter. Molecules humans describe as bitter are recognized by a 25 member subfamily of class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as TAS2Rs. Molecules humans describe as sweet are recognized by a TAS1R2/TAS1R3 heterodimer of class C GPCRs. Here we characterize the chemical space of bitter and sweet molecules: the majority of bitter compounds show higher hydrophobicity compared to sweet compounds, while sweet molecules have a wider range of sizes. Critically, recent evidence indicates that TAS1Rs and TAS2Rs are not limited to the oral cavity; moreover, some bitterants are pharmacologically promiscuous, with the hERG potassium channel, cytochrome P450 enzymes and carbonic anhydrases as common off-targets. Further focus on polypharmacology may unravel new physiological roles for tastant molecules. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Rotational excitation of molecules by electron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu; Mason, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    The anisotropic charge distribution of a molecule can easily induce a rotational transition in the molecule during an electron collision. Further, since the level spacing of the rotational states is very small, the transition can take place over a wide range of electron energies. The rotational excitation is the dominant energy-loss process for an electron in a molecular gas, when the electron energy lies below the vibrational threshold of the molecule. In the case of polar molecules, the rotationally excited molecule promptly emits microwave (or far infrared) radiation. In this way, the rotational excitation effectively cools electrons. The present paper reviews theoretical and experimental studies of the electron-impact rotational excitation of molecules. After a general introduction of the relevant theory and experiment, case studies of five different molecular species (H 2 , N 2 , CH 4 , HCl, and H 2 O) are presented to show the characteristics of rotational cross sections. From those studies, common features of the cross sections are discussed

  11. The Arabidopsis adaptor protein AP-3µ interacts with the G-protein β subunit AGB1 and is involved in abscisic acid regulation of germination and post-germination development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugama, Daisuke; Takano, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins) have been implicated in ubiquitous signalling mechanisms in eukaryotes. In plants, G-proteins modulate hormonal and stress responses and regulate diverse developmental processes. However, the molecular mechanisms of their functions are largely unknown. A yeast two-hybrid screen was performed to identify interacting partners of the Arabidopsis G-protein β subunit AGB1. One of the identified AGB1-interacting proteins is the Arabidopsis adaptor protein AP-3µ. The interaction between AGB1 and AP-3µ was confirmed by an in vitro pull-down assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Two ap-3µ T-DNA insertional mutants were found to be hyposensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) during germination and post-germination growth, whereas agb1 mutants were hypersensitive to ABA. During seed germination, agb1/ap-3µ double mutants were more sensitive to ABA than the wild type but less sensitive than agb1 mutants. However, in post-germination growth, the double mutants were as sensitive to ABA as agb1 mutants. These data suggest that AP-3µ positively regulates the ABA responses independently of AGB1 in seed germination, while AP-3µ does require AGB1 to regulate ABA responses during post-germination growth. PMID:24098050

  12. Energy-resolved positron annihilation for molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, L.D.; Gilbert, S.J.; Surko, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study designed to address the long-standing question regarding the origin of very large positron annihilation rates observed for many molecules. We report a study of the annihilation, resolved as a function of positron energy (ΔE∼25 meV, full width at half maximum) for positron energies from 50 meV to several eV. Annihilation measurements are presented for a range of hydrocarbon molecules, including a detailed study of alkanes, C n H 2n+2 , for n=1-9 and 12. Data for other molecules are also presented: C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 ; CD 4 ; isopentane; partially fluorinated and fluorinated methane (CH x F 4-x ); 1-fluorohexane (C 6 H 13 F) and 1-fluorononane (C 9 H 19 F). A key feature of the results is very large enhancements in the annihilation rates at positron energies corresponding to the excitation of molecular vibrations in larger alkane molecules. These enhancements are believed to be responsible for the large annihilation rates observed for Maxwellian distributions of positrons in molecular gases. In alkane molecules larger than ethane (C 2 H 6 ), the position of these peaks is shifted downward by an amount ∼20 meV per carbon. The results presented here are generally consistent with a physical picture recently considered in detail by Gribakin [Phys. Rev. A 61, 022720 (2000)]. In this model, the incoming positron excites a vibrational Feshbach resonance and is temporarily trapped on the molecule, greatly enhancing the probability of annihilation. The applicability of this model and the resulting enhancement in annihilation rate relies on the existence of positron-molecule bound states. In accord with this reasoning, the experimental results presented here provide the most direct evidence to date that positrons bind to neutral molecules. The shift in the position of the resonances is interpreted as a measure of the binding energy of the positron to the molecule. Other features of the results are also discussed, including large

  13. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  14. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  15. Our Galactic Neighbor Hosts Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the presence of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in a star-forming region outside our galaxy. This discovery has important implications for the formation and survival of complex organic compounds importantfor the formation of life in low-metallicity galaxies bothyoung and old.No Simple Picture of Complex Molecule FormationALMA, pictured here with the Magellanic Clouds above, has observed organic molecules in our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. [ESO/C. Malin]Complex organic molecules (those with at least six atoms, one or more of which must be carbon) are the precursors to the building blocks of life. Knowing how and where complex organic molecules can form is a key part of understanding how life came to be on Earth and how it might arise elsewhere in the universe. From exoplanet atmospheres to interstellar space, complex organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Milky Way.In our galaxy, complex organic molecules are often found in the intense environments of hot cores clumps of dense molecular gas surrounding the sites of star formation. However, its not yet fully understood how the complex organic molecules found in hot cores come to be. One possibility is that the compounds condense onto cold dust grains long before the young stars begin heating their natal shrouds. Alternatively, they might assemble themselves from the hot, dense gas surrounding the blazing protostars.Composite infrared and optical image of the N 113 star-forming region in the LMC. The ALMA coverage is indicated by the gray line. Click to enlarge. [Sewio et al. 2018]Detecting Complexity, a Galaxy AwayUsing ALMA, a team of researchers led by Marta Sewio (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) recently detected two complex organic molecules methyl formate and dimethyl ether for the first time in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Previous searches for organic molecules in the LMC detected

  16. Advances in organometallic and protein chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes two areas of scientific investigation. The first contains a description of a study on the synthesis of biotinylated and fluoresceinylated bromomaleimide based reagents. Upon synthesis, the ability of these reagents to add reversibly to cysteine containing proteins is investigated by a series of LCMS experiments. A single point mutant (L111C) of the SH2 domain of the Grb2 adaptor protein, containing a single cysteine residue, is chosen as an ideal protein for study. Thus ...

  17. Imaging and controlling proton motion in molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, H.; Beaulieu, S.; Wanie, V.; Endo, T.; Wales, B.; Tong, X.-M.; Schuurman, M. S.; Sanderson, J.; Légaré, F.

    2017-11-01

    How do atoms move within a molecule? What are the paths they take? Coulomb Explosion Imaging combined with a multi-color pump probe scheme allows us to address these questions with a table top setup. Since the momentum information of molecular fragments is preserved at the moment of explosion, we can deduce the fragment's momentary position, representing the structure of the molecule. We have studied isomerization and dissociation events through the movement of protons, deuterons and electrons, taking advantage of the rich statistics this technique provides. In the case of proton migration in the acetylene cation, we were able to identify an isotope dependent to- and fro isomerization behavior [1]. Presently, we are expanding our studies on more complex processes. Aside from passively studying dynamics, we have also actively controlled the electron localization in small molecules [2] using two-color mid-infrared asymmetric laser fields. The manipulation of protons, the lightest atomic fragments in molecules, is of great interest due to the tremendous diversity of molecules containing them, in combination with the generality of how protons behave within molecules. Their detection involves certain challenges since they move extremely fast compared to heavier atoms. Here, we focus on two different proton motions which are triggered by excitation with ultrashort laser pulses and imaged with the Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI) technique. First, we will discuss proton migration dynamics in the acetylene cation launched due to strong field multiphoton ionization with UV pulses in a rather simple table top approach. Second, we will concentrate on controlling electron localization - and thus proton localization - in the cation of the hydrogen molecule by using an asymmetric two color field in the mid-infrared (MIR).

  18. Quantum-degenerate cesium. Atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbig, J.

    2005-04-01

    A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of cesium atoms features the possibility to control the interatomic interaction. This outstanding property results from various couplings to molecular states, which show up in a rich spectrum of Feshbach resonances at easily accessible magnetic fields. In the frame of this thesis, we create a BEC of cesium and exploit its tunability for new experiments on Cs atoms and in the creation of Cs molecules. To produce the BEC we employ a sequence of two optical traps to realize good loading conditions as well as efficient evaporation. With this strategy we were able to create the first BEC of cesium. Optimization yields more than 100000 condensed atoms. We demonstrate the tunability of the mean-field interaction in the condensate by measuring the release energy as a function of the scattering lengths. By switching the scattering length to zero, we realize a non-expanding 'frozen condensate'. We use the BEC to create ultracold Cs 2 molecules by applying a magnetic field ramp over a Feshbach resonance. We separate atoms from molecules in a Stern-Gerlach type scheme. We observe ultra-low molecular expansion energies, consistent with the presence of a macroscopic molecular matter wave. Using a novel magnetic field ramping scheme we can greatly improve the achieved conversion efficiencies. In first experiments we transfer molecules to different internal molecular states using avoided level crossings. Finally, we demonstrate trapping of molecules in a CO 2 -laser trap, which offers a prospect for a trapped molecular BEC. (author)

  19. Modelling the spectroscopic behaviour of hot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    At elevated temperatures the molecules absorb and emit light in a very complicated fashion which is hard to characterise on the basis of laboraroty measurement. Computed line lists of molecule transitions therefore provide a vital input for models of hot atmospheres. I will describe the calculation and use of such line lists including the BT2 water line list [1], which contains some 500 million distinct rotation-vibration transitions. This linelist proved crucial in the detection of water in extrasolar planet HD189733b and has been used extensively in atmospheric modelling. Illustrations will be given at the meeting. A new linelist for the ammonia molecule has just been completed [2] which shows that standard compilations for this molecule need to be improved. Progress on a more extensive linelist for hot ammonia and linelists for other molecules will be discussed at the meeting. [1] R.J. Barber, J. Tennyson, G.J. Harris and R.N. Tolchenov, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 368, 1087-1094 (2006) [2] S.N. Yurchenko, R.J. Barber, A. Yachmenev, W. Theil, P. Jensen and J. Tennyson, J. Phys. Chem. A, 113, 11845-11855 (2009).

  20. Toward Generalization of Iterative Small Molecule Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jonathan W; Blair, Daniel J; Burke, Martin D

    2018-02-01

    Small molecules have extensive untapped potential to benefit society, but access to this potential is too often restricted by limitations inherent to the customized approach currently used to synthesize this class of chemical matter. In contrast, the "building block approach", i.e., generalized iterative assembly of interchangeable parts, has now proven to be a highly efficient and flexible way to construct things ranging all the way from skyscrapers to macromolecules to artificial intelligence algorithms. The structural redundancy found in many small molecules suggests that they possess a similar capacity for generalized building block-based construction. It is also encouraging that many customized iterative synthesis methods have been developed that improve access to specific classes of small molecules. There has also been substantial recent progress toward the iterative assembly of many different types of small molecules, including complex natural products, pharmaceuticals, biological probes, and materials, using common building blocks and coupling chemistry. Collectively, these advances suggest that a generalized building block approach for small molecule synthesis may be within reach.

  1. Single-molecule manipulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Siyun; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-25

    Compared to conventional ensemble methods, studying macromolecules at single-molecule level can reveal extraordinary clear and even surprising views for a biological reaction. In the past 20 years, single-molecule techniques have been undergoing a very rapid development, and these cutting edge technologies have revolutionized the biological research by facilitating single-molecule manipulation and detection. Here we give a brief review about these advanced techniques, including optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy (AFM), hydrodynamic flow-stretching assay, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET). We are trying to describe their basic principles and provide a few examples of applications for each technique. This review aims to give a rather introductory survey of single-molecule techniques for audiences with biological or biophysical background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Small molecule inhibitors of anthrax edema factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Moayeri, Mahtab; Thai, April; Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; McKasson, Linda; O'Malley, Sean; Leppla, Stephen H; Johnson, Alan T

    2018-01-15

    Anthrax is a highly lethal disease caused by the Gram-(+) bacteria Bacillus anthracis. Edema toxin (ET) is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of disease in humans exposed to B. anthracis. ET is a bipartite toxin composed of two proteins secreted by the vegetative bacteria, edema factor (EF) and protective antigen (PA). Our work towards identifying a small molecule inhibitor of anthrax edema factor is the subject of this letter. First we demonstrate that the small molecule probe 5'-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5'-adenosine (FSBA) reacts irreversibly with EF and blocks enzymatic activity. We then show that the adenosine portion of FSBA can be replaced to provide more drug-like molecules which are up to 1000-fold more potent against EF relative to FSBA, display low cross reactivity when tested against a panel of kinases, and are nanomolar inhibitors of EF in a cell-based assay of cAMP production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. RNA as a small molecule druggable target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Smith, Graham F

    2017-12-01

    Small molecule drugs have readily been developed against many proteins in the human proteome, but RNA has remained an elusive target for drug discovery. Increasingly, we see that RNA, and to a lesser extent DNA elements, show a persistent tertiary structure responsible for many diverse and complex cellular functions. In this digest, we have summarized recent advances in screening approaches for RNA targets and outlined the discovery of novel, drug-like small molecules against RNA targets from various classes and therapeutic areas. The link of structure, function, and small-molecule Druggability validates now for the first time that RNA can be the targets of therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Morse basis expansion applied to diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Emanuel F. de, E-mail: eflima@rc.unesp.br [Departamento de Estatística, Matemática Aplicada e Computação, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, Rio Claro, São Paulo 13506-900 (Brazil)

    2012-02-20

    This work explores the use of the eigenfunctions of the Morse potential with a infinite barrier at long range to solve the radial Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Analytical formulas are obtained for the kinetic energy operator matrix elements in the Morse basis. The Morse basis expansion is applied to find the vibrational–rotational levels of the sodium molecule in the electronic ground state. -- Highlights: ► The Morse potential basis is invoked to find the rovibrational levels of diatomic molecules. ► Analytical formulas for the kinetic energy operator in the Morse basis are obtained. ► The results of the Morse basis expansion show good agreement with the Fourier Grid technique.

  5. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  6. CD1: From Molecules to Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D Branch; Suliman, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The human cluster of differentiation (CD)1 system for antigen display is comprised of four types of antigen-presenting molecules, each with a distinct functional niche: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Whereas CD1 proteins were thought solely to influence T-cell responses through display of amphipathic lipids, recent studies emphasize the role of direct contacts between the T-cell receptor and CD1 itself. Moving from molecules to diseases, new research approaches emphasize human CD1-transgenic mouse models and the study of human polyclonal T cells in vivo or ex vivo in disease states. Whereas the high genetic diversity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded antigen-presenting molecules provides a major hurdle for designing antigens that activate T cells in all humans, the simple population genetics of the CD1 system offers the prospect of discovering or designing broadly acting immunomodulatory agents.

  7. Single-molecule studies using magnetic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionnet, Timothée; Allemand, Jean-François; Revyakin, Andrey; Strick, Terence R; Saleh, Omar A; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, techniques have been developed to study and manipulate single molecules of DNA and other biopolymers. In one such technique, the magnetic trap, a single DNA molecule is bound at one end to a glass surface and at the other to a magnetic microbead. Small magnets, whose position and rotation can be controlled, pull on and rotate the microbead. This provides a simple method to stretch and twist the molecule. The system allows one to apply and measure forces ranging from 10(-3) to >100 pN. In contrast to other techniques, the force measurement is absolute and does not require calibration of the sensor. In this article, we describe the principle of the magnetic trap, as well as its use in the measurement of the elastic properties of DNA and the study of DNA-protein interactions.

  8. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations. Based on invited talk at the International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology 2006.

  9. Relativistic Scott correction for atoms and molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovej, Jan Philip; Sørensen, Thomas Østergaard; Spitzer, Wolfgang Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    We prove the first correction to the leading Thomas-Fermi energy for the ground state energy of atoms and molecules in a model where the kinetic energy of the electrons is treated relativistically. The leading Thomas-Fermi energy, established in [25], as well as the correction given here, are of ......We prove the first correction to the leading Thomas-Fermi energy for the ground state energy of atoms and molecules in a model where the kinetic energy of the electrons is treated relativistically. The leading Thomas-Fermi energy, established in [25], as well as the correction given here......, are of semiclassical nature. Our result on atoms and molecules is proved from a general semiclassical estimate for relativistic operators with potentials with Coulomb-like singularities. This semiclassical estimate is obtained using the coherent state calculus introduced in [36]. The paper contains a unified treatment...

  10. Multiphoton processes in isolated atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudbo, A.S.

    1979-11-01

    The theory of coherent excitation of a multilevel quantum mechanical system is developed. Damping of the system is taken into account by the use of a density matrix formalism. General properties of the wave function and/or the density matrix are discussed. The physical implications for the behavior of the system are described, together with possible applications of the formalism, including the infrared multiphoton excitation of molecules, and optical pumping in alkali atoms. Experimental results are presented on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of molecules, followed by a discussion of the general features of this process. The experimental results were obtained using a crossed laser and molecular beam method, and the emphasis is on determining the properties of the dissociating molecule and the dissociation products. The dissociation process is shown to be described very well by the standard statistical theory (RRKM theory) of unimolecular reactions, a brief presentation of which is also included

  11. Observational astrochemistry: The quest for interstellar molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guélin M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 160 molecular species, not counting isotopologues, have been identified in circumstellar envelopes and interstellar clouds. These species have revealed a wealth of familiar, as much as exotic molecules and in complex organic (and silicon compounds, that was fully unexpected in view of the harshness of surrounding conditions: vanishingly low densities, extreme temperatures and intense embedding UV radiation. They illustrate the diversity of astrochemistry and show robust prebiotic molecules may be. In this lecture, we review the quest for interstellar molecules and show how tributary it is from theoretical ideas and technology developments. A. A. Penzias, who discovered interstellar CO and the 2.7 K Cosmic Background radiation, used to joke that astronomical research is easy: the great questions have largely been formulated; one only has to wait until technological progress makes it possible to answer.

  12. A Zeeman slower for diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, M.; Kaebert, P.; Gersema, P.; Siercke, M.; Ospelkaus, S.

    2018-04-01

    We present a novel slowing scheme for beams of laser-coolable diatomic molecules reminiscent of Zeeman slowing of atomic beams. The scheme results in efficient compression of the one-dimensional velocity distribution to velocities trappable by magnetic or magneto-optical traps. We experimentally demonstrate our method in an atomic testbed and show an enhancement of flux below v = 35 m s‑1 by a factor of ≈20 compared to white light slowing. 3D Monte Carlo simulations performed to model the experiment show excellent agreement. We apply the same simulations to the prototype molecule 88Sr19F and expect 15% of the initial flux to be continuously compressed in a narrow velocity window at around 10 m s‑1. This is the first experimentally shown continuous and dissipative slowing technique in molecule-like level structures, promising to provide the missing link for the preparation of large ultracold molecular ensembles.

  13. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  14. Small Molecule Subgraph Detector (SMSD toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding one small molecule (query in a large target library is a challenging task in computational chemistry. Although several heuristic approaches are available using fragment-based chemical similarity searches, they fail to identify exact atom-bond equivalence between the query and target molecules and thus cannot be applied to complex chemical similarity searches, such as searching a complete or partial metabolic pathway. In this paper we present a new Maximum Common Subgraph (MCS tool: SMSD (Small Molecule Subgraph Detector to overcome the issues with current heuristic approaches to small molecule similarity searches. The MCS search implemented in SMSD incorporates chemical knowledge (atom type match with bond sensitive and insensitive information while searching molecular similarity. We also propose a novel method by which solutions obtained by each MCS run can be ranked using chemical filters such as stereochemistry, bond energy, etc. Results In order to benchmark and test the tool, we performed a 50,000 pair-wise comparison between KEGG ligands and PDB HET Group atoms. In both cases the SMSD was shown to be more efficient than the widely used MCS module implemented in the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK in generating MCS solutions from our test cases. Conclusion Presently this tool can be applied to various areas of bioinformatics and chemo-informatics for finding exhaustive MCS matches. For example, it can be used to analyse metabolic networks by mapping the atoms between reactants and products involved in reactions. It can also be used to detect the MCS/substructure searches in small molecules reported by metabolome experiments, as well as in the screening of drug-like compounds with similar substructures. Thus, we present a robust tool that can be used for multiple applications, including the discovery of new drug molecules. This tool is freely available on http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/SMSD/

  15. Abrupt relaxation in high-spin molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-R.; Cheng, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    Mean-field model suggests that the rate of resonant quantum tunneling in high-spin molecules is not only field-dependent but also time-dependent. The relaxation-assisted resonant tunneling in high-spin molecules produces an abrupt magnetization change during relaxation. When the applied field is very close to the resonant field, a time-dependent interaction field gradually shifts the energies of different collective spin states, and magnetization tunneling is observed as two energies of the spin states coincide

  16. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  17. Design of small-molecule epigenetic modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiyappan, Boobalan

    2013-01-01

    The field of epigenetics has expanded rapidly to reveal multiple new targets for drug discovery. The functional elements of the epigenomic machinery can be catagorized as writers, erasers and readers, and together these elements control cellular gene expression and homeostasis. It is increasingly clear that aberrations in the epigenome can underly a variety of diseases, and thus discovery of small molecules that modulate the epigenome in a specific manner is a viable approach to the discovery of new therapeutic agents. In this Digest, the components of epigenetic control of gene expression will be briefly summarized, and efforts to identify small molecules that modulate epigenetic processes will be described. PMID:24300735

  18. Organic molecules with abnormal geometric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, Igor V

    2001-01-01

    Organic molecules, the structural parameters of which (carbon-carbon bond lengths, bond and torsion angles) differ appreciably from the typical most frequently encountered values, are discussed. Using many examples of 'record-breaking' molecules, the limits of structural distortions in carbon compounds and their unusual chemical properties are demonstrated. Particular attention is devoted to strained compounds not yet synthesised whose properties have been predicted using quantum-chemical calculations. Factors that ensure the stability of such compounds are outlined. The bibliography includes 358 references.

  19. Hadronic molecules with hidden charm and bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Feng-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the new structures observed since 2003 in experiments in the heavy quarkonium mass region, such as the X(3872 and Zc (3900, are rather close to certain thresholds, and thus can be good candidates of hadronic molecules, which are loose bound systems of hadrons. We will discuss the consequences of heavy quark symmetry for hadronic molecules with heavy quarks. We will also emphasize that the hadronic molecular component of a given structure can be directly probed in long-distance processes, while the short-distance processes are not sensitive to it.

  20. Imaging of tautomerism in a single molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwoński, Hubert; Stupperich, Clemens; Hartschuh, Achim; Sepioł, Jerzy; Meixner, Alfred; Waluk, Jacek

    2005-04-20

    Fluorescence imaging is used to visualize directly the transfer of two inner hydrogen atoms in single porphycene molecules. This reaction leads to a chemically equivalent but differently oriented structure and hence results in a rotation of the transition dipole moments. By probing single immobilized molecules with an azimuthally polarized laser beam in the focal spot of a confocal microscope we observe ring-like emission patterns, possible only for a chromophore with two nearly orthogonal transition dipole moments. Numerical simulations of the observed emission patterns yield a value of 72 degrees for the angle between the S0-S1 transition moments in the two tautomeric forms.

  1. The Interactions Between Nitrogen and Oxygen Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Willard E., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    Lippincott's delta-function model for atomic interactions is analyzed, both physically and mathematically, and extended, by differentiation between K- and L-shell electrons and the introduction of a variable parameter in the expression for the delta-function strength, to cover homonuclear molecules more complex than hydrogen. In addition, modifications are made which allow treatments of diatomic, heteronuclear molecules. This theory, in conjunction with a reasonably extensive study of resonance, dispersion, and configuration interaction phenomena, as well as the use of simple quantum mechanical arguments, is then applied to the N2-N2, N2-O2, and O2-O2 interactions.

  2. Chemical sputtering by impact of excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, P.S.; Reinhold, C.O.; Stuart, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    We study chemical sputtering of deuterated amorphous carbon surfaces by D atoms, vibrationally excited D 2 , and dissociating D 3 molecules, in a range of impact energies, 7.5 - 30 eV/D. We analyze the role of the internal state, i.e. the vibrationally excited and dissociating states of the neutral molecules resulting from above-surface neutralization of impacting molecular ions in typical sputtering experiments. The sputtering yields are shown to considerably increase with the internal vibrational energy at the lowest impact energies. By comparison of calculated and measured yields we draw conclusions regarding the possible mechanisms for neutralization. (authors)

  3. Short-range interaction between hydrogen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmahan, A. K.; Beck, H.; Krumhansl, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Recent calculations of the ground state energy of a system of four hydrogen atoms are reviewed with the aim of discerning the short-range repulsive part of the interaction potential between two hydrogen molecules. Extended-basis CI calculations which include a diffuse 2p orbital appear to be capable of determining the total interaction energy between to hydrogen molecules for any separation. Consistent results of such calculations suggest that the potential for intermolecular separations in the region from 1 to 2.5 A can now be specified to better than 10% with considerable confidence. Analytic fits to spherical averages of these results are presented.

  4. Quantum Mechanical Study of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R. C.

    1961-01-01

    This paper, following a brief introduction, is divided into five parts. Part I outlines the theory of the molecular orbital method for the ground, ionized and excited states of molecules. Part II gives a brief summary of the interaction integrals and their tabulation. Part III outlines an automatic program designed for the computation of various states of molecules. Part IV gives examples of the study of ground, ionized and excited states of CO, BH and N2 where the program of automatic computation and molecular integrals have been utilized. Part V enlists some special problems of Molecular Quantum Mechanics are being tackled at New York University.

  5. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  6. Dissociation of Vertical Semiconductor Diatomic Artificial Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, M.; Emperador, A.; Barranco, M.; Garcias, F.; Muraki, K.; Tarucha, S.; Austing, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dissociation of few-electron circular vertical semiconductor double quantum dot artificial molecules at 0T as a function of interdot distance. A slight mismatch introduced in the fabrication of the artificial molecules from nominally identical constituent quantum wells induces localization by offsetting the energy levels in the quantum dots by up to 2meV, and this plays a crucial role in the appearance of the addition energy spectra as a function of coupling strength particularly in the weak coupling limit

  7. The origin of small and large molecule behavior in the vibrational relaxation of highly excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    An explanation is proposed for the qualitatively different types of behavior that have been reported for the vibrational relaxation of highly excited diatomic and polyatomic molecules. It is argued that all of the diatomic molecules that have been studied in bulk relax adiabatically at room temperature. In contrast, large polyatomic molecules have low frequency modes which act at ''doorway'' modes for the rest of the molecules, producing an impulsive relaxation mechanism. The theoretical work of Nesbitt and Hynes showed that impulsive collisions result in an exponential decay of the average vibrational energy of a Morse oscillator, whereas adiabatic collisions produce nonexponential power law behavior. We propose that this result explains a large body of data for the vibrational relaxation of small and large molecules

  8. Strategy to discover diverse optimal molecules in the small molecule universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupakheti, Chetan; Virshup, Aaron; Yang, Weitao; Beratan, David N

    2015-03-23

    The small molecule universe (SMU) is defined as a set of over 10(60) synthetically feasible organic molecules with molecular weight less than ∼500 Da. Exhaustive enumerations and evaluation of all SMU molecules for the purpose of discovering favorable structures is impossible. We take a stochastic approach and extend the ACSESS framework ( Virshup et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013 , 135 , 7296 - 7303 ) to develop diversity oriented molecular libraries that can generate a set of compounds that is representative of the small molecule universe and that also biases the library toward favorable physical property values. We show that the approach is efficient compared to exhaustive enumeration and to existing evolutionary algorithms for generating such libraries by testing in the NKp fitness landscape model and in the fully enumerated GDB-9 chemical universe containing 3 × 10(5) molecules.

  9. DNAX-activating Protein 10 (DAP10) Membrane Adaptor Associates with Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) and Modulates the RAGE-triggered Signaling Pathway in Human Keratinocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Murata, Hitoshi; Aoyama, Yumi; Hibino, Toshihiko; Putranto, Endy Widya; Ruma, I. Made Winarsa; Inoue, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Kinoshita, Rie; Futami, Junichiro; Kataoka, Ken; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Huh, Nam-ho

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory, degenerative, and hyperproliferative diseases, including cancer. Previously, we revealed mechanisms of downstream signaling from ligand-activated RAGE, which recruits TIRAP/MyD88. Here, we showed that DNAX-activating protein 10 (DAP10), a transmembrane adaptor protein, also binds to RAGE. By artificial oligomerization of RAGE alone or RAGE-DAP10, we found that RAGE-DAP10 heterodimer formation resulted in a marked enhancement of Akt activation, whereas homomultimeric interaction of RAGE led to activation of caspase 8. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes exposed to S100A8/A9, a ligand for RAGE, at a nanomolar concentration mimicked the pro-survival response of RAGE-DAP10 interaction, although at a micromolar concentration, the cells mimicked the pro-apoptotic response of RAGE-RAGE. In transformed epithelial cell lines, A431 and HaCaT, in which endogenous DAP10 was overexpressed, and S100A8/A9, even at a micromolar concentration, led to cell growth and survival due to RAGE-DAP10 interaction. Functional blocking of DAP10 in the cell lines abrogated the Akt phosphorylation from S100A8/A9-activated RAGE, eventually leading to an increase in apoptosis. Finally, S100A8/A9, RAGE, and DAP10 were overexpressed in the psoriatic epidermis. Our findings indicate that the functional interaction between RAGE and DAP10 coordinately regulates S100A8/A9-mediated survival and/or apoptotic response of keratinocytes. PMID:25002577

  10. The microRNA mir-71 inhibits calcium signaling by targeting the TIR-1/Sarm1 adaptor protein to control stochastic L/R neuronal asymmetry in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Hsieh

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans left and right AWC olfactory neurons communicate to establish stochastic asymmetric identities, AWC(ON and AWC(OFF, by inhibiting a calcium-mediated signaling pathway in the future AWC(ON cell. NSY-4/claudin-like protein and NSY-5/innexin gap junction protein are the two parallel signals that antagonize the calcium signaling pathway to induce the AWC(ON fate. However, it is not known how the calcium signaling pathway is downregulated by nsy-4 and nsy-5 in the AWC(ON cell. Here we identify a microRNA, mir-71, that represses the TIR-1/Sarm1 adaptor protein in the calcium signaling pathway to promote the AWC(ON identity. Similar to tir-1 loss-of-function mutants, overexpression of mir-71 generates two AWC(ON neurons. tir-1 expression is downregulated through its 3' UTR in AWC(ON, in which mir-71 is expressed at a higher level than in AWC(OFF. In addition, mir-71 is sufficient to inhibit tir-1 expression in AWC through the mir-71 complementary site in the tir-1 3' UTR. Our genetic studies suggest that mir-71 acts downstream of nsy-4 and nsy-5 to promote the AWC(ON identity in a cell autonomous manner. Furthermore, the stability of mature mir-71 is dependent on nsy-4 and nsy-5. Together, these results provide insight into the mechanism by which nsy-4 and nsy-5 inhibit calcium signaling to establish stochastic asymmetric AWC differentiation.

  11. Evidence against roles for phorbol binding protein Munc13-1, ADAM adaptor Eve-1, or vesicle trafficking phosphoproteins Munc18 or NSF as phospho-state-sensitive modulators of phorbol/PKC-activated Alzheimer APP ectodomain shedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovestone Simon

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shedding of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP ectodomain can be accelerated by phorbol esters, compounds that act via protein kinase C (PKC or through unconventional phorbol-binding proteins such as Munc13-1. We have previously demonstrated that application of phorbol esters or purified PKC potentiates budding of APP-bearing secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and toward the plasma membrane where APP becomes a substrate for enzymes responsible for shedding, known collectively as α-secretase(s. However, molecular identification of the presumptive "phospho-state-sensitive modulators of ectodomain shedding" (PMES responsible for regulated shedding has been challenging. Here, we examined the effects on APP ectodomain shedding of four phorbol-sensitive proteins involved in regulation of vesicular membrane trafficking of APP: Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and Eve-1. Results Overexpression of either phorbol-sensitive wildtype Munc13-1 or phorbol-insensitive Munc13-1 H567K resulted in increased basal APP ectodomain shedding. However, in contrast to the report of Roßner et al (2004, phorbol ester-dependent APP ectodomain shedding from cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 wildtype was indistinguishable from that observed following application of phorbol to cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 H567K mutant. This pattern of similar effects on basal and stimulated APP shedding was also observed for Munc18 and NSF. Eve-1, an ADAM adaptor protein reported to be essential for PKC-regulated shedding of pro-EGF, was found to play no obvious role in regulated shedding of sAPPα. Conclusion Our results indicate that, in the HEK293 system, Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and EVE-1 fail to meet essential criteria for identity as PMES for APP.

  12. Evidence against roles for phorbol binding protein Munc13-1, ADAM adaptor Eve-1, or vesicle trafficking phosphoproteins Munc18 or NSF as phospho-state-sensitive modulators of phorbol/PKC-activated Alzheimer APP ectodomain shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikin, Annat F; Causevic, Mirsada; Pedrini, Steve; Benson, Lyndsey S; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Lovestone, Simon; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Mustelin, Tomas; Burgoyne, Robert D; Gandy, Sam

    2007-12-09

    Shedding of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) ectodomain can be accelerated by phorbol esters, compounds that act via protein kinase C (PKC) or through unconventional phorbol-binding proteins such as Munc13-1. We have previously demonstrated that application of phorbol esters or purified PKC potentiates budding of APP-bearing secretory vesicles at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and toward the plasma membrane where APP becomes a substrate for enzymes responsible for shedding, known collectively as alpha-secretase(s). However, molecular identification of the presumptive "phospho-state-sensitive modulators of ectodomain shedding" (PMES) responsible for regulated shedding has been challenging. Here, we examined the effects on APP ectodomain shedding of four phorbol-sensitive proteins involved in regulation of vesicular membrane trafficking of APP: Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and Eve-1. Overexpression of either phorbol-sensitive wildtype Munc13-1 or phorbol-insensitive Munc13-1 H567K resulted in increased basal APP ectodomain shedding. However, in contrast to the report of Rossner et al (2004), phorbol ester-dependent APP ectodomain shedding from cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 wildtype was indistinguishable from that observed following application of phorbol to cells overexpressing APP and Munc13-1 H567K mutant. This pattern of similar effects on basal and stimulated APP shedding was also observed for Munc18 and NSF. Eve-1, an ADAM adaptor protein reported to be essential for PKC-regulated shedding of pro-EGF, was found to play no obvious role in regulated shedding of sAPPalpha. Our results indicate that, in the HEK293 system, Munc13-1, Munc18, NSF, and EVE-1 fail to meet essential criteria for identity as PMES for APP.

  13. Organic- and molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The discovery of organic- and molecule-based magnets has led to design and synthesis of several families with magnetic ordering temperatures as high as ∼ 125° C. Examples of soft and hard magnets with coercivities as high as 27 kOe have also been reported. Examples from our laboratory of organic-based magnets ...

  14. Designer molecule for molecular recognition and photoinduced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amitava

    Designer molecule for molecular recognition and photoinduced energy/electron transfer processes p. A it. D. Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute (CSIR). Bhavnagar: 364002 Gujarat. Amitava Das. Bhavnagar: 364002, Gujarat. E-Mail: amitava@csmcri.org. IAS-2011 ...

  15. Controlled transport through a single molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Avijit; Heimbuch, Rene; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate how an electrode–molecule–electrode junction can be controllably opened and closed by careful tuning of the contacts' interspace and voltage. The molecule, an octanethiol, flips to bridge a ~1 nm interspace between substrate and scanning tunnelling microscope tip when an electric

  16. Molecule of the Month 7 -O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar is a. Professor of Chemistry at the Indian Institute of. Technology, Kanpur with research interests in main group organometallic chemistry, inorganic ring systems and inorganic polymers. V Chandrasekhar. One of the ...

  17. Organic-and molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The discovery of organic- and molecule-based magnets has led to design and synthesis of several families with magnetic ordering temperatures as high as ∼ 125° C. Examples of soft and hard magnets with coercivities as high as 27 kOe have also been reported. Examples from our laboratory of organic-based magnets ...

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Semiconductor; photocatalytic; photosensitive molecule; intramolecular charge transfer; TiO2/Y-zeolite. 1. Introduction. The consumption of energy has grown exponentially over the last two decades due to rapid industrialization and better living standards throughout the world. Among the various forms of energy available ...

  19. Assessing therapeutic potential of molecules: molecular property ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Module 1 is a repository of literature and related information available on the Mtb. Module 2 deals with the protein targetanalysis of the chosen disease area. Module 3 is the compound library consisting of 110.31 million unique molecules generated from public domain databases and custom designed search tools. Module ...

  20. Reflection of OH molecules from magnetic mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metsaelae, Markus; Gilijamse, Joop J.; Hoekstra, Steven; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; Meijer, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    We have reflected a Stark-decelerated beam of OH molecules under normal incidence from mirrors consisting of permanent magnets. Two different types of magnetic mirrors have been demonstrated. A long-range flat mirror made from a large disc magnet has been used to spatially focus the reflected beam

  1. Towards ultracold RbCa molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Michaela; Whitson, Hayley; Parsagian, Alexandria

    2012-06-01

    Ultracold heteronuclear molecules have seen increasing interest in the scientific community over the last few years. By controlling their ro-vibrational energy levels, ultracold molecules can be used for high precision spectroscopy, to study cold collisions with rich internal dynamics, as model systems for condensed matter physics, and as qubits in quantum information processing. We study the novel combination RbCa. In addition to a permanent electric dipole moment, it also possesses a permanent magnetic dipole moment. This makes it an ideal candidate to study strong long-range dipole-dipole interactions. We are currently in the process of adding a Ca MOT to our existing Rb MOT and will discuss our current and future efforts toward our goal of creating, for the first time, ultracold RbCa molecules. Molecules, once created, will be detected through resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI). We have also performed ab initio calculations to determine the electronic energy levels of RbCa, and calculated Franck-Condon factors between the ground and several excited states

  2. Kidney injury molecule-1 in renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, Femke; van Timmeren, Mirjan M.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Goor, Harry

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) is a marker for renal proximal tubular damage, the hallmark of virtually all proteinuric, toxic and ischaemic kidney diseases. KIM-1 has gained increasing interest because of its possible pathophysiological role in modulating tubular damage and repair. In this

  3. Writing with molecules on molecular printboards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespo biel, O.; Ravoo, B.J.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology aspires to create functional materials with characteristic dimensions of the order 1–100 nm. One requirement to make nanotechnology work is to precisely position molecules and nanoparticles on surfaces, so that they may be addressed and manipulated for bottom-up construction of

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, p-N,N-dimethyl- aminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing ...

  5. Molecule Matters-Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Molecule Matters - Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs). R Sarvanakumar S Sankararaman ... Author Affiliations. R Sarvanakumar1 S Sankararaman1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036, India.

  6. Laser Control of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Letkhov, V S

    2007-01-01

    This text treats laser light as a universal tool to control matter at the atomic and molecular level, one of the most exciting applications of lasers. Lasers can heat matter, cool atoms to ultra-low temperatures where they show quantum collective behaviour, and can act selectively on specific atoms and molecules for their detection and separation.

  7. Cluster ions and van der Waals molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    1992-01-01

    This review discusses current ideas in the physics and chemistry of cluster ions and Van der Waals molecules as well as presenting numerical data on their parameters and the processes involving them. It is also a detailed reference on basic data relating to many species.

  8. Isolation and detection of small RNA molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulneček, Jaroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, - (2007), s. 451-455 ISSN 1214-1178 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/1432 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : small RNA molecules * electrophoresis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. Molecules for Converting Sunlight into Electricity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 10. Molecules for Converting Sunlight into Electricity - Dye Sensitized Nanocrystalline-TiO2 based Photovoltaics. Ravi Mosurkal. General Article Volume 6 Issue 10 October 2001 pp 76-86 ...

  10. Organic molecules in translucent interstellar clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krełowski, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    Absorption spectra of translucent interstellar clouds contain many known molecular bands of CN, CH+, CH, OH, OH(+), NH, C2 and C3. Moreover, one can observe more than 400 unidentified absorption features, known as diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), commonly believed to be carried by complex, carbon-bearing molecules. DIBs have been observed in extragalactic sources as well. High S/N spectra allow to determine precisely the corresponding column densities of the identified molecules, rotational temperatures which differ significantly from object to object in cases of centrosymmetric molecular species, and even the (12)C/(13)C abundance ratio. Despite many laboratory based studies of possible DIB carriers, it has not been possible to unambiguously link these bands to specific species. An identification of DIBs would substantially contribute to our understanding of chemical processes in the diffuse interstellar medium. The presence of substructures inside DIB profiles supports the idea that DIBs are very likely features of gas phase molecules. So far only three out of more than 400 DIBs have been linked to specific molecules but none of these links was confirmed beyond doubt. A DIB identification clearly requires a close cooperation between observers and experimentalists. The review presents the state-of-the-art of the investigations of the chemistry of interstellar translucent clouds i.e. how far our observations are sufficient to allow some hints concerning the chemistry of, the most common in the Galaxy, translucent interstellar clouds, likely situated quite far from the sources of radiation (stars).

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, -N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing the ...

  12. Hierarchical organization in aggregates of protein molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer

    1997-01-01

    of the solution and the density of protein are varied shows the existence of specific growth processes resulting in different branch-like structures. The resulting structures are strongly influenced by the shape of each protein molecule. Lysozyme and ribonuclease are found to form spherical structures...

  13. Quantum interference experiments with complex organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenberger, S. I.

    2015-01-01

    Matter-wave interference with complex particles is a thriving field in experimental quantum physics. The quest for testing the quantum superposition principle with highly complex molecules has motivated the development of the Kapitza-Dirac-Talbot-Lau interferometer (KDTLI). This interferometer has enabled quantum interference with large organic molecules in an unprecedented mass regime. In this doctoral thesis I describe quantum superposition experiments which we were able to successfully realize with molecules of masses beyond 10 000 amu and consisting of more than 800 atoms. The typical de Broglie wavelengths of all particles in this thesis are in the order of 0.3-5 pm. This is significantly smaller than any molecular extension (nanometers) or the delocalization length in our interferometer (hundreds of nanometers). Many vibrational and rotational states are populated since the molecules are thermally highly excited (300-1000 K). And yet, high-contrast quantum interference patterns could be observed. The visibility and position of these matter-wave interference patterns is highly sensitive to external perturbations. This sensitivity has opened the path to extensive studies of the influence of internal molecular properties on the coherence of their associated matter waves. In addition, it enables a new approach to quantum-assisted metrology. Quantum interference imprints a high-contrast nano-structured density pattern onto the molecular beam which allows us to resolve tiny shifts and dephasing of the molecular beam. I describe how KDTL interferometry can be used to investigate a number of different molecular properties. We have studied vibrationally-induced conformational changes of floppy molecules and permanent electric dipole moments using matter-wave deflectometry in an external electric field. We have developed a new method for optical absorption spectroscopy which uses the recoil of the molecules upon absorption of individual photons. This allows us to

  14. Single Molecule Nanoelectrochemistry in Electrical Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Richard J; Higgins, Simon J

    2016-11-15

    It is now possible to reliably measure single molecule conductance in a wide variety of environments including organic liquids, ultrahigh vacuum, water, ionic liquids, and electrolytes. The most commonly used methods deploy scanning probe microscopes, mechanically formed break junctions, or lithographically formed nanogap contacts. Molecules are generally captured between a pair of facing electrodes, and the junction current response is measured as a function of bias voltage. Gating electrodes can also be added so that the electrostatic potential at the molecular bridge can be independently controlled by this third noncontacting electrode. This can also be achieved in an electrolytic environment using a four-electrode bipotentiostatic configuration, which allows independent electrode potential control of the two contacting electrodes. This is commonly realized using an electrochemical STM and enables single molecule electrical characterization as a function of electrode potential and redox state of the molecular bridge. This has emerged as a powerful tool in modern interfacial electrochemistry and nanoelectrochemistry for studying charge transport across single molecules as a function of electrode potential and the electrolytic environments. Such measurements are possible in electrolytes ranging from aqueous buffers to nonaqueous ionic liquids. In this Account, we illustrate a number of examples of single molecule electrical measurements under electrode potential control use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and demonstrate how these can help in the understanding of charge transport in single molecule junctions. Examples showing charge transport following phase coherent tunneling to incoherent charge hopping across redox active molecular bridges are shown. In the case of bipyridinium (or viologen) molecular wires, it is shown how electrochemical reduction leads to an increase of the single molecule conductance, which is controlled by the liquid electrochemical

  15. Prebiotic molecules and interstellar grain clumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, N.C.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that interstellar molecules detected by radioastronomical techniques in galactic clouds cover a wide range of types and complexities. Amongst the heaviest recently discovered is cyanodiacetylene. There have also been earlier detections of precursors to the simplest amino-acid, glycine and probably detections of polyoxymethylene polymers and co-polymers. A possible identification of organic molecules of even greater complexity is here discussed, together with implications for the commencement of biological activity. The large departures from thermodynamic equilibrium in the interstellar medium and the co-existence of solid grains, molecules, radicals, ions, and uv photons provide conditions that are ideal for production of 'exotic' molecular species. The effect of clumping of dust grains is discussed. The possible spectral identification of highly complex organic species in the interstellar medium is also discussed and reference is made to a property common to a wide class of such molecules, that is, an absorption band centered at 2,200 A. It is tempting to identify this feature with the well-known 2,200 A band of the interstellar extinction curve. It is thought that it may be tentatively concluded that the data so far obtained could be interpreted as independent new chemical evidence of the existence of composite grain clumps in the interstellar medium and in carbonaceous chondrites, and that these grain clumps probably include a significant mass fraction of highly complex organic pre-biotic molecules that could have led to the start and dispersal of biological activity on the Earth and elsewhere in the Galaxy. Processes of natural selection probably also played an important part, particularly in the production of self-replicable peptide chains. The problem of protection of pre-biotic material against external disruptive agencies, such as u/v light, is also discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  17. Protection of a PWR nuclear power stations against corrosion using hydrogen molecules to capture oxygen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahili, M.

    2004-01-01

    A protection method for the primary loops metals of nuclear power plants from corrosion was investigated. Hydrogen molecules were added to the primary circuit to eliminate oxygen molecules produced by radiolysis of coolant at the reactor core. The hydrogen molecules were produced by electrolyses of water and then added when the coolant water was passing through the primary coolant circuit. Thermodynamical process and the protection methods from corrosion were discussed, the discussion emphasized on the removal of oxygen molecules as one of the protection methods, and compared with other methods. The amount of hydrogen molecules needed for complete removal of oxygen was estimated in two cases: in the case without passing the water through the oxygen removal system, and in the case of passing water through the system. A pressurized water reactor VVER was chosen to be investigated in this study. The amount of hydrogen molecules was estimated so as to eliminate completely the oxygen molecules from coolant water. The estimated value was found to be less than the permissible range for coolant water for such type of reactors. A simulation study for interaction mechanism between hydrogen and oxygen molecules as water flowing in a tube similar to that of coolant water was performed with different water flow velocities. The interaction between the molecules of hydrogen and oxygen was described. The gas diffusion at the surface of the tube was found to play a major role in the interaction. A mathematical model was found to give full description of the change of oxygen concentration through the tube, as well as, to calculate the length of the tube where the concentration of oxygen reduced to few order of magnitude. (Author)

  18. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  19. Preface: Special Topic on Single-Molecule Biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E; Schuler, Benjamin

    2018-03-28

    Single-molecule measurements are now almost routinely used to study biological systems and processes. The scope of this special topic emphasizes the physics side of single-molecule observations, with the goal of highlighting new developments in physical techniques as well as conceptual insights that single-molecule measurements bring to biophysics. This issue also comprises recent advances in theoretical physical models of single-molecule phenomena, interpretation of single-molecule signals, and fundamental areas of statistical mechanics that are related to single-molecule observations. A particular goal is to illustrate the increasing synergy between theory, simulation, and experiment in single-molecule biophysics.

  20. Energy redistribution in diatomic molecules on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asscher, M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1984-04-01

    Translational and internal degrees of freedom of a scattered beam of NO molecules from a Pt(111) single crystal surface were measured as a function of scattering angle and crystal temperature in the range 450 to 1250K. None of the three degrees of freedom were found to fully accommodate to the crystal temperature, the translational degree being the most accommodated and the rotational degree of freedom the least. A precursor state model is suggested to account for the incomplete accommodation of translational and vibrational degrees of freedom as a function of crystal temperature and incident beam energy. The vibrational accommodation is further discussed in terms of a competition between desorption and vibrational excitation processes, thus providing valuable information on the interaction between vibrationally excited molecules and surfaces. Energy transfer into rotational degrees of freedom is qualitatively discussed

  1. Single molecule Studies of DNA Mismatch Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Dorothy A.; Weninger, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair involves is a widely conserved set of proteins that is essential to limit genetic drift in all organisms. The same system of proteins plays key roles in many cancer related cellular transactions in humans. Although the basic process has been reconstituted in vitro using purified components, many fundamental aspects of DNA mismatch repair remain hidden due in part to the complexity and transient nature of the interactions between the mismatch repair proteins and DNA substrates. Single molecule methods offer the capability to uncover these transient but complex interactions and allow novel insights into mechanisms that underlie DNA mismatch repair. In this review, we discuss applications of single molecule methodology including electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, particle tracking, FRET, and optical trapping to studies of DNA mismatch repair. These studies have led to formulation of mechanistic models of how proteins identify single base mismatches in the vast background of matched DNA and signal for their repair. PMID:24746644

  2. Coupled Cluster Theory for Large Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudin, Pablo

    transitions. The development of CC theory for large molecules is still in its infancy, especially regarding the calculation of frequency-dependent molecular properties. Many challenges remain to be solved and some of the ideas presented in this thesis will hopefully open the door to more innovative......This thesis describes the development of local approximations to coupled cluster (CC) theory for large molecules. Two different methods are presented, the divide–expand–consolidate scheme (DEC), for the calculation of ground state energies, and a local framework denoted LoFEx, for the calculation...... of electronic excitation energies and oscillator strengths. After an introduction to the relevant notions of electronic-structure theory, the principal aspects of DEC and LoFEx are summarized. For comparison, a selected review of the state-of-the-art is presented for each domain. This thesis should serve...

  3. Biomolecular analysis of elastic fibre molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart A; Raynal, Bertrand; Hodson, Nigel; Shuttleworth, Adrian; Kielty, Cay M

    2008-05-01

    Elastic fibres are macromolecular extracellular matrix assemblies that endow dynamic connective tissues such as arteries, lungs and skin with the property of elastic recoil. Here, we describe how we have purified elastic fibre molecules and then analysed them using a range of biochemical and biomolecular approaches. Such approaches have provided powerful insights into the complex hierarchical processes of extracellular matrix assembly. We outline molecular interaction and kinetics assays using Biacore, biophysical approaches such as multi-angle laser light scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation which provide information on molecular and macromolecular shape and mass in solution, the visualisation of molecules and assemblies using microscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy, and compositional analysis of macromolecular complexes using mass spectrometry. Data from these in vitro analytical approaches can be combined to develop powerful new models of elastic fibre assembly.

  4. Design of small molecule epigenetic modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiyappan, Boobalan; Woster, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    The field of epigenetics has expanded rapidly to reveal multiple new targets for drug discovery. The functional elements of the epigenomic machinery can be categorized as writers, erasers and readers, and together these elements control cellular gene expression and homeostasis. It is increasingly clear that aberrations in the epigenome can underly a variety of diseases, and thus discovery of small molecules that modulate the epigenome in a specific manner is a viable approach to the discovery of new therapeutic agents. In this Digest, the components of epigenetic control of gene expression will be briefly summarized, and efforts to identify small molecules that modulate epigenetic processes will be described. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural characterization of some substituted azolidine molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreocci, M.V.; Bossa, M.; Furlani, C.; Mattogno, G.; Zanoni, R.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome; Devillanova, F.A.; Verani, G.

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of a series of organic molecules of general formula RN - (CH 2 ) 2 - X - C = Y, which are also of interest in inorganic chemistry because of their properties as ligands towards metals, have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results suggest a general picture of atomic charge distribution within the investigated molecules, and allow an assessment of the effect of the different substituent groups X, Y, R (X = NR', O, S, CH 2 ; Y = O, S, Se; R, R' = H, alkyl) on the electronic structure of the ligands. Satisfactory correlation is found between experimental binding energies and computed CNDO/2 atomic charges, after correction for intramolecular Madelung potentials. (orig.)

  6. Is the Focus on ``Molecules'' Obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M.

    2013-06-01

    The technologies developed in analytical chemistry have defined in spectacular detail the properties of molecules. The field now faces enormously important and interesting problems of which molecules are only a part: for example, understanding the nature of life; helping to manage megacities, oceans, and atmospheres; and making health care (especially diagnostics) affordable and relevant. The emergence of these problems involving molecular systems raises the issue of how (and what) analytical chemistry should teach. Historically, it has been essential to chemistry in teaching the science of measurement. As complicated analytical techniques proliferate, it must consider how to balance teaching the uses of sophisticated devices and the fundamentals of analysis and measurement. This review (by an admiring but nonanalytical chemist) sketches the essential role of analytical methods—especially simple ones made up on the spot—in guiding research in new fields, with examples from self-assembled monolayers, soft lithography, paper diagnostics, and self-assembly; and suggests issues in teaching.

  7. Is the focus on "molecules" obsolete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M

    2013-01-01

    The technologies developed in analytical chemistry have defined in spectacular detail the properties of molecules. The field now faces enormously important and interesting problems of which molecules are only a part: for example, understanding the nature of life; helping to manage megacities, oceans, and atmospheres; and making health care (especially diagnostics) affordable and relevant. The emergence of these problems involving molecular systems raises the issue of how (and what) analytical chemistry should teach. Historically, it has been essential to chemistry in teaching the science of measurement. As complicated analytical techniques proliferate, it must consider how to balance teaching the uses of sophisticated devices and the fundamentals of analysis and measurement. This review (by an admiring but nonanalytical chemist) sketches the essential role of analytical methods--especially simple ones made up on the spot--in guiding research in new fields, with examples from self-assembled monolayers, soft lithography, paper diagnostics, and self-assembly; and suggests issues in teaching.

  8. Leukocyte Adhesion Molecules in Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousuke Noda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a systemic disease that causes a number of metabolic and physiologic abnormalities. One of the major microvascular complications of diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR, a leading cause of blindness in people over age 50. The mechanisms underlying the development of DR are not fully understood; however, extensive studies have recently implicated chronic, low-grade inflammation in the pathophysiology of DR. During inflammation leukocytes undergo sequential adhesive interactions with endothelial cells to migrate into the inflamed tissues, a process known as the “leukocyte recruitment cascade” which is orchestrated by precise adhesion molecule expression on the cell surface of leukocytes and the endothelium. This paper summarizes the recent clinical and preclinical works on the roles of leukocyte adhesion molecules in DR.

  9. Interstellar molecules: guides for new chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Swadhin K; Roesky, Herbert W

    2010-09-07

    Interstellar space is among the most remarkable chemical laboratories in the universe. The existence of many unstable species with low-valent main group elements in the interstellar medium inspired us to investigate the feasibility of laboratory synthesis of such unstable molecules. Particularly the lighter Group 14 element carbon plays a very important role in space astrochemistry. Low-valent carbon as well as silicon were detected in the interstellar environment. This article describes our recent efforts in developing amazing chemistry of heavier low-valent Group 14 elements. This study unravels that the disproportionation pathway of the low-valent Group 14 elements can be arrested by using a sterically protected ligand, then one can artificially generate the situation observed in the interstellar surrounding where the chance of disproportionation is very low as the molecules are extremely dilute.

  10. Automated imaging system for single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Charles; Runnheim, Rodney; Forrest, Daniel

    2012-09-18

    There is provided a high throughput automated single molecule image collection and processing system that requires minimal initial user input. The unique features embodied in the present disclosure allow automated collection and initial processing of optical images of single molecules and their assemblies. Correct focus may be automatically maintained while images are collected. Uneven illumination in fluorescence microscopy is accounted for, and an overall robust imaging operation is provided yielding individual images prepared for further processing in external systems. Embodiments described herein are useful in studies of any macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, peptides and proteins. The automated image collection and processing system and method of same may be implemented and deployed over a computer network, and may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interaction.

  11. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  12. Ultracold 4-center reactions of KRb molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Liu, Yu; Gheorghe, Andrei; Lin, Yen-Wei; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2017-04-01

    Chemical reactions at the fundamental level obey the laws of quantum mechanics. However, reactions are often far from the regime where the quantum motions of the reagents play an important role. Ultracold reactions of KRb is a good candidate, where the unusual 4-center reactions between two KRb molecules is expected to produce K2 and Rb2 molecules with 10 cm-1 (or 14.4 K) excess energy. To directly measure reaction products and to fully map out their quantum states, we are designing and constructing a novel quantum degenerate gas apparatus with the integration of REMPI and ion velocity mapping imaging. Our work aims to open up new directions for physical chemistry studies with AMO techniques.

  13. Organization of central synapses by adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallafuss, Alexandra; Constable, John R L; Washbourne, Philip

    2010-07-01

    Synapses are the primary means for transmitting information from one neuron to the next. They are formed during the development of the nervous system, and the formation of appropriate synapses is crucial for the establishment of neuronal circuits that underlie behavior and cognition. Understanding how synapses form and are maintained will allow us to address developmental disorders such as autism, mental retardation and possibly also psychological disorders. A number of biochemical and proteomic studies have revealed a diverse and vast assortment of molecules that are present at the synapse. It is now important to untangle this large array of proteins and determine how it assembles into a functioning unit. Here we focus on recent reports describing how synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with and organize the presynaptic and postsynaptic specializations of both excitatory and inhibitory central synapses. © The Authors (2010). Journal Compilation © Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen the development of a number of novel biophysical methods that allow the manipulation and study of individual biomolecules. The ability to monitor biological processes at this fundamental level of sensitivity has given rise to an improved understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Through the removal of ensemble averaging, distributions and fluctuations of molecular properties can be characterized, transient intermediates identified, and catalytic mechanisms elucidated. By applying forces on biomolecules while monitoring their activity, important information can be obtained on how proteins couple function to structure. The Handbook of Single-Molecule Biophysics provides an introduction to these techniques and presents an extensive discussion of the new biological insights obtained from them. Coverage includes: Experimental techniques to monitor and manipulate individual biomolecules The use of single-molecule techniques in super-resolution and functional imaging Single-molec...

  15. Intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND During the seminiferous epithelial cycle, restructuring takes places at the Sertoli–Sertoli and Sertoli–germ cell interface to accommodate spermatogonia/spermatogonial stem cell renewal via mitosis, cell cycle progression and meiosis, spermiogenesis and spermiation since developing germ cells, in particular spermatids, move ‘up and down’ the seminiferous epithelium. Furthermore, preleptotene spermatocytes differentiated from type B spermatogonia residing at the basal compartment must traverse the blood–testis barrier (BTB) to enter the adluminal compartment to prepare for meiosis at Stage VIII of the epithelial cycle, a process also accompanied by the release of sperm at spermiation. These cellular events that take place at the opposite ends of the epithelium are co-ordinated by a functional axis designated the apical ectoplasmic specialization (ES)—BTB—basement membrane. However, the regulatory molecules that co-ordinate cellular events in this axis are not known. METHODS Literature was searched at http://www.pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and the regulation of this axis. RESULTS Members of the ICAM family, namely ICAM-1 and ICAM-2, and the biologically active soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) are the likely regulatory molecules that co-ordinate these events. sICAM-1 and ICAM-1 have antagonistic effects on the Sertoli cell tight junction-permeability barrier, involved in Sertoli cell BTB restructuring, whereas ICAM-2 is restricted to the apical ES, regulating spermatid adhesion during the epithelial cycle. Studies in other epithelia/endothelia on the role of the ICAM family in regulating cell movement are discussed and this information has been evaluated and integrated into studies of these proteins in the testis to create a hypothetical model, depicting how ICAMs regulate junction restructuring events during spermatogenesis. CONCLUSIONS ICAMs are crucial

  16. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  17. Electron correlation in molecules and condensed phases

    CERN Document Server

    March, N H

    1996-01-01

    This reference describes the latest research on correlation effects in the multicenter problems of atoms, molecules, and solids The author utilizes first- and second-order matrices, including the important observable electron density rho(r), and the Green function for discussing quantum computer simulations With its focus on concepts and theories, this volume will benefit experimental physicists, materials scientists, and physical and inorganic chemists as well as graduate students

  18. Isatin, a versatile molecule: studies in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.iq@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Isatin is a small, versatile and widely applicable pharmacological molecule. These characteristics make isatin and its derivatives attractive to many research groups as resources for chemical and pharmacological studies. Although it has a relatively simple structure, isatin is a useful chemical scaffold for a variety of chemical transformations. This article discusses several studies performed by Brazilian groups, including investigations of its structural changes, biological assay designs and new methods for the synthesis of isatin. (author)

  19. Interstellar Molecules Their Laboratory and Interstellar Habitat

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Koichi M T

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the astrophysics and spectroscopy of the interstellar molecules. In the introduction, overview and history of interstellar observations are described in order to help understanding how the modern astrophysics and molecular spectroscopy have been developed interactively. The recent progress in the study of this field, after the 4th Cologne-Bonn-Zermatt symposium 2003 is briefly summarized. Furthermore, the basic knowledge of molecular spectroscopy, which is essential to correctly comprehend the astrophysical observations, is presented in a compact form.

  20. Vascular adhesion molecules in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Dekker, N P; MacPhail, L A; Lozada-Nur, F; McCalmont, T H

    1996-06-01

    Because recruitment and retention of lymphoid cells appear to be critical components of the pathogenesis of lichen planus, we have compared the expression and distribution of a panel of vascular adhesion molecules (ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, CD34) and leukocyte adhesion molecule ligands (LFA-1, Mac-1, VLA4, L-selectin) in biopsies of this disease. Frozen sections of 12 clinically and histologically confirmed cases of lichen planus and 9 normal control tissues were evaluated immunohistochemically with a standard 1-day avidin-biotin peroxidase technique. Staining intensity of vascular endothelium was evaluated semiquantitatively. Three microvascular zones or compartments were defined and evaluated separately. Generally, different staining patterns were observed in association with the various endothelium-associated adhesion molecules. In normal controls, PECAM was intensely expressed and VCAM-1 was weakly expressed. Intermediate staining was associated with ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and CD34. Staining within the three microvascular compartments frequently showed variations in intensity. In lichen planus, increased staining for ELAM-1, P-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 was evident in one or more of the microvascular compartments. In the subepithelial vascular compartment where the infiltrate was the most dense, VCAM-1 appeared to show the greatest positive change. Almost all cells in the lichen planus infiltrates stained positive for ICAM-1, L-selectin, LFA-1, and VLA4, and large numbers of cells also exhibited VCAM-1, PECAM-1, and Mac-1 immunoreactivity. It appears that upregulation of ELAM-1, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 (especially by endothelial cells in the subepithelial vascular plexus) could play a role in the pathogenesis of lichen planus. The expression of leukocyte receptors L-selectin, LFA-1, and VLA4 by most of the cells in the lichen planus infiltrate suggest that these molecules may be responsible for recruitment as well as retention in the active