WorldWideScience

Sample records for adaptive radiation

  1. Adaptive Radiation for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Gomez

    2011-01-01

    need to spare surrounding critical structures. Evolving radiotherapy technologies, such as four-dimensional (4D image-based motion management, daily on-board imaging and adaptive radiotherapy based on volumetric images over the course of radiotherapy, have enabled us to deliver higher dose to target while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. The image-guided radiotherapy adapted to changes of motion and anatomy has made the radiotherapy more precise and allowed ablative dose delivered to the target using novel treatment approaches such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, and proton therapy in lung cancer, techniques used to be considered very sensitive to motion change. Future clinical trials using real time tracking and biological adaptive radiotherapy based on functional images are proposed.

  2. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  3. Tissues may adapt to radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-08-01

    French scientists discovered radioactivity and developed vaccination, so it is perhaps appropriate that a prominent French cancer specialist should be promoting the idea of a radiation vaccination effect - or radiation adaptation, as he prefers to call it. Raymond Latarjet, of the Institut Curie in Paris, maintains that recent studies at the gene level are showing evidence that with low doses of radiation, there is time for a cell repair mechanism to take effect, and that this seems to provide some protection against subsequent exposure to high doses. He cited experiments in his laboratory in which exposure to a dose of 4 Gy (400 rad) had, predictably, produced a large number of gene mutations in a specimen, but the number of mutations was less than half that number in a specimen that had been exposed to a dose of 0.02 Gy some six hours before exposure to the 4 Gy.

  4. The tale of the finch: adaptive radiation and behavioural flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Tebbich, Sabine; Sterelny, Kim; Teschke, Irmgard

    2010-01-01

    Darwin's finches are a classic example of adaptive radiation. The ecological diversity of the Galápagos in part explains that radiation, but the fact that other founder species did not radiate suggests that other factors are also important. One hypothesis attempting to identify the extra factor is the flexible stem hypothesis, connecting individual adaptability to species richness. According to this hypothesis, the ancestral finches were flexible and therefore able to adapt to the new and har...

  5. Adaptive radiation versus 'radiation' and 'explosive diversification': why conceptual distinctions are fundamental to understanding evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givnish, Thomas J

    2015-07-01

    Adaptive radiation is the rise of a diversity of ecological roles and role-specific adaptations within a lineage. Recently, some researchers have begun to use 'adaptive radiation' or 'radiation' as synonymous with 'explosive species diversification'. This essay aims to clarify distinctions between these concepts, and the related ideas of geographic speciation, sexual selection, key innovations, key landscapes and ecological keys. Several examples are given to demonstrate that adaptive radiation and explosive diversification are not the same phenomenon, and that focusing on explosive diversification and the analysis of phylogenetic topology ignores much of the rich biology associated with adaptive radiation, and risks generating confusion about the nature of the evolutionary forces driving species diversification. Some 'radiations' involve bursts of geographic speciation or sexual selection, rather than adaptive diversification; some adaptive radiations have little or no effect on speciation, or even a negative effect. Many classic examples of 'adaptive radiation' appear to involve effects driven partly by geographic speciation, species' dispersal abilities, and the nature of extrinsic dispersal barriers; partly by sexual selection; and partly by adaptive radiation in the classical sense, including the origin of traits and invasion of adaptive zones that result in decreased diversification rates but add to overall diversity.

  6. Delayed radiation effect on animals: adaptive reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adaptive response by micronuclei test was studied in mole-voles (Ellobius talpinus) from two populations differing in degree of radioactive contamination. It was found the significant adaptive response in animals living the left coast of the Techa River, as compared to the reference one. Some convincing evidences of the adaptive rearrangements and higher radioresistance of animals inhabiting the radiocontaminated zone during a long period and in the course of changing generations was obtained at the example of radiosensitive specie. (authors)

  7. Fine-scale recombination and adaptive radiation could be linked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodilis, Josselin

    2013-09-15

    The difficult reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the major surface protein gene oprF highlighted an adaptive radiation in the Pseudomonas fluorescens group. The recent work of Hao (2013) showed that partial recombination events in oprF gene occurred specifically in a P. fluorescens lineage under ecological niche segregation. So, I suggest that identification of lineage-specific fine-scale recombination may be a way to detect putative adaptive radiation in bacteria. PMID:23774687

  8. Phylogenetic context determines the role of competition in adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiaqi; Slattery, Matthew R; Yang, Xian; Jiang, Lin

    2016-06-29

    Understanding ecological mechanisms regulating the evolution of biodiversity is of much interest to ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Adaptive radiation constitutes an important evolutionary process that generates biodiversity. Competition has long been thought to influence adaptive radiation, but the directionality of its effect and associated mechanisms remain ambiguous. Here, we report a rigorous experimental test of the role of competition on adaptive radiation using the rapidly evolving bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 interacting with multiple bacterial species that differed in their phylogenetic distance to the diversifying bacterium. We showed that the inhibitive effect of competitors on the adaptive radiation of P. fluorescens decreased as their phylogenetic distance increased. To explain this phylogenetic dependency of adaptive radiation, we linked the phylogenetic distance between P. fluorescens and its competitors to their niche and competitive fitness differences. Competitive fitness differences, which showed weak phylogenetic signal, reduced P. fluorescens abundance and thus diversification, whereas phylogenetically conserved niche differences promoted diversification. These results demonstrate the context dependency of competitive effects on adaptive radiation, and highlight the importance of past evolutionary history for ongoing evolutionary processes. PMID:27335414

  9. Enzo+Moray: Radiation Hydrodynamics Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations with Adaptive Ray Tracing

    CERN Document Server

    Wise, John H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological hydrodynamics code, Enzo. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilised to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole (BH) feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large timesteps and poor sampling, therefore we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. (2006, 2009). We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionisation front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities, and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an...

  10. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  11. How relevant to radiation protection is the adaptive response mechanism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence that the phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) which results from a low dose exposure could modify the risk of a subsequent radiation exposure, and conceivably could even provide a net benefit rather than the putative radiation detriment at low doses. The AR has been widely observed in human and other mammalian cells exposed to low doses and low-dose rates. The phenomenon has been demonstrated at the level of one track per cell, the lowest insult a cell can receive. The AR to radiation has been shown to: (i) protect against the DNA damaging effects of radiation and many chemical carcinogens; (ii) increase the probability that improperly repaired cells will die by apoptosis, thereby reducing risk to the whole organism; (iii) suppress both spontaneous- and radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in vitro; and (iv) reduce life-shortening in mice that develop myeloid leukemia as a result of a radiation exposure. It remains unclear, however, if the AR will be relevant to either risk assessment or radiation protection. There is currently no evidence of AR's influence on the incidence of radiogenic cancer in vivo although recent data indicate that adapting doses could lead to reduced risk in animal or human populations. Currently the existing dose control and dose management programs attempt to limit or eliminate even very low exposures, without evidence that such an approach has economic and societal benefits. Indeed, if adaptation from exposure to low doses provides the same responses in vivo as have been shown in vitro, then the current approach to protection against low doses may be counterproductive However, the demonstrated principles of the adaptive response to radiation in vitro will not likely influence the long held current formulation of radiation protection practices until the biological action of accumulated low doses of radiation in vivo and its impact on the modulation of radiation carcinogenesis are better understood. (author)

  12. Fecundity increase supports adaptive radiation hypothesis in spider web evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Todd A. Blackledge; Coddington, Jonathan A.; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms driving adaptive radiations is key to explaining the diversity of life. The extreme reliance of spiders upon silk for survival provides an exceptional system in which to link patterns of diversification to adaptive changes in silk use. Most of the world’s 41,000 species of spiders belong to two apical lineages of spiders that exhibit quite different silk ecologies, distinct from their ancestors. Orb spiders spin highly stereotyped webs that are suspended in air and ...

  13. Genotypic sex determination enabled adaptive radiations of extinct marine reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, Chris L; Janes, Daniel E; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark

    2009-09-17

    Adaptive radiations often follow the evolution of key traits, such as the origin of the amniotic egg and the subsequent radiation of terrestrial vertebrates. The mechanism by which a species determines the sex of its offspring has been linked to critical ecological and life-history traits but not to major adaptive radiations, in part because sex-determining mechanisms do not fossilize. Here we establish a previously unknown coevolutionary relationship in 94 amniote species between sex-determining mechanism and whether a species bears live young or lays eggs. We use that relationship to predict the sex-determining mechanism in three independent lineages of extinct Mesozoic marine reptiles (mosasaurs, sauropterygians and ichthyosaurs), each of which is known from fossils to have evolved live birth. Our results indicate that each lineage evolved genotypic sex determination before acquiring live birth. This enabled their pelagic radiations, where the relatively stable temperatures of the open ocean constrain temperature-dependent sex determination in amniote species. Freed from the need to move and nest on land, extreme physical adaptations to a pelagic lifestyle evolved in each group, such as the fluked tails, dorsal fins and wing-shaped limbs of ichthyosaurs. With the inclusion of ichthyosaurs, mosasaurs and sauropterygians, genotypic sex determination is present in all known fully pelagic amniote groups (sea snakes, sirenians and cetaceans), suggesting that this mode of sex determination and the subsequent evolution of live birth are key traits required for marine adaptive radiations in amniote lineages. PMID:19759619

  14. The genomic substrate for adaptive radiation in African cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Brawand, David; Russell, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Cichlid fishes are famous for large, diverse and replicated adaptive radiations in the Great Lakes of East Africa. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cichlid phenotypic diversity, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of five lineages of African cichlids: the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), an ancestral lineage with low diversity; and four members of the East African lineage: Neolamprologus brichardi/pulcher (older radiation, Lake Tanganyika), Metriaclima zebra (rec...

  15. ENZO+MORAY: radiation hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement simulations with adaptive ray tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, John H.; Abel, Tom

    2011-07-01

    We describe a photon-conserving radiative transfer algorithm, using a spatially-adaptive ray-tracing scheme, and its parallel implementation into the adaptive mesh refinement cosmological hydrodynamics code ENZO. By coupling the solver with the energy equation and non-equilibrium chemistry network, our radiation hydrodynamics framework can be utilized to study a broad range of astrophysical problems, such as stellar and black hole feedback. Inaccuracies can arise from large time-steps and poor sampling; therefore, we devised an adaptive time-stepping scheme and a fast approximation of the optically-thin radiation field with multiple sources. We test the method with several radiative transfer and radiation hydrodynamics tests that are given in Iliev et al. We further test our method with more dynamical situations, for example, the propagation of an ionization front through a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, time-varying luminosities and collimated radiation. The test suite also includes an expanding H II region in a magnetized medium, utilizing the newly implemented magnetohydrodynamics module in ENZO. This method linearly scales with the number of point sources and number of grid cells. Our implementation is scalable to 512 processors on distributed memory machines and can include the radiation pressure and secondary ionizations from X-ray radiation. It is included in the newest public release of ENZO.

  16. Are Organisms Adapting to Ionizing Radiation at Chernobyl?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Numerous organisms have shown an ability to survive and reproduce under low-dose ionizing radiation arising from natural background radiation or from nuclear accidents. In a literature review, we found a total of 17 supposed cases of adaptation, mostly based on common garden experiments with organisms only deriving from typically two or three sampling locations. We only found one experimental study showing evidence of improved resistance to radiation. Finally, we examined studies for the presence of hormesis (i.e., superior fitness at low levels of radiation compared with controls and high levels of radiation), but found no evidence to support its existence. We conclude that rigorous experiments based on extensive sampling from multiple sites are required. PMID:26868287

  17. Frequency adaptation for enhanced radiation force amplitude in dynamic elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouared, Abderrahmane; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Kazemirad, Siavash; Gaboury, Louis; Robidoux, André; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-08-01

    In remote dynamic elastography, the amplitude of the generated displacement field is directly related to the amplitude of the radiation force. Therefore, displacement improvement for better tissue characterization requires the optimization of the radiation force amplitude by increasing the push duration and/or the excitation amplitude applied on the transducer. The main problem of these approaches is that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) thresholds for medical applications and transducer limitations may be easily exceeded. In the present study, the effect of the frequency used for the generation of the radiation force on the amplitude of the displacement field was investigated. We found that amplitudes of displacements generated by adapted radiation force sequences were greater than those generated by standard nonadapted ones (i.e., single push acoustic radiation force impulse and supersonic shear imaging). Gains in magnitude were between 20 to 158% for in vitro measurements on agar-gelatin phantoms, and 170 to 336% for ex vivo measurements on a human breast sample, depending on focus depths and attenuations of tested samples. The signal-to-noise ratio was also improved more than 4-fold with adapted sequences. We conclude that frequency adaptation is a complementary technique that is efficient for the optimization of displacement amplitudes. This technique can be used safely to optimize the deposited local acoustic energy without increasing the risk of damaging tissues and transducer elements.

  18. Radiation protection concepts review with an adapted quiz commercial game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before a new employee starts working at EMBRARAD under a large irradiation operator supervision, he has to attend the first radiation protection training. After that all radiation protection subjects are revised every six months. In that half-yearly training the employees are chosen randomly to explain radiation protection subjects to other participants under an instructor supervision. After some years attending the same training, employees do not have motivation to participate in this kind of periodic event due to the same issues covered. Therefore something should be made to revival their interest and motivation to take part in this periodic training. The way chose was adapted a commercial game to revised radiation protection subjects and included it in the periodic training. The game was well accepted by the employees, it caused a competition among them because everybody wanted to win the game and consequently stimulated them to study. (author)

  19. Adaptation of radiation shielding code to space environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Koichi; Hara, Akihisa (Hazama Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Recently, the trend to the development of space has heightened. To the development of space, many problems are related, and as one of them, there is the protection from cosmic ray. The cosmic ray is the radiation having ultrahigh energy, and there was not the radiation shielding design code that copes with cosmic ray so far. Therefore, the high energy radiation shielding design code for accelerators was improved so as to cope with the peculiarity that cosmic ray possesses. Moreover, the calculation of the radiation dose equivalent rate in the moon base to which the countermeasures against cosmic ray were taken was simulated by using the improved code. As the important countermeasures for the safety protection from radiation, the covering with regolith is carried out, and the effect of regolith was confirmed by using the improved code. Galactic cosmic ray, solar flare particles, radiation belt, the adaptation of the radiation shielding code HERMES to space environment, the improvement of the three-dimensional hadron cascade code HETCKFA-2 and the electromagnetic cascade code EGS 4-KFA, and the cosmic ray simulation are reported. (K.I.).

  20. Adaptive radiation-induced epigenetic alterations mitigated by antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal, Autumn J.; Dolinoy, Dana C; Huang, Dale; Skaar, David A.; Weinhouse, Caren; Jirtle, Randy L

    2013-01-01

    Humans are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) from a number of environmental and medical sources. In addition to inducing genetic mutations, there is concern that LDIR may also alter the epigenome. Such heritable effects early in life can either be positively adaptive or result in the enhanced formation of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Herein, we show that LDIR significantly increased DNA methylation at the viable yellow agouti (Avy) locus in a sex-specific man...

  1. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, A.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduce radiation-induced toxicities. First, the clinically implemented adaptive strategy was described and the dosimetric consequences of this adaptive strategy compared to conventional non-adaptive rad...

  2. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and bleomycin (BLM) in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with a control population. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment by IR or by BLM. However, no correlation between the results obtained with both treatments was observed. A great heterogeneity in the frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM was observed. The study of the influence of different harvesting times showed that there was no correlation with the frequencies of chromatid breaks. Our results indicate that the use of BLM to detect adaptive response has several difficulties at the individual level. (author)

  3. Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Planning for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yujiao [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Fan [Occupational and Environmental Safety Office, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing, E-mail: jing.cai@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of adaptive planning on lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Forty of 66 consecutive lung SBRT patients were selected for a retrospective adaptive planning study. CBCT images acquired at each fraction were used for treatment planning. Adaptive plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original CT-based plan, with the goal to achieve comparable comformality index (CI). For each patient, 2 cumulative plans, nonadaptive plan (P{sub NON}) and adaptive plan (P{sub ADP}), were generated and compared for the following organs-at-risks (OARs): cord, esophagus, chest wall, and the lungs. Dosimetric comparison was performed between P{sub NON} and P{sub ADP} for all 40 patients. Correlations were evaluated between changes in dosimetric metrics induced by adaptive planning and potential impacting factors, including tumor-to-OAR distances (d{sub T-OAR}), initial internal target volume (ITV{sub 1}), ITV change (ΔITV), and effective ITV diameter change (Δd{sub ITV}). Results: 34 (85%) patients showed ITV decrease and 6 (15%) patients showed ITV increase throughout the course of lung SBRT. Percentage ITV change ranged from −59.6% to 13.0%, with a mean (±SD) of −21.0% (±21.4%). On average of all patients, P{sub ADP} resulted in significantly (P=0 to .045) lower values for all dosimetric metrics. Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} was found to correlate with changes in dose to 5 cc (ΔD5cc) of esophagus (r=0.61) and dose to 30 cc (ΔD30cc) of chest wall (r=0.81). Stronger correlations between Δd{sub ITV}/d{sub T-OAR} and ΔD30cc of chest wall were discovered for peripheral (r=0.81) and central (r=0.84) tumors, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric effects of adaptive lung SBRT planning depend upon target volume changes and tumor-to-OAR distances. Adaptive lung SBRT can potentially reduce dose to adjacent OARs if patients present large tumor volume shrinkage during the treatment.

  4. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost

  5. Conserved sex chromosomes across adaptively radiated Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Altmanová, Marie; Pokorná, Martina; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2014-07-01

    Vertebrates possess diverse sex-determining systems, which differ in evolutionary stability among particular groups. It has been suggested that poikilotherms possess more frequent turnovers of sex chromosomes than homoiotherms, whose effective thermoregulation can prevent the emergence of the sex reversals induced by environmental temperature. Squamate reptiles used to be regarded as a group with an extensive variability in sex determination; however, we document how the rather old radiation of lizards from the genus Anolis, known for exceptional ecomorphological variability, was connected with stability in sex chromosomes. We found that 18 tested species, representing most of the phylogenetic diversity of the genus, share the gene content of their X chromosomes. Furthermore, we discovered homologous sex chromosomes in species of two genera (Sceloporus and Petrosaurus) from the family Phrynosomatidae, serving here as an outgroup to Anolis. We can conclude that the origin of sex chromosomes within iguanas largely predates the Anolis radiation and that the sex chromosomes of iguanas remained conserved for a significant part of their evolutionary history. Next to therian mammals and birds, Anolis lizards therefore represent another adaptively radiated amniote clade with conserved sex chromosomes. We argue that the evolutionary stability of sex-determining systems may reflect an advanced stage of differentiation of sex chromosomes rather than thermoregulation strategy. PMID:24433436

  6. Adaptive phenotypic plasticity in the Midas cichlid fish pharyngeal jaw and its relevance in adaptive radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzburger Walter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution and its role in the diversification of organisms is a central topic in evolutionary biology. A neglected factor during the modern evolutionary synthesis, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, more recently attracted the attention of many evolutionary biologists and is now recognized as an important ingredient in both population persistence and diversification. The traits and directions in which an ancestral source population displays phenotypic plasticity might partly determine the trajectories in morphospace, which are accessible for an adaptive radiation, starting from the colonization of a novel environment. In the case of repeated colonizations of similar environments from the same source population this "flexible stem" hypothesis predicts similar phenotypes to arise in repeated subsequent radiations. The Midas Cichlid (Amphilophus spp. in Nicaragua has radiated in parallel in several crater-lakes seeded by populations originating from the Nicaraguan Great Lakes. Here, we tested phenotypic plasticity in the pharyngeal jaw of Midas Cichlids. The pharyngeal jaw apparatus of cichlids, a second set of jaws functionally decoupled from the oral ones, is known to mediate ecological specialization and often differs strongly between sister-species. Results We performed a common garden experiment raising three groups of Midas cichlids on food differing in hardness and calcium content. Analyzing the lower pharyngeal jaw-bones we find significant differences between diet groups qualitatively resembling the differences found between specialized species. Observed differences in pharyngeal jaw expression between groups were attributable to the diet's mechanical resistance, whereas surplus calcium in the diet was not found to be of importance. Conclusions The pharyngeal jaw apparatus of Midas Cichlids can be expressed plastically if stimulated mechanically during feeding. Since this trait is commonly differentiated - among

  7. Adaptation of the present concept of dosimetric radiation protection quantities for external radiation to radiation protection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present concept of dosimetric radiation protection quantities for external radiation is reviewed. For everyday application of the concept some adaptations are recommended. The check of the compliance with dose limits should be performed either by the comparison with values of the respective operational quantities directly or by the calculation of the protection quantity by means of the operational quantity, the appertaining conversion coefficient and additional information of the radiation field. Only four operational quantities are regarded to be sufficient for most applications in radiation protection practice. The term equivalent should be used in the connection dose equivalent only. Proposals are made for names of frequently used operational quantities which are denoted up to now by symbols only. (authors)

  8. Hybrid Adaptive Ray-Moment Method (HARM$^2$): A Highly Parallel Method for Radiation Hydrodynamics on Adaptive Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, Anna L; Oishi, Jeffrey S; Lee, Aaron T; Klein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    We present a highly-parallel multi-frequency hybrid radiation hydrodynamics algorithm that combines a spatially-adaptive long characteristics method for the radiation field from point sources with a moment method that handles the diffuse radiation field produced by a volume-filling fluid. Our Hybrid Adaptive Ray-Moment Method (HARM$^2$) operates on patch-based adaptive grids, is compatible with asynchronous time stepping, and works with any moment method. In comparison to previous long characteristics methods, we have greatly improved the parallel performance of the adaptive long-characteristics method by developing a new completely asynchronous and non-blocking communication algorithm. As a result of this improvement, our implementation achieves near-perfect scaling up to $\\mathcal{O}(10^3)$ processors on distributed memory machines. We present a series of tests to demonstrate the accuracy and performance of the method.

  9. From dinosaurs to modern bird diversity: extending the time scale of adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Daniel; Morlon, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    What explains why some groups of organisms, like birds, are so species rich? And what explains their extraordinary ecological diversity, ranging from large, flightless birds to small migratory species that fly thousand of kilometers every year? These and similar questions have spurred great interest in adaptive radiation, the diversification of ecological traits in a rapidly speciating group of organisms. Although the initial formulation of modern concepts of adaptive radiation arose from consideration of the fossil record, rigorous attempts to identify adaptive radiation in the fossil record are still uncommon. Moreover, most studies of adaptive radiation concern groups that are less than 50 million years old. Thus, it is unclear how important adaptive radiation is over temporal scales that span much larger portions of the history of life. In this issue, Benson et al. test the idea of a "deep-time" adaptive radiation in dinosaurs, compiling and using one of the most comprehensive phylogenetic and body-size datasets for fossils. Using recent phylogenetic statistical methods, they find that in most clades of dinosaurs there is a strong signal of an "early burst" in body-size evolution, a predicted pattern of adaptive radiation in which rapid trait evolution happens early in a group's history and then slows down. They also find that body-size evolution did not slow down in the lineage leading to birds, hinting at why birds survived to the present day and diversified. This paper represents one of the most convincing attempts at understanding deep-time adaptive radiations.

  10. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.A.J. van de Schoot

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and reduc

  11. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future

  12. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of both ionizing radiation (IR) (2 Gy of γ rays) and bleomycin (BLM, 0,03 U/ml), in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with controls. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment either by IR or by BLM. When a comparison is made between the cytogenetic effects of both treatments, no correlation was observed at the individual level. On the other hand, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by a challenge dose of IR were negatively correlated with the occupationally received doses during the last three years. This correlation was not observed after the challenge treatment of BLM. Moreover, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by IR treatment were homogeneous. This is not the case of the individual frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM, where a great heterogeneity was observed. (authors)

  13. Cryptic adaptive radiation in tropical forest trees in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Yohan; Hopkins, Helen C F; Rigault, Frédéric; Jaffré, Tanguy; Stacy, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    The causes of the species richness of tropical trees are poorly understood, in particular the roles of ecological factors such as soil composition. The nickel(Ni)-hyperaccumulating tree genus Geissois (Cunoniaceae) from the South-west Pacific was chosen as a model of diversification on different substrates. Here, we investigated the leaf element compositions, spatial distributions and phylogeny of all species of Geissois occurring on New Caledonia. We found that New Caledonian Geissois descended from a single colonist and diversified relatively quickly into 13 species. Species on ultramafic and nonultramafic substrates showed contrasting patterns of leaf element composition and range overlap. Those on nonultramafic substrates were largely sympatric but had distinct leaf element compositions. By contrast, species on ultramafic substrates showed similar leaf element composition, but occurred in many cases exclusively in allopatry. Further, earlier work showed that at least three out of these seven species use different molecules to bind Ni. Geissois qualifies as a cryptic adaptive radiation, and may be the first such example in a lineage of tropical forest trees. Variation in biochemical strategies for coping with both typical and adverse soil conditions may help to explain the diversification and coexistence of tropical forest trees on similar soil types.

  14. Adaptive Multichannel Radiation Sensors for Plant Parameter Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, Hannes; Remmler, Paul; Schuhmann, Gudrun; Lausch, Angela; Merbach, Ines; Assing, Martin; Mollenhauer, Olaf; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrients such as nitrogen are playing a key role in the plant life cycle. They are much needed for chlorophyll production and other plant cell components. Therefore, the crop yield is strongly affected by plant nutrient status. Due to the spatial and temporal variability of soil characteristics or swaying agricultural inputs the plant development varies within a field. Thus, the determination of these fluctuations in the plant development is valuable for a detection of stress conditions and optimization of fertilisation due to its high environmental and economic impact. Plant parameters play crucial roles in plant growth estimation and prediction since they are used as indicators of plant performance. Especially indices derived out of remote sensing techniques provide quantitative information about agricultural crops instantaneously, and above all, non-destructively. Due to the specific absorption of certain plant pigments, a characteristic spectral signature can be seen in the visible and IR part of the electromagnetic spectrum, known as narrow-band peaks. In an analogous manner, the presence and concentration of different nutrients cause a characteristic spectral signature. To this end, an adequate remote sensing monitoring concept is needed, considering heterogeneity and dynamic of the plant population and economical aspects. This work will present the development and field investigations of an inexpensive multichannel radiation sensor to observe the incoming and reflected specific parts or rather distinct wavelengths of the solar light spectrum on the crop and facilitate the determination of different plant indices. Based on the selected sensor wavelengths, the sensing device allows the detection of specific parameters, e.g. plant vitality, chlorophyll content or nitrogen content. Besides the improvement of the sensor characteristic, the simple wavelength adaption, and the price-performance ratio, the achievement of appropriate energy efficiency as well as a

  15. Is the Adaptive Response an Efficient Protection Against the Detrimental Effects of Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, S. M. Javad; Cameron, J. R.; Niroomand-rad, A.

    2003-07-01

    exposure to high-energy neutrons, protons and HZE particles during a deep space mission, needs an efficient protection against the detrimental effects of space radiation. Recent findings concerning the induction of adaptive response by neutrons and high cumulative doses of gamma radiation in human cells have opened a new horizon for possible implications of adaptive response in radiation protection and esp ecially in protection against detrimental effects of high levels of radiation during a long-term space journey. We demonstrated significant adaptive response in humans after exposure to high levels of natural radiation. Individuals whose cumulative radiation doses were up to 950 mSv, showed a significant adaptive response after exposure to 1.5 Gy gamma radiation. These doses are much lower than those received by astronauts during a sixmonth space mission. Screening the adaptive response of candidates for long-term space missions will help scientists identify individuals who not only show low radiation susceptibility but also demonstrate a high magnitude of radioadaptive response. In selected individuals, chronic exposure to elevated levels of space radiation during a long-term mission can considerably decrease their radiation susceptibility and protect them against the unpredictable exposure to relatively high radiation levels due to solar activity. Keywords: Space radiation, adaptive response, chromosome aberrations. Introduction In recent decades, humans successfully experienced relatively long time space missions. No doubt, in the near future deep space journeys as long as a few years will be inevitable. Despite current advances, there are still some great problems that limit the duration of such long-term space missions. Radiation risk due to exposure to high levels of cosmic rays and the effects of microgravity are clearly the most important problems that need to be solved before a long-term

  16. The Adaptive Radiation of Cichlid Fish in Lake Tanganyika: A Morphological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsumi Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the Great Ancient Lakes in the East Africa. This lake harbours about 250 species of cichlid fish, which are highly diverse in terms of morphology, behaviour, and ecology. Lake Tanganyika's cichlid diversity has evolved through explosive speciation and is treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, the rapid differentiation of a single ancestor into an array of species that differ in traits used to exploit their environments and resources. To elucidate the processes and mechanisms underlying the rapid speciation and adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species assemblage it is important to integrate evidence from several lines of research. Great efforts have been, are, and certainly will be taken to solve the mystery of how so many cichlid species evolved in so little time. In the present review, we summarize morphological studies that relate to the adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlids and highlight their importance for understanding the process of adaptive radiation.

  17. Learning to speciate: The biased learning of mate preferences promotes adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, R Tucker; Kozak, Genevieve M

    2015-11-01

    Bursts of rapid repeated speciation called adaptive radiations have generated much of Earth's biodiversity and fascinated biologists since Darwin, but we still do not know why some lineages radiate and others do not. Understanding what causes assortative mating to evolve rapidly and repeatedly in the same lineage is key to understanding adaptive radiation. Many species that have undergone adaptive radiations exhibit mate preference learning, where individuals acquire mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations. Mate preference learning can be biased if individuals also learn phenotypes to avoid in mates, and shift their preferences away from these avoided phenotypes. We used individual-based computational simulations to study whether biased and unbiased mate preference learning promotes ecological speciation and adaptive radiation. We found that ecological speciation can be rapid and repeated when mate preferences are biased, but is inhibited when mate preferences are learned without bias. Our results suggest that biased mate preference learning may play an important role in generating animal biodiversity through adaptive radiation.

  18. Widespread adaptive evolution during repeated evolutionary radiations in New World lupins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado, Bruno; Atchison, Guy W.; Hughes, Colin E.; Filatov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary processes that drive rapid species diversification are poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear whether Darwinian adaptation or non-adaptive processes are the primary drivers of explosive species diversifications. Here we show that repeated rapid radiations within New World lupins (Lupinus, Leguminosae) were underpinned by a major increase in the frequency of adaptation acting on coding and regulatory changes genome-wide. This contrasts with far less frequent adaptation in genomes of slowly diversifying lupins and all other plant genera analysed. Furthermore, widespread shifts in optimal gene expression coincided with shifts to high rates of diversification and evolution of perenniality, a putative key adaptation trait thought to have triggered the evolutionary radiations in New World lupins. Our results reconcile long-standing debate about the relative importance of protein-coding and regulatory evolution, and represent the first unambiguous evidence for the rapid onset of lineage- and genome-wide accelerated Darwinian evolution during rapid species diversification. PMID:27498896

  19. Comparative study of adaptive radiations with an example using parasitic flatworms (Platyhelminthes): Cercomeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, D.R.; McLennan, D.A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-11-01

    Studies of adaptive radiations require robust phylogenies, estimates of species numbers for monophyletic groups within clades, assessments of the adaptive value of putative key innovations, and estimates of the frequency of speciation modes. Four criteria are necessary to identify an adaptive radiation within the parasitic platyhelminths: (1) a group contains significantly more species than its sister group, (2) species richness is apomorphic, (3) apomorphic traits enhance the potential for adaptively driven modes of speciation (sympatric speciation and speciation by peripheral isolation via host switching), and (4) the frequency of adaptively driven speciation modes is high within the group when compared with data from free-living groups. Only the species-rich Monogenea fulfill all four criteria. The Digenea and Eucestoda also are more species rich than their sister groups, their species richness is derived, and they possess unique characters that increase the potential for host switching to occur. However, because there is not enough information to determine whether the frequency of adaptive modes of speciation is high for those groups, we cannot yet assert that their radiations have been adaptive. 102 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Rapid parallel adaptive radiations from a single hybridogenic ancestral population

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Alan G; Vonlanthen, Pascal; Seehausen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    The Alpine lake whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) species complex is a classic example of a recent radiation, associated with colonization of the Alpine lakes following the glacial retreat (less than 15 kyr BP). They have formed a unique array of endemic lake flocks, each with one to six described sympatric species differing in morphology, diet and reproductive ecology. Here, we present a genomic investigation of the relationships between and within the lake flocks. Comparing the signal between...

  1. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  2. Goal based mesh adaptivity for fixed source radiation transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Derives an anisotropic goal based error measure for shielding problems. ► Reduces the error in the detector response by optimizing the finite element mesh. ► Anisotropic adaptivity captures material interfaces using fewer elements than AMR. ► A new residual based on the numerical scheme chosen forms the error measure. ► The error measure also combines the forward and adjoint metrics in a novel way. - Abstract: In this paper, the application of goal based error measures for anisotropic adaptivity applied to shielding problems in which a detector is present is explored. Goal based adaptivity is important when the response of a detector is required to ensure that dose limits are adhered to. To achieve this, a dual (adjoint) problem is solved which solves the neutron transport equation in terms of the response variables, in this case the detector response. The methods presented can be applied to general finite element solvers, however, the derivation of the residuals are dependent on the underlying finite element scheme which is also discussed in this paper. Once error metrics for the forward and adjoint solutions have been formed they are combined using a novel approach. The two metrics are combined by forming the minimum ellipsoid that covers both the error metrics rather than taking the maximum ellipsoid that is contained within the metrics. Another novel approach used within this paper is the construction of the residual. The residual, used to form the goal based error metrics, is calculated from the subgrid scale correction which is inherent in the underlying spatial discretisation employed

  3. Prolonged stress induces adaptation of drosophila population to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster from radio-contaminated area (Vetka district of Gomel region with 24 Ci/km2 of 137Cs and 0.5 Cu/km2 of 90Sr) and from Berezynski Natural Reserve as a control area (region of Chernobyl catastrophe). Population samples were caught in 2000-2001 years. Natural insect populations from radio-contaminated areas are more resistant to additional irradiation than control populations. Keeping of natural populations under laboratory or vivarium conditions is a strong stress (limited space, overpopulation, other than in nature temperature and light conditions), which increases mutation process and induces unspecific adaptation. (authors)

  4. Crash: A Block-Adaptive-Mesh Code for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics - Implementation and Verification

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Powell, K G; Holloway, J P; Myra, E S; Stout, Q; Adams, M L; Morel, J E; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We describe the CRASH (Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics) code, a block adaptive mesh code for multi-material radiation hydrodynamics. The implementation solves the radiation diffusion model with the gray or multigroup method and uses a flux limited diffusion approximation to recover the free-streaming limit. The electrons and ions are allowed to have different temperatures and we include a flux limited electron heat conduction. The radiation hydrodynamic equations are solved in the Eulerian frame by means of a conservative finite volume discretization in either one, two, or three-dimensional slab geometry or in two-dimensional cylindrical symmetry. An operator split method is used to solve these equations in three substeps: (1) solve the hydrodynamic equations with shock-capturing schemes, (2) a linear advection of the radiation in frequency-logarithm space, and (3) an implicit solve of the stiff radiation diffusion, heat conduction, and energy exchange. We present a suite of verification test problem...

  5. Baseline adaptive Kalman filter estimation method for nuclear radiation pulse height analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To estimate the baseline of sampled pulse signal serial and then complete the analysis of the nuclear radiation pulse height, the present study concerns in baseline adaptive kalman filtering estimation method. The present study concerns in the application effect of using adaptive kalman filtering estimation method to establish the mathematical model and then estimate the baseline. The validity of this method was certified by experiment, this method is an effective way of data pretreatment for the pulse shaping and so on. (authors)

  6. p53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  7. Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimeter Telescopes (ARTIST)

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Submillimeter observations are a key for answering many of the big questions in modern-day astrophysics, such as how stars and planets form, how galaxies evolve, and how material cycles through stars and the interstellar medium. With the upcoming large submillimeter facilities ALMA and Herschel a new window will open to study these questions. ARTIST is a project funded in context of the European ASTRONET program with the aim of developing a next generation model suite for comprehensive multi-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of the dust and line emission, as well as their polarization, to help interpret observations with these groundbreaking facilities.

  8. Effect of low-dose X-ray radiation on adaptive response in gastric cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shukai Wang; Gang Jiang; Hongsheng Yu; Xiangping Liu; Chang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to study the effect and mechanism of low-dose radiation (LDR) on adaptive response of gastric cancer cell. Methods: SGC7901 cells were cultured in vitro, and divided into 4 groups: control group (D0 group), low-dose radiation group (D1 group, 75 mGy), high-dose radiation group (D2 group, 2 Gy), low-dose plus high-dose radiation group (D1 + D2 group, 75 mGy + 2 Gy, the interval of low and high-dose radiation being 8 h). Cell inhibition rate was detected by cytometry and CCK8 method; the proportion of cell cycle at different times after irradiation was determined by using a flow cytometry. The ATM mRNA levels were detected by using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: There was no significant different between groups D0 and D1, groups D2 and D1 + D2 cell inhibition rate (P > 0.05). There was a significant increase G2/M arrest in groups D2 and D1 + D2 than groups D0 and D1 after 6 h of radiation and did not recover at 48 h (P 0.05). Conclusion: LDR cannot induce adaptive response in SGC7901 cells in vitro, which may be associated the regulation of cell cycle, and its ATM mRNA expression cannot be affected by 75 mGy X-ray radiation.

  9. [Adaptive radiotherapy in routine: The radiation oncologist's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Petit, A; Sargos, P; Kantor, G; Pouypoudat, C; Saut, O; Zacharatou, C; Antoine, M

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as all processes leading to the modification of a treatment plan on the basis of patient-specific variations observed during the course of a treatment. This concept is currently of particular relevance due to the development of onboard volumetric imaging systems, which allow for daily viewing of variations in both tumour and organs at risk in terms of position, shape or volume. However, its application in routine clinical practice is limited due to the demanding nature of the processes involved (re-delineation and replanning) and increased dependence on available human resources. Even if "online" strategies, based on deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms, could lead to a reduction in both work and calculation time, for the moment their use is limited to the research field due to uncertainties surrounding the validity of results gathered. Other strategies without DIR can be used as "offline" or "hybrid offline-online" strategies that seem to offer a compromise between time consumption and therapeutic gain for the patient. PMID:26337475

  10. Comparison of adaptive response to γ-radiation and nickel sulfate treatment in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison of the adaptive response to the impact of the γ-irradiation and nickel sulfate treatment in human cells, as the adaptive factors relative to these mutagens in the challenging doses by the cells survival criterium, is carried out. The pretreatment of human fibroblasts (the rhabdomyosarcoma line) with the low dose γ-radiation (10-14 cGy) formed increased viability of human cells to the nickel sulfate high concentrations (10-5-10-3 M). The adaptive response observed was similar to the radioadaptive response in human fibroblasts pretreated with low doses of γ-radiation with subsequent impact of high dose radiation. The pretreatment of human cells with the nickel sulfate low concentrations induced the DNA increased stability by impact of challenging doses of the γ-radiation and stimulated the DNA reparative synthesis by impact of both NiSO4 and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide. These data confirm the existence of the cross-sectional adaptive response in the experiments with the nickel sulfate

  11. Testing the stages model in the adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschick, Moritz; Nosil, Patrik; Roesti, Marius; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Harmon, Luke; Salzburger, Walter

    2014-11-22

    Adaptive radiation (AR) is a key process in the origin of organismal diversity. However, the evolution of trait disparity in connection with ecological specialization is still poorly understood. Available models for vertebrate ARs predict that diversification occurs in the form of temporal stages driven by different selective forces. Here, we investigate the AR of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika and use macroevolutionary model fitting to evaluate whether diversification happened in temporal stages. Six trait complexes, for which we also provide evidence of their adaptiveness, are analysed with comparative methods: body shape, pharyngeal jaw shape, gill raker traits, gut length, brain weight and body coloration. Overall, we do not find strong evidence for the 'stages model' of AR. However, our results suggest that trophic traits diversify earlier than traits implicated in macrohabitat adaptation and that sexual communication traits (i.e. coloration) diversify late in the radiation. PMID:25274371

  12. An adaptive radiation model for the origin of new genefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francino, M. Pilar

    2004-10-18

    The evolution of new gene functions is one of the keys to evolutionary innovation. Most novel functions result from gene duplication followed by divergence. However, the models hitherto proposed to account for this process are not fully satisfactory. The classic model of neofunctionalization holds that the two paralogous gene copies resulting from a duplication are functionally redundant, such that one of them can evolve under no functional constraints and occasionally acquire a new function. This model lacks a convincing mechanism for the new gene copies to increase in frequency in the population and survive the mutational load expected to accumulate under neutrality, before the acquisition of the rare beneficial mutations that would confer new functionality. The subfunctionalization model has been proposed as an alternative way to generate genes with altered functions. This model also assumes that new paralogous gene copies are functionally redundant and therefore neutral, but it predicts that relaxed selection will affect both gene copies such that some of the capabilities of the parent gene will disappear in one of the copies and be retained in the other. Thus, the functions originally present in a single gene will be partitioned between the two descendant copies. However, although this model can explain increases in gene number, it does not really address the main evolutionary question, which is the development of new biochemical capabilities. Recently, a new concept has been introduced into the gene evolution literature which is most likely to help solve this dilemma. The key point is to allow for a period of natural selection for the duplication per se, before new function evolves, rather than considering gene duplication to be neutral as in the previous models. Here, I suggest a new model that draws on the advantage of postulating selection for gene duplication, and proposes that bursts of adaptive gene amplification in response to specific selection

  13. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: → Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. → The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. → No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. → Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  14. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  15. Skull shapes of the Lissodelphininae: radiation, adaptation and asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatius, Anders; Goodall, R Natalie P

    2016-06-01

    Within Delphinidae, the sub-family Lissodelphininae consists of 8 Southern Ocean species and 2 North Pacific species. Lissodelphininae is a result of recent phylogenetic revisions based on molecular methods. Thus, morphological radiation within the taxon has not been investigated previously. The sub-family consists of ecologically diverse groups such as (1) the Cephalorhynchus genus of 4 small species inhabiting coastal and shelf waters, (2) the robust species in the Lagenorhynchus genus with the coastal La. australis, the offshore La. cruciger, the pelagic species La. obscurus and La. obliquidens, and (3) the morphologically aberrant genus Lissodelphis. Here, the shapes of 164 skulls from adults of all 10 species were compared using 3-dimensional geometric morphometrics. The Lissodelphininae skulls were supplemented by samples of Lagenorhynchus albirostris and Delphinus delphis to obtain a context for the variation found within the subfamily. Principal components analysis was used to map the most important components of shape variation on phylogeny. The first component of shape variation described an elongation of the rostrum, lateral and dorsoventral compression of the neurocranium and smaller temporal fossa. The two Lissodelphis species were on the high extreme of this spectrum, while Lagenorhynchus australis, La. cruciger and Cephalorhynchus heavisidii were at the low extreme. Along the second component, La. cruciger was isolated from the other species by its expanded neurocranium and concave facial profile. Shape variation supports the gross phylogenetic relationships proposed by recent molecular studies. However, despite the great diversity of ecology and external morphology within the subfamily, shape variation of the feeding apparatus was modest, indicating a similar mode of feeding across the subfamily. All 10 species were similar in their pattern of skull asymmetry, but interestingly, two species using narrowband high frequency clicks (La. cruciger and C

  16. Evolution of genomic structural variation and genomic architecture in the adaptive radiations of African cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua eFan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available African cichlid fishes are an ideal system for studying explosive rates of speciation and the origin of diversity in adaptive radiation. Within the last few million years, more than 2000 species have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa, the largest adaptive radiation in vertebrates. These young species show spectacular diversity in their coloration, morphology and behavior. However, little is known about the genomic basis of this astonishing diversity. Recently, five African cichlid genomes were sequenced, including that of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, a basal and only relatively moderately diversified lineage, and the genomes of four representative endemic species of the adaptive radiations, Neolamprologus brichardi, Astatotilapia burtoni, Metriaclima zebra, and Pundamila nyererei. Using the tilapia genome as the reference genome, we generated a high-resolution genomic variation map, consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, short insertions and deletions (indels, inversions and deletions. In total, around 18.8, 17.7, 17.0 and 17.0 million SNPs, 2.3, 2.2, 1.4 and 1.9 million indels, 262, 306, 162, and 154 inversions, and 3509, 2705, 2710 and 2634 deletions were inferred to have evolved in the N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei and M. zebra respectively. Many of these variations affected the annotated gene regions in the genome. Different patterns of genetic variation were detected during the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. For SNPs, the highest rate of evolution was detected in the common ancestor of N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei and M. zebra. However, for the evolution of inversions and deletions, we found that the rates at the terminal taxa are substantially higher than the rates at the ancestral lineages. The high-resolution map provides an ideal opportunity to understand the genomic bases of the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes.

  17. Regulation Of Nf=kb And Mnsod In Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Protection Of Mouse And Human Skin Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Li

    2012-11-07

    A sampling of publications resulting from this grant is provided. One is on the subject of NF-κB-Mediated HER2 Overexpression in Radiation-Adaptive Resistance. Another is on NF-κB-mediated adaptive resistance to ionizing radiation.

  18. Molecular mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to radiation, UV light, and heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viable organisms recognize and respond to environmental changes or stresses. When these environmental changes and their responses by organisms are extreme, they can limit viability. However, organisms can adapt to these different stresses by utilizing different possible responses via signal transduction pathways when the stress is not lethal. In particular, prior mild stresses can provide some aid to prepare organisms for subsequent more severe stresses. These adjustments or adaptations for future stresses have been called adaptive responses. These responses are present in bacteria, plants and animals. The following review covers recent research which can help describe or postulate possible mechanisms which may be active in producing adaptive responses to radiation, ultraviolet light, and heat. (author)

  19. Diversity-dependent cladogenesis and trait evolution in the adaptive radiation of the auks (aves: alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jason T; Mursleen, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Through the course of an adaptive radiation, the evolutionary speed of cladogenesis and ecologically relevant trait evolution are expected to slow as species diversity increases, niches become occupied, and ecological opportunity declines. We develop new likelihood-based models to test diversity-dependent evolution in the auks, one of only a few families of seabirds adapted to underwater "flight," and which exhibit a large variety of bill sizes and shapes. Consistent with the expectations of adaptive radiation, we find both a decline in rates of cladogenesis (a sixfold decline) and bill shape (a 64-fold decline) evolution as diversity increased. Bill shape diverged into two clades at the basal cladogenesis event with one clade possessing mostly long, narrow bills used to forage primarily on fish, and the other with short thick bills used to forage primarily on plankton. Following this initial divergence in bill shape, size, a known correlate of both prey size and maximum diving depth, diverged rapidly within each of these clades. These results suggest that adaptive radiation in foraging traits underwent initial divergence in bill shape to occupy different food resources, followed by size differentiation to subdivide each niche along the depth axis of the water column. PMID:23356613

  20. 3D Continuum Radiative Transfer. An adaptive grid construction algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, G.; Alcolea, J.

    Solving the radiative transfer problem is a common problematic to may fields in astrophysics. With the increasing angular resolution of spatial or ground-based telescopes (VLTI, HST) but also with the next decade instruments (NGST, ALMA, ...), astrophysical objects reveal and will certainly reveal complex spatial structures. Consequently, it is necessary to develop numerical tools being able to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions in order to model and interpret these observations. I present a 3D radiative transfer program, using a new method for the construction of an adaptive spatial grid, based on the Monte Claro method. With the help of this tools, one can solve the continuum radiative transfer problem (e.g. a dusty medium), computes the temperature structure of the considered medium and obtain the flux of the object (SED and images).

  1. Possible human impacts on adaptive radiation: beak size bimodality in Darwin's finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Andrew P; Grant, Peter R; Rosemary Grant, B; Ford, Hugh A; Brewer, Mark J; Podos, Jeffrey

    2006-08-01

    Adaptive radiation is facilitated by a rugged adaptive landscape, where fitness peaks correspond to trait values that enhance the use of distinct resources. Different species are thought to occupy the different peaks, with hybrids falling into low-fitness valleys between them. We hypothesize that human activities can smooth adaptive landscapes, increase hybrid fitness and hamper evolutionary diversification. We investigated this possibility by analysing beak size data for 1755 Geospiza fortis measured between 1964 and 2005 on the island of Santa Cruz, Galápagos. Some populations of this species can display a resource-based bimodality in beak size, which mirrors the greater beak size differences among species. We first show that an historically bimodal population at one site, Academy Bay, has lost this property in concert with a marked increase in local human population density. We next show that a nearby site with lower human impacts, El Garrapatero, currently manifests strong bimodality. This comparison suggests that bimodality can persist when human densities are low (Academy Bay in the past, El Garrapatero in the present), but not when they are high (Academy Bay in the present). Human activities may negatively impact diversification in 'young' adaptive radiations, perhaps by altering adaptive landscapes.

  2. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, An [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sun, Ying [Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liang, Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Yan, Di, E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  3. Convergence across a continent: adaptive diversification in a recent radiation of Australian lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Mozes P K; Horner, Paul; Moritz, Craig

    2016-06-15

    Recent radiations are important to evolutionary biologists, because they provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms that link micro- and macroevolution. The role of ecological speciation during adaptive radiation has been intensively studied, but radiations can arise from a diversity of evolutionary processes; in particular, on large continental landmasses where allopatric speciation might frequently precede ecological differentiation. It is therefore important to establish a phylogenetic and ecological framework for recent continental-scale radiations that are species-rich and ecologically diverse. Here, we use a genomic (approx. 1 200 loci, exon capture) approach to fit branch lengths on a summary-coalescent species tree and generate a time-calibrated phylogeny for a recent and ecologically diverse radiation of Australian scincid lizards; the genus Cryptoblepharus We then combine the phylogeny with a comprehensive phenotypic dataset for over 800 individuals across the 26 species, and use comparative methods to test whether habitat specialization can explain current patterns of phenotypic variation in ecologically relevant traits. We find significant differences in morphology between species that occur in distinct environments and convergence in ecomorphology with repeated habitat shifts across the continent. These results suggest that isolated analogous habitats have provided parallel ecological opportunity and have repeatedly promoted adaptive diversification. By contrast, speciation processes within the same habitat have resulted in distinct lineages with relatively limited morphological variation. Overall, our study illustrates how alternative diversification processes might have jointly stimulated species proliferation across the continent and generated a remarkably diverse group of Australian lizards. PMID:27306048

  4. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  5. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kuiper, Rolf [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Peters, Thomas [Institut für Computergestützte Wissenschaften, Universität Zürich Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars, E-mail: klassm@mcmaster.ca [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-10

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  6. Escalation and trophic specialization drive adaptive radiation of freshwater gastropods in ancient lakes on Sulawesi, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Rintelen, Thomas von; Wilson, Anthony Bruce; Meyer, Axel; Glaubrecht, Matthias

    2005-01-01

    Species flocks in ancient lakes have long been appreciated as ideal model systems for the study of speciation and adaptive processes. We here present data from a new invertebrate model system with intrinsic parameters distinct from those of other documented radiations. The ancient lakes on Sulawesi harbour an endemic species flock of at least 33 species of viviparous snails. Molecular data reveal multiple independent colonizations of the lakes by riverine ancestors. In each colonizing clade, ...

  7. Adaptive Radiation: application in lung cancer; Radioterapia adaptativa: aplicacion en cancer de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Mazon, J.; Raba Diez, J. I.; Vazquez Rodriguez, J. a.; Pacheco Baldor, M. T.; Mendiguren Santiago, M. A.; Menendez Garcia, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The previous updates are a form of adaptive radiation that can be used to account for changes in the size, shape and location of both the tumor and healthy tissue. Are especially useful in the case of lung cancer which typically is associated with significant anatomical changes due to the response to treatment.In the present study, the variation in tumor volume and dosimetric effects from a new CT and replanning during the course of treatment in patients with lung cancer.

  8. The Adaptive Radiation of Cichlid Fish in Lake Tanganyika: A Morphological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsumi Takahashi; Stephan Koblmüller

    2011-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the Great Ancient Lakes in the East Africa. This lake harbours about 250 species of cichlid fish, which are highly diverse in terms of morphology, behaviour, and ecology. Lake Tanganyika's cichlid diversity has evolved through explosive speciation and is treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, the rapid differentiation of a single ancestor into an array of species that differ in traits used to exploit their environments and resources. To elucidate...

  9. Phylogenomics Reveals Three Sources of Adaptive Variation during a Rapid Radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Pease

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Speciation events often occur in rapid bursts of diversification, but the ecological and genetic factors that promote these radiations are still much debated. Using whole transcriptomes from all 13 species in the ecologically and reproductively diverse wild tomato clade (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon, we infer the species phylogeny and patterns of genetic diversity in this group. Despite widespread phylogenetic discordance due to the sorting of ancestral variation, we date the origin of this radiation to approximately 2.5 million years ago and find evidence for at least three sources of adaptive genetic variation that fuel diversification. First, we detect introgression both historically between early-branching lineages and recently between individual populations, at specific loci whose functions indicate likely adaptive benefits. Second, we find evidence of lineage-specific de novo evolution for many genes, including loci involved in the production of red fruit color. Finally, using a "PhyloGWAS" approach, we detect environment-specific sorting of ancestral variation among populations that come from different species but share common environmental conditions. Estimated across the whole clade, small but substantial and approximately equal fractions of the euchromatic portion of the genome are inferred to contribute to each of these three sources of adaptive genetic variation. These results indicate that multiple genetic sources can promote rapid diversification and speciation in response to new ecological opportunity, in agreement with our emerging phylogenomic understanding of the complexity of both ancient and recent species radiations.

  10. Phylogenomics Reveals Three Sources of Adaptive Variation during a Rapid Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, James B; Haak, David C; Hahn, Matthew W; Moyle, Leonie C

    2016-02-01

    Speciation events often occur in rapid bursts of diversification, but the ecological and genetic factors that promote these radiations are still much debated. Using whole transcriptomes from all 13 species in the ecologically and reproductively diverse wild tomato clade (Solanum sect. Lycopersicon), we infer the species phylogeny and patterns of genetic diversity in this group. Despite widespread phylogenetic discordance due to the sorting of ancestral variation, we date the origin of this radiation to approximately 2.5 million years ago and find evidence for at least three sources of adaptive genetic variation that fuel diversification. First, we detect introgression both historically between early-branching lineages and recently between individual populations, at specific loci whose functions indicate likely adaptive benefits. Second, we find evidence of lineage-specific de novo evolution for many genes, including loci involved in the production of red fruit color. Finally, using a "PhyloGWAS" approach, we detect environment-specific sorting of ancestral variation among populations that come from different species but share common environmental conditions. Estimated across the whole clade, small but substantial and approximately equal fractions of the euchromatic portion of the genome are inferred to contribute to each of these three sources of adaptive genetic variation. These results indicate that multiple genetic sources can promote rapid diversification and speciation in response to new ecological opportunity, in agreement with our emerging phylogenomic understanding of the complexity of both ancient and recent species radiations. PMID:26871574

  11. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Robertson

    Full Text Available Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and

  12. State of research and perspective on adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a review article entitled ''Physical Benefits from Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation,'' published in Health Physics in December of 1982, Professor T.D. Luckey of the University of Missouri, asserted the ''radiation hormesis'' with 200 references. This resulted in the first International Symposium on Radiation Hormesis in Oakland, California (August 1985). CRIEPI consulted many specialists about Luckey's paper and studied many other papers such as Lorenz, 1954; Luckey, 1980, Liu et al., 1985. Radiation hormesis research in Japan has been based on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were to be true, radiation management in Japan has been extremely erroneous. CRIEPI organized a Hormesis Research Steering Committee composed of leading specialists in the field concerned, and began research in cooperation with a number of universities, as well as the National Cancer Research Institute, and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. After obtaining interesting results in various experiments on the health effects of exposure to low doses of radiation, we have proceeded on an expanded program, which involves fourteen universities and two research institutes throughout Japan. The interesting results we obtained can be categorized in five groups. 1. Enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes and suppression of cancer, 2. Radio-adaptive response relating to the activation of DNA repair and adoptosis, 3. Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 4. Radiation effect on neuro-transmitting system through increase of key enzymes, 5. Others, including the therapy of adult-disease such as diabetes and hypertension. We are now carrying out experimental activities on the effects of low-dose radiation on mammals. After several years of research activities, we are recognizing Luckey's claim. Some basic surveys including Hiroshima Nagasaki and animal experiments in Japan have brought us valuable informations on the health effects of low

  13. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  14. Timing and tempo of early and successive adaptive radiations in Macaronesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Chul Kim

    Full Text Available The flora of Macaronesia, which encompasses five Atlantic archipelagos (Azores, Canaries, Madeira, Cape Verde, and Salvage, is exceptionally rich and diverse. Spectacular radiation of numerous endemic plant groups has made the Macaronesian islands an outstanding area for studies of evolution and speciation. Despite intensive investigation in the last 15 years, absolute age and rate of diversification are poorly known for the flora of Macaronesia. Here we report molecular divergence estimates and rates of diversification for five representative, putative rapid radiations of monophyletic endemic plant lineages across the core eudicot clade of flowering plants. Three discrete windows of colonization during the Miocene and early Pliocene are suggested for these lineages, all of which are inferred to have had a single colonization event followed by rapid radiation. Subsequent inter-archipelago dispersal events into Madeira and the Cape Verdes took place very recently during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene after initial diversification on the Canary Islands. The tempo of adaptive radiations differs among the groups, but is relatively rapid compared to continental and other island radiations. Our results demonstrate that opportunity for island colonization and successful radiation may have been constrained to discrete time periods of profound climatic and geological changes in northern African and the Mediterranean.

  15. In vivo study of the adaptive response induced by radiation of different types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low doses of X- and gamma-rays are known to induce the adaptive response (AR), i.e. a reduction in the damage caused by subsequent high doses. Using micronucleus test, we investigated the in vivo induction of AR in mouse bone marrow cells by low doses of radiation of different types. In our experiments we used low-LET gamma-radiation, high-LET secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons and secondary biogenic radiation. The latter is a novel type of radiation discovered only recently. Secondary biogenic radiation is known to be induced in biological objects after exposure to radiation and thought to be responsible for stimulating and protecting effects in cells in response to external irradiation. To expose mice to the secondary biogenic radiation, animals were housed in plastic cages containing gamma-irradiated oat seeds as bedding and food for 2 weeks before challenging with a high dose (1.5 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of 60Co gamma-radiation. It was found that the yield of cytogenetic damage in mice exposed to both secondary biogenic and gamma-radiation was significantly reduced as compared to that in animals exposed to the challenge dose alone, i.e. the AR was induced. Pretreatment of animals with a low dose of gamma-radiation (0.1 Gy at a dose rate of 0.125 Gy/min) also induced the AR. In contrast, preliminary exposure of mice to a low dose (0.09 Gy at a dose rate of 1 Gy/min) of secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons induced no AR, suggesting that triggering the cascade of events leading to the AR induction depends on the DNA single-strand to double- strand breaks ratio. The precise mechanisms underlying the AR are of great importance since the phenomenon of AR can be used for medical benefits and in assessment of risks for carcinogens. But they have not been elucidated well at present. Taken together, our results suggest the crucial role of particular types of initial DNA lesions and the secondary biogenic radiation induced in cells in response to external

  16. Spatially adaptive radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation during cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlik, Andreas H; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2015-01-01

    We present a suite of cosmological radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of the assembly of galaxies driving the reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z >~ 6. The simulations account for the hydrodynamical feedback from photoionization heating and the explosion of massive stars as supernovae (SNe). Our reference simulation, which was carried out in a box of size 25 comoving Mpc/h using 2 x 512^3 particles, produces a reasonable reionization history and matches the observed UV luminosity function of galaxies. Simulations with different box sizes and resolutions are used to investigate numerical convergence, and simulations in which either SNe or photoionization heating or both are turned off, are used to investigate the role of feedback from star formation. Ionizing radiation is treated using accurate radiative transfer at the high spatially adaptive resolution at which the hydrodynamics is carried out. SN feedback strongly reduces the star formation rates (SFRs) over nearly the full mass range of s...

  17. Hybrid Characteristics: 3D radiative transfer for parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rijkhorst, E J; Dubey, A; Mellema, G R; Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Plewa, Tomasz; Dubey, Anshu; Mellema, Garrelt

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiative transfer method designed specifically for use with parallel adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics codes. This new algorithm, which we call hybrid characteristics, introduces a novel form of ray tracing that can neither be classified as long, nor as short characteristics, but which applies the underlying principles, i.e. efficient execution through interpolation and parallelizability, of both. Primary applications of the hybrid characteristics method are radiation hydrodynamics problems that take into account the effects of photoionization and heating due to point sources of radiation. The method is implemented in the hydrodynamics package FLASH. The ionization, heating, and cooling processes are modelled using the DORIC ionization package. Upon comparison with the long characteristics method, we find that our method calculates the column density with a similarly high accuracy and produces sharp and well defined shadows. We show the quality of the new algorithm ...

  18. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  19. Multigroup radiation hydrodynamics with flux-limited diffusion and adaptive mesh refinement

    CERN Document Server

    González, Matthias; Commerçon, Benoît; Masson, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Radiative transfer plays a key role in the star formation process. Due to a high computational cost, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations performed up to now have mainly been carried out in the grey approximation. In recent years, multi-frequency radiation-hydrodynamics models have started to emerge, in an attempt to better account for the large variations of opacities as a function of frequency. We wish to develop an efficient multigroup algorithm for the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES which is suited to heavy proto-stellar collapse calculations. Due to prohibitive timestep constraints of an explicit radiative transfer method, we constructed a time-implicit solver based on a stabilised bi-conjugate gradient algorithm, and implemented it in RAMSES under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We present a series of tests which demonstrate the high performance of our scheme in dealing with frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamic flows. We also present a preliminary simulation of a three-dimensional p...

  20. Optical solar energy adaptations and radiative temperature control of green leaves and tree barks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrion, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut [Department of Si-Photovoltaik and Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Trees have adapted to keep leaves and barks cool in sunshine and can serve as interesting bionic model systems for radiative cooling. Silicon solar cells, on the other hand, loose up to one third of their energy efficiency due to heating in intensive sunshine. It is shown that green leaves minimize absorption of useful radiation and allow efficient infrared thermal emission. Since elevated temperatures are detrimental for tensile water flow in the Xylem tissue below barks, the optical properties of barks should also have evolved so as to avoid excessive heating. This was tested by performing optical studies with tree bark samples from representative trees. It was found that tree barks have optimized their reflection of incoming sunlight between 0.7 and 2 {mu}m. This is approximately the optical window in which solar light is transmitted and reflected by green vegetation. Simultaneously, the tree bark is highly absorbing and thus radiation emitting between 6 and 10 {mu}m. These two properties, mainly provided by tannins, create optimal conditions for radiative temperature control. In addition, tannins seem to have adopted a function as mediators for excitation energy towards photo-antioxidative activity for control of radiation damage. The results obtained are used to discuss challenges for future solar cell optimization. (author)

  1. Evolutionary Influences of Plastic Behavioral Responses Upon Environmental Challenges in an Adaptive Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Susan A; Wund, Matthew A; Baker, John A

    2015-09-01

    At the end of the 19th century, the suggestion was made by several scientists, including J. M. Baldwin, that behavioral responses to environmental change could both rescue populations from extinction (Baldwin Effect) and influence the course of subsequent evolution. Here we provide the historical and theoretical background for this argument and offer evidence of the importance of these ideas for understanding how animals (and other organisms that exhibit behavior) will respond to the rapid environmental changes caused by human activity. We offer examples from long-term research on the evolution of behavioral and other phenotypes in the adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a radiation in which it is possible to infer ancestral patterns of behavioral plasticity relative to the post-glacial freshwater radiation in northwestern North America, and to use patterns of parallelism and contemporary evolution to understand adaptive causes of responses to environmental modification. Our work offers insights into the complexity of cognitive responses to environmental change, and into the importance of examining multiple aspects of the phenotype simultaneously, if we are to understand how behavioral shifts contribute to the persistence of populations and to subsequent evolution. We conclude by discussing the origins of apparent novelties induced by environmental shifts, and the importance of accounting for geographic variation within species if we are to accurately anticipate the effects of anthropogenic environmental modification on the persistence and evolution of animals. PMID:26163679

  2. Evolutionary Influences of Plastic Behavioral Responses Upon Environmental Challenges in an Adaptive Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Susan A; Wund, Matthew A; Baker, John A

    2015-09-01

    At the end of the 19th century, the suggestion was made by several scientists, including J. M. Baldwin, that behavioral responses to environmental change could both rescue populations from extinction (Baldwin Effect) and influence the course of subsequent evolution. Here we provide the historical and theoretical background for this argument and offer evidence of the importance of these ideas for understanding how animals (and other organisms that exhibit behavior) will respond to the rapid environmental changes caused by human activity. We offer examples from long-term research on the evolution of behavioral and other phenotypes in the adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a radiation in which it is possible to infer ancestral patterns of behavioral plasticity relative to the post-glacial freshwater radiation in northwestern North America, and to use patterns of parallelism and contemporary evolution to understand adaptive causes of responses to environmental modification. Our work offers insights into the complexity of cognitive responses to environmental change, and into the importance of examining multiple aspects of the phenotype simultaneously, if we are to understand how behavioral shifts contribute to the persistence of populations and to subsequent evolution. We conclude by discussing the origins of apparent novelties induced by environmental shifts, and the importance of accounting for geographic variation within species if we are to accurately anticipate the effects of anthropogenic environmental modification on the persistence and evolution of animals.

  3. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006–2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  4. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: Alexandra.Jensen@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Co-Operation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  5. Psychophysiological adaptation of the patient with the remote effect of the III degree acute radiation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2013-12-01

    putation of both shins at level in top / 3, late beam buttock, right hip ulcers, a beam cataract of the III degree of both eyes, stabilized. The assessment of the efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation in dynamics with 2009 indicates emergence of prevalence of hypochondriac tendencies over a demonstration with accession of high uneasiness and autistic lines at preservation of the leading role of an hypochondriac somatization of alarm with considerable decrease in an emotionality, an integration, a freedom of behavior. The changes revealed in dynamics correspond to the specific increase weight of violations of mental adaptation, characteristic for the period of adaptation exhaustion. The high intelligence, good figurative and logical thinking, well-mannered forms of behavior, high control over the emotional sphere, restraint of emotions, independence, self-sufficiency, organization, behavior taking into account environment requirements provided the patient M. firmness before a heavy illness, promoted good adaptation to an environment with confidence in myself, high social adaptability, opportunity successfully to carry out duties, hold the work account (worked 39 years after accident. Comparative assessment of operator ability of the patient M. showed good average time of common and difficult sensorimotor reactions with 2 mistakes, high time of reaction for moving object, however decrease in accuracy of reaction from 10-13% to 2% testifies to manifestation in dynamics of insufficiency of real functional reserves of nervous system. Conclusions. Efficiency of psychophysiological adaptation depends not only on a dose of radiation and weight of the transferred disease, but, mostly, on premorbid properties of the identity of the victim and his social and labor installation.

  6. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (Dmin) with the planned Dmin to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV Dmin is at least 95% of the planned CTV Dmin. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery

  7. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Mingyao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Bharat, Shyam [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, New York (United States); Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Hou, Wei-Hsien [St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  8. Adaptive radiation with regard to nutrient sequestration strategies in the carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovič, Andrej

    2012-02-01

    Carnivorous pitcher plants of the genus Nepenthes have evolved a great diversity of pitcher morphologies. Selective pressures for maximizing nutrient uptake have driven speciation and diversification of the genus in a process known as adaptive radiation. This leads to the evolution of pitchers adapted to specific and often bizarre source of nutrients, which are not strictly animal-derived. One example is Nepenthes ampullaria with unusual growth pattern and pitcher morphology what enables the plant to capture a leaf litter from the canopy above. We showed that the plant benefits from nitrogen uptake by increased rate of photosynthesis and growth what may provide competitive advantage over others co-habiting plants. A possible impact of such specialization toward hybridization, an important mechanism in speciation, is discussed.

  9. Adaptive response and split-dose effect of radiation on the survival of mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashu Bhan Tiku; R K Kale

    2004-03-01

    Although the importance of radiation-induced adaptive response has been recognized in human health, risk assessment and clinical application, the phenomenon has not been understood well in terms of survival of animals. To examine this aspect Swiss albino mice were irradiated with different doses (2–10 Gy) at 0.015 Gy/s dose rate and observed on a regular basis for 30 days. Since almost 50% lethality was seen with 8 Gy, it was selected as the challenging dose for further studies. Irradiation of mice with conditioning doses (0.25 or 0.5 Gy) and subsequent exposure to 8 Gy caused significant increase in the survival of mice compared to irradiated control. The splitting of challenging dose did not influence the efficiency of conditioning doses (0.25 Gy and 0.5 Gy) to induce an adaptive response. However conditioning doses given in fractions (0.25 Gy + 0.25 Gy) or (0.5 Gy + 0.5 Gy) were able to modulate the response of challenging dose of 8 Gy. These results clearly showed the occurrence of adaptive response in terms of survival of animals. The conditioning dose given in small fractions seemed to be more effective. The findings have been discussed from a mechanistic point of view. The possible biological implications, potential medical benefits, uncertainties and controversies related to adaptive response have also been addressed.

  10. Conservatism and adaptability during squirrel radiation: what is mandible shape telling us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Casanovas-Vilar

    Full Text Available Both functional adaptation and phylogeny shape the morphology of taxa within clades. Herein we explore these two factors in an integrated way by analyzing shape and size variation in the mandible of extant squirrels using landmark-based geometric morphometrics in combination with a comparative phylogenetic analysis. Dietary specialization and locomotion were found to be reliable predictors of mandible shape, with the prediction by locomotion probably reflecting the underlying diet. In addition a weak but significant allometric effect could be demonstrated. Our results found a strong phylogenetic signal in the family as a whole as well as in the main clades, which is in agreement with the general notion of squirrels being a conservative group. This fact does not preclude functional explanations for mandible shape, but rather indicates that ancient adaptations kept a prominent role, with most genera having diverged little from their ancestral clade morphologies. Nevertheless, certain groups have evolved conspicuous adaptations that allow them to specialize on unique dietary resources. Such adaptations mostly occurred in the Callosciurinae and probably reflect their radiation into the numerous ecological niches of the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeastern Asia. Our dietary reconstruction for the oldest known fossil squirrels (Eocene, 36 million years ago show a specialization on nuts and seeds, implying that the development from protrogomorphous to sciuromorphous skulls was not necessarily related to a change in diet.

  11. Cytogenetic monitoring, radiosensitivity study and adaptive response of workers exposed to low level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the present study were: To determine the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from individuals belonging to professionally exposed groups, under normal conditions; to determine the possible differences in radiosensitivity between the lymphocytes of technicians and controls after in vitro irradiation with gamma rays during the G1 phase of the cell cycle (radiosensitivity study), and to examine the influence of in vivo and in vitro pre-exposure to low doses of radiation on the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by high doses (study of the adaptive response) in a group of technicians (T) compared to controls (C). (author)

  12. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, and cancer risk assessment for radiation and chemical exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard, the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to provide an enhanced basis for describing the nature of the dose-response curve for induced tumors at low levels of exposure. Cellular responses that might influence the nature of the dose-response curve at low exposures are understandably receiving attention. These responses (bystander effects, genomic instability, and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. The former two could result in an enhancement of the tumor response at low doses and the latter could lead to a reduced response compared to that predicted by a linear extrapolation from high dose responses. Bystander responses, whereby cells other than those directly traversed by radiation tracks are damaged, can alter the concept of target cell population per unit dose. Similarly, induced genomic instability can alter the concept of total response to an exposure. There appears to be a role for oxidative damage and cellular signaling in the etiology of these cellular responses. The adaptive response appears to be inducible at very low doses of radiation or of some chemicals and reduces the cellular response to a larger challenge dose. It is currently unclear how these cellular toxic responses might be involved in tumor formation, if indeed they are. In addition, it is not known how widespread they are as regards inducing agents. Thus, their impact on low dose cancer risk remains to be established

  13. EMMA: an adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulation code with radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Dominique; Deparis, Nicolas; Ocvirk, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    EMMA is a cosmological simulation code aimed at investigating the reionization epoch. It handles simultaneously collisionless and gas dynamics, as well as radiative transfer physics using a moment-based description with the M1 approximation. Field quantities are stored and computed on an adaptive three-dimensional mesh and the spatial resolution can be dynamically modified based on physically motivated criteria. Physical processes can be coupled at all spatial and temporal scales. We also introduce a new and optional approximation to handle radiation: the light is transported at the resolution of the non-refined grid and only once the dynamics has been fully updated, whereas thermo-chemical processes are still tracked on the refined elements. Such an approximation reduces the overheads induced by the treatment of radiation physics. A suite of standard tests are presented and passed by EMMA, providing a validation for its future use in studies of the reionization epoch. The code is parallel and is able to use graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate hydrodynamics and radiative transfer calculations. Depending on the optimizations and the compilers used to generate the CPU reference, global GPU acceleration factors between ×3.9 and ×16.9 can be obtained. Vectorization and transfer operations currently prevent better GPU performance and we expect that future optimizations and hardware evolution will lead to greater accelerations.

  14. How Magnetotactic Bacteria Respond to Radiation Induced Stress and Damage: Comparative Genomics Evidences for Evolutionary Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A mediated umuCD genes and double copied ssb gene, these low fidelity DNA polymerase along with Ssb protein may endow MTB high adaptive mutation under stress condition; 4) also, magnetosome crystals (magnetite or greigite) can reduce radiation oxidative damage and protect MTB.

  15. GPU-based ultra-fast direct aperture optimization for online adaptive radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) has great promise to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity and/or improve tumor control through real-time treatment adaptations based on the current patient anatomy. However, the major technical obstacle for clinical realization of online ART, namely the inability to achieve real-time efficiency in treatment re-planning, has yet to be solved. To overcome this challenge, this paper presents our work on the implementation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) based on our previous work on CPU. We formulate the DAO problem as a large-scale convex programming problem, and use an exact method called column generation approach to deal with its extremely large dimensionality on GPU. Five 9-field prostate and five 5-field head-and-neck IMRT clinical cases with 5\\times5 mm2 beamlet size and 2.5\\times2.5\\times2.5 mm3 voxel size were used to evaluate our algorithm on GPU. It takes onl...

  16. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plans for adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang, Zhiheng; Mathayomchan, Boonyanit; Chankong, Vira; Yoo, Sua; Lee, W Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-02-01

    For intermediate and high risk prostate cancer, both the prostate gland and seminal vesicles are included in the clinical target volume. Internal motion patterns of these two organs vary, presenting a challenge for adaptive treatment. Adaptive techniques such as isocenter repositioning and soft tissue alignment are effective when tumor volumes only exhibit translational shift, while direct re-optimization of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan maybe more desirable when extreme deformation or differential positioning changes of the organs occur. Currently, direct re-optimization of the IMRT plan using beamlet (or fluence map) has not been reported. In this study, we report a novel on-line re-optimization technique that can accomplish plan adjustment on-line. Deformable image registration is used to provide position variation information on each voxel along the three dimensions. The original planned dose distribution is used as the 'goal' dose distribution for adaptation and to ensure planning quality. Fluence maps are re-optimized via linear programming, and a plan solution can be achieved within 2 min. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with a clinical case with large deformation. Such on-line ART process can be highly valuable with hypo-fractionated prostate IMRT treatment.

  17. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plans for adaptive radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q Jackie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Thongphiew, Danthai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Wang, Zhiheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Mathayomchan, Boonyanit [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH (United States); Chankong, Vira [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH (United States); Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Lee, W Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-02-07

    For intermediate and high risk prostate cancer, both the prostate gland and seminal vesicles are included in the clinical target volume. Internal motion patterns of these two organs vary, presenting a challenge for adaptive treatment. Adaptive techniques such as isocenter repositioning and soft tissue alignment are effective when tumor volumes only exhibit translational shift, while direct re-optimization of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan maybe more desirable when extreme deformation or differential positioning changes of the organs occur. Currently, direct re-optimization of the IMRT plan using beamlet (or fluence map) has not been reported. In this study, we report a novel on-line re-optimization technique that can accomplish plan adjustment on-line. Deformable image registration is used to provide position variation information on each voxel along the three dimensions. The original planned dose distribution is used as the 'goal' dose distribution for adaptation and to ensure planning quality. Fluence maps are re-optimized via linear programming, and a plan solution can be achieved within 2 min. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with a clinical case with large deformation. Such on-line ART process can be highly valuable with hypo-fractionated prostate IMRT treatment.

  18. On-line re-optimization of prostate IMRT plans for adaptive radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Thongphiew, Danthai; Wang, Zhiheng; Mathayomchan, Boonyanit; Chankong, Vira; Yoo, Sua; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-02-01

    For intermediate and high risk prostate cancer, both the prostate gland and seminal vesicles are included in the clinical target volume. Internal motion patterns of these two organs vary, presenting a challenge for adaptive treatment. Adaptive techniques such as isocenter repositioning and soft tissue alignment are effective when tumor volumes only exhibit translational shift, while direct re-optimization of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan maybe more desirable when extreme deformation or differential positioning changes of the organs occur. Currently, direct re-optimization of the IMRT plan using beamlet (or fluence map) has not been reported. In this study, we report a novel on-line re-optimization technique that can accomplish plan adjustment on-line. Deformable image registration is used to provide position variation information on each voxel along the three dimensions. The original planned dose distribution is used as the 'goal' dose distribution for adaptation and to ensure planning quality. Fluence maps are re-optimized via linear programming, and a plan solution can be achieved within 2 min. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with a clinical case with large deformation. Such on-line ART process can be highly valuable with hypo-fractionated prostate IMRT treatment. Abstract and preliminary data presented at 49th AAPM Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, USA, July 2007.

  19. The interaction of sexually and naturally selected traits in the adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzburger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The question of how genetic variation translates into organismal diversity has puzzled biologists for decades. Despite recent advances in evolutionary and developmental genetics, the mechanisms that underlie adaptation, diversification and evolutionary innovation remain largely unknown. The exceptionally diverse species flocks of cichlid fishes are textbook examples of adaptive radiation and explosive speciation and emerge as powerful model systems to study the genetic basis of animal diversification. East Africa's hundreds of endemic cichlid species are akin to a natural mutagenesis screen and differ greatly not only in ecologically relevant (hence naturally selected) characters such as mouth morphology and body shape, but also in sexually selected traits such as coloration. One of the most fascinating aspects of cichlid evolution is the frequent occurrence of evolutionary parallelisms, which has led to the question whether selection alone is sufficient to produce these parallel morphologies, or whether a developmental or genetic bias has influenced the direction of diversification. Here, I review fitness-relevant traits that could be responsible for the cichlids' evolutionary success and assess whether these were shaped by sexual or natural selection. I then focus on the interaction and the relative importance of sexual vs. natural selection in cichlid evolution. Finally, I discuss what is currently known about the genes underlying the morphogenesis of adaptively relevant traits and highlight the importance of the forthcoming cichlid genomes in the quest of the genetic basis of diversification in this group. PMID:18992003

  20. The interaction of sexually and naturally selected traits in the adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzburger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The question of how genetic variation translates into organismal diversity has puzzled biologists for decades. Despite recent advances in evolutionary and developmental genetics, the mechanisms that underlie adaptation, diversification and evolutionary innovation remain largely unknown. The exceptionally diverse species flocks of cichlid fishes are textbook examples of adaptive radiation and explosive speciation and emerge as powerful model systems to study the genetic basis of animal diversification. East Africa's hundreds of endemic cichlid species are akin to a natural mutagenesis screen and differ greatly not only in ecologically relevant (hence naturally selected) characters such as mouth morphology and body shape, but also in sexually selected traits such as coloration. One of the most fascinating aspects of cichlid evolution is the frequent occurrence of evolutionary parallelisms, which has led to the question whether selection alone is sufficient to produce these parallel morphologies, or whether a developmental or genetic bias has influenced the direction of diversification. Here, I review fitness-relevant traits that could be responsible for the cichlids' evolutionary success and assess whether these were shaped by sexual or natural selection. I then focus on the interaction and the relative importance of sexual vs. natural selection in cichlid evolution. Finally, I discuss what is currently known about the genes underlying the morphogenesis of adaptively relevant traits and highlight the importance of the forthcoming cichlid genomes in the quest of the genetic basis of diversification in this group.

  1. Niche evolution and adaptive radiation: Testing the order of trait divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, D.D.; Schwilk, D.W.; Webb, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of an adaptive radiation, the evolution of niche parameters is of particular interest for understanding modes of speciation and the consequences for coexistence of related species within communities. We pose a general question: In the course of an evolutionary radiation, do traits related to within-community niche differences (?? niche) evolve before or after differentiation of macrohabitat affinity or climatic tolerances (?? niche)? Here we introduce a new test to address this question, based on a modification of the method of independent contrasts. The divergence order test (DOT) is based on the average age of the nodes on a tree, weighted by the absolute magnitude of the contrast at each node for a particular trait. The comparison of these weighted averages reveals whether large divergences for one trait have occurred earlier or later in the course of diversification, relative to a second trait; significance is determined by bootstrapping from maximum-likelihood ancestral state reconstructions. The method is applied to the evolution of Ceanothus, a woody plant group in California, in which co-occurring species exhibit significant differences in a key leaf trait (specific leaf area) associated with contrasting physiological and life history strategies. Co-occurring species differ more for this trait than expected under a null model of community assembly. This ?? niche difference evolved early in the divergence of two major subclades within Ceanothus, whereas climatic distributions (?? niche traits) diversified later within each of the subclades. However, rapid evolution of climate parameters makes inferences of early divergence events highly uncertain, and differentiation of the ?? niche might have taken place throughout the evolution of the group, without leaving a clear phylogenetic signal. Similar patterns observed in several plant and animal groups suggest that early divergence of ?? niche traits might be a common feature of niche evolution in

  2. Adaptation and renewal of radiation protection workforce: Competency issues for Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999, EDF decided to renew the skills and to develop the workforce in the Radiation Protection Departments of the Nuclear Power Plants. More than 200 recruitments have been made and have reinforced the health physics teams. The new staff has been recruited at all levels. 10 years after, it is necessary to renew the workforce and to adapt the skills. It is essential to provide the relieving staff with nuclear power plant operation fundamentals. Actually, from 2008 to 2012, 150 people will be retired. This is 1/5 of the total radiation protection work force, because each nuclear site has a average of 25 RP workers for two units. EDF, like many other nuclear power producers has to cope with the situation in which a whole generation will be starting to retire. 40% of the staff will be replaced in the next coming 10 years. So EDF managers must know how to hire, integrate and train all these new employees. A set of professional enhancement tools shared by the sites have been put to trial: 'nuclear craft academy', training program, practical classrooms and training job sites. A key role will be played by 'hatching grounds' in fostering skills (additional staff undergoing professional enhancement training) 900 persons at end 2007, i.e 10% of staff in crafts requiring this type of support and this an useful tool to take over the old workers by the news one. The job of radiation protection worker is in a new development and EDF need new employees with a high level of RP culture and knowledge of the technical installations. The challenge for the future is to have radiation protection staff mastering new technologies and working on the field. (author)

  3. Multiple recent co-options of Optix associated with novel traits in adaptive butterfly wing radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background While the ecological factors that drive phenotypic radiations are often well understood, less is known about the generative mechanisms that cause the emergence and subsequent diversification of novel features. Heliconius butterflies display an extraordinary diversity of wing patterns due in part to mimicry and sexual selection. Identifying the genetic drivers of this crucible of evolution is now within reach, as it was recently shown that cis-regulatory variation of the optix transcription factor explains red pattern differences in the adaptive radiations of the Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius erato species groups. Results Here, we compare the developmental expression of the Optix protein across a large phylogenetic sample of butterflies and infer that its color patterning role originated at the base of the neotropical passion-vine butterfly clade (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Tribe: Heliconiini), shortly predating multiple Optix-driven wing pattern radiations in the speciose Heliconius and Eueides genera. We also characterize novel Optix and Doublesex expression in the male-specific pheromone wing scales of the basal heliconiines Dryas and Agraulis, thus illustrating that within the Heliconinii lineage, Optix has been evolutionarily redeployed in multiple contexts in association with diverse wing features. Conclusions Our findings reveal that the repeated co-option of Optix into various aspects of wing scale specification was associated with multiple evolutionary novelties over a relatively short evolutionary time scale. In particular, the recruitment of Optix expression in colored scale cell precursors was a necessary condition to the explosive diversification of passion-vine butterfly wing patterns. The novel deployment of a gene followed by spatial modulation of its expression in a given cell type could be a common mode of developmental innovation for triggering phenotypic radiations. PMID:24499528

  4. Parasites contribute to ecologically dependent postmating isolation in the adaptive radiation of three-spined stickleback

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Nagar, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Spatial variation in parasitic infections is common, and has the potential to drive population divergence and the reproductive isolation of hosts. However, despite support from theory and model laboratory systems, little strong evidence has been forthcoming from the wild. Here, we show that parasites are likely to cause reproductive isolation in the adaptive radiation of three-spined stickleback. Adjacent wild populations on the Scottish island of North Uist differ greatly and consistently in the occurrence of different parasites that have substantial effects on fitness. Laboratory-reared fish are more resistant to experimental infection by parasite species from their own population. Furthermore, hybrid backcrosses between the host populations are more resistant to parasites from the parental population to which they are more closely related. These patterns provide strong evidence that parasites can cause ecological speciation, by contributing to selection against migrants and ecologically dependent postmating isolation. PMID:27512145

  5. Removal of noises from electromagnetic radiation of coal or rock with EEMD-adaptive morphological filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shi-hai; WANG En-yuan

    2012-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation (EMR) signal collected by monitoring system during coal or rock dynamic disaster may be interferred easily by electromagnetic noises in mines.The noises have a direct influence on the recognition and analysis of the EMR signal features during the disaster.With the aim of removing these noises,an ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) adaptive morphological filter was proposed.From the result of the simulation and the experiment,it is shown that the method can restrain the random noise and white Gaussian noise mixed with EMR signal effectively.The filter is highly useful for improving the robustness of the coal or rock dynamic disaster monitoring system.

  6. Automated registration of large deformations for adaptive radiation therapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godley, Andrew; Ahunbay, Ergun; Peng Cheng; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Available deformable registration methods are often inaccurate over large organ variation encountered, for example, in the rectum and bladder. The authors developed a novel approach to accurately and effectively register large deformations in the prostate region for adaptive radiation therapy. A software tool combining a fast symmetric demons algorithm and the use of masks was developed in C++ based on ITK libraries to register CT images acquired at planning and before treatment fractions. The deformation field determined was subsequently used to deform the delivered dose to match the anatomy of the planning CT. The large deformations involved required that the bladder and rectum volume be masked with uniform intensities of -1000 and 1000 HU, respectively, in both the planning and treatment CTs. The tool was tested for five prostate IGRT patients. The average rectum planning to treatment contour overlap improved from 67% to 93%, the lowest initial overlap is 43%. The average bladder overlap improved from 83% to 98%, with a lowest initial overlap of 60%. Registration regions were set to include a volume receiving 4% of the maximum dose. The average region was 320x210x63, taking approximately 9 min to register on a dual 2.8 GHz Linux system. The prostate and seminal vesicles were correctly placed even though they are not masked. The accumulated doses for multiple fractions with large deformation were computed and verified. The tool developed can effectively supply the previously delivered dose for adaptive planning to correct for interfractional changes.

  7. Replanning Criteria and Timing Definition for Parotid Protection-Based Adaptive Radiation Therapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei-Rong; Xu, Shou-Ping; Liu, Bo; Cao, Xiu-Tang; Ren, Gang; Du, Lei; Zhou, Fu-Gen; Feng, Lin-Chun; Qu, Bao-Lin; Xie, Chuan-Bin; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate real-time volumetric and dosimetric changes of the parotid gland so as to determine replanning criteria and timing for parotid protection-based adaptive radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Fifty NPC patients were treated with helical tomotherapy; volumetric and dosimetric (Dmean, V1, and D50) changes of the parotid gland at the 1st, 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, 31st, and 33rd fractions were evaluated. The clinical parameters affecting these changes were studied by analyses of variance methods for repeated measures. Factors influencing the actual parotid dose were analyzed by a multivariate logistic regression model. The cut-off values predicting parotid overdose were developed from receiver operating characteristic curves and judged by combining them with a diagnostic test consistency check. The median absolute value and percentage of parotid volume reduction were 19.51 cm3 and 35%, respectively. The interweekly parotid volume varied significantly (p < 0.05). The parotid Dmean, V1, and D50 increased by 22.13%, 39.42%, and 48.45%, respectively. The actual parotid dose increased by an average of 11.38% at the end of radiation therapy. Initial parotid volume, initial parotid Dmean, and weight loss rate are valuable indicators for parotid protection-based replanning. PMID:26793717

  8. Replanning Criteria and Timing Definition for Parotid Protection-Based Adaptive Radiation Therapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Rong Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate real-time volumetric and dosimetric changes of the parotid gland so as to determine replanning criteria and timing for parotid protection-based adaptive radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Fifty NPC patients were treated with helical tomotherapy; volumetric and dosimetric (Dmean, V1, and D50 changes of the parotid gland at the 1st, 6th, 11th, 16th, 21st, 26th, 31st, and 33rd fractions were evaluated. The clinical parameters affecting these changes were studied by analyses of variance methods for repeated measures. Factors influencing the actual parotid dose were analyzed by a multivariate logistic regression model. The cut-off values predicting parotid overdose were developed from receiver operating characteristic curves and judged by combining them with a diagnostic test consistency check. The median absolute value and percentage of parotid volume reduction were 19.51 cm3 and 35%, respectively. The interweekly parotid volume varied significantly (p<0.05. The parotid Dmean, V1, and D50 increased by 22.13%, 39.42%, and 48.45%, respectively. The actual parotid dose increased by an average of 11.38% at the end of radiation therapy. Initial parotid volume, initial parotid Dmean, and weight loss rate are valuable indicators for parotid protection-based replanning.

  9. Adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  10. Radiation treatment for the right naris in a pediatric anesthesia patient using an adaptive oral airway technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sponseller, Patricia, E-mail: sponselp@uw.edu; Pelly, Nicole; Trister, Andrew; Ford, Eric; Ermoian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy for pediatric patients often includes the use of intravenous anesthesia with supplemental oxygen delivered via the nasal cannula. Here, we describe the use of an adaptive anesthesia technique for electron irradiation of the right naris in a preschool-aged patient treated under anesthesia. The need for an intranasal bolus plug precluded the use of standard oxygen supplementation. This novel technique required the multidisciplinary expertise of anesthesiologists, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists, medical physicists, and radiation oncologists to ensure a safe and reproducible treatment course.

  11. Multilevel UV-B Attenuance : Morphological and Chemical Adaptations of Vicia faba to Ultraviolet-B Radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijkamp, B.B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic reduction of stratospheric ozone, levels of potentially harmful solar UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) have been increasing on earth during the last three decades. The main aim of this thesis was to study growth responses and morphological and chemical adaptation mechanisms to harmf

  12. Radiation-induced bystander effects and adaptive responses--the Yin and Yang of low dose radiobiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mothersill, Carmel [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca; Seymour, Colin [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences Unit, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada)]. E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca

    2004-12-02

    Our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the induction of bystander effects by low doses of high or low LET ionizing radiation is reviewed. The question of what actually constitutes a protective effect is discussed in the context of adaptive (often referred to as hormetic or protective) responses. Finally the review considers critically, how bystander effects may be related to observed adaptive responses or other seemingly protective effects of low doses exposures. Bystander effects induce responses at the tissue level, which are similar to generalized stress responses. Most of the work involving low LET radiation exposure discussed in the existing literature measures a death response. Since many cell populations carry damaged cells without being exposed to radiation (so-called 'background damage'), it is possible that low doses exposures cause removal of cells carrying potentially problematic lesions, prior to exposure to radiation. This mechanism could lead to the production of 'U-shaped' or hormetic dose-response curves. The level of adverse, adaptive or apparently beneficial response will be related to the background damage carried by the original cell population, the level of organization at which damage or harm are scored and the precise definition of 'harm'. This model may be important when attempting to predict the consequences of mixed exposures involving low doses of radiation and other environmental stressors.

  13. Antarctic notothenioid fishes: genomic resources and strategies for analyzing an adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrich, H W; Amemiya, Chris T

    2010-12-01

    The perciform suborder Notothenoidei provides a compelling opportunity to study the adaptive radiation of a marine species-flock in the cold Southern Ocean that surrounds Antarctica. To facilitate genome-level studies of the diversification of these fishes, we present estimates of the genome sizes of 11 Antarctic species and describe the production of high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries for two, the red-blooded notothen Notothenia coriiceps and the white-blooded icefish Chaenocephalus aceratus. Our results indicate that evolution of phylogenetically derived notothenioid families (e.g., the crown group Channichthyidae [icefishes]), was accompanied by genome expansion. Six species from the basal family Nototheniidae had C-values between 0.98 and 1.20 pg, a range that is consistent with the genome sizes of proposed outgroups (e.g., percids) of the notothenioid suborder. In contrast, four icefishes had C-values in the range 1.66-1.83 pg. The BAC libraries VMRC-19 (N. coriiceps) and VMRC-21 (C. aceratus) comprise 12× and 10× coverage of the respective genomes and have average insert sizes of 138 and 168 kb. Paired BAC-end reads representing ∼0.1% of each genome showed that the repetitive element landscapes of the two genomes (13.4% of the N. coriiceps genome and 14.5% for C. aceratus) were similar. The availability of these high-quality and well-characterized BAC libraries sets the stage for targeted genomic analyses of the unusual anatomical and physiological adaptations of the notothenioids, some of which mimic human diseases. Here we consider the evolution of secondary pelagicism by various taxa of the group and illustrate the utility of Antarctic icefishes as an evolutionary-mutant model of human osteopenia (low-mineral density of bones).

  14. Deciphering and dating the red panda's ancestry and early adaptive radiation of Musteloidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Jun J; Wolsan, Mieczyslaw; Minami, Shinji; Hosoda, Tetsuji; Sinaga, Martua H; Hiyama, Kozue; Yamaguchi, Yasunori; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2009-12-01

    Few species have been of more disputed affinities than the red or lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens), an endangered endemic Southeast Asian vegetarian member of the placental mammalian order Carnivora. This peculiar carnivoran has mostly been classified with raccoons (Procyonidae) or bears (Ursidae), grouped with the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in their own family, or considered a separate lineage of equivocal ancestry. Recent molecular studies have indicated a close affinity of the red panda to a clade of procyonids and mustelids (weasels, otters, martens, badgers, and allies), but have failed to unambiguously resolve the position of this species relative to mephitids (skunks and stink badgers). We examined the relationship of the red panda to other extant species of the carnivoran suborder Caniformia using a set of concatenated approximately 5.5-kb sequences from protein-coding exons of five nuclear genes. Bayesian, maximum likelihood, and parsimony phylogenetic analyses strongly supported the red panda as the closest living relative of a clade containing Procyonidae and Mustelidae to the exclusion of Mephitidae. These three families together with the red panda (which is classified here as a single extant species of a distinct family, Ailuridae) compose the superfamily Musteloidea, a clade strongly supported by all our phylogenetic analyses as sister to the monophyletic Pinnipedia (seals, sea lions, walruses). The approximately unbiased, Kishino-Hasegawa, and Templeton topology tests rejected (Pfossil evidence that extends the early adaptive radiation of the total clade of musteloids to the Eocene-Oligocene transition and also suggests Asia as a center of this radiation. PMID:19699810

  15. Effect of low dose radiation in lymphocytes from children exposed to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident. Cytogenetic, chromosome painting, GPA and adaptive response studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study concerns the monitoring of some children coming from Byelorussian, Ukrainian and Russian republics, exposed to the fall-out, or to the initial acute dose of radiation with the aim of assessing the effects of ionizing radiation on human health and of verifying the persisting of chromosomal damage several years after the accident. Both structural chromosomes damage (conventional cytogenetic and chromosome painting) and molecular mutation (GPA) have been investigated, moreover the possible induction of an adaptive response has been tested. (author)

  16. Convergent evolution of behavior in an adaptive radiation of Hawaiian web-building spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackledge, Todd A; Gillespie, Rosemary G

    2004-11-16

    Species in ecologically similar habitats often display patterns of divergence that are strikingly comparable, suggesting that natural selection can lead to predictable evolutionary change in communities. However, the relative importance of selection as an agent mediating in situ diversification, versus dispersal between habitats, cannot be addressed without knowledge of phylogenetic history. We used an adaptive radiation of spiders within the Hawaiian Islands to test the prediction that species of spiders on different islands would independently evolve webs with similar architectures. Tetragnatha spiders are the only nocturnal orb-weaving spiders endemic to the Hawaiian archipelago, and multiple species of orb-weaving Tetragnatha co-occur within mesic and wet forest habitats on each of the main islands. Therefore, comparison of web architectures spun by spiders on different islands allowed study of replicated evolutionary events of past behavioral diversification. We found that species within each island construct webs with architectures that differ from one another. However, pairs of species on different islands, "ethotypes," share remarkable similarities in web architectures. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the species comprising these ethotypes evolved independent of one another. Our study illustrates the high degree of predictability that can be exhibited by the evolutionary diversification of complex behaviors. However, not all web architectures were shared between islands, demonstrating that unique effects also have played an important role in the historical diversification of behavior.

  17. Differential effect of ultraviolet-B radiation on certain metabolic processes in a chromatically adapting Nostoc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of UV-B radiation on growth, pigmentation and certain physiological processes was studied in a N2-fixing chromatically adapting cyanobacterium, Nostoc spongiaeforme. A brownish form (phycoerythrin rich) was found to be more tolerant to UV-B than the blue-green (phycocyanin rich) form of N. spongiaeforme. Continuous exposure to UV-B (5.5 W m-2) for 90 min caused complete killing of the blue-green strain whereas the brown strain showed complete loss of survival after 180 min. Pigment content was more strongly inhibited in the blue-green strain than in the brown. Nitrogenase activity was completely abolished in both strains within 35 min of UV-B treatment. Restoration of nitrogenase occurred upon transfer to fluorescent or incandescent light after a lag of 5-6 h, suggesting fresh synthesis of nitrogenase. In vivo nitrate reductase activity was stimulated by UV-B treatment, the degree of enhancement being significantly higher in the blue-green strain. 14CO2 uptake was also completely abolished by UV-B treatment in both strains. (author)

  18. Lyα RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical code for solving various Lyα radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Lyα emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Lyα RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Lyα scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Lyα emitters.

  19. A framework for automated contour quality assurance in radiation therapy including adaptive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contouring of targets and normal tissues is one of the largest sources of variability in radiation therapy treatment plans. Contours thus require a time intensive and error-prone quality assurance (QA) evaluation, limitations which also impair the facilitation of adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Here, an automated system for contour QA is developed using historical data (the ‘knowledge base’). A pilot study was performed with a knowledge base derived from 9 contours each from 29 head-and-neck treatment plans. Size, shape, relative position, and other clinically-relevant metrics and heuristically derived rules are determined. Metrics are extracted from input patient data and compared against rules determined from the knowledge base; a computer-learning component allows metrics to evolve with more input data, including patient specific data for ART. Nine additional plans containing 42 unique contouring errors were analyzed. 40/42 errors were detected as were 9 false positives. The results of this study imply knowledge-based contour QA could potentially enhance the safety and effectiveness of RT treatment plans as well as increase the efficiency of the treatment planning process, reducing labor and the cost of therapy for patients. (paper)

  20. Iterative development and the scope for plasticity: contrasts among trait categories in an adaptive radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S A; Wund, M A; Graham, M A; Earley, R L; Gardiner, R; Kearns, T; Baker, J A

    2015-10-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can influence evolutionary change in a lineage, ranging from facilitation of population persistence in a novel environment to directing the patterns of evolutionary change. As the specific nature of plasticity can impact evolutionary consequences, it is essential to consider how plasticity is manifested if we are to understand the contribution of plasticity to phenotypic evolution. Most morphological traits are developmentally plastic, irreversible, and generally considered to be costly, at least when the resultant phenotype is mis-matched to the environment. At the other extreme, behavioral phenotypes are typically activational (modifiable on very short time scales), and not immediately costly as they are produced by constitutive neural networks. Although patterns of morphological and behavioral plasticity are often compared, patterns of plasticity of life history phenotypes are rarely considered. Here we review patterns of plasticity in these trait categories within and among populations, comprising the adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback fish Gasterosteus aculeatus. We immediately found it necessary to consider the possibility of iterated development, the concept that behavioral and life history trajectories can be repeatedly reset on activational (usually behavior) or developmental (usually life history) time frames, offering fine tuning of the response to environmental context. Morphology in stickleback is primarily reset only in that developmental trajectories can be altered as environments change over the course of development. As anticipated, the boundaries between the trait categories are not clear and are likely to be linked by shared, underlying physiological and genetic systems. PMID:26243135

  1. Deformable image registration of CT and truncated cone-beam CT for adaptive radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-11-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between computed tomography (CT) and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. Part of this work was presented at the 54th AAPM Annual Meeting (Charlotte, NC, USA, 29 July-2 August 2012).

  2. Multilevel UV-B Attenuance : Morphological and Chemical Adaptations of Vicia faba to Ultraviolet-B Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Meijkamp, B.B.

    2006-01-01

    Due to anthropogenic reduction of stratospheric ozone, levels of potentially harmful solar UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) have been increasing on earth during the last three decades. The main aim of this thesis was to study growth responses and morphological and chemical adaptation mechanisms to harmful UV-B radiation. Two cultivars of Vicia faba, differing in UV-B sensitivity were used as a model system. Constitutive defence mechanisms appeared to function very well; even in the sensitive cv. P...

  3. Using patient-specific phantoms to evaluate deformable image registration algorithms for adaptive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nick; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Adams, Jeffrey; Li, Shunshan; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Zhong, Hualiang

    2013-11-04

    DIR algorithms need to be verified for each registration instance when implementing adaptive radiation therapy.

  4. Chromosomal Translocations in Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae)—Facilitators of Adaptive Radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Peter H.; Yadamsuren, Oyunchuluun; Procunier, William S.

    2016-01-01

    A macrogenomic investigation of a Holarctic clade of black flies—the Simulium cholodkovskii lineage—provided a platform to explore the implications of a unique, synapomorphic whole-arm interchange in the evolution of black flies. Nearly 60 structural rearrangements were discovered in the polytene complement of the lineage, including 15 common to all 138 analyzed individuals, relative to the central sequence for the entire subgenus Simulium. Three species were represented, of which two Palearctic entities (Simulium cholodkovskii and S. decimatum) were sympatric; an absence of hybrids confirmed their reproductive isolation. A third (Nearctic) entity had nonhomologous sex chromosomes, relative to the other species, and is considered a separate species, for which the name Simulium nigricoxum is revalidated. A cytophylogeny is inferred and indicates that the two Palearctic taxa are sister species and these, in turn, are the sister group of the Nearctic species. The rise of the S. cholodkovskii lineage encompassed complex chromosomal and genomic restructuring phenomena associated with speciation in black flies, viz. expression of one and the same rearrangement as polymorphic, fixed, or sex linked in different species; taxon-specific differentiation of sex chromosomes; and reciprocal translocation of chromosome arms. The translocation is hypothesized to have occurred early in male spermatogonia, with the translocated chromosomal complement being transmitted to the X- and Y-bearing sperm during spermatogenesis, resulting in alternate disjunction of viable F1 translocation heterozygotes and the eventual formation of more viable and selectable F2 translocation homozygous progeny. Of 11 or 12 independently derived whole-arm interchanges known in the family Simuliidae, at least six are associated with subsequent speciation events, suggesting a facilitating role of translocations in adaptive radiations. The findings are discussed in the context of potential structural and

  5. Chromosomal Translocations in Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae-Facilitators of Adaptive Radiation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Adler

    Full Text Available A macrogenomic investigation of a Holarctic clade of black flies-the Simulium cholodkovskii lineage-provided a platform to explore the implications of a unique, synapomorphic whole-arm interchange in the evolution of black flies. Nearly 60 structural rearrangements were discovered in the polytene complement of the lineage, including 15 common to all 138 analyzed individuals, relative to the central sequence for the entire subgenus Simulium. Three species were represented, of which two Palearctic entities (Simulium cholodkovskii and S. decimatum were sympatric; an absence of hybrids confirmed their reproductive isolation. A third (Nearctic entity had nonhomologous sex chromosomes, relative to the other species, and is considered a separate species, for which the name Simulium nigricoxum is revalidated. A cytophylogeny is inferred and indicates that the two Palearctic taxa are sister species and these, in turn, are the sister group of the Nearctic species. The rise of the S. cholodkovskii lineage encompassed complex chromosomal and genomic restructuring phenomena associated with speciation in black flies, viz. expression of one and the same rearrangement as polymorphic, fixed, or sex linked in different species; taxon-specific differentiation of sex chromosomes; and reciprocal translocation of chromosome arms. The translocation is hypothesized to have occurred early in male spermatogonia, with the translocated chromosomal complement being transmitted to the X- and Y-bearing sperm during spermatogenesis, resulting in alternate disjunction of viable F1 translocation heterozygotes and the eventual formation of more viable and selectable F2 translocation homozygous progeny. Of 11 or 12 independently derived whole-arm interchanges known in the family Simuliidae, at least six are associated with subsequent speciation events, suggesting a facilitating role of translocations in adaptive radiations. The findings are discussed in the context of potential

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Colle, Fabio; Granot, Jonathan; López-Cámara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with ρvpropr -k , bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the relativistic flow.

  7. GAMMA-RAY BURST DYNAMICS AND AFTERGLOW RADIATION FROM ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT, SPECIAL RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lopez-Camara, Diego, E-mail: fabio@ucolick.org [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-02-20

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in gamma-ray burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite-volume conservative solvers, with second-order interpolation in space and time. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) and multi-dimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with {rho}{proportional_to}r{sup -k}, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases (which are described by the Blandford-McKee and Sedov-Taylor self-similar solutions, respectively), as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to nonrelativistic speeds in one dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, together with the scaling of position, Lorentz factor, and the shock velocity as a function of time and shock radius, is explained here using a simple analytical model based on energy conservation. The method used for calculating the afterglow radiation by post-processing the results of the simulations is described in detail. The light curves computed using the results of 1D numerical simulations during the relativistic stage correctly reproduce those calculated assuming the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution for the evolution of the flow. The jet dynamics from our 2D simulations and the resulting afterglow light curves, including the jet break, are in good agreement with those presented in previous works. Finally, we show how the details of the dynamics critically depend on properly resolving the structure of the

  8. Megaphylogeny, cell body plans, adaptive zones: causes and timing of eukaryote basal radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    I discuss eukaryote megaphylogeny and the timing of major innovations in the light of multigene trees and the rarity of marine/freshwater evolutionary transitions. The first eukaryotes were aerobic phagotrophs, probably substratum-associated heterotrophic amoeboflagellates. The primary eukaryote bifurcation generated unikonts (ancestrally probably unicentriolar, with a conical microtubular [MT] cytoskeleton) and bikonts (ciliary transformation from anterior cilium to ancestrally gliding posterior cilium; cytoskeleton of ventral MT bands). Unikonts diverged into Amoebozoa with anterior cilia, lost when lobosan broad pseudopods evolved for locomotion, and Choanozoa with posterior cilium and filose pseudopods that became unbranched tentacles/microvilli in holozoa and eventually the choanoflagellate/choanocyte collar. Of choanozoan ancestry, animals evolved epithelia, fibroblasts, eggs, and sperm. Fungi and Ichthyosporea evolved walls. Bikonts, ancestrally with ventral grooves, include three adaptively divergent megagroups: Rhizaria (Retaria and Cercozoa, ancestrally reticulofilose soft-surfaced gliding amoeboflagellates), and the originally planktonic Excavata, and the corticates (Plantae and chromalveolates) that suppressed pseudopodia. Excavata evolved cilia-generated feeding currents for grooval ingestion; corticates evolved cortical alveoli and ciliary hairs. Symbiogenetic origin and transfers of chloroplasts stimulated an explosive radiation of corticates--hard to resolve on multigene trees--and opisthokonts, and ensuing Cambrian explosions of animals and protists. Plantae lost phagotrophy and multiply evolved walls and macroalgae. Apusozoa, with dorsal pellicle and ventral pseudopods, are probably the most divergent bikonts or related to opisthokonts. Eukaryotes probably originated 800-850 My ago. Amoebozoa, Apusozoa, Loukozoa, and Metamonada may be the only extant eukaryote phyla pre-dating Neoproterozoic snowball earth. New subphyla are established for

  9. Adaptive Response to ionizing Radiation Induced by Low Doses of Gamma Rays in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells are exposed to low doses of a mutagenic or clastogenic agents, they often become less sensitive to the effects of a higher does administered subsequently. Such adaptive responses were first described in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells to low doses of an alkylating agent. Since most of the studies have been carried out with human lymphocytes, it is urgently necessary to study this effect in different cellular systems. Its relation with inherent cellular radiosensitivity and underlying mechanism also remain to be answered. In this study, adaptive response by 1 cGy of gamma rays was investigated in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines which were derived from ataxia telangiectasia homozygote, ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote, and normal individual. Experiments were carried out by delivering 1 cGy followed by 50 cGy of gamma radiation and chromatid breaks were scored as an endpoint. The results indicate that prior exposure to 1 cGy of gamma rays reduces the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher does (50 cGy). The expression of this adaptive response was similar among three cell lines despite of their different radiosensitivity. When 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added after 50 cGy, adaptive responses were abolished in all the tested cell lines. Therefore it is suggested that the adaptive response can be observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Which was first documented through this study. The expression of adaptive response was similar among the cell lines regardless of their radiosensitivity. The elimination of the adaptive response by 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromosomal repair mechanism

  10. Automatic online adaptive radiation therapy techniques for targets with significant shape change: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Laurence E; Tishler, Roy B; Petit, Joshua; Cormack, Robert; Chin, Lee

    2006-05-21

    This work looks at the feasibility of an online adaptive radiation therapy concept that would detect the daily position and shape of the patient, and would then correct the daily treatment to account for any changes compared with planning position. In particular, it looks at the possibility of developing algorithms to correct for large complicated shape change. For co-planar beams, the dose in an axial plane is approximately associated with the positions of a single multi-leaf collimator (MLC) pair. We start with a primary plan, and automatically generate several secondary plans with gantry angles offset by regular increments. MLC sequences for each plan are calculated keeping monitor units (MUs) and number of segments constant for a given beam (fluences are different). Bulk registration (3D) of planning and daily CT images gives global shifts. Slice-by-slice (2D) registration gives local shifts and rotations about the longitudinal axis for each axial slice. The daily MLC sequence is then created for each axial slice/MLC leaf pair combination, by taking the MLC positions from the pre-calculated plan with the nearest rotation, and shifting using a beam's-eye-view calculation to account for local linear shifts. A planning study was carried out using two head and neck region MR images of a healthy volunteer which were contoured to simulate a base-of-tongue treatment: one with the head straight (used to simulate the planning image) and the other with the head tilted to the left (the daily image). Head and neck treatment was chosen to evaluate this technique because of its challenging nature, with varying internal and external contours, and multiple degrees of freedom. Shape change was significant: on a slice-by-slice basis, local rotations in the daily image varied from 2 to 31 degrees, and local shifts ranged from -0.2 to 0.5 cm and -0.4 to 0.0 cm in right-left and posterior-anterior directions, respectively. The adapted treatment gave reasonable target coverage (100

  11. SU-F-BRF-07: Impact of Different Patient Setup Strategies in Adaptive Radiation Therapy with Simultaneous Integrated Volume-Adapted Boost of NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balik, S [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Weiss, E; Sleeman, W; Wu, Y; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Dogan, N [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Fatyga, M [Mayo Clinic, AZ, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential impact of several setup error correction strategies on a proposed image-guided adaptive radiotherapy strategy for locally advanced lung cancer. Methods: Daily 4D cone-beam CT and weekly 4D fan-beam CT images were acquired from 9 lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Initial planning CT was deformably registered to daily CBCT images to generate synthetic treatment courses. An adaptive radiation therapy course was simulated using the weekly CT images with replanning twice and a hypofractionated, simultaneous integrated boost to a total dose of 66 Gy to the original PTV and either a 66 Gy (no boost) or 82 Gy (boost) dose to the boost PTV (ITV + 3mm) in 33 fractions with IMRT or VMAT. Lymph nodes (LN) were not boosted (prescribed to 66 Gy in both plans). Synthetic images were rigidly, bony (BN) or tumor and carina (TC), registered to the corresponding plan CT, dose was computed on these from adaptive replans (PLAN) and deformably accumulated back to the original planning CT. Cumulative D98% of CTV of PT (ITV for 82Gy) and LN, and normal tissue dose changes were analyzed. Results: Two patients were removed from the study due to large registration errors. For the remaining 7 patients, D98% for CTV-PT (ITV-PT for 82 Gy) and CTV-LN was within 1 Gy of PLAN for both 66 Gy and 82 Gy plans with both setup techniques. Overall, TC based setup provided better results, especially for LN coverage (p = 0.1 for 66Gy plan and p = 0.2 for 82 Gy plan, comparison of BN and TC), though not significant. Normal tissue dose constraints violated for some patients if constraint was barely achieved in PLAN. Conclusion: The hypofractionated adaptive strategy appears to be deliverable with soft tissue alignment for the evaluated margins and planning parameters. Research was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  12. Adaptive Radiation along a Thermal Gradient: Preliminary Results of Habitat Use and Respiration Rate Divergence among Whitefish Morphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahilainen, Kimmo Kalevi; Patterson, William Paul; Sonninen, Eloni; Harrod, Chris; Kiljunen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive radiation is considered an important mechanism for the development of new species, but very little is known about the role of thermal adaptation during this process. Such adaptation should be especially important in poikilothermic animals that are often subjected to pronounced seasonal temperature variation that directly affects metabolic function. We conducted a preliminary study of individual lifetime thermal habitat use and respiration rates of four whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L.)) morphs (two pelagic, one littoral and one profundal) using stable carbon and oxygen isotope values of otolith carbonate. These morphs, two of which utilized pelagic habitats, one littoral and one profundal recently diverged via adaptive radiation to exploit different major niches in a deep and thermally stratified subarctic lake. We found evidence that the morphs used different thermal niches. The profundal morph had the most distinct thermal niche and consistently occupied the coldest thermal habitat of the lake, whereas differences were less pronounced among the shallow water pelagic and littoral morphs. Our results indicated ontogenetic shifts in thermal niches: juveniles of all whitefish morphs inhabited warmer ambient temperatures than adults. According to sampling of the otolith nucleus, hatching temperatures were higher for benthic compared to pelagic morphs. Estimated respiration rate was the lowest for benthivorous profundal morph, contrasting with the higher values estimated for the other morphs that inhabited shallower and warmer water. These preliminary results suggest that physiological adaptation to different thermal habitats shown by the sympatric morphs may play a significant role in maintaining or strengthening niche segregation and divergence in life-history traits, potentially contributing to reproductive isolation and incipient speciation. PMID:25405979

  13. Adaptive radiation along a thermal gradient: preliminary results of habitat use and respiration rate divergence among whitefish morphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Kalevi Kahilainen

    Full Text Available Adaptive radiation is considered an important mechanism for the development of new species, but very little is known about the role of thermal adaptation during this process. Such adaptation should be especially important in poikilothermic animals that are often subjected to pronounced seasonal temperature variation that directly affects metabolic function. We conducted a preliminary study of individual lifetime thermal habitat use and respiration rates of four whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L. morphs (two pelagic, one littoral and one profundal using stable carbon and oxygen isotope values of otolith carbonate. These morphs, two of which utilized pelagic habitats, one littoral and one profundal recently diverged via adaptive radiation to exploit different major niches in a deep and thermally stratified subarctic lake. We found evidence that the morphs used different thermal niches. The profundal morph had the most distinct thermal niche and consistently occupied the coldest thermal habitat of the lake, whereas differences were less pronounced among the shallow water pelagic and littoral morphs. Our results indicated ontogenetic shifts in thermal niches: juveniles of all whitefish morphs inhabited warmer ambient temperatures than adults. According to sampling of the otolith nucleus, hatching temperatures were higher for benthic compared to pelagic morphs. Estimated respiration rate was the lowest for benthivorous profundal morph, contrasting with the higher values estimated for the other morphs that inhabited shallower and warmer water. These preliminary results suggest that physiological adaptation to different thermal habitats shown by the sympatric morphs may play a significant role in maintaining or strengthening niche segregation and divergence in life-history traits, potentially contributing to reproductive isolation and incipient speciation.

  14. Adaptive radiation along a thermal gradient: preliminary results of habitat use and respiration rate divergence among whitefish morphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahilainen, Kimmo Kalevi; Patterson, William Paul; Sonninen, Eloni; Harrod, Chris; Kiljunen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive radiation is considered an important mechanism for the development of new species, but very little is known about the role of thermal adaptation during this process. Such adaptation should be especially important in poikilothermic animals that are often subjected to pronounced seasonal temperature variation that directly affects metabolic function. We conducted a preliminary study of individual lifetime thermal habitat use and respiration rates of four whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L.)) morphs (two pelagic, one littoral and one profundal) using stable carbon and oxygen isotope values of otolith carbonate. These morphs, two of which utilized pelagic habitats, one littoral and one profundal recently diverged via adaptive radiation to exploit different major niches in a deep and thermally stratified subarctic lake. We found evidence that the morphs used different thermal niches. The profundal morph had the most distinct thermal niche and consistently occupied the coldest thermal habitat of the lake, whereas differences were less pronounced among the shallow water pelagic and littoral morphs. Our results indicated ontogenetic shifts in thermal niches: juveniles of all whitefish morphs inhabited warmer ambient temperatures than adults. According to sampling of the otolith nucleus, hatching temperatures were higher for benthic compared to pelagic morphs. Estimated respiration rate was the lowest for benthivorous profundal morph, contrasting with the higher values estimated for the other morphs that inhabited shallower and warmer water. These preliminary results suggest that physiological adaptation to different thermal habitats shown by the sympatric morphs may play a significant role in maintaining or strengthening niche segregation and divergence in life-history traits, potentially contributing to reproductive isolation and incipient speciation. PMID:25405979

  15. [Adaptation reactions of rat blood exposed to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V N; Deriugina, A V

    2010-06-01

    It is carried out research of action low-intensive electromagnetic radiations--low-intensive laser radiation and radiations of the highest frequency on normal animals and at modelling the stress-reaction, caused by introduction of adrenaline. Absence of effects of system of blood is noted at action low-intensive electromagnetic radiations on normal an organism and them correction action on alteration an organism, shown in restoration of the broken parameters--leukocyte the blood count, electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes and phospholipide's structure of their membranes.

  16. A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. A total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (-.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (-.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

  17. Cytogenetic radiation adaptive response assessed by metaphase analysis and micronuclei test in human lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation adaptive response in human peripheral lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells was investigated using both metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay. We assessed the correlation between both tests. Two groups of the human peripheral lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells were exposed to low dose (conditioning dose, 0.18 Gy) or high dose (challenging dose, 2 Gy) Υ-rays. The other 4 groups were exposed to low dose followed by high dose after several time intervals (4, 7, 12, and 24 hours, respectively). The frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in metaphase analysis and micronuclei in micronucleus assay were counted. Chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei of preexposed group were lower than those of the group only exposed to high dose radiation. Maximal reduction in frequencies of chromosomal aberrations were observed in the group to which challenging dose was given at 7 hour after a conditioning dose (p<0.001). Metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay revealed very good correlation in both human lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells (r=0.98, p<0.001; r=0.99, p=0.001, respectively). Radiation adaptive response could be induced by low dose irradiation in both human lymphocytes and mouse bone marrow cells. There was a significant correlation between metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay

  18. Neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of ionizing radiation: Role of adaptive response and bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Lao, X.-Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Kapadia, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Elmore, E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Redpath, J.L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)]. E-mail: jlredpat@uci.edu

    2006-05-11

    The shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction by low doses of ionizing radiation is of critical importance to the assessment of cancer risk at such doses. Epidemiologic analyses are limited by sensitivity to doses typically greater than 50-100 mGy for low LET radiation. Laboratory studies allow for the examination of lower doses using cancer-relevant endpoints. One such endpoint is neoplastic transformation in vitro. It is known that this endpoint is responsive to both adaptive response and bystander effects. The relative balance of these processes is likely to play an important role in determining the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses. A factor that may influence this balance is cell density at time of irradiation. The findings reported in this paper indicate that the transformation suppressive effect of low doses previously seen following irradiation of sub-confluent cultures, and attributed to an adaptive response, is reduced for irradiated confluent cultures. However, even under these conditions designed to optimize the role of bystander effects the data do not fit a linear no-threshold model and are still consistent with the notion of a threshold dose for neoplastic transformation in vitro by low LET radiation.

  19. Adaptive radiation of island plants: Evidence from Aeonium (Crassulaceae) of the Canary Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T.H.; Olesen, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    discussion of the mechanisms governing radiations on islands. Most examples are from the Hawaiian and Canarian floras, and in particular from studies on the morphological, ecological and molecular diversification of the genus Aeonium, the largest plant radiation of the Canarian Islands....

  20. Characterization of the adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of X-rays to Vibrio cholerae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretreatment with sublethal doses of X-rays induced an adaptive response in Vibrio cholerae cells as indicated by their greater resistance to the subsequent challenging doses of X-irradiation. The adaptive response was maximum following a pre-exposure dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays and an optimum incubation period of 40 min at 37C. Pre-exposure to a sublethal dose of 1.7 Gy X-rays made the Vibrio cholerae cells 3.38-fold more resistant to the subsequent challenge by X-rays. Pretreatment with a sublethal dose of hydrogen peroxide offered a similar degree of protection to the bacterial cells against subsequent treatment with challenging doses of X-ray radiation. However, exposure of Vibrio cholerae cells to mild heat (42C for 10 min) before X-ray irradiation decreased their survival following X-irradiation

  1. Comparative genomics of Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans: divergent routes of adaptation to thermophily and radiation resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Michael J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans belong to a distinct bacterial clade but have remarkably different phenotypes. T. thermophilus is a thermophile, which is relatively sensitive to ionizing radiation and desiccation, whereas D. radiodurans is a mesophile, which is highly radiation- and desiccation-resistant. Here we present an in-depth comparison of the genomes of these two related but differently adapted bacteria. Results By reconstructing the evolution of Thermus and Deinococcus after the divergence from their common ancestor, we demonstrate a high level of post-divergence gene flux in both lineages. Various aspects of the adaptation to high temperature in Thermus can be attributed to horizontal gene transfer from archaea and thermophilic bacteria; many of the horizontally transferred genes are located on the single megaplasmid of Thermus. In addition, the Thermus lineage has lost a set of genes that are still present in Deinococcus and many other mesophilic bacteria but are not common among thermophiles. By contrast, Deinococcus seems to have acquired numerous genes related to stress response systems from various bacteria. A comparison of the distribution of orthologous genes among the four partitions of the Deinococcus genome and the two partitions of the Thermus genome reveals homology between the Thermus megaplasmid (pTT27 and Deinococcus megaplasmid (DR177. Conclusion After the radiation from their common ancestor, the Thermus and Deinococcus lineages have taken divergent paths toward their distinct lifestyles. In addition to extensive gene loss, Thermus seems to have acquired numerous genes from thermophiles, which likely was the decisive contribution to its thermophilic adaptation. By contrast, Deinococcus lost few genes but seems to have acquired many bacterial genes that apparently enhanced its ability to survive different kinds of environmental stresses. Notwithstanding the accumulation of

  2. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  3. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Leslie Redpath, Ph.D.

    2006-01-23

    The goal of this project was to investigate mechanisms underlying the adaptive response seen following exposure of HeLa x skin fibroblast human hybrid cells to low doses of low LET radiation. It was proposed to investigate the contributions of three possible mechanisms. These were: 1. Upregulation of cellular antioxidant status. 2. Upregulation of DNA repair. 3. Upregulation of gap junction intracellular communication. We have completed the study of the role of upregulation of reduced glutathione (GSH) as a possible mechanism underlying our observed suppression of transformation frequency at low radiation doses. We have also completed our study of the possible role of upregulation of DNA repair in the observed adaptive response against neoplastic transformation. We concluded that upregulation of DNA repair may be more important in modulating transformation at the higher dose. A manuscript describing the above studies has been submitted published in Carcinogenesis 24:1961-1965, 2003. Finally, we have completed two studies of the possible role of upregulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in modulating transformation frequency at low doses of low LET radiation. This research was published in Radiation Research 162:646-654, 2004. In order to optimize the opportunity for GJIC, we then carried out a study where confluent cultures were irradiated. The results indicated, that while the degree of low dose suppression was somewhat reduced compared to that seen for subconfluent cultures, it was not completely absent. This research has been submitted for publication. Our research program was of sufficient interest to generate two invited reviews, and five invited presentations.

  4. Adaptation strategies of endolithic chlorophototrophs to survive the hyperarid and extreme solar radiation environment of the Atacama Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek eWierzchos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is one of the driest deserts on Earth and, as such, a natural laboratory to explore the limits of life and the strategies evolved by microorganisms to adapt to extreme environments. Here we report the exceptional adaptation strategies of chlorophototrophic and eukaryotic algae, and chlorophototrophic and prokaryotic cyanobacteria to the hyperarid and extremely high solar radiation conditions occurring in this desert. Our approach combined several microscopy techniques, spectroscopic analytical methods, and molecular analyses. We found that the major adaptation strategy was to avoid the extreme environmental conditions by colonizing cryptoendolithic, as well as, hypoendolithic habitats within gypsum deposits. The cryptoendolithic colonization occurred a few millimeters beneath the gypsum surface and showed a succession of organized horizons of algae and cyanobacteria, which has never been reported for endolithic microbial communities. The presence of cyanobacteria beneath the algal layer, in close contact with sepiolite inclusions, and their hypoendolithic colonization suggest that occasional liquid water might persist within these sub-microhabitats. We also identified the presence of abundant carotenoids in the upper cryptoendolithic algal habitat and scytonemin in the cyanobacteria hypoendolithic habitat. This study illustrates that successful lithobiontic microbial colonization at the limit for microbial life is the result of a combination of adaptive strategies to avoid excess solar irradiance and extreme evapotranspiration rates, taking advantage of the complex structural and mineralogical characteristics of gypsum deposits – conceptually called rock’s habitable architecture. Additionally self-protection by synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites likely produces a shielding effect that prevents photoinhibition and lethal photooxidative damage to the chlorophototrophs, representing another

  5. Adaptation strategies of endolithic chlorophototrophs to survive the hyperarid and extreme solar radiation environment of the Atacama Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchos, Jacek; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne; Vítek, Petr; Artieda, Octavio; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Škaloud, Pavel; Tisza, Michel; Davila, Alfonso F.; Vílchez, Carlos; Garbayo, Inés; Ascaso, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is one of the driest deserts on Earth and, as such, a natural laboratory to explore the limits of life and the strategies evolved by microorganisms to adapt to extreme environments. Here we report the exceptional adaptation strategies of chlorophototrophic and eukaryotic algae, and chlorophototrophic and prokaryotic cyanobacteria to the hyperarid and extremely high solar radiation conditions occurring in this desert. Our approach combined several microscopy techniques, spectroscopic analytical methods, and molecular analyses. We found that the major adaptation strategy was to avoid the extreme environmental conditions by colonizing cryptoendolithic, as well as, hypoendolithic habitats within gypsum deposits. The cryptoendolithic colonization occurred a few millimeters beneath the gypsum surface and showed a succession of organized horizons of algae and cyanobacteria, which has never been reported for endolithic microbial communities. The presence of cyanobacteria beneath the algal layer, in close contact with sepiolite inclusions, and their hypoendolithic colonization suggest that occasional liquid water might persist within these sub-microhabitats. We also identified the presence of abundant carotenoids in the upper cryptoendolithic algal habitat and scytonemin in the cyanobacteria hypoendolithic habitat. This study illustrates that successful lithobiontic microbial colonization at the limit for microbial life is the result of a combination of adaptive strategies to avoid excess solar irradiance and extreme evapotranspiration rates, taking advantage of the complex structural and mineralogical characteristics of gypsum deposits—conceptually called “rock's habitable architecture.” Additionally, self-protection by synthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites likely produces a shielding effect that prevents photoinhibition and lethal photooxidative damage to the chlorophototrophs, representing another level of

  6. Potential of adaptive neuro-fuzzy system for prediction of daily global solar radiation by day of the year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ANFIS technique is applied to propose a model for daily global radiation estimation. • Day of the year (nday) is utilized as a sole input element. • The potential of ANFIS model is compared with day of the year-based (DYB) models. • ANFIS model enjoys high accuracy and outperforms DYB models. • Applying ANFIS to estimate daily global radiation by nday is really appealing. - Abstract: Estimating the horizontal global solar radiation by day of the year (nday) is particularly appealing since there is no need to any specific meteorological input data or even pre-calculation analysis. In this study, an intelligent optimization scheme based upon the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied to develop a model for estimation of daily horizontal global solar radiation using nday as the only input. The chief goal was identifying the suitability of ANFIS technique for this aim. Long-term measured data for Iranian city of Tabass was used to train and test the ANFIS model. The statistical results verified that the ANFIS model provides accurate and reliable predictions. Making comparisons with the predictions of six day of the year-based empirical models revealed the superiority of ANFIS model. For the ANFIS model, the mean absolute percentage error, mean absolute bias error, root mean square error and correlation coefficient were 3.9569%, 0.6911 MJ/m2, 0.8917 MJ/m2 and 0.9908, respectively. Also, the daily bias errors between the ANFIS predictions and measured data fell in the favorable range of –3 to 3 MJ/m2. In a nutshell, the survey results highly encouraged the application of ANFIS to estimate daily horizontal global solar radiation using only nday

  7. Adaptation of the delta-m and δ-fit truncation methods to vector radiative transfer: Effect of truncation on radiative transfer accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of aerosol and/or clouds, the use of appropriate truncation methods becomes indispensable for accurate but cost-efficient radiative transfer computations. Truncation methods allow the reduction of the large number (usually several hundreds) of Fourier components associated with particulate scattering functions to a more manageable number, thereby making it possible to carry out radiative transfer computations with a modest number of streams. While several truncation methods have been discussed for scalar radiative transfer, few rigorous studies have been made of truncation methods for the vector case. Here, we formally derive the vector form of Wiscombe's delta-m truncation method. Two main sources of error associated with delta-m truncation are identified as the delta-separation error (DSE) and the phase-truncation error (PTE). The view angles most affected by truncation error occur in the vicinity of the direction of exact backscatter. This view geometry occurs commonly in satellite based remote sensing applications, and is hence of considerable importance. In order to deal with these errors, we adapt the δ-fit approach of Hu et al. (2000) [17] to vector radiative transfer. The resulting δBGE-fit is compared with the vectorized delta-m method. For truncation at l=25 of an original phase matrix consisting of over 300 Fourier components, the use of the δBGE-fit minimizes the error due to truncation at these view angles, while practically eliminating error at other angles. We also show how truncation errors have a distorting effect on hyperspectral absorption line shapes. The choice of the δBGE-fit method over delta-m truncation minimizes errors in absorption line depths, thus affording greater accuracy for sensitive retrievals such as those of XCO2 from OCO-2 or GOSAT measurements. - Highlights: • Derives vector form for delta-m truncation method. • Adapts δ-fit truncation approach to vector RTE as δBGE-fit. • Compares truncation

  8. Conservatism and adaptability during squirrel radiation: What is mandible shape telling us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casanovas-Vilar, I.; van Dam, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Both functional adaptation and phylogeny shape the morphology of taxa within clades. Herein we explore these two factors in an integrated way by analyzing shape and size variation in the mandible of extant squirrels using landmark-based geometric morphometrics in combination with a comparative phylo

  9. Adaptive evolution of cytochrome c oxidase: Infrastructure for a carnivorous plant radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Richard W.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Laakkonen, Liisa; Wikström, Mårten; Albert, Victor A.

    2004-01-01

    Much recent attention in the study of adaptation of organismal form has centered on developmental regulation. As such, the highly conserved respiratory machinery of eukaryotic cells might seem an unlikely target for selection supporting novel morphologies. We demonstrate that a dramatic molecular evolutionary rate increase in subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from an active-trapping lineage of carnivorous plants is caused by positive Darwinian selection. Bladderworts (Utricularia) trap plankton when water-immersed, negatively pressured suction bladders are triggered. The resetting of traps involves active ion transport, requiring considerable energy expenditure. As judged from the quaternary structure of bovine COX, the most profound adaptive substitutions are two contiguous cysteines absent in ≈99.9% of databased COX I sequences from Eukaryota, Archaea, and Bacteria. This motif lies directly at the docking point of COX I helix 3 and cytochrome c, and modeling of bovine COX I suggests the possibility of an unprecedented helix-terminating disulfide bridge that could alter COX/cytochrome c dissociation kinetics. Thus, the key adaptation in Utricularia likely lies in molecular energetic changes that buttressed the mechanisms responsible for the bladderworts' radical morphological evolution. Along with evidence for COX evolution underlying expansion of the anthropoid neocortex, our findings underscore that important morphological and physiological innovations must often be accompanied by specific adaptations in proteins with basic cellular functions. PMID:15596720

  10. Reduction of radiation exposure and improvement of image quality with BMI-adapted prospective cardiac computed tomography and iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the impact of body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocols and iterative reconstruction algorithms (iDose) on patient radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective ECG-triggered 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: Image quality and radiation exposure were systematically analyzed in 100 patients. 60 Patients underwent prospective ECG-triggered CCTA using a non-tailored protocol and served as a ‘control’ group (Group 1: 120 kV, 200 mA s). 40 Consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent prospective CCTA, using BMI-adapted tube voltage and standard (Group 2: 100/120 kV, 100–200 mA s) versus reduced tube current (Group 3: 100/120 kV, 75–150 mA s). Iterative reconstructions were provided with different iDose levels and were compared to filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructions. Image quality was assessed in consensus of 2 experienced observers and using a 5-grade scale (1 = best to 5 = worse), and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR) were quantified. Results: CCTA was performed without adverse events in all patients (n = 100, heart rate of 47–87 bpm and BMI of 19–38 kg/m2). Patients examined using the non-tailored protocol in Group 1 had the highest radiation exposure (3.2 ± 0.4 mSv), followed by Group 2 (1.7 ± 0.7 mSv) and Group 3 (1.2 ± 0.6 mSv) (radiation savings of 47% and 63%, respectively, p < 0.001). Iterative reconstructions provided increased SNR and CNR, particularly when higher iDose level 5 was applied with Multi-Frequency reconstruction (iDose5 MFR) (14.1 ± 4.6 versus 21.2 ± 7.3 for SNR and 12.0 ± 4.2 versus 18.1 ± 6.6 for CNR, for FBP versus iDose5 MFR, respectively, p < 0.001). The combination of BMI adaptation with iterative reconstruction reduced radiation exposure and simultaneously improved image quality (subjective image quality of 1.4 ± 0.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.5 for Group 2 reconstructed using iDose5 MFR versus

  11. Vertical adaptive radiation in ocean Prochlorococcus: Evolutionary implications of the Chl b/a ratio from molecular evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Qin; Yinchu Wang

    2009-01-01

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium of global significance. Two ecotypes are adapted to either high-light (HL) or low-light (LL) conditions. The ratio between chlorophyll (Chl) a and b is a distinguishing characteristic of these two ecotypes. However, how this ratio evolved in Prochlorococcus during this ecotype differentiation remains unclear. Our analyses reveal that the ancestor of Prochloro-coccus was typically low-light adapted. The LL ecotype showed a stagnant evolution, and the HL ecotype was recently diverged. There was an adaptive radiation after directional evolution in the Chl b/a ratio regulation. Recombination in chlorophyllide a oxygenase (CAO) and positive selection on Clp protease contributed to the directional evolution of Prochlorococcus. The recombinant fragments of CAO were correlated with a large group of shared coevolving sites. Evidence of positive selection was found in both subunits of Clp. Chl b/a ratio evolution, as annotated by molecular evidence, appears to be among the crucial reasons that explain how Prochlorococcus has become the dominant photosynthetic organism in the ocean.

  12. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K;

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated....

  13. Feasibility of breathing-adapted PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Andersen, Flemming; Berthelsen, A K;

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Respiration can induce artifacts in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images leading to uncertainties in tumour volume, location and uptake quantification. Respiratory gating for PET images is now established but is not directly translatable to a radiotherapy setup....... uptake in PET/CT images. These results suggest that advanced therapies (such as SUV-based dose painting) will likely require breathing-adapted PET images and that the relevant SUV thresholds are yet to be investigated....

  14. Rapid adaptive evolution of colour vision in the threespine stickleback radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennison, Diana J; Owens, Gregory L; Heckman, Nancy; Schluter, Dolph; Veen, Thor

    2016-05-11

    Vision is a sensory modality of fundamental importance for many animals, aiding in foraging, detection of predators and mate choice. Adaptation to local ambient light conditions is thought to be commonplace, and a match between spectral sensitivity and light spectrum is predicted. We use opsin gene expression to test for local adaptation and matching of spectral sensitivity in multiple independent lake populations of threespine stickleback populations derived since the last ice age from an ancestral marine form. We show that sensitivity across the visual spectrum is shifted repeatedly towards longer wavelengths in freshwater compared with the ancestral marine form. Laboratory rearing suggests that this shift is largely genetically based. Using a new metric, we found that the magnitude of shift in spectral sensitivity in each population corresponds strongly to the transition in the availability of different wavelengths of light between the marine and lake environments. We also found evidence of local adaptation by sympatric benthic and limnetic ecotypes to different light environments within lakes. Our findings indicate rapid parallel evolution of the visual system to altered light conditions. The changes have not, however, yielded a close matching of spectrum-wide sensitivity to wavelength availability, for reasons we discuss. PMID:27147098

  15. Acute adaptive immune response correlates with late radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lung response to radiation exposure can involve an immediate or early reaction to the radiation challenge, including cell death and an initial immune reaction, and can be followed by a tissue injury response, of pneumonitis or fibrosis, to this acute reaction. Herein, we aimed to determine whether markers of the initial immune response, measured within days of radiation exposure, are correlated with the lung tissue injury responses occurring weeks later. Inbred strains of mice known to be susceptible (KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ) or resistant (C3H/HeJ, A/J, AKR/J) to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to vary in time to onset of respiratory distress post thoracic irradiation (from 10–23 weeks) were studied. Mice were untreated (controls) or received 18 Gy whole thorax irradiation and were euthanized at 6 h, 1d or 7 d after radiation treatment. Pulmonary CD4+ lymphocytes, bronchoalveolar cell profile & cytokine level, and serum cytokine levels were assayed. Thoracic irradiation and inbred strain background significantly affected the numbers of CD4+ cells in the lungs and the bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential of exposed mice. At the 7 day timepoint greater numbers of pulmonary Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes and reduced lavage interleukin17 and interferonγ levels were significant predictors of late stage fibrosis. Lavage levels of interleukin-10, measured at the 7 day timepoint, were inversely correlated with fibrosis score (R = −0.80, p = 0.05), while serum levels of interleukin-17 in control mice significantly correlated with post irradiation survival time (R = 0.81, p = 0.04). Lavage macrophage, lymphocyte or neutrophil counts were not significantly correlated with either of fibrosis score or time to respiratory distress in the six mouse strains. Specific cytokine and lymphocyte levels, but not strain dependent lavage cell profiles, were predictive of later radiation-induced lung injury in this panel of inbred strains. The online version of this

  16. Radiation diffusion for multi-fluid Eulerian hydrodynamics with adaptive mesh refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block-structured meshes provide the ability to concentrate grid points and computational effort in interesting regions of a flow field, without sacrificing the efficiency and low memory requirements of a regular grid. We describe an algorithm for simulating radiation diffusion on such a mesh, coupled to multi-fluid gasdynamics. Conservation laws are enforced by using locally conservative difference schemes along with explicit synchronization operations between different levels of refinement. In unsteady calculations each refinement level is advanced at its own optimal timestep. Particular attention is given to the appropriate coupling between the fluid energy and the radiation field, the behavior of the discretization at sharp interfaces, and the form of synchronization between levels required for energy conservation in the diffusion process. Two- and three-dimensional examples are presented, including parallel calculations performed on an IBM SP-2

  17. Processes Driving the Adaptive Radiation of a Tropical Tree (Diospyros, Ebenaceae) in New Caledonia, a Biodiversity Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Ovidiu; Turner, Barbara; Trucchi, Emiliano; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-03-01

    Due to its special geological history, the New Caledonian Archipelago is a mosaic of soil types, and in combination with climatic conditions this results in a heterogeneous environment across relatively small distances. A group of over 20 endemic species of Diospyros (Ebenaceae) has rapidly and recently radiated on the archipelago after a single long-distance dispersal event. Most of the Diospyros species in the radiating group are morphologically and ecologically well differentiated, but they exhibit low levels of DNA variability. To investigate the processes that shaped the diversification of this group we employed restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq). Over 8400 filtered SNPs generally confirm species delimitations and produce a well-supported phylogenetic tree. Our analyses document local introgression, but only a limited potential for gene flow over longer distances. The phylogenetic relationships point to an early regional clustering among populations and species, indicating that allopatric speciation with respect to macrohabitat (i.e., climatic conditions) may have had a role in the initial differentiation within the group. A later, more rapid radiation involved divergence with respect to microhabitat (i.e., soil preference). Several sister species in the group show a parallel divergence in edaphic preference. Searches for genomic regions that are systematically differentiated in this replicated phenotypic divergence pointed to loci potentially involved in ion binding and cellular transport. These loci appear meaningful in the context of adaptations to soil types that differ in heavy-metal and mineral content. Identical nucleotide changes affected only two of these loci, indicating that introgression may have played a limited role in their evolution. Our results suggest that both allopatric diversification and (parapatric) ecological divergence shaped successive rounds of speciation in the Diospyros radiation on New Caledonia. PMID:26430059

  18. Optimal schedules of fractionated radiation therapy by way of the greedy principle: biologically-based adaptive boosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit a long-standing problem of optimization of fractionated radiotherapy and solve it in considerable generality under the following three assumptions only: (1) repopulation of clonogenic cancer cells between radiation exposures follows linear birth-and-death Markov process; (2) clonogenic cancer cells do not interact with each other; and (3) the dose response function s(D) is decreasing and logarithmically concave. Optimal schedules of fractionated radiation identified in this work can be described by the following ‘greedy’ principle: give the maximum possible dose as soon as possible. This means that upper bounds on the total dose and the dose per fraction reflecting limitations on the damage to normal tissue, along with a lower bound on the time between successive fractions of radiation, determine the optimal radiation schedules completely. Results of this work lead to a new paradigm of dose delivery which we term optimal biologically-based adaptive boosting (OBBAB). It amounts to (a) subdividing the target into regions that are homogeneous with respect to the maximum total dose and maximum dose per fraction allowed by the anatomy and biological properties of the normal tissue within (or adjacent to) the region in question and (b) treating each region with an individual optimal schedule determined by these constraints. The fact that different regions may be treated to different total dose and dose per fraction mean that the number of fractions may also vary between regions. Numerical evidence suggests that OBBAB produces significantly larger tumor control probability than the corresponding conventional treatments. (paper)

  19. Adapting MRI Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging For In Vivo Human Brain Focused Ultrasound Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, Elena A.; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-01-01

    A variety of MRI acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) pulse sequences as the means for image guidance of focused ultrasound therapy have been recently developed and tested ex vivo and in animal models. To successfully translate MR-ARFI guidance into human applications, ensuring that MR-ARFI provides satisfactory image quality in the presence of patient motion and deposits safe amount of ultrasound energy during image acquisition is necessary. The first aim of this work was to study the ...

  20. Adaptive melanin response of the soil fungus Aspergillus niger to UV radiation stress at "Evolution Canyon", Mount Carmel, Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Singaravelan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adaptation is an evolutionary process in which traits in a population are tailored by natural selection to better meet the challenges presented by the local environment. The major discussion relating to natural selection concerns the portraying of the cause and effect relationship between a presumably adaptive trait and selection agents generating it. Therefore, it is necessary to identify trait(s that evolve in direct response to selection, enhancing the organism's fitness. "Evolution Canyon" (EC in Israel mirrors a microcosmic evolutionary system across life and is ideal to study natural selection and local adaptation under sharply, microclimatically divergent environments. The south-facing, tropical, sunny and xeric "African" slope (AS receives 200%-800% higher solar radiation than the north-facing, temperate, shady and mesic "European" slope (ES, 200 meters apart. Thus, solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR is a major selection agent in EC influencing the organism-environment interaction. Melanin is a trait postulated to have evolved for UV-screening in microorganisms. Here we investigate the cause and effect relationship between differential UVR on the opposing slopes of EC and the conidial melanin concentration of the filamentous soil fungus Aspergillus niger. We test the working hypothesis that the AS strains exhibit higher melanin content than strains from the ES resulting in higher UV resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured conidial melanin concentration of 80 strains from the EC using a spectrophotometer. The results indicated that mean conidial melanin concentration of AS strains were threefold higher than ES strains and the former resisted UVA irradiation better than the latter. Comparisons of melanin in the conidia of A. niger strains from sunny and shady microniches on the predominantly sunny AS and predominantly shady ES indicated that shady conditions on the AS have no influence on the selection on melanin

  1. The ecology of an adaptive radiation of three-spined stickleback from North Uist, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Isabel S; D'Agostino, Daniele; Hohenlohe, Paul A; MacColl, Andrew D C

    2016-09-01

    There has been a large focus on the genetics of traits involved in adaptation, but knowledge of the environmental variables leading to adaptive changes is surprisingly poor. Combined use of environmental data with morphological and genomic data should allow us to understand the extent to which patterns of phenotypic and genetic diversity within a species can be explained by the structure of the environment. Here, we analyse the variation of populations of three-spined stickleback from 27 freshwater lakes on North Uist, Scotland, that vary greatly in their environment, to understand how environmental and genetic constraints contribute to phenotypic divergence. We collected 35 individuals per population and 30 abiotic and biotic environmental parameters to characterize variation across lakes and analyse phenotype-environment associations. Additionally, we used RAD sequencing to estimate the genetic relationships among a subset of these populations. We found a large amount of phenotypic variation among populations, most prominently in armour and spine traits. Despite large variation in the abiotic environment, namely in ion composition, depth and dissolved organic Carbon, more phenotypic variation was explained by the biotic variables (presence of predators and density of predator and competitors), than by associated abiotic variables. Genetic structure among populations was partly geographic, with closer populations being more similar. Altogether, our results suggest that differences in body shape among stickleback populations are the result of both canalized genetic and plastic responses to environmental factors, which shape fish morphology in a predictable direction regardless of their genetic starting point. PMID:27374399

  2. Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measured by Acridine Orange Stained Micronuleus Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange dye stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: An adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed [1- 4]. However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose [3]. This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. Materials and Methods: Specific pathogen free 5-week-old C3H/He mice, purchased from Shizuoka Laboratory Center (Japan), were kept in clean and conventional environment. When 6 weeks old, the animal were whole body irradiated using irradiator of IBL-437 (137Cs, 0.8Gy/min). After various time intervals, the two groups were administrated to adaptation dose and challenge dose of 0.01Gy and 2Gy, respectively. For experiments, sham-irradiated, only adaptive and challenge dose irradiated groups were run concurrently. Smears were stained and scored using Acridine orange dye method [2]. Statistically significant differences in MN-PCE frequency were determined by comparing tie individual values at each group with the respective control values (challenge dose irradiated group) by using the paired ttest. Results and Discussions: Induced MN by the challenge dose (2Gy) after the pretreatment with 0.01Gy is low to the one induced by the challenge dose alone. In the present study, this estimation for the

  3. The evolution of the Indian Ocean parrots (Psittaciformes): extinction, adaptive radiation and eustacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, S; Jones, C G; Prys-Jones, R P; Groombridge, J J

    2012-01-01

    Parrots are among the most recognisable and widely distributed of all bird groups occupying major parts of the tropics. The evolution of the genera that are found in and around the Indian Ocean region is particularly interesting as they show a high degree of heterogeneity in distribution and levels of speciation. Here we present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indian Ocean parrots, identifying the possible geological and geographical factors that influenced their evolution. We hypothesise that the Indian Ocean islands acted as stepping stones in the radiation of the Old-World parrots, and that sea-level changes may have been an important determinant of current distributions and differences in speciation. A multi-locus phylogeny showing the evolutionary relationships among genera highlights the interesting position of the monotypic Psittrichas, which shares a common ancestor with the geographically distant Coracopsis. An extensive species-level molecular phylogeny indicates a complex pattern of radiation including evidence for colonisation of Africa, Asia and the Indian Ocean islands from Australasia via multiple routes, and of island populations 'seeding' continents. Moreover, comparison of estimated divergence dates and sea-level changes points to the latter as a factor in parrot speciation. This is the first study to include the extinct parrot taxa, Mascarinus mascarinus and Psittacula wardi which, respectively, appear closely related to Coracopsis nigra and Psittacula eupatria.

  4. Low-dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Polychromatic Mice Erythrocyte as Measures by Acridine Orange Stained Micronucleus Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.01Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 2Gy of g-rays was determined in peripheral blood of C3H/He mice. The timing of their administration of challenge doses was 6 hr. The response was determined by scoring of Acridine orange due stained MN-PCEs. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge g-ray dose. Introduction: an adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in vivo reported. Some research team reports that a reduction on MN-PCE of mice caused by the pretreatment was observed (1-4). However, there was variability in the amount of the response depending on the time and adaptive dose (3). This is important because the variation of MN-PCE frequency with time could lead to differences in the interpretation. In this study, differences in the biological effects within the priming dose ranges are discussed. (Author)

  5. Predictable variation of range-sizes across an extreme environmental gradient in a lizard adaptive radiation: evolutionary and ecological inferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pincheira-Donoso

    Full Text Available Large-scale patterns of current species geographic range-size variation reflect historical dynamics of dispersal and provide insights into future consequences under changing environments. Evidence suggests that climate warming exerts major damage on high latitude and elevation organisms, where changes are more severe and available space to disperse tracking historical niches is more limited. Species with longer generations (slower adaptive responses, such as vertebrates, and with restricted distributions (lower genetic diversity, higher inbreeding in these environments are expected to be particularly threatened by warming crises. However, a well-known macroecological generalization (Rapoport's rule predicts that species range-sizes increase with increasing latitude-elevation, thus counterbalancing the impact of climate change. Here, I investigate geographic range-size variation across an extreme environmental gradient and as a function of body size, in the prominent Liolaemus lizard adaptive radiation. Conventional and phylogenetic analyses revealed that latitudinal (but not elevational ranges significantly decrease with increasing latitude-elevation, while body size was unrelated to range-size. Evolutionarily, these results are insightful as they suggest a link between spatial environmental gradients and range-size evolution. However, ecologically, these results suggest that Liolaemus might be increasingly threatened if, as predicted by theory, ranges retract and contract continuously under persisting climate warming, potentially increasing extinction risks at high latitudes and elevations.

  6. Evaluation of a prototype 3D ultrasound system for multimodality imaging of cervical nodes for adaptive radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Danielle; Fava, Palma; Cury, Fabio; Vuong, Te; Falco, Tony; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Sonography has good topographic accuracy for superficial lymph node assessment in patients with head and neck cancers. It is therefore an ideal non-invasive tool for precise inter-fraction volumetric analysis of enlarged cervical nodes. In addition, when registered with computed tomography (CT) images, ultrasound information may improve target volume delineation and facilitate image-guided adaptive radiation therapy. A feasibility study was developed to evaluate the use of a prototype ultrasound system capable of three dimensional visualization and multi-modality image fusion for cervical node geometry. A ceiling-mounted optical tracking camera recorded the position and orientation of a transducer in order to synchronize the transducer's position with respect to the room's coordinate system. Tracking systems were installed in both the CT-simulator and radiation therapy treatment rooms. Serial images were collected at the time of treatment planning and at subsequent treatment fractions. Volume reconstruction was performed by generating surfaces around contours. The quality of the spatial reconstruction and semi-automatic segmentation was highly dependent on the system's ability to track the transducer throughout each scan procedure. The ultrasound information provided enhanced soft tissue contrast and facilitated node delineation. Manual segmentation was the preferred method to contour structures due to their sonographic topography.

  7. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  8. Reducing the radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique for chest CT in adults: a parameter study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wenyun; Ding Xiaobo; Kong Boyu; Fan Baoyan; Chen Liang

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently there is a trend towards reducing radiation dose while maintaining image quality during computer tomography (CT) examination.This results from the concerns about radiation exposure from CT and the potential increase in the incidence of radiation induced carcinogenesis.This study aimed to investigate the lowest radiation dose for maintaining good image quality in adult chest scanning using GE CT equipment.Methods Seventy-two adult patients were examined by Gemstone Spectral CT.They were randomly divided into six groups.We set up a different value of noise index (NI) when evaluating each group every other number from 13.0 to 23.0.The original images were acquired with a slice of 5 mm thickness.For each group,several image series were reconstructed using different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) (30%,50%,and 70%).We got a total of 18 image sequences of different combinations of NI and ASIR percentage.On one hand,quantitative indicators,such as CT value and standard deviation (SD),were assessed at the region of interest.The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated.The volume CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded.On the other hand,two radiologists with >5 years of experience blindly reviewed the subjective image quality using the standards we had previously set.Results The different combinations of noise index and ASIR were assessed.There was no significant difference in CT values among the 18 image sequences.The SD value was reduced with the noise index's reduction or ASIR's increase.There was a trend towards gradually lower SNR and CNR with an NI increase.The CTDI and DLP were diminishing as the NI increased.The scores from subjective image quality evaluation were reduced in all groups as the ASIR increased.Conclusions Increasing NI can reduce radiation dose.With the premise of maintaining the same image quality,using a suitable percentage of

  9. Reducing abdominal CT radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm has been shown to reduce radiation doses in adults undergoing abdominal CT studies while preserving image quality. To our knowledge, no studies have been done to validate the use of ASIR in children. To retrospectively evaluate differences in radiation dose and image quality in pediatric CT abdominal studies utilizing 40% ASIR compared with filtered-back projection (FBP). Eleven patients (mean age 8.5 years, range 2-17 years) had separate 40% ASIR and FBP enhanced abdominal CT studies on different days between July 2009 and October 2010. The ASIR studies utilized a 38% mA reduction in addition to our pediatric protocol mAs. Study volume CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) and dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. A consistent representative image was obtained from each study. The images were independently evaluated by two radiologists in a blinded manner for diagnostic utility, image sharpness and image noise. The average CTDIvol and DLP for the 40% ASIR studies were 4.25 mGy and 185.04 mGy-cm, compared with 6.75 mGy and 275.79 mGy-cm for the FBP studies, representing 37% and 33% reductions in both, respectively. The radiologists' assessments of subjective image quality did not demonstrate any significant differences between the ASIR and FBP images. In our experience, the use of 40% ASIR with a 38% decrease in mA lowers the radiation dose for children undergoing enhanced abdominal examinations by an average of 33%, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (orig.)

  10. Reducing abdominal CT radiation dose with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorona, Gregory A. [The Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Allegheny General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ceschin, Rafael C.; Clayton, Barbara L.; Sutcavage, Tom; Tadros, Sameh S.; Panigrahy, Ashok [The Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The use of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm has been shown to reduce radiation doses in adults undergoing abdominal CT studies while preserving image quality. To our knowledge, no studies have been done to validate the use of ASIR in children. To retrospectively evaluate differences in radiation dose and image quality in pediatric CT abdominal studies utilizing 40% ASIR compared with filtered-back projection (FBP). Eleven patients (mean age 8.5 years, range 2-17 years) had separate 40% ASIR and FBP enhanced abdominal CT studies on different days between July 2009 and October 2010. The ASIR studies utilized a 38% mA reduction in addition to our pediatric protocol mAs. Study volume CT dose indexes (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. A consistent representative image was obtained from each study. The images were independently evaluated by two radiologists in a blinded manner for diagnostic utility, image sharpness and image noise. The average CTDI{sub vol} and DLP for the 40% ASIR studies were 4.25 mGy and 185.04 mGy-cm, compared with 6.75 mGy and 275.79 mGy-cm for the FBP studies, representing 37% and 33% reductions in both, respectively. The radiologists' assessments of subjective image quality did not demonstrate any significant differences between the ASIR and FBP images. In our experience, the use of 40% ASIR with a 38% decrease in mA lowers the radiation dose for children undergoing enhanced abdominal examinations by an average of 33%, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (orig.)

  11. Simulations of recoiling black holes: adaptive mesh refinement and radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Meliani, Zakaria; Olivares, Hector; Porth, Oliver; Rezzolla, Luciano; Younsi, Ziri

    2016-01-01

    (Abridged) We here continue our effort to model the behaviour of matter when orbiting or accreting onto a generic black hole by developing a new numerical code employing advanced techniques geared solve the equations of in general-relativistic hydrodynamics. The new code employs a number of high-resolution shock-capturing Riemann-solvers and reconstruction algorithms, exploiting the enhanced accuracy and the reduced computational cost of AMR techniques. In addition, the code makes use of sophisticated ray-tracing libraries that, coupled with general-relativistic radiation-transfer calculations, allow us to compute accurately the electromagnetic emissions from such accretion flows. We validate the new code by presenting an extensive series of stationary accretion flows either in spherical or axial symmetry and performed either in 2D or 3D. In addition, we consider the highly nonlinear scenario of a recoiling black hole produced in the merger of a supermassive black hole binary interacting with the surrounding ...

  12. Radiation dose reduction in soft tissue neck CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachha, Behroze, E-mail: bvachha@partners.org [Neuroradiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Brodoefel, Harald; Wilcox, Carol; Hackney, David B.; Moonis, Gul [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare objective and subjective image quality in neck CT images acquired at different tube current–time products (275 mA s and 340 mA s) and reconstructed with filtered-back-projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Materials and methods: HIPAA-compliant study with IRB approval and waiver of informed consent. 66 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to undergo contrast-enhanced neck CT at a standard tube-current–time-product (340 mA s; n = 33) or reduced tube-current–time-product (275 mA s, n = 33). Data sets were reconstructed with FBP and 2 levels (30%, 40%) of ASIR-FBP blending at 340 mA s and 275 mA s. Two neuroradiologists assessed subjective image quality in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length-product (DLP), effective dose, and objective image noise were recorded. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was computed as mean attenuation in a region of interest in the sternocleidomastoid muscle divided by image noise. Results: Compared with FBP, ASIR resulted in a reduction of image noise at both 340 mA s and 275 mA s. Reduction of tube current from 340 mA s to 275 mA s resulted in an increase in mean objective image noise (p = 0.02) and a decrease in SNR (p = 0.03) when images were reconstructed with FBP. However, when the 275 mA s images were reconstructed using ASIR, the mean objective image noise and SNR were similar to those of the standard 340 mA s CT images reconstructed with FBP (p > 0.05). Subjective image noise was ranked by both raters as either average or less-than-average irrespective of the tube current and iterative reconstruction technique. Conclusion: Adapting ASIR into neck CT protocols reduced effective dose by 17% without compromising image quality.

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Dynamics and Afterglow Radiation from Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Special Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    De Colle, Fabio; Lopez-Camara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of Mezcal-SRHD, a new adaptive mesh refinement, special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) code, developed with the aim of studying the highly relativistic flows in Gamma-Ray Burst sources. The SRHD equations are solved using finite volume conservative solvers. The correct implementation of the algorithms is verified by one-dimensional (1D) shock tube and multidimensional tests. The code is then applied to study the propagation of 1D spherical impulsive blast waves expanding in a stratified medium with $\\rho \\propto r^{-k}$, bridging between the relativistic and Newtonian phases, as well as to a two-dimensional (2D) cylindrically symmetric impulsive jet propagating in a constant density medium. It is shown that the deceleration to non-relativistic speeds in one-dimension occurs on scales significantly larger than the Sedov length. This transition is further delayed with respect to the Sedov length as the degree of stratification of the ambient medium is increased. This result, toge...

  14. Clinical outcome and dosimetric parameters of chemo-radiation including MRI guided adaptive brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators for cervical cancer patients: A single institution experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, C.N.; Leeuw, A.A. de; Roesink, J.M.; Tersteeg, R.J.; Moerland, M.A.; Witteveen, P.O.; Schreuder, H.W.B.; Dorst, E.B. van; Jurgenliemk-Schulz, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate dosimetric parameters and clinical outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemo-radiation and MR-image guided adaptive brachytherapy (MR-IGABT) using tandem-ovoid applicators for intracavitary or combined intracavitary/interstitial approaches. METHOD: This retrospecti

  15. Local Adaptive Calibration of the GLASS Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Product Using Smoothing Spline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Liang, S.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    Incident solar radiation (ISR) over the Earth's surface plays an important role in determining the Earth's climate and environment. Generally, can be obtained from direct measurements, remotely sensed data, or reanalysis and general circulation models (GCMs) data. Each type of product has advantages and limitations: the surface direct measurements provide accurate but sparse spatial coverage, whereas other global products may have large uncertainties. Ground measurements have been normally used for validation and occasionally calibration, but transforming their "true values" spatially to improve the satellite products is still a new and challenging topic. In this study, an improved thin-plate smoothing spline approach is presented to locally "calibrate" the Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS) ISR product using the reconstructed ISR data from surface meteorological measurements. The influences of surface elevation on ISR estimation was also considered in the proposed method. The point-based surface reconstructed ISR was used as the response variable, and the GLASS ISR product and the surface elevation data at the corresponding locations as explanatory variables to train the thin plate spline model. We evaluated the performance of the approach using the cross-validation method at both daily and monthly time scales over China. We also evaluated estimated ISR based on the thin-plate spline method using independent ground measurements at 10 sites from the Coordinated Enhanced Observation Network (CEON). These validation results indicated that the thin plate smoothing spline method can be effectively used for calibrating satellite derived ISR products using ground measurements to achieve better accuracy.

  16. Variation of Human Hairiness: A Possible Adaptation to Solar Radiation and Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhugga Amrita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many theories have been advanced to explain human hairlessness, however, there is no consensus. This study of 76 males observed that skin reflectance measuring skin colouration and melanin pigmentation correlated with hair size and follicle density. Individuals with a greater concentration of melanin within the superficial layer of the skin had a lower follicle density and smaller sizes of hairs. In contrast, individuals with a lower melanin concentration and lighter skin colour had a full range of hairiness. This leads to the suggestion that over the course of human evolution, high concentrations of melanin in consistently exposed to ultraviolet radiation areas developed first and that hair loss was a consequence of competition in the skin between melanin production and hair growth. Darker pigmented skin and lower follicle density are significantly correlated (R2=0.283; p<0.05. Individuals with darker skin had a mean of 4.91 follicles per cm2 whereas those with lighter skin reflectance had 11.20 follicles per cm2. This suggests that increased concentrations of melanin in the basal layer of the epidermis may limit hairiness by negatively influencing the skin's ability to produce hair.

  17. Adaptive/Nonadaptive Proton Radiation Planning and Outcomes in a Phase II Trial for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Lege, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze dosimetric variables and outcomes after adaptive replanning of radiation therapy during concurrent high-dose protons and chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Nine of 44 patients with stage III NSCLC in a prospective phase II trial of concurrent paclitaxel/carboplatin with proton radiation [74 Gy(RBE) in 37 fractions] had modifications to their original treatment plans after re-evaluation revealed changes that would compromise coverage of the target volume or violate dose constraints; plans for the other 35 patients were not changed. We compared patients with adaptive plans with those with nonadaptive plans in terms of dosimetry and outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up of 21.2 months (median overall survival, 29.6 months), no differences were found in local, regional, or distant failure or overall survival between groups. Adaptive planning was used more often for large tumors that shrank to a greater extent (median, 107.1 cm{sup 3} adaptive and 86.4 cm{sup 3} nonadaptive; median changes in volume, 25.3% adaptive and 1.2% nonadaptive; P<.01). The median number of fractions delivered using adaptive planning was 13 (range, 4-22). Adaptive planning generally improved sparing of the esophagus (median absolute decrease in V{sub 70}, 1.8%; range, 0%-22.9%) and spinal cord (median absolute change in maximum dose, 3.7 Gy; range, 0-13.8 Gy). Without adaptive replanning, target coverage would have been compromised in 2 cases (57% and 82% coverage without adaptation vs 100% for both with adaptation); neither patient experienced local failure. Radiation-related grade 3 toxicity rates were similar between groups. Conclusions: Adaptive planning can reduce normal tissue doses and prevent target misses, particularly for patients with large tumors that shrink substantially during therapy. Adaptive plans seem to have acceptable toxicity and achieve similar local, regional, and distant control and overall

  18. TH-A-BRF-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - Modeling Tumor Evolution for Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Lee, CG [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chan, TCY [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cho, YB; Islam, MK [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ontario Consortium for Adaptive Interventions in Radiation Oncology (OCAIRO) (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    was supported in part by the Ontario Consortium for Adaptive Interventions in Radiation Oncology (OCAIRO) funded by the Ontario Research Fund (ORF) and the MITACS Accelerate Internship Program.

  19. TH-A-BRF-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - Modeling Tumor Evolution for Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    was supported in part by the Ontario Consortium for Adaptive Interventions in Radiation Oncology (OCAIRO) funded by the Ontario Research Fund (ORF) and the MITACS Accelerate Internship Program

  20. Adaptive response and genetic instability induced by a low-dose rate radiation simulating the high-altitude flight conditions on mice in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In the present work, we investigated the effect of a low-dose rate of high-LET radiation that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response, and genetic instability in generation F1 born from males irradiated under these conditions were examined in polychromatic erythrocytes of bone marrow using the micronucleus test. Two-month-old males of SHK white mongrel mice were used. Irradiation was performed for 24 h a day in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the U-70 accelerator of 70 GeV protons (Serpukhov), which adequately simulates radiation field formed in the atmosphere at a height of about 10 km, to accumulate doses of 11.5, 21.5 and 31.5 cGy (1 cGy/day). The experiments demonstrated that: 1) irradiation of mice in vivo with these doses of low dose rate high-LET radiation leads to an increase in cytogenetic damage in polychromatic erythrocytes; 2) irradiation of mice with these doses induces no adaptive response in polychromatic erythrocytes as opposite to γ-radiation; and 3) in mice of the F1 generation born from males irradiated with doses of 11.5, 21.5 and 31.5 cGy, an increase in sensitivity to additional irradiation with a dose of 1.5 Gy of γ-radiation and the absence of adaptive response compared with the descendants of unirradiated males occur. These data indicate a genetic instability in generation F1 born from irradiated males.

  1. The adaptive response of human lymphocytes to very low doses of ionizing radiation: a case of induced chromosomal repair with the induction of specific proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appears that the adaptive response of human lymphocytes to low doses of X-rays can be mimicked by exposure to low levels of a truly radiomimetic compound, bleomycin, that induces double-strand breaks in DNA. Similarly, the adaptive response can be induced by exposure to low levels of H2O2, which produces reactive species similar to those induced by ionizing radiation. This adaptive response, which is attributed to the induction of a repair mechanism, i.e. repair enzymes, can be prevented if protein synthesis, and thus enzyme synthesis, is inhibited by cycloheximide at the crucial time (4-6 h) after exposure to the adaptive dose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has shown that 1 cGy of X-rays can reproducibly induce several proteins not found in unirradiated lymphocytes. These proteins are considered to be excellent candidates for the actual repair enzyme(s). (author)

  2. RTTOV-gb - adapting the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV for the assimilation of ground-based microwave radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Hocking, James; Martinet, Pauline; Kneifel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer a new capability to provide continuous observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer. Thus, they are potential candidates to supplement radiosonde network and satellite data to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through a variational assimilation of their data. However in order to assimilate MWR observations, a fast radiative transfer model is required and such a model is not currently available. This is necessary for going from the model state vector space to the observation space at every observation point. The fast radiative transfer model RTTOV is well accepted in the NWP community, though it was developed to simulate satellite observations only. In this work, the RTTOV code has been modified to allow for simulations of ground-based upward-looking microwave sensors. In addition, the tangent linear, adjoint, and K-modules of RTTOV have been adapted to provide Jacobians (i.e., the sensitivity of observations to the atmospheric thermodynamical state) for ground-based geometry. These modules are necessary for the fast minimization of the cost function in a variational assimilation scheme. The proposed ground-based version of RTTOV, called RTTOV-gb, has been validated against accurate and less time-efficient line-by-line radiative transfer models. In the frequency range commonly used for temperature and humidity profiling (22-60 GHz), root-mean-square brightness temperature differences are smaller than typical MWR uncertainties (˜ 0.5 K) at all channels used in this analysis. Brightness temperatures (TBs) computed with RTTOV-gb from radiosonde profiles have been compared with nearly simultaneous and co-located ground-based MWR observations. Differences between simulated and measured TBs are below 0.5 K for all channels except for the water vapor band, where most of the uncertainty comes from instrumental errors. The Jacobians calculated with the K-module of RTTOV

  3. Scale invariant feature transform in adaptive radiation therapy: a tool for deformable image registration assessment and re-planning indication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Peroni, Marta; Riboldi, Marco; Sharp, Gregory C.; Ciardo, Delia; Alterio, Daniela; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aims at compensating for anatomic and pathological changes to improve delivery along a treatment fraction sequence. Current ART protocols require time-consuming manual updating of all volumes of interest on the images acquired during treatment. Deformable image registration (DIR) and contour propagation stand as a state of the ART method to automate the process, but the lack of DIR quality control methods hinder an introduction into clinical practice. We investigated the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method as a quantitative automated tool (1) for DIR evaluation and (2) for re-planning decision-making in the framework of ART treatments. As a preliminary test, SIFT invariance properties at shape-preserving and deformable transformations were studied on a computational phantom, granting residual matching errors below the voxel dimension. Then a clinical dataset composed of 19 head and neck ART patients was used to quantify the performance in ART treatments. For the goal (1) results demonstrated SIFT potential as an operator-independent DIR quality assessment metric. We measured DIR group systematic residual errors up to 0.66 mm against 1.35 mm provided by rigid registration. The group systematic errors of both bony and all other structures were also analyzed, attesting the presence of anatomical deformations. The correct automated identification of 18 patients who might benefit from ART out of the total 22 cases using SIFT demonstrated its capabilities toward goal (2) achievement.

  4. A Phenotypic Point of View of the Adaptive Radiation of Crested Newts (Triturus cristatus Superspecies, Caudata, Amphibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ivanović

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The divergence in phenotype and habitat preference within the crested newt Triturus cristatus superspecies, examined across different ontogenetic stages, provides an excellent setting to explore the pattern of adaptive radiation. The crested newts form a well-supported monophyletic clade for which at least the full mitochondrial DNA phylogeny is resolved. Here we summarise studies that explored the variation in morphological (larval and adult body form, limb skeleton, and skull shape and other phenotypic traits (early life history, developmental sequences, larval growth rate, and sexual dimorphism to infer the magnitude and direction of evolutionary changes in crested newts. The phenotypic traits show a high level of concordance in the pattern of variation; there is a cline-like variation, from T. dobrogicus, via T. cristatus, T. carnifex, and T. macedonicus to the T. karelinii group. This pattern matches the cline of ecological preferences; T. dobrogicus is relatively aquatic, followed by T. cristatus. T. macedonicus, T. carnifex, and the T. karelinii group are relatively terrestrial. The observed pattern indicates that phenotypic diversification in crested newts emerged due to an evolutionary switch in ecological preferences. Furthermore, the pattern indicates that heterochronic changes, or changes in the timing and rate of development, underlie the observed phenotypic evolutionary diversification.

  5. Principal component analysis-based anatomical motion models for use in adaptive radiation therapy of head and neck cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.

    Purpose: To develop standard and regularized principal component analysis (PCA) models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients, assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART), and to extract quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT (pCT) images of H&N patients were artificially deformed to create "digital phantom" images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during Radiation Therapy (RT). Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients' actual deformations, and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms), and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific standard PCA (SPCA) and regularized PCA (RPCA) models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. Eigenvectors, or eigenDVFs (EDVFs), having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Modeled anatomies were used to assess the dose deviations with respect to the planned dose distribution. Results: PCA models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade SPCA's ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes, and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. For dose assessment it has been shown that the modeled dose distribution was different from the planned dose for the parotid glands due to their shrinkage and shift into

  6. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF ACCURACY OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER DIFFERENTIAL APPROXIMATION METHOD FOR MULTI DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF AUTO-ADAPTABLE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential approximation is derived from radiation transfer equation by averaging over the solid angle. It is one of the more effective methods for engineering calculations of radia- tive heat transfer in complex three-dimensional thermal power systems with selective and scattering media. The new method for improvement of accuracy of the differential approximation based on using of auto-adaptable boundary conditions is introduced in the paper. The  efficiency  of  the  named  method  is  proved  for  the  test  2D-systems.  Self-consistent auto-adaptable boundary conditions taking into consideration the nonorthogonal component of the incident to the boundary radiation flux are formulated. It is demonstrated that taking in- to consideration of the non- orthogonal incident flux in multi-dimensional systems, such as furnaces, boilers, combustion chambers improves the accuracy of the radiant flux simulations and to more extend in the zones adjacent to the edges of the chamber.Test simulations utilizing the differential approximation method with traditional boundary conditions, new self-consistent boundary conditions and “precise” discrete ordinates method were performed. The mean square errors of the resulting radiative fluxes calculated along the boundary of rectangular and triangular test areas were decreased 1.5–2 times by using auto- adaptable boundary conditions. Radiation flux gaps in the corner points of non-symmetric sys- tems are revealed by using auto-adaptable boundary conditions which can not be obtained by using the conventional boundary conditions.

  8. Bentho-Pelagic Divergence of Cichlid Feeding Architecture Was Prodigious and Consistent during Multiple Adaptive Radiations within African Rift-Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    W. James Cooper; Kevin Parsons; Alyssa McIntyre; Brittany Kern; Alana McGee-Moore; R. Craig Albertson

    2010-01-01

    Background How particular changes in functional morphology can repeatedly promote ecological diversification is an active area of evolutionary investigation. The African rift-lake cichlids offer a calibrated time series of the most dramatic adaptive radiations of vertebrate trophic morphology yet described, and the replicate nature of these events provides a unique opportunity to test whether common changes in functional morphology have repeatedly facilitated their ecological success. ...

  9. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique level for chest CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this research is to determine the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) level that enables optimal image quality and dose reduction in the chest computed tomography (CT) protocol with ASIR. A chest phantom with 0-50 % ASIR levels was scanned and then noise power spectrum (NPS), signal and noise and the degree of distortion of peak signal-to noise ratio (PSNR) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) were measured. In addition, the objectivity of the experiment was measured using the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. Moreover, on a qualitative basis, five lesions' resolution, latitude and distortion degree of chest phantom and their compiled statistics were evaluated. The NPS value decreased as the frequency increased. The lowest noise and deviation were at the 20 % ASIR level, mean 126.15±22.21. As a result of the degree of distortion, signal-to-noise ratio and PSNR at 20 % ASIR level were at the highest value as 31.0 and 41.52. However, maximum absolute error and RMSE showed the lowest deviation value as 11.2 and 16. In the ACR phantom study, all ASIR levels were within acceptable allowance of guidelines. The 20 % ASIR level performed best in qualitative evaluation at five lesions of chest phantom as resolution score 4.3, latitude 3.47 and the degree of distortion 4.25. The 20 % ASIR level was proved to be the best in all experiments, noise, distortion evaluation using ImageJ and qualitative evaluation of five lesions of a chest phantom. Therefore, optimal images as well as reduce radiation dose would be acquired when 20 % ASIR level in thoracic CT is applied. (authors)

  10. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D improves chest CT image quality and reduces radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneo Yamashiro

    Full Text Available To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT.Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D. Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic to 5 (excellent, three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease, and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts. Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test.At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001 and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01. For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001, and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA.For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%.

  11. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated 'help-desk' team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. (author)

  12. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  13. Time-effect of adaptive response of mouse thymocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low dose radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    目的:观察低剂量辐射(LDR)诱导胸腺细胞凋亡及细胞周期进程适应性反应的基本规律。方法:用X射线照射昆明系雄性小鼠,其诱导剂量(D1)及其后攻击剂量(D2)分别是75 mGy 和1.5 Gy。D1和D2间隔时间分别是3、6、12、24和60 h。D2照射后18 h胸腺细胞培养4、20 和44 h用流式细胞仪检测胸腺细胞凋亡小体(TAB)和细胞周期进程的变化。结果:当D1和D2间隔3、6和12 h,在D2照射后胸腺细胞培养4和20 h,D1 + D2组 TAB 百分数明显低于D2组(P<0.05),G0/G1和G2+M期细胞百分数也不同程度地低于D2组, 而S期细胞百分数却明显高于D2组(P<0.05或P<0.01)。结论:D1和D2分别是75 mGy(剂量率,12.5 mGy/min)和1.5 Gy(剂量率,0.287 Gy/min),D1和D2间隔3~12 h, 在小鼠全身照射后其胸腺细胞培养4和20 h可诱导细胞凋亡和细胞周期进程的适应性反应。%Objective: In the present study we observed the general pattern of the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low dose radiation (LDR). Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with the inductive dose (D1, 75 mGy) and the challenging dose (D2, 1.5 Gy). The intervals between D1 and D2 were 3, 6, 12, 24 and 60 hours. The changes of thymocyte apoptotic bodies (TAB) and cell cycle progression were measured with flow cytometry with the thymocytes cultured for 4, 20 and 44 hours, respectively, 18 hours after irradiation with D2. Results: When the intervals between D1 and D2 were 3, 6 and 12 hours, the percentages of TAB in the D1 + D2 groups in the thymocytes cultured for 4 and 20 hours were significantly lower than those in the D2 groups (P<0.05) and the percentages of G0/G1 and G2 + M phase cells decreased in varying degrees, while the percentages of S phase cells increased significantly (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: The results mentioned above indicate that when the mice were irradiated with 75 m

  14. Bentho-pelagic divergence of cichlid feeding architecture was prodigious and consistent during multiple adaptive radiations within African rift-lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W James Cooper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How particular changes in functional morphology can repeatedly promote ecological diversification is an active area of evolutionary investigation. The African rift-lake cichlids offer a calibrated time series of the most dramatic adaptive radiations of vertebrate trophic morphology yet described, and the replicate nature of these events provides a unique opportunity to test whether common changes in functional morphology have repeatedly facilitated their ecological success. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Specimens from 87 genera of cichlid fishes endemic to Lakes Tanganyka, Malawi and Victoria were dissected in order to examine the functional morphology of cichlid feeding. We quantified shape using geometric morphometrics and compared patterns of morphological diversity using a series of analytical tests. The primary axes of divergence were conserved among all three radiations, and the most prevalent changes involved the size of the preorbital region of the skull. Even the fishes from the youngest of these lakes (Victoria, which exhibit the lowest amount of skull shape disparity, have undergone extensive preorbital evolution relative to other craniofacial traits. Such changes have large effects on feeding biomechanics, and can promote expansion into a wide array of niches along a bentho-pelagic ecomorphological axis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we show that specific changes in trophic anatomy have evolved repeatedly in the African rift lakes, and our results suggest that simple morphological alterations that have large ecological consequences are likely to constitute critical components of adaptive radiations in functional morphology. Such shifts may precede more complex shape changes as lineages diversify into unoccupied niches. The data presented here, combined with observations of other fish lineages, suggest that the preorbital region represents an evolutionary module that can respond quickly to natural selection when fishes

  15. Modifying effect of extremal temperature depending on the organism adaptation to this factor on the effect of radiation. 2. Analysis of the potential damages using heat resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown, that the effect of high temperature within the range of 33, 35, 37 and 38 deg C after irradiation (X-rays 3000r) increases the radiation effect, manifesting itself in the loss of X-chromosome of Kanton-C line flies, not adapted to high temperature. It takes place at the expense of reparation process depression and the increase of probability of potential damage realization. The effect on the flies of T-32 line, adapted to high temperature (32 deg C) turned non-effective at the temperature of 33 and 35 deg C. Heat-resistance of reparation ferments in this line is supposed to be higher. The temperature of 37 and 38 deg C has been effective for heat-resistant lines as well as for other lines

  16. Differences in the adaptive response to radiation damage in G0 human lymphocytes conditioned with hydrogen peroxide or low-dose X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out experiments to study the adaptive response in G0 human lymphocytes conditioned with either hydrogen peroxide or low-dose X-rays and challenged with 1.5 Gy of X-rays after stimulation. Peroxide conditioning treatment was given at different times before stimulation, while the low-dose irradiation was delivered at different dose rates just before stimulation of lymphocytes. A protective effect of pre-exposure to H2O2 against radiation damage detected as micronuclei in binucleated cells was evident, regardless of the time of conditioning treatment during G0. For low-dose-irradiated cells, on the other hand, the adaptation observed seemed to depend upon the dose rate, and never reached the extent observed in cells treated with peroxide

  17. Multileaf collimator leaf position verification and analysis for adaptive radiation therapy using a video-optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Sohrab B.

    External beam radiation therapy is commonly used to eliminate and control cancerous tumors. High-energy beams are shaped to match the patient's specific tumor volume, whereby maximizing radiation dose to malignant cells and limiting dose to normal tissue. A multileaf collimator (MLC) consisting of multiple pairs of tungsten leaves is used to conform the radiation beam to the desired treatment field. Advanced treatment methods utilize dynamic MLC settings to conform to multiple treatment fields and provide intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Future methods would further increase conformity by actively tracking tumor motion caused by patient cardiac and respiratory motion. Leaf position quality assurance for a dynamic MLC is critical as variation between the planned and actual leaf positions could induce significant errors in radiation dose. The goal of this research project is to prototype a video-optical quality assurance system for MLC leaf positions. The system captures light-field images of MLC leaf sequences during dynamic therapy. Image acquisition and analysis software was developed to determine leaf edge positions. The mean absolute difference between QA prototype predicted and caliper measured leaf positions was found to be 0.6 mm with an uncertainty of +/- 0.3 mm. Maximum errors in predicted positions were below 1.0 mm for static fields. The prototype served as a proof of concept for quality assurance of future tumor tracking methods. Specifically, a lung tumor phantom was created to mimic a lung tumor's motion from respiration. The lung tumor video images were superimposed on MLC field video images for visualization and analysis. The toolbox is capable of displaying leaf position, leaf velocity, tumor position, and determining errors between planned and actual treatment fields for dynamic radiation therapy.

  18. Mechanisms underlying the adaptive response against spontaneous neoplastic transformation induced by low doses of low LET radiation - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2007-01-17

    The objective of the research was to examine mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of low doses (<10 cGy) of low-LET radiation on the endpoint of neoplastic transformation in vitro. The findings indicated a role for upregulation of DNA repair but not of antioxidants.

  19. Development and evaluation of a training program for therapeutic radiographers as a basis for online adaptive radiation therapy for bladder carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroudi, Farshad [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)], E-mail: farshad.foroudi@petermac.org; Wong, Jacky [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Kron, Tomas; Roxby, Paul; Haworth, Annette [Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Bailey, Alistair [Southern Interior Cancer Centre, 399 Royal Avenue, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Rolfo, Aldo; Paneghel, Andrea; Styles, Colin; Laferlita, Marcus [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Tai, Keen Hun; Williams, Scott; Duchesne, Gillian [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St Andrews Place, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Aims: Online adaptive radiotherapy requires a new level of soft tissue anatomy recognition and decision making by therapeutic radiographers at the linear accelerator. We have developed a therapeutic radiographer training workshop encompassing soft tissue matching for an online adaptive protocol for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Our aim is to present the training program, and its evaluation which compares pre and post training staff soft tissue matching and bladder contouring using Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Prior to commencement of an online adaptive bladder protocol, a staff training program for 33 therapeutic radiographers, with a separate ethics approved evaluation component was developed. A multidisciplinary training program over two days was carried out with a total of 11 h of training, covering imaging technology, pelvic anatomy and protocol specific decision making in both practical and theoretical sessions. The evaluation included both pre training and post training testing of staff. Results: Pre training and post training, the standard deviations in the contoured bladder between participants in left-right direction were 0.64 vs 0.59 cm, superior-inferior 0.89 vs 0.77 cm and anterior-posterior direction was 0.88 vs 0.52 cm respectively. Similarly the standard deviation in the volume contoured decreased from 40.7 cc pre training to 24.5 cc post training. Time taken in contouring was reduced by the training program (19.8 vs 17.2 min) as was the discrepancy in choice of adaptive radiotherapy plans. The greatest reduction in variations in contouring was seen in staff whose pre training had the largest deviations from the reference radiation oncologist contours. Conclusion: A formalized staff training program is feasible, well received by staff and reduces variation in organ matching and contouring. The improvement was particularly noticed in staff who pre training had larger deviations from the reference standard.

  20. Development and evaluation of a training program for therapeutic radiographers as a basis for online adaptive radiation therapy for bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aims: Online adaptive radiotherapy requires a new level of soft tissue anatomy recognition and decision making by therapeutic radiographers at the linear accelerator. We have developed a therapeutic radiographer training workshop encompassing soft tissue matching for an online adaptive protocol for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Our aim is to present the training program, and its evaluation which compares pre and post training staff soft tissue matching and bladder contouring using Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Prior to commencement of an online adaptive bladder protocol, a staff training program for 33 therapeutic radiographers, with a separate ethics approved evaluation component was developed. A multidisciplinary training program over two days was carried out with a total of 11 h of training, covering imaging technology, pelvic anatomy and protocol specific decision making in both practical and theoretical sessions. The evaluation included both pre training and post training testing of staff. Results: Pre training and post training, the standard deviations in the contoured bladder between participants in left-right direction were 0.64 vs 0.59 cm, superior-inferior 0.89 vs 0.77 cm and anterior-posterior direction was 0.88 vs 0.52 cm respectively. Similarly the standard deviation in the volume contoured decreased from 40.7 cc pre training to 24.5 cc post training. Time taken in contouring was reduced by the training program (19.8 vs 17.2 min) as was the discrepancy in choice of adaptive radiotherapy plans. The greatest reduction in variations in contouring was seen in staff whose pre training had the largest deviations from the reference radiation oncologist contours. Conclusion: A formalized staff training program is feasible, well received by staff and reduces variation in organ matching and contouring. The improvement was particularly noticed in staff who pre training had larger deviations from the reference standard.

  1. Adaptive radiation of the European whitefish Coregonus lavaretus (L.) in the Pasvik watercourse: the genetic description of a new morph

    OpenAIRE

    Couton, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    Sympatric occurring fish morphs in postglacial lakes usually exhibit differences in morphology and physiology driven by adaptations to differential trophic niches. The European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus (L.)) is a highly variable fish species, with more than 200 intraspecific forms described in Europe. The morphs usually differ in their number of gill-rakers, therefore this trait has been traditionally used for whitefish classification. According to this taxonomy, three different morphs ...

  2. Ecological speciation in postglacial European whitefish: rapid adaptive radiations into the littoral, pelagic, and profundal lake habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Præbel, Kim; Knudsen, Rune; Siwertsson, Anna; Karhunen, Markku; Kahilainen, Kimmo K.; Ovaskainen, Otso; Østbye, Kjartan; Peruzzi, Stefano; Fevolden, Svein-Erik; Amundsen, Per-Arne

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how a monophyletic lineage of a species diverges into several adaptive forms has received increased attention in recent years, but the underly- ing mechanisms in this process are still under debate. Postglacial fishes are excellent model organisms for exploring this process, especially the initial stages of ecological speciation, as postglacial lakes represent replicated discrete envi- ronments with variation in available niches. Here, we combine data of niche ...

  3. Ecological speciation in postglacial European whitefish: rapid adaptive radiations into the littoral, pelagic, and profundal lake habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Præbel, Kim; Knudsen, Rune; Siwertsson, Anna; Karhunen, Markku; Kahilainen, Kimmo K; Ovaskainen, Otso; Ostbye, Kjartan; Peruzzi, Stefano; Fevolden, Svein-Erik; Amundsen, Per-Arne

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how a monophyletic lineage of a species diverges into several adaptive forms has received increased attention in recent years, but the underlying mechanisms in this process are still under debate. Postglacial fishes are excellent model organisms for exploring this process, especially the initial stages of ecological speciation, as postglacial lakes represent replicated discrete environments with variation in available niches. Here, we combine data of niche utilization, trophic morphology, and 17 microsatellite loci to investigate the diversification process of three sympatric European whitefish morphs from three northern Fennoscandian lakes. The morphological divergence in the gill raker number among the whitefish morphs was related to the utilization of different trophic niches and was associated with reproductive isolation within and across lakes. The intralacustrine comparison of whitefish morphs showed that these systems represent two levels of adaptive divergence: (1) a consistent littoral-pelagic resource axis; and (2) a more variable littoral-profundal resource axis. The results also indicate that the profundal whitefish morph has diverged repeatedly from the ancestral littoral whitefish morph in sympatry in two different watercourses. In contrast, all the analyses performed revealed clustering of the pelagic whitefish morphs across lakes suggesting parallel postglacial immigration with the littoral whitefish morph into each lake. Finally, the analyses strongly suggested that the trophic adaptive trait, number of gill rakers, was under diversifying selection in the different whitefish morphs. Together, the results support a complex evolutionary scenario where ecological speciation acts, but where both allopatric (colonization history) and sympatric (within watercourse divergence) processes are involved. PMID:24455129

  4. Structure alterations of human lymphocyte nuclei affected by ionizing radiation within the range of doses that cause the adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-level radiation either from external or from incorporated sources is shown to cause a nonmonotonous change in some intranuclear parameters of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. For instance, radiation induces changes in the parameters that characterize the location of perecentromeric regions within the interphase nucleus and a nonmonotonous increase in nuclear sizes. The exposure to doses exceeding 5 cGy impairs the realtionship between the nuclear sizes and location therein of the perecentromeric regions of interphase chromosomes which exist in the control and after exposure to 2.5 cGy. Differences between the dose ranges of 1.5-3.5 and 17-25 cGy are manifested by the kinetics of restoration of the pattern of distribution of lymphocyte nuclear sizes

  5. Effects of varying doses of gamma radiation on locally adapted Tradescantia clone 02 (BNL) (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study determined the effects of gamma radiation on the meiotic cells of Tradescantia bracteata clone 02 (BNL). The flower buds collected were exposed through dosages ranging from 1 Gy to 5 Gy using gamma cell 220 machine (AECL) in a central axis position (c/a) and grown in Peralta's solution for three days. Out of the twenty buds designated for each dosages, ten buds were treated with 0.05% colchicine solution. The occurrence of micronuclei among the irradiated pollen mother cells suggested a linear relation with the quantity of radiation dose. The occurrence of MN among cells increased linearly from 1 Gy until it reached 3 Gy and 4 Gy. Beyond this maximum dose, cells were less responsive to the dose caused by inhibition of cell division, as demonstrated in the buds exposed to 5 Gy. This result was validated through the kruskal-Wallis test, where the computed h value was 3.44 (critical region of X20.05 = 9.49) Experimental results also showed chromosomal breaks, sticky chromosomes, and anaphase bridges in the pollen mother cells of irradiated buds. A significant numbers of cells were also found to have micronuclei, which may vary from 1 to 6 per pollen mother cell, and this showed no relationship with radiation dose. (Author)

  6. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  7. Adaptive response of the mutagenicity of the somatic and germ cells in mice induced by in vivo 147Pm radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGZhanxhan; ZHUShoupeng; 等

    1999-01-01

    Effects of pretreatment of mouse with low doses of internally deposited 147Pm on the mutagenicity of both the bone marrow lymphocytes and the spermatoblasts induced by subsequent high dose of internally deposited 147Pm were studied.Kunming male mice were injected from the tail vein with low doses of 147Pm(NO3)3 of 0.37,3.7 and 37Bq/g body weight.Three days later the mice were injected with a high dose of 147Pm(NO3)3 of 18.5kBq/g body weight.The animals were sacrificed at 24h after the high dose injection.The results show that the bone marrow lymplhocytes and the spermatoblasts pre-exposed in vivo to low doses of 147Pm can produce an adaptive response.The radioadapted cells had a resistance to the mutagenicity induced by the subsequent high dose of 147Pm,that is,the proportion of both the bone marrow lymphocytes containing micronuclei and the sperm shape abnormalities was significantly lower than those for the pure high dose group(P<0.01),In addition,the induction of the adaptive response of the cells possesses the different dose ranges for the different biological aprameters.The 147Pm dose ranges of the adaptive response are 0.37-3.7and 0.37-37Bq/g body weight for the frequency of micronucleated bone marrow lymphocytes and abnormal sperms,respectively.

  8. Relieved residual damage in the hematopoietic system of mice rescued by radiation-induced adaptive response (Yonezawa Effect)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; VarèS, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    Existence of adaptive response (AR) was previously demonstrated in C57BL/6J mice. Irradiations were performed by delivering a priming low dose of X-rays (0.50 Gy) in combination with a challenge high dose of accelerated carbon or neon ion particles. AR was characterized by significantly decreased mortality in the 30-day survival test. This mouse AR model (‘Yonezawa Effect’) was originally established by using X-rays as both the priming and challenge irradiations. The underlying mechanism was ...

  9. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  10. Analysis and adaptation of a mathematical model for the prediction of solar radiation; Analisis y adaptacion de un modelo matematico de prediccion de radiacion solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrano, Lorenzo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1986-12-31

    There is an abundant, reliable, free, source of energy whose use can be planned and besides, practicably inexhaustible: the solar energy. In Mexico it constitutes an important resource, because of its geographical position; for this reason it is fundamental to know it well, either by means of measurements conducted for several years or by mathematical models. These last ones predict with meteorological variables, the values of the solar radiation with acceptable precision. At the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) a model is studied for the prediction of the solar radiation to be adapted to the local conditions of Mexico. It is used in simulation studies of the solar plants functioning and other solar systems. [Espanol] Existe una fuente de energia abundante, confiable, gratuita, cuyo uso puede planearse y, ademas, es practicamente inagotable: la solar. En Mexico constituye un recurso importante, por la posicion geografica del pais; por eso es fundamental conocerlo bien, ya mediante mediciones realizadas durante algunos anos, ya mediante modelos matematicos. Estos ultimos predicen, con datos de variables meteorologicas, los valores de la radiacion solar con precision aceptable. En el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) se estudia un modelo de prediccion de radiacion solar para adaptarlo a las condiciones locales de Mexico. Se usa en estudios de simulacion del funcionamiento de plantas helioelectricas y otros sistemas solares.

  11. Adaptive divergence in experimental populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens. V. Insight into the niche specialist fuzzy spreader compels revision of the model Pseudomonas radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Gayle C; Bertels, Frederic; Rainey, Paul B

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a model for the study of adaptive radiation. When propagated in a spatially structured environment, the bacterium rapidly diversifies into a range of niche specialist genotypes. Here we present a genetic dissection and phenotypic characterization of the fuzzy spreader (FS) morphotype-a type that arises repeatedly during the course of the P. fluorescens radiation and appears to colonize the bottom of static broth microcosms. The causal mutation is located within gene fuzY (pflu0478)-the fourth gene of the five-gene fuzVWXYZ operon. fuzY encodes a β-glycosyltransferase that is predicted to modify lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O antigens. The effect of the mutation is to cause cell flocculation. Analysis of 92 independent FS genotypes showed each to have arisen as the result of a loss-of-function mutation in fuzY, although different mutations have subtly different phenotypic and fitness effects. Mutations within fuzY were previously shown to suppress the phenotype of mat-forming wrinkly spreader (WS) types. This prompted a reinvestigation of FS niche preference. Time-lapse photography showed that FS colonizes the meniscus of broth microcosms, forming cellular rafts that, being too flimsy to form a mat, collapse to the vial bottom and then repeatably reform only to collapse. This led to a reassessment of the ecology of the P. fluorescens radiation. Finally, we show that ecological interactions between the three dominant emergent types (smooth, WS, and FS), combined with the interdependence of FS and WS on fuzY, can, at least in part, underpin an evolutionary arms race with bacteriophage SBW25Φ2, to which mutation in fuzY confers resistance. PMID:24077305

  12. Toxicity of cobalt-complexed cyanide to Oncorhynchus mykiss, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia: Potentiation by ultraviolet radiation and attenuation by dissolved organic carbon and adaptive UV tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.D.; Theodorakos, P.; Brown, Z.A.; Johnson, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Cobalt cyanide complexes often result when ore is treated with cyanide solutions to extract gold and other metals. These have recently been discovered in low but significant concentrations in effluents from gold leach operations. This study was conducted to determine the potential toxicity of cobalt-cyanide complexes to freshwater organisms and the extent to which ultraviolet radiation (UV) potentiates this toxicity. Tests were also conducted to determine if humic acids or if adaptation to UV influenced sensitivity to the cyanide complexes. Methods. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia were exposed to potassium hexacyanocobaltate in the presence and absence of UV radiation, in the presence and absence of humic acids. Cyano-cobalt exposures were also conducted with C. dubia from cultures adapted to elevated UV. Results. With an LC50 concentration of 0.38 mg/L, cyanocobalt was over a 1000 times more toxic to rainbow trout in the presence of UV at a low, environmentally relevant irradiance level (4 ??W/cm2 as UVB) than exposure to this compound in the absence of UV with an LC50 of 112.9 mg/L. Toxicity was immediately apparent, with mortality occurring within an hour of the onset of exposure at the highest concentration. Fish were unaffected by exposure to UV alone. Weak-acid dissociable cyanide concentrations were observed in irradiated aqueous solutions of cyanocobaltate within hours of UV exposure and persisted in the presence of UV for at least 96 hours, whereas negligible concentrations were observed in the absence of UV. The presence of humic acids significantly diminished cyanocobalt toxicity to D. magna and reduced mortality from UV exposure. Humic acids did not significantly influence survival among C. dubia. C. dubia from UV-adapted populations were less sensitive to metallocyanide compounds than organisms from unadapted populations. Conclusions. The results indicate that metallocyanide complexes may pose a

  13. Investigation on the effect of MR elastomer based adaptive vibration absorbers on the radiated sound from circular elastic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmatian, M.; Sedaghati, R.

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of using magnetorheological elastomer (MRE)-based adaptive tuned vibration absorbers (ATVA) on the sound transmission in an elastic plate. Sound transmission loss (STL) of an elastic circular thin plate is analytically studied. The plate is excited by a plane acoustic wave as an incident sound and the displacement of the plate is calculated using corresponding mode shapes of the system for clamped boundary condition. Rayleigh integral approach is used to express the transmitted sound pressure in terms of the plate's displacement modal amplitude. In order to increase sound transmission loss of the plate, the MRE-based ATVA is considered. The basic idea is to be able to change the stiffness of the ATVA by varying magnetic field in order to reduce the transmitted acoustic energy of the host structure in a wide frequency range. Here, a MRE-based ATVA under the shear mode consisting of an oscillator mass, magnetic conductor, coils and MRE is investigated. In order to predict the viscoelastic characteristics of the field-dependent MRE based on the applied magnetic field, the double pole model is used. Finally, MRE-based ATVAs are integrated with the plate to absorb the plate energy with the aim of decreasing the transmitted sound power. Results show that plate with integrated MRE-based ATVAs suppresses the axisymmetric vibration of the plate and thus considerably improves the STL. Parametric studies on the influence of the position of MRE-based ATVAs and the effects of applied current on their performance are also presented.

  14. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-applied ultra-low-dose CT with radiography- comparable radiation dose: Usefulness for lung nodule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jung Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To assess the performance of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)-applied ultra-low-dose CT (ULDCT) in detecting small lung nodules. Thirty patients underwent both ULDCT and standard dose CT (SCT). After determining the reference standard nodules, five observers, blinded to the reference standard reading results, independently evaluated SCT and both subsets of ASIR- and filtered back projection (FBP)-driven ULDCT images. Data assessed by observers were compared statistically. Converted effective doses in SCT and ULDCT were 2.81 ± 0.92 and 0.17 ± 0.02 mSv, respectively. A total of 114 lung nodules were detected on SCT as a standard reference. There was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT for three out of the five observers (p = 0.678, 0.735, < 0.01, 0.038, and < 0.868 for observers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively). The sensitivity of FBP-driven ULDCT was significantly lower than that of ASIR-driven ULDCT in three out of the five observers (p < 0.01 for three observers, and p = 0.064 and 0.146 for two observers). In jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis, the mean values of figure-of-merit (FOM) for FBP, ASIR-driven ULDCT, and SCT were 0.682, 0.772, and 0.821, respectively, and there were no significant differences in FOM values between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT (p = 0.11), but the FOM value of FBP-driven ULDCT was significantly lower than that of ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT (p = 0.01 and 0.00). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-driven ULDCT delivering a radiation dose of only 0.17 mSv offers acceptable sensitivity in nodule detection compared with SCT and has better performance than FBP-driven ULDCT.

  15. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Lambert, Jonathan [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Parker, Joel [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  16. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean ± standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 ± 0.12, 0.70 ± 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 ± 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 ± 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The

  17. Image quality in children with low-radiation chest CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihang Sun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate noise reduction and image quality improvement in low-radiation dose chest CT images in children using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR algorithm. METHODS: Forty-five children (age ranging from 28 days to 6 years, median of 1.8 years who received low-dose chest CT scans were included. Age-dependent noise index (NI was used for acquisition. Images were retrospectively reconstructed using three methods: MBIR, 60% of ASIR and 40% of conventional filtered back-projection (FBP, and FBP. The subjective quality of the images was independently evaluated by two radiologists. Objective noises in the left ventricle (LV, muscle, fat, descending aorta and lung field at the layer with the largest cross-section area of LV were measured, with the region of interest about one fourth to half of the area of descending aorta. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was calculated. RESULT: In terms of subjective quality, MBIR images were significantly better than ASIR and FBP in image noise and visibility of tiny structures, but blurred edges were observed. In terms of objective noise, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction decreased the image noise by 55.2% and 31.8%, respectively, for LV compared with FBP. Similarly, MBIR and ASIR reconstruction increased the SNR by 124.0% and 46.2%, respectively, compared with FBP. CONCLUSION: Compared with FBP and ASIR, overall image quality and noise reduction were significantly improved by MBIR. MBIR image could reconstruct eligible chest CT images in children with lower radiation dose.

  18. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function preservation

  19. Interval for the expression of the adaptive response induced by gamma radiation in leucocytes of mouse In vivo; Intervalo para la expresion de la respuesta adaptativa inducida por radiacion gamma en leucocitos de raton In vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The interval between the adaptive gamma radiation dose (0.01 Gy) and challenge (1.0 Gy) capable to induce the maximum expression of the adaptive response in lymphocytes of mouse In vivo. The animals were exposed to the mentioned doses with different intervals among both (1, 1.5, 5 or 18 hr). By means of the unicellular electrophoresis in gel technique, four damage parameters were analysed. The results showed that from the 1 hr interval an adaptive response was produced since in the pretreated organisms with 0.01 Gy the cells present lesser damage than in those not adapted. The maximum response was induced with the intervals between 2.5 and 5 hr and even though it persisted until 18 hr, the effect was reducing. (Author)

  20. In vitro techniques for selection of radiation induced mutations adapted to adverse environmental conditions. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ever increasing human population and dwindling land and water resources worldwide make it essential to produce more food, fibre and fodder from less and less land. During the last century, plant breeding contributed remarkably to increasing food by producing varieties which give higher yield, have improved quality and nutrition, and resist diseases and pests. Nearly 50% of the increase in food production in Asia during the last fifty years can be attributed to the high yielding, short height varieties of rice and wheat, the remaining to the improved agronomic inputs and management. Many crops, such as cassava, potato, pineapple, sweet potato, sugarcane, banana and plantain are major food crops, and others such as sugarcane and pineapple are important to the economies of many developing countries. One of the solutions to have a sustainable and secure food production is to breed varieties which are tolerant of stress conditions during their growth and development. Hence a Co-ordinated Research Project on In vitro Techniques for Selection of Radiation Induced Mutations Adapted to Adverse Environmental Conditions was initiated and focused primarily on the improvement of vegetatively propagated plants. Since the inception of this project, several participating scientists established the optimal dose requirement for in vitro cultured material. Investigations were carried out on the effect of radiation to alter traits which affect survival under stress conditions and high temperature stress in potato, pineapple, sweet potato and garlic. The possibility to change traits such as tolerance to saline and water logged soils in sugarcane and gene regulation for salinity tolerance were studied. The limited number of available reports suggest that callus cultures are much more sensitive to radiation treatment and require much lower doses (2 to 5 Gy) than stem cuttings or seeds, and that relatively higher doses (15 to 20 Gy) cause necrosis or loss of regenerative capacity. The

  1. Reducing radiation dose in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and lower tube potential in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, David [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Grupp, Ulrich; Kahn, Johannes; Wiener, Edzard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ghadjar, Pirus [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    To assess the impact of ASIR (adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction) and lower tube potential on dose reduction and image quality in chest computed tomography angiographies (CTAs) of patients with pulmonary embolism. CT data from 44 patients with pulmonary embolism were acquired using different protocols - Group A: 120 kV, filtered back projection, n = 12; Group B: 120 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 12; Group C: 100 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 12 and Group D: 80 kV, 40 % ASIR, n = 8. Normalised effective dose was calculated; image quality was assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Normalised effective dose in Group B was 33.8 % lower than in Group A (p = 0.014) and 54.4 % lower in Group C than in Group A (p < 0.001). Group A, B and C did not show significant differences in qualitative or quantitative analysis of image quality. Group D showed significantly higher noise levels in qualitative and quantitative analysis, significantly more artefacts and decreased overall diagnosability. Best results, considering dose reduction and image quality, were achieved in Group C. The combination of ASIR and lower tube potential is an option to reduce radiation without significant worsening of image quality in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  2. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C; Lee, C [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.

  3. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV

  4. Deformable Image Registration for Adaptive Radiation Therapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Accuracy and Precision in the Presence of Tumor Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mencarelli, Angelo, E-mail: a.mencarelli@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kranen, Simon Robert van; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Beek, Suzanne van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nico Rasch, Coenraad Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy and precision for normal and tumor tissues in head and neck cancer patients during the course of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with oropharyngeal tumors, who underwent submucosal implantation of small gold markers (average 6, range 4-10) around the tumor and were treated with RT were retrospectively selected. Two observers identified 15 anatomical features (landmarks) representative of normal tissues in the planning computed tomography (pCT) scan and in weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs). Gold markers were digitally removed after semiautomatic identification in pCTs and CBCTs. Subsequently, landmarks and gold markers on pCT were propagated to CBCTs, using a b-spline-based DIR and, for comparison, rigid registration (RR). To account for observer variability, the pair-wise difference analysis of variance method was applied. DIR accuracy (systematic error) and precision (random error) for landmarks and gold markers were quantified. Time trend of the precisions for RR and DIR over the weekly CBCTs were evaluated. Results: DIR accuracies were submillimeter and similar for normal and tumor tissue. DIR precision (1 SD) on the other hand was significantly different (P<.01), with 2.2 mm vector length in normal tissue versus 3.3 mm in tumor tissue. No significant time trend in DIR precision was found for normal tissue, whereas in tumor, DIR precision was significantly (P<.009) degraded during the course of treatment by 0.21 mm/week. Conclusions: DIR for tumor registration proved to be less precise than that for normal tissues due to limited contrast and complex non-elastic tumor response. Caution should therefore be exercised when applying DIR for tumor changes in adaptive procedures.

  5. Feasibility study of radiation dose reduction in adult female pelvic CT scan with low tube-voltage and adaptive statistical iterative econstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin Lian; He, Wen; Chen, Jian Hong; Hu, Zhi Hai; Zhao, Li Qin [Dept. of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate image quality of female pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans reconstructed with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique combined with low tube-voltage and to explore the feasibility of its clinical application. Ninety-four patients were divided into two groups. The study group used 100 kVp, and images were reconstructed with 30%, 50%, 70%, and 90% ASIR. The control group used 120 kVp, and images were reconstructed with 30% ASIR. The noise index was 15 for the study group and 11 for the control group. The CT values and noise levels of different tissues were measured. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. A subjective evaluation was carried out by two experienced radiologists. The CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) was recorded. A 44.7% reduction in CTDIvol was observed in the study group (8.18 ± 3.58 mGy) compared with that in the control group (14.78 ± 6.15 mGy). No significant differences were observed in the tissue noise levels and CNR values between the 70% ASIR group and the control group (p = 0.068-1.000). The subjective scores indicated that visibility of small structures, diagnostic confidence, and the overall image quality score in the 70% ASIR group was the best, and were similar to those in the control group (1.87 vs. 1.79, 1.26 vs. 1.28, and 4.53 vs. 4.57; p = 0.122-0.585). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was detected between the study group and the control group (42/47 vs. 43/47, p = 1.000). Low tube-voltage combined with automatic tube current modulation and 70% ASIR allowed the low CT radiation dose to be reduced by 44.7% without losing image quality on female pelvic scan.

  6. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J.

    2013-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  7. Correction for 'artificial' electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disher, Brandon; Hajdok, George; Wang, An; Craig, Jeff; Gaede, Stewart; Battista, Jerry J

    2013-06-21

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (-1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  8. Real-time fast inverse dose optimization for image guided adaptive radiation therapy-Enhancements to fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S. P.; Turnbull, D.; Johnson, C.; Chen, J. Z.; Battista, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    A fast, accurate and stable optimization algorithm is very important for inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and for implementing dose-adaptive radiotherapy in the future. Conventional numerical search algorithms with positive beam weight constraints generally require numerous iterations and may produce suboptimal dose results due to trapping in local minima regions of the objective function landscape. A direct solution of the inverse problem using conventional quadratic objective functions without positive beam constraints is more efficient but it will result in unrealistic negative beam weights. We review here a direct solution of the inverse problem that is efficient and does not yield unphysical negative beam weights. In fast inverse dose optimization (FIDO) method the objective function for the optimization of a large number of beamlets is reformulated such that the optimization problem is reducible to a linear set of equations. The optimal set of intensities is then found through a matrix inversion, and negative beamlet intensities are avoided without the need for externally imposed ad hoc conditions. In its original version [S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, in Proceedings of the XIVth International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, 2004, pp. 112-115; S. P. Goldman, J. Z. Chen, and J. J. Battista, Med. Phys. 32, 3007 (2005)], FIDO was tested on single two-dimensional computed tomography (CT) slices with sharp KERMA beams without scatter, in order to establish a proof of concept which demonstrated that FIDO could be a viable method for the optimization of cancer treatment plans. In this paper we introduce the latest advancements in FIDO that now include not only its application to three-dimensional volumes irradiated by beams with full scatter but include as well a complete implementation of clinical dose-volume constraints including maximum and minimum dose as well as equivalent uniform dose

  9. Correction for ‘artificial’ electron disequilibrium due to cone-beam CT density errors: implications for on-line adaptive stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has rapidly become a clinically useful imaging modality for image-guided radiation therapy. Unfortunately, CBCT images of the thorax are susceptible to artefacts due to scattered photons, beam hardening, lag in data acquisition, and respiratory motion during a slow scan. These limitations cause dose errors when CBCT image data are used directly in dose computations for on-line, dose adaptive radiation therapy (DART). The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of errors in CBCT numbers (HU), and determine the resultant effects on derived tissue density and computed dose accuracy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung cancer. Planning CT (PCT) images of three lung patients were acquired using a Philips multi-slice helical CT simulator, while CBCT images were obtained with a Varian On-Board Imaging system. To account for erroneous CBCT data, three practical correction techniques were tested: (1) conversion of CBCT numbers to electron density using phantoms, (2) replacement of individual CBCT pixel values with bulk CT numbers, averaged from PCT images for tissue regions, and (3) limited replacement of CBCT lung pixels values (LCT) likely to produce artificial lateral electron disequilibrium. For each corrected CBCT data set, lung SBRT dose distributions were computed for a 6 MV volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique within the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The reference prescription dose was set such that 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) received at least 54 Gy (i.e. D95). Further, we used the relative depth dose factor as an a priori index to predict the effects of incorrect low tissue density on computed lung dose in regions of severe electron disequilibrium. CT number profiles from co-registered CBCT and PCT patient lung images revealed many reduced lung pixel values in CBCT data, with some pixels corresponding to vacuum (−1000 HU). Similarly, CBCT data in a plastic lung

  10. Radiation controlling reversible window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, H.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A coated glass glazing system is presented including a transparent glass substrate having one surface coated with a radiation absorptive film which is overcoated with a radiation reflective film by a technique which renders the radiation reflective film radiation absorptive at the surface contracting the radiating absorptive film. The coated glass system is used as glazing for storm windows which are adapted to be reversible so that the radiation reflective surface may be exposed to the outside of the dwelling during the warm seasons to prevent excessive solar radiation from entering a dwelling and reversed during cold seasons to absorb solar radiation and utilize it to aid in keeping the dwelling interior warm.

  11. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  12. Response of the extremely halophilic Halococcus dombrowskii strain H4 to UV radiation and space conditions in the EXPOSE -ADAPT project on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrihan, Sergiu; Grosbacher, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2010-05-01

    The international project ADAPT focuses on the response of different microorganisms to outer space conditions. In 2007, the European Space Agency (ESA) has installed the Columbus laboratory and the exposure facility EXPOSE-E on the International Space Station (ISS). One of the microorganisms that were exposed for 18 months on the ISS is Halococcus dombrowskii strain H4, an extremely halophilic archaeon which was isolated from about 250 million years old alpine salt deposits (1). Ground experiments with Hcc. dombrowskii included irradiation with different wavelengths and doses of UV, using a Hg low pressure lamp, a solar simulator SOL2 (both at the DLR, Cologne) and a Mars UV simulation lamp (2). Cells were embedded in halite crystals which were formed on quartz discs by evaporation of high salt buffers. Methods for analyzing the effects of exposure on Hcc. dombrowskii include the estimation of colony forming units (CFUs), staining for viability with the BacLight LIVE/DEAD kit (2), establishing long term liquid cultures and determination of the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) with specific antibodies (3). Counting of viable (green) and dead (red) cells showed an apparent preservation of viability following exposure to about 21 kJ/m2 in ground experiments, but the calculated D37 (dose of 37 % survival) for Hcc. dombrowskii was about 400 kJ/m2 in salt crystals (2). CPDs were detected in about 6-8% of cells of Hcc. dombrowskii following exposure to a dose of 3000 kJ/m2 (200-400 nm). Preliminary results with the samples of Hcc. dombrowskii from the ISS suggested preservation of cellular morphology and stainability with the fluorescent dyes of the LIVE/DEAD kit, as well as formation of CPDs in about 2-3 % of the cells. The determination of the survival of cells by measuring proliferation requires months of incubation; data can be expected in May or June 2010. (1) Stan-Lotter H, Pfaffenhuemer M, Legat A, Busse H-J, Radax C, Gruber C (2002) Halococcus

  13. Oxidative stress as a significant factor for development of an adaptive response in irradiated and nonirradiated human lymphocytes after inducing the bystander effect by low-dose X-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, Aleksei V., E-mail: avePlato@mail.ru [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Science, ul. Moskvorechye, 1, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Egolina, Natalya A.; Efremova, Liudmila V.; Veiko, Natalya N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Science, ul. Moskvorechye, 1, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-02

    X-radiation (10 cGy) was shown to induce in human lymphocytes transposition of homologous chromosomes loci from the membrane towards the centre of the nucleus and activation of the chromosomal nucleolus-forming regions (NFRs). These effects are transmitted by means of extracellular DNA (ecDNA) fragments to nonirradiated cells (the so-called bystander effect, BE). We demonstrated that in the development of the BE an important role is played by oxidative stress (which is brought about by low radiation doses and ecDNA fragments of the culture medium of the irradiated cells), by an enzyme of apoptosis called caspase-3, and by DNA-binding receptors of the bystander cells, presumably TLR9. Proposed herein is a scheme of the development of an adaptive response and the BE on exposure to radiation. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis of the radiosensitive fraction of cells due to the development of the 'primary' oxidative stress (OS). DNA fragments of apoptotic cells are released into the intercellular space and interact with the DNA-binding receptors of the bystander cells. This interaction activates in lymphocytes signalling pathways associated with synthesis of the reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species, i.e., induces secondary oxidative stress accompanied by apoptosis of part of the cells, etc. Hence, single exposure to radiation may be followed by relatively long-lasting in the cellular population oxidative stress contributing to the development of an adaptive response. We thus believe that ecDNA of irradiated apoptotic lymphocytes is a significant factor of stress-signalling.

  14. Cytogenetic monitoring, radiosensitivity study and adaptive response of workers exposed to low level ionizing radiation; Monitorizacao citogenetica, estudo de radiossensibilidade e resposta adaptativa em profissionais expostos a baixos niveis de radiacao ionizante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peitl Junior, Paulo

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were: To determine the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from individuals belonging to professionally exposed groups, under normal conditions; to determine the possible differences in radiosensitivity between the lymphocytes of technicians and controls after in vitro irradiation with gamma rays during the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle (radiosensitivity study), and to examine the influence of in vivo and in vitro pre-exposure to low doses of radiation on the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by high doses (study of the adaptive response) in a group of technicians (T) compared to controls (C). (author)

  15. A Hadron Radiation Installation and Verification Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, F.J.; Bom, V.R.

    2013-01-01

    A hadron radiation installation adapted to subject a target to irradiation by a hadron radiation beam, said installation comprising: - a target support configured to support, preferably immobilize, a target: - a hadron radiation apparatus adapted to emit a hadron radiation beam along a beam axis to

  16. Adaptive Lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive LightingAdaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled i...

  17. 一种基于自适应滤波器的潜艇辐射噪声仿真方法%A Simulation Method for Submarine Radiation Noise Based on Adaptive Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙时珍

    2013-01-01

      文章提出了一种基于自适应滤波器的潜艇辐射噪声仿真方法。在对潜艇辐射噪声连续谱、线谱和调制谱的数学模型进行研究的基础上,利用Ecs型功率谱模型,基于自适应滤波器,通过傅里叶反变换对潜艇辐射噪声连续谱进行了仿真,分别叠加了线谱信号和调制谱信号之后,得到潜艇辐射噪声的仿真结果。通过对仿真结果的分析和利用仿真结果与实装进行对接测试,表明仿真的辐射噪声逼真度较高。%A simulation method for submarine radiation noise based on adaptive filter was proposed. Based on the research on the mathematical models of continuous spectrum, line spectrum and modulation spectrum of sub⁃marine radiation noise, the continuous spectrum of submarine radiation noise was simulated via inverse fourier transform based on adaptive filter using Ecs spectrum model. The simulation results was obtained after superpose⁃ing the line sepctrum signal and modulation signal. The analysis and equipment test of the simulation results showed that its naturalness was so good that the method was practical.

  18. Age estimates for an adaptive lake fish radiation, its mitochondrial introgression, and an unexpected sister group: Sailfin silversides of the Malili Lakes system in Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Stelbrink, Björn; Stöger, Isabella; Hadiaty, Renny K; Schliewen, Ulrich K.; Herder, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Background The Malili Lakes system in central Sulawesi (Indonesia) is a hotspot of freshwater biodiversity in the Wallacea, characterized by endemic species flocks like the sailfin silversides (Teleostei: Atherinomorpha: Telmatherinidae) radiation. Phylogenetic reconstructions of these freshwater fishes have previously revealed two Lake Matano Telmatherina lineages (sharpfins and roundfins) forming an ancient monophyletic group, which is however masked by introgressive hybridization of sharpf...

  19. Low dose radiation induced adaptive response upon salt stress and vacuum stress: a possible mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose response curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose-response curve, the relationship of irradiation-vacuum stress, and irradiation-salt stress, was investigated with rice seeds irradiated to 60-560 Gy by 60Co γ-rays. The dose-response curve was simulated based on seedling height data, which showed obedient to linear-quadratic model. During germination,the irradiated rice seeds were stressed by 10-3 Pa vacuum, or by NaCl in different concentrations. After that, the dose-response curve manifested a saddle-like shape. The results indicate that while low dose irradiation could retard seedling growth synergistically with vacuum stress and salt stress, it could also induce adaptive response upon vacuum stress and salt stress. Low dose irradiation induced adaptive response upon environmental adverse factors could contribute to the mechanism for the effect of saddle-like dose-response curve. (authors)

  20. Research advance on responsive and adaptive mechanism of Cryptogam to the increased UV-B radiation%隐花植物对UV-B辐射响应和适应机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    回嵘; 李新荣; 贾荣亮; 赵昕; 刘立超

    2012-01-01

    Cryptogam means nonseed-bearing plant; it is a constituent part of biological soil crust ( BSC )-the main characteristic on the surface in arid and semi-arid regions, which plays a vital role in ecosystem. According to diversity and difference of the dominated species in BSC, the cryptogam is mainly distinguished into three basic types; algae, moss and lichen. Because of their simple morphological and anatomical structures, the cryptogam is easily influenced by environments and often used as an indicator of environmental variations. So the response and a-daptability of cryptogam to environmental factors is of great importance in the stability of the whole ecosystem. The increase in the intensity of ultraviolet radiation ( mainly UV - B) invades land due to stratospheric ozone depletion resulted from human activities, made a series of impacts on terrestrial beings, it also effects the composition, structure and function of cryptogam to an even greater degree. Many studies have shown that enhanced UV - B radiation intensity made effects on growth development, photosynthesis, metabolism, antioxidant system and cell membrane of plants. Therefore, studies related to the effects of enhanced UV - B radiation on cryptogam has become a growing tendency and one of the hot spots in UV - B radiation research. The Cryptogam has very important eco-value in arid and semi-arid regions, which is the dominant component of BSC in desert region, It is also one of the evaluating index for ecosystem stability and restoration of degraded ecosystem. Now there are many reports about the researches concerned with the effects of UV - B on cryptogam and as a result the paper introduces the concerned domestic and international researches in this field, which include effects of cryptogam to enhanced UV - B radiation on biomass, photosynthetic ability, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes activity, water-soluble protein content, DNA damage, fatty acids and so on. In order to understand

  1. Radio-adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adaptive response to radiation stress was found as a suppressed induction of chromosomal damage including micronuclei and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells pre-exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiations. The mechanism underlying this novel chromosomal response, called 'radio-adaptive response (RAR)' has been studied progressively. The following results were obtained in recent experiments. 1. Low doses of β-rays from tritiated water (HTO) as well as tritium-thymidine can cause RAR. 2. Thermal neutrons, a high LET radiation, can not act as tritium β-rays or γ-rays. 3. The RAR expression is suppressed not only by the treatment with an inhibitor of protein synthesis but also by RNA synthesis inhibition. 4. Several proteins are newly synthesized concurrently with the RAR expression after the adapting doses, viewed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of cellular proteins. These results suggests that the RAR might be a cellular stress response to a signal produced preferentially by very low doses of low LET radiation under restricted conditions, accompany the inducible specific gene expression. (author)

  2. Low incidence of chest wall pain with a risk-adapted lung stereotactic body radiation therapy approach using three or five fractions based on chest wall dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud P Coroller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. METHODS: We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10-12 Gy×5 fractions (50-60 Gy total otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3% patients developed CW pain including three (4.2% grade 1, two (2.8% grade 2 and one (1.4% grade 3. Five (6.9% patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain.

  3. Megavoltage cone-beam CT:clinical applications for adaptive radiation therapy%兆伏级锥形束CT在自适应性放疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O. Morin; H. Chen; L. Simpson; J. Pouliot; 王艳阳; M. Aubin; J. Chen; H. Chen; J-F. Aubry; A.Gillis; K. Bucci; M. Geffen; K. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    随着兆伏级锥形束CT(Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT,MV CBCT)技术的诞生,目前利用电子验证影像设备(electronic portal imaging devices,EPID)与治疗用X线束在治疗体位状态下对患者进行三维成像,并根据所获影像进行电子密度校准,已逐渐在临床上获得应用.本文首先介绍MV CBCT的一般特性,并对其在适应性放疗(Adaptive Radiation Therapy,ART)中的临床应用及发展方向进行探讨.

  4. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...... involvement. The patients received whole pelvis intensity-modulated radiation therapy (45-50 Gy/25-30 fx) to whole pelvis and two fractions of MRI pulsed-dose-rate BT. The delineated LN groups were para-aortic, inguinal, common iliac (CI), external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral. For each LN...

  5. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  6. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... distributed differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial...

  7. Challenges for the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) design due to the high intensity photon radiation environment at the European XFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, J; Göttlicher, P; Graafsma, H; Hirsemann, H; Jack, S; Klyuev, A; Marras, S Lange A; Trunk, U; Klanner, R; Schwandt, J; Zhang, J; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Henrich, B; Mozzanica, A; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Gronewald, M; Krüger, H

    2013-01-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) is a new research facility currently under construction in Hamburg, Germany. With a pulse length of less than 100 fs and an extremely high luminosity of 27000 flashes per second the European XFEL will have a unique time structure that demands the development of new detectors tailored to the requirements imposed by the experiments while complying with the machine specific operation parameters. The Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) is one response to the need for large 2D detectors, able to cope with the 4.5 MHz frame rate, as well as with the high dynamic range needed by XFEL experiments ranging from single photons to more than 10$^4$ 12 keV photons per pixel per pulse. In addition it has to withstand doses of up to 1 GGy over three years.

  8. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and...

  9. Adaptive Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Provides information on various adaptive technology resources available to people with disabilities. (Contains 19 references, an annotated list of 129 websites, and 12 additional print resources.) (JOW)

  10. ADAPT Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) Project Lead: Scott Poll Subject Fault diagnosis in electrical power systems Description The Advanced...

  11. Determination of the adaptive response induced In vivo by gamma radiation and its relation with the sensibility to the damage induction in the DNA and with the repairing capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of damage induction and repair at different doses as well as the adaptive response induced by gamma ray exposure were determined in murine leukocytes in vivo. The damage-repair kinetics were established after the exposure to 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 Gy in a 137Cs source. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from the tails of mice, the percentage of damaged cells and the DNA migration in each one were analyzed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) technique or comet assay. Results indicated that there was an induction of approximately 75% comets with the doses of 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, which was considerably reduced to 22% and 42% respectively during the first 15 minutes. This evidences the presence of a rapid repair process and suggests that leucocytes are genetically well prepared to repair this kind of damage. After 15 minutes, a second increase in the percentage of damaged cells that was proportional to dose occurred, which seems to represent the breaks produced during the repair of other kind of lesions. After that a second reduction was observed, reaching values near to the basal ones, except with the dose of 2.0 Gy. The kinetics obtained with the dose of 0.5 Gy was similar to that established with 1.0 Gy, but in this case the initial damage was 50 % lower. Besides, the adaptive response was observed after the exposure of the mice to an adaptive dose of 0.01 Gy and to a challenge dose of 1.0 Gy 60 minutes later. The pretreatment reduced the percentage of damaged cells caused by the challenge dose to one third approximately, and also diminished this parameter produced during the late repair process. This indicates that the early adaptive response is caused, instead of by an increment in repair, by the induction of a process that protects DNA from damage induction by radiation, i.e synthesis of substances that increase the scavenging of free radicals. (Author)

  12. Radiation Therapy Alone in cT1-3N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Unfit for Surgical Resection or Stereotactic Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Risk-Adaptive Dose Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won Kyung; Noh, Jae Myoung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul; Pyo, Hongryull

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High dose definitive radiation therapy (RT) alone is recommended to patients with cT1-3N0 non-small cell lung cancer, who are unfit for surgery or stereotactic RT. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness following RT alone using two different modest hypofractionation dose schemes. Materials and Methods Between 2001 and 2014, 124 patients underwent RT alone. From 2001 till 2010, 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered to 79 patients (group 1). Since 2011, 60 Gy in 20 fractions (group 2, 20 patients), and 60 Gy in 15 fractions (group 3, 25 patients) were selectively chosen depending on estimated risk of esophagitis. Results At follow-up of 16.7 months, 2-year rates of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 62.6%, 39.1%, and 59.1%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly better in group 3 (p=0.002). In multivariate analyses, cT3 was the most powerful adverse factor affecting clinical outcomes. Incidence and severity of radiation pneumonitis were not different among groups, while no patients developed grade 2 esophagitis in group 3 (p=0.003). Under current Korean Health Insurance Policy, RT cost per person was 22.5% less in group 3 compared with others. Conclusion The current study demonstrated that 60 Gy in 15 fractions instead of 60 Gy in 20 fractions resulted in comparable clinical outcomes with excellent safety, direct cost saving, and improved convenience to the patients with tumors located at ≥ 1.5 cm from the esophagus. PMID:26987393

  13. Was there a second adaptive radiation of giant tortoises in the Indian Ocean? Using mitochondrial DNA to investigate speciation and biogeography of Aldabrachelys (Reptilia, Testudinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jeremy J; Arnold, E Nicholas; Bour, Roger

    2003-06-01

    A radiation of five species of giant tortoises (Cylindraspis) existed in the southwest Indian Ocean, on the Mascarene islands, and another (of Aldabrachelys) has been postulated on small islands north of Madagascar, from where at least eight nominal species have been named and up to five have been recently recognized. Of 37 specimens of Madagascan and small-island Aldabrachelys investigated by us, 23 yielded significant portions of a 428-base-pair (bp) fragment of mitochondrial (cytochrome b and tRNA-Glu), including type material of seven nominal species (A. arnoldi, A. dussumieri, A. hololissa, A. daudinii, A. sumierei, A. ponderosa and A. gouffei). These and nearly all the remaining specimens, including 15 additional captive individuals sequenced previously, show little variation. Thirty-three exhibit no differences and the remainder diverge by only 1-4 bp (0.23-0.93%). This contrasts with more widely accepted tortoise species which show much greater inter- and intraspecific differences. The non-Madagascan material examined may therefore only represent a single species and all specimens may come from Aldabra where the common haplotype is known to occur. The present study provides no evidence against the Madagascan origin for Aldabra tortoises suggested by a previous molecular phylogenetic analysis, the direction of marine currents and phylogeography of other reptiles in the area. Ancient mitochondrial DNA from the extinct subfossil A. grandidieri of Madagascar differs at 25 sites (5.8%) from all other Aldabrachelys samples examined here. PMID:12755871

  14. Expression of protein encoded by apoptosis-associated gene p53, bcl-2, and bax in adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by low dose radiation with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the regulative mechanism of apoptosis-associated gene proteins on the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by low dose radiation with X-rays. Methods: Kunming male mice were irradiated with the inductive doses (D1: 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 mGy; dose rate: 12.5 mGy ·min-1) and the challenging dose (D2: 1.5 Gy; dose rate: 287 mGy·min-1). The time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The expressive levels of thymocyte apoptosis-associated gene proteins were measured with flow cytometry. Results: As compared with the sham-irradiation, the positive percentage of thymocyte Bcl-2 protein expression decreased significantly in D2 group (P<0.05), Bax increased significantly (P<0.05), and Bcl-2/Bax decreased significantly (P<0.001); p 53 increased significantly (P<0.001). As compared with D2 group, the positive percentage of thymocyte Bcl-2 protein expression increased in varying degree in D1+ D2 group of 25-75 mGy D1, Bax decreased in varying degree, and Bcl-2/Bax increased significantly (P<0.01); p53 decreased significantly (P<0.001 or P<0.05). Conclusion: The apoptotic thymocytes in the adaptive response of thymocyte apoptosis in mice induced by irradiation with 25-75 mGy decrease significantly due to the increase of apoptosis-associated gene Bcl-2 protein expression and Bcl-2/Bax, the decrease of Bax and p53 protein expressions. (authors)

  15. Manifestation Pattern of Early-Late Vaginal Morbidity After Definitive Radiation (Chemo)Therapy and Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: An Analysis From the EMBRACE Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands); Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark); Westerveld, Henrike [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haie-Meder, Christine [Department of Radiotherapy, Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Petrič, Primož [Department of Radiotherapy, Institute of Oncology Ljubljana (Slovenia); Department of Radiotherapy, National Center for Cancer Care and Research, Doha (Qatar); Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    Background and Purpose: Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study ( (www.embracestudy.dk)) on image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). So far, little has been reported about the development of early to late vaginal morbidity in the frame of IGABT. Therefore, the aim of the present EMBRACE analysis was to evaluate the manifestation pattern of vaginal morbidity during the first 2 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: In total, 588 patients with a median follow-up time of 15 months and information on vaginal morbidity were included. Morbidity was prospectively assessed at baseline, every 3 months during the first year, and every 6 months in the second year according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, regarding vaginal stenosis, dryness, mucositis, bleeding, fistula, and other symptoms. Crude incidence rates, actuarial probabilities, and prevalence rates were analyzed. Results: At 2 years, the actuarial probability of severe vaginal morbidity (grade ≥3) was 3.6%. However, mild and moderate vaginal symptoms were still pronounced (grade ≥1, 89%; grade ≥2, 29%), of which the majority developed within 6 months. Stenosis was most frequently observed, followed by vaginal dryness. Vaginal bleeding and mucositis were mainly mild and infrequently reported. Conclusion: Severe vaginal morbidity within the first 2 years after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy including IGABT with intracavitary/interstitial techniques for locally advanced cervical cancer is limited and is significantly less than has been reported from earlier studies. Thus, the new adaptive target concept seems to be a safe treatment with regard to the vagina being an organ at risk. However, mild to moderate vaginal morbidity

  16. Radiation Worker Protection by Exposure Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenbecler, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the protective adaptive response of cells to a low dose of radiation suggests applications to radiation worker/first responder protection. Its use in cancer radiotherapy has been discussed in a separate publication. This paper describes simple changes in scheduling that can make use of these beneficial adaptive effects for protection. No increase in total exposure is necessary, only a simple change in the timing of radiation exposure. A low dose of radiation at a sufficient d...

  17. Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation? Is adaptation. Truly an adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Flores Nogueira Diniz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition, joined with the study of recycling, remaking, and every form of retelling. The film deals with the attempt by the scriptwriter Charles Kaufman, cast by Nicholas Cage, to adapt/translate a non-fictional book to the cinema, but ends up with a kind of film which is by no means what it intended to be: a film of action in the model of Hollywood productions. During the process of creation, Charles and his twin brother, Donald, undergo a series of adventures involving some real persons from the world of film, the author and the protagonist of the book, all of them turning into fictional characters in the film. In the film, adaptation then signifies something different from itstraditional meaning. The article begins by historicizing film adaptation from the arrival of cinema, pointing out the many theoretical approaches under which the process has been seen: from the concept of “the same story told in a different medium” to a comprehensible definition such as “the process through which works can be transformed, forming an intersection of textual surfaces, quotations, conflations and inversions of other texts”. To illustrate this new concept, the article discusses Spike Jonze’s film Adaptation. according to James Naremore’s proposal which considers the study of adaptation as part of a general theory of repetition

  18. Adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Eriksen, Mette Rose

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  19. Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of theoretical contributions that have influenced the discourse around strategic adaptation including contingency perspectives, strategic fit reasoning, decision structure, information processing, corporate entrepreneurship, and strategy process. The related...... concepts of strategic renewal, dynamic managerial capabilities, dynamic capabilities, and strategic response capabilities are discussed and contextualized against strategic responsiveness. The insights derived from this article are used to outline the contours of a dynamic process of strategic adaptation....... This model incorporates elements of central strategizing, autonomous entrepreneurial behavior, interactive information processing, and open communication systems that enhance the organization's ability to observe exogenous changes and respond effectively to them....

  20. Adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  1. Radiation enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... often are no good treatments for chronic radiation enteritis that is more severe. Medicines such as cholestyramine, ...

  2. Analysis of image quality and dose calculation accuracy in cone beam CT acquisitions with limited projection data (half scan, half fan) with regard to usability for adaptive radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subject of this study is the question of whether cone beam CT (CBCT) images with reduced projection data are suitable for use in adaptive radiation therapy (ART) treatment planning. For this purpose image quality and dose calculation accuracy depending on imaging modality were analysed. In this context, two CBCT-methods will be indicated having reduced projection data sets: Scans acquired with 200 rotation angle in order to accelerate the CBCT process (half scan), or scans with an asymmetric cone beam and detector offset, used to enlarge the field-of-view (half fan). Methods: For three different CBCT-modes (On-Board-Imaging, Varian Medical Systems), two of them based on reduced projection data, and a conventional multidetector CT system, the main image quality parameters were studied. Treatment plans for two phantoms were transferred to all datasets and re-computed to analyse dose calculation accuracy. Furthermore imaging dose was measured for all modalities. Results: All three CBCT-modes showed similar results with regard to image quality. It was found, that a reduction in projection data does not necessarily involve deterioration in image quality parameters. For dose calculation based on CBCT images, a good agreement with the reference plan was found, with a maximum deviation for the mean dose in regions of interest of 1.1%. Imaging dose was found to be 2.5 cGy and 2.9 cGy for the large-FOV mode and the partial rotation mode, respectively, and 5.4 cGy for the 360 -full fan mode. (orig.)

  3. Radiation and heredity: genetic aspects of protection against radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary radiogenetic effects and delayed genetic radiation effects are considered. Experimental and published data on possibility to protect organisms and populations against single and long-term (during life of several generations) effect of ionizing radiation are given. Problem concerning population adaptation to low dose irradiation is discussed. 490 refs., 28 figs., 43 tabs

  4. Adaptation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-11-15

    Efforts to help the world's poor will face crises in coming decades as climate change radically alters conditions. Action Research for Community Adapation in Bangladesh (ARCAB) is an action-research programme on responding to climate change impacts through community-based adaptation. Set in Bangladesh at 20 sites that are vulnerable to floods, droughts, cyclones and sea level rise, ARCAB will follow impacts and adaptation as they evolve over half a century or more. National and international 'research partners', collaborating with ten NGO 'action partners' with global reach, seek knowledge and solutions applicable worldwide. After a year setting up ARCAB, we share lessons on the programme's design and move into our first research cycle.

  5. Adaptive ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berth, Mette

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of an adaptive ethnography when studying such phenomena as young people's use of mobile media in a learning perspective. Mobile media such as PDAs and mobile phones have a number of affordances which make them potential tools for learning. However, before we begin...... formal and informal learning contexts. The paper also proposes several adaptive methodological techniques for studying young people's interaction with mobiles....... to design and develop educational materials for mobile media platforms we must first understand everyday use and behaviour with a medium such as a mobile phone. The paper outlines the research design for a PhD project on mobile learning which focuses on mobile phones as a way to bridge the gap between...

  6. Hedonic "adaptation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available People live in a world in which they are surrounded by potential disgust elicitors such as ``used'' chairs, air, silverware, and money as well as excretory activities. People function in this world by ignoring most of these, by active avoidance, reframing, or adaptation. The issue is particularly striking for professions, such as morticians, surgeons, or sanitation workers, in which there is frequent contact with major disgust elicitors. In this study, we study the ``adaptation'' process to dead bodies as disgust elicitors, by measuring specific types of disgust sensitivity in medical students before and after they have spent a few months dissecting a cadaver. Using the Disgust Scale, we find a significant reduction in disgust responses to death and body envelope violation elicitors, but no significant change in any other specific type of disgust. There is a clear reduction in discomfort at touching a cold dead body, but not in touching a human body which is still warm after death.

  7. Adaptive noise

    OpenAIRE

    Viney, Mark; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    In biology, noise implies error and disorder and is therefore something which organisms may seek to minimize and mitigate against. We argue that such noise can be adaptive. Recent studies have shown that gene expression can be noisy, noise can be genetically controlled, genes and gene networks vary in how noisy they are and noise generates phenotypic differences among genetically identical cells. Such phenotypic differences can have fitness benefits, suggesting that evolution can shape noise ...

  8. Adaptable positioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the circuits and programs in assembly language, developed to control the two DC motors that give mobility to a mechanical arm with two degrees of freedom. As a whole, the system is based in a adaptable regulator designed around a 8 bit microprocessor that, starting from a mode of regulation based in the successive approximation method, evolve to another mode through which, only one approximation is sufficient to get the right position of each motor. (Author) 22 fig. 6 ref

  9. Adaptive management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Lucy; Campbell, Bruce Morgan; Frost, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in scientific articles, policy documents and management plans, but both understanding and application of the concept is mixed. This paper reviews recent literature from conservation and natural resource management journals to assess diversity in how the term is used, highlight ambiguities and consider how...... a management framework, as well as of identified challenges and pathologies, are needed. Further discussion and systematic assessment of the approach is required, together with greater attention to its definition and description, enabling the assessment of new approaches to managing uncertainty, and AM itself.......Adaptive management (AM) emerged in the literature in the mid-1970s in response both to a realization of the extent of uncertainty involved in management, and a frustration with attempts to use modelling to integrate knowledge and make predictions. The term has since become increasingly widely used...

  10. Radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prerequisite for the safe use of ionizing radiation in a country is the availability of an adequate infrastructure to achieve the desired degree of protection. The extent of such an infrastructure, generally comprising regulatory mechanisms and technical capabilities for application and enforcement of regulations, has to be commensurate with the stage of technological development. The expanding application of ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research calls for vigorous promotion of effective radiation protection efforts, not only to prevent any unsafe practices but also to assess correctly and provide authoritative information on the safety of adopted practices. Experience reveals that radiation protection practices vary considerably from one country to another. The regulatory structures and type of organization with regard to radiation protection are very different, depending on a number of factors such as the constitutional framework, the legal and administrative systems of the country concerned, the state of technical development, the status of application of radiation sources, the existence of research and associated institutions, and the technical skills and financial resources available. Radiation protection principles evolve with time as further experience is gained and as new research evidence becomes available. Regulation of radiation protection has to take account of such changes and adapt to changing conditions. Forty-eight papers from 29 Member States and two International Organizations were presented in nine scientific sessions. Topics included radiation protection regulation and licensing notification, registration, inspection and control programmes, education and training, the role of supporting institutions such as national laboratories and research institutes, the role of professional associations, the contribution of radiation protection services, and international activities. A concluding panel addressed development strategies to

  11. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  12. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  13. The SILENE reactor: an instrument suitable for studying the impact of intermediate and high radiation doses; Reacteur silene : outil adapte aux etudes appliquees a l'effet des moyennes et fortes doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verray, B.; Leo, Y.; Fouillaud, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA, Service de Recherches en Neutronique et Criticite, SNRC, Valduc, Is sur Tille (France)

    2002-07-01

    Designed in 1974 to study the phenomenology and consequences of a criticality accident, the SILENE experimental reactor, an intense source of mixed neutron and gamma radiation, is also suited to radiobiological studies. (author)

  14. Adaptive Management of Liver Cancer Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive radiation therapy for liver cancer has the potential to reduce normal tissue complications and enable dose escalation, allowing the potential for tumor control in this challenging site. Using adaptive techniques to tailor treatment margins to reflect patient specific breathing motions and image-guidance techniques can reduce the high dose delivered to surrounding normal tissues while ensuring the prescription dose is delivered to the tumor. Several treatment planning and delivery tec...

  15. Adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xianqiang; YANG Yuanxi

    2006-01-01

    The key problems in applying the adaptively robust filtering to navigation are to establish an equivalent weight matrix for the measurements and a suitable adaptive factor for balancing the contributions of the measurements and the predicted state information to the state parameter estimates. In this paper, an adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was proposed, based on the principles of the adaptively robust filtering and bi-factor robust estimation for correlated observations. According to the constant velocity model of Kalman filtering, the state parameter vector was divided into two groups, namely position and velocity. The estimator of the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors was derived, and the calculation expressions of the classified adaptive factors were presented. Test results show that the adaptively robust filtering with classified adaptive factors is not only robust in controlling the measurement outliers and the kinematic state disturbing but also reasonable in balancing the contributions of the predicted position and velocity, respectively, and its filtering accuracy is superior to the adaptively robust filter with single adaptive factor based on the discrepancy of the predicted position or the predicted velocity.

  16. Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.

  17. Adaptive Image Denoising by Mixture Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Enming; Chan, Stanley H; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2016-10-01

    We propose an adaptive learning procedure to learn patch-based image priors for image denoising. The new algorithm, called the expectation-maximization (EM) adaptation, takes a generic prior learned from a generic external database and adapts it to the noisy image to generate a specific prior. Different from existing methods that combine internal and external statistics in ad hoc ways, the proposed algorithm is rigorously derived from a Bayesian hyper-prior perspective. There are two contributions of this paper. First, we provide full derivation of the EM adaptation algorithm and demonstrate methods to improve the computational complexity. Second, in the absence of the latent clean image, we show how EM adaptation can be modified based on pre-filtering. The experimental results show that the proposed adaptation algorithm yields consistently better denoising results than the one without adaptation and is superior to several state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27416593

  18. High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project is the continued development of the High Efficiency Lighting with Integrated Adaptive Control (HELIAC) system. Solar radiation is not a viable...

  19. Kinetics of the early adaptive response and adaptation threshold dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression kinetics of the adaptive response (RA) in mouse leukocytes in vivo and the minimum dose of gamma radiation that induces it was determined. The mice were exposed 0.005 or 0.02 Gy of 137 Cs like adaptation and 1h later to the challenge dose (1.0 Gy), another group was only exposed at 1.0 Gy and the damage is evaluated in the DNA with the rehearsal it makes. The treatment with 0. 005 Gy didn't induce RA and 0. 02 Gy causes a similar effect to the one obtained with 0.01 Gy. The RA was show from an interval of 0.5 h being obtained the maximum expression with 5.0 h. The threshold dose to induce the RA is 0.01 Gy and in 5.0 h the biggest quantity in molecules is presented presumably that are related with the protection of the DNA. (Author)

  20. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... goal of causing less harm to the surrounding healthy tissue. You don't have to worry that you'll glow in the dark after radiation treatment: People who receive external radiation are not radioactive. You' ...

  1. Adaptive speciation theory : A conceptual review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weissing, Franz J.; Edelaar, Pim; van Doorn, G. Sander

    2011-01-01

    Speciation-the origin of new species-is the source of the diversity of life. A theory of speciation is essential to link poorly understood macro-evolutionary processes, such as the origin of biodiversity and adaptive radiation, to well understood micro-evolutionary processes, such as allele frequenc

  2. Adaptive Modular Playware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Þorsteinsson, Arnar Tumi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the concept of adaptive modular playware, where the playware adapts to the interaction of the individual user. We hypothesize that there are individual differences in user interaction capabilities and styles, and that adaptive playware may adapt to the individual user’s...

  3. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to simplify some of the relevant points of legislation, biological effects and protection for the benefit of the occupational health nurse not familiar with the nuclear industries. The subject is dealt with under the following headings; Understanding atoms. What is meant by ionizing radiation. Types of ionizing radiation. Effects of radiation: long and short term somatic effects, genetic effects. Control of radiation: occupational exposure, women of reproductive age, medical aspects, principles of control. The occupational health nurse's role. Emergency arrangements: national arrangements for incidents involving radiation, action to be taken by the nurse. Decontamination procedures: external and internal contamination. (U.K.)

  4. The Impact of the Myeloid Response to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gough

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is showing potential as a partner for immunotherapies in preclinical cancer models and early clinical studies. As has been discussed elsewhere, radiation provides debulking, antigen and adjuvant release, and inflammatory targeting of effector cells to the treatment site, thereby assisting multiple critical checkpoints in antitumor adaptive immunity. Adaptive immunity is terminated by inflammatory resolution, an active process which ensures that inflammatory damage is repaired and tissue function is restored. We discuss how radiation therapy similarly triggers inflammation followed by repair, the consequences to adaptive immune responses in the treatment site, and how the myeloid response to radiation may impact immunotherapies designed to improve control of residual cancer cells.

  5. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  6. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  7. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  8. Biology responses to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biology responses to low dose radiation is the most important problem of medical radiation and radiation protection. The especial mechanism of low dose or low dose rate induced cell responses, has been found independent with linear no-threshold model. This article emphasize to introduce low dose or low dose rate induced biology responses of adaptive response, by-effect, super-sensitivity and genomic instability. (authors)

  9. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  10. Blended learning specialists in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a blended learning Radiation Protection Technician through an approved degree from the Polytechnic University of Valencia, which covers the knowledge and skills of functions relating to operators and supervisors in various areas and skilled workers to be to perform their work in technical units or Radiation Protection Radiation Protection Services. The benefits of this work are those related to achieving quality training flexible and adapted to follow the check off the person conducting the course, adapted to internal and external training of the applicant companies.

  11. Expressing Adaptation Strategies Using Adaptation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, N.; Bourda, Y.; Reynaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a real challenge to enable personalized access to information. Several systems have been proposed to address this challenge including Adaptive Hypermedia Systems (AHSs). However, the specification of adaptation strategies remains a difficult task for creators of such systems. In this paper, we consider the problem of the definition…

  12. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  13. Radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The risk of iatrogenic tumors with radiation therapy is so outweighed by the benefit of cure that estimates of risk have not been considered necessary. However, with the introduction of chemotherapy, combined therapy, and particle radiation therapy, the comparative risks should be examined. In the case of radiation, total dose, fractionation, dose rate, dose distribution, and radiation quality should be considered in the estimation of risk. The biological factors that must be considered include incidence of tumors, latent period, degree of malignancy, and multiplicity of tumors. The risk of radiation induction of tumors is influenced by the genotype, sex, and age of the patient, the tissues that will be exposed, and previous therapy. With chemotherapy the number of cells at risk is usually markedly higher than with radiation therapy. Clearly the problem of the estimation of comparative risks is complex. This paper presents the current views on the comparative risks and the importance of the various factors that influence the estimation of risk.

  14. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    SALTIK, Metin; Mustafa KURT; Mehmet KAYMAK

    1996-01-01

    According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated m...

  15. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  16. Plume radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  17. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  18. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  19. Radiation medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet has been produced by UKAEA and the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation to give some basic information about what radiation is and how it is used in day to day diagnosis and treatment. It will be of interest to people undergoing treatment, their relatives and friends, and anyone who wants to know more about this important area. After a brief historical introduction the booklet explains what radiation is, the natural and man-made sources of radiation, how it is produced and how X-rays are used in medical diagnosis and treatment. The radiation protection measures taken and safety standards followed are mentioned. (author)

  20. Radio-Adaptive Responses of Mouse Myocardiocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seawright, John W.; Westby, Christian M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most significant occupational hazards to an astronaut is the frequent exposure to radiation. Commonly associated with increased risk for cancer related morbidity and mortality, radiation is also known to increase the risk for cardiovascular related disorders including: pericarditis, hypertension, and heart failure. It is believed that these radiation-induced disorders are a result of abnormal tissue remodeling. It is unknown whether radiation exposure promotes remodeling through fibrotic changes alone or in combination with programmed cell death. Furthermore, it is not known whether it is possible to mitigate the hazardous effects of radiation exposure. As such, we assessed the expression and mechanisms of radiation-induced tissue remodeling and potential radio-adaptive responses of p53-mediated apoptosis and fibrosis pathways along with markers for oxidative stress and inflammation in mice myocardium. 7 week old, male, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to 6Gy (H) or 5cGy followed 24hr later with 6Gy (LH) Cs-137 gamma radiation. Mice were sacrificed and their hearts extirpated 4, 24, or 72hr after final irradiation. Real Time - Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to evaluate target genes. Pro-apoptotic genes Bad and Bax, pro-cell survival genes Bcl2 and Bcl2l2, fibrosis gene Vegfa, and oxidative stress genes Sod2 and GPx4 showed a reduced fold regulation change (Bad,-6.18; Bax,-6.94; Bcl2,-5.09; Bcl2l2,-4.03; Vegfa, -11.84; Sod2,-5.97; GPx4*,-28.72; * = Bonferroni adjusted p-value . 0.003) 4hr after H, but not after 4hr LH when compared to control. Other p53-mediated apoptosis genes Casp3, Casp9, Trp53, and Myc exhibited down-regulation but did not achieve a notable level of significance 4hr after H. 24hr after H, genetic down-regulation was no longer present compared to 24hr control. These data suggest a general reduction in genetic expression 4hrs after a high dose of gamma radiation. However, pre-exposure to 5cGy gamma radiation appears to facilitate a radio-adaptive

  1. Adaptive Rationality, Adaptive Behavior and Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic literature focused on understanding decision-making and choice processes reveals a vast collection of approaches to human rationality. Theorists’ attention has moved from absolutely rational, utility-maximizing individuals to boundedly rational and adaptive ones. A number of economists have criticized the concepts of adaptive rationality and adaptive behavior. One of the recent trends in the economic literature is to consider humans irrational. This paper offers an approach which examines adaptive behavior in the context of existing institutions and constantly changing institutional environment. It is assumed that adaptive behavior is a process of evolutionary adjustment to fundamental uncertainty. We emphasize the importance of actors’ engagement in trial and error learning, since if they are involved in this process, they obtain experience and are able to adapt to existing and new institutions. The paper aims at identifying relevant institutions, adaptive mechanisms, informal working rules and practices that influence actors’ behavior in the field of Higher Education in Russia (Rostov Region education services market has been taken as an example. The paper emphasizes the application of qualitative interpretative methods (interviews and discourse analysis in examining actors’ behavior.

  2. Principles of adaptive optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tyson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    History and BackgroundIntroductionHistoryPhysical OpticsTerms in Adaptive OpticsSources of AberrationsAtmospheric TurbulenceThermal BloomingNonatmospheric SourcesAdaptive Optics CompensationPhase ConjugationLimitations of Phase ConjugationArtificial Guide StarsLasers for Guide StarsCombining the LimitationsLinear AnalysisPartial Phase ConjugationAdaptive Optics SystemsAdaptive Optics Imaging SystemsBeam Propagation Syst

  3. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  4. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  5. A fast, robust, and simple implicit method for adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh-refinement grids

    CERN Document Server

    Benoit, Commercon; Romain, Teyssier

    2014-01-01

    Implicit solvers present strong limitations when used on supercomputing facilities and in particular for adaptive mesh-refinement codes. We present a new method for implicit adaptive time-stepping on adaptive mesh refinement-grids and implementing it in the radiation hydrodynamics solver we designed for the RAMSES code for astrophysical purposes and, more particularly, for protostellar collapse. We briefly recall the radiation hydrodynamics equations and the adaptive time-stepping methodology used for hydrodynamical solvers. We then introduce the different types of boundary conditions (Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin) that are used at the interface between levels and present our implementation of the new method in the RAMSES code. The method is tested against classical diffusion and radiation hydrodynamics tests, after which we present an application for protostellar collapse. We show that using Dirichlet boundary conditions at level interfaces is a good compromise between robustness and accuracy and that it ca...

  6. Adaptation to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Carmin; K. Tierney; E. Chu; L.M. Hunter; J.T. Roberts; L. Shi

    2015-01-01

    Climate change adaptation involves major global and societal challenges such as finding adequate and equitable adaptation funding and integrating adaptation and development programs. Current funding is insufficient. Debates between the Global North and South center on how best to allocate the financ

  7. Radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  8. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the

  9. Determination of the adaptive response induced In vivo by gamma radiation and its relation with the sensibility to the damage induction in the DNA and with the repairing capacity; Determinacion de la respuesta adaptativa inducida In vivo por radiacion gamma y su relacion con la sensibilidad a la induccion de dano en el ADN y con la capacidad de reparacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M.T

    2002-07-01

    The kinetics of damage induction and repair at different doses as well as the adaptive response induced by gamma ray exposure were determined in murine leukocytes in vivo. The damage-repair kinetics were established after the exposure to 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 Gy in a {sup 137}Cs source. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from the tails of mice, the percentage of damaged cells and the DNA migration in each one were analyzed by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) technique or comet assay. Results indicated that there was an induction of approximately 75% comets with the doses of 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, which was considerably reduced to 22% and 42% respectively during the first 15 minutes. This evidences the presence of a rapid repair process and suggests that leucocytes are genetically well prepared to repair this kind of damage. After 15 minutes, a second increase in the percentage of damaged cells that was proportional to dose occurred, which seems to represent the breaks produced during the repair of other kind of lesions. After that a second reduction was observed, reaching values near to the basal ones, except with the dose of 2.0 Gy. The kinetics obtained with the dose of 0.5 Gy was similar to that established with 1.0 Gy, but in this case the initial damage was 50 % lower. Besides, the adaptive response was observed after the exposure of the mice to an adaptive dose of 0.01 Gy and to a challenge dose of 1.0 Gy 60 minutes later. The pretreatment reduced the percentage of damaged cells caused by the challenge dose to one third approximately, and also diminished this parameter produced during the late repair process. This indicates that the early adaptive response is caused, instead of by an increment in repair, by the induction of a process that protects DNA from damage induction by radiation, i.e synthesis of substances that increase the scavenging of free radicals. (Author)

  10. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  11. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy. At this time, you will have a physical exam , talk about your medical history , and maybe have imaging tests . Your doctor or nurse will discuss external beam radiation therapy, its benefits and side effects, and ways you can care ...

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  14. Radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the beginning of the seventies the two types of radiation sources applied in industrial processes, electron radiation and UV, had been given rather optimistic forecasts. While UV could succeed in the field of panel and film coating, electron radiation curing seems to gain success in quite new fields of manufacturing. The listing of the suggested applications of radiation curing and a comparison of both advantages and disadvantages of this technology are followed by a number of case studies emphasizing the features of these processes and giving some examplary calculations. The data used for the calculations should provide an easy calculation of individual manufacturing costs if special production parameters, investment or energy costs are employed. (Author)

  15. New Technologies in Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Wolfgang; Bortfeld, Thomas; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in radiation oncology, many of which have originated from physics and engineering sciences. After an introductory section on basic aspects of 3D medical imaging, the role of 3D imaging in the context of radiotherapy is explored in a series of chapters on the various modern imaging techniques. A further major section addresses 3D treatment planning for conformal radiotherapy, with consideration of both external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Subsequently the modern techniques of 3D conformal radiotherapy are described, including stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy, and radiotherapy with charged particles.

  16. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  17. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  18. Radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaborate precautions are taken in the design, construction and operation of nuclear installations. Even then, there always remains the possibility, however small, of accidents. A radiation emergency can be defined as any abnormal situation following an incident/accident which may result in either unusually large radiation fields in any plant/area or large release of air or liquid borne radioactivity leading to widespread contamination of areas

  19. Radiation Entomology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nagaratnam

    2000-01-01

    The article reviews the use of radiation and radioisotopes in entomology with special reference to the use of radiotracers in entomological studies and the use of sterile insect techniques in the control of insect pests. It also presents' a profile of Shri Koshy and his contributions to defence entomology, including design of an efficient device for the rearing of cockroaches, evaluation of different repellents against leeches, laboratory and pilot field studies on the use of radiation-steril...

  20. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  1. Adaptive integral equation methods in transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an adaptive multilevel algorithm for integral equations is described that has been developed with the Chandrasekhar H equation and its generalizations in mind. The algorithm maintains good performance when the Frechet derivative of the nonlinear map is singular at the solution, as happens in radiative transfer with conservative scattering and in critical neutron transport. Numerical examples that demonstrate the algorithm's effectiveness are presented

  2. Technology transfer for adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  3. Diffusion Adaptation over Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sayed, Ali H

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive networks are well-suited to perform decentralized information processing and optimization tasks and to model various types of self organized and complex behavior encountered in nature. Adaptive networks consist of a collection of agents with processing and learning abilities. The agents are linked together through a connection topology, and they cooperate with each other through local interactions to solve distributed inference problems in real-time. The continuous diffusion of information across the network enables agents to adapt their performance in relation to changing data and network conditions; it also results in improved adaptation and learning performance relative to non-cooperative networks. This article provides an overview of diffusion strategies for adaptation and learning over networks. The article is divided into several sections: 1. Motivation; 2. Mean-Square-Error Estimation; 3. Distributed Optimization via Diffusion Strategies; 4. Adaptive Diffusion Strategies; 5. Performance of Ste...

  4. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  5. Stability versus diversity of the dentition during evolutionary radiation in cyprinine fish

    OpenAIRE

    Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Yang, Lei; Veran, Monette; Balter, Vincent; Mayden, Richard L.; Laudet, Vincent; Viriot, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary radiations, especially adaptive radiations, have been widely studied but mainly for recent events such as in cichlid fish or Anolis lizards. Here, we investigate the radiation of the subfamily Cyprininae, which includes more than 1300 species and is estimated to have originated from Southeast Asia around 55 Ma. In order to decipher a potential adaptive radiation, within a solid phylogenetic framework, we investigated the trophic apparatus, and especially the pharyngeal dentition,...

  6. The Adaptive Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Hallin, Carina Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary organizations operate under turbulent business conditions and must adapt their strategies to ongoing changes. This article argues that sustainable organizational performance is achieved when top management directs and coordinates interactive processes anchored in emerging organizatio......Contemporary organizations operate under turbulent business conditions and must adapt their strategies to ongoing changes. This article argues that sustainable organizational performance is achieved when top management directs and coordinates interactive processes anchored in emerging...... the adaptive organization....

  7. Human Adaptations: Free divers

    OpenAIRE

    Tournat, Troy Z.

    2014-01-01

    Freediving has been around for thousands of years and was only way to dive until the inventionof oxygen tanks in the 19th century. Around the world, people dove for goods such as pearls, andtoday people freedive for sport. Divers stretch the limit of their body and mind’s capabilitiesthrough psychological adaptations from thermal, respiratory, and cardiovascular responses.Findings conclude that thermal adaptations are a similar process to cold adaptive response. Withthe implementation of wets...

  8. Consciousness And Adaptive Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sieb, Richard/A.

    2005-01-01

    Consciousness has resisted scientific explanation for centuries. The main problem in explaining consciousness is its subjectivity. Subjective systems may be adaptive. Humans can produce voluntary new or novel intentional (adaptive) action and such action is always accompanied by consciousness. Action normally arises from perception. Perception must be rerepresented in order to produce new or novel adaptive action. The internal explicit states produced by a widespread nonlinear emergen...

  9. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  10. Adaptive Wireless Transceiver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless technologies are an increasingly attractive means for spatial data, input, manipulation, and distribution. Mobitrum is proposing an innovative Adaptive...

  11. Global VTEC-modelling in near real-time based on space geodetic techniques, adapted B-spline expansions and Kalman-filtering including observations of the Sun's radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börger, Klaus; Schmidt, Michael; Dettmering, Denise; Limberger, Marco; Erdogan, Eren; Seitz, Florian; Brandert, Sylvia; Görres, Barbara; Kersten, Wilhelm; Bothmer, Volker; Hinrichs, Johannes; Venzmer, Malte; Mrotzek, Niclas

    2016-04-01

    Today, the observations of space geodetic techniques are usually available with a rather low latency which applies to space missions observing the solar terrestrial environment, too. Therefore, we can use all these measurements in near real-time to compute and to provide ionosphere information, e.g. the vertical total electron content (VTEC). GSSAC and BGIC support a project aiming at a service for providing ionosphere information. This project is called OPTIMAP, meaning "Operational Tool for Ionosphere Mapping and Prediction"; the scientific work is mainly done by the German Geodetic Research Institute of the Technical University Munich (DGFI-TUM) and the Institute for Astrophysics of the University of Goettingen (IAG). The OPTIMAP strategy for providing ionosphere target quantities of high quality, such as VTEC or the electron density, includes mathematical approaches and tools allowing for the model adaptation to the real observational scenario as a significant improvement w.r.t. the traditional well-established methods. For example, OPTIMAP combines different observation types such as GNSS (GPS, GLONASS), Satellite Altimetry (Jason-2), DORIS as well as radio-occultation measurements (FORMOSAT#3/COSMIC). All these observations run into a Kalman-filter to compute global ionosphere maps, i.e. VTEC, for the current instant of time and as a forecast for a couple of subsequent days. Mathematically, the global VTEC is set up as a series expansion in terms of two-dimensional basis functions defined as tensor products of trigonometric B-splines for longitude and polynomial B-splines for latitude. Compared to the classical spherical harmonics, B-splines have a localizing character and, therefore, can handle an inhomogeneous data distribution properly. Finally, B-splines enable a so-called multi-resolution-representation (MRR) enabling the combination of global and regional modelling approaches. In addition to the geodetic measurements, Sun observations are pre

  12. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  13. Adaptive Multimedia Retrieval: Semantics, Context, and Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the thoroughly refereed post-conference proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Adaptive Multimedia Retrieval, AMR 2012, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in October 2012. The 17 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from numerous submissi...

  14. Radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, I.A.; Myers, S.J.

    1976-02-01

    Myelopathy secondary to radiation is a relatively uncommon entity which was reported initially in 1941 by Ahlbom. From a total of 65 patients who were seen in our spinal injury clinic during the past four years, three patients have received a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy. This is 4.6 percent of the total number. The case histories of two patients with radiation myelopathy are presented. The clinical and pathologic features are discussed. Since the three patients with this diagnosis whose cases are followed in the clinic are still alive, the second case that is reported is taken from the files of the pathology department so that autopsy and histologic data also can be presented.

  15. Radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelopathy secondary to radiation is a relatively uncommon entity which was reported initially in 1941 by Ahlbom. From a total of 65 patients who were seen in our spinal injury clinic during the past four years, three patients have received a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy. This is 4.6 percent of the total number. The case histories of two patients with radiation myelopathy are presented. The clinical and pathologic features are discussed. Since the three patients with this diagnosis whose cases are followed in the clinic are still alive, the second case that is reported is taken from the files of the pathology department so that autopsy and histologic data also can be presented

  16. Radiation gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji Electric has developed a pipe wall thinning detection device, which operates based on radiation gauge technology, for use in nuclear power plants and thermoelectric power plants. The radiation from the pipe wall thinning detection device, which can be used even during the plant operation, can penetrate heat insulation material. The device consists of detector and radiation source, and can detect the thickness of pipes (less than 500 mm in external diameter and less than 50 mm in thickness) with 2% reproducibility (with a measurement time of several minutes), based on the attenuation rate. Operation is easy and efficient since there is no need to remove the heat insulation and it is easy to mount the device, thus enabling more effective detection. (author)

  17. [Postvagotomy adaptation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, V A

    1998-01-01

    It was established in experiment, that the changes of the natural resistance of organism indexes and of the peritoneal cavity cytology has compensatory-adaptational character while the denervation-adaptational syndrome occurrence and progress, which may be assessed as eustress. Vagotomy and operative trauma cause qualitatively different reactions of an organism.

  18. Adaptive Wavelet Transforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szu, H.; Hsu, C. [Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Human sensors systems (HSS) may be approximately described as an adaptive or self-learning version of the Wavelet Transforms (WT) that are capable to learn from several input-output associative pairs of suitable transform mother wavelets. Such an Adaptive WT (AWT) is a redundant combination of mother wavelets to either represent or classify inputs.

  19. Behavioral Adaptation and Acceptance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.H.; Jenssen, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of Intelligent Vehicles is to improve road safety, throughput, and emissions. However, the predicted effects are not always as large as aimed for. Part of this is due to indirect behavioral changes of drivers, also called behavioral adaptation. Behavioral adaptation (BA) refers to uninte

  20. Behavioural adaptation and acceptance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, M.H.; Jenssen, G.D.; Eskandarian, A.

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of Intelligent Vehicles is to improve road safety, throughput, and emissions. However, the predicted effects are not always as large as aimed for. Part of this is due to indirect behavioral changes of drivers, also called behavioral adaptation. Behavioral adaptation (BA) refers to uninte

  1. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allow radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that models are needed that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  2. Radiation Entomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagaratnam

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the use of radiation and radioisotopes in entomology with special reference to the use of radiotracers in entomological studies and the use of sterile insect techniques in the control of insect pests. It also presents' a profile of Shri Koshy and his contributions to defence entomology, including design of an efficient device for the rearing of cockroaches, evaluation of different repellents against leeches, laboratory and pilot field studies on the use of radiation-sterilised males for the control of the mosquito Culex fatigans.

  3. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allows radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that we need models that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  4. Radiation-induced reactions of the lungs: Hormesis, guideline on radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain almost all full papers presented at the 34th annual meeting of the Vereinigung Deutscher Strahlenschutzaerzte e.V., held in Dresden from May 3-5, 1993. There were three main topics selected for this meeting: radiation-induced reactions in the lungs, radiation hormesis, and the German regulatory guide for Radiation Protection in Medicine, as amended in mid-1993. The papers discuss the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lesions in the lungs, results of animal experiments applying partial and whole-lung irradiation, clinical experience and diagnostics, lung function impairment, and X-ray signs of the thorax after radiation exposure of the respiratory organ. The two papers discussing the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, radiation hormesis and adaptive response in biological systems have been presented by experts in this matter which give a picture of the current scientific knowledge and of the items of controversy. (orig./MG)

  5. Adaptive noise cancellation

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, N

    1999-01-01

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique.

  6. Appraising Adaptive Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai N. Lee

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive management is appraised as a policy implementation approach by examining its conceptual, technical, equity, and practical strengths and limitations. Three conclusions are drawn: (1 Adaptive management has been more influential, so far, as an idea than as a practical means of gaining insight into the behavior of ecosystems utilized and inhabited by humans. (2 Adaptive management should be used only after disputing parties have agreed to an agenda of questions to be answered using the adaptive approach; this is not how the approach has been used. (3 Efficient, effective social learning, of the kind facilitated by adaptive management, is likely to be of strategic importance in governing ecosystems as humanity searches for a sustainable economy.

  7. Adaptive signal processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental, general purpose adaptive signal processor system has been developed, utilizing a quantized (clipped) version of the Widrow-Hoff least-mean-square adaptive algorithm developed by Moschner. The system accommodates 64 adaptive weight channels with 8-bit resolution for each weight. Internal weight update arithmetic is performed with 16-bit resolution, and the system error signal is measured with 12-bit resolution. An adapt cycle of adjusting all 64 weight channels is accomplished in 8 μsec. Hardware of the signal processor utilizes primarily Schottky-TTL type integrated circuits. A prototype system with 24 weight channels has been constructed and tested. This report presents details of the system design and describes basic experiments performed with the prototype signal processor. Finally some system configurations and applications for this adaptive signal processor are discussed

  8. Ecology and Evolution of Adaptive Morphological Variation in Fish Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Svanbäck, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The work in this thesis deals with the ecology and evolution of adaptive individual variation. Ecologists have long used niche theory to describe the ecology of a species as a whole, treating conspecific individuals as ecological equivalent. During recent years, research about individual variation in diet and morphology has gained interest in adaptive radiations and ecological speciation. Such variation among individual niche use may have important conservation implications as well as ecologi...

  9. Repeated adaptive divergence of microhabitat specialization in avian feather lice

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Kevin P; Shreve Scott M; Smith Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Repeated adaptive radiations are evident when phenotypic divergence occurs within lineages, but this divergence into different forms is convergent when compared across lineages. Classic examples of such repeated adaptive divergence occur in island (for example, Caribbean Anolis lizards) and lake systems (for example, African cichlids). Host-parasite systems in many respects are analogous to island systems, where host species represent isolated islands for parasites whose l...

  10. Radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Film is one of the most simple ways to detect radiation although for film as dosimeters a careful attention is required in many aspects, such as emulsion characteristics, film response capacity processing techniques and interpretation of the exposition. Surpassing these factors the film dosimeter is the most reliable

  11. Radiation dosage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosage at Bikini Atoll is the result of current soil contamination, a relic of the nuclear weapons testing program of some 30 years ago. The principal contaminants today and some of their physical properties are listed: cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium -239, 240 and americium-241. Cobalt-60 contributes less than 1 to the dose and is not considered significant. A resident of the atoll would accumulate radiation dose (rem) in two ways -- by exposure to radiation emanating from the ground and vegetation, and by exposure to radiation released in the spontaneous decay of radionuclides that have entered his body during the ingestion of locally grown foods. The latter process would account for some 90% of the dose; cesium-137 would be responsible for 0 90% of it. Since BARC's method of estimating dosage differs in some respects from that employed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (Ref.1, LLNL 1982) we are presenting our method in detail. The differences have two sources. First, the numbers used by BARC for the daily ingestion of radionuclides via the diet are higher than LLNL's. Second, BARC's calculation of dose from radionuclide intake utilizes the ICRP system. The net result is that BARC doses are consistently higher than LLNL doses, and in this respect are more conservative

  12. Radiation Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was organized to evaluate the application directions of radiation technology in Vietnam and to utilize the Irradiation Centre in Hanoi with the Co-60 source of 110 kCi. The investigation and study of technico-economic feasibility for technology development to various items of food and non-food objects was reported. (N.H.A)

  13. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Adaptive Fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Bortfeld, Thomas; Tsitsiklis, John

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a previously introduced adaptive fractionation problem in a dynamic programming (DP) framework and explore various solution techniques. The two messages of this paper are: (i) the DP model is a useful framework for studying adaptive radiation therapy, particularly adaptive fractionation, and (ii) there is a potential for substantial decrease in dose to the primary organ-at-risk (OAR), or equivalently increase in tumor escalation, when using an adaptive fraction size. The essence of adaptive fractionation is to increase the fraction size when observing a "favorable" anatomy or when the tumor and OAR are far apart and to decrease the fraction size when they are close together. Given that a fixed prescribed dose must be delivered to the tumor over the course of the treatment, such an approach results in a lower cumulative dose to the OAR when compared to that resulting from standard fractionation. We first establish a benchmark by using the DP algorithm to solve the problem exactly. In this case, we...

  14. Adapt or Become Extinct!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goumas, Georgios; McKee, Sally A.; Själander, Magnus;

    2011-01-01

    boundaries (walls) for applications which limit software development (parallel programming wall), performance (memory wall, communication wall) and viability (power wall). The only way to survive in such a demanding environment is by adaptation. In this paper we discuss how dynamic information collected...... static analysis (either during ahead-of-time or just-in-time) compilation. We extend the notion of information-driven adaptation and outline the architecture of an infrastructure designed to enable information ow and adaptation throughout the life-cycle of an application....

  15. Adaptation investments and homeownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Skak, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This article develops a model where ownership improves efficiency of the housing market as it enhances the utility of housing consumption for some consumers. The model is based on an extended Hotelling-Lancaster utility approach in which the ideal variant of housing is obtainable only by adapting...... the home through a supplementary investment. Ownership offers low costs of adaptation, but has high contract costs compared with renting. Consumers simultaneously decide housing demand and tenure, and because of the different cost structure only consumers with strong preferences for individual adaptation...

  16. [Adaptive optics for ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive optics is a technology enhancing the visual performance of an optical system by correcting its optical aberrations. Adaptive optics have already enabled several breakthroughs in the field of visual sciences, such as improvement of visual acuity in normal and diseased eyes beyond physiologic limits, and the correction of presbyopia. Adaptive optics technology also provides high-resolution, in vivo imaging of the retina that may eventually help to detect the onset of retinal conditions at an early stage and provide better assessment of treatment efficacy.

  17. Adaptive network countermeasures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland-Bane, Randy; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Carathimas, Anthony G.; Thomas, Eric D.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year LDRD funded by the Differentiating Technologies investment area. The project investigated the use of countermeasures in protecting computer networks as well as how current countermeasures could be changed in order to adapt with both evolving networks and evolving attackers. The work involved collaboration between Sandia employees and students in the Sandia - California Center for Cyber Defenders (CCD) program. We include an explanation of the need for adaptive countermeasures, a description of the architecture we designed to provide adaptive countermeasures, and evaluations of the system.

  18. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  19. The process of organisational adaptation through innovations, and organisational adaptability

    OpenAIRE

    Tikka, Tommi

    2010-01-01

    This study is about the process of organisational adaptation and organisational adaptability. The study generates a theoretical framework about organisational adaptation behaviour and conditions that have influence on success of organisational adaptation. The research questions of the study are: How does an organisation adapt through innovations, and which conditions enhance or impede organisational adaptation through innovations? The data were gathered from five case organisations withi...

  20. Fast Adaptive Beamforming with Smart Antenna for Radio Frequency Repeater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a fast adaptive beamforming null algorithm with smart antenna for Radio Frequency Repeater (RFR. The smart antenna system is realized by a Direction Of Arrival (DOA Estimator, whose output is used by an adaptive beamforming algorithm to shape a suitable radiation pattern of the equivalent antenna; so that the co-channel interference due to retransmitting antenna can be reduced. The proposed adaptive beamforming algorithm, which has been proved by formulaic analysis and simulation, has a lower computation complexity yet better performance.

  1. Adapt or Die

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brody, Joshua Eric; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the role non-adaptivity plays in maintaining dynamic data structures. Roughly speaking, a data structure is non-adaptive if the memory locations it reads and/or writes when processing a query or update depend only on the query or update and not on the contents of previously...... read cells. We study such non-adaptive data structures in the cell probe model. This model is one of the least restrictive lower bound models and in particular, cell probe lower bounds apply to data structures developed in the popular word-RAM model. Unfortunately, this generality comes at a high cost...... several different notions of non-adaptivity and identify key properties that must be dealt with if we are to prove polynomial lower bounds without restrictions on the data structures. Finally, our results also unveil an interesting connection between data structures and depth-2 circuits. This allows us...

  2. Adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, D M; Haselton, M G; Shackelford, T K; Bleske, A L; Wakefield, J C

    1998-05-01

    Adaptation and natural selection are central concepts in the emerging science of evolutionary psychology. Natural selection is the only known causal process capable of producing complex functional organic mechanisms. These adaptations, along with their incidental by-products and a residue of noise, comprise all forms of life. Recently, S. J. Gould (1991) proposed that exaptations and spandrels may be more important than adaptations for evolutionary psychology. These refer to features that did not originally arise for their current use but rather were co-opted for new purposes. He suggested that many important phenomena--such as art, language, commerce, and war--although evolutionary in origin, are incidental spandrels of the large human brain. The authors outline the conceptual and evidentiary standards that apply to adaptations, exaptations, and spandrels and discuss the relative utility of these concepts for psychological science. PMID:9612136

  3. Adaptive Architectural Envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing variety of applications of adaptive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability....... The general scopes of this paper are to develop a new adaptive kinetic architectural structure, particularly a reconfigurable architectural structure which can transform body shape from planar geometries to hyper-surfaces using different control strategies, i.e. a transformation into more than one or two...... different shape alternatives. The adaptive structure is a proposal for a responsive building envelope which is an idea of a first level operational framework for present and future investigations towards performance based responsive architectures through a set of responsive typologies. A mock- up concept...

  4. Asimovian Adaptive Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, D F

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop agents that are adaptive and predictable and timely. At first blush, these three requirements seem contradictory. For example, adaptation risks introducing undesirable side effects, thereby making agents' behavior less predictable. Furthermore, although formal verification can assist in ensuring behavioral predictability, it is known to be time-consuming. Our solution to the challenge of satisfying all three requirements is the following. Agents have finite-state automaton plans, which are adapted online via evolutionary learning (perturbation) operators. To ensure that critical behavioral constraints are always satisfied, agents' plans are first formally verified. They are then reverified after every adaptation. If reverification concludes that constraints are violated, the plans are repaired. The main objective of this paper is to improve the efficiency of reverification after learning, so that agents have a sufficiently rapid response time. We present two solutions: ...

  5. The genomics of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation.

  6. Statistical Physics of Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Perunov, Nikolai; England, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    All living things exhibit adaptations that enable them to survive and reproduce in the natural environment that they inhabit. From a biological standpoint, it has long been understood that adaptation comes from natural selection, whereby maladapted individuals do not pass their traits effectively to future generations. However, we may also consider the phenomenon of adaptation from the standpoint of physics, and ask whether it is possible to delineate what the difference is in terms of physical properties between something that is well-adapted to its surrounding environment, and something that is not. In this work, we undertake to address this question from a theoretical standpoint. Building on past fundamental results in far-from-equilibrium statistical mechanics, we demonstrate a generalization of the Helmholtz free energy for the finite-time stochastic evolution of driven Newtonian matter. By analyzing this expression term by term, we are able to argue for a general tendency in driven many-particle systems...

  7. Islands, resettlement and adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jon; O'Neill, Saffron J.

    2012-01-01

    Resettlement of people living on islands in anticipation of climate impacts risks maladaptation, but some forms of population movement carry fewer risks and larger rewards in terms of adapting to climate change.

  8. Adaptive Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Babajanyan, S. G.; Martirosyan, N. H.; Melkikh, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    A major limitation of many heat engines is that their functioning demands on-line control and/or an external fitting between the environmental parameters (e.g., temperatures of thermal baths) and internal parameters of the engine. We study a model for an adaptive heat engine, where—due to feedback from the functional part—the engine's structure adapts to given thermal baths. Hence, no on-line control and no external fitting are needed. The engine can employ unknown resources; it can also adapt to results of its own functioning that make the bath temperatures closer. We determine resources of adaptation and relate them to the prior information available about the environment.

  9. Adaptive digital filters

    CERN Document Server

    Kovačević, Branko; Milosavljević, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Digital Filters” presents an important discipline applied to the domain of speech processing. The book first makes the reader acquainted with the basic terms of filtering and adaptive filtering, before introducing the field of advanced modern algorithms, some of which are contributed by the authors themselves. Working in the field of adaptive signal processing requires the use of complex mathematical tools. The book offers a detailed presentation of the mathematical models that is clear and consistent, an approach that allows everyone with a college level of mathematics knowledge to successfully follow the mathematical derivations and descriptions of algorithms.   The algorithms are presented in flow charts, which facilitates their practical implementation. The book presents many experimental results and treats the aspects of practical application of adaptive filtering in real systems, making it a valuable resource for both undergraduate and graduate students, and for all others interested in m...

  10. Limits to adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Kirstin; Berkhout, Frans; Preston, Benjamin L.; Klein, Richard J. T.; Midgley, Guy; Shaw, M. Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society's responses to climate change.

  11. The genomics of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-12-22

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far are beginning to challenge some widespread views of the way in which natural selection operates at the genomic level. Papers in this Special Feature of Proceedings of the Royal Society B illustrate various aspects of the broad field of adaptation genomics. This introductory article sets up a context and, on the basis of a few selected examples, discusses how genomic data can advance our understanding of the process of adaptation. PMID:23097510

  12. Adaptive quantum teleportation

    OpenAIRE

    Modlawska, Joanna; Grudka, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    We consider multiple teleportation in the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn (KLM) scheme. We introduce adaptive teleportation, i.e., such that the choice of entangled state used in the next teleportation depends on the results of the measurements performed during the previous teleportations. We show that adaptive teleportation enables an increase in the probability of faithful multiple teleportation in the KLM scheme. In particular if a qubit is to be teleported more than once then it is better to use n...

  13. From equivalence to adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Borowczyk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to illustrate in which cases the translators use the adaptation when they are confronted with a term related to sociocultural aspects. We will discuss the notions of equivalence and adaptation and their limits in the translation. Some samples from Arte TV news and from the American film Shrek translated into Polish, German and French will be provided as a support for this article.

  14. Opportunistic Adaptation Knowledge Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Badra, Fadi; Cordier, Amélie; Lieber, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com International audience Adaptation has long been considered as the Achilles' heel of case-based reasoning since it requires some domain-specific knowledge that is difficult to acquire. In this paper, two strategies are combined in order to reduce the knowledge engineering cost induced by the adaptation knowledge (CA) acquisition task: CA is learned from the case base by the means of knowledge discovery techniques, and the CA a...

  15. Frustratingly Easy Domain Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach to domain adaptation that is appropriate exactly in the case when one has enough ``target'' data to do slightly better than just using only ``source'' data. Our approach is incredibly simple, easy to implement as a preprocessing step (10 lines of Perl!) and outperforms state-of-the-art approaches on a range of datasets. Moreover, it is trivially extended to a multi-domain adaptation problem, where one has data from a variety of different domains.

  16. Robust Adaptive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, K. S.; Annaswamy, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Several concepts and results in robust adaptive control are are discussed and is organized in three parts. The first part surveys existing algorithms. Different formulations of the problem and theoretical solutions that have been suggested are reviewed here. The second part contains new results related to the role of persistent excitation in robust adaptive systems and the use of hybrid control to improve robustness. In the third part promising new areas for future research are suggested which combine different approaches currently known.

  17. Network and adaptive sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Arijit

    2014-01-01

    Combining the two statistical techniques of network sampling and adaptive sampling, this book illustrates the advantages of using them in tandem to effectively capture sparsely located elements in unknown pockets. It shows how network sampling is a reliable guide in capturing inaccessible entities through linked auxiliaries. The text also explores how adaptive sampling is strengthened in information content through subsidiary sampling with devices to mitigate unmanageable expanding sample sizes. Empirical data illustrates the applicability of both methods.

  18. The genomics of adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    The amount and nature of genetic variation available to natural selection affect the rate, course and outcome of evolution. Consequently, the study of the genetic basis of adaptive evolutionary change has occupied biologists for decades, but progress has been hampered by the lack of resolution and the absence of a genome-level perspective. Technological advances in recent years should now allow us to answer many long-standing questions about the nature of adaptation. The data gathered so far ...

  19. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    Radioactive Shipping Service

    2005-01-01

    The section of the radiation protection group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  20. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  1. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tel. 73171

  2. Radiation pager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of interdicting nuclear materials to date have favored the use of large portal detectors at choke points, or hand carried instruments used by trained personnel for conducting spot searches. Although these methods are effective in some instances, it is often impractical to insert choke points at busy traffic areas, and it is not cost effective to maintain a force of skilled operators whose focus is nuclear interdiction. Recent technology developments are causing profound changes in the philosophy and methods employed for interdicting nuclear materials. Breakthrough advances in the miniaturization of detectors and low power electronics have made possible a new class of small gamma-ray radiation detectors, roughly the size of a message pager, with unprecedented sensitivity for their size. These instruments, named Radiation PagersTM, are ideally suited for use by untrained individual law enforcement personnel and emergency responders in the course of their regular duties. New tactics that utilize a radiation detector worn by every officer are creating a moving curtain of detection with a significantly higher likelihood of locating illicit nuclear contraband. These individual detectors also provide each officer with a high level of confidence that they are not being unknowingly irradiated in the course of their work. (author)

  3. Leak test adapter for containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  4. Adaptation through proportion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liyang; Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation is a ubiquitous feature in biological sensory and signaling networks. It has been suggested that adaptive systems may follow certain simple design principles across diverse organisms, cells and pathways. One class of networks that can achieve adaptation utilizes an incoherent feedforward control, in which two parallel signaling branches exert opposite but proportional effects on the output at steady state. In this paper, we generalize this adaptation mechanism by establishing a steady-state proportionality relationship among a subset of nodes in a network. Adaptation can be achieved by using any two nodes in the sub-network to respectively regulate the output node positively and negatively. We focus on enzyme networks and first identify basic regulation motifs consisting of two and three nodes that can be used to build small networks with proportional relationships. Larger proportional networks can then be constructed modularly similar to LEGOs. Our method provides a general framework to construct and analyze a class of proportional and/or adaptation networks with arbitrary size, flexibility and versatile functional features.

  5. Adaptation and perceptual norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A.; Yasuda, Maiko; Haber, Sara; Leonard, Deanne; Ballardini, Nicole

    2007-02-01

    We used adaptation to examine the relationship between perceptual norms--the stimuli observers describe as psychologically neutral, and response norms--the stimulus levels that leave visual sensitivity in a neutral or balanced state. Adapting to stimuli on opposite sides of a neutral point (e.g. redder or greener than white) biases appearance in opposite ways. Thus the adapting stimulus can be titrated to find the unique adapting level that does not bias appearance. We compared these response norms to subjectively defined neutral points both within the same observer (at different retinal eccentricities) and between observers. These comparisons were made for visual judgments of color, image focus, and human faces, stimuli that are very different and may depend on very different levels of processing, yet which share the property that for each there is a well defined and perceptually salient norm. In each case the adaptation aftereffects were consistent with an underlying sensitivity basis for the perceptual norm. Specifically, response norms were similar to and thus covaried with the perceptual norm, and under common adaptation differences between subjectively defined norms were reduced. These results are consistent with models of norm-based codes and suggest that these codes underlie an important link between visual coding and visual experience.

  6. Learning to Adapt. Organisational Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of human adaptation to climate change should be based on realistic models of adaptive behaviour at the level of organisations and individuals. The paper sets out a framework for analysing adaptation to the direct and indirect impacts of climate change in business organisations with new evidence presented from empirical research into adaptation in nine case-study companies. It argues that adaptation to climate change has many similarities with processes of organisational learning. The paper suggests that business organisations face a number of obstacles in learning how to adapt to climate change impacts, especially in relation to the weakness and ambiguity of signals about climate change and the uncertainty about benefits flowing from adaptation measures. Organisations rarely adapt 'autonomously', since their adaptive behaviour is influenced by policy and market conditions, and draws on resources external to the organisation. The paper identifies four adaptation strategies that pattern organisational adaptive behaviour

  7. Radiation preservation of maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation preservation of maize was carried out. Radiation doses and sources, shielding materials, packaging materials, chemical radiation effects, biological radiation effects, were discussed. Experimental methods, samples and accessories were also presented. (SMN)

  8. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  9. Personal Radiation Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Mark; Vinci, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the personal radiation protection system (PRPS), which has been invented for use on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. The PRPS comprises walls that can be erected inside spacecraft, where and when needed, to reduce the amount of radiation to which personnel are exposed. The basic structural modules of the PRPS are pairs of 1-in. (2.54-cm)-thick plates of high-density polyethylene equipped with fasteners. The plates of each module are assembled with a lap joint. The modules are denoted bricks because they are designed to be stacked with overlaps, in a manner reminiscent of bricks, to build 2-in. (5.08-cm)-thick walls of various lengths and widths. The bricks are of two varieties: one for flat wall areas and one for corners. The corner bricks are specialized adaptations of the flat-area bricks that make it possible to join walls perpendicular to each other. Bricks are attached to spacecraft structures and to each other by use of straps that can be tightened to increase the strengths and stiffnesses of joints.

  10. Non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultraviolet A (320 - 380 nm) component of sunlight generates an oxidative stress in skin which contributes to both the acute (sunburn) and chronic (aging, skin cancer) effects of sunlight. The damaging effects occur via generation of active oxygen species and will be exacerbated by the presence of catalytically reactive iron so that the observation that UVA radiation causes an immediate release of 'free' iron in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes via the proteolysis of ferritin is likely to be biologically significant. UVA radiation also breaks down heme-containing proteins in the microsomal membrane to release free heme. The well-characterised activation of heme oxygenase 1 by UVA radiation will lead to breakdown of heme and further release of iron. Overall these interactions generate a strong oxidative stress on cells. Both the basal and UVA-induced levels of labile iron are 2-4 times higher in fibroblasts than keratinocytes and this is consistent with the higher resistance of keratinocytes to UVA-induced necrotic cell death. Modulating cellular iron levels by hemin (to enhance the levels) or iron chelators (to reduce the levels) has the predicted effect on levels of necrotic cell death. Overall these studies further illustrate the potent oxidising nature of UVA radiation. A series of genes activated by UVA radiation including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), ferritin and superoxide dismutase (SOD) may be involved in protection against the damaging effects of this oxidising carcinogen. HO will act by removing free heme and possibly by promoting the efflux of free iron, ferritin will bind free iron and SOD will remove superoxide anion. The strong response of HO-1 to oxidants in human skin fibroblasts provides a useful molecular model to study this inducible enzyme which appears to play a major role in anti-inflammatory activity in mammals and could play a significant role in preventing atherosclerosis. Several indirect lines of evidence support the role of UVA

  11. Perspective of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of the applications of radiation techniques is very wide. This paper only relates to the applications of radiation techniques in industries including radiation chemical industry, radiation processing of foods and environmental protection by radiation, but the nuclear instruments and the instrumentations of radiation are out-side of our study. (author)

  12. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to verify the existence of the adaptive response phenomenon induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in living cells.A wild-type yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was chosen as the biological target.As a parameter to quantify the sensibility of the target to radiation, the Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 ) was observed. In our experimental condition a value of (60 ± 1) Gy was measured for LD50 with Dose Rate of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy/min. The method employed to show up the adaptive response phenomenon consisted in exposing the sample to low ''conditioning'' doses, which would initiate these mechanisms. Later the samples with and without conditioning were exposed to higher ''challenging'' doses (such as LD50), and the surviving fractions were compared. In order to maximize the differences, the doses and the time between irradiations were varied. The best results were obtained with both a conditioning dose of (0.44 ± 0.03) Gy and a waiting time of 2 hs until the application of the challenging dose. Following this procedures the 80% of the conditioned samples has survived, after receiving the application of the LD50. The adaptive response phenomenon was also verified for a wide range of challenging doses

  13. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  14. Sunrise: Polychromatic Dust Radiative Transfer in Arbitrary Geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Patrik

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes Sunrise, a parallel, free Monte-Carlo code for the calculation of radiation transfer through astronomical dust. Sunrise uses an adaptive-mesh refinement grid to describe arbitrary geometries of emitting and absorbing/scattering media, with spatial dynamical range exceeding 10^4, and it can efficiently generate images of the emerging radiation at arbitrary points in space. In addition to the monochromatic radiative transfer typically used by Monte-Carlo codes, Sunrise is c...

  15. [Cellular adaptation and cancerogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, F; Silpigni, A; Tomasello, R; Picone, G S; La Torre, I; Aragona, M

    1998-06-01

    The paper describes the main adaptive mechanisms involved in the carcinogenic process. As a result of the action of carcinogenic agents (physical, chemical, biological), and in relation to the functional status of the affected cells, a number of systems are triggered off: detoxification and conjugation systems, the metabolisation of the said agents, DNA repairing enzymes, increased shock proteins (HSP), the induction of clonal proliferation. All these systems are valuable to the survival of the body and the species and culminate in the apoptosis of damaged cells as the last attempt at adaptation of a social kind for the good of the body. When these compensation mechanisms prove ineffective, imprecise or are exceeded by cell adaptive capacity, the resulting structural and functional alterations trigger off (induction) a very long process which often lasts between one and two thirds of the body's life, in various stages, multistep and multifactorial: this neoplastic transformation leads to a purposeless, egoistic, anarchic proliferation of cells which wish to survive at all costs, even to the detriment of the body of which they form part. Following the exhaustion of cell adaptive defences, there is an accumulation of additional genetic alterations (promotion and progression), the cells become manifestly neoplastic and continue their egoistic adaptation, according to the laws of natural selection: the cells which survive are those which adapt best to the hostile environment of the host's body, which are unaffected by proliferation control mechanisms (contact inhibition, differentiation factors, apoptosis, etc.), which make the best of the growth factors present in their microenvironment, which accomplish the so-called decathlon of the metastatization process, namely acquiring new capacities which can overcome the basal membrane, invade tissues to which they are attracted and continue to proliferate. Manifestly neoplastic cells become not self at a later stage

  16. Adaptable radiative transfer innovations for submillimeter telescopes (ARTIST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padovani, Marco; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bertoldi, Frank;

    2011-01-01

    Submillimeter observations are a key for answering many of the big questions in modern-day astrophysics, such as how stars and planets form, how galaxies evolve, and how material cycles through stars and the interstellar medium. With the upcoming large submillimeter facilities ALMA and Herschel a...

  17. AMPHIBIAN DECLINE, ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND LOCAL POPULATION ADAPTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amphibian population declines have been noted on both local and global scales. Causes for these declines are unknown although many hypotheses have been offered. In areas adjacent to human development, loss of habitat is a fairly well accepted cause. However in isolated, seemingl...

  18. Wood anatomy of Argyroxiphium (Asteraceae): adaptive radiation and ecological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood anatomy shows close correlation with ecology: A. kauense, A. sandwicense (stem), and A. virescens, which occur in dry localities, show xeromorphic wood patterns. The most mesomorphic woods are those of the bog species A. grayanum and root wood of A. sandwicense. The wood of A. caliginis is xeromorphic, despite the bog habitat of the species, a fact explainable if A. caliginis is a recent entrant into the bog habitat Libriform wall thickness appears correlated with habit. Quantitative features of stem woods of Argyroxiphium are comparable to woods ranging from desert to moist montane forest areas in California. The similarities to woods from each Californian habitat are correlative to the relative moisture availability of the respective Hawaiian habitats of the Argyroxiphium species. (author)

  19. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  20. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  1. Radiation hormesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author defines hormesis as the stimulus given to any organism by non-toxic concentrations of toxic substances and gives a few examples of the experimental evidence for the existence of radiation hormesis. The most probable explanation for its working lies not in the education of the nuclear repair system but in the education of the immune system, which is very complex and is capable of learning to deal with a variety of threats to living cells. The effects of both high LET and low LET particles are considered. (author)

  2. Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: Adaptation energy, stress, and oscillating death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorban, Alexander N; Tyukina, Tatiana A; Smirnova, Elena V; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I

    2016-09-21

    In 1938, Selye proposed the notion of adaptation energy and published 'Experimental evidence supporting the conception of adaptation energy.' Adaptation of an animal to different factors appears as the spending of one resource. Adaptation energy is a hypothetical extensive quantity spent for adaptation. This term causes much debate when one takes it literally, as a physical quantity, i.e. a sort of energy. The controversial points of view impede the systematic use of the notion of adaptation energy despite experimental evidence. Nevertheless, the response to many harmful factors often has general non-specific form and we suggest that the mechanisms of physiological adaptation admit a very general and nonspecific description. We aim to demonstrate that Selye׳s adaptation energy is the cornerstone of the top-down approach to modelling of non-specific adaptation processes. We analyze Selye׳s axioms of adaptation energy together with Goldstone׳s modifications and propose a series of models for interpretation of these axioms. Adaptation energy is considered as an internal coordinate on the 'dominant path' in the model of adaptation. The phenomena of 'oscillating death' and 'oscillating remission' are predicted on the base of the dynamical models of adaptation. Natural selection plays a key role in the evolution of mechanisms of physiological adaptation. We use the fitness optimization approach to study of the distribution of resources for neutralization of harmful factors, during adaptation to a multifactor environment, and analyze the optimal strategies for different systems of factors. PMID:26801872

  3. Symmetry Adapted Basis Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avery, John Scales; Rettrup, Sten; Avery, James Emil

    automatically with computer techniques. The method has a wide range of applicability, and can be used to solve difficult eigenvalue problems in a number of fields. The book is of special interest to quantum theorists, computer scientists, computational chemists and applied mathematicians....... eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for the Hamiltonian of a many-particle system is usually so difficult that it requires approximate methods, the most common of which is expansion of the eigenfunctions in terms of basis functions that obey the boundary conditions of the problem. The computational effort needed...... in such problems can be much reduced by making use of symmetry-adapted basis functions. The conventional method for generating symmetry-adapted basis sets is through the application of group theory, but this can be difficult. This book describes an easier method for generating symmetry-adapted basis sets...

  4. Adaptive Alternating Minimization Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Niesen, Urs; Wornell, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The classical alternating minimization (or projection) algorithm has been successful in the context of solving optimization problems over two variables or equivalently of finding a point in the intersection of two sets. The iterative nature and simplicity of the algorithm has led to its application to many areas such as signal processing, information theory, control, and finance. A general set of sufficient conditions for the convergence and correctness of the algorithm is quite well-known when the underlying problem parameters are fixed. In many practical situations, however, the underlying problem parameters are changing over time, and the use of an adaptive algorithm is more appropriate. In this paper, we study such an adaptive version of the alternating minimization algorithm. As a main result of this paper, we provide a general set of sufficient conditions for the convergence and correctness of the adaptive algorithm. Perhaps surprisingly, these conditions seem to be the minimal ones one would expect in ...

  5. Adaptable Embedded Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lisbôa, Carlos; Carro, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    As embedded systems become more complex, designers face a number of challenges at different levels: they need to boost performance, while keeping energy consumption as low as possible, they need to reuse existent software code, and at the same time they need to take advantage of the extra logic available in the chip, represented by multiple processors working together.  This book describes several strategies to achieve such different and interrelated goals, by the use of adaptability. Coverage includes reconfigurable systems, dynamic optimization techniques such as binary translation and trace reuse, new memory architectures including homogeneous and heterogeneous multiprocessor systems, communication issues and NOCs, fault tolerance against fabrication defects and soft errors, and finally, how one can combine several of these techniques together to achieve higher levels of performance and adaptability.  The discussion also includes how to employ specialized software to improve this new adaptive system, and...

  6. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  7. Ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun or artificial sources is reflected or transmitted at the surface of the skin, about 5% of normally incident rays being directly reflected. The transmitted fraction is scattered, photochemically absorbed or dissipated as heat within the skin, or passes from it to contribute to the variable total amount of reflected and transmitted radiation. The UVR absorbers in skin are not definitely known, but DNA is a definite target and probably lipoprotein membranes, RNA, proteins, mucopolysaccharides, elastin and collagen. Photochemical or free radical damage to absorber or nearby organelles leads to pharmacological, ultrastructural, histological and clinical changes. Most frequent DNA damage is pyrimidine dimer formation, apparently inhibiting cell function and replication. This is largely enzymatically repaired in man in the dark by excision repair, post-replication repair and possible other enzymatic mechanisms, and at least in some organisms by light-induced photoreactivation repair. UVR exposure causes well recognized acute and chronic clinical syndromes in man. These are discussed in this paper

  8. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  9. ANTENNAS ARRAY ADJUST WITH ADAPTIVE NEURONAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Padrón

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work an array failure correction for Linear Antenna Array (LAA is presented. This is carried out by means ofan Adaptive Artificial Neural Network (AANN that adjusts the amplitude and phase at beamforming. Theappropriated corrections are given, when one, or two, or three elements have a failure in the antenna linear array.The AANN corrects the corresponding parameters in the radiation pattern obtained due to the failure, when weknow the coefficients of the array factor (AF. This yields a reduction of side lobe level and some interferencesdisappear.

  10. The Adaptability of Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Frances; Boer, Harry

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, data from a longitudinal case study in an organization attempting to adapt its internal work processes to changes in its external context are presented, analyzed and discussed. Specifically, functionally structured work teams in one department of a Danish production facility were...... on the proper alignment between the structuring of the work processes and characteristics of the external context (Lawrence & Lorsch, 1967) – it provides a unique opportunity to explore the adaptation process in practice. The paper contributes to the development of contingency theory by lending support...

  11. Adaptation investments and homeownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Skak, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This article develops a model where ownership improves the efficiency of the housing market as it enhances the utility of housing consumption for some consumers. The model is based on an extended Hotelling-Lancaster utility approach in which the ideal variant of housing is obtainable only...... by adapting the home through a supplementary investment. Ownership offers low costs of adaptation, but has high contract costs compared with renting. Consumers simultaneously choose housing demand and tenure, and because of the different cost structure only consumers with strong preferences for individual...

  12. Adaptive management: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive management has explicit structure, including a careful elucidation of goals, identification of alternative management objectives and hypotheses of causation, and procedures for the collection of data followed by evaluation and reiteration. The process is iterative, and serves to reduce uncertainty, build knowledge and improve management over time in a goal-oriented and structured process.

  13. STUDYING COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Holland

    2006-01-01

    Complex adaptive systems (cas) - systems that involve many components that adapt or learn as they interact - are at the heart of important contemporary problems. The study of cas poses unique challenges: Some of our most powerful mathematical tools, particularly methods involving fixed points, attractors, and the like, are of limited help in understanding the development of cas. This paper suggests ways to modify research methods and tools, with an emphasis on the role of computer-based models, to increase our understanding of cas.

  14. Adaptive radar resource management

    CERN Document Server

    Moo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Radar Resource Management (RRM) is vital for optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars, which are the primary sensor for aircraft, ships, and land platforms. Adaptive Radar Resource Management gives an introduction to radar resource management (RRM), presenting a clear overview of different approaches and techniques, making it very suitable for radar practitioners and researchers in industry and universities. Coverage includes: RRM's role in optimizing the performance of modern phased array radars The advantages of adaptivity in implementing RRMThe role that modelling and

  15. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications.

  16. Engineering Adaptive Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter

    2007-01-01

    . With the growing amount of information and services, the web applications become natural candidates to adopt the concepts of ambient intelligence. Such applications can deal with divers user intentions and actions based on the user profile and can suggest the combination of information content and services which...... suit the user profile the most. This paper summarizes the domain engineering framework for such adaptive web applications. The framework provides guidelines to develop adaptive web applications as members of a family. It suggests how to utilize the design artifacts as knowledge which can be used...

  17. Adaptive Metric Kernel Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used nonparametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate regression by...... minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows one to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the standard...

  18. Adaptive metric kernel regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Larsen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Kernel smoothing is a widely used non-parametric pattern recognition technique. By nature, it suffers from the curse of dimensionality and is usually difficult to apply to high input dimensions. In this contribution, we propose an algorithm that adapts the input metric used in multivariate...... regression by minimising a cross-validation estimate of the generalisation error. This allows to automatically adjust the importance of different dimensions. The improvement in terms of modelling performance is illustrated on a variable selection task where the adaptive metric kernel clearly outperforms the...

  19. How harmful are adaptation restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, de, B.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adaptation restrictions, on the composition and level of climate change costs and on welfare. Several adaptation restrictions are identified and then simulated in a revised DICE model, extended with ad...

  20. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  1. Biological effect of radiation on human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved

  2. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  3. Rich diversity and potency of skin antioxidant peptides revealed a novel molecular basis for high-altitude adaptation of amphibians

    OpenAIRE

    Xinwang Yang; Ying Wang; Yue Zhang; Wen-Hui Lee; Yun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation is an important research area in modern biology. To date, however, knowledge has been limited to the genetic mechanisms of adaptation to the lower oxygen and temperature levels prevalent at high altitudes, with adaptation to UV radiation largely neglected. Furthermore, few proteomic or peptidomic analyses of these factors have been performed. In this study, the molecular adaptation of high-altitude Odorrana andersonii and cavernicolous O....

  4. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, van Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André W.P.; Vervoort, Wiek A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is n

  5. Adaptive kernel density estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Van Kerm

    2003-01-01

    This insert describes the module akdensity. akdensity extends the official kdensity that estimates density functions by the kernel method. The extensions are of two types: akdensity allows the use of an "adaptive kernel" approach with varying, rather than fixed, bandwidths; and akdensity estimates pointwise variability bands around the estimated density functions. Copyright 2003 by Stata Corporation.

  6. Exploring Adaptive Program Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lars Frydendal; Probst, Christian W.

    . Both solutions come at a cost; adaptivity issues a runtime overhead and requires more design effort, while dynamic recompilation takes time to perform. In this project, we plan to investigate the possibilities, limitations, and benefits of these techniques. This abstract covers our thoughts on how...

  7. Compiler Assisted Runtime Adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sima, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, we address the problem of runtime adaptation of the application to its execution environment. A typical example is changing theprocessing element on which a computation is executed, considering the available processing elements in the system. This is done based on the informati

  8. Engineering Adaptive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter

    for a domain.In this book, we propose a new domain engineering framework which extends a development process of Web applications with techniques required when designing such adaptive customizable Web applications. The framework is provided with design abstractions which deal separately with information served...

  9. Complex adaptive systems ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2003-01-01

    In the following, I will analyze two articles called Complex Adaptive Systems EcologyI & II (Molin & Molin, 1997 & 2000). The CASE-articles are some of the more quirkyarticles that have come out of the Molecular Microbial Ecology Group - a groupwhere I am currently making observational studies...

  10. Robust Adaptive Structural Control

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chi-Ming; Beck, James L.

    1995-01-01

    A new robust adaptive structural control design methodology is developed and presented which treats modeling uncertainties and limitations of control devices. Furthermore, no restriction is imposed on the structural models and the nature of the control devices so that the proposed method is very general. A simple linear single degree-of-freedom numerical example is presented to illustrate this approach.

  11. Prism Adaptation in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Nirav O.; Turner, Beth M.; Andreasen, Nancy C.; Paulsen, Jane S.; O'Leary, Daniel S.; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2006-01-01

    The prism adaptation test examines procedural learning (PL) in which performance facilitation occurs with practice on tasks without the need for conscious awareness. Dynamic interactions between frontostriatal cortices, basal ganglia, and the cerebellum have been shown to play key roles in PL. Disruptions within these neural networks have also…

  12. Generalization of Prism Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Gordon M.; Wallace, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Prism exposure produces 2 kinds of adaptive response. Recalibration is ordinary strategic remapping of spatially coded movement commands to rapidly reduce performance error. Realignment is the extraordinary process of transforming spatial maps to bring the origins of coordinate systems into correspondence. Realignment occurs when spatial…

  13. Adapting Bulls to Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adaptation of bulls used for natural breeding purposes to the Gulf Coast region of the United States including all of Florida is an important topic. Nearly 40% of the U.S. cow/calf population resides in the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Thus, as A.I. is relatively rare, the number of bulls used for ...

  14. Adaptive municipal electronic forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Pieter; Dijk, van Betsy; Bondarouk, Tanya; Ruël, Huub; Guiderdoni-Jourdain, Karine; Oiry, Ewan

    2009-01-01

    Adaptation of electronic forms (e-forms) seems to be a step forward to reduce the burden for people who fill in forms. Municipalities more and more offer e-forms online that can be used by citizens to request a municipal product or service or by municipal employees to place a request on behalf of a

  15. Radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. The overall thrust of the research is aimed at understanding the effects of radiation on organisms. Specific subject areas include: the effects of heavy-particle beam nuclear interactions in tissue on dosimetry; tracer studies with radioactive fragments of heavy-ion beams; the effects of heavy/ions on human kidney cells and Chinese hamster cells; the response of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system in rats to heavy-ion beams; the use of heavy charged particles in radiotherapy of human cancer; heavy-ion radiography; the biological effects of high magnetic fields; central nervous system neurotoxicity; and biophysical studies on cell membranes

  16. Environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of ionizing radiations from the atomic nucleus are explained, such as the beams alpha, beta and gamma. The definitions of spectrometry and nuclear traces have been included.The study presents two researches realized in Costa Rica on the radioactive nuclear and artificial elements in the environment. The first shown is the analysis of coastal sediments where explains which are radioactive artificial isotopes and the pollution that occurs in food, coastal sediments, fertilizers, the soil, the water and the air. Within the analysis techniques are the gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and nuclear strokes. Among the conclusions of this initial investigation is shown that at Punta Leona descendants of Uranium and Thorium present lower concentrations in relation to the gulf and its variations are not important. In the following study the radon gas is analyzed in the human environment where is determined that it is the second generator that causes cancer in lungs after the tobacco. This work indicates that the doses come from natural and artificial sources of radiation for the public are a whole of 2.7 mSv/year, information provided by the UNSCEAR, 2000. The radon gas is inert and radioactive of atomic number 86, includes 23 isotopes and 3 natural isotopes. The radon is everywhere, as are houses and buildings, in Costa Rica it is located in old homes with little ventilation. It describes the equipment used for the detection of radon gas in the environment. Within the conclusions radon gas is concentrated in confined spaces which can be harmful to health. It is determined that enough ventilation in places of high concentrations of radon is important. Finally it is recommended to monitor the sites where can be detected high concentrations of radon and that they have important influx of people

  17. Antiradiation Vaccine: Immunological neutralization of Radiation Toxins at Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Current medical management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include immune prophylaxis based on the Antiradiation Vaccine. Existing principles for the treatment of acute radiation syndromes are based on the replacement and supportive therapy. Haemotopoietic cell transplantation is recomended as an important method of treatment of a Haemopoietic form of the ARS. Though in the different hospitals and institutions, 31 pa-tients with a haemopoietic form have previously undergone transplantation with stem cells, in all cases(100%) the transplantants were rejected. Lethality rate was 87%.(N.Daniak et al. 2005). A large amount of biological substances or antigens isolated from bacterias (flagellin and derivates), plants, different types of venom (honeybees, scorpions, snakes) have been studied. This biological active substances can produce a nonspecific stimulation of immune system of mammals and protect against of mild doses of irradiation. But their radioprotection efficacy against high doses of radiation were not sufficient. Relative radioprotection characteristics or adaptive properties of antioxidants were expressed only at mild doses of radiation. However antioxidants demonstrated a very low protective efficacy at high doses of radiation. Some ex-periments demonstrated even a harmful effect of antioxidants administered to animals that had severe forms of the ARS. Only Specific Radiation Toxins roused a specific antigenic stim-ulation of antibody synthesis. An active immunization by non-toxic doses of radiation toxins includes a complex of radiation toxins that we call the Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD). Immunization must be provided not less than 24 days before irradiation and it is effective up to three years and more. Active immunization by radiation toxins significantly reduces the mortality rate (100%) and improves survival rate up to 60% compare with the 0% sur-vival rate among the irradiated animals in control groups

  18. Adaptation: Needs, Financing and Institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Richard J.T.; Kartha, Sivan; Persson, Aasa; Watkiss, Paul; Ackerman, Frank; Downing, Thomas E.; Kjellen, Bo; Schipper, Lisa (Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm (SE))

    2008-07-01

    Regardless of the efforts put into mitigation, some impacts of climate change are already unavoidable. Adaptation to climate change has therefore become a key component of domestic climate policy, along with mitigation. Adaptation has also become key to the success of global climate policy. Without an agreement on supporting adaptation in developing countries, there will be no agreement on mitigation. Strong mitigation efforts make it more likely that adaptation will be effective and affordable. The world cannot rely on adaptation alone: it would eventually lead to a level of climate change to which adaptation is no longer feasible. Government action is needed to create an enabling environment for adaptation. This includes removing existing financial, legal, institutional and knowledge barriers to adaptation, and strengthening the capacity of people and organisations to adapt. The success of adaptation relies on the success of development, and vice versa. Poverty reduction, good governance, education, environmental protection, health and gender equality all contribute to adaptive capacity. Substantially more money is needed to support adaptation in developing countries. Current levels of funding will soon have to be scaled up by two orders of magnitude (from US$ hundreds of million to US$ tens of billion per year). An agreement on adaptation in Copenhagen in 2009 will need to include concrete steps towards a strengthened knowledge base for adaptation, substantially more funding for developing countries, and enhanced adaptation planning and implementation at the national level. Recommendations: Developed countries should accept a transparent, principle-based allocation of responsibility for adaptation funding, resulting in adequate, new and additional money to support adaptation programmes in developing countries. Levies on carbon market transactions and auctioning emission permits are two existing mechanisms of generating new and additional funds consistent with

  19. Radiation hormesis--a remedy for fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-04-01

    Personal reflections on radiation hormesis for the past 50 years are presented. The causes of ignoring and rejections of this phenomenon by international and national bodies and by radiation protection establishment are analyzed. The opposition against nuclear weapons and preparations for nuclear war was probably the main factor in inducing the concern for adverse effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, a byproduct of activism against the nuclear weapon tests. UNSCEAR was deeply involved in preparation of the scientific basis for cessation of nuclear test, and contributed to elaboration of the LNT assumption, which is in contradiction with the hormetic phenomenon. However, this authoritative body recognized also the existence of radiation hormesis, termed as 'adaptive response.' The political and vested interests behind exclusion of hormesis from the current risk assessment methodology are discussed. PMID:20332170

  20. AdaptME toolkit : adaptation monitoring and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Pringle, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Organisations that have undertaken adaptation activities now face the challenge of evaluating what worked, what didn’t, how and why. This toolkit responds to a growing demand for practical support in evaluating adaptation progress and performance. AdaptME will help you to think through some of the factors that can make an evaluation of adaptation activities inherently challenging, and equip you to design a robust evaluation. You will be able to ‘tweak’ a single part of your evaluation des...

  1. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP)

  2. Active control of radiated sound using nearfield pressure sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ke'an; YIN Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Based on nearfield sound pressure sensing to pick up error information, an approach for constructing active acoustic structure to effectively reduce radiated sound power at low frequency is proposed. The idea is that a nearfield pressure after active control is used as error signals and transformed into an objective function in adaptive active control process.Firstly sound power expression using near-field pressure radiated from a flexible structure is derived, and then three kind of nearfield pressure based active control strategies, I.e. Minimization of radiated sound power, minimization of sound power for dominant radiation modes and minimization of sound power for modified dominant radiation modes are respectively presented and applied to active control of radiated single and broadband noise. Finally computer simulations on sound power reduction under three strategies are conducted and it is shown that the proposed active control strategies are invalid and considerable reduction in radiated sound power can be achieved.

  3. Adaptive Inflow Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Volkov, Vasily Y; Zhuravlev, Oleg N; Nukhaev, Marat T; Shchelushkin, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the idea and realization for the unique Adaptive Inflow Control System being a part of well completion, able to adjust to the changing in time production conditions. This system allows to limit the flow rate from each interval at a certain level, which solves the problem of water and gas breakthroughs. We present the results of laboratory tests and numerical calculations obtaining the characteristics of the experimental setup with dual-in-position valves as parts of adaptive inflow control system, depending on the operating conditions. The flow distribution in the system was also studied with the help of three-dimensional computer model. The control ranges dependences are determined, an influence of the individual elements on the entire system is revealed.

  4. Unconsciously triggered conflict adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon van Gaal

    Full Text Available In conflict tasks such as the Stroop, the Eriksen flanker or the Simon task, it is generally observed that the detection of conflict in the current trial reduces the impact of conflicting information in the subsequent trial; a phenomenon termed conflict adaptation. This higher-order cognitive control function has been assumed to be restricted to cases where conflict is experienced consciously. In the present experiment we manipulated the awareness of conflict-inducing stimuli in a metacontrast masking paradigm to directly test this assumption. Conflicting response tendencies were elicited either consciously (through primes that were weakly masked or unconsciously (strongly masked primes. We demonstrate trial-by-trial conflict adaptation effects after conscious as well as unconscious conflict, which could not be explained by direct stimulus/response repetitions. These findings show that unconscious information can have a longer-lasting influence on our behavior than previously thought and further stretch the functional boundaries of unconscious cognition.

  5. Capabilities for Strategic Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    firms’ ability to absorb and leverage new knowledge. The third paper is an empirical study which conceptualizes top managers’ resource cognition as a managerial capability underlying firms’ resource adaptation; it empirically examines the performance implications of this capability and organizational......This dissertation explores capabilities that enable firms to strategically adapt to environmental changes and preserve competitiveness over time – often referred to as dynamic capabilities. While dynamic capabilities being a popular research domain, too little is known about what these capabilities...... empirical studies through the dynamic capabilities lens and develops propositions for future research. The second paper is an empirical study on the origins of firm-level absorptive capacity; it explores how organization-level antecedents, through their impact on individual-level antecedents, influence...

  6. Designing Adaptive Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The unique characteristic of web applications is that they are supposed to be used by much bigger and diverse set of users and stakeholders. An example application area is e-Learning or business to business interaction. In eLearning environment, various users with different background use the e......Learning system to study a discipline. In business to business interaction, different requirements and parameters of exchanged business requests might be served by different services from third parties. Such applications require certain intelligence and a slightly different approach to design. Adpative web...... adaptation to the changed parameters of environments, user or context. Adaptation can be seen as an orthogonal concern or viewpoint in a design process. In this paper I will discuss design abstractions which are employed in current design methods for web applications. I will exemplify the use...

  7. Bacterial surface adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  8. Adaptive sensor fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Ivan

    1995-07-01

    A perceptual reasoning system adaptively extracting, associating, and fusing information from multiple sources, at various levels of abstraction, is considered as the building block for the next generation of surveillance systems. A system architecture is presented which makes use of both centralized and distributed predetection fusion combined with intelligent monitor and control coupling both on-platform and off-board track and decision level fusion results. The goal of this system is to create a `gestalt fused sensor system' whose information product is greater than the sum of the information products from the individual sensors and has performance superior to either individual or a sub-group of combined sensors. The application of this architectural concept to the law enforcement arena (e.g. drug interdiction) utilizing multiple spatially and temporally diverse surveillance platforms and/or information sources, is used to illustrate the benefits of the adaptive perceptual reasoning system concept.

  9. Adaptive semantics visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Nazemi, Kawa

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces a novel approach for intelligent visualizations that adapts the different visual variables and data processing to human’s behavior and given tasks. Thereby a number of new algorithms and methods are introduced to satisfy the human need of information and knowledge and enable a usable and attractive way of information acquisition. Each method and algorithm is illustrated in a replicable way to enable the reproduction of the entire “SemaVis” system or parts of it. The introduced evaluation is scientifically well-designed and performed with more than enough participants to validate the benefits of the methods. Beside the introduced new approaches and algorithms, readers may find a sophisticated literature review in Information Visualization and Visual Analytics, Semantics and information extraction, and intelligent and adaptive systems. This book is based on an awarded and distinguished doctoral thesis in computer science.

  10. Adaptive method of lines

    CERN Document Server

    Saucez, Ph

    2001-01-01

    The general Method of Lines (MOL) procedure provides a flexible format for the solution of all the major classes of partial differential equations (PDEs) and is particularly well suited to evolutionary, nonlinear wave PDEs. Despite its utility, however, there are relatively few texts that explore it at a more advanced level and reflect the method''s current state of development.Written by distinguished researchers in the field, Adaptive Method of Lines reflects the diversity of techniques and applications related to the MOL. Most of its chapters focus on a particular application but also provide a discussion of underlying philosophy and technique. Particular attention is paid to the concept of both temporal and spatial adaptivity in solving time-dependent PDEs. Many important ideas and methods are introduced, including moving grids and grid refinement, static and dynamic gridding, the equidistribution principle and the concept of a monitor function, the minimization of a functional, and the moving finite elem...

  11. Adaptive Large Neighbourhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Stefan

    Large neighborhood search is a metaheuristic that has gained popularity in recent years. The heuristic repeatedly moves from solution to solution by first partially destroying the solution and then repairing it. The best solution observed during this search is presented as the final solution....... This tutorial introduces the large neighborhood search metaheuristic and the variant adaptive large neighborhood search that dynamically tunes parameters of the heuristic while it is running. Both heuristics belong to a broader class of heuristics that are searching a solution space using very large...... neighborhoods. The tutorial also present applications of the adaptive large neighborhood search, mostly related to vehicle routing problems for which the heuristic has been extremely successful. We discuss how the heuristic can be parallelized and thereby take advantage of modern desktop computers...

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  13. Semantische Adaption von Komponenten

    OpenAIRE

    Söldner, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Im Bereich der Informationstechnik ist die Adaption von Software an veränderte Gegebenheiten und Umgebungen ein wichtiges Thema. Dabei bestimmen vor allem die konkret verwendete Software-Programmiersprache, die benutzten Entwurfsmuster und die der Applikation zugrundeliegende Software-Architektur, mit welchem Aufwand eine Anwendung auf neue Anforderungen eingehen kann. Darüber hinaus war und ist es interessant, Mechanismen zu entwickeln, mit denen Applikationen selbst auf spontane Änderungen ...

  14. Traffic-Adaptive Routing

    OpenAIRE

    Kammenhuber, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Despite the bursty and highly volatile traffic, routing in the Internet today is optimised only on coarse time scales, as load-adaptive routing is known to induce performance deterioration by causing massive oscillations. We describe ReplEx, an universally applicable distributed algorithm for dynamic routing/traffic engineering, which is based on game theory. We show through extensive realistic simulations that ReplEx does not oscillate, and that it achieves performance gains comparable to tr...

  15. Reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxe, Robin L. (Inventor); Galica, Gary E. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Described are methods and apparatus, including computer program products, for reconfigurable environmentally adaptive computing technology. An environmental signal representative of an external environmental condition is received. A processing configuration is automatically selected, based on the environmental signal, from a plurality of processing configurations. A reconfigurable processing element is reconfigured to operate according to the selected processing configuration. In some examples, the environmental condition is detected and the environmental signal is generated based on the detected condition.

  16. Adaptive positioner; Posicionador adaptativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador Pavon, I.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes the circuits and programs in assembly language, developed to control the two DC motors that give mobility to a mechanical arm with two degrees of freedom. As a whole, the system is based in a adaptable regulator designed around a 8 bit microprocessor that, starting from a mode of regulation based in the successive approximation method, evolve to another mode through which, only one approximation is sufficient to get the right position of each motor. (Author) 6 refs.

  17. Homeowiscous adaptation in fish

    OpenAIRE

    Flipiak, Anna; Gondko, Roman; Gabryelak, Teresa

    1997-01-01

    Homeowiscous adaptation is a common phenomenon observed in poikilotherms which remain active at different temperatures. It is usually caused by changes in fatty acids pool in cellular membranes, what enable to maintain the physical structure of their membranes within tolerable limits. The increased unsaturaition of membrane lipids has as its basis some changes in activity of the appropriate enzymes. Fluctuations in fluidity of membrame lipids activate transcription of the genes...

  18. Invited article: Adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Parr Rud

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last several decades, organizations have dealt with economic shifts using change management. Based on the new science, there are two major flaws with this approach. First, the word change implies an event with an ending. Second, it implies that change can be managed. In a world of economic volatility, this approach is no longer viable. The continuous climate of uncertainty and volatility demands another view, one that supports adaptability and resilience.

  19. Improved Adaptive Fingerprint Binarization

    OpenAIRE

    Bartunek, Josef Ström; Nilsson, Mikael; Nordberg, Jörgen; Claesson, Ingvar

    2008-01-01

    In this paper improvements to a previous work are presented. Removing the redundant artifacts in the fingerprint mask is introduced enhancing the final result. The proposed method is entirely adaptive process adjusting to each fingerprint without any further supervision of the user. Hence, the algorithm is insensitive to the characteristics of the fingerprint sensor and the various physical appearances of the fingerprints. Further, a detailed description of fingerprint mask generation not ful...

  20. Stylistic Adaptation in Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙芳

    2011-01-01

    <正>A translation criteria universally accepted is faithfulness, which can be examined from different dimensions of content, form and style.Among these three dimensions,faithfulness in content and form is easier to be noted,while the faithfulness in style is harder to judge.This paper will mainly focus on the study of stylistic features for the purpose of language providing methods to achieve stylistic adaptation in translation.

  1. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  2. Adaptive Brain Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Millán, José del R.

    2003-01-01

    Severely disabled people are largely excluded from the benefits information and communication technologies have brought to our industries, economies, appliances, and general quality of life. But what if that technology would allow them to communicate their wishes or control electronic devices directly through their thoughts alone? This is the goal and promise of the Adaptive Brain Interfaces (ABI) project, which aims to augment natural human capabilities by enabling people to interact with co...

  3. Adaptive Consumption Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Howitt; Ömer Özak

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes and studies a theory of adaptive consumption behavior under income uncertainty and liquidity constraints. We assume that consumption is governed by a linear function of wealth, whose coefficients are revised each period by a procedure, which, although sophisticated, places few informational or computational demands on the consumer. We show that under a variety of settings, our procedure converges quickly to a set of coefficients with low welfare cost relative to a fully op...

  4. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Siegel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Further expanding on the changes made to the fifth edition, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 6th Edition continues to highlight the relevance of thermal radiative transfer and focus on concepts that develop the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The book explains the fundamentals of radiative transfer, introduces the energy and radiative transfer equations, covers a variety of approaches used to gauge radiative heat exchange between different surfaces and structures, and provides solution techniques for solving the RTE.

  5. An Adaptive Robot Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Svenstrup, Mikael; Dalgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal is to im...... to the behavior of the interacting person. This paper presents a simple ball game between a single player and a mobile robot platform. The algorithm has been validated using simulation and real world experiments.......The goal of this paper is to describe an adaptive robot game, which motivates elderly people to do a regular amount of physical exercise while playing. One of the advantages of robot based games is that the initiative to play can be taken autonomously by the robot. In this case, the goal...... is to improve the mental and physical state of the user by playing a physical game with the robot. Ideally, a robot game should be simple to learn but difficult to master, providing an appropriate degree of challenge for players with different skills. In order to achieve that, the robot should be able to adapt...

  6. Adaptive colouration in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudh, Andreas; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians, i.e. salamanders, frogs and caecilians show a wide range of bright colours in combination with contrasting patterns. There is variation among species, populations and also within species and populations. Furthermore, individuals often change colours during developmental stages or in response to environmental factors. This extraordinary variation means that there are excellent opportunities to test hypotheses of the adaptive significance of colours using amphibian species as models. We review the present view of functions of colouration in amphibians with the main focus on relatively unexplored topics. Variation in colouration has been found to play a role in thermoregulation, UV protection, predator avoidance and sexual signalling. However, many proposed cases of adaptive functions of colouration in amphibians remain virtually scientifically unexplored and surprisingly few genes influencing pigmentation or patterning have been detected. We would like to especially encourage more studies that take advantage of recent developments in measurement of visual properties of several possible signalling receivers (e.g. predators, competitors or mates). Future investigations on interactions between behaviour, ecology and vision have the potential to challenge our current view of the adaptive function of colouration in amphibians.

  7. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. PMID:27386298

  8. Vestibulospinal adaptation to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Human balance control is known to be transiently disrupted after spaceflight; however, the mechanisms responsible for postflight postural ataxia are still under investigation. In this report, we propose a conceptual model of vestibulospinal adaptation based on theoretical adaptive control concepts and supported by the results from a comprehensive study of balance control recovery after spaceflight. The conceptual model predicts that immediately after spaceflight the balance control system of a returning astronaut does not expect to receive gravity-induced afferent inputs and that descending vestibulospinal control of balance is disrupted until the central nervous system is able to cope with the newly available vestibular otolith information. Predictions of the model are tested using data from a study of the neurosensory control of balance in astronauts immediately after landing. In that study, the mechanisms of sensorimotor balance control were assessed under normal, reduced, and/or altered (sway-referenced) visual and somatosensory input conditions. We conclude that the adaptive control model accurately describes the neurobehavioral responses to spaceflight and that similar models of altered sensory, motor, or environmental constraints are needed clinically to predict responses that patients with sensorimotor pathologies may have to various visual-vestibular or changing stimulus environments.

  9. Estimation of daily net radiation from synoptic meteorological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five models for net radiation estimation reported by Linacre (1968), Berljand(1956), Nakayama et al. (1983), Chang (1970) and Doorenbos et al. (1977) were tested for the adaptability to Korea. A new model with effective longwave radiation term parameterized by air temperature, solar radiation and vapor pressure was formulated and tested for its accuracy. Above five models with original parameter values showed large absolute mean deviations ranging from 0.86 to 1.64 MJ/m2/day. The parameters of the above five models were reestimated by using net radiation and meteorological elements measured in Suwon, Korea

  10. Adaptive Leadership in Digital Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Mette; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Mathiassen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Leaders’ ability to quickly adapt IT practices is especially critical in today’s increasingly turbulent environment with frequent changes in the competitive and technological landscape. However, developing such adaptive leadership is a difficult and complex process. Often, underlying assumptions...

  11. Adaptive Structural Mode Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes the development of an adaptive structural mode control system. The adaptive control system will begin from a "baseline" dynamic model of the...

  12. AdapterRemoval v2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Mikkel; Lindgreen, Stinus; Orlando, Ludovic Antoine Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As high-throughput sequencing platforms produce longer and longer reads, sequences generated from short inserts, such as those obtained from fossil and degraded material, are increasingly expected to contain adapter sequences. Efficient adapter trimming algorithms are also needed to...... process the growing amount of data generated per sequencing run. FINDINGS: We introduce AdapterRemoval v2, a major revision of AdapterRemoval v1, which introduces (i) striking improvements in throughput, through the use of single instruction, multiple data (SIMD; SSE1 and SSE2) instructions and multi......-threading support, (ii) the ability to handle datasets containing reads or read-pairs with different adapters or adapter pairs, (iii) simultaneous demultiplexing and adapter trimming, (iv) the ability to reconstruct adapter sequences from paired-end reads for poorly documented data sets, and (v) native gzip and...

  13. Quiz commercial game adaptation to help in the radioprotection training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An employee will be qualified to operate a gamma irradiation facility at EMBRARAD after doing a radiation protection training of at least 18 months. After that, the main radiation protection subjects are revised every six months. In that half-yearly training the operators become teachers and so they explain the radiation protection subjects, under the supervision of an instructor. After some years attending the same training, operators do not have motivation to participate in this kind of periodic event due to the same issues covered. Therefore something should be made to revival their interest and motivation to take part in this periodic training. The way chose was adapted a quiz commercial game to revised radiation protection subjects and included it in the periodic training. The game was well accepted by the operators, it caused a competition among them because everybody wanted to win the game and consequently stimulated them to study. (author)

  14. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  15. Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    The absence of a global agreement on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions calls for adaptation to climate change. The associated paper explains the need for climate change adaptation of the building stock and suggests a pattern for a strategic approach to how to reach the climate change...... adaptation needed. Issues that must be addressed in case a strategic approach is not developed, as the building sector is continuously investing in measures to adapt to climate change as impacts emerge are described....

  16. Attention modulates visual size adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzer, Sylvia; Fink, G R; R. Weidner

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined in healthy subjects (n = 16) whether size adaptation occurs at early, i.e., preattentive, levels of processing or whether higher cognitive processes such as attention can modulate the illusion. To investigate this issue, bottom-up stimulation was kept constant across conditions by using a single adaptation display containing both small and large adapter stimuli. Subjects' attention was directed to either the large or small adapter stimulus by means of a luminance ...

  17. Adaptation: A Partially Automated Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Manjing, Tham; Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases the possibility of creating an adaptive auditing system. Adaptation in an audit environment need human intervention at some point. Based on a case study this paper focuses on automation of adaptation process. It is divided into solution design and validation parts. The artifact design is developed around import procedures of M-company. An overview of the artefact is discussed in detail to fully describes the adaptation mechanism with automatic adjustment for compliance re...

  18. Chapter 17 - Economics of adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Chambwera, M.; Heal, G.; Dubeux, C.; Hallegatte, S.; Leclerc, L.; Markandya, A.; McCarl, B.A.; Mechler, R; Neumann, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter assesses the literature on the economics of climate change adaptation, building on the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) and the increasing role that economic considerations are playing in adaptation decisionmaking and policy. AR4 provided a limited assessment of the costs and benefits of adaptation, based on narrow and fragmented sectoral and regional literature (Adger et al, 2007). Substantial advances have been made in the economics of climate change adaptation after AR4.

  19. Partially repeatable genetic basis of benthic adaptation in threespine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Killingbeck, Emily E; Agoglia, Rachel M; Baek, Jiyeon; Carsanaro, Sara M; Lee, Anthony M; Cleves, Phillip A; Schluter, Dolph; Miller, Craig T

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which convergent adaptation to similar ecological niches occurs by a predictable genetic basis remains a fundamental question in biology. Threespine stickleback fish have undergone an adaptive radiation in which ancestral oceanic populations repeatedly colonized and adapted to freshwater habitats. In multiple lakes in British Columbia, two different freshwater ecotypes have evolved: a deep-bodied benthic form adapted to forage near the lake substrate, and a narrow-bodied limnetic form adapted to forage in open water. Here, we use genome-wide linkage mapping in marine × benthic F2 genetic crosses to test the extent of shared genomic regions underlying benthic adaptation in three benthic populations. We identify at least 100 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) harboring genes influencing skeletal morphology. The majority of QTL (57%) are unique to one cross. However, four genomic regions affecting eight craniofacial and armor phenotypes are found in all three benthic populations. We find that QTL are clustered in the genome and overlapping QTL regions are enriched for genomic signatures of natural selection. These findings suggest that benthic adaptation has occurred via both parallel and nonparallel genetic changes. PMID:26947264

  20. Adaptation in Tourist Publicity Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭娟

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide a preliminary study of adaptation adopted in the translation of tourist publicity and ex-plore the main reasons behind the adaptive techniques on the basis of functionalist theories of translation. It is found that cultural blanks, different linguistic conventions and also the intended functions of tourist publicity may all contribute to adaptation in translation.

  1. How Harmful are Adaptation Restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de K.C.; Dellink, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant assumption in economic models of climate policy remains that adaptation will be implemented in an optimal manner. There are, however, several reasons why optimal levels of adaptation may not be attainable. This paper investigates the effects of suboptimal levels of adaptation, i.e. adap

  2. Evolving concepts of sensory adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems constantly adapt their responses to match the current environment. These adjustments occur at many levels of the system and increasingly appear to calibrate even for highly abstract perceptual representations of the stimulus. The similar effects of adaptation across very different stimulus domains point to common design principles but also continue to raise questions about the purpose of adaptation.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of metabolic adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoek, M.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we study how organisms adapt their metabolism to a changing environment. Metabolic adaptation occurs at different timescales. Organisms adapt their metabolism via metabolic regulation, which happens in the order of minutes to hours and via evolution, which takes many generations. Here

  4. Adaptation : A Partially Automated Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manjing, Tham; Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases the possibility of creating an adaptive auditing system. Adaptation in an audit environment need human intervention at some point. Based on a case study this paper focuses on automation of adaptation process. It is divided into solution design and validation parts. The artifact

  5. Transoral robotic surgery: The radiation oncologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew C; Koyfman, Shlomo A

    2016-09-01

    Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) is a fascinating new technology allowing for excellent functional outcomes after resection of head and neck tumors that previously required morbid surgical approaches for access. With a new technology, however, come new questions as to optimal patient selection and its impact on adjuvant therapy considerations. Here we review the issues most pertinent to a radiation oncologist adapting to the use of TORS. Patient selection, indications for adjuvant radiotherapy, radiation dose and target volumes are discussed. Finally, ongoing clinical trials and future directions are considered. PMID:27531879

  6. On Adaptive vs. Non-adaptive Security of Multiparty Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dziembowski, Stefan;

    2001-01-01

    Security analysis of multiparty cryptographic protocols distinguishes between two types of adversarialsettings: In the non-adaptive setting, the set of corrupted parties is chosen in advance, before the interaction begins. In the adaptive setting, the adversary chooses who to corrupt during...... the course of the computation. We study the relations between adaptive security (i.e., security in the adaptive setting) and non-adaptive security, according to two definitions and in several models of computation. While affirming some prevailing beliefs, we also obtain some unexpected results. Some...... highlights of our results are: – - According to the definition of Dodis-Micali-Rogaway (which is set in the information-theoretic model), adaptive and non-adaptive security are equivalent. This holds for both honest-but-curious and Byzantine adversaries, and for any number of parties. – - According...

  7. Adaptability Responding Effectively to Change

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Calarco, Allan

    2011-01-01

    In today's business world, the complexity and pace of change can be daunting. Adaptability has become recognized as a necessary skill for leaders to develop to be effective in this environment. Even so, leaders rarely know what they can do to become more adaptable and foster adaptability in others. This guidebook contributes to a greater understanding of adaptability and the cognitive, emotional, and dispositional flexibility it requires. Leaders will learn how to develop their adaptability and to become more effective for themselves, the people they lead, and their organizations.

  8. Adaptive filtering prediction and control

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, Graham C

    2009-01-01

    Preface1. Introduction to Adaptive TechniquesPart 1. Deterministic Systems2. Models for Deterministic Dynamical Systems3. Parameter Estimation for Deterministic Systems4. Deterministic Adaptive Prediction5. Control of Linear Deterministic Systems6. Adaptive Control of Linear Deterministic SystemsPart 2. Stochastic Systems7. Optimal Filtering and Prediction8. Parameter Estimation for Stochastic Dynamic Systems9. Adaptive Filtering and Prediction10. Control of Stochastic Systems11. Adaptive Control of Stochastic SystemsAppendicesA. A Brief Review of Some Results from Systems TheoryB. A Summary o

  9. Adaptive Optical Scanning Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, Ting-Chung; Liu, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Optical Scanning Holography (OSH) is a powerful technique that employs a single-pixel sensor and a row-by-row scanning mechanism to capture the hologram of a wide-view, three-dimensional object. However, the time required to acquire a hologram with OSH is rather lengthy. In this paper, we propose an enhanced framework, which is referred to as Adaptive OSH (AOSH), to shorten the holographic recording process. We have demonstrated that the AOSH method is capable of decreasing the acquisition time by up to an order of magnitude, while preserving the content of the hologram favorably. PMID:26916866

  10. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    of matched filters (one for each veloc- ity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out....... Simulations in Field II for pul- sating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior per- formance for short observation...

  11. Reentry vehicle adaptive telemetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidner, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    In RF telemetry (TM) the allowable RF bandwidth limits the amount of data in the telemetered data set. Typically the data set is less than ideal to accommodate all aspects of a test. In the case of diagnostic data, the compromise often leaves insufficient diagnostic data when problems occur. As a solution, intelligence was designed into a TM, allowing it to adapt to changing data requirements. To minimize the computational requirements for an intelligent TM, a fuzzy logic inference engine was developed. This reference engine was simulated on a PC and then loaded into a TM hardware package for final testing.

  12. An Adaptive TVD Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Yih Nen; Payne, Uon Jan

    1995-05-01

    An adaptive TVD limiter, based on a limiter approximating the upper boundary of the TVD range and that of the third-order upwind TVD scheme, is developed in this work. The limiter switches to the comprressive limiter near a discontinuity, to the third-order TVD scheme's limiter in the smooth region, and to a weighted averaged scheme in the transition region between smooth and high gradient solutions. Numerical experiments show that the proposed scheme works very well for one-dimensional scalar equation problems but becomes less effective in one- and two-dimensional Euler equation problems. Further study is required for the two-dimensional scalar equation problems.

  13. Adopting an Adaptive Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2009-01-01

    This thesis grounds itself upon two implicitly time-based assumptions: 1. Change is inevitable 2. Design is an iterative process Herbert Simon posits design as an engine of change. He states that design activity is the devising of ‘courses of action aimed at changing existing situations into pref...... particular time-based attributes can be exhibited – most notably, adaptation. The implementation of this framework necessitates a re-examination of the process and concerns of architectural design. The sub-text of the thesis is to remember that the activity of design is itself designed....

  14. Adaptive antennas and receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, Melvin M

    2005-01-01

    In our modern age of remote sensing, wireless communication, and the nearly endless list of other antenna-based applications, complex problems require increasingly sophisticated solutions. Conventional antenna systems are no longer suited to high-noise or low-signal applications such as intrusion detection. Detailing highly effective approaches to non-Gaussian weak signal detection, Adaptive Antennas and Receivers provides an authoritative introduction to state-of-the-art research on the modeling, testing, and application of these technologies.Edited by innovative researcher and eminent expert

  15. Adaptation in Collaborative Governance Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Kirk; Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Adaptation and the adaptive capacity of human and environmental systems have been of central concern to natural and social science scholars, many of whom characterize and promote the need for collaborative cross-boundary systems that are seen as flexible and adaptive by definition. Researchers who study collaborative governance systems in the public administration, planning and policy literature have paid less attention to adaptive capacity specifically and institutional adaptation in general. This paper bridges the two literatures and finds four common dimensions of capacity, including structural arrangements, leadership, knowledge and learning, and resources. In this paper, we focus on institutional adaptation in the context of collaborative governance regimes and try to clarify and distinguish collaborative capacity from adaptive capacity and their contributions to adaptive action. We posit further that collaborative capacities generate associated adaptive capacities thereby enabling institutional adaptation within collaborative governance regimes. We develop these distinctions and linkages between collaborative and adaptive capacities with the help of an illustrative case study in watershed management within the National Estuary Program.

  16. Detection of Terahertz Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation.......The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation....

  17. Difficulties of adaptation to Order 453 by radiology services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has as its objective to present some difficulties of adaptation of a Radiological Service to Order 453, of Health Ministry. The Order 453, gives regulations to use of radiodiagnostic techniques and require the implementation of Quality Assurance Programs in all institution that make use of ionizing radiation. A survey of functioning conditions of General Hospital - Radiological Service of Santa Casa de Misericordia do Rio de Janeiro, was performed with basis on Order 453. After analysis of these conditions, were noticed some needs as, improvement of professional competence about radiation protection and implementation of a Quality Assurance Program in radiological unit of this hospital

  18. AdapterRemoval v2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Mikkel; Lindgreen, Stinus; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    process the growing amount of data generated per sequencing run. FINDINGS: We introduce AdapterRemoval v2, a major revision of AdapterRemoval v1, which introduces (i) striking improvements in throughput, through the use of single instruction, multiple data (SIMD; SSE1 and SSE2) instructions and multi......-threading support, (ii) the ability to handle datasets containing reads or read-pairs with different adapters or adapter pairs, (iii) simultaneous demultiplexing and adapter trimming, (iv) the ability to reconstruct adapter sequences from paired-end reads for poorly documented data sets, and (v) native gzip and...... bzip2 support. CONCLUSIONS: We show that AdapterRemoval v2 compares favorably with existing tools, while offering superior throughput to most alternatives examined here, both for single and multi-threaded operations....

  19. The Adaptation Finance Gap Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Environment Programme (UNEP), which laid out the concept of ‘adaptation gaps’ and outlined three such gaps: technology, finance and knowledge. The 2016 Adaptation Gap Report assesses the difference between the financial costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries and the amount of money......UNEP’s Adaptation Gap Report series focuses on Finance, Technology and Knowledge gaps in climate change adaptation. It compliments the Emissions Gap Report series, and explores the implications of failing to close the emissions gap. The report builds on a 2014 assessment by the United Nations...... actually available to meet these costs – a difference known as the “adaptation finance gap”. Like the 2014 report, the 2016 report focuses on developing countries, where adaptation capacity is often the lowest and needs the highest, and concentrates on the period up to 2050. The report identifies trends...

  20. Classifying climate change adaptation frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Complex socio-ecological demographics are factors that must be considered when addressing adaptation to the potential effects of climate change. As such, a suite of deployable climate change adaptation frameworks is necessary. Multiple frameworks that are required to communicate the risks of climate change and facilitate adaptation. Three principal adaptation frameworks have emerged from the literature; Scenario - Led (SL), Vulnerability - Led (VL) and Decision - Centric (DC). This study aims to identify to what extent these adaptation frameworks; either, planned or deployed are used in a neighbourhood vulnerable to climate change. This work presents a criterion that may be used as a tool for identifying the hallmarks of adaptation frameworks and thus enabling categorisation of projects. The study focussed on the coastal zone surrounding the Sizewell nuclear power plant in Suffolk in the UK. An online survey was conducted identifying climate change adaptation projects operating in the study area. This inventory was analysed to identify the hallmarks of each adaptation project; Levels of dependency on climate model information, Metrics/units of analysis utilised, Level of demographic knowledge, Level of stakeholder engagement, Adaptation implementation strategies and Scale of adaptation implementation. The study found that climate change adaptation projects could be categorised, based on the hallmarks identified, in accordance with the published literature. As such, the criterion may be used to establish the matrix of adaptation frameworks present in a given area. A comprehensive summary of the nature of adaptation frameworks in operation in a locality provides a platform for further comparative analysis. Such analysis, enabled by the criterion, may aid the selection of appropriate frameworks enhancing the efficacy of climate change adaptation.