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Sample records for adaptation improves temporal

  1. Temporal specificity of the initial adaptive response in motor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Wilsaan M; Sing, Gary C; Smith, Maurice A

    2017-07-01

    Repeated exposure to a novel physical environment eventually leads to a mature adaptive response whereby feedforward changes in motor output mirror both the amplitude and temporal structure of the environmental perturbations. However, adaptive responses at the earliest stages of learning have been found to be not only smaller, but systematically less specific in their temporal structure compared to later stages of learning. This observation has spawned a lively debate as to whether the temporal structure of the initial adaptive response is, in fact, stereotyped and non-specific. To settle this debate, we directly measured the adaptive responses to velocity-dependent and position-dependent force-field perturbations (vFFs and pFFs) at the earliest possible stage of motor learning in humans-after just a single-movement exposure. In line with previous work, we found these earliest stage adaptive responses to be more similar than the perturbations that induced them. However, the single-trial adaptive responses for vFF and pFF perturbations were clearly distinct, and the disparity between them reflected the difference between the temporal structure of the perturbations that drove them. Critically, we observed these differences between single-trial adaptive responses when vFF and pFF perturbations were randomly intermingled from one trial to the next within the same block, indicating perturbation response specificity at the single trial level. These findings demonstrate that the initial adaptive responses to physical perturbations are not stereotyped. Instead, the neural plasticity in sensorimotor areas is sensitive to the temporal structure of a movement perturbation even at the earliest stage in learning. This insight has direct implications for the development of computational models of early-stage motor adaptation and the evolution of this adaptive response with continued training.

  2. Motor Activity Improves Temporal Expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautrelle, Lilian; Mareschal, Denis; French, Robert; Addyman, Caspar; Thomas, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Certain brain areas involved in interval timing are also important in motor activity. This raises the possibility that motor activity might influence interval timing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed interval timing in healthy adults following different types of training. The pre- and post-training tasks consisted of a button press in response to the presentation of a rhythmic visual stimulus. Alterations in temporal expectancy were evaluated by measuring response times. Training consisted of responding to the visual presentation of regularly appearing stimuli by either: (1) pointing with a whole-body movement, (2) pointing only with the arm, (3) imagining pointing with a whole-body movement, (4) simply watching the stimulus presentation, (5) pointing with a whole-body movement in response to a target that appeared at irregular intervals (6) reading a newspaper. Participants performing a motor activity in response to the regular target showed significant improvements in judgment times compared to individuals with no associated motor activity. Individuals who only imagined pointing with a whole-body movement also showed significant improvements. No improvements were observed in the group that trained with a motor response to an irregular stimulus, hence eliminating the explanation that the improved temporal expectations of the other motor training groups was purely due to an improved motor capacity to press the response button. All groups performed a secondary task equally well, hence indicating that our results could not simply be attributed to differences in attention between the groups. Our results show that motor activity, even when it does not play a causal or corrective role, can lead to improved interval timing judgments. PMID:25806813

  3. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Li-Chung; Su, Hung-Wei; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Cho, Keng-Chi; Yen, Wei-Chung; Xu, Chris; Dong, Chen Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Temporal profile distortions reduce excitation efficiency and image quality in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy. In order to compensate the distortions, a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics system (AOS) was integrated into the microscope. The feedback control signal of the AOS was acquired from local image intensity maximization via a hill-climbing algorithm. The control signal was then utilized to drive a deformable mirror in such a way as to eliminate the distortions. With the AOS correction, not only is the axial excitation symmetrically refocused, but the axial resolution with full two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) intensity is also maintained. Hence, the contrast of the TPEF image of a R6G-doped PMMA thin film is enhanced along with a 3.7-fold increase in intensity. Furthermore, the TPEF image quality of 1μm fluorescent beads sealed in agarose gel at different depths is improved. PMID:24940539

  4. The Experience of Fluid Temporality in Adaptive Lighting Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents research on the experiential qualities emerging from the performative engagement within adaptive lighting environments. Being performatively engaged in an environment, where the lighting is continuously adapting, opens an experiential position with fuid temporality, and opens...... of adaptive lighting environments through the lighting research and designs of the four authors....

  5. Temporal recalibration in vocalization induced by adaptation of delayed auditory feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants produced a single voice sound repeatedly with specific delay times of DAF (0, 66, 133 ms during three minutes to induce 'Lag Adaptation'. They then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback. We found that lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. Furthermore, we found that the temporal recalibration in vocalization can be affected by averaging delay times in the adaptation phase. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  6. Temporal adaptation enhances efficient contrast gain control on natural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Sinz

    Full Text Available Divisive normalization in primary visual cortex has been linked to adaptation to natural image statistics in accordance to Barlow's redundancy reduction hypothesis. Using recent advances in natural image modeling, we show that the previously studied static model of divisive normalization is rather inefficient in reducing local contrast correlations, but that a simple temporal contrast adaptation mechanism of the half-saturation constant can substantially increase its efficiency. Our findings reveal the experimentally observed temporal dynamics of divisive normalization to be critical for redundancy reduction.

  7. Improving temporal cognition by enhancing motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avlar, Billur; Kahn, Julia B; Jensen, Greg; Kandel, Eric R; Simpson, Eleanor H; Balsam, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    Increasing motivation can positively impact cognitive performance. Here we employed a cognitive timing task that allows us to detect changes in cognitive performance that are not influenced by general activity or arousal factors such as the speed or persistence of responding. This approach allowed us to manipulate motivation using three different methods; molecular/genetic, behavioral and pharmacological. Increased striatal D2Rs resulted in deficits in temporal discrimination. Switching off the transgene improved motivation in earlier studies, and here partially rescued the temporal discrimination deficit. To manipulate motivation behaviorally, we altered reward magnitude and found that increasing reward magnitude improved timing in control mice and partially rescued timing in the transgenic mice. Lastly, we manipulated motivation pharmacologically using a functionally selective 5-HT2C receptor ligand, SB242084, which we previously found to increase incentive motivation. SB242084 improved temporal discrimination in both control and transgenic mice. Thus, while there is a general intuitive belief that motivation can affect cognition, we here provide a direct demonstration that enhancing motivation, in a variety of ways, can be an effective strategy for enhancing temporal cognition. Understanding the interaction of motivation and cognition is of clinical significance since many psychiatric disorders are characterized by deficits in both domains. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Adaptation to Delayed Speech Feedback Induces Temporal Recalibration between Vocal Sensory and Auditory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. Participants read some sentences with specific delay times of DAF (0, 30, 75, 120 ms during three minutes to induce ‘Lag Adaptation’. After the adaptation, they then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback in producing simple voice but not speech. We found that speech production with lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  9. Temporal adaptation to audiovisual asynchrony generalizes across different sound frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi eNavarra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The human brain exhibits a highly-adaptive ability to reduce natural asynchronies between visual and auditory signals. Even though this mechanism robustly modulates the subsequent perception of sounds and visual stimuli, it is still unclear how such a temporal realignment is attained. In the present study, we investigated whether or not temporal adaptation generalizes across different sound frequencies. In a first exposure phase, participants adapted to a fixed 220-ms audiovisual asynchrony or else to synchrony for 3min. In a second phase, the participants performed simultaneity judgments (SJs regarding pairs of audiovisual stimuli that were presented at different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs and included either the same tone as in the exposure phase (a 250Hz beep, another low-pitched beep (300Hz, or a high-pitched beep (2500Hz. Temporal realignment was always observed (when comparing SJ performance after exposure to asynchrony vs. synchrony, regardless of the frequency of the sound tested. This suggests that temporal recalibration influences the audiovisual perception of sounds in a frequency non-specific manner and may imply the participation of non-primary perceptual areas of the brain that are not constrained by certain physical features such as sound frequency.

  10. A comparison between temporal and subband minimum variance adaptive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Voxen, Iben Holfort; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    for the temporal approach. The same numbers for the subband approach are 0.62 109 for the point and 1.33 109 for the cystphantom. The comparison demonstrates similar resolution but slightly lower side-lobes and higher contrast for the subband approach at the expense of increased computation time.......This paper compares the performance between temporal and subband Minimum Variance (MV) beamformers for medical ultrasound imaging. Both adaptive methods provide an optimized set of apodization weights but are implemented in the time and frequency domains respectively. Their performance is evaluated...... with simulated synthetic aperture data obtained from Field II and is quantified by the Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), the Peak-Side-Lobe level (PSL) and the contrast level. From a point phantom, a full sequence of 128 emissions with one transducer element transmitting and all 128 elements receiving each time...

  11. Quality Adaptive Video Streaming Mechanism Using the Temporal Scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunhun; Chung, Kwangsue

    In video streaming applications over the Internet, TCP-friendly rate control schemes are useful for improving network stability and inter-protocol fairness. However, they do not always guarantee a smooth video streaming. To simultaneously satisfy both the network and user requirements, video streaming applications should be quality-adaptive. In this paper, we propose a new quality adaptation mechanism to adjust the quality of congestion-controlled video stream by controlling the frame rate. Based on the current network condition, it controls the frame rate of video stream and the sending rate in a TCP-friendly manner. Through a simulation, we prove that our adaptation mechanism appropriately adjusts the quality of video stream while improving network stability.

  12. Fused Adaptive Lasso for Spatial and Temporal Quantile Function Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Quantile functions are important in characterizing the entire probability distribution of a random variable, especially when the tail of a skewed distribution is of interest. This article introduces new quantile function estimators for spatial and temporal data with a fused adaptive Lasso penalty to accommodate the dependence in space and time. This method penalizes the difference among neighboring quantiles, hence it is desirable for applications with features ordered in time or space without replicated observations. The theoretical properties are investigated and the performances of the proposed methods are evaluated by simulations. The proposed method is applied to particulate matter (PM) data from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to characterize the upper quantiles, which are crucial for studying spatial association between PM concentrations and adverse human health effects. © 2016 American Statistical Association and the American Society for Quality.

  13. Adaptive visual memory reorganization in right medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Patrícia; Santana, Isabel; Teixeira, João; Cunha, Catarina; Machado, Egídeo; Sales, Francisco; Almeida, Eduarda; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    We investigated functional reorganization mechanisms of the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) for episodic memory, in patients suffering from medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity changes during matched episodic encoding tasks of abstract words (Verbal) and line drawings (Visual), in patients with unilateral right MTLE undergoing presurgical evaluation and healthy controls. As expected, a significant interaction between material type and the side of MTL activity was present in the control group, with preferential involvement of the left hippocampus in verbal encoding and the right parahippocampal region in visual encoding. When compared with controls, right MTLE patients with intact performance activated a region in the left hippocampus more during visual encoding, which resulted in an interaction between group and hemisphere. Importantly, an effect of memory performance on visual encoding activity was observed in the patients, with greater engagement of the left MTL being associated with higher recognition scores. Interestingly, activity in the left MTL also depended on the epileptic seizure frequency, suggesting a role for this clinical parameter in the recruitment of contralateral regions. Taken together, these results indicate functional reorganization of the MTLs in right HS, through transfer of function from the right to the left hemisphere, and strongly suggest an adaptive role for such reorganization mechanism in supporting preserved visual memory.

  14. A comparison between temporal and subband minimum variance adaptive beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Voxen, Iben H.; Greenaway, Alan H.; Anderson, Tom; Jensen, Jørgen A.; Sboros, Vassilis

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares the performance between temporal and subband Minimum Variance (MV) beamformers for medical ultrasound imaging. Both adaptive methods provide an optimized set of apodization weights but are implemented in the time and frequency domains respectively. Their performance is evaluated with simulated synthetic aperture data obtained from Field II and is quantified by the Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), the Peak-Side-Lobe level (PSL) and the contrast level. From a point phantom, a full sequence of 128 emissions with one transducer element transmitting and all 128 elements receiving each time, provides a FWHM of 0.03 mm (0.14λ) for both implementations at a depth of 40 mm. This value is more than 20 times lower than the one achieved by conventional beamforming. The corresponding values of PSL are -58 dB and -63 dB for time and frequency domain MV beamformers, while a value no lower than -50 dB can be obtained from either Boxcar or Hanning weights. Interestingly, a single emission with central element #64 as the transmitting aperture provides results comparable to the full sequence. The values of FWHM are 0.04 mm and 0.03 mm and those of PSL are -42 dB and -46 dB for temporal and subband approaches. From a cyst phantom and for 128 emissions, the contrast level is calculated at -54 dB and -63 dB respectively at the same depth, with the initial shape of the cyst being preserved in contrast to conventional beamforming. The difference between the two adaptive beamformers is less significant in the case of a single emission, with the contrast level being estimated at -42 dB for the time domain and -43 dB for the frequency domain implementation. For the estimation of a single MV weight of a low resolution image formed by a single emission, 0.44 * 109 calculations per second are required for the temporal approach. The same numbers for the subband approach are 0.62 * 109 for the point and 1.33 * 109 for the cyst phantom. The comparison demonstrates similar

  15. OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing by Exploiting Spatio-Temporal Sparsity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We propose a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly-moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. We observe that the target and interference spectra are inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data and produces an equivalent performance as the other existing STAP techniques. In addition, the use of an OFDM signal increases the frequency diversity of our system, as different scattering centers of a target resonate at different frequencies, and thus improves the target detectability. First, we formulate a realistic sparse-measurement model for an OFDM radar considering both the clutter and jammer as the interfering sources. Then, we apply a residual sparse-recovery technique based on the LASSO estimator to estimate the target and interference covariance matrices, and subsequently compute the optimal STAP-filter weights. Our numerical results demonstrate a comparative performance analysis of the proposed sparse-STAP algorithm with four other existing STAP methods. Furthermore, we discover that the OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  16. Improving Flood Plain Management through Adaptive Learning ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will explore how an adaptive learning approach can improve CBO governance (transparency, equity, gender relations), generate new knowledge for improving resource sustainability and productivity, and facilitate learning and an exchange of experiences between CBOs, and between CBOs and policymakers.

  17. Sensorimotor synchronization with tempo-changing auditory sequences: Modeling temporal adaptation and anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, M C Marieke; Jacoby, Nori; Fairhurst, Merle T; Keller, Peter E

    2015-11-11

    The current study investigated the human ability to synchronize movements with event sequences containing continuous tempo changes. This capacity is evident, for example, in ensemble musicians who maintain precise interpersonal coordination while modulating the performance tempo for expressive purposes. Here we tested an ADaptation and Anticipation Model (ADAM) that was developed to account for such behavior by combining error correction processes (adaptation) with a predictive temporal extrapolation process (anticipation). While previous computational models of synchronization incorporate error correction, they do not account for prediction during tempo-changing behavior. The fit between behavioral data and computer simulations based on four versions of ADAM was assessed. These versions included a model with adaptation only, one in which adaptation and anticipation act in combination (error correction is applied on the basis of predicted tempo changes), and two models in which adaptation and anticipation were linked in a joint module that corrects for predicted discrepancies between the outcomes of adaptive and anticipatory processes. The behavioral experiment required participants to tap their finger in time with three auditory pacing sequences containing tempo changes that differed in the rate of change and the number of turning points. Behavioral results indicated that sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and precision, while generally high, decreased with increases in the rate of tempo change and number of turning points. Simulations and model-based parameter estimates showed that adaptation mechanisms alone could not fully explain the observed precision of sensorimotor synchronization. Including anticipation in the model increased the precision of simulated sensorimotor synchronization and improved the fit of model to behavioral data, especially when adaptation and anticipation mechanisms were linked via a joint module based on the notion of joint internal

  18. Spatio-Temporal Video Object Segmentation via Scale-Adaptive 3D Structure Tensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yun Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To address multiple motions and deformable objects' motions encountered in existing region-based approaches, an automatic video object (VO segmentation methodology is proposed in this paper by exploiting the duality of image segmentation and motion estimation such that spatial and temporal information could assist each other to jointly yield much improved segmentation results. The key novelties of our method are (1 scale-adaptive tensor computation, (2 spatial-constrained motion mask generation without invoking dense motion-field computation, (3 rigidity analysis, (4 motion mask generation and selection, and (5 motion-constrained spatial region merging. Experimental results demonstrate that these novelties jointly contribute much more accurate VO segmentation both in spatial and temporal domains.

  19. Adaptive OFDM Waveform Design for Spatio-Temporal-Sparsity Exploited STAP Radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL

    2017-11-01

    In this chapter, we describe a sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP) algorithm to detect a slowly moving target using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar. The motivation of employing an OFDM signal is that it improves the target-detectability from the interfering signals by increasing the frequency diversity of the system. However, due to the addition of one extra dimension in terms of frequency, the adaptive degrees-of-freedom in an OFDM-STAP also increases. Therefore, to avoid the construction a fully adaptive OFDM-STAP, we develop a sparsity-based STAP algorithm. We observe that the interference spectrum is inherently sparse in the spatio-temporal domain, as the clutter responses occupy only a diagonal ridge on the spatio-temporal plane and the jammer signals interfere only from a few spatial directions. Hence, we exploit that sparsity to develop an efficient STAP technique that utilizes considerably lesser number of secondary data compared to the other existing STAP techniques, and produces nearly optimum STAP performance. In addition to designing the STAP filter, we optimally design the transmit OFDM signals by maximizing the output signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) in order to improve the STAP performance. The computation of output SINR depends on the estimated value of the interference covariance matrix, which we obtain by applying the sparse recovery algorithm. Therefore, we analytically assess the effects of the synthesized OFDM coefficients on the sparse recovery of the interference covariance matrix by computing the coherence measure of the sparse measurement matrix. Our numerical examples demonstrate the achieved STAP-performance due to sparsity-based technique and adaptive waveform design.

  20. Adapting to Climate Change through Improved Watershed ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Adapting to Climate Change through Improved Watershed Management and Payment for Environmental Services in Morocco's Tensift Basin ... Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and ...

  1. An efficient content-adaptive motion-compensated 3-D DWT with enhanced spatial and temporal scalability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrseresht, Nagita; Taubman, David

    2006-06-01

    We propose a novel, content adaptive method for motion-compensated three-dimensional wavelet transformation (MC 3-D DWT) of video. The proposed method overcomes problems of ghosting and nonaligned aliasing artifacts which can arise in regions of motion model failure, when the video is reconstructed at reduced temporal or spatial resolutions. Previous MC 3-D DWT structures either take the form of MC temporal DWT followed by a spatial transform ("t+2D"), or perform the spatial transform first ("2D + t"), limiting the spatial frequencies which can be jointly compensated in the temporal transform, and hence limiting the compression efficiency. When the motion model fails, the "t + 2D" structure causes nonaligned aliasing artifacts in reduced spatial resolution sequences. Essentially, the proposed transform continuously adapts itself between the "t + 2D" and "2D + t" structures, based on information available within the compressed bit stream. Ghosting artifacts may also appear in reduced frame-rate sequences due to temporal low-pass filtering along invalid motion trajectories. To avoid the ghosting artifacts, we continuously select between different low-pass temporal filters, based on the estimated accuracy of the motion model. Experimental results indicate that the proposed adaptive transform preserves high compression efficiency while substantially improving the quality of reduced spatial and temporal resolution sequences.

  2. Temporally stable adaptation is robust, specific and incomplete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, K.; Overvliet, K.E.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation, the process that reduces movement errors by learning from sensory feedback, is often studied within a session of about half an hour. Within such a single session, adaptation generally reaches plateau before errors are completely removed. However, adaptation may complete on

  3. Assessing the Resolution Adaptability of the Zhang-McFarlane Cumulus Parameterization With Spatial and Temporal Averaging: RESOLUTION ADAPTABILITY OF ZM SCHEME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yuxing [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Fan, Jiwen [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xiao, Heng [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Zhang, Guang J. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego CA USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton VA USA; Ma, Po-Lun [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Gustafson, William I. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2017-11-01

    Realistic modeling of cumulus convection at fine model resolutions (a few to a few tens of km) is problematic since it requires the cumulus scheme to adapt to higher resolution than they were originally designed for (~100 km). To solve this problem, we implement the spatial averaging method proposed in Xiao et al. (2015) and also propose a temporal averaging method for the large-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) tendency in the Zhang-McFarlane (ZM) cumulus parameterization. The resolution adaptability of the original ZM scheme, the scheme with spatial averaging, and the scheme with both spatial and temporal averaging at 4-32 km resolution is assessed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, by comparing with Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) results. We find that the original ZM scheme has very poor resolution adaptability, with sub-grid convective transport and precipitation increasing significantly as the resolution increases. The spatial averaging method improves the resolution adaptability of the ZM scheme and better conserves the total transport of moist static energy and total precipitation. With the temporal averaging method, the resolution adaptability of the scheme is further improved, with sub-grid convective precipitation becoming smaller than resolved precipitation for resolution higher than 8 km, which is consistent with the results from the CRM simulation. Both the spatial distribution and time series of precipitation are improved with the spatial and temporal averaging methods. The results may be helpful for developing resolution adaptability for other cumulus parameterizations that are based on quasi-equilibrium assumption.

  4. Environmental Adaptations Improve Everyday Action in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Rachel K; Rhodes, Emma; Giovannetti, Tania

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive functioning, particularly executive functioning, is a strong predictor of functional outcomes in people with schizophrenia. Cognitive remediation has been shown to improve specific cognitive processes, but adjunctive interventions are required for meaningful gains in adaptive functioning, particularly in people with chronic illness. This study examined whether (and how) environmental adaptations, used without training, may circumvent cognitive difficulties and facilitate everyday task performance in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Forty-two individuals with chronic schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder were administered cognitive measures and two versions of the Naturalistic Action Test (NAT)-a standard version (ST-NAT), and a user-centered version (UC-NAT) that incorporated environmental adaptations designed to facilitate task performance. The NAT conditions were counterbalanced across participants. Analyses compared performance between the NAT versions and examined the cognitive correlates of each NAT condition. Individuals with schizophrenia made fewer errors on the UC-NAT as compared to the ST-NAT; this between-group difference was significant for all error types. Compared to the ST-NAT, the UC-NAT performance was not significantly associated with an executive function measure of planning. Environmental adaptations may be implemented without extensive training to improve everyday action in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Environmental adaptations that reduce planning demands may be most effective in this population.

  5. Temporal partitioning of adaptive responses of the murine heart to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rachel A; Collins, Helen E; Berry, Ryan D; Brahma, Manoja K; Tirado, Brian A; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; Stanley, Haley L; Wende, Adam R; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Rajasekaran, Namakkal Soorappan; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua; Frank, Stuart J; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2018-01-30

    Recent studies suggest that the time of day at which food is consumed dramatically influences clinically-relevant cardiometabolic parameters (e.g., adiposity, insulin sensitivity, and cardiac function). Meal feeding benefits may be the result of daily periods of feeding and/or fasting, highlighting the need for improved understanding of the temporal adaptation of cardiometabolic tissues (e.g., heart) to fasting. Such studies may provide mechanistic insight regarding how time-of-day-dependent feeding/fasting cycles influence cardiac function. We hypothesized that fasting during the sleep period elicits beneficial adaptation of the heart at transcriptional, translational, and metabolic levels. To test this hypothesis, temporal adaptation was investigated in wild-type mice fasted for 24-h, or for either the 12-h light/sleep phase or the 12-h dark/awake phase. Fasting maximally induced fatty acid responsive genes (e.g., Pdk4) during the dark/active phase; transcriptional changes were mirrored at translational (e.g., PDK4) and metabolic flux (e.g., glucose/oleate oxidation) levels. Similarly, maximal repression of myocardial p-mTOR and protein synthesis rates occurred during the dark phase; both parameters remained elevated in the heart of fasted mice during the light phase. In contrast, markers of autophagy (e.g., LC3II) exhibited peak responses to fasting during the light phase. Collectively, these data show that responsiveness of the heart to fasting is temporally partitioned. Autophagy peaks during the light/sleep phase, while repression of glucose utilization and protein synthesis is maximized during the dark/active phase. We speculate that sleep phase fasting may benefit cardiac function through augmentation of protein/cellular constituent turnover. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Realigning thunder and lightning: temporal adaptation to spatiotemporally distant events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Navarra

    Full Text Available The brain is able to realign asynchronous signals that approximately coincide in both space and time. Given that many experience-based links between visual and auditory stimuli are established in the absence of spatiotemporal proximity, we investigated whether or not temporal realignment arises in these conditions. Participants received a 3-min exposure to visual and auditory stimuli that were separated by 706 ms and appeared either from the same (Experiment 1 or from different spatial positions (Experiment 2. A simultaneity judgment task (SJ was administered right afterwards. Temporal realignment between vision and audition was observed, in both Experiment 1 and 2, when comparing the participants' SJs after this exposure phase with those obtained after a baseline exposure to audiovisual synchrony. However, this effect was present only when the visual stimuli preceded the auditory stimuli during the exposure to asynchrony. A similar pattern of results (temporal realignment after exposure to visual-leading asynchrony but not after exposure to auditory-leading asynchrony was obtained using temporal order judgments (TOJs instead of SJs (Experiment 3. Taken together, these results suggest that temporal recalibration still occurs for visual and auditory stimuli that fall clearly outside the so-called temporal window for multisensory integration and appear from different spatial positions. This temporal realignment may be modulated by long-term experience with the kind of asynchrony (vision-leading that we most frequently encounter in the outside world (e.g., while perceiving distant events.

  7. An Adaptive Tutor for Improving Visual Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0797 TITLE: An Adaptive Tutor for Improving Visual Diagnosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Martin V. Pusic, MD RECIPIENT... Visual Diagnosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0797 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin V. Pusic – NYUSoM; David...for visual diagnosis can transcend institutional barriers to enable broad distribution of learning material. However, most current examples are based

  8. Improved LMS algorithm for adaptive beamforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godara, Lal C.

    1990-01-01

    Two adaptive algorithms which make use of all the available samples to estimate the required gradient are proposed and studied. The first algorithm is referred to as the recursive LMS (least mean squares) and is applicable to a general array. The second algorithm is referred to as the improved LMS algorithm and exploits the Toeplitz structure of the ACM (array correlation matrix); it can be used only for an equispaced linear array.

  9. Understanding Homophily and More-Becomes-More Through Adaptive Temporal-Causal Network Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukel, Sven van den; Goos, Simon; Treur, J.; De la Prieta, F

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the use of adaptive temporal-causal networks to model and simulate the development of mutually interacting opinion states and connections between individuals in social networks. The focus is on adaptive networks combining the homophily principle with the more becomes more

  10. Flicker Adaptation of Low-Level Cortical Visual Neurons Contributes to Temporal Dilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Laura; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Several seconds of adaptation to a flickered stimulus causes a subsequent brief static stimulus to appear longer in duration. Nonsensory factors, such as increased arousal and attention, have been thought to mediate this flicker-based temporal-dilation aftereffect. In this study, we provide evidence that adaptation of low-level cortical visual…

  11. Improvement of Adaptive Cruise Control Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagami Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Adaptive Cruise Control system (ACC, a system which reduces the driving burden on the driver. The ACC system primarily supports four driving modes on the road and controls the acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle in order to maintain a set speed or to avoid a crash. This paper proposes more accurate methods of detecting the preceding vehicle by radar while cornering, with consideration for the vehicle sideslip angle, and also of controlling the distance between vehicles. By making full use of the proposed identification logic for preceding vehicles and path estimation logic, an improvement in driving stability was achieved.

  12. Auditory adaptation improves tactile frequency perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crommett, L.E.; Pérez Bellido, A.; Yau, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Our ability to process temporal frequency information by touch underlies our capacity to perceive and discriminate surface textures. Auditory signals, which also provide extensive temporal frequency information, can systematically alter the perception of vibrations on the hand. How auditory signals

  13. Dim small targets detection based on self-adaptive caliber temporal-spatial filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiangsuo; Xu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianlin; Huang, Yongmei; Peng, Zhenming

    2017-09-01

    To boost the detect ability of dim small targets, this paper began by using improved anisotropy for background prediction (IABP), followed by target enhancement by improved high-order cumulates (HQS). Finally, on the basis of image pre-processing, to address the problem of missed and wrong detection caused by fixed caliber of traditional pipeline filtering, this paper used targets' multi-frame movement correlation in the time-space domain, combined with the scale-space theory, to propose a temporal-spatial filtering algorithm which allows the caliber to make self-adaptive changes according to the changes of the targets' scale, effectively solving the detection-related issues brought by unchanged caliber and decreased/increased size of the targets. Experiments showed that the improved anisotropic background predication could be loyal to the true background of the original image to the maximum extent, presenting a superior overall performance to other background prediction methods; the improved HQS significantly increased the signal-noise ratio of images; when the signal-noise ratio was lower than 2.6 dB, this detection algorithm could effectively eliminate noise and detect targets. For the algorithm, the lowest signal-to-noise ratio of the detectable target is 0.37.

  14. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback induces the temporal recalibration effect in both speech perception and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawabata, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    We ordinarily speak fluently, even though our perceptions of our own voices are disrupted by various environmental acoustic properties. The underlying mechanism of speech is supposed to monitor the temporal relationship between speech production and the perception of auditory feedback, as suggested by a reduction in speech fluency when the speaker is exposed to delayed auditory feedback (DAF). While many studies have reported that DAF influences speech motor processing, its relationship to the temporal tuning effect on multimodal integration, or temporal recalibration, remains unclear. We investigated whether the temporal aspects of both speech perception and production change due to adaptation to the delay between the motor sensation and the auditory feedback. This is a well-used method of inducing temporal recalibration. Participants continually read texts with specific DAF times in order to adapt to the delay. Then, they judged the simultaneity between the motor sensation and the vocal feedback. We measured the rates of speech with which participants read the texts in both the exposure and re-exposure phases. We found that exposure to DAF changed both the rate of speech and the simultaneity judgment, that is, participants' speech gained fluency. Although we also found that a delay of 200 ms appeared to be most effective in decreasing the rates of speech and shifting the distribution on the simultaneity judgment, there was no correlation between these measurements. These findings suggest that both speech motor production and multimodal perception are adaptive to temporal lag but are processed in distinct ways.

  15. Solving viscoelastic problems by combining SBFEM and a temporally piecewise adaptive algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yiqian; Yang, Haitian

    2017-08-01

    A combination of the scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM) with a temporally piecewise adaptive algorithm is exploited to solve viscoelastic problems. By expanding variables at a discretized time interval, a coupled spatial-temporal problem is decoupled into a series of recursive spatial problems, which are solved by SBFEM, and a piecewise adaptive process in the time domain is realized via the change of expansion powers. Numerical verification, including the cases involving stress singularity, infinite domain, and inhomogeneous medium, are provided in comparison with analytical or ABAQUS-based solutions.

  16. Improving the human-computer dialogue with increased temporal predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Florian; Haering, Carola; Thomaschke, Roland

    2013-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the impacts of length and variability of system response time (SRT) on user behavior and user experience (UX) in sequential computing tasks. Length is widely considered to be the most important aspect of SRTs in human-computer interaction. Research on temporal attention shows that humans adjust to temporal structures and that performance substantially improves with temporal predictability. Participants performed a sequential task with simulated office software. Duration and variability, that is, the number of different SRTs, was manipulated. Lower variability came at the expense of on average higher durations. User response times, task execution times, and failure rates were measured to assess user performance. UX was measured with a questionnaire. A reduction in variability improved user performance significantly. Whereas task load and failure rates remained constant, responses were significantly faster. Although a reduction in variability came along with, on average, increased SRTs, no difference in UX was found. Considering SRT variability when designing software can yield considerable performance benefits for the users. Although reduced variability comes at the expense of overall longer SRTs, the interface is not subjectively evaluated to be less satisfactory or demanding. Time design should aim not only at reducing average SRT length but also at finding the optimum balance of length and variability. Our findings can easily be applied in any user interface for sequential tasks. User performance can be improved without loss of satisfaction by selectively prolonging particular SRTs to reduce variability.

  17. Improved neonatal seizure detection using adaptive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, A H; Cherian, P J; Caicedo, A; De Vos, M; Naulaers, G; Van Huffel, S

    2017-07-01

    In neonatal intensive care units performing continuous EEG monitoring, there is an unmet need for around-the-clock interpretation of EEG, especially for recognizing seizures. In recent years, a few automated seizure detection algorithms have been proposed. However, these are suboptimal in detecting brief-duration seizures (<; 30s), which frequently occur in neonates with severe neurological problems. Recently, a multi-stage neonatal seizure detector, composed of a heuristic and a data-driven classifier was proposed by our group and showed improved detection of brief seizures. In the present work, we propose to add a third stage to the detector in order to use feedback of the Clinical Neurophysiologist and adaptively retune a threshold of the second stage to improve the performance of detection of brief seizures. As a result, the false alarm rate (FAR) of the brief seizure detections decreased by 50% and the positive predictive value (PPV) increased by 18%. At the same time, for all detections, the FAR decreased by 35% and PPV increased by 5% while the good detection rate remained unchanged.

  18. High temporal resolution aberrometry in a 50-eye population and implications for adaptive optics error budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Jessica; Mecê, Pedro; Conan, Jean-Marc; Petit, Cyril; Paques, Michel; Meimon, Serge

    2017-04-01

    We formed a database gathering the wavefront aberrations of 50 healthy eyes measured with an original custom-built Shack-Hartmann aberrometer at a temporal frequency of 236 Hz, with 22 lenslets across a 7-mm diameter pupil, for a duration of 20 s. With this database, we draw statistics on the spatial and temporal behavior of the dynamic aberrations of the eye. Dynamic aberrations were studied on a 5-mm diameter pupil and on a 3.4 s sequence between blinks. We noted that, on average, temporal wavefront variance exhibits a n -2 power-law with radial order n and temporal spectra follow a f -1.5 power-law with temporal frequency f . From these statistics, we then extract guidelines for designing an adaptive optics system. For instance, we show the residual wavefront error evolution as a function of the number of corrected modes and of the adaptive optics loop frame rate. In particular, we infer that adaptive optics performance rapidly increases with the loop frequency up to 50 Hz, with gain being more limited at higher rates.

  19. An Adaptive Temporal-Causal Network Model for Enabling Learning of Social Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commu, Charlotte; Theelen, Mathilde; Treur, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an adaptive temporal-causal network model is present-ed for learning of basic skills for social interaction. It focuses on greeting a known person and how that relates to learning how to recognize a person from seeing his or her face. The model involves a Hebbian learning process. The

  20. Improvements to the adaptive maneuvering logic program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, George H.

    1986-01-01

    The Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) computer program simulates close-in, one-on-one air-to-air combat between two fighter aircraft. Three important improvements are described. First, the previously available versions of AML were examined for their suitability as a baseline program. The selected program was then revised to eliminate some programming bugs which were uncovered over the years. A listing of this baseline program is included. Second, the equations governing the motion of the aircraft were completely revised. This resulted in a model with substantially higher fidelity than the original equations of motion provided. It also completely eliminated the over-the-top problem, which occurred in the older versions when the AML-driven aircraft attempted a vertical or near vertical loop. Third, the requirements for a versatile generic, yet realistic, aircraft model were studied and implemented in the program. The report contains detailed tables which make the generic aircraft to be either a modern, high performance aircraft, an older high performance aircraft, or a previous generation jet fighter.

  1. Recurrent coupling improves discrimination of temporal spike patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei eYuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ubiquitous presence of recurrent synaptic connections insensory neuronal systems, their general functional purpose is not wellunderstood. A recent conceptual advance has been achieved by theoriesof reservoir computing in which recurrent networks have been proposedto generate short-term memory as well as to improve neuronalrepresentation of the sensory input for subsequent computations.Here, we present a numerical study on the distinct effects ofinhibitory and excitatory recurrence in a canonical linearclassification task. It is found that both types of coupling improvethe ability to discriminate temporal spike patterns as compared to apurely feed-forward system, although in different ways. For a largeclass of inhibitory networks, the network's performance is optimal aslong as a fraction of roughly 50% of neurons per stimulus is activein the resulting population code. Thereby the contribution of inactiveneurons to the neural code is found to be even more informative thanthat of the active neurons, generating an inherent robustness ofclassification performance against temporal jitter of the inputspikes. Excitatory couplings are found to not only produce ashort-term memory buffer but also to improve linear separability ofthe population patterns by evoking more irregular firing as comparedto the purely inhibitory case. As the excitatory connectivity becomesmore sparse, firing becomes more variable and pattern separabilityimproves. We argue that the proposed paradigm is particularlywell-suited as a conceptual framework for processing of sensoryinformation in the auditory pathway.

  2. Adaptive Quantum State Tomography Improves Accuracy Quadratically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, D. H.; Rozema, Lee A.; Darabi, Ardavan; Ferrie, Christopher; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Steinberg, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a simple protocol for adaptive quantum state tomography, which reduces the worst-case infidelity [1-F(ρ^,ρ)] between the estimate and the true state from O(1/N) to O(1/N). It uses a single adaptation step and just one extra measurement setting. In a linear optical qubit experiment, we demonstrate a full order of magnitude reduction in infidelity (from 0.1% to 0.01%) for a modest number of samples (N≈3×104).

  3. Large spatial, temporal, and algorithmic adaptivity for implicit nonlinear finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, B.E.; Whirley, R.G.

    1992-07-30

    The development of effective solution strategies to solve the global nonlinear equations which arise in implicit finite element analysis has been the subject of much research in recent years. Robust algorithms are needed to handle the complex nonlinearities that arise in many implicit finite element applications such as metalforming process simulation. The authors experience indicates that robustness can best be achieved through adaptive solution strategies. In the course of their research, this adaptivity and flexibility has been refined into a production tool through the development of a solution control language called ISLAND. This paper discusses aspects of adaptive solution strategies including iterative procedures to solve the global equations and remeshing techniques to extend the domain of Lagrangian methods. Examples using the newly developed ISLAND language are presented to illustrate the advantages of embedding temporal, algorithmic, and spatial adaptivity in a modem implicit nonlinear finite element analysis code.

  4. Video Enhancement Using Adaptive Spatio-Temporal Connective Filter and Piecewise Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Qiang Yang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel video enhancement system based on an adaptive spatio-temporal connective (ASTC noise filter and an adaptive piecewise mapping function (APMF. For ill-exposed videos or those with much noise, we first introduce a novel local image statistic to identify impulse noise pixels, and then incorporate it into the classical bilateral filter to form ASTC, aiming to reduce the mixture of the most two common types of noises—Gaussian and impulse noises in spatial and temporal directions. After noise removal, we enhance the video contrast with APMF based on the statistical information of frame segmentation results. The experiment results demonstrate that, for diverse low-quality videos corrupted by mixed noise, underexposure, overexposure, or any mixture of the above, the proposed system can automatically produce satisfactory results.

  5. Video Enhancement Using Adaptive Spatio-Temporal Connective Filter and Piecewise Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel video enhancement system based on an adaptive spatio-temporal connective (ASTC noise filter and an adaptive piecewise mapping function (APMF. For ill-exposed videos or those with much noise, we first introduce a novel local image statistic to identify impulse noise pixels, and then incorporate it into the classical bilateral filter to form ASTC, aiming to reduce the mixture of the most two common types of noises—Gaussian and impulse noises in spatial and temporal directions. After noise removal, we enhance the video contrast with APMF based on the statistical information of frame segmentation results. The experiment results demonstrate that, for diverse low-quality videos corrupted by mixed noise, underexposure, overexposure, or any mixture of the above, the proposed system can automatically produce satisfactory results.

  6. Adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient calculation for temporal networks (applied to a real-world pig trade network).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The average topological overlap of two graphs of two consecutive time steps measures the amount of changes in the edge configuration between the two snapshots. This value has to be zero if the edge configuration changes completely and one if the two consecutive graphs are identical. Current methods depend on the number of nodes in the network or on the maximal number of connected nodes in the consecutive time steps. In the first case, this methodology breaks down if there are nodes with no edges. In the second case, it fails if the maximal number of active nodes is larger than the maximal number of connected nodes. In the following, an adaption of the calculation of the temporal correlation coefficient and of the topological overlap of the graph between two consecutive time steps is presented, which shows the expected behaviour mentioned above. The newly proposed adaption uses the maximal number of active nodes, i.e. the number of nodes with at least one edge, for the calculation of the topological overlap. The three methods were compared with the help of vivid example networks to reveal the differences between the proposed notations. Furthermore, these three calculation methods were applied to a real-world network of animal movements in order to detect influences of the network structure on the outcome of the different methods.

  7. Lamotrigine improves aggression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroko; Fukatsu, Naofumi; Noguchi, Takahiro; Oshima, Tomohiro; Tadokoro, Yukari; Kanemoto, Kousuke

    2011-06-01

    Aggression in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) may have phenomenological and neurobiological heterogeneity. In the present study, we targeted patients with TLE who showed aggression and evaluated the effects of lamotrigine on this symptom using the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BAQ), which is based on a four-factor model that includes Physical Aggression, Verbal Aggression, Anger, and Hostility. As compared with the healthy control subjects (n=115), patients with TLE (n=21) had significantly higher BAQ Total, Physical Aggression, Anger, and Hostility scores. Ten weeks after initiation of lamotrigine, the BAQ Total and Anger scores of the patients with TLE were significantly improved. However, the patients with TLE in this study did not exhibit depressive symptoms. Our results suggest that lamotrigine mitigates aggression, especially anger, which represents the emotional factor of aggression in the BAQ. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Improving WCDMA netwotk capacity using adaptive sectorisation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A major problem affecting the capacity of Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) is interference. This work focuses on reducing co-channel interference problem by the application of adaptive sectorisation in nonuniform traffic. It considers an isolated areas of congested traffic called Hot Spots (HS).

  9. An Adaptive Middleware for Improved Computational Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lars Frydendal

    The performance improvements in computer systems over the past 60 years have been fueled by an exponential increase in energy efficiency. In recent years, the phenomenon known as the end of Dennard’s scaling has slowed energy efficiency improvements — but improving computer energy efficiency...... is more important now than ever. Traditionally, most improvements in computer energy efficiency have come from improvements in lithography — the ability to produce smaller transistors — and computer architecture - the ability to apply those transistors efficiently. Since the end of scaling, we have seen....... In this thesis we champion using software to improve energy efficiency — in particular we develop guidelines for reasoning and evaluating software performance on modern computers, and a middleware that has been designed for modern computers, improving computational performance both in terms of energy...

  10. Verbal and spatial learning after temporal lobe excisions in children: an adaptation of the Grober and Buschke procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leunen, Dorothée; Caroff, Xavier; Chmura, Sabrina; Fohlen, Martine; Delalande, Olivier; Jambaqué, Isabelle

    2009-11-01

    Using an adaptation of Grober and Buschke's procedure, we assessed verbal and visuospatial learning abilities in 16 children after left or right anteromesial temporal resection and 16 healthy controls to evaluate material-specific memory deficits. All children had relatively well-preserved verbal and spatial learning capacities after unilateral temporal resection. Children who had left temporal resection showed impaired verbal memory performance despite semantic control by cued recall. No memory deficits with visual material were detected in children who underwent right anteromesial temporal resection. Grober and Buschke's procedure appears relevant for the detection of verbal memory disorders in children with left-sided temporal resection.

  11. Adaptive Landing Gear: Optimum Control Strategy and Potential for Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Mikułowski; Łukasz Jankowski

    2009-01-01

    An adaptive landing gear is a landing gear (LG) capable of active adaptation to particular landing conditions by means of controlled hydraulic force. The objective of the adaptive control is to mitigate the peak force transferred to the aircraft structure during touch-down, and thus to limit the structural fatigue factor. This paper investigates the ultimate limits for improvement due to various strategies of active control. Five strategies are proposed and investigated numerically using a~va...

  12. Adaptive Intelligent Support to Improve Peer Tutoring in Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Erin; Rummel, Nikol; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive collaborative learning support (ACLS) involves collaborative learning environments that adapt their characteristics, and sometimes provide intelligent hints and feedback, to improve individual students' collaborative interactions. ACLS often involves a system that can automatically assess student dialogue, model effective and…

  13. A Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Markov Model for Improved Flood Mapping Using Multi-Temporal X-Band SAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Twele

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, a hybrid multi-contextual Markov model for unsupervised near real-time flood detection in multi-temporal X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR data is presented. It incorporates scale-dependent, as well as spatio-temporal contextual information, into the classification scheme, by combining hierarchical marginal posterior mode (HMPM estimation on directed graphs with noncausal Markov image modeling related to planar Markov random fields (MRFs. In order to increase computational performance, marginal posterior-based entropies are used for restricting the iterative bi-directional exchange of spatio-temporal information between consecutive images of a time sequence to objects exhibiting a low probability, to be classified correctly according to the HMPM estimation. The Markov models, originally developed for inference on regular graph structures of quadtrees and planar lattices, are adapted to the variable nature of irregular graphs, which are related to information driven image segmentation. Entropy based confidence maps, combined with spatio-temporal relationships of potentially inundated bright scattering vegetation to open water areas, are used for the quantification of the uncertainty in the labeling of each image element in flood possibility masks. With respect to accuracy and computational effort, experiments performed on a bi-temporal TerraSAR-X ScanSAR data-set from the Caprivi region of Namibia during flooding in 2009 and 2010 confirm the effectiveness of integrating hierarchical as well as spatio-temporal context into the labeling process, and of adapting the models to irregular graph structures.

  14. Recognition Memory is Improved by a Structured Temporal Framework During Encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavabalasingam, Sathesan; O'Neil, Edward B; Zeng, Zheng; Lee, Andy C H

    2015-01-01

    In order to function optimally within our environment, we continuously extract temporal patterns from our experiences and formulate expectations that facilitate adaptive behavior. Given that our memories are embedded within spatiotemporal contexts, an intriguing possibility is that mnemonic processes are sensitive to the temporal structure of events. To test this hypothesis, in a series of behavioral experiments we manipulated the regularity of interval durations at encoding to create temporally structured and unstructured frameworks. Our findings revealed enhanced recognition memory (d') for stimuli that were explicitly encoded within a temporally structured vs. unstructured framework. Encoding information within a temporally structured framework was also associated with a reduction in the negative effects of proactive interference and was linked to greater recollective recognition memory. Furthermore, rhythmic temporal structure was found to enhance recognition memory for incidentally encoded information. Collectively, these results support the possibility that we possess a greater capacity to learn and subsequently remember temporally structured information.

  15. Recognition memory is improved by a structured temporal framework during encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathesan eThavabalasingam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to function optimally within our environment, we continuously extract temporal patterns from our experiences and formulate expectations that facilitate adaptive behavior. Given that our memories are embedded within spatiotemporal contexts, an intriguing possibility is that mnemonic processes are sensitive to the temporal structure of events. To test this hypothesis, in a series of behavioral experiments we manipulated the regularity of interval durations at encoding to create temporally structured and unstructured frameworks. Our findings revealed enhanced recognition memory (d’ for stimuli that were explicitly encoded within a temporally structured versus unstructured framework. Encoding information within a temporally structured framework was also associated with a reduction in the negative effects of proactive interference and was linked to greater recollective recognition memory. Furthermore, rhythmic temporal structure was found to enhance recognition memory for incidentally encoded information. Collectively, these results support the possibility that we possess a greater capacity to learn and subsequently remember temporally structured information.

  16. A phantom study on temporal and subband Minimum Variance adaptive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Voxen, Iben Holfort; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares experimentally temporal and subband implementations of the Minimum Variance (MV) adaptive beamformer for medical ultrasound imaging. The performance of the two approaches is tested by comparing wire phantom measurements, obtained by the research ultrasound scanner SARUS. A 7 MHz...... BK8804 linear transducer was used to scan a wire phantom in which wires are separated by 10 mm. Performance is then evaluated by the lateral Full-Width-Half-Maximum (FWHM), the Peak Sidelobe Level (PSL), and the computational load. Beamformed single emission responses are also compared with those...

  17. Adaptive Filtering Queueing for Improving Fairness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Pin Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a scalable and efficient Active Queue Management (AQM scheme to provide fair bandwidth sharing when traffic is congested dubbed Adaptive Filtering Queueing (AFQ. First, AFQ identifies the filtering level of an arriving packet by comparing it with a flow label selected at random from the first level to an estimated level in the filtering level table. Based on the accepted traffic estimation and the previous fair filtering level, AFQ updates the fair filtering level. Next, AFQ uses a simple packet-dropping algorithm to determine whether arriving packets are accepted or discarded. To enhance AFQ’s feasibility in high-speed networks, we propose a two-layer mapping mechanism to effectively simplify the packet comparison operations. Simulation results demonstrate that AFQ achieves optimal fairness when compared with Rotating Preference Queues (RPQ, Core-Stateless Fair Queueing (CSFQ, CHOose and Keep for responsive flows, CHOose and Kill for unresponsive flows (CHOKe and First-In First-Out (FIFO schemes under a variety of traffic conditions.

  18. Modeling astronomical adaptive optics performance with temporally filtered Wiener reconstruction of slope data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Carlos M; Bond, Charlotte Z; Sauvage, Jean-François; Fusco, Thierry; Conan, Rodolphe; Wizinowich, Peter L

    2017-10-01

    We build on a long-standing tradition in astronomical adaptive optics (AO) of specifying performance metrics and error budgets using linear systems modeling in the spatial-frequency domain. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive tool for the calculation of error budgets in terms of residual temporally filtered phase power spectral densities and variances. In addition, the fast simulation of AO-corrected point spread functions (PSFs) provided by this method can be used as inputs for simulations of science observations with next-generation instruments and telescopes, in particular to predict post-coronagraphic contrast improvements for planet finder systems. We extend the previous results presented in Correia and Teixeira [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A31, 2763 (2014)JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.31.002763] to the closed-loop case with predictive controllers and generalize the analytical modeling of Rigaut et al. [Proc. SPIE3353, 1038 (1998)PSISDG0277-786X10.1117/12.321649], Flicker [Technical Report (W. M. Keck Observatory, 2007)], and Jolissaint [J. Eur. Opt. Soc.5, 10055 (2010)1990-257310.2971/jeos.2010.10055]. We follow closely the developments of Ellerbroek [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 310 (2005)JOAOD60740-323210.1364/JOSAA.22.000310] and propose the synthesis of a distributed Kalman filter to mitigate both aniso-servo-lag and aliasing errors while minimizing the overall residual variance. We discuss applications to (i) analytic AO-corrected PSF modeling in the spatial-frequency domain, (ii) post-coronagraphic contrast enhancement, (iii) filter optimization for real-time wavefront reconstruction, and (iv) PSF reconstruction from system telemetry. Under perfect knowledge of wind velocities, we show that ∼60  nm rms error reduction can be achieved with the distributed Kalman filter embodying antialiasing reconstructors on 10 m class high-order AO systems, leading to contrast improvement factors of up to three orders of magnitude at few λ/D separations (∼1-5λ/D) for a

  19. Temporal Scalability through Adaptive -Band Filter Banks for Robust H.264/MPEG-4 AVC Video Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents different structures that use adaptive -band hierarchical filter banks for temporal scalability. Open-loop and closed-loop configurations are introduced and illustrated using existing video codecs. In particular, it is shown that the H.264/MPEG-4 AVC codec allows us to introduce scalability by frame shuffling operations, thus keeping backward compatibility with the standard. The large set of shuffling patterns introduced here can be exploited to adapt the encoding process to the video content features, as well as to the user equipment and transmission channel characteristics. Furthermore, simulation results show that this scalability is obtained with no degradation in terms of subjective and objective quality in error-free environments, while in error-prone channels the scalable versions provide increased robustness.

  20. Quality circles: Organizational adaptations, improvements and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorich, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effective application in industry and government of quality circles work was demonstrated. The results achieved in quality and productivity improvements and cost savings are impressive. The circle process should be institutionalized within industry and government. The stages of circle program growth, innovations that help achieve circle process institutionalization, and the result achieved at Martin Marietta's Michoud Division and within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are addressed.

  1. Microgeographical population structure and adaptation in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua: spatio-temporal insights from gene-associated DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Aagaard; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Loeschcke, V.

    2011-01-01

    populations, indicating long-term temporal adaptive stability driven by strong local selection. In an environmentally dynamic area, on the other hand, patterns of genetic structuring were more variable. Overall, our results not only suggest separation of populations under both evolutionary and ecological...... paradigms, but also illustrate the usefulness of the spatio-temporal approach for making inferences about the dynamics and geographical distribution of adaptive genetic variation in natural populations.......Recent technical advances have stimulated studies on spatial scales of adaptive genetic variation in marine fishes. However, very few studies have combined spatial and temporal sampling to investigate adaptive genetic structuring at local and microgeographical scales, i.e. scales at which neutral...

  2. Optic flow improves adaptability of spatiotemporal characteristics during split-belt locomotor adaptation with tactile stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikema, Diderik Jan A; Chien, Jung Hung; Stergiou, Nicholas; Myers, Sara A; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mukherjee, Mukul

    2016-02-01

    similar in the two groups, suggesting that temporal parameters are not modified by optic flow. However, whereas the TC group displayed significant stance time asymmetries during the post-treadmill session, such aftereffects were absent in the VRT group. The results indicated that the enhanced transfer resulting from exposure to plantar cutaneous vibration during adaptation was alleviated by optic flow information. The presence of visual self-motion information may have reduced proprioceptive gain during learning. Thus, during overground walking, the learned proprioceptive split-belt pattern is more rapidly overridden by visual input due to its increased relative gain. The results suggest that when visual stimulation is provided during adaptive training, the system acquires the novel movement dynamics while maintaining the ability to flexibly adapt to different environments.

  3. Motion artifact removal from photoplethysmographic signals by combining temporally constrained independent component analysis and adaptive filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fulai; Zhang, Zhengbo; Gou, Xiaoming; Liu, Hongyun; Wang, Weidong

    2014-04-24

    The calculation of arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) relies heavily on the amplitude information of the high-quality photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals, which could be contaminated by motion artifacts (MA) during monitoring. A new method combining temporally constrained independent component analysis (cICA) and adaptive filters is presented here to extract the clean PPG signals from the MA corrupted PPG signals with the amplitude information reserved. The underlying PPG signal could be extracted from the MA contaminated PPG signals automatically by using cICA algorithm. Then the amplitude information of the PPG signals could be recovered by using adaptive filters. Compared with conventional ICA algorithms, the proposed approach is permutation and scale ambiguity-free. Numerical examples with both synthetic datasets and real-world MA corrupted PPG signals demonstrate that the proposed method could remove the MA from MA contaminated PPG signals more effectively than the two existing FFT-LMS and moving average filter (MAF) methods. This paper presents a new method which combines the cICA algorithm and adaptive filter to extract the underlying PPG signals from the MA contaminated PPG signals with the amplitude information reserved. The new method could be used in the situations where one wants to extract the interested source automatically from the mixed observed signals with the amplitude information reserved. The results of study demonstrated the efficacy of this proposed method.

  4. Effects of tonotopicity, adaptation, modulation tuning, and temporal coherence in “primitive” auditory stream segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Simon Krogholt; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    The perceptual organization of two-tone sequences into auditory streams was investigated using a modeling framework consisting of an auditory pre-processing front end [Dau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2892–2905 (1997)] combined with a temporal coherence-analysis back end [Elhilali et al......., Neuron 61, 317–329 (2009)]. Two experimental paradigms were considered: (i) Stream segregation as a function of tone repetition time (TRT) and frequency separation (Df) and (ii) grouping of distant spectral components based on onset/offset synchrony. The simulated and experimental results of the present...... study supported the hypothesis that forward masking enhances the ability to perceptually segregate spectrally close tone sequences. Furthermore, the modeling suggested that effects of neural adaptation and processing though modulation-frequency selective filters may enhance the sensitivity to onset...

  5. Adaptive Landing Gear: Optimum Control Strategy and Potential for Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Mikułowski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive landing gear is a landing gear (LG capable of active adaptation to particular landing conditions by means of controlled hydraulic force. The objective of the adaptive control is to mitigate the peak force transferred to the aircraft structure during touch-down, and thus to limit the structural fatigue factor. This paper investigates the ultimate limits for improvement due to various strategies of active control. Five strategies are proposed and investigated numerically using a~validated model of a real, passive landing gear as a reference. Potential for improvement is estimated statistically in terms of the mean and median (significant peak strut forces as well as in terms of the extended safe sinking velocity range. Three control strategies are verified experimentally using a laboratory test stand.

  6. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Improving Water Governance and Climate Change Adaptation in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improving Water Governance and Climate Change Adaptation in Cambodia. Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake is the largest freshwater lake in Southeast Asia. It is estimated that up to half of Cambodia's population benefits directly or indirectly from the lake's resources. Over the next few decades, climate change and new ...

  8. Possible routes to improve adaptive management of firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, M.; Westerink, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores possible routes to improve the adaptive management of firms and proposes to view firms as social-ecological systems. We conceptualise three possible ways in which firms can frame their relation with the natural environment. The first is impact related: strategies for assessing

  9. Flooding in Dakar suburbs: towards adaptation by improving ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Flooding in Dakar suburbs: towards adaptation by improving buildings, infrastructure and local governance. Managing flooding is one of the major challenges Africa faces in regard to climate change. Frantic urbanization, out of control urban sprawl and destitute populations forced to live on marginal land have led to ...

  10. Barley adaptation and improvement in the Mediterranean basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pswarayi, A.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Ceccarelli, S.; Grando, S.; Comadran, J.; Russell, J.R.; Stanca, A.M.; Francia, E.; Pecchioni, N.; Akar, T.; Al-Yassin, A.; Benbelkacem, A.; Choumane, W.; Karrou, M.; Ouabbou, H.; Bort, J.; Araus, J.L.; Molina-Cano, J.L.; Thomas, W.T.B.; Romagosa, I.

    2008-01-01

    To study barley adaptation and improvement in the Mediterranean basin, a collection of 188 entries comprising landraces and old genotypes and current modern varieties from the Mediterranean basin and elsewhere was tested on moisture-contrasted environments in seven Mediterranean countries, during

  11. Adaptive optics simulation performance improvements using reconfigurable logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basden, Alastair

    2007-02-20

    A technique used to accelerate an adaptive optics simulation platform using reconfigurable logic is described. The performance of parts of this simulation has been improved by up to 600 times (reducing computation times by this factor) by implementing algorithms within hardware and enables adaptive optics simulations to be carried out in a reasonable time scale. This demonstrates that it is possible to use reconfigurable logic to accelerate computational codes by very large factors when compared with conventional software approaches, and this has relevance for many computationally intensive applications. The use of reconfigurable logic for high performance computing is currently in its infancy and has never before been applied to this field.

  12. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R

    2012-04-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants' ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed.

  13. Improving cellulase production by Aspergillus niger using adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Arentshorst, Mark; Allijn, Iris E; Ram, Arthur F J; de Vries, Ronald P; Gelber, Isabelle Benoit

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the potential of adaptive evolution as a tool in generating strains with an improved production of plant biomass degrading enzymes. An Aspergillus niger cellulase mutant was obtained by adaptive evolution. Physiological properties of this mutant revealed a five times higher cellulose production than the parental strain. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of noxR, encoding the regulatory subunit of the NADPH oxidase complex, was reduced in the mutant compared to the parental strain. Subsequent analysis of a noxR knockout strain showed the same phenotypic effect as observed for the evolution mutant, confirming the role of NoxR in cellulose degradation. Adaptive evolution is an efficient approach to modify a strain and activate genes involved in polysaccharide degradation.

  14. Designing Training for Temporal and Adaptive Transfer: A Comparative Evaluation of Three Training Methods for Process Control Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Annette; Sauer, Juergen; Burkolter, Dina; Ritzmann, Sandrina

    2010-01-01

    Training in process control environments requires operators to be prepared for temporal and adaptive transfer of skill. Three training methods were compared with regard to their effectiveness in supporting transfer: Drill & Practice (D&P), Error Training (ET), and procedure-based and error heuristics training (PHT). Communication…

  15. Multi-view 3D human pose estimation combining single-frame recovery, temporal integration and model adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, M.; Gavrila, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a system for the estimation of unconstrained 3D human upper body movement from multiple cameras. Its main novelty lies in the integration of three components: single frame pose recovery, temporal integration and model adaptation. Single frame pose recovery consists of a hypothesis

  16. Cross-Adaptation: Heat and Cold Adaptation to Improve Physiological and Cellular Responses to Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Oliver R; Taylor, Lee; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-09-01

    To prepare for extremes of heat, cold or low partial pressures of oxygen (O 2 ), humans can undertake a period of acclimation or acclimatization to induce environment-specific adaptations, e.g. heat acclimation (HA), cold acclimation (CA), or altitude training. While these strategies are effective, they are not always feasible due to logistical impracticalities. Cross-adaptation is a term used to describe the phenomenon whereby alternative environmental interventions, e.g. HA or CA, may be a beneficial alternative to altitude interventions, providing physiological stress and inducing adaptations observable at altitude. HA can attenuate physiological strain at rest and during moderate-intensity exercise at altitude via adaptations allied to improved O 2 delivery to metabolically active tissue, likely following increases in plasma volume and reductions in body temperature. CA appears to improve physiological responses to altitude by attenuating the autonomic response to altitude. While no cross-acclimation-derived exercise performance/capacity data have been measured following CA, post-HA improvements in performance underpinned by aerobic metabolism, and therefore dependent on O 2 delivery at altitude, are likely. At a cellular level, heat shock protein responses to altitude are attenuated by prior HA, suggesting that an attenuation of the cellular stress response and therefore a reduced disruption to homeostasis at altitude has occurred. This process is known as cross-tolerance. The effects of CA on markers of cross-tolerance is an area requiring further investigation. Because much of the evidence relating to cross-adaptation to altitude has examined the benefits at moderate to high altitudes, future research examining responses at lower altitudes should be conducted, given that these environments are more frequently visited by athletes and workers. Mechanistic work to identify the specific physiological and cellular pathways responsible for cross-adaptation between

  17. Channel noise-induced temporal coherence transitions and synchronization transitions in adaptive neuronal networks with time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yubing; Xie, Huijuan

    2017-09-01

    Using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), we study the effect of channel noise on temporal coherence and synchronization of adaptive scale-free Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with time delay. It is found that the spiking regularity and spatial synchronization of the neurons intermittently increase and decrease as channel noise intensity is varied, exhibiting transitions of temporal coherence and synchronization. Moreover, this phenomenon depends on time delay, STDP, and network average degree. As time delay increases, the phenomenon is weakened, however, there are optimal STDP and network average degree by which the phenomenon becomes strongest. These results show that channel noise can intermittently enhance the temporal coherence and synchronization of the delayed adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into channel noise for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Super-Resolution Reconstruction of Remote-Sensing Images Based on Adaptive Multi-Scale Detail Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xinming; Xie, Junfeng; Song, Weidong; Mo, Fan; Gao, Xiaoming

    2018-02-07

    There are many problems in existing reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms, such as the lack of texture-feature representation and of high-frequency details. Multi-scale detail enhancement can produce more texture information and high-frequency information. Therefore, super-resolution reconstruction of remote-sensing images based on adaptive multi-scale detail enhancement (AMDE-SR) is proposed in this paper. First, the information entropy of each remote-sensing image is calculated, and the image with the maximum entropy value is regarded as the reference image. Subsequently, spatio-temporal remote-sensing images are processed using phase normalization, which is to reduce the time phase difference of image data and enhance the complementarity of information. The multi-scale image information is then decomposed using the L ₀ gradient minimization model, and the non-redundant information is processed by difference calculation and expanding non-redundant layers and the redundant layer by the iterative back-projection (IBP) technique. The different-scale non-redundant information is adaptive-weighted and fused using cross-entropy. Finally, a nonlinear texture-detail-enhancement function is built to improve the scope of small details, and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is used as an iterative constraint. Ultimately, high-resolution remote-sensing images with abundant texture information are obtained by iterative optimization. Real results show an average gain in entropy of up to 0.42 dB for an up-scaling of 2 and a significant promotion gain in enhancement measure evaluation for an up-scaling of 2. The experimental results show that the performance of the AMED-SR method is better than existing super-resolution reconstruction methods in terms of visual and accuracy improvements.

  19. GESTALT GAME TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ ADAPTABILITY IN PONDOK PESANTREN

    OpenAIRE

    Imas Kania Rahman; Furqon Furqon

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at finding the effectiveness of guidance and counselling through Gestalt Game technique in improving students’ adaptability in two Islamic boarding schools. The study was conducted by using a pretest-posttest nonequivalent group design involving four groups of students from two different Islamic boarding schools. The study considered the influnce of gender and boarding school environment towards the effectiveness of Gestalt Game. It was conducted by controlling ...

  20. Sensorimotor Adaptability Training Improves Motor and Dual-Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J.J.; Peters, B.T.; Mulavara, A.P.; Brady, R.; Batson, C.; Cohen, H.S.

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of our project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program designed to facilitate recovery of functional capabilities when astronauts transition to different gravitational environments. The goal of our current study was to determine if SA training using variation in visual flow and support surface motion produces improved performance in a novel sensory environment and demonstrate the retention characteristics of SA training.

  1. Improved Adaptive LSB Steganography Based on Chaos and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lifang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel steganographic method in JPEG images with high performance. Firstly, we propose improved adaptive LSB steganography, which can achieve high capacity while preserving the first-order statistics. Secondly, in order to minimize visual degradation of the stego image, we shuffle bits-order of the message based on chaos whose parameters are selected by the genetic algorithm. Shuffling message's bits-order provides us with a new way to improve the performance of steganography. Experimental results show that our method outperforms classical steganographic methods in image quality, while preserving characteristics of histogram and providing high capacity.

  2. A Matched Comparison Across Three Different Sensory Pairs of Cross-Modal Temporal Recalibration From Sustained and Transient Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alais, David; Ho, Tam; Han, Shui'er; Van der Burg, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sustained exposure to an asynchronous multisensory signal causes perceived simultaneity to shift in the direction of the leading component of the adapting stimulus. This is known as temporal recalibration, and recent evidence suggests that it can occur very rapidly, even after a single asynchronous audiovisual (AV) stimulus. However, this form of rapid recalibration appears to be unique to AV stimuli, in contrast to recalibration following sustained asynchronies which occurs with audiotactile (AT) and visuotactile (VT) stimuli. This study examines temporal recalibration to AV, VT and AT asynchrony with spatially collocated stimuli using a design that produces both sustained and inter-trial recalibration by combining the traditional sustained adaptation approach with an inter-trial analysis of sequential dependencies in an extended test period. Thus, we compare temporal recalibration to both sustained and transient asynchrony in three crossmodal combinations using the same design, stimuli and observers. The results reveal that prolonged exposure to asynchrony produced equivalent temporal recalibration for all combinations: AV, AT and VT. The pattern for rapid, inter-trial recalibration was very different. Rapid recalibration occurred strongly for AV stimuli, weakly for AT and did not occur at all for VT. For all sensory pairings, recalibration from sustained asynchrony decayed to baseline during the test phase while inter-trial recalibration was present and stable throughout testing, suggesting different mechanisms may underlie adaptation at long and short timescales.

  3. Improved Adaptive Routing Algorithm in Distributed Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Perepelkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, telecom operators use virtualization of network infrastructure based on Data Centers (DCs. But when a company grows to a certain size and one DC is not sufficient, there are questions how to further develop the network infrastructure. There is a need to expand existing DC boundaries or to add new elements in the network structure. In this paper, we propose improved adaptive routing algorithm in distributed networks of DCs with united service providers, which increases the efficiency of adaptive routing process during dynamic adding of nodes or communication links. The mathematical model and enlarged form of algorithm are shown in the work. In the paper, a comparison of the proposed algorithm with known analogies, such as modified Dijkstra's algorithm and paired transitions algorithm, is performed. To validate the correctness of proposed algorithm, we developed software for simulation of adaptive routing processes in networks of distributed DCs. Comparative analysis of adaptive routing algorithms in distributed networks of DCs with united service providers confirms the effectiveness of the proposed approach and reduces the complexity of constructing routing tables to the value O(mN.

  4. Auditory-perceptual learning improves speech motor adaptation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Douglas M; Rochon, Marie-Lyne

    2014-08-01

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in children's speech development by providing the child with information about speech outcomes that is used to learn and fine-tune speech motor plans. The use of auditory feedback in speech motor learning has been extensively studied in adults by examining oral motor responses to manipulations of auditory feedback during speech production. Children are also capable of adapting speech motor patterns to perceived changes in auditory feedback; however, it is not known whether their capacity for motor learning is limited by immature auditory-perceptual abilities. Here, the link between speech perceptual ability and the capacity for motor learning was explored in two groups of 5- to 7-year-old children who underwent a period of auditory perceptual training followed by tests of speech motor adaptation to altered auditory feedback. One group received perceptual training on a speech acoustic property relevant to the motor task while a control group received perceptual training on an irrelevant speech contrast. Learned perceptual improvements led to an enhancement in speech motor adaptation (proportional to the perceptual change) only for the experimental group. The results indicate that children's ability to perceive relevant speech acoustic properties has a direct influence on their capacity for sensory-based speech motor adaptation.

  5. Auditory-Perceptual Learning Improves Speech Motor Adaptation in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Douglas M.; Rochon, Marie-Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in children’s speech development by providing the child with information about speech outcomes that is used to learn and fine-tune speech motor plans. The use of auditory feedback in speech motor learning has been extensively studied in adults by examining oral motor responses to manipulations of auditory feedback during speech production. Children are also capable of adapting speech motor patterns to perceived changes in auditory feedback, however it is not known whether their capacity for motor learning is limited by immature auditory-perceptual abilities. Here, the link between speech perceptual ability and the capacity for motor learning was explored in two groups of 5–7-year-old children who underwent a period of auditory perceptual training followed by tests of speech motor adaptation to altered auditory feedback. One group received perceptual training on a speech acoustic property relevant to the motor task while a control group received perceptual training on an irrelevant speech contrast. Learned perceptual improvements led to an enhancement in speech motor adaptation (proportional to the perceptual change) only for the experimental group. The results indicate that children’s ability to perceive relevant speech acoustic properties has a direct influence on their capacity for sensory-based speech motor adaptation. PMID:24842067

  6. Adaptive whitening of the electromyogram to improve amplitude estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, E A; Farry, K A

    2000-06-01

    Previous research showed that whitening the surface electromyogram (EMG) can improve EMG amplitude estimation (where EMG amplitude is defined as the time-varying standard deviation of the EMG). However, conventional whitening via a linear filter seems to fail at low EMG amplitude levels, perhaps due to additive background noise in the measured EMG. This paper describes an adaptive whitening technique that overcomes this problem by cascading a nonadaptive whitening filter, an adaptive Wiener filter, and an adaptive gain correction. These stages can be calibrated from two, five second duration, constant-angle, constant-force contractions, one at a reference level [e.g., 50% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)] and one at 0% MVC. In experimental studies, subjects used real-time EMG amplitude estimates to track a uniform-density, band-limited random target. With a 0.25-Hz bandwidth target, either adaptive whitening or multiple-channel processing reduced the tracking error roughly half-way to the error achieved using the dynamometer signal as the feedback. At the 1.00-Hz bandwidth, all of the EMG processors had errors equivalent to that of the dynamometer signal, reflecting that errors in this task were dominated by subjects' inability to track targets at this bandwidth. Increases in the additive noise level, smoothing window length, and tracking bandwidth diminish the advantages of whitening.

  7. fMR-adaptation indicates selectivity to audiovisual content congruency in distributed clusters in human superior temporal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomert Leo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient multisensory integration is of vital importance for adequate interaction with the environment. In addition to basic binding cues like temporal and spatial coherence, meaningful multisensory information is also bound together by content-based associations. Many functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies propose the (posterior superior temporal cortex (STC as the key structure for integrating meaningful multisensory information. However, a still unanswered question is how superior temporal cortex encodes content-based associations, especially in light of inconsistent results from studies comparing brain activation to semantically matching (congruent versus nonmatching (incongruent multisensory inputs. Here, we used fMR-adaptation (fMR-A in order to circumvent potential problems with standard fMRI approaches, including spatial averaging and amplitude saturation confounds. We presented repetitions of audiovisual stimuli (letter-speech sound pairs and manipulated the associative relation between the auditory and visual inputs (congruent/incongruent pairs. We predicted that if multisensory neuronal populations exist in STC and encode audiovisual content relatedness, adaptation should be affected by the manipulated audiovisual relation. Results The results revealed an occipital-temporal network that adapted independently of the audiovisual relation. Interestingly, several smaller clusters distributed over superior temporal cortex within that network, adapted stronger to congruent than to incongruent audiovisual repetitions, indicating sensitivity to content congruency. Conclusions These results suggest that the revealed clusters contain multisensory neuronal populations that encode content relatedness by selectively responding to congruent audiovisual inputs, since unisensory neuronal populations are assumed to be insensitive to the audiovisual relation. These findings extend our previously revealed mechanism for

  8. What You See is what You Just Heard: The Effect of Temporal Rate Adaptation on Human Intersensory Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel Levitan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on perception have yet to establish that psychophysical adaptation effects transfer from one sense to another. To test for this phenomenon, the current study examines the possible crossmodal transfer of temporal rate adaptation from vision to audition (VA and from audition to vision (AV. Participants were trained, using feedback, to discriminate the perceived rapidity of either auditory or visual stimuli presented at a range of randomly-ordered frequencies (3.25–4.75 Hz as compared to that of stimuli (of the same modality at a familiar average frequency (4 Hz. Afterwards, subjects were repeatedly exposed to stimuli (of the other modality at a specific rate (3 Hz or 5 Hz. To test whether adaptation resulted from this exposure, subjects again completed the task previously used for training, but now without feedback. After the initial training and adaptation phases, these test and adaptation tasks were presented in 20 alternating blocks. A comparison of the pre- and post-adaptation responses showed crossmodal changes in subjects' perception of temporal rate, such that adaptation to 5 Hz led to the subsequent stimuli seeming slower than they had before adaptation. On the other hand, after exposure to 3 Hz stimuli, the opposite effect was seen. This shift occurred in both VA and AV conditions. As audition and vision were never simultaneously presented, this is suggestive of a strong linkage between the two modalities in perceiving rate. We propose that this is due to the presence of early, distributed, within-modal clocks, that can vigorously modulate each other cross-modally.

  9. Improved Side Information Generation for Distributed Video Coding by Exploiting Spatial and Temporal Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Shuiming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed video coding (DVC is a video coding paradigm allowing low complexity encoding for emerging applications such as wireless video surveillance. Side information (SI generation is a key function in the DVC decoder, and plays a key-role in determining the performance of the codec. This paper proposes an improved SI generation for DVC, which exploits both spatial and temporal correlations in the sequences. Partially decoded Wyner-Ziv (WZ frames, based on initial SI by motion compensated temporal interpolation, are exploited to improve the performance of the whole SI generation. More specifically, an enhanced temporal frame interpolation is proposed, including motion vector refinement and smoothing, optimal compensation mode selection, and a new matching criterion for motion estimation. The improved SI technique is also applied to a new hybrid spatial and temporal error concealment scheme to conceal errors in WZ frames. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme can achieve up to 1.0 dB improvement in rate distortion performance in WZ frames for video with high motion, when compared to state-of-the-art DVC. In addition, both the objective and perceptual qualities of the corrupted sequences are significantly improved by the proposed hybrid error concealment scheme, outperforming both spatial and temporal concealments alone.

  10. Improvements for Image Compression Using Adaptive Principal Component Extraction (APEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyad, Nigel A.; Gilmore, Erwin T.; Chouikha, Mohamed F.

    1997-01-01

    The issues of image compression and pattern classification have been a primary focus of researchers among a variety of fields including signal and image processing, pattern recognition, data classification, etc. These issues depend on finding an efficient representation of the source data. In this paper we collate our earlier results where we introduced the application of the. Hilbe.rt scan to a principal component algorithm (PCA) with Adaptive Principal Component Extraction (APEX) neural network model. We apply these technique to medical imaging, particularly image representation and compression. We apply the Hilbert scan to the APEX algorithm to improve results

  11. Advantages of signal-adaptive approaches for the nonlinear, time-variant analysis of heart rate variability of children with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiecke, Karin; Wacker, Matthias; Benninger, Franz; Feucht, Martha; Leistritz, Lutz; Witte, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Major aim of our study is to demonstrate that signal-adaptive approaches improve the nonlinear and time-variant analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) of children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Nonlinear HRV analyses are frequently applied in epileptic patients. As HRV is characterized by components with oscillatory properties frequency-selective methods are in the focus, whereby application of nonlinear analysis to linear filtered signals seems to be doubtful. Signal-adaptive methods that preserve nonlinear properties and utilize only the signal data for an automatic computation of the result could benefit to nonlinear analysis of HRV. Combinations of (1) the signal-adaptive Matched Gabor Transform with time-variant nonlinear bispectral analysis and of (2) signal-adaptive Empirical Mode Decomposition methods with time-variant nonlinear stability analysis are investigated with regard to their application in the analysis of specific HRV components (respiratory sinus arrhythmia and Mayer wave associated low-frequency HRV components) of 18 children with TLE. Changes of timing and coordination of both HRV components during preictal, ictal and postictal periods occur which can be better quantified by advanced signal-adaptive methods. Both approaches contribute with specific importance to the analysis.

  12. Adaptive evolution of synthetic cooperating communities improves growth performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Zhang

    Full Text Available Symbiotic interactions between organisms are important for human health and biotechnological applications. Microbial mutualism is a widespread phenomenon and is important in maintaining natural microbial communities. Although cooperative interactions are prevalent in nature, little is known about the processes that allow their initial establishment, govern population dynamics and affect evolutionary processes. To investigate cooperative interactions between bacteria, we constructed, characterized, and adaptively evolved a synthetic community comprised of leucine and lysine Escherichia coli auxotrophs. The co-culture can grow in glucose minimal medium only if the two auxotrophs exchange essential metabolites - lysine and leucine (or its precursors. Our experiments showed that a viable co-culture using these two auxotrophs could be established and adaptively evolved to increase growth rates (by ∼3 fold and optical densities. While independently evolved co-cultures achieved similar improvements in growth, they took different evolutionary trajectories leading to different community compositions. Experiments with individual isolates from these evolved co-cultures showed that changes in both the leucine and lysine auxotrophs improved growth of the co-culture. Interestingly, while evolved isolates increased growth of co-cultures, they exhibited decreased growth in mono-culture (in the presence of leucine or lysine. A genome-scale metabolic model of the co-culture was also constructed and used to investigate the effects of amino acid (leucine or lysine release and uptake rates on growth and composition of the co-culture. When the metabolic model was constrained by the estimated leucine and lysine release rates, the model predictions agreed well with experimental growth rates and composition measurements. While this study and others have focused on cooperative interactions amongst community members, the adaptive evolution of communities with other

  13. Improving Sensorimotor Function and Adaptation using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, R. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during adaption to G-transitions that occur when entering and exiting microgravity. Post space flight, these sensorimotor disturbances can include postural and gait instability, visual performance changes, manual control disruptions, spatial disorientation, and motion sickness, all of which can hinder the operational capabilities of the astronauts. Crewmember safety would be significantly increased if sensorimotor changes brought on by gravitational changes could be mitigated and adaptation could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate and develop the use of electrical stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a countermeasure to augment sensorimotor function and facilitate adaptation. For this project, SVS will be applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes at imperceptible amplitude levels. We hypothesize that SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through the phenomena of stochastic resonance, which occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. In line with the theory of stochastic resonance, a specific optimal level of SVS will be found and tested for each subject [1]. Three experiments are planned to investigate the use of SVS in sensory-dependent tasks and performance. The first experiment will aim to demonstrate stochastic resonance in the vestibular system through perception based motion recognition thresholds obtained using a 6-degree of freedom Stewart platform in the Jenks Vestibular Laboratory at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. A range of SVS amplitudes will be applied to each subject and the subjectspecific optimal SVS level will be identified as that which results in the lowest motion recognition threshold, through previously established, well developed methods [2,3,4]. The second experiment will investigate the use of optimal SVS in facilitating sensorimotor adaptation to system

  14. Temporal Doppler Effect and Future Orientation: Adaptive Function and Moderating Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yiqun; Miao, Miao; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Haihua

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine whether the temporal Doppler effect exists in different time intervals and whether certain individual and environmental factors act as moderators of the effect. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we examined the existence of the temporal Doppler effect and the moderating effect of future orientation among 139 university students (Study 1), and then the moderating conditions of the temporal Doppler effect using two independent samples of 143 and 147 university students (Studies 2 and 3). Results indicated that the temporal Doppler effect existed in all of our studies, and that future orientation moderated the temporal Doppler effect. Further, time interval perception mediated the relationship between future orientation and the motivation to cope at long time intervals. Finally, positive affect was found to enhance the temporal Doppler effect, whereas control deprivation did not influence the effect. The temporal Doppler effect is moderated by the personality trait of future orientation and by the situational variable of experimentally manipulated positive affect. We have identified personality and environmental processes that could enhance the temporal Doppler effect, which could be valuable in cases where attention to a future task is necessary. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Adaptive thresholding of chest temporal subtraction images in computer-aided diagnosis of pathologic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melanie; Looper, Jared; Armato, Samuel G.

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists frequently use chest radiographs acquired at different times to diagnose a patient by identifying regions of change. Temporal subtraction (TS) images are formed when a computer warps a radiographic image to register and then subtract one image from the other, accentuating regions of change. The purpose of this study was to create a computeraided diagnostic (CAD) system to threshold chest TS images and identify candidate regions of pathologic change. Each thresholding technique created two different candidate regions: light and dark. Light regions have a high gray-level mean, while dark regions have a low gray-level mean; areas with no change appear as medium-gray pixels. Ten different thresholding techniques were examined and compared. By thresholding light and dark candidate regions separately, the number of properly thresholded regions improved. The thresholding of light and dark regions separately produced fewer overall candidate regions that included more regions of actual pathologic change than global thresholding of the image. Overall, the moment-preserving method produced the best results for light regions, while the normal distribution method produced the best results for dark regions. Separation of light and dark candidate regions by thresholding shows potential as the first step in creating a CAD system to detect pathologic change in chest TS images.

  16. Neural activity in the dorsal medial superior temporal area of monkeys represents retinal error during adaptive motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Aya; Ofuji, Tomoyo; Miura, Kenichiro; Kawano, Kenji

    2017-01-19

    To adapt to variable environments, humans regulate their behavior by modulating gains in sensory-to-motor processing. In this study, we measured a simple eye movement, the ocular following response (OFR), in monkeys to study the neuronal basis of adaptive motor learning in the visuomotor processing stream. The medial superior temporal (MST) area of the cerebral cortex is a critical site for contextual gain modulation of the OFR. However, the role of MST neurons in adaptive gain modulation of the OFR remains unknown. We adopted a velocity step-down sequence paradigm that was designed to promote adaptive gain modulation of the OFR to investigate the role of the dorsal MST (MSTd) in adaptive motor learning. In the initial learning stage, we observed a reduction in the OFR but no significant change in the "open-loop" responses for the majority of the MSTd neurons. However, in the late learning stage, some MSTd neurons exhibited significantly enhanced "closed-loop" responses in association with increases in retinal error velocity. These results indicate that the MSTd area primarily encodes visual motion, suggesting that MSTd neurons function upstream of the motor learning site to provide sensory signals to the downstream structures involved in adaptive motor learning.

  17. Prism adaptation improves ego-centered but not allocentric neglect in early rehabilitation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossmann, Anja; Kastrup, Andreas; Kerkhoff, Georg; López-Herrero, Carmen; Hildebrandt, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral neglect due to parieto-temporo-frontal lesions has a negative impact on the success of rehabilitation, and prism adaptation (PA) enhances recovery from neglect. However, it is unclear if this effect holds also in severely impaired patients and/or in the postacute phase of rehabilitation. Moreover, it is not known whether PA affects all aspects of neglect recovery or ego-centered spatial orientation only. Sixteen patients in a postacute stage (on average 36 days after a large right cerebrovascular stroke) were entered into a series of single case design studies with 4 measurements: 2 before and 2 after 1 week of PA treatment. All patients had severe neglect (showing trunk, head, and eye deviation; canceling less than 20% of targets in a visual cancellation test). Lesions were transferred to a standard brain to analyze size and location. Patients improved in cued body orientation and in the cancellation task, that is, in ego-centered neglect. However, none of the measures used to evaluate neglect of left side of objects irrespective of their position on the right or left side of the patient (allocentric neglect) showed an improvement. Treatment effects were not influenced by total lesion size, but lesions including the postcentral cortex were related to smaller recovery gains. PA is helpful in treating severely impaired patients in the postacute phase, but the effect is restricted to ego-centered neglect. Lesions in the postcentral cortex (middle occipito-temporal, middle temporal, and posterior parietal areas) seem to limit the effect of PA.

  18. GENOMIC APPROACHES FOR IMPROVEMENT OF DROUGHT ADAPTATION IN WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dénes Dudits

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Breeding for yield stability under water limited conditions plays an essential role in the reduction of economic and social consequences of global climate changes. We show that two exotic drought resistant genotypes (Kobomughi and Plainsmann differ in root growth rate, root/shoot ratio, and adaptation to low soil water content. These genotypes exhibit characteristic transcript profiles as shown by barley macroarray studies using 10500 unigenes. Reprogramming of gene expression primarily occurred during the 1-2 weeks of water stress, and 6,1% of tested genes were up-regulated in roots of the more adaptive Plainsmann plants. The time course for expression of gene clusters from Kobomughi genotype revealed a prompt and transient gene activation that can help the survival of plants through function of various defense mechanisms. The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs can detoxify lipid peroxidation products (4-hydroxynon-2-enal and glycolysis-derived reactive aldehydes (metylglyoxal that contribute significantly to cellular damages caused by variety of environmental stresses such as drought, high light intensity, UV-B irradiation, cold. Overproduction of AKRs in transgenic tobacco or wheat plants provides considerable stress tolerance and resistance to methylglyoxal. Several transgenic wheat genotypes have been produced with production of elevated level of AKR enzyme. The drought tolerance of these materials was tested by a complex stress diagnostic system, that integrates imaging of plants and monitoring the leaf temperature and fluorescence induction. Based on these parameters, we can conclude that this transgenic strategy that is based on detoxification of lipid aldehyde can result in improved stress adaptation and reduced yield loss.

  19. An Improved Adaptive Tracking Controller of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat-Bao-Thien Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new adaptive fuzzy neural control to suppress chaos and also to achieve the speed tracking control in a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM drive system with unknown parameters and uncertainties. The control scheme consists of fuzzy neural and compensatory controllers. The fuzzy neural controller with online parameter tuning is used to estimate the unknown nonlinear models and construct linearization feedback control law, while the compensatory controller is employed to attenuate the estimation error effects of the fuzzy neural network and ensure the robustness of the controlled system. Moreover, due to improvement in controller design, the singularity problem is surely avoided. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate that the proposed control scheme can successfully remove chaotic oscillations and allow the speed to follow the desired trajectory in a chaotic PMSM despite the existence of unknown models and uncertainties.

  20. Auditory-somatosensory temporal sensitivity improves when the somatosensory event is caused by voluntary body movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimichi Kitagawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available When we actively interact with the environment, it is crucial that we perceive a precise temporal relationship between our own actions and sensory effects to guide our body movements.Thus, we hypothesized that voluntary movements improve perceptual sensitivity to the temporal disparity between auditory and movement-related somatosensory events compared to when they are delivered passively to sensory receptors. In the voluntary condition, participants voluntarily tapped a button, and a noise burst was presented at various onset asynchronies relative to the button press. The participants made either 'sound-first' or 'touch-first' responses. We found that the performance of temporal order judgment (TOJ in the voluntary condition (as indexed by the just noticeable difference was significantly better (M=42.5 ms ±3.8 s.e.m than that when their finger was passively stimulated (passive condition: M=66.8 ms ±6.3 s.e.m. We further examined whether the performance improvement with voluntary action can be attributed to the prediction of the timing of the stimulation from sensory cues (sensory-based prediction, kinesthetic cues contained in voluntary action, and/or to the prediction of stimulation timing from the efference copy of the motor command (motor-based prediction. When the participant’s finger was moved passively to press the button (involuntary condition and when three noise bursts were presented before the target burst with regular intervals (predictable condition, the TOJ performance was not improved from that in the passive condition. These results suggest that the improvement in sensitivity to temporal disparity between somatosensory and auditory events caused by the voluntary action cannot be attributed to sensory-based prediction and kinesthetic cues. Rather, the prediction from the efference copy of the motor command would be crucial for improving the temporal sensitivity.

  1. Eye movements show similar adaptations in temporal coordination to movement planning conditions in both people with and without cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Alexander R; Plimmer, Beryl; McDaid, Andrew; Davies, T Claire

    2017-05-01

    The effects of cerebral palsy on movement planning for simple reaching tasks are not well understood. Movement planning is complex and entails many processes which could be affected. This study specifically sought to evaluate integrating task information, decoupling movements, and adjusting to altered mapping. For a reaching task, the asynchrony between the eye onset and the hand onset was measured across different movement planning conditions for participants with and without cerebral palsy. Previous research shows people without cerebral palsy vary this temporal coordination for different planning conditions. Our measurements show similar adaptations in temporal coordination for groups with and without cerebral palsy, to three of the four variations in planning condition tested. However, movement durations were still longer for the participants with cerebral palsy. Hence for simple goal-directed reaching, movement execution problems appear to limit activity more than movement planning deficits.

  2. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  3. AN ADAPTIVE ORGANIZATION METHOD OF GEOVIDEO DATA FOR SPATIO-TEMPORAL ASSOCIATION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Public security incidents have been increasingly challenging to address with their new features, including large-scale mobility, multi-stage dynamic evolution, spatio-temporal concurrency and uncertainty in the complex urban environment, which require spatio-temporal association analysis among multiple regional video data for global cognition. However, the existing video data organizational methods that view video as a property of the spatial object or position in space dissever the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video shots captured from multiple video channels, limit the query functions on interactive retrieval between a camera and its video clips and hinder the comprehensive management of event-related scattered video shots. GeoVideo, which maps video frames onto a geographic space, is a new approach to represent the geographic world, promote security monitoring in a spatial perspective and provide a highly feasible solution to this problem. This paper analyzes the large-scale personnel mobility in public safety events and proposes a multi-level, event-related organization method with massive GeoVideo data by spatio-temporal trajectory. This paper designs a unified object identify(ID structure to implicitly store the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video clips and support the distributed storage management of massive cases. Finally, the validity and feasibility of this method are demonstrated through suspect tracking experiments.

  4. An improved temporal correction method for mobile measurement of outdoor thermal climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Lin, Yaoyu; Wang, Dan; Liu, Jing

    2017-07-01

    Accurate temporal corrections for the spatial meteorological parameters obtained through mobile measurements are essential in the synchronous analysis of local urban climates. This paper discusses current temporal correction models and proposes an improved model by considering correlation coefficients that are influenced by the underlying surface conditions, and the distance between the stationary weather stations and the mobile location points during a mobile measurement. Together with four adjacent, simultaneously recording stationary weather stations, long-term mobile temperature and humidity measurements were taken along a 17-km transect covering 18 mobile location points through the University Town of Shenzhen. Using the multiple air temperature and relative humidity values of the mobile location points and stationary weather stations, the function equations for determining the correlation coefficients were obtained for application in the proposed temporal correction model. Further, three kinds of validation methods were applied to compare temporal correction models. Validation results showed that the temporal correction model proposed in this study was significantly more accurate and reliable compared to the other models.

  5. Spatio-Temporally Adaptive Waiting Time for Cell Phone Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Deepthi Chander; Bhushan Jagyasi; Desai, U. B.; Merchant, S N

    2011-01-01

    In cell phone sensor networks (CpSN), sensor-embedded cell phones communicate sensor data using Near Field Communication outlets such as Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. This paper considers a query dissemination application of CpSN, where sensor data belonging to a certain time window [ts,min, ts,max] is needed from a region of interest. Existing approaches, such as ADAPT, use adaptive broadcast ranges at the Wireless Access Point (WAP) for query dissemination. This paper proposes the adaptation of waiti...

  6. Improving Accuracy of Processing by Adaptive Control Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Barbashov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When machining the work-pieces a range of scatter of the work-piece dimensions to the tolerance limit is displaced in response to the errors. To improve an accuracy of machining and prevent products from defects it is necessary to diminish the machining error components, i.e. to improve the accuracy of machine tool, tool life, rigidity of the system, accuracy of adjustment. It is also necessary to provide on-machine adjustment after a certain time. However, increasing number of readjustments reduces the performance and high machine and tool requirements lead to a significant increase in the machining cost.To improve the accuracy and machining rate, various devices of active control (in-process gaging devices, as well as controlled machining through adaptive systems for a technological process control now become widely used. Thus, the accuracy improvement in this case is reached by compensation of a majority of technological errors. The sensors of active control can provide improving the accuracy of processing by one or two quality classes, and simultaneous operation of several machines.For efficient use of sensors of active control it is necessary to develop the accuracy control methods by means of introducing the appropriate adjustments to solve this problem. Methods based on the moving average, appear to be the most promising for accuracy control, since they contain information on the change in the last several measured values of the parameter under control.When using the proposed method in calculation, the first three members of the sequence of deviations remain unchanged, therefore 1 1 x  x , 2 2 x  x , 3 3 x  x Then, for each i-th member of the sequence we calculate that way: , ' i i i x  x  k x , where instead of the i x values will be populated with the corresponding values ' i x calculated as an average of three previous members:3 ' 1  2  3  i i i i x x x x .As a criterion for the estimate of the control

  7. An improved genetic algorithm for designing optimal temporal patterns of neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Isaac R.; Titus, Nathan D.; Grill, Warren M.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Electrical neuromodulation therapies typically apply constant frequency stimulation, but non-regular temporal patterns of stimulation may be more effective and more efficient. However, the design space for temporal patterns is exceedingly large, and model-based optimization is required for pattern design. We designed and implemented a modified genetic algorithm (GA) intended for design optimal temporal patterns of electrical neuromodulation. Approach. We tested and modified standard GA methods for application to designing temporal patterns of neural stimulation. We evaluated each modification individually and all modifications collectively by comparing performance to the standard GA across three test functions and two biophysically-based models of neural stimulation. Main results. The proposed modifications of the GA significantly improved performance across the test functions and performed best when all were used collectively. The standard GA found patterns that outperformed fixed-frequency, clinically-standard patterns in biophysically-based models of neural stimulation, but the modified GA, in many fewer iterations, consistently converged to higher-scoring, non-regular patterns of stimulation. Significance. The proposed improvements to standard GA methodology reduced the number of iterations required for convergence and identified superior solutions.

  8. An improved genetic algorithm for designing optimal temporal patterns of neural stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Isaac R; Titus, Nathan D; Grill, Warren M

    2017-12-01

    Electrical neuromodulation therapies typically apply constant frequency stimulation, but non-regular temporal patterns of stimulation may be more effective and more efficient. However, the design space for temporal patterns is exceedingly large, and model-based optimization is required for pattern design. We designed and implemented a modified genetic algorithm (GA) intended for design optimal temporal patterns of electrical neuromodulation. We tested and modified standard GA methods for application to designing temporal patterns of neural stimulation. We evaluated each modification individually and all modifications collectively by comparing performance to the standard GA across three test functions and two biophysically-based models of neural stimulation. The proposed modifications of the GA significantly improved performance across the test functions and performed best when all were used collectively. The standard GA found patterns that outperformed fixed-frequency, clinically-standard patterns in biophysically-based models of neural stimulation, but the modified GA, in many fewer iterations, consistently converged to higher-scoring, non-regular patterns of stimulation. The proposed improvements to standard GA methodology reduced the number of iterations required for convergence and identified superior solutions.

  9. Advancing of Land Surface Temperature Retrieval Using Extreme Learning Machine and Spatio-Temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a critical variable to characterize the biophysical processes in ecological environment, and as a key indicator in the surface energy balance, evapotranspiration and urban heat islands, Land Surface Temperature (LST retrieved from Thermal Infra-Red (TIR images at both high temporal and spatial resolution is in urgent need. However, due to the limitations of the existing satellite sensors, there is no earth observation which can obtain TIR at detailed spatial- and temporal-resolution simultaneously. Thus, several attempts of image fusion by blending the TIR data from high temporal resolution sensor with data from high spatial resolution sensor have been studied. This paper presents a novel data fusion method by integrating image fusion and spatio-temporal fusion techniques, for deriving LST datasets at 30 m spatial resolution from daily MODIS image and Landsat ETM+ images. The Landsat ETM+ TIR data were firstly enhanced based on extreme learning machine (ELM algorithm using neural network regression model, from 60 m to 30 m resolution. Then, the MODIS LST and enhanced Landsat ETM+ TIR data were fused by Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT in order to derive high resolution synthetic data. The synthetic images were evaluated for both testing and simulated satellite images. The average difference (AD and absolute average difference (AAD are smaller than 1.7 K, where the correlation coefficient (CC and root-mean-square error (RMSE are 0.755 and 1.824, respectively, showing that the proposed method enhances the spatial resolution of the predicted LST images and preserves the spectral information at the same time.

  10. Fast temporal adaptation of on-off units in the first optic chiasm of the blowfly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, N.M.; Hateren, J.H. van

    1991-01-01

    We recorded from spiking units in the first optic chiasm between lamina and medulla in the brain of the blowfly (Calliphora vicina). Both previously characterized neuron types, on-off units and sustaining units, were encountered. On-off units had a temporal frequency response with a lower cut-off

  11. Spatial and temporal patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation in the endangered African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Clare D; Woodroffe, Rosie; Mills, Michael G L; McNutt, J Weldon; Creel, Scott; Groom, Rosemary; Emmanuel, Masenga; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kat, Pieter; Rasmussen, Gregory S A; Ginsberg, Joshua; Lines, Robin; André, Jean-Marc; Begg, Colleen; Wayne, Robert K; Mable, Barbara K

    2012-03-01

    Deciphering patterns of genetic variation within a species is essential for understanding population structure, local adaptation and differences in diversity between populations. Whilst neutrally evolving genetic markers can be used to elucidate demographic processes and genetic structure, they are not subject to selection and therefore are not informative about patterns of adaptive variation. As such, assessments of pertinent adaptive loci, such as the immunity genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), are increasingly being incorporated into genetic studies. In this study, we combined neutral (microsatellite, mtDNA) and adaptive (MHC class II DLA-DRB1 locus) markers to elucidate the factors influencing patterns of genetic variation in the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus); an endangered canid that has suffered extensive declines in distribution and abundance. Our genetic analyses found all extant wild dog populations to be relatively small (N(e)  African mammals. We found strong structuring of wild dog populations, indicating the negative influence of extensive habitat fragmentation and loss of gene flow between habitat patches. Across populations, we found that the spatial and temporal structure of microsatellite diversity and MHC diversity were correlated and strongly influenced by demographic stability and population size, indicating the effects of genetic drift in these small populations. Despite this correlation, we detected signatures of selection at the MHC, implying that selection has not been completely overwhelmed by genetic drift. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. An Efficient Adaptive Window Size Selection Method for Improving Spectrogram Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibli Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT is an important technique for the time-frequency analysis of a time varying signal. The basic approach behind it involves the application of a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT to a signal multiplied with an appropriate window function with fixed resolution. The selection of an appropriate window size is difficult when no background information about the input signal is known. In this paper, a novel empirical model is proposed that adaptively adjusts the window size for a narrow band-signal using spectrum sensing technique. For wide-band signals, where a fixed time-frequency resolution is undesirable, the approach adapts the constant Q transform (CQT. Unlike the STFT, the CQT provides a varying time-frequency resolution. This results in a high spectral resolution at low frequencies and high temporal resolution at high frequencies. In this paper, a simple but effective switching framework is provided between both STFT and CQT. The proposed method also allows for the dynamic construction of a filter bank according to user-defined parameters. This helps in reducing redundant entries in the filter bank. Results obtained from the proposed method not only improve the spectrogram visualization but also reduce the computation cost and achieves 87.71% of the appropriate window length selection.

  13. LEACH-A: An Adaptive Method for Improving LEACH Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli ZHAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy has become one of the most important constraints on wireless sensor networks. Hence, many researchers in this field focus on how to design a routing protocol to prolong the lifetime of the network. The classical hierarchical protocols such as LEACH and LEACH-C have better performance in saving the energy consumption. However, the choosing strategy only based on the largest residue energy or shortest distance will still consume more energy. In this paper an adaptive routing protocol named “LEACH-A” which has an energy threshold E0 is proposed. If there are cluster nodes whose residual energy are greater than E0, the node of largest residual energy is selected to communicated with the base station; When all the cluster nodes energy are less than E0, the node nearest to the base station is select to communication with the base station. Simulations show that our improved protocol LEACH-A performs better than the LEACH and the LEACH-C.

  14. Deriving urban dynamic evolution rules from self-adaptive cellular automata with multi-temporal remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingqing; Ai, Bin; Yao, Yao; Zhong, Fajun

    2015-06-01

    Cellular automata (CA) have proven to be very effective for simulating and predicting the spatio-temporal evolution of complex geographical phenomena. Traditional methods generally pose problems in determining the structure and parameters of CA for a large, complex region or a long-term simulation. This study presents a self-adaptive CA model integrated with an artificial immune system to discover dynamic transition rules automatically. The model's parameters are allowed to be self-modified with the application of multi-temporal remote sensing images: that is, the CA can adapt itself to the changed and complex environment. Therefore, urban dynamic evolution rules over time can be efficiently retrieved by using this integrated model. The proposed AIS-based CA model was then used to simulate the rural-urban land conversion of Guangzhou city, located in the core of China's Pearl River Delta. The initial urban land was directly classified from TM satellite image in the year 1990. Urban land in the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2012 was correspondingly used as the observed data to calibrate the model's parameters. With the quantitative index figure of merit (FoM) and pattern similarity, the comparison was further performed between the AIS-based model and a Logistic CA model. The results indicate that the AIS-based CA model can perform better and with higher precision in simulating urban evolution, and the simulated spatial pattern is closer to the actual development situation.

  15. Stochastic modelling of aquifer level temporal fluctuations using the Kalman filter adaptation algorithm and an autoregressive exogenous variable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varouchakis, Emmanouil

    2017-04-01

    Reliable temporal modelling of groundwater level is significant for efficient water resources management in hydrological basins and for the prevention of possible desertification effects. In this work we propose a stochastic data driven approach of temporal monitoring and prediction that can incorporate auxiliary information. More specifically, we model the temporal (mean annual and biannual) variation of groundwater level by means of a discrete time autoregressive exogenous variable model (ARX model). The ARX model parameters and its predictions are estimated by means of the Kalman filter adaptation algorithm (KFAA). KFAA is suitable for sparsely monitored basins that do not allow for an independent estimation of the ARX model parameters. Three new modified versions of the original form of the ARX model are proposed and investigated: the first considers a larger time scale, the second a larger time delay in terms of the groundwater level input and the third considers the groundwater level difference between the last two hydrological years, which is incorporated in the model as a third input variable. We apply KFAA to time series of groundwater level values from Mires basin in the island of Crete. In addition to precipitation measurements, we use pumping data as exogenous variables. We calibrate the ARX model based on the groundwater level for the years 1981 to 2006 and use it to successfully predict the mean annual and biannual groundwater level for recent years (2007-2010).

  16. Towards Adaptive Educational Assessments: Predicting Student Performance using Temporal Stability and Data Analytics in Learning Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Gautam [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; McNair, Wade [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Data-driven assessments and adaptive feedback are becoming a cornerstone research in educational data analytics and involve developing methods for exploring the unique types of data that come from the educational context. For example, predicting college student performance is crucial for both the students and educational institutions. It can support timely intervention to prevent students from failing a course, increasing efficacy of advising functions, and improving course completion rate. In this paper, we present our efforts in using data analytics that enable educationists to design novel data-driven assessment and feedback mechanisms. In order to achieve this objective, we investigate temporal stability of students grades and perform predictive analytics on academic data collected from 2009 through 2013 in one of the most commonly used learning management systems, called Moodle. First, we have identified the data features useful for assessments and predicting student outcomes such as students scores in homework assignments, quizzes, exams, in addition to their activities in discussion forums and their total Grade Point Average(GPA) at the same term they enrolled in the course. Second, time series models in both frequency and time domains are applied to characterize the progression as well as overall projections of the grades. In particular, the model analyzed the stability as well as fluctuation of grades among students during the collegiate years (from freshman to senior) and disciplines. Third, Logistic Regression and Neural Network predictive models are used to identify students as early as possible who are in danger of failing the course they are currently enrolled in. These models compute the likelihood of any given student failing (or passing) the current course. The time series analysis indicates that assessments and continuous feedback are critical for freshman and sophomores (even with easy courses) than for seniors, and those assessments may be

  17. Temporal variation in sex allocation in the mealybug Planococcus citri : Adaptation, constraint, or both?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ross, Laura; Langenhof, Minke B. W.; Pen, Ido; Shuker, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Sex ratio theory has been very successful in predicting under which circumstances parents should bias their investment towards a particular offspring sex. However, most examples of adaptive sex ratio bias come from species with well-defined mating systems and sex determining mechanisms, while in

  18. A New Perspective on Changing Arctic Marine Ecosystems: Panarchy Adaptive Cycles in Pan-Arctic Spatial and Temporal Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, F. K.; Huntington, H. P.; Carmack, E.; Wassmann, P. F. J.; Leu, E. S.; Gradinger, R.

    2016-02-01

    Changes in the physical/biological interactions in the Arctic are occurring across a variety of spatial and temporal scales and may be mitigated or strengthened based on varying rates of evolutionary adaptation. A novel way to view these interactions and their social relevance is through the systems theory perspective of "Panarchy" proposed by Gunderson and Holling. Panarchy is an interdisciplinary approach in which structures, scales and linkages of complex-adaptive systems, including those of nature (e.g. ocean), humans (e.g. economics), and combined social-ecological systems (e.g. institutions that govern natural resource use), are mapped across multiple space and time scales in continual and interactive adaptive cycles of growth, accumulation, restructuring and renewal. In complex-adaptive systems the dynamics at a given scale are generally dominated by a small number of key internal variables that are forced by one or more external variables. The stability of such a system is characterized by its resilience, i.e. its capacity to absorb disturbance and re-organize while undergoing change, so as to retain essentially similar function, structure, identity and feedbacks. It is in the capacity of a system to cope with pressures and adversities such as exploitation, warming, governance restrictions, competition, etc. that resilience embraces human and natural systems as complex entities continually adapting through cycles of change. In this paper we explore processes at four linked spatial domains in the Arctic Ocean and link it to ecosystem resilience and re-organization characteristics. From this we derive a series of hypotheses concerning the biological responses to future physical changes and suggest ways how Panarchy theory can be applied to observational strategies to help detect early signs of environmental shifts affecting marine system services and functions. We close by discussing possible implications of the Panarchy framework for policy and governance.

  19. Temporal Hierarchical Adaptive Texture CRF for Automatic Detection of Gadolinium-Enhancing Multiple Sclerosis Lesions in Brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Rivaz, Hassan; Arnold, Douglas L; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2015-06-01

    We propose a conditional random field (CRF) based classifier for segmentation of small enhanced pathologies. Specifically, we develop a temporal hierarchical adaptive texture CRF (THAT-CRF) and apply it to the challenging problem of gad enhancing lesion segmentation in brain MRI of patients with multiple sclerosis. In this context, the presence of many nonlesion enhancements (such as blood vessels) renders the problem more difficult. In addition to voxel-wise features, the framework exploits multiple higher order textures to discriminate the true lesional enhancements from the pool of other enhancements. Since lesional enhancements show more variation over time as compared to the nonlesional ones, we incorporate temporal texture analysis in order to study the textures of enhanced candidates over time. The parameters of the THAT-CRF model are learned based on 2380 scans from a multi-center clinical trial. The effect of different components of the model is extensively evaluated on 120 scans from a separate multi-center clinical trial. The incorporation of the temporal textures results in a general decrease of the false discovery rate. Specifically, THAT-CRF achieves overall sensitivity of 95% along with false discovery rate of 20% and average false positive count of 0.5 lesions per scan. The sensitivity of the temporal method to the trained time interval is further investigated on five different intervals of 69 patients. Moreover, superior performance is achieved by the reviewed labelings of our model compared to the fully manual labeling when applied to the context of separating different treatment arms in a real clinical trial.

  20. Improved Gaussian Mixture Models for Adaptive Foreground Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsarakis, Nikolaos; Pnevmatikakis, Aristodemos; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    elements to the baseline algorithm: The learning rate can change across space and time, while the Gaussian distributions can be merged together if they become similar due to their adaptation process. We quantify the importance of our enhancements and the effect of parameter tuning using an annotated......Adaptive foreground segmentation is traditionally performed using Stauffer & Grimson’s algorithm that models every pixel of the frame by a mixture of Gaussian distributions with continuously adapted parameters. In this paper we provide an enhancement of the algorithm by adding two important dynamic...

  1. Sentence Syntax and Content in the Human Temporal Lobe: An fMRI Adaptation Study in Auditory and Visual Modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devauchelle, A.D.; Dehaene, S.; Pallier, C. [INSERM, Gif sur Yvette (France); Devauchelle, A.D.; Dehaene, S.; Pallier, C. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, NeuroSpin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Devauchelle, A.D.; Pallier, C. [Univ. Paris 11, Orsay (France); Oppenheim, C. [Univ Paris 05, Ctr Hosp St Anne, Paris (France); Rizzi, L. [Univ Siena, CISCL, I-53100 Siena (Italy); Dehaene, S. [Coll France, F-75231 Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Priming effects have been well documented in behavioral psycho-linguistics experiments: The processing of a word or a sentence is typically facilitated when it shares lexico-semantic or syntactic features with a previously encountered stimulus. Here, we used fMRI priming to investigate which brain areas show adaptation to the repetition of a sentence's content or syntax. Participants read or listened to sentences organized in series which could or not share similar syntactic constructions and/or lexico-semantic content. The repetition of lexico-semantic content yielded adaptation in most of the temporal and frontal sentence processing network, both in the visual and the auditory modalities, even when the same lexico-semantic content was expressed using variable syntactic constructions. No fMRI adaptation effect was observed when the same syntactic construction was repeated. Yet behavioral priming was observed at both syntactic and semantic levels in a separate experiment where participants detected sentence endings. We discuss a number of possible explanations for the absence of syntactic priming in the fMRI experiments, including the possibility that the conglomerate of syntactic properties defining 'a construction' is not an actual object assembled during parsing. (authors)

  2. Improved proper name recall in aging after electrical stimulation of the anterior temporal lobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars A Ross

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from neuroimaging and neuropsychology suggests that portions of the anterior temporal lobes play a critical role in proper name retrieval. We previously found that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the anterior temporal lobes improved retrieval of proper names in young adult. Here we extend that finding to older adults who tend to experience greater proper-naming deficits than young adults. The task was to look at pictures of famous faces or landmarks and verbally recall the associated proper name. Our results show a numerical improvement in face naming after left or right anterior temporal lobe stimulation, but a statistically significant effect only after left-lateralized stimulation. The magnitude of the enhancing effect was similar in older and younger adults but the lateralization of the effect differed depending on age. These results provide evidence that tDCS may be a useful tool for the neurorehabilitation of cognitive function in healthy and pathological cognitive decline.

  3. Adaptation to Climatic Hazards in the Savannah Ecosystem: Improving Adaptation Policy and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiran, Gerald A. B.; Stringer, Lindsay C.

    2017-10-01

    People in Ghana's savannah ecosystem have historically experienced a range of climatic hazards that have affected their livelihoods. In view of current climate variability and change, and projected increases in extreme events, adaptation to climate risks is vital. Policies have been put in place to enhance adaptation across sub-Saharan Africa in accordance with international agreements. At the same time, local people, through experience, have learned to adapt. This paper examines current policy actions and their implementation alongside an assessment of barriers to local adaptation. In doing so it links adaptation policy and practice. Policy documents were analysed that covered key livelihood sectors, which were identified as climate sensitive. These included agriculture, water, housing and health policies, as well as the National Climate Change Policy. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were also held with key stakeholders in the Upper East Region of Ghana. Analyses were carried using thematic content analysis. Although policies and actions complement each other, their integration is weak. Financial, institutional, social, and technological barriers hinder successful local implementation of some policy actions, while lack of local involvement in policy formulation also hinders adaptation practice. Integration of local perspectives into policy needs to be strengthened in order to enhance adaptation. Coupled with this is a need to consider adaptation to climate change in development policies and to pursue efforts to reduce or remove the key barriers to implementation at the local level.

  4. CleanTag Adapters Improve Small RNA Next-Generation Sequencing Library Preparation by Reducing Adapter Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Sabrina; Henderson, Jordana M; McCaffrey, Anton P

    2018-01-01

    Next-generation small RNA sequencing is a valuable tool which is increasing our knowledge regarding small noncoding RNAs and their function in regulating genetic information. Library preparation protocols for small RNA have thus far been restricted due to higher RNA input requirements (>10 ng), long workflows, and tedious manual gel purifications. Small RNA library preparation methods focus largely on the prevention or depletion of a side product known as adapter dimer that tends to dominate the reaction. Adapter dimer is the ligation of two adapters to one another without an intervening library RNA insert or any useful sequencing information. The amplification of this side reaction is favored over the amplification of tagged library since it is shorter. The small size discrepancy between these two species makes separation and purification of the tagged library very difficult. Adapter dimer hinders the use of low input samples and the ability to automate the workflow so we introduce an improved library preparation protocol which uses chemically modified adapters (CleanTag) to significantly reduce the adapter dimer. CleanTag small RNA library preparation workflow decreases adapter dimer to allow for ultra-low input samples (down to approx. 10 pg total RNA), elimination of the gel purification step, and automation. We demonstrate how to carry out this streamlined protocol to improve NGS data quality and allow for the use of sample types with limited RNA material.

  5. Predictors of meaningful improvement in quality of life after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Carla; Schwarzbold, Marcelo Liborio; Diaz, Alexandre Paim; de Oliveira Thais, Maria Emilia Rodrigues; Kondageski, Charles; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Guarnieri, Ricardo; de Lemos Zingano, Bianca; Ben, Juliana; Nunes, Jean Costa; Markowitsch, Hans Joachim; Wolf, Peter; Wiebe, Samuel; Lin, Katia; Walz, Roger

    2017-05-01

    To investigate prospectively the independent predictors of a minimum clinically important change (MCIC) in quality of life (QOL) after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) for drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy related to hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) in Brazilian patients. Multiple binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the clinical, demographic, radiologic, and electrophysiologic variables independently associated with MCIC in the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 Inventory (QOLIE-31) overall score 1 year after ATL in 77 consecutive patients with unilateral MTLE-HS. The overall QOLIE-31 score and all its subscale scores increased significantly (p Canadian patients showing that presurgical depression and complete seizure control after surgery are independent predictors for meaningful improvement in QOL after ATL, and have implications for the surgical management of MTLE patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Adaptive OFDM Radar Waveform Design for Improved Micro-Doppler Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Satyabrata [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Engineering Science Advanced Research, Computer Science and Mathematics Division

    2014-07-01

    Here we analyze the performance of a wideband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in estimating the micro-Doppler frequency of a rotating target having multiple scattering centers. The use of a frequency-diverse OFDM signal enables us to independently analyze the micro-Doppler characteristics with respect to a set of orthogonal subcarrier frequencies. We characterize the accuracy of micro-Doppler frequency estimation by computing the Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) on the angular-velocity estimate of the target. Additionally, to improve the accuracy of the estimation procedure, we formulate and solve an optimization problem by minimizing the CRB on the angular-velocity estimate with respect to the OFDM spectral coefficients. We present several numerical examples to demonstrate the CRB variations with respect to the signal-to-noise ratios, number of temporal samples, and number of OFDM subcarriers. We also analysed numerically the improvement in estimation accuracy due to the adaptive waveform design. A grid-based maximum likelihood estimation technique is applied to evaluate the corresponding mean-squared error performance.

  7. Adaptation to Stochastic Temporal Variations in Intratumoral Blood Flow: The Warburg Effect as a Bet Hedging Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenmier, Curtis A; Siddique, Miriam; Gatenby, Robert A

    2017-05-15

    While most cancers promote ingrowth of host blood vessels, the resulting vascular network usually fails to develop a mature organization, resulting in abnormal vascular dynamics with stochastic variations that include slowing, cessation, and even reversal of flow. Thus, substantial spatial and temporal variations in oxygen concentration are commonly observed in most cancers. Cancer cells, like all living systems, are subject to Darwinian dynamics such that their survival and proliferation are dependent on developing optimal phenotypic adaptations to local environmental conditions. Here, we consider the environmental stresses placed on tumors subject to profound, frequent, but stochastic variations in oxygen concentration as a result of temporal variations in blood flow. While vascular fluctuations will undoubtedly affect local concentrations of a wide range of molecules including growth factors (e.g., estrogen), substrate (oxygen, glucose, etc.), and metabolites ([Formula: see text], we focus on the selection forces that result solely from stochastic fluctuations in oxygen concentration. The glucose metabolism of cancer cells has been investigated for decades following observations that malignant cells ferment glucose regardless of oxygen concentration, a condition termed the Warburg effect. In contrast, normal cells cease fermentation under aerobic conditions and this physiological response is termed the Pasteur effect. Fermentation is markedly inefficient compared to cellular respiration in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, generating just 2 ATP/glucose, whereas respiration generates 38 ATP/glucose. This inefficiency requires cancer cells to increase glycolytic flux, which subsequently increases acid production and can significantly acidify local tissue. Hence, it initially appears that cancer cells adopt a disadvantageous metabolic phenotype. Indeed, this metabolic "hallmark" of cancer is termed "energy dysregulation." However, if cancers arise

  8. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M; Redmond, Robert W.; Liber, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naïve recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to one hour to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least one hour of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12–24 hours to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent γ-ray exposures. PMID:19695271

  9. Ionizing radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis and adaptation: Quantitative and temporal aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ying; Zhou Junqing; Baldwin, Joseph [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Redmond, Robert W. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Liber, Howard L., E-mail: howard.liber@colostate.edu [Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); University of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This work explores several quantitative aspects of radiation-induced bystander mutagenesis in WTK1 human lymphoblast cells. Gamma-irradiation of cells was used to generate conditioned medium containing bystander signals, and that medium was transferred onto naive recipient cells. Kinetic studies revealed that it required up to 1 h to generate sufficient signal to induce the maximal level of mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in the bystander cells receiving the conditioned medium. Furthermore, it required at least 1 h of exposure to the signal in the bystander cells to induce mutations. Bystander signal was fairly stable in the medium, requiring 12-24 h to diminish. Medium that contained bystander signal was rendered ineffective by a 4-fold dilution; in contrast a greater than 20-fold decrease in the cell number irradiated to generate a bystander signal was needed to eliminate bystander-induced mutagenesis. This suggested some sort of feedback inhibition by bystander signal that prevented the signaling cells from releasing more signal. Finally, an ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response was shown to be effective in reducing bystander mutagenesis; in addition, low levels of exposure to bystander signal in the transferred medium induced adaptation that was effective in reducing mutations induced by subsequent {gamma}-ray exposures.

  10. Improving the evidence for ecosystem-based adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Hannah

    2011-11-15

    Ecosystem-based approaches to adaptation (EBA) integrate the use of biodiversity and ecosystem services into an overall strategy for helping people adapt to climate change. The body of scientific evidence that indicates how effective they are is in some cases lacking but in other cases is dispersed across a range of related fields, such as natural resource management, disaster risk reduction and agroecology, from which it needs to be synthesised. Without presenting and strengthening this evidence in a consolidated way, EBA cannot secure the policy traction at local, national and international levels that it merits.

  11. Improving a real-time object detector with compact temporal information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrnbom, Martin; Jensen, Morten Bornø; Åström, Kalle

    2017-01-01

    Neural networks designed for real-time object detection have recently improved significantly, but in practice, look- ing at only a single RGB image at the time may not be ideal. For example, when detecting objects in videos, a foreground detection algorithm can be used to obtain compact temporal...... data, which can be fed into a neural network alongside RGB images. We propose an approach for doing this, based on an existing object detector, that re-uses pretrained weights for the processing of RGB images. The neural network was tested on the VIRAT dataset with annotations for object de- tection...

  12. Improving farmer adaptive capacity by integrating local and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-22

    Apr 22, 2016 ... Despite the availability of more reliable forecasts from meteorological services in Kenya, farmers seldom use them for farm level decision-making. This case study discusses how downscaled forecasts and more accessible climate information can enhance the adaptive capacity of small-holder farmers.

  13. Improving farmer adaptive capacity by integrating local and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    22 avr. 2016 ... Research led by Sokoine University of Agriculture demonstrates the usefulness of integrating seasonal climate forecasting with farm management activities in the uncertainty of changing climate patterns. Download the PDF. This brief resulted from two projects supported by the Climate Change Adaptation ...

  14. Short-term memory trace in rapidly adapting synapses of inferior temporal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Sugase-Miyamoto

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual short-term memory tasks depend upon both the inferior temporal cortex (ITC and the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Activity in some neurons persists after the first (sample stimulus is shown. This delay-period activity has been proposed as an important mechanism for working memory. In ITC neurons, intervening (nonmatching stimuli wipe out the delay-period activity; hence, the role of ITC in memory must depend upon a different mechanism. Here, we look for a possible mechanism by contrasting memory effects in two architectonically different parts of ITC: area TE and the perirhinal cortex. We found that a large proportion (80% of stimulus-selective neurons in area TE of macaque ITCs exhibit a memory effect during the stimulus interval. During a sequential delayed matching-to-sample task (DMS, the noise in the neuronal response to the test image was correlated with the noise in the neuronal response to the sample image. Neurons in perirhinal cortex did not show this correlation. These results led us to hypothesize that area TE contributes to short-term memory by acting as a matched filter. When the sample image appears, each TE neuron captures a static copy of its inputs by rapidly adjusting its synaptic weights to match the strength of their individual inputs. Input signals from subsequent images are multiplied by those synaptic weights, thereby computing a measure of the correlation between the past and present inputs. The total activity in area TE is sufficient to quantify the similarity between the two images. This matched filter theory provides an explanation of what is remembered, where the trace is stored, and how comparison is done across time, all without requiring delay period activity. Simulations of a matched filter model match the experimental results, suggesting that area TE neurons store a synaptic memory trace during short-term visual memory.

  15. Adaptive prefetching on POWER7: Improving performance and power consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Victor [Barcelona Supercomputing Center and Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Cazorla, Francisco [Barcelona Supercomputing Center and Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Gioiosa, Roberto [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buyuktosunoglu, Alper [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Bose, Pradip [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); O' Connel, Francis P. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Mealey, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Hardware data prefetch engines are integral parts of many general purpose server-class microprocessors in the field today. Some prefetch engines allow users to change some of their parameters. But, the prefetcher is usually enabled in a default configuration during system bring-up, and dynamic reconfiguration of the prefetch engine is not an autonomic feature of current machines. Conceptually, however, it is easy to infer that commonly used prefetch algorithms—when applied in a fixed mode—will not help performance in many cases. In fact, they may actually degrade performance due to useless bus bandwidth consumption and cache pollution, which in turn, will also waste power. We present an adaptive prefetch scheme that dynamically modifies the prefetch settings in order to adapt to workloads

  16. Spatio-Temporal Error Sources Analysis and Accuracy Improvement in Landsat 8 Image Ground Displacement Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ding

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of the advantages of low cost, large coverage and short revisit cycle, Landsat 8 images have been widely applied to monitor earth surface movements. However, there are few systematic studies considering the error source characteristics or the improvement of the deformation field accuracy obtained by Landsat 8 image. In this study, we utilize the 2013 Mw 7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake to analyze error spatio-temporal characteristics and elaborate how to mitigate error sources in the deformation field extracted from multi-temporal Landsat 8 images. We found that the stripe artifacts and the topographic shadowing artifacts are two major error components in the deformation field, which currently lack overall understanding and an effective mitigation strategy. For the stripe artifacts, we propose a small spatial baseline (<200 m method to avoid the stripe artifacts effect on the deformation field. We also propose a small radiometric baseline method to reduce the topographic shadowing artifacts and radiometric decorrelation noises. Those performances and accuracy evaluation show that these two methods are effective in improving the precision of deformation field. This study provides the possibility to detect subtle ground movement with higher precision caused by earthquake, melting glaciers, landslides, etc., with Landsat 8 images. It is also a good reference for error source analysis and corrections in deformation field extracted from other optical satellite images.

  17. Auditory-Perceptual Learning Improves Speech Motor Adaptation in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Shiller, Douglas M.; Rochon, Marie-Lyne

    2014-01-01

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in children’s speech development by providing the child with information about speech outcomes that is used to learn and fine-tune speech motor plans. The use of auditory feedback in speech motor learning has been extensively studied in adults by examining oral motor responses to manipulations of auditory feedback during speech production. Children are also capable of adapting speech motor patterns to perceived changes in auditory feedback, however it...

  18. Development and evaluation of a data-adaptive alerting algorithm for univariate temporal biosurveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, Yevgeniy; Burkom, Howard S

    2009-11-20

    This paper discusses further advances in making robust predictions with the Holt-Winters forecasts for a variety of syndromic time series behaviors and introduces a control-chart detection approach based on these forecasts. Using three collections of time series data, we compare biosurveillance alerting methods with quantified measures of forecast agreement, signal sensitivity, and time-to-detect. The study presents practical rules for initialization and parameterization of biosurveillance time series. Several outbreak scenarios are used for detection comparison. We derive an alerting algorithm from forecasts using Holt-Winters-generalized smoothing for prospective application to daily syndromic time series. The derived algorithm is compared with simple control-chart adaptations and to more computationally intensive regression modeling methods. The comparisons are conducted on background data from both authentic and simulated data streams. Both types of background data include time series that vary widely by both mean value and cyclic or seasonal behavior. Plausible, simulated signals are added to the background data for detection performance testing at signal strengths calculated to be neither too easy nor too hard to separate the compared methods. Results show that both the sensitivity and the timeliness of the Holt-Winters-based algorithm proved to be comparable or superior to that of the more traditional prediction methods used for syndromic surveillance.

  19. Neural network based adaptive output feedback control: Applications and improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutay, Ali Turker

    Application of recently developed neural network based adaptive output feedback controllers to a diverse range of problems both in simulations and experiments is investigated in this thesis. The purpose is to evaluate the theory behind the development of these controllers numerically and experimentally, identify the needs for further development in practical applications, and to conduct further research in directions that are identified to ultimately enhance applicability of adaptive controllers to real world problems. We mainly focus our attention on adaptive controllers that augment existing fixed gain controllers. A recently developed approach holds great potential for successful implementations on real world applications due to its applicability to systems with minimal information concerning the plant model and the existing controller. In this thesis the formulation is extended to the multi-input multi-output case for distributed control of interconnected systems and successfully tested on a formation flight wind tunnel experiment. The command hedging method is formulated for the approach to further broaden the class of systems it can address by including systems with input nonlinearities. Also a formulation is adopted that allows the approach to be applied to non-minimum phase systems for which non-minimum phase characteristics are modeled with sufficient accuracy and treated properly in the design of the existing controller. It is shown that the approach can also be applied to augment nonlinear controllers under certain conditions and an example is presented where the nonlinear guidance law of a spinning projectile is augmented. Simulation results on a high fidelity 6 degrees-of-freedom nonlinear simulation code are presented. The thesis also presents a preliminary adaptive controller design for closed loop flight control with active flow actuators. Behavior of such actuators in dynamic flight conditions is not known. To test the adaptive controller design in

  20. Temporal profile of improvement of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Mewes, Klaus; DeLong, Mahlon R; Gross, Robert E; Triche, Shirley D; Jinnah, H A; Boulis, Nicholas; Willie, Jon T; Freeman, Alan; Alexander, Garrett E; Aia, Pratibha; Butefisch, Cathrine M; Esper, Christine D; Factor, Stewart A

    2015-02-01

    Several case reports and small series have indicated that tardive dystonia is responsive to globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. Whether different subtypes or distributions of tardive dystonia are associated with different outcomes remains unknown. We assessed the outcomes and temporal profile of improvement of eight tardive dystonia patients who underwent globus pallidus deep brain stimulation over the past six years through record review. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, it was not blinded or placebo controlled. Consistent with previous studies, deep brain stimulation improved the overall the Burke-Fahn-Marsden motor scores by 85.1 ± 13.5%. The distributions with best responses in descending order were upper face, lower face, larynx/pharynx, limbs, trunk, and neck. Patients with prominent cervical dystonia demonstrated improvement in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale but improvements took several months. In four patients the effects of deep brain stimulation on improvement in Burke Fahn Marsden score was rapid, while in four cases there was partial rapid response of neck and trunk dystonia followed by was gradual resolution of residual symptoms over 48 months. Our retrospective analysis shows excellent resolution of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. We found instantaneous response, except with neck and trunk dystonia where partial recovery was followed by further resolution at slower rate. Such outcome is encouraging for using deep brain stimulation in treatment of tardive dystonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving personality facet scores with multidimensional computer adaptive testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Glas, Cees A W

    2013-01-01

    personality tests contain many highly correlated facets. This article investigates the possibility of increasing the precision of the NEO PI-R facet scores by scoring items with multidimensional item response theory and by efficiently administering and scoring items with multidimensional computer adaptive...... testing (MCAT). The increase in the precision of personality facet scores is obtained from exploiting the correlations between the facets. Results indicate that the NEO PI-R could be substantially shorter without attenuating precision when the MCAT methodology is used. Furthermore, the study shows...

  2. Adaptive optics for improved retinal surgery and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humayun, M S; Sadda, S R; Thompson, C A; Olivier, S S; Kartz, M W

    2000-08-21

    It is now possible to field a compact adaptive optics (AO) system on a surgical microscope for use in retinal diagnostics and surgery. Recent developments in integrated circuit technology and optical photonics have led to the capability of building an AO system that is compact and significantly less expensive than traditional AO systems. It is foreseen that such an AO system can be integrated into a surgical microscope while maintaining a package size of a lunchbox. A prototype device can be developed in a manner that lends itself well to large-scale manufacturing.

  3. Temporalization of Electric Generation Emissions for Improved Representation of Peak Air Quality Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, C. M.; Moeller, M.; Carlton, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Photochemical transport models routinely under predict peak air quality events. This deficiency may be due, in part, to inadequate temporalization of emissions from the electric generating sector. The National Emissions Inventory (NEI) reports emissions from Electric Generating Units (EGUs) by either Continuous Emission Monitors (CEMs) that report hourly values or as an annual total. The Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions preprocessor (SMOKE), used to prepare emissions data for modeling with the CMAQ air quality model, allocates annual emission totals throughout the year using specific monthly, weekly, and hourly weights according to standard classification code (SCC) and location. This approach represents average diurnal and seasonal patterns of electricity generation but does not capture spikes in emissions due to episodic use as with peaking units or due to extreme weather events. In this project we use a combination of state air quality permits, CEM data, and EPA emission factors to more accurately temporalize emissions of NOx, SO2 and particulate matter (PM) during the extensive heat wave of July and August 2006. Two CMAQ simulations are conducted; the first with the base NEI emissions and the second with improved temporalization, more representative of actual emissions during the heat wave. Predictions from both simulations are evaluated with O3 and PM measurement data from EPA's National Air Monitoring Stations (NAMS) and State and Local Air Monitoring Stations (SLAMS) during the heat wave, for which ambient concentrations of criteria pollutants were often above NAAQS. During periods of increased photochemistry and high pollutant concentrations, it is critical that emissions are most accurately represented in air quality models.

  4. Simultaneous expression of regulatory genes associated with specific drought-adaptive traits improves drought adaptation in peanut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Vemanna S; Swetha, Thavarekere N; Sheela, Shekarappa H; Babitha, Chandrashekar K; Rohini, Sreevathsa; Reddy, Malireddy K; Tuteja, Narendra; Reddy, Chandrashekar P; Prasad, Trichi Ganesh; Udayakumar, Makarla

    2016-03-01

    Adaptation of crops to drought-prone rain-fed conditions can be achieved by improving plant traits such as efficient water mining (by superior root characters) and cellular-level tolerance mechanisms. Pyramiding these drought-adaptive traits by simultaneous expression of genes regulating drought-adaptive mechanisms has phenomenal relevance in improving stress tolerance. In this study, we provide evidence that peanut transgenic plants expressing Alfalfa zinc finger 1 (Alfin1), a root growth-associated transcription factor gene, Pennisetum glaucum heat-shock factor (PgHSF4) and Pea DNA helicase (PDH45) involved in protein turnover and protection showed improved tolerance, higher growth and productivity under drought stress conditions. Stable integration of all the transgenes was noticed in transgenic lines. The transgenic lines showed higher root growth, cooler crop canopy air temperature difference (less CCATD) and higher relative water content (RWC) under drought stress. Low proline levels in transgenic lines substantiate the maintenance of higher water status. The survival and recovery of transgenic lines was significantly higher under gradual moisture stress conditions with higher biomass. Transgenic lines also showed significant tolerance to ethrel-induced senescence and methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress. Several stress-responsive genes such as heat-shock proteins (HSPs), RING box protein-1 (RBX1), Aldose reductase, late embryogenesis abundant-5 (LEA5) and proline-rich protein-2 (PRP2), a gene involved in root growth, showed enhanced expression under stress in transgenic lines. Thus, the simultaneous expression of regulatory genes contributing for drought-adaptive traits can improve crop adaptation and productivity under water-limited conditions. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. An Improved Adaptive Deconvolution Algorithm for Single Image Deblurring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Che Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common defects in digital photography is motion blur caused by camera shake. Shift-invariant motion blur can be modeled as a convolution of the true latent image and a point spread function (PSF with additive noise. The goal of image deconvolution is to reconstruct a latent image from a degraded image. However, ringing is inevitable artifacts arising in the deconvolution stage. To suppress undesirable artifacts, regularization based methods have been proposed using natural image priors to overcome the ill-posedness of deconvolution problem. When the estimated PSF is erroneous to some extent or the PSF size is large, conventional regularization to reduce ringing would lead to loss of image details. This paper focuses on the nonblind deconvolution by adaptive regularization which preserves image details, while suppressing ringing artifacts. The way is to control the regularization weight adaptively according to the image local characteristics. We adopt elaborated reference maps that indicate the edge strength so that textured and smooth regions can be distinguished. Then we impose an appropriate constraint on the optimization process. The experiments’ results on both synthesized and real images show that our method can restore latent image with much fewer ringing and favors the sharp edges.

  6. An Improved DINEOF Algorithm for Filling Missing Values in Spatio-Temporal Sea Surface Temperature Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ping

    Full Text Available In this study, an improved Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF algorithm for determination of missing values in a spatio-temporal dataset is presented. Compared with the ordinary DINEOF algorithm, the iterative reconstruction procedure until convergence based on every fixed EOF to determine the optimal EOF mode is not necessary and the convergence criterion is only reached once in the improved DINEOF algorithm. Moreover, in the ordinary DINEOF algorithm, after optimal EOF mode determination, the initial matrix with missing data will be iteratively reconstructed based on the optimal EOF mode until the reconstruction is convergent. However, the optimal EOF mode may be not the best EOF for some reconstructed matrices generated in the intermediate steps. Hence, instead of using asingle EOF to fill in the missing data, in the improved algorithm, the optimal EOFs for reconstruction are variable (because the optimal EOFs are variable, the improved algorithm is called VE-DINEOF algorithm in this study. To validate the accuracy of the VE-DINEOF algorithm, a sea surface temperature (SST data set is reconstructed by using the DINEOF, I-DINEOF (proposed in 2015 and VE-DINEOF algorithms. Four parameters (Pearson correlation coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio, root-mean-square error, and mean absolute difference are used as a measure of reconstructed accuracy. Compared with the DINEOF and I-DINEOF algorithms, the VE-DINEOF algorithm can significantly enhance the accuracy of reconstruction and shorten the computational time.

  7. An Improved DINEOF Algorithm for Filling Missing Values in Spatio-Temporal Sea Surface Temperature Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Bo; Su, Fenzhen; Meng, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an improved Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF) algorithm for determination of missing values in a spatio-temporal dataset is presented. Compared with the ordinary DINEOF algorithm, the iterative reconstruction procedure until convergence based on every fixed EOF to determine the optimal EOF mode is not necessary and the convergence criterion is only reached once in the improved DINEOF algorithm. Moreover, in the ordinary DINEOF algorithm, after optimal EOF mode determination, the initial matrix with missing data will be iteratively reconstructed based on the optimal EOF mode until the reconstruction is convergent. However, the optimal EOF mode may be not the best EOF for some reconstructed matrices generated in the intermediate steps. Hence, instead of using asingle EOF to fill in the missing data, in the improved algorithm, the optimal EOFs for reconstruction are variable (because the optimal EOFs are variable, the improved algorithm is called VE-DINEOF algorithm in this study). To validate the accuracy of the VE-DINEOF algorithm, a sea surface temperature (SST) data set is reconstructed by using the DINEOF, I-DINEOF (proposed in 2015) and VE-DINEOF algorithms. Four parameters (Pearson correlation coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio, root-mean-square error, and mean absolute difference) are used as a measure of reconstructed accuracy. Compared with the DINEOF and I-DINEOF algorithms, the VE-DINEOF algorithm can significantly enhance the accuracy of reconstruction and shorten the computational time.

  8. A technique for improved stability of adaptive feedforward controllers without detailed uncertainty measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    Model errors in adaptive controllers for reduction of broadband noise and vibrations may lead to unstable systems or increased error signals. Previous work has shown that the addition of a low-authority controller that increases damping in the system may lead to improved performance of an adaptive,

  9. A technique for improved stability of adaptive feedforward controllers without detailed uncertainty measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Model errors in adaptive controllers for reduction of broadband noise and vibrations may lead to unstable systems or increased error signals. Previous work has shown that the addition of a low-authority controller that increases damping in the system may lead to improved performance of an adaptive,

  10. Improved probabilistic neural networks with self-adaptive strategies for transformer fault diagnosis problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Hong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic neural network has successfully solved all kinds of engineering problems in various fields since it is proposed. In probabilistic neural network, Spread has great influence on its performance, and probabilistic neural network will generate bad prediction results if it is improperly selected. It is difficult to select the optimal manually. In this article, a variant of probabilistic neural network with self-adaptive strategy, called self-adaptive probabilistic neural network, is proposed. In self-adaptive probabilistic neural network, Spread can be self-adaptively adjusted and selected and then the best selected Spread is used to guide the self-adaptive probabilistic neural network train and test. In addition, two simplified strategies are incorporated into the proposed self-adaptive probabilistic neural network with the aim of further improving its performance and then two versions of simplified self-adaptive probabilistic neural network (simplified self-adaptive probabilistic neural networks 1 and 2 are proposed. The variants of self-adaptive probabilistic neural networks are further applied to solve the transformer fault diagnosis problem. By comparing them with basic probabilistic neural network, and the traditional back propagation, extreme learning machine, general regression neural network, and self-adaptive extreme learning machine, the results have experimentally proven that self-adaptive probabilistic neural networks have a more accurate prediction and better generalization performance when addressing the transformer fault diagnosis problem.

  11. Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    detection in mammography ." Medical Physics 31: 958. Timp, S., N. Karssemeijer and J. Hendriks (2003). Analysis of changes in masses using contrast and...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0755 TITLE: Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer Screening PRINCIPAL...14Dec2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0755 Adaptive Computer-Assisted Mammography Training for Improved Breast Cancer

  12. Spatial and temporal modifications of multitalker speech can improve speech perception in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gygi, Brian; Shafiro, Valeriy

    2014-04-01

    Speech perception in multitalker environments often requires listeners to divide attention among several concurrent talkers before focusing on one talker with pertinent information. Such attentionally demanding tasks are particularly difficult for older adults due both to age-related hearing loss (presbacusis) and general declines in attentional processing and associated cognitive abilities. This study investigated two signal-processing techniques that have been suggested as a means of improving speech perception accuracy of older adults: time stretching and spatial separation of target talkers. Stimuli in each experiment comprised 2-4 fixed-form utterances in which listeners were asked to consecutively 1) detect concurrently spoken keywords in the beginning of the utterance (divided attention); and, 2) identify additional keywords from only one talker at the end of the utterance (selective attention). In Experiment 1, the overall tempo of each utterance was unaltered or slowed down by 25%; in Experiment 2 the concurrent utterances were spatially coincident or separated across a 180-degree hemifield. Both manipulations improved performance for elderly adults with age-appropriate hearing on both tasks. Increasing the divided attention load by attending to more concurrent keywords had a marked negative effect on performance of the selective attention task only when the target talker was identified by a keyword, but not by spatial location. These findings suggest that the temporal and spatial modifications of multitalker speech improved perception of multitalker speech primarily by reducing competition among cognitive resources required to perform attentionally demanding tasks. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. An improved adaptive wavelet shrinkage for ultrasound despeckling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Perundurai 638 052, India. 2Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Kongunadu College of. Engineering and Technology, Thottiyam 621 ... ter achieves an improvement in terms of quantitative measures and in terms of visual quality of the images. Keywords. Wavelet; translation invariance; inter and ...

  14. An improved adaptive wavelet shrinkage for ultrasound despeckling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparison of the results shows that the proposed filter achieves an improvement in terms of quantitative measures and in terms of visual quality of the images. ... Kongu Engineering College, Perundurai 638 052, India; Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Kongunadu College of Engineering and ...

  15. MOOC Adaptation and Translation to Improve Equity in Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Freda; Cross, Simon; Henry, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need to improve elementary and secondary school classroom practices across India and the scale of this challenge is argued to demand new approaches to teacher professional learning. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) represent one such approach and one that, in the context of this study, is considered to provide a means by…

  16. Adapting Job Analysis Methodology to Improve Evaluation Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Susan M.; Curtin, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how job analysis, a method commonly used in personnel research and organizational psychology, provides a systematic method for documenting program staffing and service delivery that can improve evaluators' knowledge about program operations. Job analysis data can be used to increase evaluators' insight into how staffs…

  17. Adapting workload improves the measurement of heart rate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberts, R P; Maskell, S; Borresen, J; Lambert, M I

    2011-09-01

    Heart rate after a standardized test varies with a change in training status, possibly compromising the accuracy of measuring changes in heart rate recovery (HRR). The aim of this study was to determine if a change in the exercise intensity would result in a change in heart rate recovery and/or the accuracy of the heart rate recovery measurement. 31 subjects performed 4 submaximal running tests (HIMS). Based on the heart rate after the first HIMS, subjects either completed 4 identical HIMS (SAME (n=9)), 2 standard and 2 faster HIMS (FASTER (n=10)) or 2 standard and 2 slower HIMS (SLOWER (n=12)). Although no changes in heart rate recovery were found when the HIMS protocol was adapted, lower coefficients of variation (CV) and typical errors of measurement (TEM) were found in the SLOWER (CV: 11 ± 7 to 5 ± 3% ( P=0.025)), TEM: 6 to 3 beats and FASTER group (CV: 11 ± 7 to 4 ± 3% ( P=0.048), TEM: 7 to 3 beats). To ensure the highest level of sensitivity in detecting meaningful changes in HRR over time, submaximal testing protocols should target exercise intensities ranging in-between 86-93% of heart rate maximum. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Advances in catchment scale bank erosion modelling - quantifying the improved representation of temporal and spatial variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Victoria; Holman, Ian; O'Donnell, Greg; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Kilsby, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Channel bank erosion processes are influenced by numerous factors resulting in high spatial and temporal variability of sediment production. The representation of channel bank erosion is overly simplistic within most catchment models, despite its significance to catchment sediment budgets. Within this study, the physically-based distributed SHETRAN model is modified to incorporate bank vegetation and channel sinuosity factors that influence spatial and temporal bank erosion rates. The modified model simulates the temporal variation of bank erosion in response to high magnitude events with the potential to remove bank vegetation and de-stabilise banks, thereby increasing erodibility. As vegetation re-establishes, simulated bank erodibility decreases. During the recovery period, banks have increased vulnerability to further high magnitude events that will result in increased bank erosion. This enables the model to represent the impact of flood clustering on sediment generation. The modified model also represents the spatial variation of bank erosion as a result of varying channel planform. Channel geometry has also been linked to bank erosion rates as a result of flow circulation within channels. Channel sinuosity shows a non-linear relationship with bank erosion, with bank erosion increasing up to a threshold value of sinuosity and decreasing as sinuosity increases above this point. The original and modified models have been applied to the Eden catchment in north east England. Bank erosion data derived from a GIS overlay methodology covering 150 years has been used to validate the models, indicating annual sediment generation from bank erosion processes within the catchment is 410-4500 t yr-1, equivalent to 2-11% of the catchment sediment budget. Comparison of the original and modified models highlights the improved ability of the modified model to simulate annual variation of bank eroded sediment production; annual sediment production from the original model ranged

  19. A Framework of Temporal-Spatial Descriptors-Based Feature Extraction for Improved Myoelectric Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushaba, Rami N; Al-Timemy, Ali H; Al-Ani, Ahmed; Al-Jumaily, Adel

    2017-10-01

    The extraction of the accurate and efficient descriptors of muscular activity plays an important role in tackling the challenging problem of myoelectric control of powered prostheses. In this paper, we present a new feature extraction framework that aims to give an enhanced representation of muscular activities through increasing the amount of information that can be extracted from individual and combined electromyogram (EMG) channels. We propose to use time-domain descriptors (TDDs) in estimating the EMG signal power spectrum characteristics; a step that preserves the computational power required for the construction of spectral features. Subsequently, TDD is used in a process that involves: 1) representing the temporal evolution of the EMG signals by progressively tracking the correlation between the TDD extracted from each analysis time window and a nonlinearly mapped version of it across the same EMG channel and 2) representing the spatial coherence between the different EMG channels, which is achieved by calculating the correlation between the TDD extracted from the differences of all possible combinations of pairs of channels and their nonlinearly mapped versions. The proposed temporal-spatial descriptors (TSDs) are validated on multiple sparse and high-density (HD) EMG data sets collected from a number of intact-limbed and amputees performing a large number of hand and finger movements. Classification results showed significant reductions in the achieved error rates in comparison to other methods, with the improvement of at least 8% on average across all subjects. Additionally, the proposed TSDs achieved significantly well in problems with HD-EMG with average classification errors of <5% across all subjects using windows lengths of 50 ms only.

  20. Scale invariance properties of intracerebral EEG improve seizure prediction in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kais Gadhoumi

    Full Text Available Although treatment for epilepsy is available and effective for nearly 70 percent of patients, many remain in need of new therapeutic approaches. Predicting the impending seizures in these patients could significantly enhance their quality of life if the prediction performance is clinically practical. In this study, we investigate the improvement of the performance of a seizure prediction algorithm in 17 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy by means of a novel measure. Scale-free dynamics of the intracerebral EEG are quantified through robust estimates of the scaling exponents--the first cumulants--derived from a wavelet leader and bootstrap based multifractal analysis. The cumulants are investigated for the discriminability between preictal and interictal epochs. The performance of our recently published patient-specific seizure prediction algorithm is then out-of-sample tested on long-lasting data using combinations of cumulants and state similarity measures previously introduced. By using the first cumulant in combination with state similarity measures, up to 13 of 17 patients had seizures predicted above chance with clinically practical levels of sensitivity (80.5% and specificity (25.1% of total time under warning for prediction horizons above 25 min. These results indicate that the scale-free dynamics of the preictal state are different from those of the interictal state. Quantifiers of these dynamics may carry a predictive power that can be used to improve seizure prediction performance.

  1. Temporal plasticity in auditory cortex improves neural discrimination of speech sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Crystal T; Shetake, Jai A; Engineer, Navzer D; Vrana, Will A; Wolf, Jordan T; Kilgard, Michael P

    Many individuals with language learning impairments exhibit temporal processing deficits and degraded neural responses to speech sounds. Auditory training can improve both the neural and behavioral deficits, though significant deficits remain. Recent evidence suggests that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) paired with rehabilitative therapies enhances both cortical plasticity and recovery of normal function. We predicted that pairing VNS with rapid tone trains would enhance the primary auditory cortex (A1) response to unpaired novel speech sounds. VNS was paired with tone trains 300 times per day for 20 days in adult rats. Responses to isolated speech sounds, compressed speech sounds, word sequences, and compressed word sequences were recorded in A1 following the completion of VNS-tone train pairing. Pairing VNS with rapid tone trains resulted in stronger, faster, and more discriminable A1 responses to speech sounds presented at conversational rates. This study extends previous findings by documenting that VNS paired with rapid tone trains altered the neural response to novel unpaired speech sounds. Future studies are necessary to determine whether pairing VNS with appropriate auditory stimuli could potentially be used to improve both neural responses to speech sounds and speech perception in individuals with receptive language disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Utilizing temporal variations in chemotherapeutic response to improve breast cancer treatment efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. McGrail

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Though survival rates for women with stage I breast cancer have radically improved, treatment options remain poor for the 40% of women diagnosed with later-stage disease. For these patients, improved chemotherapeutic treatment strategies are critical to eradicate any disseminated tumor cells. Despite many promising new drugs in vitro, most ultimately fail in the clinic. One aspect often lost during testing is in vivo circulation half-lives rarely exceed 24 hours, whereas in vitro studies involve drug exposure for 2-3 days. Here, we show how mimicking these exposure times alters efficacy. Next, using this model we show how drug response is highly time-dependent by extending analysis of cell viability out to two weeks. Variations in response both with feeding and time were dependent on drug mechanism of action. Finally, we show that by implementing this temporal knowledge of drug effects to optimize scheduling of drug administration we are able to regain chemosensitivity in a Carboplatin-resistant cell line.

  3. Adaptive shaping system for both spatial and temporal profiles of a highly stabilized UV laser light source for a photocathode RF gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, H.; Dewa, H.; Taniuchi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Asaka, T.; Yanagida, K.; Suzuki, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Hanaki, H.; Matsui, F.

    2006-02-01

    We have been developing a stable and highly qualified ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse as a light source of an RF gun for an injector candidate of future light sources. Our gun cavity is a single-cell pillbox, and the copper inner wall is used as a photocathode. The chirped pulse amplification (CPA) Ti:sapphire laser system is operated at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. At the third harmonic generation (central wavelength—263 nm), the laser pulse energy after a 45 cm silica rod is up to 850 μJ/pulse. In its present status, the laser's pulse energy stability has been improved down to 0.2˜0.3% at the fundamental, and 0.7-1.4% (rms; 10 pps; 33,818 shots) at the third harmonic generation, respectively. This stability has been held for 1 month continuously, 24 h a day. The improvements we had passively implemented were to stabilize the laser system as well as the environmental conditions. We introduced a humidity-control system kept at 50-60% in a clean room to reduce damage to the optics. In addition, we prepared a deformable mirror for spatial shaping and a spatial light modulator based on fused-silica plates for temporal shaping. We are applying both the adaptive optics to automatic optimization of the electron beam bunch to produce lower emittance with the feedback routine. Before the improvements, the electron beam produced from a cathode suffered inhomogeneous distribution caused by the quantum efficiency effect, and some pulse distortions caused by its response time. However, we can now freely form any arbitrary electron beam distribution on the surface of the cathode.

  4. An Improved STARFM with Help of an Unmixing-Based Method to Generate High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Remote Sensing Data in Complex Heterogeneous Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Xie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing technology plays an important role in monitoring rapid changes of the Earth's surface. However, sensors that can simultaneously provide satellite images with both high temporal and spatial resolution haven’t been designed yet. This paper proposes an improved spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model (STARFM with the help of an Unmixing-based method (USTARFM to generate the high spatial and temporal data needed for the study of heterogeneous areas. The results showed that the USTARFM had higher accuracy than STARFM methods in two aspects of analysis: individual bands and of heterogeneity analysis. Taking the predicted NIR band as an example, the correlation coefficients (r for the USTARFM, STARFM and unmixing methods were 0.96, 0.95, 0.90, respectively (p-value < 0.001; Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values were 0.0245, 0.0300, 0.0401, respectively; and ERGAS values were 0.5416, 0.6507, 0.8737, respectively. The USTARM showed consistently higher performance than STARM when the degree of heterogeneity ranged from 2 to 10, highlighting that the use of this method provides the capacity to solve the data fusion problems faced when using STARFM. Additionally, the USTARFM method could help researchers achieve better performance than STARFM at a smaller window size from its heterogeneous land surface quantitative representation.

  5. Adaptation of macrophages to exercise training improves innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizaki, Takako; Takemasa, Tohru; Sakurai, Takuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru; Haga, Shukoh; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko; Ohno, Hideki

    2008-07-18

    The effects of 3-week exercise training on the functions of peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice were investigated. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) and proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages from trained mice was markedly higher than those from control mice. Meanwhile, exercise training decreased the steady state level of beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) mRNA in macrophages. Overexpression of beta(2)AR in the macrophage cell line RAW264 by transfecting with beta(2)AR cDNA suppressed NO synthase (NOS) II expression but dose not influenced proinflammatory cytokine expression. When expression of transfected beta(2)AR in RAWar cells was downregulated by a tetracycline repressor-regulated mammalian expression system, NOS II mRNA expression was significantly increased; this suggested that the changes in the beta(2)AR expression level in macrophages associated with exercise training play a role in the regulation of NO production following LPS stimulation. These findings indicate that exercise training improves macrophage innate immune function in a beta(2)AR-dependent and -independent manner.

  6. Classroom Keyboard Instruction Improves Kindergarten Children's Spatial-Temporal Performance: A Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Frances H.; Zupan, Mary Anne

    2000-01-01

    Determined the effects of classroom music instruction featuring the keyboard on the spatial-temporal reasoning of 62 kindergartners assigned to keyboard or no music conditions. Found that the keyboard group scored significantly higher than the no music group on both spatial-temporal tasks after 4 months of lessons, a difference that was greater in…

  7. Improving Prediction Accuracy for WSN Data Reduction by Applying Multivariate Spatio-Temporal Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Neuman de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method based on multivariate spatial and temporal correlation to improve prediction accuracy in data reduction for Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN. Prediction of data not sent to the sink node is a technique used to save energy in WSNs by reducing the amount of data traffic. However, it may not be very accurate. Simulations were made involving simple linear regression and multiple linear regression functions to assess the performance of the proposed method. The results show a higher correlation between gathered inputs when compared to time, which is an independent variable widely used for prediction and forecasting. Prediction accuracy is lower when simple linear regression is used, whereas multiple linear regression is the most accurate one. In addition to that, our proposal outperforms some current solutions by about 50% in humidity prediction and 21% in light prediction. To the best of our knowledge, we believe that we are probably the first to address prediction based on multivariate correlation for WSN data reduction.

  8. Improving prediction accuracy for WSN data reduction by applying multivariate spatio-temporal correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carlos; Gomes, Danielo G; Agoulmine, Nazim; de Souza, José Neuman

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a method based on multivariate spatial and temporal correlation to improve prediction accuracy in data reduction for wireless sensor networks (WSN). Prediction of data not sent to the sink node is a technique used to save energy in WSNs by reducing the amount of data traffic. However, it may not be very accurate. Simulations were made involving simple linear regression and multiple linear regression functions to assess the performance of the proposed method. The results show a higher correlation between gathered inputs when compared to time, which is an independent variable widely used for prediction and forecasting. Prediction accuracy is lower when simple linear regression is used, whereas multiple linear regression is the most accurate one. In addition to that, our proposal outperforms some current solutions by about 50% in humidity prediction and 21% in light prediction. To the best of our knowledge, we believe that we are probably the first to address prediction based on multivariate correlation for WSN data reduction.

  9. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  10. Stereoscopic 3D display technique using spatiotemporal interlacing has improved spatial and temporal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul V.; Kim, Joohwan; Banks, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) displays use spatial or temporal interlacing to send different images to the two eyes. Temporal interlacing delivers images to the left and right eyes alternately in time; it has high effective spatial resolution but is prone to temporal artifacts. Spatial interlacing delivers even pixel rows to one eye and odd rows to the other eye simultaneously; it is subject to spatial limitations such as reduced spatial resolution. We propose a spatiotemporal-interlacing protocol that interlaces the left- and right-eye views spatially, but with the rows being delivered to each eye alternating with each frame. We performed psychophysical experiments and found that flicker, motion artifacts, and depth distortion are substantially reduced relative to the temporal-interlacing protocol, and spatial resolution is better than in the spatial-interlacing protocol. Thus, the spatiotemporal-interlacing protocol retains the benefits of spatial and temporal interlacing while minimizing or even eliminating the drawbacks. PMID:25968758

  11. Temporal Subtraction of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Images for Improved Mass Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Christina M

    2007-01-01

    .... The purpose of this project is to determine the feasibility of using temporal subtraction on DBT phantom images to allow for easier and earlier detection of breast cancer than with either technique alone...

  12. Temporal change in genetic integrity suggests loss of local adaptation in a wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) population following introgression by farmed escapees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, V; O'Reilly, P T; Carr, J W; Berg, P R; Bernatchez, L

    2011-01-01

    In some wild Atlantic salmon populations, rapid declines in numbers of wild returning adults has been associated with an increase in the prevalence of farmed salmon. Studies of phenotypic variation have shown that interbreeding between farmed and wild salmon may lead to loss of local adaptation. Yet, few studies have attempted to assess the impact of interbreeding at the genome level, especially among North American populations. Here, we document temporal changes in the genetic makeup of the severely threatened Magaguadavic River salmon population (Bay of Fundy, Canada), a population that might have been impacted by interbreeding with farmed salmon for nearly 20 years. Wild and farmed individuals caught entering the river from 1980 to 2005 were genotyped at 112 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and/or eight microsatellite loci, to scan for potential shifts in adaptive genetic variation. No significant temporal change in microsatellite-based estimates of allele richness or gene diversity was detected in the wild population, despite its precipitous decline in numbers over the last two decades. This might reflect the effect of introgression from farmed salmon, which was corroborated by temporal change in linkage-disequilibrium. Moreover, SNP genome scans identified a temporal decrease in candidate loci potentially under directional selection. Of particular interest was a SNP previously shown to be strongly associated with an important quantitative trait locus for parr mark number, which retained its genetic distinctiveness between farmed and wild fish longer than other outliers. Overall, these results indicate that farmed escapees have introgressed with wild Magaguadavic salmon resulting in significant alteration of the genetic integrity of the native population, including possible loss of adaptation to wild conditions. PMID:21224876

  13. Improved Adaptive Vibe and the Application for Segmentation of Complex Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problems that basic Vibe algorithm cannot effectively eliminate the influence of background noise, follower shadow, and ghost under complex background effectively, an adaptive threshold algorithm, AdaVibe, based on the framework of basic Vibe is proposed. Aiming at the shortage of the basic algorithm, this paper puts forward some improvement measures in threshold setting, shadow eliminating, and ghost suppression. Firstly, judgment threshold takes adjustment with the changes of background. Secondly, a fast eliminating ghost algorithm depending on adaptive threshold is introduced. Finally, follower shadow is detected and inhibited effectively through the gray properties and texture characteristics. Experiments show that the proposed AdaVibe algorithm works well in complex environment without affecting computing speed and has stronger robustness and better adaptability than the basic algorithm. Meanwhile, the ghost and follower shadow can be absorbed quickly as well. Therefore, the accuracy of target detection is effectively improved.

  14. Adaptive physical activity improves mobility function and quality of life in chronic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, Richard F; Benvenuti, Francesco; Stanhope, Steven; Macellari, Velio; Taviani, Antonia; Nesi, Barbara; Weinrich, Michael; Stuart, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of an adaptive physical activity (APA) program on mobility function and quality of life (QOL) in chronic stroke patients. Twenty subjects with chronic hemiparesis completed a 2-month, combined group, class-home exercise regimen that emphasized mobility training. APA improved Berg Balance Scale scores (35 +/- 2 vs 45 +/- 2, p = 0.001), 6-minute walk distances (114 +/- 15 vs 142 +/- 7 m, p APA (p APA has the potential to improve gait, balance, and basic but not instrumental activities of daily living profiles in individuals with chronic stroke. Improved depression and SIS scores suggest APA improves stroke-specific outcomes related to QOL.

  15. Astronomical image denoising by means of improved adaptive backtracking-based matching pursuit algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qianshun; Bai, Jian; Yu, Feihong

    2014-11-10

    In an effort to improve compressive sensing and spare signal reconstruction by way of the backtracking-based adaptive orthogonal matching pursuit (BAOMP), a new sparse coding algorithm called improved adaptive backtracking-based OMP (ABOMP) is proposed in this study. Many aspects have been improved compared to the original BAOMP method, including replacing the fixed threshold with an adaptive one, adding residual feedback and support set verification, and others. Because of these ameliorations, the proposed algorithm can more precisely choose the atoms. By adding the adaptive step-size mechanism, it requires much less iteration and thus executes more efficiently. Additionally, a simple but effective contrast enhancement method is also adopted to further improve the denoising results and visual effect. By combining the IABOMP algorithm with the state-of-art dictionary learning algorithm K-SVD, the proposed algorithm achieves better denoising effects for astronomical images. Numerous experimental results show that the proposed algorithm performs successfully and effectively on Gaussian and Poisson noise removal.

  16. An improved adaptive genetic algorithm for image segmentation and vision alignment used in microelectronic bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fujun; Li, Junlan; Liu, Shiwei; Zhao, Xingyu; Zhang, Dawei; Tian, Yanling

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the precision and efficiency of microelectronic bonding, this paper presents an improved adaptive genetic algorithm (IAGA) for the image segmentation and vision alignment of the solder joints in the microelectronic chips. The maximum between-cluster variance (OTSU) threshold segmentation method was adopted for the image segmentation of microchips, and the IAGA was introduced to the threshold segmentation considering the features of the images. The performance of the image ...

  17. Improving Ingredient Substitution using Formal Concept Analysis and Adaptation of Ingredient Quantities with Mixed Linear Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Gaillard, Emmanuelle; Lieber, Jean; Nauer, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the participation of the Taaable team to the 2015 Computer Cooking Contest. The Taaable system addresses the mixology and the sandwich challenges. For the mixology challenge, the 2014 Taaable system was extended in two ways. First, a formal concept analysis approach is used to improve the ingredient substitution, which must take into account a limited set of available foods. Second, the adaptation of the ingredient quantities has also been improved ...

  18. Improving the Adaptability of Simulated Evolutionary Swarm Robots in Dynamically Changing Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store ‘good behaviour’ and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment. PMID:24599485

  19. Improving the bearing fault diagnosis efficiency by the adaptive stochastic resonance in a new nonlinear system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaole; Liu, Houguang; Yang, Jianhua; Litak, Grzegorz; Cheng, Gang; Han, Shuai

    2017-11-01

    It is a challenging task to detect the weak character signal in the noisy background. The stochastic resonance (SR) method has been wildly adopted recently because it can not only reduce the noise, but also enhance the weak feature information simultaneously. However, the traditional bistable model for SR is not perfect. So, this paper presents a new model with periodic potential to induce the adaptive SR. In the new model, based on the adaptive SR theory, the system parameters are simultaneously optimized by the improved artificial fish swarm algorithm. Meanwhile, the improved signal-to-noise ratio (ISNR) is set as the evaluation index. When the ISNR reaches a maximum, the output is optimal. In order to eliminate interference to obtain more useful information, the signals are preprocessed by Hilbert transform and High-pass filter before being input to the adaptive SR system. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, both numerical simulation and the vibration signal of the rolling element bearing from the lab experimental are adopted. Both of the results indicate that the adaptive SR model proposed shows better performance in weak character signals detection than the traditional adaptive SR in the bistable model. Meanwhile, the experimental signals with different working conditions are also processed by the new method. The results show that the method proposed could be more widely applied.

  20. Improving environmental and social targeting through adaptive management in Mexico's payments for hydrological services program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Katharine R E; Alix-Garcia, Jennifer M; Shapiro-Garza, Elizabeth; Fine, Leah R; Radeloff, Volker C; Aronson, Glen; Castillo, Selene; Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos; Yañez-Pagans, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Natural resource managers are often expected to achieve both environmental protection and economic development even when there are fundamental trade-offs between these goals. Adaptive management provides a theoretical structure for program administrators to balance social priorities in the presence of trade-offs and to improve conservation targeting. We used the case of Mexico's federal Payments for Hydrological Services program (PSAH) to illustrate the importance of adaptive management for improving program targeting. We documented adaptive elements of PSAH and corresponding changes in program eligibility and selection criteria. To evaluate whether these changes resulted in enrollment of lands of high environmental and social priority, we compared the environmental and social characteristics of the areas enrolled in the program with the characteristics of all forested areas in Mexico, all areas eligible for the program, and all areas submitted for application to the program. The program successfully enrolled areas of both high ecological and social priority, and over time, adaptive changes in the program's criteria for eligibility and selection led to increased enrollment of land scoring high on both dimensions. Three factors facilitated adaptive management in Mexico and are likely to be generally important for conservation managers: a supportive political environment, including financial backing and encouragement to experiment from the federal government; availability of relatively good social and environmental data; and active participation in the review process by stakeholders and outside evaluators. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Does a torsion adapter improve functional mobility, pain, and fatigue in patients with transtibial amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Ava D; Kracht, Rose; Klute, Glenn K

    2014-10-01

    Turning gait is an integral part of daily ambulation and likely poses a greater challenge for patients with transtibial amputation compared with walking a straight pathway. A torsion adapter is a prosthetic component that can increase transverse plane compliance of the prosthesis and decrease the torque applied to the residual limb, but whether this will improve patients' mobility, pain, and fatigue remains unknown. Does prescription of a torsion adapter translate to improvements in (1) functional mobility and (2) self-perceived pain and fatigue in moderately active patients with lower limb amputation? Ten unilateral transtibial amputees wore a torsion or rigid adapter in random order. Functional mobility was assessed through a field measurement using an activity monitor and through a laboratory measurement using a 6-minute walk test that included turns. The residual limb pain grade assessed self-perceived pain and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory assessed fatigue. We found relatively small functional differences for amputees wearing a torsion adapter versus a rigid adapter. Amputees wearing a torsion adapter tended to take more low- and medium-intensity steps per day (331 ± 365 and 437 ± 511 difference in steps; effect size = 0.44 and 0.17; confidence interval [CI], 70-592 and 71-802; p = 0.019 and 0.024, respectively). They also experienced less pain interference with activities (1.9 ± 1.7 change in score; effect size = 0.83; CI, 0.3-3.4; p = 0.026) when wearing a torsion adapter. However, these patients took a similar number of total steps per day, walked a comparable distance in 6 minutes, and reported similar residual limb pain and fatigue. For a moderately active group of amputees, the torsion adapter did not translate to substantial improvements in functional mobility and self-perceived pain and fatigue. The small increases in low- and medium-intensity activities with less pain interference when wearing a torsion adapter provides evidence to support

  2. Adaptive social learning strategies in temporally and spatially varying environments : how temporal vs. spatial variation, number of cultural traits, and costs of learning influence the evolution of conformist-biased transmission, payoff-biased transmission, and individual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, Wataru; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Henrich, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Long before the origins of agriculture human ancestors had expanded across the globe into an immense variety of environments, from Australian deserts to Siberian tundra. Survival in these environments did not principally depend on genetic adaptations, but instead on evolved learning strategies that permitted the assembly of locally adaptive behavioral repertoires. To develop hypotheses about these learning strategies, we have modeled the evolution of learning strategies to assess what conditions and constraints favor which kinds of strategies. To build on prior work, we focus on clarifying how spatial variability, temporal variability, and the number of cultural traits influence the evolution of four types of strategies: (1) individual learning, (2) unbiased social learning, (3) payoff-biased social learning, and (4) conformist transmission. Using a combination of analytic and simulation methods, we show that spatial-but not temporal-variation strongly favors the emergence of conformist transmission. This effect intensifies when migration rates are relatively high and individual learning is costly. We also show that increasing the number of cultural traits above two favors the evolution of conformist transmission, which suggests that the assumption of only two traits in many models has been conservative. We close by discussing how (1) spatial variability represents only one way of introducing the low-level, nonadaptive phenotypic trait variation that so favors conformist transmission, the other obvious way being learning errors, and (2) our findings apply to the evolution of conformist transmission in social interactions. Throughout we emphasize how our models generate empirical predictions suitable for laboratory testing.

  3. Combining offsets with precedence constraints to improve temporal analysis of cyclic real-time streaming applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtin, Philip Sebastian; Hausmans, J.P.H.M.; Bekooij, Marco Jan Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Stream processing applications executed on multiprocessor systems usually contain cyclic data dependencies due to the presence of bounded FIFO buffers and feedback loops, as well as cyclic resource dependencies due to the usage of shared processors. In recent works it has been shown that temporal

  4. Improved Cerebral Function in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy after Subtemporal Amygdalohippocampectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Shigetoshi; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Mitsueda, Takahiro; Satow, Takeshi; Taki, Junya; Kinoshita, Masako; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Ikeda, Akio; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2009-01-01

    The functional changes that occur throughout the human brain after the selective removal of an epileptogenic lesion remain unclear. Subtemporal selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) has been advocated as a minimally invasive surgical procedure for patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We evaluated the effects…

  5. An improved adaptive sampling and experiment design method for aerodynamic optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jiangtao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiment design method is a key to construct a highly reliable surrogate model for numerical optimization in large-scale project. Within the method, the experimental design criterion directly affects the accuracy of the surrogate model and the optimization efficient. According to the shortcomings of the traditional experimental design, an improved adaptive sampling method is proposed in this paper. The surrogate model is firstly constructed by basic sparse samples. Then the supplementary sampling position is detected according to the specified criteria, which introduces the energy function and curvature sampling criteria based on radial basis function (RBF network. Sampling detection criteria considers both the uniformity of sample distribution and the description of hypersurface curvature so as to significantly improve the prediction accuracy of the surrogate model with much less samples. For the surrogate model constructed with sparse samples, the sample uniformity is an important factor to the interpolation accuracy in the initial stage of adaptive sampling and surrogate model training. Along with the improvement of uniformity, the curvature description of objective function surface gradually becomes more important. In consideration of these issues, crowdness enhance function and root mean square error (RMSE feedback function are introduced in C criterion expression. Thus, a new sampling method called RMSE and crowdness enhance (RCE adaptive sampling is established. The validity of RCE adaptive sampling method is studied through typical test function firstly and then the airfoil/wing aerodynamic optimization design problem, which has high-dimensional design space. The results show that RCE adaptive sampling method not only reduces the requirement for the number of samples, but also effectively improves the prediction accuracy of the surrogate model, which has a broad prospects for applications.

  6. Effect of motor cognition program for improving temporal-spatial timing memory ability with mild cognitive impairment patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyeon

    2017-08-01

    This exploratory study evaluated motor cognition program for improving temporal-spatial timing memory ability with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients. The purpose was to explore the efficacies of motor cognition program according to practice methods, centering on coordination and observation pattern. Two practice methods were applied to the 40 MCI elder. In experiment 1, participants divided into two group as, one-hand practice group (n=20) and both-hands practice group (n=20). In experiment 2, participants divided into two group as, active observation group (n=20) and passive observation group (n=20). The participant was asked to alternatively press two buttons 6 times with the index finger hand with goal rhythm pattern (3,600 msec in total duration). In coordination pattern, bimanual practice was more effective for improving temporal-spatial timing memory ability than unilateral practice. In observation pattern, active observation showed better learning effect than passive observation. However, there was a learning effect even in passive observation pattern. Such a result claimed for the elderly, who has problem to do daily activity, could use observation of temporal-spatial timing task for improving cognitive ability.

  7. A self-adaptive step Cuckoo search algorithm based on dimension by dimension improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu REN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The choice of step length plays an important role in convergence speed and precision of Cuckoo search algorithm. In the paper, a self-adaptive step Cuckoo search algorithm based on dimensional improvement is provided. First, since the step in the original self-adaptive step Cuckoo search algorithm is not updated when the current position of the nest is in the optimal position, simple modification of the step is made for the update. Second, evaluation strategy based on dimension by dimension update is introduced to the modified self-adaptive step Cuckoo search algorithm. The experimental results show that the algorithm can balance the contradiction between the global convergence ability and the precision of optimization. Moreover, the proposed algorithm has better convergence speed.

  8. Moving forward with prisms: Sensory-motor adaptation improves gait initiation in Parkinson’s disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Helen Bultitude

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that the decreased walking speed; small, shuffling steps; and ‘freezing’ shown by patients with Parkinson’s disease could stem from an inability to tilt the body forward enough to provide sufficient forward propulsion. In two repeated-measures studies we examined whether adaptation to upward-shifting prisms, resulting in a downward after-effect, could improve gait initiation in healthy participants and patients with Parkinson’s disease. Faster forward stepping followed a brief (5 min exposure period for patients, and a longer (20 min exposure period for age-matched controls. Backward stepping was unchanged, and adaptation to downward-shifting prisms with control participants showed no effect on forward or backward stepping. These results suggest that adaptation of arm proprioception in the vertical plane may generalise to anterior-posterior postural control, presenting new possibilities for the treatment of gait disturbance in basal ganglia disorders.

  9. Autonomous emergency braking systems adapted to snowy road conditions improve drivers' perceived safety and trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koglbauer, Ioana; Holzinger, Jürgen; Eichberger, Arno; Lex, Cornelia

    2017-12-11

    This study investigated drivers' evaluation of a conventional autonomous emergency braking (AEB) system on high and reduced tire-road friction and compared these results to those of an AEB system adaptive to the reduced tire-road friction by earlier braking. Current automated systems such as the AEB do not adapt the vehicle control strategy to the road friction; for example, on snowy roads. Because winter precipitation is associated with a 19% increase in traffic crashes and a 13% increase in injuries compared to dry conditions, the potential of conventional AEB to prevent collisions could be significantly improved by including friction in the control algorithm. Whereas adaption is not legally required for a conventional AEB system, higher automated functions will have to adapt to the current tire-road friction because human drivers will not be required to monitor the driving environment at all times. For automated driving functions to be used, high levels of perceived safety and trust of occupants have to be reached with new systems. The application case of an AEB is used to investigate drivers' evaluation depending on the road condition in order to gain knowledge for the design of future driving functions. In a driving simulator, the conventional, nonadaptive AEB was evaluated on dry roads with high friction (μ = 1) and on snowy roads with reduced friction (μ = 0.3). In addition, an AEB system adapted to road friction was designed for this study and compared with the conventional AEB on snowy roads with reduced friction. Ninety-six drivers (48 males, 48 females) assigned to 5 age groups (20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, and 60-75 years) drove with AEB in the simulator. The drivers observed and evaluated the AEB's braking actions in response to an imminent rear-end collision at an intersection. The results show that drivers' safety and trust in the conventional AEB were significantly lower on snowy roads, and the nonadaptive autonomous braking strategy was

  10. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  11. Improvement of temporal signal-to-noise ratio of GRAPPA accelerated EPI using a FLASH based calibration scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talagala, S. L.; Sarlls, J. E.; Liu, S.; Inati, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that the temporal SNR of GRAPPA accelerated EPI can be enhanced and made more spatially uniform by using a FLASH based calibration scan. Methods EPI of a phantom and human brains were acquired at 3T without and with GRAPPA acceleration factor of 2. The GRAPPA accelerated data were reconstructed using calibration scans acquired with EPI and FLASH acquisition schemes. The increase in temporal signal fluctuation due to GRAPPA reconstruction was quantified and compared. Simulated g-factor maps were also created for different calibration scans. Results GRAPPA accelerated phantom data exhibited areas with high g values when using the EPI based calibration for reconstruction. The g-factor maps were uniform when using the FLASH calibration scan. g was greater than 1.1 in 74% of pixels in 64 × 64 data reconstructed with the EPI calibration compared to only 15% when using the FLASH calibration scan. Human data also showed abnormally high g regions when using the EPI calibration but not when using the FLASH calibration scan. Use of the FLASH calibration scan increased the whole brain temporal SNR by ~12 % without affecting the image quality. Experimental observations were confirmed by simulations. Conclusion A calibration scan based on a FLASH acquisition scheme can be used to improve the temporal SNR of GRAPPA accelerated EPI time series. PMID:26192822

  12. Coping capacities for improving adaptation pathways for flood protection in Can Tho, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, A.; Radhakrishnan, M.; Quan, N. H.; Gersonius, B.; Ashley, R.; Zevenbergen, C.

    2016-12-01

    Studying the evolution of coping and adaptation capacities is a prerequisite for preparing an effective flood management plan for the future, especially in the dynamic and fast changing cities of developing countries. The objectives, requirements, targets, design and performance of flood protection measures will have to be determined after taking into account, or in conjunction with, the coping capacities. A methodology is presented based on adaptation pathways to account for coping capacities and to assess the effect on flood protection measures. The adaptation pathways method determines the point of failure of a particular strategy based on the change in an external driver, a point in time or a socio economic situation where / at which the strategy can no longer meet its objective. Pathways arrived at based on this methodology reflect future reality by considering changing engineering standards along with future uncertainties, risk taking abilities and adaptation capacities. This pathways based methodology determines the Adaptation tipping points (ATP), `time of occurrence of ATP' of flood protection measures after accounting for coping capacities, evaluates the measures and then provides the means to determine the adaptation pathways. Application of this methodology for flood protection measures in Can Tho city in the Mekong delta reveals the effect of coping capacity on the usefulness of flood protection measures and the delay in occurrence of tipping points. Consideration of coping capacity in the system owing to elevated property floor levels lead to the postponement of tipping points and improved the adaptation pathways comprising flood protection measures such as dikes. This information is useful to decision makers for planning and phasing of investments in flood protection.

  13. Improving GPU-accelerated adaptive IDW interpolation algorithm using fast kNN search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-nearest neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is obtained by weighted interpolating using the power parameter. In this work, we develop a fast kNN search approach based on the space-partitioning data structure, even grid, to improve the previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm. The improved algorithm is composed of the stages of kNN search and weighted interpolating. To evaluate the performance of the improved algorithm, we perform five groups of experimental tests. The experimental results indicate: (1) the improved algorithm can achieve a speedup of up to 1017 over the corresponding serial algorithm; (2) the improved algorithm is at least two times faster than our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm; and (3) the utilization of fast kNN search can significantly improve the computational efficiency of the entire GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm.

  14. FAST TEMPORAL ADAPTATION OF ON-OFF UNITS IN THE 1ST OPTIC CHIASM OF THE BLOWFLY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSONIUS, NM; VANHATEREN, JH

    1991-01-01

    1. We recorded from spiking units in the first optic chiasm between lamina and medulla in the brain of the blowfly (Calliphora vicina). Both previously characterized neuron types, on-off units and sustaining units, were encountered. On-off units had a temporal frequency response with a lower cut-off

  15. Improving the response of accelerometers for automotive applications by using LMS adaptive filters: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Wilmar; de Vicente, Jesús; Sergiyenko, Oleg Y; Fernández, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the fast least-mean-squares (LMS) algorithm was used to both eliminate noise corrupting the important information coming from a piezoresisitive accelerometer for automotive applications, and improve the convergence rate of the filtering process based on the conventional LMS algorithm. The response of the accelerometer under test was corrupted by process and measurement noise, and the signal processing stage was carried out by using both conventional filtering, which was already shown in a previous paper, and optimal adaptive filtering. The adaptive filtering process relied on the LMS adaptive filtering family, which has shown to have very good convergence and robustness properties, and here a comparative analysis between the results of the application of the conventional LMS algorithm and the fast LMS algorithm to solve a real-life filtering problem was carried out. In short, in this paper the piezoresistive accelerometer was tested for a multi-frequency acceleration excitation. Due to the kind of test conducted in this paper, the use of conventional filtering was discarded and the choice of one adaptive filter over the other was based on the signal-to-noise ratio improvement and the convergence rate.

  16. Improving the Response of Accelerometers for Automotive Applications by Using LMS Adaptive Filters: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the fast least-mean-squares (LMS algorithm was used to both eliminate noise corrupting the important information coming from a piezoresisitive accelerometer for automotive applications, and improve the convergence rate of the filtering process based on the conventional LMS algorithm. The response of the accelerometer under test was corrupted by process and measurement noise, and the signal processing stage was carried out by using both conventional filtering, which was already shown in a previous paper, and optimal adaptive filtering. The adaptive filtering process relied on the LMS adaptive filtering family, which has shown to have very good convergence and robustness properties, and here a comparative analysis between the results of the application of the conventional LMS algorithm and the fast LMS algorithm to solve a real-life filtering problem was carried out. In short, in this paper the piezoresistive accelerometer was tested for a multi-frequency acceleration excitation. Due to the kind of test conducted in this paper, the use of conventional filtering was discarded and the choice of one adaptive filter over the other was based on the signal-to-noise ratio improvement and the convergence rate.

  17. Improving Grassland Inventories In Ireland- The Contribution Of Multi-Temporal Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brian; Nitze, Ingmar; Green, Stuart; Cawkwell, Fiona

    2013-12-01

    Accurate inventories of grassland are important for studies of carbon dynamics, biodiversity and agricultural management. Due to persistent cloud cover over Ireland and considering upcoming missions (Sentinel-1 & ALOS-2), the use of multi-temporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data provides an attractive solution for providing up-to-date grassland inventories. This study assesses the performance of two non-parametric classifiers; Random Forests (RF) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) in discriminating between different types of grasslands using multi- temporal SAR and ancillary data. The study sites cover two counties located in the midlands and northwest of Ireland and the EO-database consists of ENVISAT ASAR, ERS-2 and ALOS PALSAR data acquired throughout 2008. High overall accuracies (> 90%) are obtained for both study areas where the SVM and RF compare similarly.

  18. Adaptive slab laser beam quality improvement using a weighted least-squares reconstruction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanqiu; Dong, LiZhi; Chen, XiaoJun; Tan, Yi; Liu, Wenjin; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Ping; Xu, Bing; Ye, YuTang

    2016-04-10

    Adaptive optics is an important technology for improving beam quality in solid-state slab lasers. However, there are uncorrectable aberrations in partial areas of the beam. In the criterion of the conventional least-squares reconstruction method, it makes the zones with small aberrations nonsensitive and hinders this zone from being further corrected. In this paper, a weighted least-squares reconstruction method is proposed to improve the relative sensitivity of zones with small aberrations and to further improve beam quality. Relatively small weights are applied to the zones with large residual aberrations. Comparisons of results show that peak intensity in the far field improved from 1242 analog digital units (ADU) to 2248 ADU, and beam quality β improved from 2.5 to 2.0. This indicates the weighted least-squares method has better performance than the least-squares reconstruction method when there are large zonal uncorrectable aberrations in the slab laser system.

  19. Improving Sensorimotor Adaptation Following Long Duration Space Flight by Enhancing Vestibular Information Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, A. P.; Kofman, I. S.; De Dios, Y. E; Galvan, R.; Goel, R.; Miller, C.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Jeevarajan, J.; Reschke, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after gravitational transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" - immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals (Vestibular Stochastic Resonance, VSR) especially when combined with balance training exercises such as sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. This countermeasure to improve detection of vestibular signals is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation). To determine efficacy of vestibular stimulation on physiological and perceptual responses during otolith-canal conflicts and dynamic perturbations we have conducted a series of studies: We have shown that imperceptible binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system across the mastoids enhances balance performance in the mediolateral (ML) plane while standing on an unstable surface. We have followed up on the previous study showing VSR stimulation improved balance

  20. Assessment of the conservation measures partnership's effort to improve conservation outcomes through adaptive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, Kent H; Hulvey, Kristin B; Williamson, Matthew; Schwartz, Mark W

    2018-01-03

    Conservation practice has demonstrated an increasing desire for accountability of actions, particularly with respect to effectiveness, efficiency, and impact to specified objectives. This has been accompanied by increased attention to achieving adaptive management. In 2003 practitioners representing several prominent conservation non-governmental organizations (NGO's) launched a community of practice called the Conservation Measures Partnership (CMP). This organization has worked to establish standards of conservation practice to improve accountability of conservation actions through adaptive management. The focal organizing entity for the CMP has been the Open Standards for the Practice of Conservation (OS). We present results of an evaluation, using an online survey and personal interviews, of the first decade of CMP and the OS. We find that the CMP, has garnered a positive reputation among the leading scientists across conservation NGO's and succeeded at developing a large user base of the OS. However, the CMP has not fully achieved its goal of making the OS standard operating procedure for the large NGO's. This lack of institutionalization is attributable to multiple causes, including an increase in the number of competing decision support frameworks and challenges achieving full cycle adaptive management. We find that users strongly feel that the OS fosters better conservation practice and highly value the OS for improving their practice. A primary objective of the OS is to assist practitioners to achieve full cycle adaptive management in order to better integrate learning into improving the effectiveness and efficiency of actions. However, we find that most practitioners have not yet achieved cycle completion for their projects. We summarize recommendations for improving effectiveness of the CMP, OS, and generally for conservation practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Sentence Syntax and Content in the Human Temporal Lobe: An fMRI Adaptation Study in Auditory and Visual Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, Anne-Dominique; Oppenheim, Catherine; Rizzi, Luigi; Dehaene, Stanislas; Pallier, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Priming effects have been well documented in behavioral psycholinguistics experiments: The processing of a word or a sentence is typically facilitated when it shares lexico-semantic or syntactic features with a previously encountered stimulus. Here, we used fMRI priming to investigate which brain areas show adaptation to the repetition of a…

  2. Research on Improved Adaptive Control for Static Synchronous Compensator in Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problems of “explosion of term,” uncertain parameter in static synchronous compensator (STATCOM system with nonlinear time-delay. An improved adaptive controller is proposed to enhance the transient stability of system states and reduce computational complexity of STATCOM control system. In contrast to backstepping control scheme in high order systems, the problem of “explosion of term” is avoided by designing dynamic surface controller. The low pass filter is included to allow a design where the model is not differentiated and thus has prevented the mathematical complexities effectively. In addition, unlike the traditional adaptive control schemes, the certainty equivalence principle is not required for estimating the uncertain parameter by system immersion and manifold invariant (I&I adaptive control. A smooth function is added to ensure that the estimation error converges to zero in finite time. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is verified by the simulations. Compared with adaptive backstepping and proportion integration differentiation (PID, the oscillation amplitudes of transient response are reduced by nearly half, and the time of reaching steady state is shortened by at least 11%.

  3. Using temporal sampling to improve attribution of source populations for invasive species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn J Goldstien

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have applied genetic tools to the identification of source populations and transport pathways for invasive species. However, there are many gaps in the knowledge obtained from such studies because comprehensive and meaningful spatial sampling to meet these goals is difficult to achieve. Sampling populations as they arrive at the border should fill the gaps in source population identification, but such an advance has not yet been achieved with genetic data. Here we use previously acquired genetic data to assign new incursions as they invade populations within New Zealand ports and marinas. We also investigated allelelic frequency change in these recently established populations over a two-year period, and assessed the effect of temporal genetic sampling on our ability to assign new incursions to their population of source. We observed shifts in the allele frequencies among populations, as well as the complete loss of some alleles and the addition of alleles novel to New Zealand, within these recently established populations. There was no significant level of genetic differentiation observed in our samples between years, and the use of these temporal data did alter the assignment probability of new incursions. Our study further suggests that new incursions can add genetic variation to the population in a single introduction event as the founders themselves are often more genetically diverse than theory initially predicted.

  4. Improving Early Adaptation Following Long Duration Spaceflight by Enhancing Vestibular Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Kofman, Igor; DeDios, Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Cohen, Helen; Jeevarajan, Jerome; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott; hide

    2014-01-01

    Crewmember adapted to the microgravity state may need to egress the vehicle within a few minutes for safety and operational reasons after g-transitions. The transition from one sensorimotor state to another consists of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic-adaptive and have been demonstrated in astronauts returning after long duration space flight. Strategic modifications represent "early adaptation" -immediate and transitory changes in control that are employed to deal with short-term changes in the environment. If these modifications are prolonged then plastic-adaptive changes are evoked that modify central nervous system function, automating new behavioral responses. More importantly, this longer term adaptive recovery mechanism was significantly associated with their strategic ability to recover on the first day after return to Earth G. We are developing a method based on stochastic resonance (SR) to enhance information transfer by improving the brain's ability to detect vestibular signals especially when combined with balance training exercises for rapid improvement in functional skill, for standing and mobility. The countermeasure to improve post-flight balance and locomotor disturbances is a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing low imperceptible levels of white noise based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The techniques for improving signal detection using SVS may thus provide additional information to improve such strategic abilities and thus help in significantly reducing the number of days required to recover functional performance to preflight levels after long duration space flight. We have conducted a series of studies to document the efficacy of SVS stimulation on balance/locomotion tasks on unstable surfaces and motion tracking tasks during intra-vestibular system conflicts. In an initial study, we showed that SVS improved overall balance

  5. 3T MRI quantification of hippocampal volume and signal in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy improves detection of hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, A C; Kubota, B; Bergo, F P G; Campos, B M; Cendes, F

    2014-01-01

    In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, MR imaging quantification of hippocampal volume and T2 signal can improve the sensitivity for detecting hippocampal sclerosis. However, the current contributions of these analyses for the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis in 3T MRI are not clear. Our aim was to compare visual analysis, volumetry, and signal quantification of the hippocampus for detecting hippocampal sclerosis in 3T MRI. Two hundred three patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy defined by clinical and electroencephalogram criteria had 3T MRI visually analyzed by imaging epilepsy experts. As a second step, we performed automatic quantification of hippocampal volumes with FreeSurfer and T2 relaxometry with an in-house software. MRI of 79 healthy controls was used for comparison. Visual analysis classified 125 patients (62%) as having signs of hippocampal sclerosis and 78 (38%) as having normal MRI findings. Automatic volumetry detected atrophy in 119 (95%) patients with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 10 (13%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. Relaxometry analysis detected hyperintense T2 signal in 103 (82%) patients with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 15 (19%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. Considered together, volumetry plus relaxometry detected signs of hippocampal sclerosis in all except 1 (99%) patient with visually detected hippocampal sclerosis and in 22 (28%) with visually normal MR imaging findings. In 3T MRI visually inspected by experts, quantification of hippocampal volume and signal can increase the detection of hippocampal sclerosis in 28% of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

  6. Adaptive optics in spinning disk microscopy: improved contrast and brightness by a simple and fast method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraisier, V; Clouvel, G; Jasaitis, A; Dimitrov, A; Piolot, T; Salamero, J

    2015-09-01

    Multiconfocal microscopy gives a good compromise between fast imaging and reasonable resolution. However, the low intensity of live fluorescent emitters is a major limitation to this technique. Aberrations induced by the optical setup, especially the mismatch of the refractive index and the biological sample itself, distort the point spread function and further reduce the amount of detected photons. Altogether, this leads to impaired image quality, preventing accurate analysis of molecular processes in biological samples and imaging deep in the sample. The amount of detected fluorescence can be improved with adaptive optics. Here, we used a compact adaptive optics module (adaptive optics box for sectioning optical microscopy), which was specifically designed for spinning disk confocal microscopy. The module overcomes undesired anomalies by correcting for most of the aberrations in confocal imaging. Existing aberration detection methods require prior illumination, which bleaches the sample. To avoid multiple exposures of the sample, we established an experimental model describing the depth dependence of major aberrations. This model allows us to correct for those aberrations when performing a z-stack, gradually increasing the amplitude of the correction with depth. It does not require illumination of the sample for aberration detection, thus minimizing photobleaching and phototoxicity. With this model, we improved both signal-to-background ratio and image contrast. Here, we present comparative studies on a variety of biological samples. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  8. Computing Adaptive Feature Weights with PSO to Improve Android Malware Detection

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    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Android malware detection is a complex and crucial issue. In this paper, we propose a malware detection model using a support vector machine (SVM method based on feature weights that are computed by information gain (IG and particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithms. The IG weights are evaluated based on the relevance between features and class labels, and the PSO weights are adaptively calculated to result in the best fitness (the performance of the SVM classification model. Moreover, to overcome the defects of basic PSO, we propose a new adaptive inertia weight method called fitness-based and chaotic adaptive inertia weight-PSO (FCAIW-PSO that improves on basic PSO and is based on the fitness and a chaotic term. The goal is to assign suitable weights to the features to ensure the best Android malware detection performance. The results of experiments indicate that the IG weights and PSO weights both improve the performance of SVM and that the performance of the PSO weights is better than that of the IG weights.

  9. Compound faults detection of rotating machinery using improved adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinglong; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia; Yuan, Jing

    2013-07-01

    Due to the character of diversity and complexity, the compound faults detection of rotating machinery under non-stationary operation turns into a challenging task. Multiwavelet with two or more base functions and many excellent properties provides a possibility to detect and extract all the features of compound faults at one time. However, the fixed basis functions independent of the vibration signal may decrease the accuracy of fault detection. Moreover, the decomposition result of discrete multiwavelet transform does not possess time invariance, which is harmful to extract the feature of periodical impulses. To overcome these deficiencies, based on the Hermite splines interpolation, taking the minimum envelope spectrum entropy as the optimization objective, adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet is developed. Additionally, in order to eliminate error propagation of decomposition results, adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet is improved by adding the normalization factors. As an effective method, Hilbert transform demodulation analysis is used to extract the fault feature from the high frequency modulation signal. The proposed method incorporating improved adaptive redundant lifting multiwavelet (IARLM) with Hilbert transform demodulation analysis is applied to compound faults detection for the simulation experiment, rolling element bearing test bench and traveling unit of electric locomotive. Compared with some other fault detection methods, the results show the superior effectiveness and reliability on the compound faults detection.

  10. SU-E-I-38: Improved Metal Artifact Correction Using Adaptive Dual Energy Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, X; Elder, E; Roper, J; Dhabaan, A [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Methods: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Results: Highly attenuating copper rods cause severe streaking artifacts on standard CT images. EDEC improves the image quality, but cannot eliminate the streaking artifacts. Compared to EDEC, the proposed ADEC method further reduces the streaking resulting from metallic inserts and beam-hardening effects and obtains material decomposition images with significantly improved accuracy. Conclusion: We propose an adaptive dual energy calibration method to correct for metal artifacts. ADEC is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan phantom, and shows superior metal artifact correction performance. In the future, we will further evaluate the performance of the proposed method with phantom and patient data.

  11. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorn Trommelen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  12. Stable adaptive PI control for permanent magnet synchronous motor drive based on improved JITL technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiqi; Tang, Xiaoqi; Song, Bao; Lu, Shaowu; Ye, Bosheng

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, a stable adaptive PI control strategy based on the improved just-in-time learning (IJITL) technique is proposed for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drive. Firstly, the traditional JITL technique is improved. The new IJITL technique has less computational burden and is more suitable for online identification of the PMSM drive system which is highly real-time compared to traditional JITL. In this way, the PMSM drive system is identified by IJITL technique, which provides information to an adaptive PI controller. Secondly, the adaptive PI controller is designed in discrete time domain which is composed of a PI controller and a supervisory controller. The PI controller is capable of automatically online tuning the control gains based on the gradient descent method and the supervisory controller is developed to eliminate the effect of the approximation error introduced by the PI controller upon the system stability in the Lyapunov sense. Finally, experimental results on the PMSM drive system show accurate identification and favorable tracking performance. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Improvement of Spatial-Temporal PM2.5 Resolution in Taiwan by Using Data Assimilation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Qing; Lin, Yuan-Chien

    2017-04-01

    Forecasting air pollution concentration, e.g., the concentration of PM2.5, is of great significance to protect human health and the environment. Accurate prediction of PM2.5 concentrations is limited in number and the data quality of air quality monitoring stations. The spatial and temporal variations of PM2.5 concentrations are measured by 76 National Air Quality Monitoring Stations (built by the TW-EPA) in Taiwan. The National Air Quality Monitoring Stations are costly and scarce because of the highly precise instrument and their size. Therefore, many places still out of the range of National Air Quality Monitoring Stations. Recently, there are an enormous number of portable air quality sensors called "AirBox" developed jointly by the Taiwan government and a private company. By virtue of its price and portative, the AirBox can provide higher resolution of space-time PM2.5 measurement. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and data quality are different between AirBox and National Air Quality Monitoring Stations. To integrate the heterogeneous PM2.5 data, the data assimilation method should be performed before further analysis. In this study, we propose a data assimilation method based on Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), which is a variant of classic Kalman Filter, can be used to combine additional heterogeneous data from different source while modeling to improve the estimation of spatial-temporal PM2.5 concentration. The assimilation procedure uses the advantages of the two kinds of heterogeneous data and merges them to produce the final estimation. The results have shown that by combining AirBox PM2.5 data as additional information in our model based EnKF can bring the better estimation of spatial-temporal PM2.5 concentration and improve the it's space-time resolution. Under the approach proposed in this study, higher spatial-temporal resoultion could provide a very useful information for a better spatial-temporal data analysis and further environmental

  14. An improved adaptive weighting function method for State Estimation in Power Systems with VSC-MTDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Yang, Xiaonan; Lang, Yansheng; Song, Xuri; Wang, Minkun; Luo, Yadi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Peng

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents an effective approach for state estimation in power systems that include multi-terminal voltage source converter based high voltage direct current (VSC-MTDC), called improved adaptive weighting function method. The proposed approach is simplified in which the VSC-MTDC system is solved followed by the AC system. Because the new state estimation method only changes the weight and keeps the matrix dimension unchanged. Accurate and fast convergence of AC/DC system can be realized by adaptive weight function method. This method also provides the technical support for the simulation analysis and accurate regulation of AC/DC system. Both the oretical analysis and numerical tests verify practicability, validity and convergence of new method.

  15. Improving preschooler conduct adaptation by using a social learning program based on motion games

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    Zsuzsa Szilárda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Being aware of the changes which occur under the influence of environmental conditions, education, culture and social roles upon the child is indispensable with a view to build up a conduct adapted to the social environment. For any preschooler child, entering kindergarten is an important social event and getting adapted to the new situation is not easy. Broadening the relational framework with objects, other individuals, with one’s own self, results in disciplining preschooler conducts and increasing the number of socially desirable conducts. Relying upon the above statements, this study is aimed at working out a social learning programme made up of motion games involving socialization/cooperation elements intended for inducing amelioration in terms of the child’s conduct during the process of adaptation to the kindergarten environment. The experiment was conducted using a sample of “little group” preschoolers (children 3-4 years of age. As research methods, the following have been used: studying the reference literature, the method of pedagogical observation, the method of experiment and the method of playing. Further to the practical application of the programme worked out with a view to enhance the adaptation conduct in the said subjects, the experimental group proved to have undergone a significant positive evolution and each subject showed improvements considering the conduct of adaptation to kindergarten conditions, as highlighted by the change i.e. higher values in terms of the individual scores achieved at the final test. Preschool education is meant to provide all possible ways and means to enable any child’s integration into groups of children of a peer age, to develop sociability in children and to create favorable conditions for building out inter-children networks.

  16. High baseline activity in inferior temporal cortex improves neural and behavioral discriminability during visual categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazli eEmadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous firing is a ubiquitous property of neural activity in the brain. Recent literature suggests that this baseline activity plays a key role in perception. However, it is not known how the baseline activity contributes to neural coding and behavior. Here, by recording from the single neurons in the inferior temporal cortex of monkeys performing a visual categorization task, we thoroughly explored the relationship between baseline activity, the evoked response, and behavior. Specifically we found that a low-frequency (< 8 Hz oscillation in the spike train, prior and phase-locked to the stimulus onset, was correlated with increased gamma power and neuronal baseline activity. This enhancement of the baseline activity was then followed by an increase in the neural selectivity and the response reliability and eventually a higher behavioral performance.

  17. Improvement of axial excitation confinement in temporal focusing-based multiphoton microscopy via spatially modulated illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2017-02-01

    Conventional temporal focusing-based multiphoton excitation microscopy (TFMPEM) can offer widefield optical sectioning with an axial excitation confinement (AEC) of a few microns. Herein, a developed TFMPEM with a digital micromirror device (DMD), acting as the blazed grating for light spatial dispersion and simultaneous patterned illumination, has been extended to implement spatially modulated illumination at structured frequency and orientation. By implementing the spatially modulated illumination, the beam coverage at the back-focal aperture of the objective lens can be increased. As a result, the AEC can be condensed from 3.0 μm to 1.5 μm in full width at half maximum for a 2-fold enhancement. Furthermore, by using HiLo microscopy with two structured illuminations at the same spatial frequency but different orientation, biotissue images according to the structured illumination with condensed AEC is obviously superior in contrast and scattering suppression.

  18. Improved depth resolution in video-rate line-scanning multiphoton microscopy using temporal focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Eran; Oron, Dan; Silberberg, Yaron

    2005-07-01

    By introducing spatiotemporal pulse shaping techniques to multiphoton microscopy it is possible to obtain video-rate images with depth resolution similar to point-by-point scanning multiphoton microscopy while mechanically scanning in only one dimension. This is achieved by temporal focusing of the illumination pulse: The pulsed excitation field is compressed as it propagates through the sample, reaching its shortest duration (and highest peak intensity) at the focal plane before stretching again beyond it. This method is applied to produce, in a simple and scalable setup, video-rate two-photon excitation fluorescence images of Drosophila egg chambers with nearly 100,000 effective pixels and 1.5 μm depth resolution.

  19. Improved efficiency of maximum likelihood analysis of time series with temporally correlated errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John O.

    2017-01-01

    Most time series of geophysical phenomena have temporally correlated errors. From these measurements, various parameters are estimated. For instance, from geodetic measurements of positions, the rates and changes in rates are often estimated and are used to model tectonic processes. Along with the estimates of the size of the parameters, the error in these parameters needs to be assessed. If temporal correlations are not taken into account, or each observation is assumed to be independent, it is likely that any estimate of the error of these parameters will be too low and the estimated value of the parameter will be biased. Inclusion of better estimates of uncertainties is limited by several factors, including selection of the correct model for the background noise and the computational requirements to estimate the parameters of the selected noise model for cases where there are numerous observations. Here, I address the second problem of computational efficiency using maximum likelihood estimates (MLE). Most geophysical time series have background noise processes that can be represented as a combination of white and power-law noise, 1/fα">1/fα1/fα with frequency, f. With missing data, standard spectral techniques involving FFTs are not appropriate. Instead, time domain techniques involving construction and inversion of large data covariance matrices are employed. Bos et al. (J Geod, 2013. doi:10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0) demonstrate one technique that substantially increases the efficiency of the MLE methods, yet is only an approximate solution for power-law indices >1.0 since they require the data covariance matrix to be Toeplitz. That restriction can be removed by simply forming a data filter that adds noise processes rather than combining them in quadrature. Consequently, the inversion of the data covariance matrix is simplified yet provides robust results for a wider range of power-law indices.

  20. Improved efficiency of maximum likelihood analysis of time series with temporally correlated errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John

    2017-08-01

    Most time series of geophysical phenomena have temporally correlated errors. From these measurements, various parameters are estimated. For instance, from geodetic measurements of positions, the rates and changes in rates are often estimated and are used to model tectonic processes. Along with the estimates of the size of the parameters, the error in these parameters needs to be assessed. If temporal correlations are not taken into account, or each observation is assumed to be independent, it is likely that any estimate of the error of these parameters will be too low and the estimated value of the parameter will be biased. Inclusion of better estimates of uncertainties is limited by several factors, including selection of the correct model for the background noise and the computational requirements to estimate the parameters of the selected noise model for cases where there are numerous observations. Here, I address the second problem of computational efficiency using maximum likelihood estimates (MLE). Most geophysical time series have background noise processes that can be represented as a combination of white and power-law noise, 1/f^{α } with frequency, f. With missing data, standard spectral techniques involving FFTs are not appropriate. Instead, time domain techniques involving construction and inversion of large data covariance matrices are employed. Bos et al. (J Geod, 2013. doi: 10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0) demonstrate one technique that substantially increases the efficiency of the MLE methods, yet is only an approximate solution for power-law indices >1.0 since they require the data covariance matrix to be Toeplitz. That restriction can be removed by simply forming a data filter that adds noise processes rather than combining them in quadrature. Consequently, the inversion of the data covariance matrix is simplified yet provides robust results for a wider range of power-law indices.

  1. Method of Improved Fuzzy Contrast Combined Adaptive Threshold in NSCT for Medical Image Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Noises and artifacts are introduced to medical images due to acquisition techniques and systems. This interference leads to low contrast and distortion in images, which not only impacts the effectiveness of the medical image but also seriously affects the clinical diagnoses. This paper proposes an algorithm for medical image enhancement based on the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT, which combines adaptive threshold and an improved fuzzy set. First, the original image is decomposed into the NSCT domain with a low-frequency subband and several high-frequency subbands. Then, a linear transformation is adopted for the coefficients of the low-frequency component. An adaptive threshold method is used for the removal of high-frequency image noise. Finally, the improved fuzzy set is used to enhance the global contrast and the Laplace operator is used to enhance the details of the medical images. Experiments and simulation results show that the proposed method is superior to existing methods of image noise removal, improves the contrast of the image significantly, and obtains a better visual effect.

  2. Method of Improved Fuzzy Contrast Combined Adaptive Threshold in NSCT for Medical Image Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Jia, ZhenHong; Yang, Jie; Kasabov, Nikola

    2017-01-01

    Noises and artifacts are introduced to medical images due to acquisition techniques and systems. This interference leads to low contrast and distortion in images, which not only impacts the effectiveness of the medical image but also seriously affects the clinical diagnoses. This paper proposes an algorithm for medical image enhancement based on the nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), which combines adaptive threshold and an improved fuzzy set. First, the original image is decomposed into the NSCT domain with a low-frequency subband and several high-frequency subbands. Then, a linear transformation is adopted for the coefficients of the low-frequency component. An adaptive threshold method is used for the removal of high-frequency image noise. Finally, the improved fuzzy set is used to enhance the global contrast and the Laplace operator is used to enhance the details of the medical images. Experiments and simulation results show that the proposed method is superior to existing methods of image noise removal, improves the contrast of the image significantly, and obtains a better visual effect.

  3. An Improved Adaptive Template Size Pixel-Tracking Method for Monitoring Large-Gradient Mining Subsidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilei Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of large-gradient deformation caused by coal mining is of great significance to the prevention and management of disasters in mining areas. The interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR method captures the small-gradient ground deformation on the edge of the subsidence basin accurately but is unreliable for capturing large-gradient deformation. The intensity-based pixel-tracking method (e.g., the normalized cross-correlation (NCC method can overcome the limitations of InSAR’s maximum detectable displacement gradient and incoherence. However, the pixel-tracking method is sensitive to template size. It is difficult to estimate ground subsidence accurately by the conventional pixel-tracking method with fixed template size. In this paper, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is redefined and an improved locally adaptive template size method is proposed by identifying optimal template adaptively based on maximization of the redefined SNR. The constraint radius is used to constrain the search area in this improved method. The frequency of misrepresentation is reduced by finding the peak of the correlation coefficient surface within the search area. Both simulation data and real ground subsidence data are used to test this algorithm. The results show that this method can improve monitoring accuracy compared with the traditional pixel-tracking method for fixed template size.

  4. Enhanced detectability of small objects in correlated clutter using an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ffrench, P A; Zeidler, J H; Ku, W H

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) adaptive filtering is a technique that can be applied to many image processing applications. This paper will focus on the development of an improved 2-D adaptive lattice algorithm (2-D AL) and its application to the removal of correlated clutter to enhance the detectability of small objects in images. The two improvements proposed here are increased flexibility in the calculation of the reflection coefficients and a 2-D method to update the correlations used in the 2-D AL algorithm. The 2-D AL algorithm is shown to predict correlated clutter in image data and the resulting filter is compared with an ideal Wiener-Hopf filter. The results of the clutter removal will be compared to previously published ones for a 2-D least mean square (LMS) algorithm. 2-D AL is better able to predict spatially varying clutter than the 2-D LMS algorithm, since it converges faster to new image properties. Examples of these improvements are shown for a spatially varying 2-D sinusoid in white noise and simulated clouds. The 2-D LMS and 2-D AL algorithms are also shown to enhance a mammogram image for the detection of small microcalcifications and stellate lesions.

  5. Molecular Docking Improvement: Coefficient Adaptive Genetic Algorithms for Multiple Scoring Functions

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    Zhengfu Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a coefficient adaptive scoring method of molecular docking is presented to improve the docking accuracy with multiple available scoring functions. Based on force-field scoring function, we considered hydrophobic and deformation as well in the proposed method, Instead of simple combination with fixed weights, coefficients of each factor are adaptive in searching procedure. In order to improve the docking accuracy and stability, knowledge-based scoring function is used as another scoring factor. Genetic algorithm with the multi-population evolution and entropy-based searching technique with narrowing down space is used to solve the optimization model for molecular docking. To evaluate the method, we carried out a numerical experiment with 134 protein- ligand complexes of the publicly available GOLD test set. The results validated that it improved the docking accuracy over the individual force-field scoring. In addition, analyses were given to show the disadvantage of individual scoring model. Through the comparison with other popular docking software, the proposed method showed higher accuracy. Among more than 77% of the complexes, the docked results were within 1.0 Å according to Root- Mean-Square Deviation (RMSD of the X-ray structure. The average computing time obtained here is 563.9 s.

  6. Adapted Tango improves aspects of participation in older adults versus individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Manal; Bozzorg, Ariyana; Hackney, Madeleine E

    2017-11-01

    Our aims were to determine (1) the impact of aging versus combined aging and disease on participation and (2) participation before and after a 12-week, Adapted Tango dance intervention (AT) in older adults with and without Parkinson's disease (PD). Participant responses to open and closed-ended questions on the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire (IPA) were recorded before, one-week-after, and three-months after 20 lessons of AT. Twenty-five older individuals with PD and 63 older adults without PD were initially enrolled and assessed, and 44 older adults and 22 individuals with PD finished the program with post-testing. Thematic analysis revealed major themes of difficulty with mobility, transportation and financial management, feelings of being forced to limit activities, and interest in work or volunteering for both groups at baseline and post-test. At post-test, additional emphasis on resilience in the face of challenges was noted. No differences were noted between groups on the IPA subscales at baseline. Quantitative analysis with a 2 (group) × 3 (time) MANOVA revealed a main effect of time (p Tango improved aspects of participation for these cohorts of older adults with and without PD. Implications for Rehabilitation Both Parkinson's disease and neurotypical aging can negatively impact participation in life's activities in older adults. Adapted Tango is an alternative therapy that has improved quality of life and mobility in people with PD and older adults. Quantitative data show that Adapted Tango may improve some aspects of participation for older adults with and without PD. Open-ended responses reveal aging and combined aging and disease-related issues have a lasting impact upon participation.

  7. Optimization of Classification Strategies of Acetowhite Temporal Patterns towards Improving Diagnostic Performance of Colposcopy

    OpenAIRE

    Guti?rrez-Fragoso, Karina; Acosta-Mesa, H?ctor Gabriel; Cruz-Ram?rez, Nicandro; Hern?ndez-Jim?nez, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Efforts have been being made to improve the diagnostic performance of colposcopy, trying to help better diagnose cervical cancer, particularly in developing countries. However, improvements in a number of areas are still necessary, such as the time it takes to process the full digital image of the cervix, the performance of the computing systems used to identify different kinds of tissues, and biopsy sampling. In this paper, we explore three different, well-known automatic classification meth...

  8. Bayesian adaptive design: improving the effectiveness of monitoring of the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Su Yun; McGree, James M; Drovandi, Christopher C; Caley, M Julian; Mengersen, Kerrie L

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring programs are essential for understanding patterns, trends, and threats in ecological and environmental systems. However, such programs are costly in terms of dollars, human resources, and technology, and complex in terms of balancing short- and long-term requirements. In this work, We develop new statistical methods for implementing cost-effective adaptive sampling and monitoring schemes for coral reef that can better utilize existing information and resources, and which can incorporate available prior information. Our research was motivated by developing efficient monitoring practices for Australia's Great Barrier Reef. We develop and implement two types of adaptive sampling schemes, static and sequential, and show that they can be more informative and cost-effective than an existing (nonadaptive) monitoring program. Our methods are developed in a Bayesian framework with a range of utility functions relevant to environmental monitoring. Our results demonstrate the considerable potential for adaptive design to support improved management outcomes in comparison to set-and-forget styles of surveillance monitoring. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Improvement of small incision transscleral sulcus fixation of Akreos Adapt AO foldable intraocular lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao He

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:to observe the effect of modified surgery of small incision transscleral sulcus fixation of Akreos Adapt AO foldable intraocular lens.METHODS:The study included 37 patients(37 eyeswho could not be performed the regular implantation of posterior chamber intraocular lens for the rupture of posterior capsule or for the zonular dialysis caused by trauma, congenital or surgery. Bausch & lomb Akreos Adapt AO fordable intraocular lens, VE22000 implantation device were applied in this study. Regular 2.4mm transparent cornea incision and pocket-like sclera incision were made. The intraocular lens were transscleral sulcus fixed by 10/0 prolene suture and the suture was buried within the scleral incision.RESULTS:The intraocular lenses were all well posited and the postoperative visual acuity(VAwas improved in all patients. Three eyes(8%were≥0.8 while 18 eyes(49%>0.4~≤0.6 and the remaining 16(43%were ≤ 0.4 at 3mo after surgery.Cornea astigmatism was 1.73D±1.22D and 1.62±1.34D before and after surgery, no statistic significance was observed(PCONCLUSION:The modified surgery of 2.4mm small incision transscleral sulcus fixation of Akreos Adapt AO foldable intraocular lens has the following advantages such as:good visual results, less postoperative astigmatism, small surgery incision, steady intraocular lens, less manipulation, less complication and more effective.

  10. Therapeutic Alliance With Depressed Adolescents: Predictor or Outcome? Disentangling Temporal Confounds to Understand Early Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouliere, Christa D; Reyes, J P; Shirk, Stephen; Karver, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Psychotherapy research reveals consistent associations between therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes in the youth literature; however, past research frequently suffered measurement issues that obscured temporal relationships between alliance and symptomatology by measuring variables later in therapy, thereby precluding examination of important early changes. The current study aimed to explore the directions of effect between alliance and outcome early in therapy with adolescents by examining associations between first- and fourth-session therapeutic alliance and symptomatology. Thirty-four adolescents (∼63% female, 38% ethnic/racial minority) participated in a school-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescents with depression. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory at baseline and Session 4, and therapeutic alliance was coded from audiotapes of Sessions 1 and 4 by objective coders using the Alliance Observation Coding System. Autoregressive path analyses determined that first-session therapeutic alliance was a strong significant predictor of Session 4 depression symptoms, but pretreatment depression scores were not significantly predictive of subsequent therapeutic alliance. Adding reciprocal effects between alliance and depression scores did not adversely affect model fit, suggesting that reciprocal effects may exist. Early therapeutic alliance with adolescents is critical to fostering early gains in depressive symptomatology. Knowing alliance's subsequent effect on youth outcomes, clinicians should increase effort to foster a strong relationship in early sessions and additional research should be conducted on the reciprocal effects of therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome in adolescence.

  11. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Deliano

    Full Text Available Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning.

  12. Temporal Changes in Mortality Related to Extreme Temperatures for 15 Cities in Northeast Asia: Adaptation to Heat and Maladaptation to Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yeonseung; Noh, Heesang; Honda, Yasushi; Hashizume, Masahiro; Bell, Michelle L; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon; Kim, Ho

    2017-05-15

    Understanding how the temperature-mortality association worldwide changes over time is crucial to addressing questions of human adaptation under climate change. Previous studies investigated the temporal changes in the association over a few discrete time frames or assumed a linear change. Also, most studies focused on attenuation of heat-related mortality and studied the United States or Europe. This research examined continuous temporal changes (potentially nonlinear) in mortality related to extreme temperature (both heat and cold) for 15 cities in Northeast Asia (1972-2009). We used a generalized linear model with splines to simultaneously capture 2 types of nonlinearity: nonlinear association between temperature and mortality and nonlinear change over time in the association. We combined city-specific results to generate country-specific results using Bayesian hierarchical modeling. Cold-related mortality remained roughly constant over decades and slightly increased in the late 2000s, with a larger increase for cardiorespiratory deaths than for deaths from other causes. Heat-related mortality rates have decreased continuously over time, with more substantial decrease in earlier decades, for older populations and for cardiorespiratory deaths. Our findings suggest that future assessment of health effects of climate change should account for the continuous changes in temperature-related health risk and variations by factors such as age, cause of death, and location. © Crown copyright 2017.

  13. Development of Adaptive Feedback Control System of Both Spatial and Temporal Beam Shaping for UV-Laser Light Source for RF Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Tomizawa, H; Dewa, H; Hanaki, H; Kobayashi, T; Mizuno, A; Suzuki, S; Taniuchi, T; Yanagida, K

    2004-01-01

    The ideal spatial and temporal profiles of a shot-by-shot single laser pulse are essential to suppress the emittance growth of the electron beam from a photo-cathode rf gun. We have been developing highly qualified UV-laser pulse as a light source of the rf gun for an injector candidate of future light sources. The gun cavity is a single-cell pillbox, and the copper inner wall is used as a photo cathode. The electron beam was accelerated up to 4.1 MeV at the maximum electric field on the cathode surface of 175 MV/m. For emittance compensation, two solenoid coils were used. As the first test run, with a microlens array as a simple spatial shaper, we obtained a minimum emittance value of 2 π·mm·mrad with a beam energy of 3.1 MeV, holding its charge to 0.1 nC/bunch. In the next test run, we prepared a deformable mirror for spatial shaping, and a spatial light modulator based on fused-silica plates for temporal shaping. We applied the both adaptive optics to automatically shape the bot...

  14. Monitoring snow cover variability (2000-2014) in the Hengduan Mountains based on cloud-removed MODIS products with an adaptive spatio-temporal weighted method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Fu, Wenxuan; Shen, Huanfeng; Huang, Chunlin; Zhang, Liangpei

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring the variability of snow cover is necessary and meaningful because snow cover is closely connected with climate and ecological change. In this work, 500 m resolution MODIS daily snow cover products from 2000 to 2014 were adopted to analyze the status in Hengduan Mountains. In order to solve the spatial discontinuity caused by clouds in the products, we propose an adaptive spatio-temporal weighted method (ASTWM), which is based on the initial result of a Terra and Aqua combination. This novel method simultaneously considers the temporal and spatial correlations of the snow cover. The simulated experiments indicate that ASTWM removes clouds completely, with a robust overall accuracy (OA) of above 93% under different cloud fractions. The spatio-temporal variability of snow cover in the Hengduan Mountains was investigated with two indices: snow cover days (SCD) and snow fraction. The results reveal that the annual SCD gradually increases and the coefficient of variation (CV) decreases with elevation. The pixel-wise trends of SCD first rise and then drop in most areas. Moreover, intense intra-annual variability of the snow fraction occurs from October to March, during which time there is abundant snow cover. The inter-annual variability, which mainly occurs in high elevation areas, shows an increasing trend before 2004/2005 and a decreasing trend after 2004/2005. In addition, the snow fraction responds to the two climate factors of air temperature and precipitation. For the intra-annual variability, when the air temperature and precipitation decrease, the snow cover increases. Besides, precipitation plays a more important role in the inter-annual variability of snow cover than temperature.

  15. Improved accuracy of quantitative parameter estimates in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT study with low temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Mo, E-mail: Sunmo.Kim@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Haider, Masoom A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Yeung, Ivan W. T. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Stronach Regional Cancer Centre, Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario L3Y 2P9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: A previously proposed method to reduce radiation dose to patient in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT is enhanced by principal component analysis (PCA) filtering which improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of time-concentration curves in the DCE-CT study. The efficacy of the combined method to maintain the accuracy of kinetic parameter estimates at low temporal resolution is investigated with pixel-by-pixel kinetic analysis of DCE-CT data. Methods: The method is based on DCE-CT scanning performed with low temporal resolution to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. The arterial input function (AIF) with high temporal resolution can be generated with a coarsely sampled AIF through a previously published method of AIF estimation. To increase the SNR of time-concentration curves (tissue curves), first, a region-of-interest is segmented into squares composed of 3 × 3 pixels in size. Subsequently, the PCA filtering combined with a fraction of residual information criterion is applied to all the segmented squares for further improvement of their SNRs. The proposed method was applied to each DCE-CT data set of a cohort of 14 patients at varying levels of down-sampling. The kinetic analyses using the modified Tofts’ model and singular value decomposition method, then, were carried out for each of the down-sampling schemes between the intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the measured data in high temporal resolution (i.e., original scanning frequency) as the reference. Results: The patients’ AIFs were estimated to high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases of arterial impulse responses established in the previous paper. In addition, noise in the images was effectively reduced by using five principal components of the tissue curves for filtering. Kinetic analyses using the proposed method showed superior results compared to those with down-sampling alone; they were able to maintain the accuracy in the

  16. Use of Adaptive Digital Signal Processing to Improve Speech Communication for Normally Hearing aand Hearing-Impaired Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A two-microphone adaptive digital noise cancellation technique improved word-recognition ability for 20 normal and 12 hearing-impaired adults by reducing multitalker speech babble and speech spectrum noise 18-22 dB. Word recognition improvements averaged 37-50 percent for normal and 27-40 percent for hearing-impaired subjects. Improvement was best…

  17. An improved cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) algorithm considering invalid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pangwei; Wang, Yunpeng; Yu, Guizhen; Tang, Tieqiao

    2014-05-01

    For the Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) Algorithm, existing research studies mainly focus on how inter-vehicle communication can be used to develop CACC controller, the influence of the communication delays and lags of the actuators to the string stability. However, whether the string stability can be guaranteed when inter-vehicle communication is invalid partially has hardly been considered. This paper presents an improved CACC algorithm based on the sliding mode control theory and analyses the range of CACC controller parameters to maintain string stability. A dynamic model of vehicle spacing deviation in a platoon is then established, and the string stability conditions under improved CACC are analyzed. Unlike the traditional CACC algorithms, the proposed algorithm can ensure the functionality of the CACC system even if inter-vehicle communication is partially invalid. Finally, this paper establishes a platoon of five vehicles to simulate the improved CACC algorithm in MATLAB/Simulink, and the simulation results demonstrate that the improved CACC algorithm can maintain the string stability of a CACC platoon through adjusting the controller parameters and enlarging the spacing to prevent accidents. With guaranteed string stability, the proposed CACC algorithm can prevent oscillation of vehicle spacing and reduce chain collision accidents under real-world circumstances. This research proposes an improved CACC algorithm, which can guarantee the string stability when inter-vehicle communication is invalid.

  18. Improving the web site's effectiveness by considering each page's temporal information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, ZG; Sun, MT; Dunham, MH; Xiao, YQ; Dong, G; Tang, C; Wang, W

    2003-01-01

    Improving the effectiveness of a web site is always one of its owner's top concerns. By focusing on analyzing web users' visiting behavior, web mining researchers have developed a variety of helpful methods, based upon association rules, clustering, prediction and so on. However, we have found

  19. Improved moving window cross-spectral analysis for resolving large temporal seismic velocity changes in permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. R.; Knox, H. A.; Abbott, R. E.; Screaton, E. J.

    2017-05-01

    Cross correlations of seismic noise can potentially record large changes in subsurface velocity due to permafrost dynamics and be valuable for long-term Arctic monitoring. We applied seismic interferometry, using moving window cross-spectral analysis (MWCS), to 2 years of ambient noise data recorded in central Alaska to investigate whether seismic noise could be used to quantify relative velocity changes due to seasonal active-layer dynamics. The large velocity changes (>75%) between frozen and thawed soil caused prevalent cycle-skipping which made the method unusable in this setting. We developed an improved MWCS procedure which uses a moving reference to measure daily velocity variations that are then accumulated to recover the full seasonal change. This approach reduced cycle-skipping and recovered a seasonal trend that corresponded well with the timing of active-layer freeze and thaw. This improvement opens the possibility of measuring large velocity changes by using MWCS and permafrost monitoring by using ambient noise.

  20. Spatio-temporal complexity of chimpanzee food: How cognitive adaptations can counteract the ephemeral nature of ripe fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmaat, Karline R L; Boesch, Christophe; Byrne, Richard; Chapman, Colin A; Goné Bi, Zoro B; Head, Josephine S; Robbins, Martha M; Wrangham, Richard W; Polansky, Leo

    2016-06-01

    Ecological complexity has been proposed to play a crucial role in primate brain-size evolution. However, detailed quantification of ecological complexity is still limited. Here we assess the spatio-temporal distribution of tropical fruits and young leaves, two primary chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) foods, focusing on the predictability of their availability in individual trees. Using up to 20 years of information on monthly availability of young leaf, unripe and ripe fruit in plant species consumed by chimpanzees from tropical forests in East, Central, and West Africa, we estimated: (1) the forest-wide frequency of occurrence of each food type and (2) the predictability of finding ripe fruit-bearing trees, focusing on the timing, frequency, and amount of ripe fruit present. In all three forests, at least half of all encountered trees belonged to species that chimpanzees were known to feed on. However, the proportion of these trees bearing young leaves and fruit fluctuated widely between months. Ripe fruit was the most ephemeral food source, and trees that had more than half of their crown filled were at least nine times scarcer than other trees. In old growth forests only one large ripe fruit crop was on average encountered per 10 km. High levels of inter-individual variation in the number of months that fruit was present existed, and in some extreme cases individuals bore ripe fruit more than seven times as often as conspecifics. Some species showed substantially less variation in such ripe fruit production frequencies and fruit quantity than others. We hypothesize that chimpanzees employ a suite of cognitive mechanisms, including abilities to: (1) generalize or classify food trees; (2) remember the relative metrics of quantity and frequency of fruit production across years; and (3) flexibly plan return times to feeding trees to optimize high-energy food consumption in individual trees, and efficient travel between them. Am. J. Primatol. 78:626-645, 2016. © 2016

  1. Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation improves quality of reaching movements more than traditional reaching therapy following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Margaret; Chen, Yinpeng; Cheng, Long; Liu, Sheng-Min; Blake, Paul; Wolf, Steven L; Rikakis, Thanassis

    2013-05-01

    Adaptive mixed reality rehabilitation (AMRR) is a novel integration of motion capture technology and high-level media computing that provides precise kinematic measurements and engaging multimodal feedback for self-assessment during a therapeutic task. We describe the first proof-of-concept study to compare outcomes of AMRR and traditional upper-extremity physical therapy. Two groups of participants with chronic stroke received either a month of AMRR therapy (n = 11) or matched dosing of traditional repetitive task therapy (n = 10). Participants were right handed, between 35 and 85 years old, and could independently reach to and at least partially grasp an object in front of them. Upper-extremity clinical scale scores and kinematic performances were measured before and after treatment. Both groups showed increased function after therapy, demonstrated by statistically significant improvements in Wolf Motor Function Test and upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) scores, with the traditional therapy group improving significantly more on the FMA. However, only participants who received AMRR therapy showed a consistent improvement in kinematic measurements, both for the trained task of reaching to grasp a cone and the untrained task of reaching to push a lighted button. AMRR may be useful in improving both functionality and the kinematics of reaching. Further study is needed to determine if AMRR therapy induces long-term changes in movement quality that foster better functional recovery.

  2. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Angeler

    Full Text Available The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994-2011 data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  3. Quantifying the adaptive cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeler, David G.; Allen, Craig R.; Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Gunderson, Lance H.; Hjerne, Olle; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and adaptation provides opportunities to cope with the intricacies and uncertainties associated with fast ecological change, driven by shifting system controls. Ultimately, combining traditional ecological paradigms with heuristics of complex system dynamics using quantitative approaches may help refine ecological theory and improve our understanding of the resilience of ecosystems.

  4. Improving Temporal Coverage of an Energy-Efficient Data Extraction Algorithm for Environmental Monitoring Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo Chatterjea

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Collecting raw data from a wireless sensor network for environmental monitoring applications can be a difficult task due to the high energy consumption involved. This is especially difficult when the application requires specialized sensors that have very high energy consumption, e.g. hydrological sensors for monitoring marine environments. This paper introduces a technique for reducing energy consumption by minimizing sensor sampling operations. In addition, we illustrate how a randomized algorithm can be used to improve temporal coverage such that the time between the occurrence of an event and its detection can be minimized. We evaluate our approach using real data collected from a sensor network deployment on the Great Barrier Reef.

  5. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging.

  6. Improved Reversed Phase Chromatography of Hydrophilic Peptides from Spatial and Temporal Changes in Column Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Clifford; Podtelejnikov, Alexandre V; Nielsen, Michael Lund

    2017-01-01

    Reversed phase chromatography is an established method for peptide separation and frequently coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for proteomic analysis. Column temperature is one parameter that influences peptide retention and elution, but it is often overlooked as its implementa...... version when the analytical column temperature was decreased to 5 °C. Aside from demonstrating the utility of lower temperatures for improved chromatography, its application at specific locations and time points is critical for peptide detection and separation.......Reversed phase chromatography is an established method for peptide separation and frequently coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for proteomic analysis. Column temperature is one parameter that influences peptide retention and elution, but it is often overlooked as its...

  7. Adapted Bailenger method improves the rate of Ascaris suum eggs recovery from liquid pig manure compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Facco de Sá

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Liquid pig manure (LPM is widely used as a compost fertilizer for vegetable crops destined for human consumption. However, these wastes may contain parasites eggs, such as the nematode Ascaris suum, that pose serious health risks to humans. We attempted to determine the most appropriate technique for recovering A. suum eggs from LPM compost. Samples were collected from two waste sources during composting, including 23 samples containing LPM, sawdust, and wood shavings, and 14 samples of LPM alone-both in triplicate. Samples were analyzed using several different recovery methods. Recovery of eggs by the modified Bailenger method with adaptations was significantly more effective and recovered 57% more eggs than by the modified Bailenger method alone. Willis-Mollay method, modified Faust method, and the simple sedimentation technique only recovered 4.4%, 13.9%, and 26% of eggs, respectively, compared with the modified Bailenger method with adaptations, indicating that the adjustments made to the Bailenger method were key to improving the recovery of A. suum eggs from compost and LPM.

  8. An improved algorithm for learning long-term dependency problems in adaptive processing of data structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Siu-Yeung; Chi, Zheru; Siu, Wan-Chi; Tsoi, Ah Chung

    2003-01-01

    Many researchers have explored the use of neural-network representations for the adaptive processing of data structures. One of the most popular learning formulations of data structure processing is backpropagation through structure (BPTS). The BPTS algorithm has been successful applied to a number of learning tasks that involve structural patterns such as logo and natural scene classification. The main limitations of the BPTS algorithm are attributed to slow convergence speed and the long-term dependency problem for the adaptive processing of data structures. In this paper, an improved algorithm is proposed to solve these problems. The idea of this algorithm is to optimize the free learning parameters of the neural network in the node representation by using least-squares-based optimization methods in a layer-by-layer fashion. Not only can fast convergence speed be achieved, but the long-term dependency problem can also be overcome since the vanishing of gradient information is avoided when our approach is applied to very deep tree structures.

  9. Study on Adaptive Slid Mode Controller for Improving Handling Stability of Motorized Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LiQiang Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive slid mode controller was established for improving the handling stability of motorized electric vehicle (MEV. First and foremost, the structure and advantages of electric vehicle driven by in-wheel motors will be provided. Then, an ideal cornering model of vehicles will be brought and analyzed, after which a method to estimate side-slip angle was also proposed and three typical sensors were used in the theory. Besides, an idea for the recognition of road adhesion coefficient was derived based on MEV platform, which will be helpful for better control performances. Finally, the scheme of control method was given and some typical tests for observing handling properties were implemented based on Simulink and Carsim software. With the outcomes from the experiments, which vividly showed the merits of the controller, one can come to a conclusion that MEV that equips with the adaptive slid mode controller always enjoys better handling performances than the one without control. Furthermore, the controller researched is friendly to the real-time working conditions, which will hold practical values in the future.

  10. Pairwise adaptive thermostats for improved accuracy and stability in dissipative particle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, Benedict, E-mail: b.leimkuhler@ed.ac.uk; Shang, Xiaocheng, E-mail: x.shang@brown.edu

    2016-11-01

    We examine the formulation and numerical treatment of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and momentum-conserving molecular dynamics. We show that it is possible to improve both the accuracy and the stability of DPD by employing a pairwise adaptive Langevin thermostat that precisely matches the dynamical characteristics of DPD simulations (e.g., autocorrelation functions) while automatically correcting thermodynamic averages using a negative feedback loop. In the low friction regime, it is possible to replace DPD by a simpler momentum-conserving variant of the Nosé–Hoover–Langevin method based on thermostatting only pairwise interactions; we show that this method has an extra order of accuracy for an important class of observables (a superconvergence result), while also allowing larger timesteps than alternatives. All the methods mentioned in the article are easily implemented. Numerical experiments are performed in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium settings; using Lees–Edwards boundary conditions to induce shear flow.

  11. Droop Control with Improved Disturbance Adaption for PV System with Two Power Conversion Stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hongpeng; Loh, Poh Chiang; Wang, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    with no or insufficient storage for cushioning climatic changes. In addition, most droop-controlled literatures have assumed a single dc-ac inverter with its input dc source fixed. Front-end dc-dc converter added to a two-stage photovoltaic (PV) system has therefore usually been ignored. To address these unresolved...... issues, an improved droop scheme for a two-stage PV system has been developed in the paper. The developed scheme uses the same control structure in both grid-connected and islanded modes, which together with properly tuned synchronizers, allows mode transfer to be seamlessly triggered. Moreover......, the proposed scheme adapts well with internal PV and external grid fluctuations, and is hence more precise with its tracking, as compared with the traditional droop scheme. Simulation and experimental results have verified these expectations, and hence the effectiveness of the proposed scheme....

  12. Joint-Angle Specific Strength Adaptations Influence Improvements in Power in Highly Trained Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea Matthew R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of training at different ranges of motion during the squat exercise on joint-angle specific strength adaptations. Methods. Twenty eight men were randomly assigned to one of three training groups, differing only in the depth of squats (quarter squat, half squat, and full squat performed in 16-week training intervention. Strength measures were conducted in the back squat pre-, mid-, and post-training at all three depths. Vertical jump and 40-yard sprint time were also measured. Results. Individuals in the quarter and full squat training groups improved significantly more at the specific depth at which they trained when compared to the other two groups (p < 0.05. Jump height and sprint speed improved in all groups (p < 0.05; however, the quarter squat had the greatest transfer to both outcomes. Conclusions. Consistently including quarter squats in workouts aimed at maximizing speed and jumping power can result in greater improvements.

  13. Working memory load-dependent spatio-temporal activity of single-trial P3 response detected with an adaptive wavelet denoiser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiushi; Yang, Xueqian; Yao, Li; Zhao, Xiaojie

    2017-03-27

    Working memory (WM) refers to the holding and manipulation of information during cognitive tasks. Its underlying neural mechanisms have been explored through both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). Trial-by-trial coupling of simultaneously collected EEG and fMRI signals has become an important and promising approach to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of such cognitive processes. Previous studies have demonstrated a modulation effect of the WM load on both the BOLD response in certain brain areas and the amplitude of P3. However, much remains to be explored regarding the WM load-dependent relationship between the amplitude of ERP components and cortical activities, and the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the EEG signal still poses a challenge to performing single-trial analyses. In this paper, we investigated the spatio-temporal activities of P3 during an n-back verbal WM task by introducing an adaptive wavelet denoiser into the extraction of single-trial P3 features and using general linear model (GLM) to integrate simultaneously collected EEG and fMRI data. Our results replicated the modulation effect of the WM load on the P3 amplitude. Additionally, the activation of single-trial P3 amplitudes was detected in multiple brain regions, including the insula, the cuneus, the lingual gyrus (LG), and the middle occipital gyrus (MOG). Moreover, we found significant correlations between P3 features and behavioral performance. These findings suggest that the single-trial integration of simultaneous EEG and fMRI signals may provide new insights into classical cognitive functions. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An adaptive grid to improve the efficiency and accuracy of modelling underwater noise from shipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, Leah; Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Ingram, Simon; Embling, Clare

    2017-04-01

    represents a 2 to 5-fold increase in efficiency. The 5 km grid reduces the number of model executions further to 1024. However, over the first 25 km the 5 km grid produces errors of up to 13.8 dB when compared to the highly accurate but inefficient 1 km grid. The newly developed adaptive grid generates much smaller errors of less than 0.5 dB while demonstrating high computational efficiency. Our results show that the adaptive grid provides the ability to retain the accuracy of noise level predictions and improve the efficiency of the modelling process. This can help safeguard sensitive marine ecosystems from noise pollution by improving the underwater noise predictions that inform management activities. References Shapiro, G., Chen, F., Thain, R., 2014. The Effect of Ocean Fronts on Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Shallow Sea, Journal of Marine System, 139: 217 - 226. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmarsys.2014.06.007.

  15. Passive-ocean radial basis function approach to improve temporal gravity recovery from GRACE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kusche, Jürgen; Forootan, Ehsan; Rietbroek, Roelof

    2017-08-01

    We present a state-of-the-art approach of passive-ocean modified radial basis functions (MRBFs) that improves the recovery of time-variable gravity fields from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). As is well known, spherical harmonics (SHs), which are commonly used to recover gravity fields, are orthogonal basis functions with global coverage. However, the chosen SH truncation involves a global compromise between data coverage and obtainable resolution, and strong localized signals may not be fully captured. Radial basis functions (RBFs) provide another representation, which has been proposed in earlier works to be better suited to retrieve regional gravity signals. In this paper, we propose a MRBF approach by embedding the known coastal geometries in the RBF parameterization and imposing global mass conservation and equilibrium behavior of the oceans. Our hypothesis is that with this physically justified constraint, the GRACE-derived gravity signals can be more realistically partitioned into the land and ocean contributions along the coastlines. We test this new technique to invert monthly gravity fields from GRACE level-1b observations covering 2005-2010, for which the numerical results indicate that (1) MRBF-based solutions reduce the number of parameters by approximately 10% and allow for more flexible regularization when compared to ordinary RBF solutions and (2) the MRBF-derived mass flux is better confined along coastal areas. The latter is particularly tested in the southern Greenland, and our results indicate that the trend of mass loss from the MRBF solutions is approximately 11% larger than that from the SH solutions and approximately 4%-6% larger than that of RBF solutions.

  16. Improving the use of crop models for risk assessment and climate change adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challinor, Andrew J; Müller, Christoph; Asseng, Senthold; Deva, Chetan; Nicklin, Kathryn Jane; Wallach, Daniel; Vanuytrecht, Eline; Whitfield, Stephen; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian; Koehler, Ann-Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Crop models are used for an increasingly broad range of applications, with a commensurate proliferation of methods. Careful framing of research questions and development of targeted and appropriate methods are therefore increasingly important. In conjunction with the other authors in this special issue, we have developed a set of criteria for use of crop models in assessments of impacts, adaptation and risk. Our analysis drew on the other papers in this special issue, and on our experience in the UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017 and the MACSUR, AgMIP and ISIMIP projects. The criteria were used to assess how improvements could be made to the framing of climate change risks, and to outline the good practice and new developments that are needed to improve risk assessment. Key areas of good practice include: i. the development, running and documentation of crop models, with attention given to issues of spatial scale and complexity; ii. the methods used to form crop-climate ensembles, which can be based on model skill and/or spread; iii. the methods used to assess adaptation, which need broadening to account for technological development and to reflect the full range options available. The analysis highlights the limitations of focussing only on projections of future impacts and adaptation options using pre-determined time slices. Whilst this long-standing approach may remain an essential component of risk assessments, we identify three further key components: 1.Working with stakeholders to identify the timing of risks. What are the key vulnerabilities of food systems and what does crop-climate modelling tell us about when those systems are at risk?2.Use of multiple methods that critically assess the use of climate model output and avoid any presumption that analyses should begin and end with gridded output.3.Increasing transparency and inter-comparability in risk assessments. Whilst studies frequently produce ranges that quantify uncertainty, the assumptions

  17. Adaptive Wavelet Threshold Denoising Method for Machinery Sound Based on Improved Fruit Fly Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As the sound signal of a machine contains abundant information and is easy to measure, acoustic-based monitoring or diagnosis systems exhibit obvious superiority, especially in some extreme conditions. However, the sound directly collected from industrial field is always polluted. In order to eliminate noise components from machinery sound, a wavelet threshold denoising method optimized by an improved fruit fly optimization algorithm (WTD-IFOA is proposed in this paper. The sound is firstly decomposed by wavelet transform (WT to obtain coefficients of each level. As the wavelet threshold functions proposed by Donoho were discontinuous, many modified functions with continuous first and second order derivative were presented to realize adaptively denoising. However, the function-based denoising process is time-consuming and it is difficult to find optimal thresholds. To overcome these problems, fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA was introduced to the process. Moreover, to avoid falling into local extremes, an improved fly distance range obeying normal distribution was proposed on the basis of original FOA. Then, sound signal of a motor was recorded in a soundproof laboratory, and Gauss white noise was added into the signal. The simulation results illustrated the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed approach by a comprehensive comparison among five typical methods. Finally, an industrial application on a shearer in coal mining working face was performed to demonstrate the practical effect.

  18. Improving reflectance reconstruction from tristimulus values by adaptively combining colorimetric and reflectance similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Yasheng; Cheng, Haobo

    2017-05-01

    The use of spectral reflectance as fundamental color information finds application in diverse fields related to imaging. Many approaches use training sets to train the algorithm used for color classification. In this context, we note that the modification of training sets obviously impacts the accuracy of reflectance reconstruction based on classical reflectance reconstruction methods. Different modifying criteria are not always consistent with each other, since they have different emphases; spectral reflectance similarity focuses on the deviation of reconstructed reflectance, whereas colorimetric similarity emphasizes human perception. We present a method to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed spectral reflectance by adaptively combining colorimetric and spectral reflectance similarities. The different exponential factors of the weighting coefficients were investigated. The spectral reflectance reconstructed by the proposed method exhibits considerable improvements in terms of the root-mean-square error and goodness-of-fit coefficient of the spectral reflectance errors as well as color differences under different illuminants. Our method is applicable to diverse areas such as textiles, printing, art, and other industries.

  19. Placing prairie pothole wetlands along spatial and temporal continua to improve integration of wetland function in ecological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliss, Ned H.; Mushet, David M.; Newton, Wesley E.; Otto, Clint R.V.; Nelson, Richard D.; LaBaugh, James W.; Scherff, Eric J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of using chemical characteristics to rank wetland relation to surface and groundwater along a hydrologic continuum ranging from groundwater recharge to groundwater discharge. We used 27 years (1974–2002) of water chemistry data from 15 prairie pothole wetlands and known hydrologic connections of these wetlands to groundwater to evaluate spatial and temporal patterns in chemical characteristics that correspond to the unique ecosystem functions each wetland performed. Due to the mineral content and the low permeability rate of glacial till and soils, salinity of wetland waters increased along a continuum of wetland relation to groundwater recharge, flow-through or discharge. Mean inter-annual specific conductance (a proxy for salinity) increased along this continuum from wetlands that recharge groundwater being fresh to wetlands that receive groundwater discharge being the most saline, and wetlands that both recharge and discharge to groundwater (i.e., groundwater flow-through wetlands) being of intermediate salinity. The primary axis from a principal component analysis revealed that specific conductance (and major ions affecting conductance) explained 71% of the variation in wetland chemistry over the 27 years of this investigation. We found that long-term averages from this axis were useful to identify a wetland’s long-term relation to surface and groundwater. Yearly or seasonal measurements of specific conductance can be less definitive because of highly dynamic inter- and intra-annual climate cycles that affect water volumes and the interaction of groundwater and geologic materials, and thereby influence the chemical composition of wetland waters. The influence of wetland relation to surface and groundwater on water chemistry has application in many scientific disciplines and is especially needed to improve ecological understanding in wetland investigations. We suggest ways that monitoring in situ wetland conditions could be linked

  20. Investigation of instabilities affecting detonations: Improving the resolution using block-structured adaptive mesh refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Prashaanth

    The unstable nature of detonation waves is a result of the critical relationship between the hydrodynamic shock and the chemical reactions sustaining the shock. A perturbative analysis of the critical point is quite challenging due to the multiple spatio-temporal scales involved along with the non-linear nature of the shock-reaction mechanism. The author's research attempts to provide detailed resolution of the instabilities at the shock front. Another key aspect of the present research is to develop an understanding of the causality between the non-linear dynamics of the front and the eventual breakdown of the sub-structures. An accurate numerical simulation of detonation waves requires a very efficient solution of the Euler equations in conservation form with detailed, non-equilibrium chemistry. The difference in the flow and reaction length scales results in very stiff source terms, requiring the problem to be solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For this purpose, Berger-Colella's block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) strategy has been developed and applied to time-explicit finite volume methods. The block-structured technique uses a hierarchy of parent-child sub-grids, integrated recursively over time. One novel approach to partition the problem within a large supercomputer was the use of modified Peano-Hilbert space filling curves. The AMR framework was merged with CLAWPACK, a package providing finite volume numerical methods tailored for wave-propagation problems. The stiffness problem is bypassed by using a 1st order Godunov or a 2nd order Strang splitting technique, where the flow variables and source terms are integrated independently. A linearly explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta integrator is used for the flow, and an ODE solver was used to overcome the numerical stiffness. Second-order spatial resolution is obtained by using a second-order Roe-HLL scheme with the inclusion of numerical viscosity to stabilize the solution near the discontinuity

  1. Scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting improve adaptation to night shift work in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinoy, Evan D; Harris, Michael P; Kim, Min Ju; Wang, Wei; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2016-12-01

    We tested whether a sleep and circadian-based treatment shown to improve circadian adaptation to night shifts and attenuate negative effects on alertness, performance and sleep in young adults would also be effective in older adults. We assessed subjective alertness, sustained attention (psychomotor vigilance task, PVT), sleep duration (actigraphy) and circadian timing (salivary dim-light melatonin onset, DLMO) in 18 older adults (57.2±3.8 years; mean±SD) in a simulated shift work protocol. 4 day shifts were followed by 3 night shifts in the laboratory. Participants slept at home and were randomised to either the treatment group (scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting during the latter half of night shifts) or control group (ad-lib sleep and typical lighting during night shifts). Compared with day shifts, alertness and sustained attention declined on the first night shift in both groups, and was worse in the latter half of the night shifts. Alertness and attention improved on nights 2 and 3 for the treatment group but remained lower for the control group. Sleep duration in the treatment group remained similar to baseline (6-7 hours) following night shifts, but was shorter (3-5 hours) following night shifts in the control group. Treatment group circadian timing advanced by 169.3±16.1 min (mean±SEM) but did not shift (-9.7±9.9 min) in the control group. The combined treatment of scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting increased sleep duration and partially aligned circadian phase with sleep and work timing, resulting in improved night shift alertness and performance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Scheduled Evening Sleep and Enhanced Lighting Improve Adaptation to Night Shift Work in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinoy, Evan D.; Harris, Michael P.; Kim, Min Ju; Wang, Wei; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We tested whether a sleep and circadian-based treatment shown to improve circadian adaptation to night shifts and attenuate negative effects on alertness, performance, and sleep in young adults would also be effective in older adults. Methods We assessed subjective alertness, sustained attention (psychomotor vigilance task, PVT), sleep duration (actigraphy), and circadian timing (salivary dim-light melatonin onset, DLMO) in eighteen older adults (57.2±3.8 y; mean±SD) in a simulated shift work protocol. Four day shifts were followed by three night shifts in the laboratory. Participants slept at home and were randomized to either the Treatment Group (scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting during the latter half of night shifts), or Control Group (ad lib sleep and typical lighting during night shifts). Results Compared to day shifts, alertness and sustained attention declined on the first night shift in both groups, and was worse in the latter half of the night shifts. Alertness and attention improved on nights 2 and 3 for the Treatment Group but remained lower for the Control Group. Sleep duration in the Treatment Group remained similar to baseline (6–7 h) following night shifts, but was shorter (3–5 h) following night shifts in the Control Group. Treatment Group circadian timing advanced by 169.3±16.1 min (mean±SEM) but did not shift (−9.7±9.9 min) in the Control Group. Conclusions The combined treatment of scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting increased sleep duration and partially aligned circadian phase with sleep and work timing, resulting in improved night shift alertness and performance. PMID:27566781

  3. Improving femtosecond laser pulse delivery through a hollow core photonic crystal fiber for temporally focused two-photon endomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejin; So, Peter T C

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we present a strategy to improve delivery of femtosecond laser pulses from a regenerative amplifier through a hollow core photonic crystal fiber for temporally focused wide-field two-photon endomicroscopy. For endomicroscope application, wide-field two-photon excitation has the advantage of requiring no scanning in the distal end. However, wide-field two-photon excitation requires peak power that is 10(4)-10(5) times higher than the point scanning approach corresponding to femtosecond pulses with energy on the order of 1-10 μJ at the specimen plane. The transmission of these high energy pulses through a single mode fiber into the microendoscope is a significant challenge. Two approaches were pursued to partially overcome this limitation. First, a single high energy pulse is split into a train of pulses with energy below the fiber damage threshold better utilizing the available laser energy. Second, stretching the pulse width in time by introducing negative dispersion was shown to have the dual benefit of reducing fiber damage probability and compensating for the positive group velocity dispersion induced by the fiber. With these strategy applied, 11 fold increase in the two photon excitation signal has been demonstrated.

  4. An Improved Method for Producing High Spatial-Resolution NDVI Time Series Datasets with Multi-Temporal MODIS NDVI Data and Landsat TM/ETM+ Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to technical limitations, it is impossible to have high resolution in both spatial and temporal dimensions for current NDVI datasets. Therefore, several methods are developed to produce high resolution (spatial and temporal NDVI time-series datasets, which face some limitations including high computation loads and unreasonable assumptions. In this study, an unmixing-based method, NDVI Linear Mixing Growth Model (NDVI-LMGM, is proposed to achieve the goal of accurately and efficiently blending MODIS NDVI time-series data and multi-temporal Landsat TM/ETM+ images. This method firstly unmixes the NDVI temporal changes in MODIS time-series to different land cover types and then uses unmixed NDVI temporal changes to predict Landsat-like NDVI dataset. The test over a forest site shows high accuracy (average difference: −0.0070; average absolute difference: 0.0228; and average absolute relative difference: 4.02% and computation efficiency of NDVI-LMGM (31 seconds using a personal computer. Experiments over more complex landscape and long-term time-series demonstrated that NDVI-LMGM performs well in each stage of vegetation growing season and is robust in regions with contrasting spatial and spatial variations. Comparisons between NDVI-LMGM and current methods (i.e., Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM, Enhanced STARFM (ESTARFM and Weighted Linear Model (WLM show that NDVI-LMGM is more accurate and efficient than current methods. The proposed method will benefit land surface process research, which requires a dense NDVI time-series dataset with high spatial resolution.

  5. Temporal subtraction of 'virtual dual-energy' chest radiographs for improved conspicuity of growing cancers and other pathologic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Armato, Samuel G., III; Engelmann, Roger; Caligiuri, Philip; MacMahon, Heber

    2011-03-01

    A temporal-subtraction (TS) technique provides enhanced visualization of tumor growth and subtle pathologic changes between previous and current chest radiographs (CXRs) from the same patient. Our purpose was to develop a new TS technique incorporating "virtual dual-energy" technology to improve its enhancement quality. Our TS technique consisted of ribcage edge detection, rigid body transformation based on a global alignment criterion, image warping under the maximum cross-correlation criterion, and subtraction between the registered previous and current images. A major problem with TS was obscuring of abnormalities by rib artifacts due to misregistration. To reduce the rib artifacts, we developed a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) for separation of ribs from soft tissue. The MTANN was trained with input CXRs and the corresponding "teaching" soft-tissue CXRs obtained with real dualenergy radiography. Once trained, the MTANNs did not require a dual-energy system and provided "soft-tissue" images. Our database consisted of 100 sequential pairs of CXR studies from 53 patients. To assess the registration accuracy and clinical utility, a chest radiologist subjectively rated the original TS and rib-suppressed TS images on a 5-point scale. By use of "virtual dual-energy" technology, rib artifacts in the TS images were reduced substantially. The registration accuracy and clinical utility ratings for TS rib-suppressed images (3.7; 3.9) were significantly better than those for original TS images (3.5; 3.6) (P<0.01 P<0.02, respectively). Our "virtual dual-energy" TS CXRs can provide improved enhancement quality of TS images for the assessment of pathologic change.

  6. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction improves image quality without affecting perfusion CT quantitation in primary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezzi, D; Goh, V; Virdi, S; Mallett, S; Grierson, C; Breen, D J

    2017-01-01

    To determine the effect of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) on perfusion CT (pCT) parameter quantitation and image quality in primary colorectal cancer. Prospective observational study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent, 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent pCT (100 kV, 150 mA, 120 s acquisition, axial mode). Tumour regional blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) were determined using identical regions-of-interests for ASIR percentages of 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. Image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and pCT parameters were assessed across ASIR percentages. Coefficients of variation (CV), repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) and Spearman' rank order correlation were performed with statistical significance at 5%. With increasing ASIR percentages, image noise decreased by 33% while CNR increased by 61%; peak tumour CNR was greater than 1.5 with 60% ASIR and above. Mean BF, BV, MTT and PS differed by less than 1.8%, 2.9%, 2.5% and 2.6% across ASIR percentages. CV were 4.9%, 4.2%, 3.3% and 7.9%; rANOVA P values: 0.85, 0.62, 0.02 and 0.81 respectively. ASIR improves image noise and CNR without altering pCT parameters substantially.

  7. Adaptive Focused Acoustics (AFA) Improves the Performance of Microtiter Plate ELISAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David J; Rudd, Edwin A; Laugharn, James A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the use of Adaptive Focused Acoustics (AFA) technology to improve the performance of microtiter plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Experiments were performed with commercially available AFA instrumentation and off-the-shelf 96-well microtiter plate sandwich ELISAs. AFA was applied over a range of acoustic energies, temperatures, and durations to the antigen/antibody binding step of an ELISA for measuring HIV-1 p24 in tissue culture samples. AFA-mediated antigen/antibody binding was enhanced up to 2-fold over passive binding at comparable temperatures and was superior or comparable at low temperature (8-10 °C) to passive binding at 37 °C. Lower nonspecific binding (NSB), lower inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variation (CVs), higher Z' factors, and lower limits of detection (LODs) were measured in AFA-mediated assays compared with conventional passive binding. In a more limited study, AFA enhancement of antigen/antibody binding and lower NSB was measured in an ELISA for measuring IGFBP-3 in human plasma. We conclude from this study that application of AFA to antigen/antibody binding steps in microtiter plate ELISAs can enhance key assay performance parameters, particularly Z' factors and LODs. These features render AFA-mediated binding assays potentially more useful in applications such as high-throughput screening and in vitro diagnostics than assays processed with conventional passive antigen/antibody binding steps. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  8. Improving conservation outcomes with a new paradigm for understanding species’ fundamental and realized adaptive capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik; O’Leary, John; Mengelt, Claudia; West, Jordan M.; Julius, Susan; Green, Nancy; Magness, Dawn; Petes, Laura E.; Stein, Bruce A.; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Hellmann, Jessica J; Robertson, Amanda L; Staudinger, Michelle D.; Rosenberg, Andrew A.; Babij, Eleanora; Brennan, Jean; Schuurman, Gregor W.; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, many species are responding to ongoing climate change with shifts in distribution, abundance, phenology, or behavior. Consequently, natural-resource managers face increasingly urgent conservation questions related to biodiversity loss, expansion of invasive species, and deteriorating ecosystem services. We argue that our ability to address these questions is hampered by the lack of explicit consideration of species’ adaptive capacity (AC). AC is the ability of a species or population to cope with climatic changes and is characterized by three fundamental components: phenotypic plasticity, dispersal ability, and genetic diversity. However, few studies simultaneously address all elements; often, AC is confused with sensitivity or omitted altogether from climate-change vulnerability assessments. Improved understanding, consistent definition, and comprehensive evaluations of AC are needed. Using classic ecological-niche theory as an analogy, we propose a new paradigm that considers fundamental and realized AC: the former reflects aspects inherent to species, whereas the latter denotes how extrinsic factors constrain AC to what is actually expressed or observed. Through this conceptualization, we identify ecological attributes contributing to AC, outline areas of research necessary to advance understanding of AC, and provide examples demonstrating how the inclusion of AC can better inform conservation and natural-resource management.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide 2 treatment may improve intestinal adaptation during weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymann, Thomas; Le Huërou-Luron, I; Petersen, Y M

    2014-01-01

    Transition from sow’s milk to solid feed is associated with intestinal atrophy and diarrhea. We hypothesized that the intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) would induce a dose- and health status-dependent effect on gut adaptation. In Exp. 1, weaned pigs (average BW at weaning 4.......98 ± 0.18 kg) were kept in a high-sanitary environment and injected with saline or short-acting GLP-2 (80 μg/(kg BW·12 h); n = 8). Under these conditions, there was no diarrhea and GLP-2 did not improve gastrointestinal structure or function. In Exp. 2, weaned pigs (average BW at weaning 6.68 ± 0.27 kg...... effects on diarrhea. In Exp. 3, weaned pigs (average BW at weaning 6.90 ± 0.32 kg) were kept in a low-sanitary environment and injected with saline or a long-acting acylated GLP-2 analogue (25 µg/(kg BW·12 h); n = 8). In this experiment, GLP-2 increased intestinal weight (+22%; P

  10. Assessing Continuous Quality Improvement in Public Health: Adapting Lessons from Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alex; Schwartz, Robert; Cohen, Joanna; Manson, Heather; Scott, Fran

    2017-02-01

    Evidence of the effect of continuous quality improvement (CQI) in public health and valid tools to judge that such effects are not fully formed. The objective was to adapt and apply Shortell et al.'s (1998) four dimensions of CQI in an examination of a public health accountability and performance management initiative in Ontario, Canada. In total, 24 semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with informants from public health units and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. A web survey of public health managers in the province was also carried out. A mix of facilitators and barriers was identified. Leadership and organizational cultures, conducive to CQI success were evident. However, limitations in performance measurement and managerial discretion were key barriers. The four dimensions of CQI provided insight into both facilitators and barriers of CQI adoption in public health. Future research should compare the outcomes of public health CQI initiatives to the framework's stated facilitators and barriers. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  11. A new adaptive controller of facts-based FMRLC aimed at improving power system stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellatif Naceri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Various control techniques using Advanced Super-conducting Magnetic Energy Storage (ASMES aimed at improving power system stability have been proposed. As fuzzy controller has proved its value in some applications, the number of investigations employing fuzzy controller with ASMES has been greatly increased over recent period. Nevertheless, it is sometimes difficult to specify the rule base for some plants, or the need can arise for tuning the rule-base parameters if the plant changes. In order to solve such problems the Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Controller (FMRLC is proposed. This paper investigates multi-inputs/multi-outputs FMRLC for time-variant nonlinear system. This provides the motivation for adaptive fuzzy control, whereby the focus is placed on the automatic on-line synthesis and tuning of fuzzy controller parameters (i.e., the use of on-line data for continuous learning of the fuzzy controller which ensures that the performance objectives are met. The simulation results show that the proposed robust controller is able to work with nonlinear power system (i.e., single machine connected at infinite bus, under various fault conditions and significant disturbances.

  12. Improving our legacy: Incorporation of adaptive management into state wildlife action plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The loss of biodiversity is a mounting concern, but despite numerous attempts there are few large scale conservation efforts that have proven successful in reversing current declines. Given the challenge of biodiversity conservation, there is a need to develop strategic conservation plans that address species declines even with the inherent uncertainty in managing multiple species in complex environments. In 2002, the State Wildlife Grant program was initiated to fulfill this need, and while not explicitly outlined by Congress follows the fundamental premise of adaptive management, 'Learning by doing'. When action is necessary, but basic biological information and an understanding of appropriate management strategies are lacking, adaptive management enables managers to be proactive in spite of uncertainty. However, regardless of the strengths of adaptive management, the development of an effective adaptive management framework is challenging. In a review of 53 State Wildlife Action Plans, I found a keen awareness by planners that adaptive management was an effective method for addressing biodiversity conservation, but the development and incorporation of explicit adaptive management approaches within each plan remained elusive. Only ???25% of the plans included a framework for how adaptive management would be implemented at the project level within their state. There was, however, considerable support across plans for further development and implementation of adaptive management. By furthering the incorporation of adaptive management principles in conservation plans and explicitly outlining the decision making process, states will be poised to meet the pending challenges to biodiversity conservation. ?? 2010 .

  13. A search algorithm to meta-optimize the parameters for an extended Kalman filter to improve classification on hyper-temporal images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available -1 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, Munich, Germany, 22-27 July 2012 A search algorithm to meta-optimize the parameters for an extended Kalman filter to improve classification on hyper-temporal images yzB.P. Salmon, yz...

  14. Improving adaptation to weaning: Effect of intermittent suckling regimens on piglet feed intake, growth, and gut characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkeveld, M.; Langendijk, P.; Soede, N.M.; Kemp, B.; Taverne, M.A.M.; Verheijden, J.H.M.; Kuijken, N.; Koets, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Daily separation of sows and piglets during lactation, intermittent suckling (IS), improves feed intake and postweaning adaptation in piglets. The aim of the current study was to determine how, in piglets that have been subjected to IS, age at weaning and the duration of the preceding IS period

  15. A community based approach to improving resilience of forests and water resources: A local and regional climate adaptation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby Thaler; Gwen Griffith; Nancy Gilliam

    2014-01-01

    Forest-based ecosystem services are at risk from human-caused stressors, including climate change. Improving governance and management of forests to reduce impacts and increase community resilience to all stressors is the objective of forest-related climate change adaptation. The Model Forest Policy Program (MFPP) has applied one method designed to meet this objective...

  16. Usability of an adaptive computer assistant that improves self-care and health literacy of older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Rogers, W.A.; Fisk, A.D.; Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Mast, C.A.P.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: We developed an adaptive computer assistant for the supervision of diabetics' self-care, to support limiting illness and need for acute treatment, and improve health literacy. This assistant monitors self-care activities logged in the patient's electronic diary. Accordingly, it provides

  17. Bearing Fault Diagnosis Based on Improved Locality-Constrained Linear Coding and Adaptive PSO-Optimized SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haodong Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel bearing fault diagnosis method based on improved locality-constrained linear coding (LLC and adaptive PSO-optimized support vector machine (SVM is proposed. In traditional LLC, each feature is encoded by using a fixed number of bases without considering the distribution of the features and the weight of the bases. To address these problems, an improved LLC algorithm based on adaptive and weighted bases is proposed. Firstly, preliminary features are obtained by wavelet packet node energy. Then, dictionary learning with class-wise K-SVD algorithm is implemented. Subsequently, based on the learned dictionary the LLC codes can be solved using the improved LLC algorithm. Finally, SVM optimized by adaptive particle swarm optimization (PSO is utilized to classify the discriminative LLC codes and thus bearing fault diagnosis is realized. In the dictionary leaning stage, other methods such as selecting the samples themselves as dictionary and K-means are also conducted for comparison. The experiment results show that the LLC codes can effectively extract the bearing fault characteristics and the improved LLC outperforms traditional LLC. The dictionary learned by class-wise K-SVD achieves the best performance. Additionally, adaptive PSO-optimized SVM can greatly enhance the classification accuracy comparing with SVM using default parameters and linear SVM.

  18. Computer-Based Adaptive Instructional Strategies for the Improvement of Performance and Reduction of Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Robert D.; Tennyson, Carol L.

    Three design strategies for selecting number of instructional instances needed in concept learning were investigated. Two strategies used adaptive procedures for the selection, while a nonadaptive strategy selected instances by number of associated attributes. The data analysis showed that the full adaptive strategy (using pretask and on-task…

  19. Designing Automated Adaptive Support to Improve Student Helping Behaviors in a Peer Tutoring Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Erin; Rummel, Nikol; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive collaborative learning support systems analyze student collaboration as it occurs and provide targeted assistance to the collaborators. Too little is known about how to design adaptive support to have a positive effect on interaction and learning. We investigated this problem in a reciprocal peer tutoring scenario, where two students take…

  20. Evaluating spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China based on improved FORCCHN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Zhao

    Full Text Available An improved individual-based forest ecosystem carbon budget model for China (FORCCHN was applied to investigate the spatial-temporal dynamics of net primary productivity of different forest types in northeastern China. In this study, the forests of northeastern China were categorized into four ecological types according to their habitats and generic characteristics (evergreen broadleaf forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The results showed that distribution and change of forest NPP in northeastern China were related to the different forest types. From 1981 to 2002, among the forest types in northeastern China, per unit area NPP and total NPP of deciduous broadleaf forest were the highest, with the values of 729.4 gC/(m(2•yr and 106.0 TgC/yr, respectively, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest, deciduous needleleaf forest and evergreen needleleaf forest. From 1981 to 2002, per unit area NPP and total NPP of different forest types in northeastern China exhibited significant trends of interannual increase, and rapid increase was found between the 1980s and 1990s. The contribution of the different forest type's NPP to total NPP in northeastern China was clearly different. The greatest was deciduous broadleaf forest, followed by mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous needleleaf forest. The smallest was evergreen needleleaf forest. Spatial difference in NPP between different forest types was remarkable. High NPP values of deciduous needleleaf forest, mixed broadleaf- needleleaf forest and deciduous broadleaf forest were found in the Daxing'anling region, the southeastern of Xiaoxing'anling and Jilin province, and the Changbai Mountain, respectively. However, no regional differences were found for evergreen needleleaf NPP. This study provided not only an estimation NPP of different forest types in northeastern China but also a useful methodology for estimating forest

  1. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction improves image quality without affecting perfusion CT quantitation in primary colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Prezzi

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the effect of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR on perfusion CT (pCT parameter quantitation and image quality in primary colorectal cancer. Methods: Prospective observational study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent, 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent pCT (100 kV, 150 mA, 120 s acquisition, axial mode. Tumour regional blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, mean transit time (MTT and permeability surface area product (PS were determined using identical regions-of-interests for ASIR percentages of 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100%. Image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR and pCT parameters were assessed across ASIR percentages. Coefficients of variation (CV, repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA and Spearman’ rank order correlation were performed with statistical significance at 5%. Results: With increasing ASIR percentages, image noise decreased by 33% while CNR increased by 61%; peak tumour CNR was greater than 1.5 with 60% ASIR and above. Mean BF, BV, MTT and PS differed by less than 1.8%, 2.9%, 2.5% and 2.6% across ASIR percentages. CV were 4.9%, 4.2%, 3.3% and 7.9%; rANOVA P values: 0.85, 0.62, 0.02 and 0.81 respectively. Conclusions: ASIR improves image noise and CNR without altering pCT parameters substantially. Keywords: Perfusion imaging, Multidetector computed tomography, Colorectal neoplasms, Computer-assisted image processing, Radiation dosage

  2. Improvement of Navigation and Representation in Virtual Reality after Prism Adaptation in Neglect Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Glize

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prism adaptation (PA is responsible for an expansion of sensori-motor after-effects to cognitive domains for patients with spatial neglect. One important question is whether the cognitive after-effects induced by PA may also concern higher aspects of spatial cognition, such as navigation and topographic memory, which are critical in everyday life. The aim of this study was to assess whether multiple sessions of right PA can affect navigation and topographic memory. Seven right brain-damaged (RBD patients with chronic neglect were included. We used a virtual supermarket named VAP-S which is an original paradigm, similar to the “shopping list test” during which patients had to purchase items from a list of eight products. Furthermore, in order to assess generalization of PA effects on constructing a spatial map from virtual information, each participant was then asked to draw the map of the virtual supermarket from memory. Regarding navigation performance, significant results were obtained: session duration reduction, fewer numbers of pauses and omissions, more items purchased on the left side and more items purchased over all. A long-lasting effect was noted, up to one month after PA. The representational task performance was also significantly increased for map drawing, with a reduction of the right shift of the symmetry axis of the map, more items drawn on the left side of maps and over all, and more items correctly located on the map. Some of these effects lasted for at least 7 days. These results suggest an expansion of PA benefit to a virtual environment. Crucially, the cognitive benefits induced by PA were noted for complex spatial cognition tasks required in everyday life such as navigation and topographic memory and this improvement was maintained for up to 1 month.

  3. Improvement of Navigation and Representation in Virtual Reality after Prism Adaptation in Neglect Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glize, Bertrand; Lunven, Marine; Rossetti, Yves; Revol, Patrice; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Klinger, Evelyne; Joseph, Pierre-Alain; Rode, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Prism adaptation (PA) is responsible for an expansion of sensori-motor after-effects to cognitive domains for patients with spatial neglect. One important question is whether the cognitive after-effects induced by PA may also concern higher aspects of spatial cognition, such as navigation and topographic memory, which are critical in everyday life. The aim of this study was to assess whether multiple sessions of right PA can affect navigation and topographic memory. Seven right brain-damaged (RBD) patients with chronic neglect were included. We used a virtual supermarket named VAP-S which is an original paradigm, similar to the "shopping list test" during which patients had to purchase items from a list of eight products. Furthermore, in order to assess generalization of PA effects on constructing a spatial map from virtual information, each participant was then asked to draw the map of the virtual supermarket from memory. Regarding navigation performance, significant results were obtained: session duration reduction, fewer numbers of pauses and omissions, more items purchased on the left side and more items purchased over all. A long-lasting effect was noted, up to one month after PA. The representational task performance was also significantly increased for map drawing, with a reduction of the right shift of the symmetry axis of the map, more items drawn on the left side of maps and over all, and more items correctly located on the map. Some of these effects lasted for at least 7 days. These results suggest an expansion of PA benefit to a virtual environment. Crucially, the cognitive benefits induced by PA were noted for complex spatial cognition tasks required in everyday life such as navigation and topographic memory and this improvement was maintained for up to 1 month.

  4. INTRA-VARIETAL CROSSING AS METHOD TO IMPROVE ADAPTATION CHARACTERISTICS IN INITIAL BREEDING ACCESSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kozlovskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The important goal of breeding program is to achieve the heterosis effect and develop the appropriate breeding lines to be used for crossing. The cultivation of the variety or breeding line for a long time and selection process under the same environmental factors lead to decrease of livability and productivity of the variety or breeding line. The intra-varietal and intra-line crossing is the method that enables to improve the genetic basis of the existing breeding accessions, when increasing the recombination ability, particular-ly among valuable and rare characteristics. The accessions of sweet pepper of different ecological origin: local varieties ‘Aeneas’, ‘Ivanhoe’ (Ukraine, ‘Sladkiy’ (Italy, breeding line ‘n 138d’ (Russia were taken to study the influence of intra-varietal crossing on recovery of combining ability in breeding lines. The progeny produced from intra-varietal crossing has been assessed for the fruit number, average fruit weight, yielding ability and marketability, and then consequently compared with control accession. As results showed the yielding ability had increased by 2.3-25.7%, depending on genotype, while the fruit weight had increased by 2-11%. Phenological observation showed that there is no significant difference at the phase of growing and development between control plants and plants produced through intra-varietal crossing. The detailed progeny assessment has revealed the different effect of adaptive ability among different plants when the plants crossing within the same accession. This enables to select the best accessions to be used in further heterosis breeding pro-gram.

  5. Improving Stability and Convergence for Adaptive Radial Basis Function Neural Networks Algorithm. (On-Line Harmonics Estimation Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyad K Almaita

    2017-03-01

    Keywords: Energy efficiency, Power quality, Radial basis function, neural networks, adaptive, harmonic. Article History: Received Dec 15, 2016; Received in revised form Feb 2nd 2017; Accepted 13rd 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Almaita, E.K and Shawawreh J.Al (2017 Improving Stability and Convergence for Adaptive Radial Basis Function Neural Networks Algorithm (On-Line Harmonics Estimation Application.  International Journal of Renewable Energy Develeopment, 6(1, 9-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.1.9-17

  6. Improved covariance matrix estimation in spectrally inhomogeneous sea clutter with application to adaptive small boat detection.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, PL

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Asymptotically optimal coherent detection techniques yield sub-clutter visibility in heavy-tailed sea clutter. The adaptive linear quadratic detector inherently assumes spectral homogeneity for the reference window of the covariance matrix estimator...

  7. Improving the Effectiveness of Speaker Verification Domain Adaptation With Inadequate In-Domain Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-20

    verification scores. One such scoring method is probabilistic linear discriminant analysis (PLDA) [2], which provides a sta- tistical tool for...error rate (EER) and minimum decision cost function (mindcf), and pooled across gender . For all adaptation methods, an adaptation coefficient of α=0.5...Elder, “Probabilistic linear discriminant analysis for inferences about identity,” in ICCV, 2007. [3] D. Garcia-Romero and A. McCree, “Supervised domain

  8. Assessing the components of adaptive capacity to improve conservation and management efforts under global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Adrienne; Beever, Erik; Robertson, Amanda; Hofmann, Gretchen; O’Leary, John

    2015-01-01

    Natural-resource managers and other conservation practitioners are under unprecedented pressure to categorize and quantify the vulnerability of natural systems based on assessment of the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of species to climate change. Despite the urgent need for these assessments, neither the theoretical basis of adaptive capacity nor the practical issues underlying its quantification has been articulated in a manner that is directly applicable to natural-resource management. Both are critical for researchers, managers, and other conservation practitioners to develop reliable strategies for assessing adaptive capacity. Drawing from principles of classical and contemporary research and examples from terrestrial, marine, plant, and animal systems, we examined broadly the theory behind the concept of adaptive capacity. We then considered how interdisciplinary, trait- and triage-based approaches encompassing the oft-overlooked interactions among components of adaptive capacity can be used to identify species and populations likely to have higher (or lower) adaptive capacity. We identified the challenges and value of such endeavors and argue for a concerted interdisciplinary research approach that combines ecology, ecological genetics, and eco-physiology to reflect the interacting components of adaptive capacity. We aimed to provide a basis for constructive discussion between natural-resource managers and researchers, discussions urgently needed to identify research directions that will deliver answers to real-world questions facing resource managers, other conservation practitioners, and policy makers. Directing research to both seek general patterns and identify ways to facilitate adaptive capacity of key species and populations within species, will enable conservation ecologists and resource managers to maximize returns on research and management investment and arrive at novel and dynamic management and policy decisions.

  9. Assessing the components of adaptive capacity to improve conservation and management efforts under global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Adrienne B; Beever, Erik A; Robertson, Amanda L; Hofmann, Gretchen E; O'Leary, John

    2015-10-01

    Natural-resource managers and other conservation practitioners are under unprecedented pressure to categorize and quantify the vulnerability of natural systems based on assessment of the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of species to climate change. Despite the urgent need for these assessments, neither the theoretical basis of adaptive capacity nor the practical issues underlying its quantification has been articulated in a manner that is directly applicable to natural-resource management. Both are critical for researchers, managers, and other conservation practitioners to develop reliable strategies for assessing adaptive capacity. Drawing from principles of classical and contemporary research and examples from terrestrial, marine, plant, and animal systems, we examined broadly the theory behind the concept of adaptive capacity. We then considered how interdisciplinary, trait- and triage-based approaches encompassing the oft-overlooked interactions among components of adaptive capacity can be used to identify species and populations likely to have higher (or lower) adaptive capacity. We identified the challenges and value of such endeavors and argue for a concerted interdisciplinary research approach that combines ecology, ecological genetics, and eco-physiology to reflect the interacting components of adaptive capacity. We aimed to provide a basis for constructive discussion between natural-resource managers and researchers, discussions urgently needed to identify research directions that will deliver answers to real-world questions facing resource managers, other conservation practitioners, and policy makers. Directing research to both seek general patterns and identify ways to facilitate adaptive capacity of key species and populations within species, will enable conservation ecologists and resource managers to maximize returns on research and management investment and arrive at novel and dynamic management and policy decisions. © 2015 Society for

  10. Improving spatio-temporal benefit transfers for pest control by generalist predators in cotton in the southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederholt, Ruscena; Bagstad, Kenneth J.; McCracken, Gary F.; Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Loomis, John B.; Semmens, Darius J.; Russell, Amy L.; Sansone, Chris; LaSharr, Kelsie; Cryan, Paul; Reynoso, Claudia; Medellin, Rodrigo A.; Lopez-Hoffman, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Given rapid changes in agricultural practice, it is critical to understand how alterations in ecological, technological, and economic conditions over time and space impact ecosystem services in agroecosystems. Here, we present a benefit transfer approach to quantify cotton pest-control services provided by a generalist predator, the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana), in the southwestern United States. We show that pest-control estimates derived using (1) a compound spatial–temporal model – which incorporates spatial and temporal variability in crop pest-control service values – are likely to exhibit less error than those derived using (2) a simple-spatial model (i.e., a model that extrapolates values derived for one area directly, without adjustment, to other areas) or (3) a simple-temporal model (i.e., a model that extrapolates data from a few points in time over longer time periods). Using our compound spatial–temporal approach, the annualized pest-control value was \\$12.2 million, in contrast to an estimate of \\$70.1 million (5.7 times greater), obtained from the simple-spatial approach. Using estimates from one year (simple-temporal approach) revealed large value differences (0.4 times smaller to 2 times greater). Finally, we present a detailed protocol for valuing pest-control services, which can be used to develop robust pest-control transfer functions for generalist predators in agroecosystems.

  11. An Unsupervised Method of Change Detection in Multi-Temporal PolSAR Data Using a Test Statistic and an Improved K&I Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqi Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, multi-temporal imagery from spaceborne sensors has provided a fast and practical means for surveying and assessing changes in terrain surfaces. Owing to the all-weather imaging capability, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR has become a key tool for change detection. Change detection methods include both unsupervised and supervised methods. Supervised change detection, which needs some human intervention, is generally ineffective and impractical. Due to this limitation, unsupervised methods are widely used in change detection. The traditional unsupervised methods only use a part of the polarization information, and the required thresholding algorithms are independent of the multi-temporal data, which results in the change detection map being ineffective and inaccurate. To solve these problems, a novel method of change detection using a test statistic based on the likelihood ratio test and the improved Kittler and Illingworth (K&I minimum-error thresholding algorithm is introduced in this paper. The test statistic is used to generate the comparison image (CI of the multi-temporal PolSAR images, and improved K&I using a generalized Gaussian model simulates the distribution of the CI. As a result of these advantages, we can obtain the change detection map using an optimum threshold. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated by the use of multi-temporal PolSAR images acquired by RADARSAT-2 over Wuhan, China. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and highly accurate.

  12. Highly undersampled MR image reconstruction using an improved dual-dictionary learning method with self-adaptive dictionaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiansen; Song, Ying; Zhu, Zhen; Zhao, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Dual-dictionary learning (Dual-DL) method utilizes both a low-resolution dictionary and a high-resolution dictionary, which are co-trained for sparse coding and image updating, respectively. It can effectively exploit a priori knowledge regarding the typical structures, specific features, and local details of training sets images. The prior knowledge helps to improve the reconstruction quality greatly. This method has been successfully applied in magnetic resonance (MR) image reconstruction. However, it relies heavily on the training sets, and dictionaries are fixed and nonadaptive. In this research, we improve Dual-DL by using self-adaptive dictionaries. The low- and high-resolution dictionaries are updated correspondingly along with the image updating stage to ensure their self-adaptivity. The updated dictionaries incorporate both the prior information of the training sets and the test image directly. Both dictionaries feature improved adaptability. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently and significantly improve the quality and robustness of MR image reconstruction.

  13. Rift Valley fever dynamics in Senegal: a project for pro-active adaptation and improvement of livestock raising management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafaye, Murielle; Sall, Baba; Ndiaye, Youssou; Vignolles, Cecile; Tourre, Yves M; Borchi, Franc Ois; Soubeyroux, Jean-Michel; Diallo, Mawlouth; Dia, Ibrahima; Ba, Yamar; Faye, Abdoulaye; Ba, Taibou; Ka, Alioune; Ndione, Jacques-André; Gauthier, Hélène; Lacaux, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The multi-disciplinary French project "Adaptation à la Fiévre de la Vallée du Rift" (AdaptFVR) has concluded a 10-year constructive interaction between many scientists/partners involved with the Rift Valley fever (RVF) dynamics in Senegal. The three targeted objectives reached were (i) to produce--in near real-time--validated risk maps for parked livestock exposed to RVF mosquitoes/vectors bites; (ii) to assess the impacts on RVF vectors from climate variability at different time-scales including climate change; and (iii) to isolate processes improving local livestock management and animal health. Based on these results, concrete, pro-active adaptive actions were taken on site, which led to the establishment of a RVF early warning system (RVFews). Bulletins were released in a timely fashion during the project, tested and validated in close collaboration with the local populations, i.e. the primary users. Among the strategic, adaptive methods developed, conducted and evaluated in terms of cost/benefit analyses are the larvicide campaigns and the coupled bio-mathematical (hydrological and entomological) model technologies, which are being transferred to the staff of the "Centre de Suivi Ecologique" (CSE) in Dakar during 2013. Based on the results from the AdaptFVR project, other projects with similar conceptual and modelling approaches are currently being implemented, e.g. for urban and rural malaria and dengue in the French Antilles.

  14. Rift Valley fever dynamics in Senegal: a project for pro-active adaptation and improvement of livestock raising management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murielle Lafaye

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The multi-disciplinary French project “Adaptation à la Fièvre de la Vallée du Rift” (AdaptFVR has concluded a 10-year constructive interaction between many scientists/partners involved with the Rift Valley fever (RVF dynamics in Senegal. The three targeted objectives reached were (i to produce - in near real-time - validated risk maps for parked livestock exposed to RVF mosquitoes/vectors bites; (ii to assess the impacts on RVF vectors from climate variability at different time-scales including climate change; and (iii to isolate processes improving local livestock management and animal health. Based on these results, concrete, pro-active adaptive actions were taken on site, which led to the establishment of a RVF early warning system (RVFews. Bulletins were released in a timely fashion during the project, tested and validated in close collaboration with the local populations, i.e. the primary users. Among the strategic, adaptive methods developed, conducted and evaluated in terms of cost/benefit analyses are the larvicide campaigns and the coupled bio-mathematical (hydrological and entomological model technologies, which are being transferred to the staff of the “Centre de Suivi Ecologique” (CSE in Dakar during 2013. Based on the results from the AdaptFVR project, other projects with similar conceptual and modelling approaches are currently being implemented, e.g. for urban and rural malaria and dengue in the French Antilles.

  15. The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS): Demonstrating key technologies for a future constellation to improve temporal sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounding of the atmosphere has become a vital element in the observational system for weather forecast prediction at National Weather Prediction (NWP) centers worldwide. The NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument was the pathfinder for the hyperspectral infrared observations and was designed to provide accurate atmospheric temperature and water vapor profile information in support of weather prediction. AIRS was launched in 2002 and continues to operate well. The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi NPP satellite was launched in 2011 to continue the AIRS measurement record. CrIS also continues to operate well and additional sensors are planned for launch promising to continue the hyperspectral infrared measurements in support of NWP into the late 2030's. The high cost of IR sounders makes it costly to launch them into multiple orbits to improve temporal sampling, or into GEO, although EUMETSAT is planning a GEO IR Sounder to launch in the early 2020's. JPL NASA is offering an alternate hyperspectral IR sounder architecture for the future involving CubeSats. The latest technology in large format focal plane assemblies, wide field optics and active cryocoolers enables a reduction in size, mass and cost of the legacy sounders and offer new configurations. Lessons learned from AIRS and CrIS indicate that temperature and water vapor sounding in the lower troposphere can be achieved with only the MWIR portion of the spectrum. The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS) employs only an MWIR spectrometer to achieve lower tropospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, but with comparable spatial, spectral and radiometric sensitivity in this band as AIRS and CrIS. CIRAS operates from 4.08-5.13 µm with 625 channels and spectral resolution of 1.2-2.0 cm-1. CIRAS employs an immersion grating spectrometer making the optics incredibly compact, and HOT-BIRD detectors enabling good uniformity and operability over the large

  16. An Improved WiFi/PDR Integrated System Using an Adaptive and Robust Filter for Indoor Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengke Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBS are services offered through a mobile device that take into account a device’s geographical location. To provide position information for these services, location is a key process. GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System can provide sub-meter accuracy in open-sky areas using satellite signals. However, for indoor and dense urban environments, the accuracy deteriorates significantly because of weak signals and dense multipaths. The situation becomes worse in indoor environments where the GNSS signals are unreliable or totally blocked. To improve the accuracy of indoor positioning for location-based services, an improved WiFi/Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR integrated positioning and navigation system using an adaptive and robust filter is presented. The adaptive filter is based on scenario and motion state recognition and the robust filter is based on the Mahalanobis distance. They are combined and used in the WiFi/PDR integrated system to weaken the effect of gross errors on the dynamic and observation models. To validate their performance in the WiFi/PDR integrated system, a real indoor localization experiment is conducted. The results indicate that the adaptive filter is better able to adapt to the circumstances of the dynamic model by adjusting the covariance of the process noise and the robust Kalman filter is able to mitigate the harmful effect of gross errors from the WiFi positioning.

  17. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC...

  18. Minimal Enteral Nutrition to Improve Adaptation After Intestinal Resection in Piglets and Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsholt, Lise; Qvist, Niels; Sangild, Per Torp

    2017-01-01

    , enteral colostrum supplementation was well tolerated, and no infants developed clinical signs of cow's milk allergy. CONCLUSION: Minimal enteral nutrition feeding with bovine colostrum and formula induced similar intestinal adaptation after resection in piglets. Colostrum was well tolerated by newly......BACKGROUND: Minimal enteral nutrition (MEN) may induce a diet-dependent stimulation of gut adaptation following intestinal resection. Bovine colostrum is rich in growth factors, and we hypothesized that MEN with colostrum would stimulate intestinal adaptation, compared with formula, and would...... be well tolerated in patients with short bowel syndrome. METHODS: In experiment 1, 3-day-old piglets with 50% distal small intestinal resection were fed parenteral nutrition (PN, n = 10) or PN plus MEN given as either colostrum (PN-COL, n = 5) or formula (PN-FORM, n = 9) for 7 days. Intestinal nutrient...

  19. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    While many studies have documented the beneficial effect of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations in trained subjects (reviewed in Iaia & Bangsbo 2010; J Bangsbo 2015; Hostrup & Bangsbo 2016), knowledge in certain areas are lacking. Examples on such areas...... compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged...... and proteins related to Ca2+ re-uptake. The changes in 10-km performance were associated with improved running economy and anaerobic capacity, thereby blueprinting the relevance of intense training for long-term performance. Collectively, these findings indicate that short-term performance does continuously...

  20. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    While many studies have documented the beneficial effect of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations in trained subjects (reviewed in Iaia & Bangsbo 2010; J Bangsbo 2015; Hostrup & Bangsbo 2016), knowledge in certain areas are lacking. Examples on such areas...... compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged...... and proteins related to Ca2+ re-uptake. The changes in 10-km performance were associated with improved running economy and anaerobic capacity, thereby blueprinting the relevance of intense training for long-term performance. Collectively, these findings indicate that short-term performance does continuously...

  1. Efficiency and reliability improvement in wind turbine converters by grid converter adaptive control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trintis, Ionut; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Abrahamsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a control method that reduces the losses in wind turbine converters adaptively controlling the grid converter. The dc-link voltage adapts its reference based on the system state and therefore reduces the stored energy, and is therefore kept at the minimum necessary for the grid...... and generator side. Operating in this way, the electrical and thermal stress factors are decreased on the power electronic devices, increasing their lifetime. The simulation results using this method show efficiency increase and devices temperature cycles slightly decreased. Experimental results on a wind...... turbine power stack shows efficiency increase in the high power region....

  2. Improving features used for hyper-temporal land cover change detection by reducing the uncertainty in the feature extraction method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salmon, BP

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available the effect which the length of a temporal sliding window has on the success of detecting land cover change. It is shown using a short Fourier transform as a feature extraction method provides meaningful robust input to a machine learning method. In theory...

  3. Spatial mapping of temporal risk to improve prevention measures: A case study of dengue epidemic in Lahore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Sidrah; Amin, Muhammad; Munir, Bilal Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Dengue is identified as serious vector born infectious disease by WHO, threating around 2.5 billion people around the globe. Pakistan is facing dengue epidemic since 1994 but 2010 and 2011 dengue outbreaks were worst. During 2011 dengue outbreak 22,562 cases were reported and 363 died due to this fatal infection in Pakistan. In this study, Lahore District was chosen as it was severely affected in 2011 dengue outbreak with 14,000 reported cases and 300 deaths. There is no vaccine developed yet for the disease control, so only effective early warning, prevention and control measures can reduce the potential disease risk. This study proposes a method for detecting spatial autocorrelation of temporal dynamics of disease using Local Index of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA) using three temporal indices: (a) how often the dengue cases occur, frequency index; (b) how long the epidemic wave prevails, duration index; (c) how significant dengue cases occur in successive periods, severity index. Overlay analysis of LISA value for each temporal index resulted in eight risk types. The mapping of spatio-temporal risk indices and their overlay analysis identified that 10.6% area of Lahore (184.3km(2) and population density 119,110persons/km(2)) had high values for frequency, duration, and severity index (pdengue. Spatial risk identification by using local spatial-autocorrelation helps in identifying other possible causes of disease risk and further strategic planning for prevention and control measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adaptive e-learning to improve dietary behaviour: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J; Felix, L; Miners, A; Murray, E; Michie, S; Ferguson, E; Free, C; Lock, K; Landon, J; Edwards, P

    2011-10-01

    UK public health policy strongly advocates dietary change for the improvement of population health and emphasises the importance of individual empowerment to improve health. A new and evolving area in the promotion of dietary behavioural change is 'e-learning', the use of interactive electronic media to facilitate teaching and learning on a range of issues including health. The high level of accessibility, combined with emerging advances in computer processing power, data transmission and data storage, makes interactive e-learning a potentially powerful and cost-effective medium for improving dietary behaviour. This review aims to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adaptive e-learning interventions for dietary behaviour change, and also to explore potential psychological mechanisms of action and components of effective interventions. Electronic bibliographic databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, The Cochrane Library, Dissertation Abstracts, EMBASE, Education Resources Information Center, Global Health, Health Economic Evaluations Database, Health Management Information Consortium, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Web of Science) were searched for the period January 1990 to November 2009. Reference lists of included studies and previous reviews were also screened; authors were contacted and trial registers were searched. Studies were included if they were randomised controlled trials, involving participants aged ≥ 13 years, which evaluated the effectiveness of interactive software programs for improving dietary behaviour. Primary outcomes were measures of dietary behaviours, including estimated intakes or changes in intake of energy, nutrients, dietary fibre, foods or food groups. Secondary outcome measures were clinical outcomes such as anthropometry or blood biochemistry. Psychological mediators of dietary behaviour change were also investigated. Two review authors independently screened results and extracted data from

  5. Improving the role of vulnerability assessments In decision support for effective climate adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda A. Joyce; Constance I. Millar

    2014-01-01

    Vulnerability assessments (VA) have been proposed as an initial step in a process to develop and implement adaptation management for climate change in forest ecosystems. Scientific understanding of the effects of climate change is an ever-accumulating knowledge base. Synthesizing information from this knowledge base in the context of our understanding of ecosystem...

  6. The Contextualized Technology Adaptation Process (CTAP): Optimizing Health Information Technology to Improve Mental Health Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Aaron R.; Wasse, Jessica Knaster; Ludwig, Kristy; Zachry, Mark; Bruns, Eric J.; Unützer, Jürgen; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Health information technologies have become a central fixture in the mental healthcare landscape, but few frameworks exist to guide their adaptation to novel settings. This paper introduces the Contextualized Technology Adaptation Process (CTAP) and presents data collected during Phase 1 of its application to measurement feedback system development in school mental health. The CTAP is built on models of human-centered design and implementation science and incorporates repeated mixed methods assessments to guide the design of technologies to ensure high compatibility with a destination setting. CTAP phases include: (1) Contextual evaluation, (2) Evaluation of the unadapted technology, (3) Trialing and evaluation of the adapted technology, (4) Refinement and larger-scale implementation, and (5) Sustainment through ongoing evaluation and system revision. Qualitative findings from school-based practitioner focus groups are presented, which provided information for CTAP Phase 1, contextual evaluation, surrounding education sector clinicians’ workflows, types of technologies currently available, and influences on technology use. Discussion focuses on how findings will inform subsequent CTAP phases, as well as their implications for future technology adaptation across content domains and service sectors. PMID:25677251

  7. Building Turnaround Capacity for Urban School Improvement: The Role of Adaptive Leadership and Defined Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jill K.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the levels of and relationships between technical leadership, adaptive leadership, and defined autonomy among Denver school leaders along with their combined effects on school growth gains over time. Thirty principals provided complete responses to an online survey that included existing scales for technical leadership,…

  8. Dancing Aerobics as Means of Improving Adaptive Possibilities of Foreign Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Yu Razmakhova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of modeling training sessions of health aerobic classes in international higher schools is quite topical. The proposed form of training helps to speed up the adaptive responses of foreign students in the new conditions of their life and the implementation of the goals of internationalization.

  9. Analysis of revenue improvements with runtime adaptation of service composition based on conditional request retries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Miroslav; van den Berg, Hans Leo

    In this paper we consider the runtime service adaptation mechanism for service compositions that is based on conditional retries. A single retry may be issued while a concrete service within composition is executed. This retry could either invoke the same concrete service or a functionally

  10. Investigating Purposeful Science Curriculum Adaptation as a Strategy to Improve Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debarger, Angela Haydel; Penuel, William R.; Moorthy, Savitha; Beauvineau, Yves; Kennedy, Cathleen A.; Boscardin, Christy Kim

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the potential and conditions for using curriculum adaptation to support reform of science teaching and learning. With each wave of reform in science education, curriculum has played a central role and the contemporary wave focused on implementation of the principles and vision of the "Framework for K-12 Science…

  11. Improving Adaptive Importance Sampling Simulation of Markovian Queueing Models using Non-parametric Smoothing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudt, Edwin; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work on state-dependent adaptive importance sampling techniques for the simulation of rare events in Markovian queueing models used either no smoothing or a parametric smoothing technique, which was known to be non-optimal. In this paper, we introduce the use of kernel smoothing in this

  12. Improving the Stability of the LMF Adaptive Algorithm Using the Median Filteer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bysted, Tommy Kristensen; Rusu, Corneliu

    1998-01-01

    environments and secondly it enables the use of larger step-size of the adaptive algorithm especially when the signals are corrupted by noise. The disadvantages are a small raise in the computational complexity and slower convergence than the LMF. Two examples are given which illustrates the behavior...

  13. Integration of auto-steering with adaptive cruise control for improved cornering behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idriz, Adem; Abdul Rachman, Arya Senna; Baldi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Several works have proposed longitudinal control strategies enabling a vehicle to operate adaptive cruise control and collision avoidance functions. However, no integration with lateral control has been proposed in the current state of the art,
    which motivates the developments of this work. This

  14. Improved methods in neural network-based adaptive output feedback control, with applications to flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nakwan

    Utilizing the universal approximation property of neural networks, we develop several novel approaches to neural network-based adaptive output feedback control of nonlinear systems, and illustrate these approaches for several flight control applications. In particular, we address the problem of non-affine systems and eliminate the fixed point assumption present in earlier work. All of the stability proofs are carried out in a form that eliminates an algebraic loop in the neural network implementation. An approximate input/output feedback linearizing controller is augmented with a neural network using input/output sequences of the uncertain system. These approaches permit adaptation to both parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. All physical systems also have control position and rate limits, which may either deteriorate performance or cause instability for a sufficiently high control bandwidth. Here we apply a method for protecting an adaptive process from the effects of input saturation and time delays, known as "pseudo control hedging". This method was originally developed for the state feedback case, and we provide a stability analysis that extends its domain of applicability to the case of output feedback. The approach is illustrated by the design of a pitch-attitude flight control system for a linearized model of an R-50 experimental helicopter, and by the design of a pitch-rate control system for a 58-state model of a flexible aircraft consisting of rigid body dynamics coupled with actuator and flexible modes. A new approach to augmentation of an existing linear controller is introduced. It is especially useful when there is limited information concerning the plant model, and the existing controller. The approach is applied to the design of an adaptive autopilot for a guided munition. Design of a neural network adaptive control that ensures asymptotically stable tracking performance is also addressed.

  15. Long-term effective population sizes, temporal stability of genetic composition and potential for local adaptation in anadromous brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Ruzzante, D.E.; Eg Nielsen, Einar

    2002-01-01

    (3 km) river showed Ne greater than or equal to 300. Assuming a stepping-stone model of gene flow we considered the relative roles of gene flow, random genetic drift and selection to assess the possibilities for local adaptation. The requirements for local adaptation were fulfilled, but only...

  16. Adaptive control algorithm for improving power capture of wind turbines in turbulent winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz-Guerra, Lluis; Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    , the complex and time-varying aerodynamics a WT face due to turbulent winds make their determination a hard task. The selected constant parameters may maximize energy for a particular, but not all, wind regime conditions. Adaptivity can modify the controller to increase power capture under variable wind...... conditions. This paper present new analysis tools and an adaptive control law to increase the energy captured by a wind turbine. Due to its simplicity, it can be easily added to existing industry-standard controllers. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is assessed by simulations on a high......The standard wind turbine (WT) control law modifies the torque applied to the generator as a quadratic function of the generator speed (K!2) while blades are positioned at some optimal pitch angle (). The value of K and should be properly selected such that energy capture is increased. In practice...

  17. Improving Energy Efficiency of an Autonomous Bicycle with Adaptive Controller Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rodriguez-Rosa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed to achieve lateral stability of an autonomous bicycle with only the rotation of the front wheel. This can be achieved with a classic controller. However, if the energy consumption of the bicycle also has to be minimized, this solution is not valid. To solve this problem, an adaptive controller has been designed, which modifies its gains according to the bicycle’s forward velocity, adapting its response with minimum energy consumption and satisfying the design specifications. The study demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed control, achieving an energy saving of 73 . 8 % in trajectory tracking with respect to a conventional proportional-integral ( P I controller. These results show the importance of designing energy-efficient controllers, not only for autonomous vehicles but also for any automatic system where the energy consumption can be minimized.

  18. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction improves image quality without affecting perfusion CT quantitation in primary colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Prezzi, Davide; Goh, V.; Virdi, S.; Mallett, S; Grierson, C; Breen, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) on perfusion CT (pCT) parameter quantitation and image quality in primary colorectal cancer. Methods: Prospective observational study. Following institutional review board approval and informed consent, 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma underwent pCT (100 kV, 150 mA, 120 s acquisition, axial mode). Tumour regional blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability sur...

  19. Studying citizen science through adaptive management and learning feedbacks as mechanisms for improving conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rebecca; Gray, Steven; Sorensen, Amanda; Newman, Greg; Mellor, David; Newman, Greg; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; LaDeau, Shannon; Biehler, Dawn; Crall, Alycia

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science has generated a growing interest among scientists and community groups, and citizen science programs have been created specifically for conservation. We examined collaborative science, a highly interactive form of citizen science, which we developed within a theoretically informed framework. In this essay, we focused on 2 aspects of our framework: social learning and adaptive management. Social learning, in contrast to individual-based learning, stresses collaborative and generative insight making and is well-suited for adaptive management. Adaptive-management integrates feedback loops that are informed by what is learned and is guided by iterative decision making. Participants engaged in citizen science are able to add to what they are learning through primary data collection, which can result in the real-time information that is often necessary for conservation. Our work is particularly timely because research publications consistently report a lack of established frameworks and evaluation plans to address the extent of conservation outcomes in citizen science. To illustrate how our framework supports conservation through citizen science, we examined how 2 programs enacted our collaborative science framework. Further, we inspected preliminary conservation outcomes of our case-study programs. These programs, despite their recent implementation, are demonstrating promise with regard to positive conservation outcomes. To date, they are independently earning funds to support research, earning buy-in from local partners to engage in experimentation, and, in the absence of leading scientists, are collecting data to test ideas. We argue that this success is due to citizen scientists being organized around local issues and engaging in iterative, collaborative, and adaptive learning. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  20. Improving link prediction in complex networks by adaptively exploiting multiple structural features of networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Bao, Zhong-Kui; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2017-10-01

    So far, many network-structure-based link prediction methods have been proposed. However, these methods only highlight one or two structural features of networks, and then use the methods to predict missing links in different networks. The performances of these existing methods are not always satisfied in all cases since each network has its unique underlying structural features. In this paper, by analyzing different real networks, we find that the structural features of different networks are remarkably different. In particular, even in the same network, their inner structural features are utterly different. Therefore, more structural features should be considered. However, owing to the remarkably different structural features, the contributions of different features are hard to be given in advance. Inspired by these facts, an adaptive fusion model regarding link prediction is proposed to incorporate multiple structural features. In the model, a logistic function combing multiple structural features is defined, then the weight of each feature in the logistic function is adaptively determined by exploiting the known structure information. Last, we use the "learnt" logistic function to predict the connection probabilities of missing links. According to our experimental results, we find that the performance of our adaptive fusion model is better than many similarity indices.

  1. Opportunities to Improve Urban and Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change Through Conservation of Green Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    The conservation of biotic communities in urbanized ecosystems is critical in light of heightened vulnerability due to climate change. Conservation of large open spaces around cities and smaller 'green' spaces within cities - such as forest patches and wetlands - has the capacity to diminish the vulnerability of human communities to higher temperatures, water shortages, increased flooding and other impacts of climate change. In addition, native species need to migrate to track their climate niches and the chances of successful migration will be increased if species have access to habitat throughout the landscape. Thus there is a strong rationale to do more conservation and restoration for both ecosystem and urban adaptation to climate change. Despite this alignment, planning efforts in the urban and ecosystem sectors are rarely done synergistically. As a result it is not clear how well plans will achieve biodiversity along with other ecosystem services goals. In this talk, I will discuss how urban adaptation planning can better align with ecosystem adaptation planning by drawing on research exploring sustainability plans and urban ecology in US cities, including work conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area by the Terrestrial Biodiversity and Climate Change Collaborative (TBC3). This research shows that there are considerable opportunities for linking agendas across sectors in ways that could yield multiple benefits. There are however both social and ecological challenges. In some cases difficult choices will need to be made about which values and services are most important, or where in the landscape different values should be prioritized.

  2. Temporal Coding of Volumetric Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llull, Patrick Ryan

    of other information within that video; namely, focal and spectral information. The next part of the thesis demonstrates derivative works of CACTI: compressive extended depth of field and compressive spectral-temporal imaging. These works successfully show the technique's extension of temporal coding to improve sensing performance in these other dimensions. Geometrical optics-related tradeoffs, such as the classic challenges of wide-field-of-view and high resolution photography, have motivated the development of mulitscale camera arrays. The advent of such designs less than a decade ago heralds a new era of research- and engineering-related challenges. One significant challenge is that of managing the focal volume (x,y,z ) over wide fields of view and resolutions. The fourth chapter shows advances on focus and image quality assessment for a class of multiscale gigapixel cameras developed at Duke. Along the same line of work, we have explored methods for dynamic and adaptive addressing of focus via point spread function engineering. We demonstrate another form of temporal coding in the form of physical translation of the image plane from its nominal focal position. We demonstrate this technique's capability to generate arbitrary point spread functions.

  3. A Novel Clinical Decision Support System Using Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm for the Assessment of Fetal Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Ravindran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical decision support system is proposed in this paper for evaluating the fetal well-being from the cardiotocogram (CTG dataset through an Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm (IAGA and Extreme Learning Machine (ELM. IAGA employs a new scaling technique (called sigma scaling to avoid premature convergence and applies adaptive crossover and mutation techniques with masking concepts to enhance population diversity. Also, this search algorithm utilizes three different fitness functions (two single objective fitness functions and multi-objective fitness function to assess its performance. The classification results unfold that promising classification accuracy of 94% is obtained with an optimal feature subset using IAGA. Also, the classification results are compared with those of other Feature Reduction techniques to substantiate its exhaustive search towards the global optimum. Besides, five other benchmark datasets are used to gauge the strength of the proposed IAGA algorithm.

  4. Adaptive step size LMS improves ECG detection during MRI at 1.5 and 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillou, André; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Ménétré, Sarah; Petitmangin, Grégory; Felblinger, Jacques; Bonnemains, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    We describe a new real-time filter to reduce artefacts on electrocardiogram (ECG) due to magnetic field gradients during MRI. The proposed filter is a least mean square (LMS) filter able to continuously adapt its step size according to the gradient signal of the ongoing MRI acquisition. We implemented this filter and compared it, within two databases (at 1.5 and 3 T) with over 6000 QRS complexes, to five real-time filtering strategies (no filter, low pass filter, standard LMS, and two other filters optimized within the databases: optimized LMS, and optimized Kalman filter). The energy of the remaining noise was significantly reduced (26 vs. 68%, p Kalman filter, and 11% with optimized LMS filter. The adaptive step size LMS improves ECG denoising during MRI. QRS detection has the same F1 score with this filter than with filters optimized within the database.

  5. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    While many studies have documented the beneficial effect of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations in trained subjects (reviewed in Iaia & Bangsbo 2010; J Bangsbo 2015; Hostrup & Bangsbo 2016), knowledge in certain areas are lacking. Examples on such areas...... are the effect of: intense training for a prolonged period, intense training performed very frequently, reduced training volume after a period with frequent intense training, and repeating a period of intense training. Thus, the overall aim of this PhD project was to investigate the effect of different...... compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged...

  6. Improving Performance of Computer-aided Detection of Subtle Breast Masses Using an Adaptive Cueing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Li, Lihua; Xu, Weidong; Liu, Wei; Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Current computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for detecting mammographic masses have several limitations including high correlation with radiologists’ detection and cueing most subtle masses only on one view. To increase CAD sensitivity in cueing more subtle masses that are likely missed and/or overlooked by radiologists without increasing false-positive rates, we investigated a new case-dependent cueing method by combining the original CAD-generated detection scores with a computed bilateral mammographic density asymmetry index. Using the new method, we adaptively raise CAD-generated scores of regions detected on “high-risk” cases to cue more subtle mass regions and reduce CAD scores of regions detected on “low-risk” cases to discard more false-positive regions. A testing dataset involving 78 positive and 338 negative cases was used to test this adaptive cueing method. Each positive case involves two sequential examinations in which the mass was detected in “current” examination and missed in “prior” examination but detected in a retrospective review by radiologists. Applying to this dataset, a pre-optimized CAD scheme yielded 75% case-based and 55% region-based sensitivity on “current” examinations at a false-positive rate of 0.25 per image. CAD sensitivity was reduced to 42% (case-based) and 27% (region-based) on “prior” examinations. Using the new cueing method, case-based and region-based sensitivity could maximally increase 9% and 33% on the “prior” examinations, respectively. The percentages of the masses cued on two views also increased from 27% to 65%. The study demonstrated that using this adaptive cueing method enabled to help CAD cue more subtle cancers without increasing false-positive cueing rate. PMID:22218075

  7. Context-based service adaptation platform: Improving the user experience towards mobile location services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Saowanee

    2008-01-01

    Back in 2000 and the, following two or three years, mobile location services gained a great deal of interest and they were considered as one of the few service categories where users would be willing to pay for the usage. Since 2000 countless mobile location services have been launched in different...... parts of the world. However, the mobile location services have obviously not yet met the hyped expectation of mass-market adoption that was expressed in 2000. The lack of adaptability and offerings tailored to different user requirements in specific contexts of use is one of the factors inhibiting...

  8. Improved prediction error filters for adaptive feedback cancellation in hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Kim; van Waterschoot, Toon; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2013-01-01

    and the loudspeaker signal caused by the closed signal loop, in particular when the near-end signal is spectrally colored as is the case for a speech signal. This paper adopts a prediction-error method (PEM)-based approach to AFC, which is based on the use of decorrelating prediction error filters (PEFs). We propose......Acoustic feedback is a well-known problem in hearing aids, caused by the undesired acoustic coupling between the hearing aid loudspeaker and microphone. Acoustic feedback produces annoying howling sounds and limits the maximum achievable hearing aid amplification. This paper is focused on adaptive...

  9. Improving the response of accelerometers for automotive applications by using LMS adaptive filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Wilmar; de Vicente, Jesús; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Fernández, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the least-mean-squares (LMS) algorithm was used to eliminate noise corrupting the important information coming from a piezoresisitive accelerometer for automotive applications. This kind of accelerometer is designed to be easily mounted in hard to reach places on vehicles under test, and they usually feature ranges from 50 to 2,000 g (where is the gravitational acceleration, 9.81 m/s(2)) and frequency responses to 3,000 Hz or higher, with DC response, durable cables, reliable performance and relatively low cost. However, here we show that the response of the sensor under test had a lot of noise and we carried out the signal processing stage by using both conventional and optimal adaptive filtering. Usually, designers have to build their specific analog and digital signal processing circuits, and this fact increases considerably the cost of the entire sensor system and the results are not always satisfactory, because the relevant signal is sometimes buried in a broad-band noise background where the unwanted information and the relevant signal sometimes share a very similar frequency band. Thus, in order to deal with this problem, here we used the LMS adaptive filtering algorithm and compare it with others based on the kind of filters that are typically used for automotive applications. The experimental results are satisfactory.

  10. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora, E-mail: rexha.vry@gmail.com [Master Program of Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No.10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger’s method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger’s result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  11. Adaptive evolution of nontransgenic Escherichia coli KC01 for improved ethanol tolerance and homoethanol fermentation from xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongze; Manow, Ryan; Finan, Christopher; Wang, Jinhua; Garza, Erin; Zhou, Shengde

    2011-09-01

    Due to its excellent capability to ferment five-carbon sugars, Escherichia coli has been considered one of the platform organisms to be engineered for production of cellulosic ethanol. Nevertheless, genetically engineered ethanologenic E. coli lacks the essential trait of alcohol tolerance. Development of ethanol tolerance is required for cost-effective ethanol fermentation. In this study, we improved alcohol tolerance of a nontransgenic E. coli KC01 (ldhA pflB ackA frdBC pdhR::pflBp6-aceEF-lpd) through adaptive evolution. During ~350 generations of adaptive evolution, a gradually increased concentration of ethanol was used as a selection pressure to enrich ethanol-tolerant mutants. The evolved mutant, E. coli SZ470, was able to grow anaerobically at 40 g l(-1) ethanol, a twofold improvement over parent KC01. When compared with KC01 for small-scale (500 ml) xylose (50 g l(-1)) fermentation, SZ470 achieved 67% higher cell mass, 48% faster volumetric ethanol productivity, and 50% shorter time to complete fermentation with ethanol titer of 23.5 g l(-1) and yield of 94%. These results demonstrate that an industry-oriented nontransgenic E. coli strain could be developed through incremental improvements of desired traits by a combination of molecular biology and traditional microbiology techniques.

  12. Simultaneous application of multiple platforms (Glider, Scanfish, profiling mooring, CTD) to improve detection and quantification of temporal ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D.; Prien, R. D.; Lips, U.; Naumann, M.; Liblik, T.; Schulz-Bull, D. E.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean dynamics are difficult to observe given the broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales. Robotic technology can be used to address this issue, and help to investigate the variability of physical and biogeochemical processes. This work focuses on ocean robots and in particular on glider technology which seems to be one of the most promising oceanographic tools for future marine research. In this context, we present the results of an observational program conducted in the Baltic Sea combining a profiling mooring (GODESS - Gotland Deep Environmental Sampling Station) and glider technology (Slocum). The temporal variability is captured by the mooring, while the spatial variability is obtained from the glider sampling the surrounding area. Furthermore, classical CTD-measurements and an underwater vehicle (Scanfish) are used simultaneously by two different research vessels to validate and complement the observing network. The main aim of the study is to identify possible synergies between the different platforms and to get a better understanding of maximizing the information content of the data collected by this network. The value and the quality of the data of each individual platform is analyzed and their contribution to the performance of the network itself evaluated.

  13. Improved formulations and an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search heuristic for the integrated berth allocation and quay crane assignment problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iris, Cagatay; Pacino, Dario; Røpke, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the integrated berth allocation and quay crane assignment problem in container terminals. We consider the decrease in the marginal productivity of quay cranes and the increase in handling time due to deviation from the desired position. We consider a continuous berth......, discretized in small equal-sized sections. A number of enhancements over the state-of-the-art formulation and an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search (ALNS) heuristic are presented. Computational results reveal that the enhancements improve many of the best-known bounds, and the ALNS outperforms the state-of-the-art...

  14. Temporal sensitivity. [time dependent human perception of visual stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1986-01-01

    Human visual temporal sensitivity is examined. The stimuli used to measure temporal sensitivity are described and the linear systems theory is reviewed in terms of temporal sensitivity. A working model which represents temporal sensitivity is proposed. The visibility of a number of temporal wave forms, sinusoids, rectangular pulses, and pulse pairs, is analyzed. The relation between spatial and temporal effects is studied. Temporal variations induced by image motion and the effects of light adaptation on temporal sensitivity are considered.

  15. Interleaved diffusion-weighted EPI improved by adaptive partial-Fourier and multi-band multiplexed sensitivity-encoding reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We report a series of techniques to reliably eliminate artifacts in interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) based diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Methods First, we integrate the previously reported multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) algorithm with a new adaptive Homodyne partial-Fourier reconstruction algorithm, so that images reconstructed from interleaved partial-Fourier DWI data are free from artifacts even in the presence of either a) motion-induced k-space energy peak displacement, or b) susceptibility field gradient induced fast phase changes. Second, we generalize the previously reported single-band MUSE framework to multi-band MUSE, so that both through-plane and in-plane aliasing artifacts in multi-band multi-shot interleaved DWI data can be effectively eliminated. Results The new adaptive Homodyne-MUSE reconstruction algorithm reliably produces high-quality and high-resolution DWI, eliminating residual artifacts in images reconstructed with previously reported methods. Furthermore, the generalized MUSE algorithm is compatible with multi-band and high-throughput DWI. Conclusion The integration of the multi-band and adaptive Homodyne-MUSE algorithms significantly improves the spatial-resolution, image quality, and scan throughput of interleaved DWI. We expect that the reported reconstruction framework will play an important role in enabling high-resolution DWI for both neuroscience research and clinical uses. PMID:24925000

  16. Temporal network epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Petter

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in epidemic process models and related data on temporally varying networks. It is widely recognized that contact networks are indispensable for describing, understanding, and intervening to stop the spread of infectious diseases in human and animal populations; “network epidemiology” is an umbrella term to describe this research field. More recently, contact networks have been recognized as being highly dynamic. This observation, also supported by an increasing amount of new data, has led to research on temporal networks, a rapidly growing area. Changes in network structure are often informed by epidemic (or other) dynamics, in which case they are referred to as adaptive networks. This volume gathers contributions by prominent authors working in temporal and adaptive network epidemiology, a field essential to understanding infectious diseases in real society.

  17. Species adaptability, seed availability and prospects for improvement of eucalyptus in Minas Gerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrevia, M.; Balloni, E.A.; Pinto, J.E. Jr.; Jacob, W.S.

    1978-01-01

    As part of a continuing study into possible improvement of Eucalyptus spp. in plantations, data are presented from all existing trials and experimental plantings in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Growth, uniformity, form and fruiting are indicated.

  18. Data-driven adaptive selection of rule quality measures for improving rule induction and filtration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Marek; Wróbel, Łukasz

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a proposal of a rule induction algorithm selecting a rule quality measure adaptively. The quality measure plays the role of an optimization criterion of the generated rules. Nine quality measures applied by the algorithm are presented and discussed in the paper. It is shown experimentally that the proposed algorithm provides us with obtaining a classifier of the best quality. During experiments, three criteria of the classifier quality were considered: overall accuracy, balanced accuracy (average accuracy of decision classes), and complexity of the classifier (understood to mean the number of induced rules). The experiments were carried out on 34 data sets coming from the UCI machine learning repository. Moreover, a proposal of four-rule filtration algorithms is presented in the paper. Their task is to limit the number of rules in the classifier. In particular, filtration influence on the classifier quality is studied.

  19. Towards an improved wind speed scale and damage description adapted for Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Groenemeijer, Pieter; Dirksen, Erik; Hubrig, Martin; Holzer, Alois M.; Dotzek, Nikolai

    2011-06-01

    We propose an updated wind speed scale description adapted for Central Europe considering wind impact to buildings as well as to vegetation. The scale is motivated by the need of a broadly applicable, accurate and consistent tornado or downburst intensity rating system based on a standardised wind speed scale for the purpose of climatological homogeneity. The description comprises building and vegetation damage characteristics, which can be found in Central Europe - but similar in other parts of the world, occurring with the various classes of the Fujita- and T-scales. The scale description is supplemented by photographs of typical damage. For practical application, an ensemble-based use of a decision matrix for specific building structures and vegetation types is suggested.

  20. Identifying Ground-Robot Impedance to Improve Terrain Adaptability in Running Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Arevalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, running robots are still outperformed by animals, but their dynamic behaviour can be described by the same model. This coincidence means that biomechanical studies can reveal much about the adaptability and energy efficiency of walking mechanisms. In particular, animals adjust their leg stiffness to negotiate terrains with different stiffnesses to keep the total leg-ground stiffness constant. In this work, we aim to provide one method to identify ground-robot impedance so that control can be applied to emulate the aforementioned animal behaviour. Experimental results of the method are presented, showing well-differentiated estimations on four different types of terrain. Additionally, an analysis of the convergence time is presented and compared with the contact time of humans while running, indicating that the method is suitable for use at high speeds.

  1. Cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann B; Wang, Honghong; Burgess, Jane; Li, Xianhong; Danvers, Karina

    2013-04-01

    Adapting nursing interventions to suit the needs and culture of a new population (cultural adaptation) is an important early step in the process of implementation and dissemination. While the need for cultural adaptation is widely accepted, research-based strategies for doing so are not well articulated. Non-adherence to medications for chronic disease is a global problem and cultural adaptation of existing evidence-based interventions could be useful. This paper aims to describe the cultural adaptation of an evidence-based nursing intervention to improve medication adherence among people living with HIV/AIDS and to offer recommendations for adaptation of interventions across cultures and borders. SITE: The intervention, which demonstrated efficacy in a randomized controlled trial in North America, was adapted for the cultural and social context of Hunan Province, in south central China. The adaptation process was undertaken by intervention stakeholders including the original intervention study team, the proposed adaptation team, and members of a Community Advisory Board, including people living with HIV/AIDS, family members, and health care workers at the target clinical sites. The adaptation process was driven by quantitative and qualitative data describing the new population and context and was guided by principles for cultural adaptation drawn from prevention science research. The primary adaptation to the intervention was the inclusion of family members in intervention activities, in response to the cultural and social importance of the family in rural China. In a pilot test of the adapted intervention, self-reported medication adherence improved significantly in the group receiving the intervention compared to the control group (p=0.01). Recommendations for cultural adaptation of nursing interventions include (1) involve stakeholders from the beginning; (2) assess the population, need, and context; (3) evaluate the intervention to be adapted with attention to

  2. Awareness of temporal lag is necessary for motor–visual temporal recalibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eTsujita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers’ voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor–visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of motor–visual temporal recalibration for awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor–visual temporal recalibration.

  3. Adaptive spatial filtering improves speech reception in noise while preserving binaural cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissmeyer, Susan R S; Goldsworthy, Raymond L

    2017-09-01

    Hearing loss greatly reduces an individual's ability to comprehend speech in the presence of background noise. Over the past decades, numerous signal-processing algorithms have been developed to improve speech reception in these situations for cochlear implant and hearing aid users. One challenge is to reduce background noise while not introducing interaural distortion that would degrade binaural hearing. The present study evaluates a noise reduction algorithm, referred to as binaural Fennec, that was designed to improve speech reception in background noise while preserving binaural cues. Speech reception thresholds were measured for normal-hearing listeners in a simulated environment with target speech generated in front of the listener and background noise originating 90° to the right of the listener. Lateralization thresholds were also measured in the presence of background noise. These measures were conducted in anechoic and reverberant environments. Results indicate that the algorithm improved speech reception thresholds, even in highly reverberant environments. Results indicate that the algorithm also improved lateralization thresholds for the anechoic environment while not affecting lateralization thresholds for the reverberant environments. These results provide clear evidence that this algorithm can improve speech reception in background noise while preserving binaural cues used to lateralize sound.

  4. An adaptation method to improve secret key rates of time-frequency QKD in atmospheric turbulence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaole; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) channels can be characterized by random power fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, which is known as scintillation. Weak coherent source based FSO quantum key distribution (QKD) systems suffer from the scintillation effect because during the deep channel fading the expected detection rate drops, which then gives an eavesdropper opportunity to get additional information about protocol by performing photon number splitting (PNS) attack and blocking single-photon pulses without changing QBER. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we study a large-alphabet QKD protocol, which is achieved by using pulse-position modulation (PPM)-like approach that utilizes the time-frequency uncertainty relation of the weak coherent photon state, called here TF-PPM-QKD protocol. We first complete finite size analysis for TF-PPM-QKD protocol to give practical bounds against non-negligible statistical fluctuation due to finite resources in practical implementations. The impact of scintillation under strong atmospheric turbulence regime is studied then. To overcome the secure key rate performance degradation of TF-PPM-QKD caused by scintillation, we propose an adaptation method for compensating the scintillation impact. By changing source intensity according to the channel state information (CSI), obtained by classical channel, the adaptation method improves the performance of QKD system with respect to the secret key rate. The CSI of a time-varying channel can be predicted using stochastic models, such as autoregressive (AR) models. Based on the channel state predictions, we change the source intensity to the optimal value to achieve a higher secret key rate. We demonstrate that the improvement of the adaptation method is dependent on the prediction accuracy.

  5. Improvements to the ShipIR/NTCS adaptive track gate algorithm and 3D flare particle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.; Gunter, Willem H.; February, Faith J.

    2017-05-01

    A key component in any image-based tracking system is the adaptive tracking algorithm used to segment the image into potential targets, rank-and-select the best candidate target, and gate the selected target to further improve tracker performance. Similarly, a key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare/chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes the recent improvements to the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR). Efforts to analyse and match the 3D flare particle model against actual IR measurements of the Chemring TALOS IR round resulted in further refinement of the 3D flare particle distribution. The changes in the flare model characteristics were significant enough to require an overhaul to the adaptive track gate (ATG) algorithm in the way it detects the presence of flare decoys and reacquires the target after flare separation. A series of test scenarios are used to demonstrate the impact of the new flare and ATG on IR tactics simulation.

  6. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to improve the power quality of a split shaft microturbine power generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğuz, Yüksel; Üstün, Seydi Vakkas; Yabanova, İsmail; Yumurtaci, Mehmet; Güney, İrfan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents design of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for the turbine speed control for purpose of improving the power quality of the power production system of a split shaft microturbine. To improve the operation performance of the microturbine power generation system (MTPGS) and to obtain the electrical output magnitudes in desired quality and value (terminal voltage, operation frequency, power drawn by consumer and production power), a controller depended on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system was designed. The MTPGS consists of the microturbine speed controller, a split shaft microturbine, cylindrical pole synchronous generator, excitation circuit and voltage regulator. Modeling of dynamic behavior of synchronous generator driver with a turbine and split shaft turbine was realized by using the Matlab/Simulink and SimPowerSystems in it. It is observed from the simulation results that with the microturbine speed control made with ANFIS, when the MTPGS is operated under various loading situations, the terminal voltage and frequency values of the system can be settled in desired operation values in a very short time without significant oscillation and electrical production power in desired quality can be obtained.

  7. Improving productivity software through the adaptation of an agile development framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Fiallos Ordoñez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2015/02/20 - Accepted: 2015/06/17The current research suggests that using of agile methodologies in conjunction with open source software tools can improve productivity, reduce costs and optimize resources in the process of software development, and helps improve user satisfaction due to implementation of excellent quality software. The following analysis shows the most important variables for the successful implementation of IT development projects and their relation with the use of traditional and agile software development methodologies.

  8. Gait adaptability training improves obstacle avoidance and dynamic stability in patients with cerebellar degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonteyn, E.M.R.; Heeren, A.; Engels, J.J.; Boer, J.J. den; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Balance and gait problems in patients with cerebellar degeneration lead to reduced mobility, loss of independence, and frequent falls. It is currently unclear, however, whether balance and gait capacities can be improved by training in this group of patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to

  9. Adapting to climate change in Malawi by improving soils and nutrition

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-28

    Apr 28, 2016 ... ... ecohealth approach to research: Helping communities control leishmaniasis in rural Tunisia · Involving urban communities in controlling dengue fever in Latin America · Preventing Chagas in Central America through simple home improvements · Reducing liver fluke transmission in northeastern Thailand ...

  10. Improving peri-prosthetic bone adaptation around cementless hip stems: A clinical and finite element study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, R.H. Ten; Tarala, M.; Arts, J.J.C.; Janssen, D.W.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Geesink, R.G.T.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed whether the Symax implant, a modification of the Omnifit((R)) stem (in terms of shape, proximal coating and distal surface treatment), would yield improved bone remodelling in a clinical DEXA study, and if these results could be predicted in a finite element (FE) simulation

  11. Improving peri-prosthetic bone adaptation around cementless hip stems: A clinical and finite element study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, R.H.M.; Tarala, M.; Arts, J.J.; Janssen, D.W.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Geesink, R.G.T.

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed whether the Symax™ implant, a modification of the Omnifit® stem (in terms of shape, proximal coating and distal surface treatment), would yield improved bone remodelling in a clinical DEXA study, and if these results could be predicted in a finite element (FE) simulation study.

  12. Context-dependent adaptation improves robustness of myoelectric control for upper-limb prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Gauravkumar K.; Hahne, Janne M.; Castellini, Claudio; Farina, Dario; Dosen, Strahinja

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Dexterous upper-limb prostheses are available today to restore grasping, but an effective and reliable feed-forward control is still missing. The aim of this work was to improve the robustness and reliability of myoelectric control by using context information from sensors embedded within the prosthesis. Approach. We developed a context-driven myoelectric control scheme (cxMYO) that incorporates the inference of context information from proprioception (inertial measurement unit) and exteroception (force and grip aperture) sensors to modulate the outputs of myoelectric control. Further, a realistic evaluation of the cxMYO was performed online in able-bodied subjects using three functional tasks, during which the cxMYO was compared to a purely machine-learning-based myoelectric control (MYO). Main results. The results demonstrated that utilizing context information decreased the number of unwanted commands, improving the performance (success rate and dropped objects) in all three functional tasks. Specifically, the median number of objects dropped per round with cxMYO was zero in all three tasks and a significant increase in the number of successful transfers was seen in two out of three functional tasks. Additionally, the subjects reported better user experience. Significance. This is the first online evaluation of a method integrating information from multiple on-board prosthesis sensors to modulate the output of a machine-learning-based myoelectric controller. The proposed scheme is general and presents a simple, non-invasive and cost-effective approach for improving the robustness of myoelectric control.

  13. ADAPTED SWIMMING TRAINING FOCUSED ON IMPROVEMENT OF PSYCHOPHYSICAL STATUS OD ELDERLY PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Krivokapić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries chronological age from 65 is often mentioned as age limit when elderly age begins, and which is featured by significant changes in organic functions as well as social relations. Thanks to qualitative medical care and contemporary ways of treatment, an average lifetime has been prolonged. Therefore, according to some data in developed countries of Western Europe, each fourth inhabitant is older than 65. However, there psychophysical abilities are very weak, and health is bad, which directly influences reduction in life quality. Adapted physical activities in water adjusted to abilities and health state of elderly people give a series of advantages in comparison to exercises that can be done outside water. For that reason, in those conditions effect of gravity is reduced, so PTO-skeletal system suffers a lot less burden than at practicing on dry. Taking into account that postural system with elderly people is often damaged, great advantage at exercising in water enables horizontal position that a person takes. That beneficially influences first of all the spinal cord, which is in horizontal position disburdened from gravity influence which beneficially affects spinal disease. Results of numerous researches indicate that swimming harmonically burdens organism so that almost all musculature of upper and lower extremities, belly and pelvis area. Swimming accelerates blood circulation, heart gets more blood which directly affects increase in minute volume. Eventually it all brings to fortification of heart muscle and more permanent increase of its functional abilities. Possibility of precise dosing of burden in swimming enables excellent way of therapy with elderly people and those with damaged heart. Besides, activated musculature enables fast relaxation of organism and restore of all vital cardio respiratory functions to the level of standard work ability of a man.

  14. Incorporating Deeply Uncertain Factors into the Many Objective Search Process: Improving Adaptation to Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Watson, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Deep uncertainty refers to situations in which decision makers or stakeholders do not know, or cannot fully agree upon, the full suite of risk factors within a planning problem. This phenomenon is especially important when considering scenarios of future environmental change, since there exist multiple trajectories of environmental forcings (e.g., streamflow timing and magnitude) and socioeconomic factors (e.g., population growth). This presentation first briefly reviews robust optimization and scenario approaches that have been proposed to plan for systems under deep uncertainty. One recently introduced framework is Many Objective Robust Decision Making (MORDM). MORDM combines two techniques: evolutionary algorithm search is used to generate planning alternatives, and robust decision making methods are used to sample performance over a large range of plausible factors and, subsequently, choose a robust solution. Within MORDM, Pareto approximate tradeoff sets of solutions are used to balance objectives and examine alternatives. However, MORDM does not currently incorporate the deeply uncertain scenario information into the search process itself. In this presentation, we suggest several avenues for doing so, that are focused on modifying the suite of uncertain data that is selected within the search process. Visualizations that compare tradeoff sets across different sets of assumptions can be used to guide decision makers' learning and, ultimately, their selection of several candidate solutions for further planning. For example, the baseline assumptions about probability distributions can be compared to optimization results under severe events to determine adaptive management strategies. A case study of water planning in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) in Texas is used to demonstrate the approach. Our LRGV results compare baseline optimization with new solution sets that examine optimal management strategies under scenarios characterized by lower than average

  15. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Weir-Sen

    2016-03-02

    The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients' true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access.

  16. Proposing an adaptive mutation to improve XCSF performance to classify ADHD and BMD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatnezhad, Khadijeh; Boostani, Reza; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    There is extensive overlap of clinical symptoms observed among children with bipolar mood disorder (BMD) and those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thus, diagnosis according to clinical symptoms cannot be very accurate. It is therefore desirable to develop quantitative criteria for automatic discrimination between these disorders. This study is aimed at designing an efficient decision maker to accurately classify ADHD and BMD patients by analyzing their electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. In this study, 22 channels of EEGs have been recorded from 21 subjects with ADHD and 22 individuals with BMD. Several informative features, such as fractal dimension, band power and autoregressive coefficients, were extracted from the recorded signals. Considering the multimodal overlapping distribution of the obtained features, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to reduce the input dimension in a more separable space to make it more appropriate for the proposed classifier. A piecewise linear classifier based on the extended classifier system for function approximation (XCSF) was modified by developing an adaptive mutation rate, which was proportional to the genotypic content of best individuals and their fitness in each generation. The proposed operator controlled the trade-off between exploration and exploitation while maintaining the diversity in the classifier's population to avoid premature convergence. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, the extracted features were applied to support vector machine, LDA, nearest neighbor and XCSF classifiers. To evaluate the method, a noisy environment was simulated with different noise amplitudes. It is shown that the results of the proposed technique are more robust as compared to conventional classifiers. Statistical tests demonstrate that the proposed classifier is a promising method for discriminating between ADHD and BMD patients.

  17. Adapted Tango Improves Mobility, Motor-Cognitive Function, and Gait but Not Cognition in Older Adults in Independent Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Byers, Colleen; Butler, Gail; Sweeney, Morgan; Rossbach, Lauren; Bozzorg, Aaron

    2015-10-01

    To determine the efficacy of adapted tango for improving mobility, motor-cognitive function, and gait; to determine whether former dance experience was associated with improvements; and to evaluate participant satisfaction, changes in depression, and quality of life. Quasi-experimental, two-group, repeated-measures preintervention, postintervention, and 3-month postintervention study. Diverse senior independent living communities in an urban metropolitan area. Individuals aged 59 to 95 (73% aged 80 and older; 31% nonwhite, 72% female) (N = 74). Participants were assigned to 20 sessions of 90-minute tango (n = 62) or health education (n = 12) classes over 12 weeks. Mobility, motor-cognitive function, gait, cognition, and psychosocial function were evaluated before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Two (groups) by two (before and after) repeated-measures analyses of variance with post hoc comparisons were used to evaluate differences in primary analyses. Secondary analyses from immediately after to 3 months after were used to examine the data for retention of any gains. Forty-four tango and 10 education participants completed 20 sessions. Significant group by time interactions revealed that tango improved mobility (P = .006), backward and fast gait speeds (P tango may improve mobility, gait and motor-cognitive function more than health education classes in older adults. Further research is necessary to confirm these findings. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. An improved adaptive interpolation clock recovery loop based on phase splitting algorithm for coherent optical communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Li-jia; Xin, Xiang-jun; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Yong-jun; Tian, Qing-hua; Tian, Feng; Mao, Ya-ya

    2018-01-01

    Traditional clock recovery scheme achieves timing adjustment by digital interpolation, thus recovering the sampling sequence. Based on this, an improved clock recovery architecture joint channel equalization for coherent optical communication system is presented in this paper. The loop is different from the traditional clock recovery. In order to reduce the interpolation error caused by the distortion in the frequency domain of the interpolator and to suppress the spectral mirroring generated by the sampling rate change, the proposed algorithm joint equalization, improves the original interpolator in the loop, along with adaptive filtering, and makes error compensation for the original signals according to the balanced pre-filtering signals. Then the signals are adaptive interpolated through the feedback loop. Furthermore, the phase splitting timing recovery algorithm is adopted in this paper. The time error is calculated according to the improved algorithm when there is no transition between the adjacent symbols, making calculated timing error more accurate. Meanwhile, Carrier coarse synchronization module is placed before the beginning of timing recovery to eliminate the larger frequency offset interference, which effectively adjust the sampling clock phase. In this paper, the simulation results show that the timing error is greatly reduced after the loop is changed. Based on the phase splitting algorithm, the BER and MSE are better than those in the unvaried architecture. In the fiber channel, using MQAM modulation format, after 100 km-transmission of single-mode fiber, especially when ROF(roll-off factor) values tends to 0, the algorithm shows a better clock performance under different ROFs. When SNR values are less than 8, the BER could achieve 10-2 to 10-1 magnitude. Furthermore, the proposed timing recovery is more suitable for the situation with low SNR values.

  19. Simultaneous adaptive control of dual deformable mirrors for full-field beam shaping with the improved stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haotong; Liu, Zejin; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2013-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate the simultaneous adaptive control of a dual deformable mirror system for full-field beam shaping based on an improved stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm and dual-phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs). One LC-SLM adaptively redistributes the intensity of the input beam and the other adaptively compensates the wavefront of the output beam. However, the intensity redistribution and wavefront compensation closed loops run simultaneously. In addition, the intensity redistribution and wavefront compensation closed loops adopt their respective metric functions independently. Experimental results show that the improved SPGD algorithm can not only be used for controlling dual deformable mirror configuration to adaptively generate near diffraction-limited flattop beams with desired intensity distributions, but also can greatly improve the control bandwidth.

  20. Improving temporal profiles of anthropogenic emissions influenced by human activities and meteorological drivers for atmospheric dispersion modelling - a case study for the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieno, M.; Reis, S.; Ambelas Skjøth, C.; Lang, M.; Geels, C.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions of trace gases originating from anthropogenic activities are vital input data for chemical transport models (CTMs). Other key input datasets such as meteorological drivers, and biogeochemical and physical processes have been subject to detailed investigation and research in the recent past, while the representation of emission data in CTMs has been somewhat neglected. Arguably, this has less impact on the regional to hemispheric or global scale, where the grid sizes of currently applied CTMs represent well mixed average concentrations or deposition values. Evaluating model output against ground-based observations or remote sensing results on these spatial levels appears not to be overly sensitive to the temporal (and spatial) profiles of emission input data. With increasing level of detail and spatiotemporal resolution, CTMs applied to determine national or local scale air quality are likely prone to be more sensitive to the spatial and temporal patterns of anthropogenic emissions. This paper discusses results of the application of the EMEP4UK CTM on a 5 km x 5 km resolution for the whole of the United Kingdom. In a first instance, detailed temporal profiles for emissions from road transport, power generation and other stationary sources have been developed. Depending on typical sectoral activities, hourly to seasonal variations have been quantified and (sub-)sectoral time curves generated. Here, we will discuss how these improved time curves influence modelled concentrations of NO2, Ozone and PM10 for selected episodes in the year 2007. In a second application, both anthropogenic activities (e.g. manure spreading and fertilizer application) and meteorological factors (e.g. temperature and seasonality) have been investigated regarding their influence on the spatiotemporal distribution of NH3 emissions (Skjøth et al., 2004; see as well Pinder et al., 2004; Gilliland et al., 2006). The discussion of results in this case will focus on the impact on the

  1. The Life History of Flabellula baltica Smirnov (Gymnamoebae, Rhizopoda): Adaptations to a Spatially and Temporally Heterogeneous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The polymorphic life history of the marine naked amoeba Flabellula baltica was studied. It can be interpreted in terms of adaptations to an environment that is patchy in time and space and it represents trade-off between longevity during starvation and the ability to initiate multiplication soon ...... after food resource become available. The life history also represents bet hedging in that different cells within a clonal culture may respond in different ways when food is depleted....

  2. Application of an adaptive acquisition regularization parameter based on an improved GCV criterion in pre-stack AVO inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangtan; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Jingye; Luo, Cong; Wang, Benfeng

    2017-02-01

    In exploration geophysics, AVO inversion is undoubtedly the most common inverse problem which is ill-posed and must be regularized. Once regularization is used, the selection of the regularization parameter will become an important problem to solve. In practice, the proper regularization parameter value is usually data dependent and determined empirically. For one work area, inversion engineers often give a fixed parameter. In such a case, the results of AVO inversion will be accompanied by strong artificial subjective factors. Besides, it is difficult to guarantee that the fixed parameter could be applied to each trace of the seismic data. In this paper, we first emphasize the importance of the regularization parameter selection for the inverse problems. Then, based on a traditional GCV function, we propose an adaptive acquisition regularization parameter method which can be used in regularization for arbitrary norm conditions, and derive the theoretical formula of the adaptive computation of the regularization parameter. Applying this method to the AVO inversion of synthetic data and field data, we have found that the improved GCV method has better accuracy and robustness than the traditional method.

  3. Improvements in intelligibility of noisy reverberant speech using a binaural subband adaptive noise-cancellation processing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Paul W.; Campbell, Douglas R.

    2001-12-01

    This article reports on the performance of an adaptive subband noise cancellation scheme, which performs binaural preprocessing of speech signals for a hearing-aid application. The multi-microphone subband adaptive (MMSBA) signal processing scheme uses the least mean squares (LMS) algorithm in frequency-limited subbands. The use of subbands enables a diverse processing mechanism to be employed, splitting the two-channel wide-band signal into smaller frequency-limited subbands, which can be processed according to their individual signal characteristics. The frequency delimiting used a linear- or cochlear-spaced subband distribution. The effect of the processing scheme on speech intelligibility was assessed in a trial involving 15 hearing-impaired volunteers with moderate sensorineural hearing loss. The acoustic material consisted of speech and speech-shaped noise signals, generated using simulated and real-room acoustic environments, at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in the range -6 to +3 dB. The results show that the MMSBA scheme delivered average speech intelligibility improvements of 11.5%, with a maximum of 37.25%, in noisy reverberant conditions. There was no significant reduction in mean speech intelligibility due to processing, in any of the test conditions.

  4. Assessing the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of adaptive e-Learning to improve dietary behaviour: protocol for a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michie Susan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The composition of habitual diets is associated with adverse or protective effects on aspects of health. Consequently, UK public health policy strongly advocates dietary change for the improvement of population health and emphasises the importance of individual empowerment to improve health. A new and evolving area in the promotion of dietary behavioural change is e-Learning, the use of interactive electronic media to facilitate teaching and learning on a range of issues, including diet and health. The aims of this systematic review are to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adaptive e-Learning for improving dietary behaviours. Methods/Design The research will consist of a systematic review and a cost-effectiveness analysis. Studies will be considered for the review if they are randomised controlled trials, involving participants aged 13 or over, which evaluate the effectiveness or efficacy of interactive software programmes for improving dietary behaviour. Primary outcome measures will be those related to dietary behaviours, including estimated intakes of energy, nutrients and dietary fibre, or the estimated number of servings per day of foods or food groups. Secondary outcome measures will be objective clinical measures that are likely to respond to changes in dietary behaviours, such as anthropometry or blood biochemistry. Knowledge, self-efficacy, intention and emotion will be examined as mediators of dietary behaviour change in order to explore potential mechanisms of action. Databases will be searched using a comprehensive four-part search strategy, and the results exported to a bibliographic database. Two review authors will independently screen results to identify potentially eligible studies, and will independently extract data from included studies, with any discrepancies at each stage settled by a third author. Standardised forms and criteria will be used. A descriptive analysis of included

  5. Assessing the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of adaptive e-Learning to improve dietary behaviour: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Phil; Felix, Lambert; Harris, Jody; Ferguson, Elaine; Free, Caroline; Landon, Jane; Lock, Karen; Michie, Susan; Miners, Alec; Murray, Elizabeth

    2010-04-21

    The composition of habitual diets is associated with adverse or protective effects on aspects of health. Consequently, UK public health policy strongly advocates dietary change for the improvement of population health and emphasises the importance of individual empowerment to improve health. A new and evolving area in the promotion of dietary behavioural change is e-Learning, the use of interactive electronic media to facilitate teaching and learning on a range of issues, including diet and health. The aims of this systematic review are to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adaptive e-Learning for improving dietary behaviours. The research will consist of a systematic review and a cost-effectiveness analysis. Studies will be considered for the review if they are randomised controlled trials, involving participants aged 13 or over, which evaluate the effectiveness or efficacy of interactive software programmes for improving dietary behaviour. Primary outcome measures will be those related to dietary behaviours, including estimated intakes of energy, nutrients and dietary fibre, or the estimated number of servings per day of foods or food groups. Secondary outcome measures will be objective clinical measures that are likely to respond to changes in dietary behaviours, such as anthropometry or blood biochemistry. Knowledge, self-efficacy, intention and emotion will be examined as mediators of dietary behaviour change in order to explore potential mechanisms of action. Databases will be searched using a comprehensive four-part search strategy, and the results exported to a bibliographic database. Two review authors will independently screen results to identify potentially eligible studies, and will independently extract data from included studies, with any discrepancies at each stage settled by a third author. Standardised forms and criteria will be used.A descriptive analysis of included studies will describe study design, participants, the

  6. Improving Naive Bayes with Online Feature Selection for Quick Adaptation to Evolving Feature Usefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-19

    The definition of what makes an article interesting varies from user to user and continually evolves even for a single user. As a result, for news recommendation systems, useless document features can not be determined a priori and all features are usually considered for interestingness classification. Consequently, the presence of currently useless features degrades classification performance [1], particularly over the initial set of news articles being classified. The initial set of document is critical for a user when considering which particular news recommendation system to adopt. To address these problems, we introduce an improved version of the naive Bayes classifier with online feature selection. We use correlation to determine the utility of each feature and take advantage of the conditional independence assumption used by naive Bayes for online feature selection and classification. The augmented naive Bayes classifier performs 28% better than the traditional naive Bayes classifier in recommending news articles from the Yahoo! RSS feeds.

  7. Exploiting the Interplay between Innate and Adaptive Immunity to Improve Immunotherapeutic Strategies for Epstein-Barr-Virus-Driven Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Martorelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration that immunotherapeutic approaches may be clinically effective for cancer patients has renewed the interest for this strategy of intervention. In particular, clinical trials using adoptive T-cell therapies disclosed encouraging results, particularly in the context of Epstein-Barr-virus- (EBV- related tumors. Nevertheless, the rate of complete clinical responses is still limited, thus stimulating the development of more effective therapeutic protocols. Considering the relevance of innate immunity in controlling both infections and cancers, innovative immunotherapeutic approaches should take into account also this compartment to improve clinical efficacy. Evidence accumulated so far indicates that innate immunity effectors, particularly NK cells, can be exploited with therapeutic purposes and new targets have been recently identified. We herein review the complex interactions between EBV and innate immunity and summarize the therapeutic strategies involving both adaptive and innate immune system, in the light of a fruitful integration between these immunotherapeutic modalities for a better control of EBV-driven tumors.

  8. [Adaptability of Helianthus annuus seedlings to crude oil pollution in soil and its improvement measures under salinization stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-lei; Ci, Hua-cong; He, Xing-dong; Liang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Xuan; Sun, Hui-ting; Xie, Hong-tao

    2015-11-01

    To explore the adaptability of plant under salt stress to crude oil pollution of soil and improvement measures, a pot experiment of Helianthus annuus seedlings was conducted using orthogonal experiment method with crude oil-sodium chloride-desulfurization gypsum and cinder-zeolite-desulfurization gypsum-sawdust. The results showed that, with the increase of soil crude oil concentration, the relative growth rate (RGR) of plant height, RGR of aboveground biomass and root N: P ratios of H. annuus seedlings decreased significantly, while the activity of SOD and CAT increased at first and then decreased significantly. The RGR of plant height and aboveground biomass significantly increased (P pollution of soil could decrease the relative growth rate of H. annuus seedling, and sawdust could reduce the influence of crude oil pollution on plant growth under salt stress.

  9. Adaptive Reactive Power Control of PV Power Plants for Improved Power Transfer Capability under Ultra-Weak Grid Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Dongsheng; Wang, Xiongfei; Liu, Fangcheng

    2018-01-01

    the ultra-weak grid is significantly improved with the low PF operation. An adaptive reactive power droop control is next proposed to effectively distribute the reactive power demands to the individual inverters, and meanwhile maximize the power transfer capacity of the PV power plant. Simulation results......This paper analyzes the power transfer limitation of the PV power plant under the ultra-weak grid condition, i.e., when the Short-Circuit Ratio (SCR) is close to 1. It explicitly identifies that a minimum SCR of 2 is required for the PV power plant to deliver the rated active power when operating...... of a 200 MW PV power plant demonstrate that the proposed method can ensure the rated power transfer of PV power plant with the SCR of 1.25, provided that the PV inverters are operated with the minimal PF=0.9....

  10. Image quality improvements using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for evaluating chronic myocardial infarction using iodine density images with spectral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Junichi; Ohta, Yasutoshi; Kitao, Shinichiro; Watanabe, Tomomi; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-10-19

    Single-source dual-energy CT (ssDECT) allows the reconstruction of iodine density images (IDIs) from projection based computing. We hypothesized that adding adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) could improve image quality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect and determine the optimal blend percentages of ASiR for IDI of myocardial late iodine enhancement (LIE) in the evaluation of chronic myocardial infarction using ssDECT. A total of 28 patients underwent cardiac LIE using a ssDECT scanner. IDIs between 0 and 100% of ASiR contributions in 10% increments were reconstructed. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of remote myocardia and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of infarcted myocardia were measured. Transmural extent of infarction was graded using a 5-point scale. The SNR, CNR, and transmural extent were assessed for each ASiR contribution ratio. The transmural extents were compared with MRI as a reference standard. Compared to 0% ASiR, the use of 20-100% ASiR resulted in a reduction of image noise (p ASiR images, reconstruction with 100% ASiR image showed the highest improvement in SNR (229%; p ASiR above 80% showed the highest ratio (73.7%) of accurate transmural extent classification. In conclusion, ASiR intensity of 80-100% in IDIs can improve image quality without changes in signal and maximizes the accuracy of transmural extent in infarcted myocardium.

  11. Adaptable Design Improvements for Electromagnetic Shock Wave Lithotripters and Techniques for Controlling Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan Birchard

    In this dissertation work, the aim was to garner better mechanistic understanding of how shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) breaks stones in order to guide design improvements to modern electromagnetic (EM) shock wave lithotripters. To accomplish this goal, experimental studies were carefully designed to isolate mechanisms of fragmentation, and models for wave propagation, fragmentation, and stone motion were developed. In the initial study, a representative EM lithotripter was characterized and tested for in vitro stone comminution efficiency at a variety of field positions and doses using phantom kidney stones of variable physical properties, and in different fluid mediums to isolate the contribution of cavitation. Through parametric analysis of the acoustic field measurements alongside comminution results, a logarithmic correlation was determined between average peak pressure incident on the stone surface and comminution efficiency. It was also noted that for a given stone type, the correlations converged to an average peak pressure threshold for fragmentation, independent of fluid medium in use. The correlation of average peak pressure to efficacy supports the rationale for the acoustic lens modifications, which were pursued to simultaneously enhance beam width and optimize the pulse profile of the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) via in situ pulse superposition for improved stone fragmentation by stress waves and cavitation, respectively. In parallel, a numerical model for wave propagation was used to investigate the variations of critical parameters with changes in lens geometry. A consensus was reached on a new lens design based on high-speed imaging and stone comminution experiments against the original lens at a fixed acoustic energy setting. The results have demonstrated that the new lens has improved efficacy away from the focus, where stones may move due to respiration, fragmentation, acoustic radiation forces, or voluntary patient movements. Using the

  12. Effect of improving spatial or temporal resolution on image quality and quantitative perfusion assessment with k-t SENSE acceleration in first-pass CMR myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maredia, Neil; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Kozerke, Sebastian; Larghat, Abdulghani; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2010-12-01

    k-t Sensitivity-encoded (k-t SENSE) acceleration has been used to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and slice coverage in first-pass cardiac magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging. This study compares the effect of investing the speed-up afforded by k-t SENSE acceleration in spatial or temporal resolution. Ten healthy volunteers underwent adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging using four saturation-recovery gradient echo perfusion sequences: a reference sequence accelerated by sensitivity encoding (SENSE), and three k-t SENSE-accelerated sequences with higher spatial resolution ("k-t High"), shorter acquisition window ("k-t Fast"), or a shared increase in both parameters ("k-t Hybrid") relative to the reference. Dark-rim artifacts and image quality were analyzed. Semiquantitative myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) and Fermi-derived quantitative MPR were also calculated. The k-t Hybrid sequence produced highest image quality scores at rest (P = 0.015). Rim artifact thickness and extent were lowest using k-t High and k-t Hybrid sequences (P spatial resolution by k-t SENSE acceleration produces the greatest reduction in dark rim artifact. There is good agreement between k-t SENSE and standard acquisition methods for semiquantitative and fully quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Multi-temporal image co-registration improvement for a better representation and quantification of risky situations: the Belvedere Glacier case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Borgogno Mondino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scientific applications dealing with natural hazards make wide use of digital geographical data and change detection techniques. If the attention is focused on changes affecting surfaces’ geometry, multi-temporal aerial photogrammetry can represent an effective tool. In this case, the degree of spatial coherence between measurements at different times is an important issue to deal with. Reliability and accuracy of measured differences strictly depend on the strategy used during image processing. In this paper, a simultaneous multi-temporal aerial image bundle adjustment approach (MTBA is compared against two more traditional strategies for aerial stereo-pair adjustment to map surface changes of the Belvedere Glacier (Italian north-western Alps in the period 2001–2003. Two aerial stereo pairs (of 2001 and 2003 were used to generate the correspondent digital surface models. These were then compared to map glacier shape differences and calculate ablation and accumulation volumes. Results demonstrate that the proposed MTBA approach improves and maximizes accuracy and reliability of measured differences also when available reference data are low quality ones. Final uncertainty for both direct (surface height differences and derived (volume changes measurements were quantified and mapped.

  14. Self-Adaptive Strategy Based on Fuzzy Control Systems for Improving Performance in Wireless Sensors Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Díaz, Vicente; Martínez, José-Fernán; Lucas Martínez, Néstor; del Toro, Raúl M

    2015-09-18

    The solutions to cope with new challenges that societies have to face nowadays involve providing smarter daily systems. To achieve this, technology has to evolve and leverage physical systems automatic interactions, with less human intervention. Technological paradigms like Internet of Things (IoT) and Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are providing reference models, architectures, approaches and tools that are to support cross-domain solutions. Thus, CPS based solutions will be applied in different application domains like e-Health, Smart Grid, Smart Transportation and so on, to assure the expected response from a complex system that relies on the smooth interaction and cooperation of diverse networked physical systems. The Wireless Sensors Networks (WSN) are a well-known wireless technology that are part of large CPS. The WSN aims at monitoring a physical system, object, (e.g., the environmental condition of a cargo container), and relaying data to the targeted processing element. The WSN communication reliability, as well as a restrained energy consumption, are expected features in a WSN. This paper shows the results obtained in a real WSN deployment, based on SunSPOT nodes, which carries out a fuzzy based control strategy to improve energy consumption while keeping communication reliability and computational resources usage among boundaries.

  15. Self-Adaptive Strategy Based on Fuzzy Control Systems for Improving Performance in Wireless Sensors Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Hernández Díaz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The solutions to cope with new challenges that societies have to face nowadays involve providing smarter daily systems. To achieve this, technology has to evolve and leverage physical systems automatic interactions, with less human intervention. Technological paradigms like Internet of Things (IoT and Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS are providing reference models, architectures, approaches and tools that are to support cross-domain solutions. Thus, CPS based solutions will be applied in different application domains like e-Health, Smart Grid, Smart Transportation and so on, to assure the expected response from a complex system that relies on the smooth interaction and cooperation of diverse networked physical systems. The Wireless Sensors Networks (WSN are a well-known wireless technology that are part of large CPS. The WSN aims at monitoring a physical system, object, (e.g., the environmental condition of a cargo container, and relaying data to the targeted processing element. The WSN communication reliability, as well as a restrained energy consumption, are expected features in a WSN. This paper shows the results obtained in a real WSN deployment, based on SunSPOT nodes, which carries out a fuzzy based control strategy to improve energy consumption while keeping communication reliability and computational resources usage among boundaries.

  16. Adaptation to various environments and resistance to disease of the Improved Boer goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus

    2000-05-01

    The Improved Boer Goat is a remarkable small-stock ruminant that possesses distinctive qualities enabling it to excel as an efficient red meat producer. It is early maturing, reaching a mean maximum weight of approximately 62kg at 3.5 years of age on natural pasture under extensive grazing conditions. It boasts high fecundity, with approximately 2.09 kids born per doe kidded. A relatively large proportion of does ( approximately 33%) have triplets, whilst the occurrence of kids born as quadruplets and quintuplets have also been documented. The Boer goat is predominantly a browser, enabling it to convert shrub and bush into red meat, thereby playing a supplementary role to other farm stock in increasing meat production per unit area, rather than being in competition with them. As a browser, the goat is also extremely useful and effective in combatting undesirable bush encroachment. In addition, it appears to be fairly resistant towards certain diseases which are normally contracted by other small stock, such as sheep. Lastly, Boer goats produce red meat of high quality which is hardly distinguishable from that of mutton or lamb as far as flavour is concerned, provided animals are slaughtered at a relatively young age.

  17. [Adaptation to intermittent hypoxia-hyperoxia improves cognitive performance and exercise tolerance in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, U; Glazachev, O S; Likar, R; Burtscher, M; Kofler, W; Pinter, G; Stettner, H; Demschar, S; Trummer, B; Neuwersch, S

    2017-01-01

    For improvements in exercise tolerance and cognitive function in geriatric patients Multimodal training programs (MTP) are used as combination of physiotherapy, occupational therapy and cardiovascular training. Intermittent Hypoxic-Hyperoxic Training (IHHT), a modified type of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) is proposed to be included in MTP to elicit more pronounced beneficial effects in exercise tolerance and cognitive functions of geriatric patients likely by an additional pathway than a single MTP. Thirty four patients of the Geriatric Day Clinic aged between 64 and 92 years participated in the placebo controlled clinical trial. They were randomly assigned to receive MTP plus IHHT (experimental group - EG) or MTP plus placebo-breathing through a machine face mask (control group - CG) in a double blind fashion. Before and after the interventions course cognitive performance was assessed by the Dementia-Detection-Test (DemTect) and the Clock-Drawing-Test (CDT), and functional exercise capacity - by the total distance of 6-Minute-Walk-Test (6MWT). After IHHT combined with MTP cognitive performance (DemTect) increased significantly when compared to NG (+16,7 % vs. +0,39 %, pcognitive performance and exercise capacity in elderly performing MTP. IHHT sessions are considered to be easily applicable to and well tolerated by geriatric patients up to 92 years.

  18. Speed endurance training is a powerful stimulus for physiological adaptations and performance improvements of athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaia, F. M.; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The present article reviews the physiological and performance effects of speed endurance training consisting of exercise bouts at near maximal intensities in already trained subjects. Despite a reduction in training volume, speed endurance training of endurance-trained athletes can maintain the o......(+) pump activity during exercise may delay fatigue development during intense exercise. In conclusion, athletes from disciplines involving periods of intense exercise can benefit from the inclusion of speed endurance sessions in their training programs.......The present article reviews the physiological and performance effects of speed endurance training consisting of exercise bouts at near maximal intensities in already trained subjects. Despite a reduction in training volume, speed endurance training of endurance-trained athletes can maintain...... performance during longer events, e.g. 40 K cycling and 10 K running. Athletes in team sports involving intense exercise actions and endurance aspects can also benefit from performing speed endurance training. These improvements don't appear to depend on changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), muscle...

  19. Improved Adaptive Droop Control Design for Optimal Power Sharing in VSC-MTDC Integrating Wind Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Ran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT converters, Multi-Terminal DC (MTDC based on the voltage-source converter (VSC has developed rapidly in renewable and electric power systems. To reduce the copper loss of large capacity and long distance DC transmission line, an improved droop control design based on optimal power sharing in VSC-MTDC integrating offshore wind farm is proposed. The proposed approach provided a calculation method for power-voltage droop coefficients under two different scenarios either considering local load or not. The available headroom of each converter station was considered as a converter outage, to participate in the power adjustment according to their ability. A four-terminal MTDC model system including two large scale wind farms was set up in PSCAD/EMTDC. Then, the proposed control strategy was verified through simulation under the various conditions, including wind speed variation, rectifier outage and inverter outage, and a three-phase short-circuit of the converter.

  20. An adaptive threshold method for improving astrometry of space debris CCD images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rong-yu; Zhao, Chang-yin

    2014-06-01

    Optical survey is a main technique for observing space debris, and precisely measuring the positions of space debris is of great importance. Due to several factors, e.g. the angle object normal to the observer, the shape as well as the attitude of the object, the variations of observed characteristics for low earth orbital space debris are distinct. When we look at optical CCD images of observed objects, the size and brightness are varying, hence it’s difficult to decide the threshold during centroid measurement and precise astrometry. Traditionally the threshold is given empirically and constantly in data reduction, and obviously it’s not suitable for data reduction of space debris. Here we offer a solution to provide the threshold. Our method assumes that the PSF (point spread function) is Gaussian and estimates the signal flux by a directly two-dimensional Gaussian fit, then a cubic spline interpolation is performed to divide each initial pixel into several sub-pixels, at last the threshold is determined by the estimation of signal flux and the sub-pixels above threshold are separated to estimate the centroid. A trail observation of the fast spinning satellite Ajisai is made and the CCD frames are obtained to test our algorithm. The calibration precision of various threshold is obtained through the comparison between the observed equatorial position and the reference one, the latter are obtained from the precise ephemeris of the satellite. The results indicate that our method reduces the total errors of measurements, it works effectively in improving the centering precision of space debris images.

  1. Improving the effectiveness of real-time flood forecasting through Predictive Uncertainty estimation: the multi-temporal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbetta, Silvia; Coccia, Gabriele; Moramarco, Tommaso; Todini, Ezio

    2015-04-01

    The negative effects of severe flood events are usually contrasted through structural measures that, however, do not fully eliminate flood risk. Non-structural measures, such as real-time flood forecasting and warning, are also required. Accurate stage/discharge future predictions with appropriate forecast lead-time are sought by decision-makers for implementing strategies to mitigate the adverse effects of floods. Traditionally, flood forecasting has been approached by using rainfall-runoff and/or flood routing modelling. Indeed, both types of forecasts, cannot be considered perfectly representing future outcomes because of lacking of a complete knowledge of involved processes (Todini, 2004). Nonetheless, although aware that model forecasts are not perfectly representing future outcomes, decision makers are de facto implicitly assuming the forecast of water level/discharge/volume, etc. as "deterministic" and coinciding with what is going to occur. Recently the concept of Predictive Uncertainty (PU) was introduced in hydrology (Krzysztofowicz, 1999), and several uncertainty processors were developed (Todini, 2008). PU is defined as the probability of occurrence of the future realization of a predictand (water level/discharge/volume) conditional on: i) prior observations and knowledge, ii) the available information obtained on the future value, typically provided by one or more forecast models. Unfortunately, PU has been frequently interpreted as a measure of lack of accuracy rather than the appropriate tool allowing to take the most appropriate decisions, given a model or several models' forecasts. With the aim to shed light on the benefits for appropriately using PU, a multi-temporal approach based on the MCP approach (Todini, 2008; Coccia and Todini, 2011) is here applied to stage forecasts at sites along the Upper Tiber River. Specifically, the STAge Forecasting-Rating Curve Model Muskingum-based (STAFOM-RCM) (Barbetta et al., 2014) along with the Rating

  2. Image quality improvement in three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using the subtraction method for brain and temporal bone diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu-Hui; Shen, Chao-Yu; Wu, Ming-Chi; Lin, Yue-Der; Huang, Chun-Huang; Kang, Ruei-Jin; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Tsao, Teng-Fu

    2013-08-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography is based on flow-related enhancement using the T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo, or the fast low-angle shot gradient echo sequence. However, materials with short T1 relaxation times may show hyperintensity signals and contaminate the TOF images. The objective of our study was to determine whether subtraction three-dimensional (3D) TOF MR angiography improves image quality in brain and temporal bone diseases with unwanted contaminations with short T1 relaxation times. During the 12-month study period, patients who had masses with short T1 relaxation times noted on precontrast T1-weighted brain MR images and 24 healthy volunteers were scanned using conventional and subtraction 3D TOF MR angiography. The qualitative evaluation of each MR angiogram was based on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and scores in three categories, namely, (1) presence of misregistration artifacts, (2) ability to display arterial anatomy selectively (without contamination by materials with short T1 relaxation times), and (3) arterial flow-related enhancement. We included 12 patients with intracranial hematomas, brain tumors, or middle-ear cholesterol granulomas. Subtraction 3D TOF MR angiography yielded higher CNRs between the area of the basilar artery (BA) and normal-appearing parenchyma of the brain and lower SNRs in the area of the BA compared with the conventional technique (147.7 ± 77.6 vs. 130.6 ± 54.2, p angiography did not deteriorate image quality with misregistration artifacts and showed a better selective display of arteries (p angiography is more appropriate than the conventional method in improving the image quality in brain and temporal bone diseases with unwanted contaminations with short T1 relaxation times. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Concurrent Temporal and Spatial Trends in Sulfate and Organic Mass Concentrations Measured in the IMPROVE Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, William C.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Hand, Jenny L.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2017-10-01

    Recent modeling and field studies have highlighted a relationship between sulfate concentrations and secondarily formed organic aerosols related to isoprene and other volatile biogenic gaseous emissions. The relationship between these biogenic emissions and sulfate is thought to be primarily associated with the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity, increased aerosol water at high relative humidities, and aerosol volume. The Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program provides aerosol concentration levels of sulfate (SO4) and organic carbon (OC) at 136 monitoring sites in rural and remote areas of the United States over time periods of between 15 and 28 years. This data set allows for an examination of relationships between these variables over time and space. The relative decreases in SO4 and OC were similar over most of the eastern United States, even though concentrations varied dramatically from one region to another. The analysis implied that for every unit decrease in SO4 there was about a 0.29 decrease in organic aerosol mass (OA = 1.8 × OC). This translated to a 2 μg/m3 decrease in biogenically derived secondary organic aerosol over 15 years in the southeastern United States. The analysis further implied that 35% and 27% in 2001 and 2015, respectively, of average total OA may be biogenically derived secondary organic aerosols and that there was a small but significant decrease in OA not linked to changes in SO4 concentrations. The analysis yields a constraint on ambient SO4-OC relationships that should help to refine and improve regional-scale chemical transport models.

  4. Short-term adaptation during propagation improves the performance of xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae in simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Fredrik; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Olsson, Lisbeth; Wallberg, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors that are generated during thermochemical pretreatment and hydrolysis impair the performance of microorganisms during fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In omitting costly detoxification steps, the fermentation process relies extensively on the performance of the fermenting microorganism. One attractive option of improving its performance and tolerance to microbial inhibitors is short-term adaptation during propagation. This study determined the influence of short-term adaptation on the performance of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF). The aim was to understand how short-term adaptation with lignocellulosic hydrolysate affects the cell mass yield of propagated yeast and performance in subsequent fermentation steps. The physiology of propagated yeast was examined with regard to viability, vitality, stress responses, and upregulation of relevant genes to identify any links between the beneficial traits that are promoted during adaptation and overall ethanol yields in co-fermentation. The presence of inhibitors during propagation significantly improved fermentation but lowered cell mass yield during propagation. Xylose utilization of adapted cultures was enhanced by increasing amounts of hydrolysate in the propagation. Ethanol yields improved by over 30 % with inhibitor concentrations that corresponded to ≥2.5 % water-insoluble solids (WIS) load during the propagation compared with the unadapted culture. Adaptation improved cell viability by >10 % and increased vitality by >20 %. Genes that conferred resistance against inhibitors were upregulated with increasing amounts of inhibitors during the propagation, but the adaptive response was not associated with improved ethanol yields in SSCF. The positive effects in SSCF were observed even with adaptation at inhibitor concentrations that corresponded to 2.5 % WIS. Higher amounts of hydrolysate in the propagation feed further

  5. Improving accuracy and efficiency of mutual information for multi-modal retinal image registration using adaptive probability density estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, P A; Rosin, P L; Marshall, D; Morgan, J E

    2013-01-01

    Mutual information (MI) is a popular similarity measure for performing image registration between different modalities. MI makes a statistical comparison between two images by computing the entropy from the probability distribution of the data. Therefore, to obtain an accurate registration it is important to have an accurate estimation of the true underlying probability distribution. Within the statistics literature, many methods have been proposed for finding the 'optimal' probability density, with the aim of improving the estimation by means of optimal histogram bin size selection. This provokes the common question of how many bins should actually be used when constructing a histogram. There is no definitive answer to this. This question itself has received little attention in the MI literature, and yet this issue is critical to the effectiveness of the algorithm. The purpose of this paper is to highlight this fundamental element of the MI algorithm. We present a comprehensive study that introduces methods from statistics literature and incorporates these for image registration. We demonstrate this work for registration of multi-modal retinal images: colour fundus photographs and scanning laser ophthalmoscope images. The registration of these modalities offers significant enhancement to early glaucoma detection, however traditional registration techniques fail to perform sufficiently well. We find that adaptive probability density estimation heavily impacts on registration accuracy and runtime, improving over traditional binning techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Green tea extract supplementation does not hamper endurance-training adaptation but improves antioxidant capacity in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chi; Lin, Jung-Charng; Bernard, Jeffrey R; Liao, Yi-Hung

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of green tea extract (GTE) supplementation combined with endurance training on endurance capacity and performance in sedentary men. Forty untrained men (age: 20 ± 1 years) participated in this study. Subjects were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: (i) placebo-control (CTRL), (ii) GTE, (iii) endurance training (Ex), and (iv) endurance training with GTE (ExGTE). During the 4-week intervention, exercise training was prescribed as 75% oxygen uptake reserve for three 20-min sessions per week, and either GTE (250 mg/day) or placebo was provided. Endurance capacity, malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), and creatine kinase (CK) were examined. Ex and ExGTE but not GTE improved exhaustive-run time (Ex: +8.2%, p = 0.031; ExGTE: +14.3%, p training (p = 0.040), and GTE, Ex, and ExGTE markedly attenuated exercise-induced MDA production (p = 0.01, p = 0.005, p = 0.011, respectively). In conclusion, this investigation demonstrated that daily ingestion of GTE during endurance training does not impair improvements in endurance capacity. Moreover, endurance training combined with GTE not only increases antioxidant capacity without attenuating endurance training adaptations, but also further attenuates acute exercise-induced CK release.

  7. Reduction of radiation exposure and improvement of image quality with BMI-adapted prospective cardiac computed tomography and iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosch, Waldemar, E-mail: waldemar.hosch@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Stiller, Wolfram [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Mueller, Dirk [Philips GmbH Healthcare Division, Hamburg (Germany); Gitsioudis, Gitsios [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Welzel, Johanna; Dadrich, Monika [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Buss, Sebastian J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans U. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Katus, Hugo A. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Korosoglou, Grigorios, E-mail: gkorosoglou@hotmail.com [University of Heidelberg, Department of Cardiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocols and iterative reconstruction algorithms (iDose) on patient radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective ECG-triggered 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: Image quality and radiation exposure were systematically analyzed in 100 patients. 60 Patients underwent prospective ECG-triggered CCTA using a non-tailored protocol and served as a 'control' group (Group 1: 120 kV, 200 mA s). 40 Consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent prospective CCTA, using BMI-adapted tube voltage and standard (Group 2: 100/120 kV, 100-200 mA s) versus reduced tube current (Group 3: 100/120 kV, 75-150 mA s). Iterative reconstructions were provided with different iDose levels and were compared to filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructions. Image quality was assessed in consensus of 2 experienced observers and using a 5-grade scale (1 = best to 5 = worse), and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR) were quantified. Results: CCTA was performed without adverse events in all patients (n = 100, heart rate of 47-87 bpm and BMI of 19-38 kg/m{sup 2}). Patients examined using the non-tailored protocol in Group 1 had the highest radiation exposure (3.2 {+-} 0.4 mSv), followed by Group 2 (1.7 {+-} 0.7 mSv) and Group 3 (1.2 {+-} 0.6 mSv) (radiation savings of 47% and 63%, respectively, p < 0.001). Iterative reconstructions provided increased SNR and CNR, particularly when higher iDose level 5 was applied with Multi-Frequency reconstruction (iDose5 MFR) (14.1 {+-} 4.6 versus 21.2 {+-} 7.3 for SNR and 12.0 {+-} 4.2 versus 18.1 {+-} 6.6 for CNR, for FBP versus iDose5 MFR, respectively, p < 0.001). The combination of BMI adaptation with iterative reconstruction reduced radiation exposure and simultaneously improved image quality (subjective image quality of 1.4 {+-} 0.4 versus 1.9 {+-} 0.5 for Group 2 reconstructed using

  8. Flexibility of Scope, Type and Temporality in Mustang, Nepal. Opportunities for Adaptation in a Farming System Facing Climatic and Market Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Holmelin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is projected to increase the seasonality in river flows in the great river systems of Himalaya and impose challenges to regional food production. Since climate change increases the uncertainty in local weather patterns, people’s ability to maintain local agricultural production will probably depend on how flexible the local farming systems are to adjust to unpredictable changes. The objective of this paper is to investigate the flexibility of one such farming system which is located in Mustang, Nepal, Himalaya. Defining flexibility as “uncommitted potentialities for change” following Gregory Bateson, the paper identifies opportunities for change in the farming system, as well as factors that constrain flexibility. Further developing the concept of flexibility, it is suggested that flexibility may be analyzed in terms of scope, type and temporal flexibility. Although there are several underexploited resources in the studied farming system, the present situation is not regarded as one of irrational and suboptimal exploitation of resources. Instead, unexploited resources imply opportunities for change, which provide the system with flexibility to rapidly adjust agricultural production to varying and uncertain conditions of production.

  9. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and did

  10. Improved laser-based triangulation sensor with enhanced range and resolution through adaptive optics-based active beam control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Syed Azer; Khwaja, Tariq Shamim; Mazhar, Mohsin Ali; Niazi, Haris Khan; Nawab, Rahma

    2017-07-20

    Various existing target ranging techniques are limited in terms of the dynamic range of operation and measurement resolution. These limitations arise as a result of a particular measurement methodology, the finite processing capability of the hardware components deployed within the sensor module, and the medium through which the target is viewed. Generally, improving the sensor range adversely affects its resolution and vice versa. Often, a distance sensor is designed for an optimal range/resolution setting depending on its intended application. Optical triangulation is broadly classified as a spatial-signal-processing-based ranging technique and measures target distance from the location of the reflected spot on a position sensitive detector (PSD). In most triangulation sensors that use lasers as a light source, beam divergence-which severely affects sensor measurement range-is often ignored in calculations. In this paper, we first discuss in detail the limitations to ranging imposed by beam divergence, which, in effect, sets the sensor dynamic range. Next, we show how the resolution of laser-based triangulation sensors is limited by the interpixel pitch of a finite-sized PSD. In this paper, through the use of tunable focus lenses (TFLs), we propose a novel design of a triangulation-based optical rangefinder that improves both the sensor resolution and its dynamic range through adaptive electronic control of beam propagation parameters. We present the theory and operation of the proposed sensor and clearly demonstrate a range and resolution improvement with the use of TFLs. Experimental results in support of our claims are shown to be in strong agreement with theory.

  11. Food crops face rising temperatures: An overview of responses, adaptive mechanisms, and approaches to improve heat tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeru Kaushal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising temperatures are resulting in heat stress for various agricultural crops to limit their growth, metabolism, and leading to significant loss of yield potential worldwide. Heat stress adversely affects normal plant growth and development depending on the sensitivity of each crop species. Each crop species has its own range of temperature maxima and minima at different developmental stages beyond which all these processes get inhibited. The reproductive stage is on the whole more sensitive to heat stress, resulting in impaired fertilization to cause abortion of flowers. During seed filling, heat stress retards seed growth by affecting all the biochemical events to reduce seed size. Unfavorable temperature may significantly affect photosynthesis, respiration, water balance, and membrane stability of leaves. To combat heat stress, plants acquire various defense mechanisms for their survival such as maintaining membrane stability, and scavenging reactive oxygen species by generating antioxidants and stress proteins. Thermo-tolerance can be improved by the accumulation of various compounds of low molecular mass known as thermo-protectants as well as phyto-hormones. Exogenous application of these molecules has benefited plants growing under heat stress. Alternatively, transgenic plants over-expressing the enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of these molecules may be raised to increase their endogenous levels to improve heat tolerance. In recent times, various transgenics have been developed with improved thermo-tolerance having potential benefits for inducing heat tolerance in food crops. Updated information about of the effects of heat stress on various food crops and their responses as well as adaptive mechanisms is reviewed here.

  12. Adaptation of red blood cell lysis represents a fundamental breakthrough that improves the sensitivity of Salmonella detection in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, MA; Tennant, SM; Melendez, JH; Toema, D; Galen, JE; Geddes, CD; Levine, MM

    2015-01-01

    Aims Isolation of Salmonella Typhi from blood culture is the standard diagnostic for confirming typhoid fever but it is unavailable in many developing countries. We previously described a Microwave Accelerated Metal Enhanced Fluorescence (MAMEF)-based assay to detect Salmonella in medium. Attempts to detect Salmonella in blood were unsuccessful, presumably due to the interference of erythrocytes. The objective of this study was to evaluate various blood treatment methods that could be used prior to PCR, real-time PCR or MAMEF to increase sensitivity of detection of Salmonella. Methods and Results We tested ammonium chloride and erythrocyte lysis buffer, water, Lymphocyte Separation Medium, BD Vacutainer® CPT™ Tubes and dextran. Erythrocyte lysis buffer was the best isolation method as it is fast, inexpensive and works with either fresh or stored blood. The sensitivity of PCR- and real-time PCR detection of Salmonella in spiked blood was improved when whole blood was first lysed using erythrocyte lysis buffer prior to DNA extraction. Removal of erythrocytes and clotting factors also enabled reproducible lysis of Salmonella and fragmentation of DNA, which are necessary for MAMEF sensing. Conclusions Use of the erythrocyte lysis procedure prior to DNA extraction has enabled improved sensitivity of Salmonella detection by PCR and real-time PCR and has allowed lysis and fragmentation of Salmonella using microwave radiation (for future detection by MAMEF). Significance and Impact of the Study Adaptation of the blood lysis method represents a fundamental breakthrough that improves the sensitivity of DNA-based detection of Salmonella in blood. PMID:25630831

  13. Mapping of Temporal Surface-water Resources Availability and Agricultural Adaptability due to Climate Change and Anthropogenic Activity in a Hot Semi-arid Region of Maharashtra State, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Inamdar, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Major part of Godavari River Basin is intensely drought prone and climate vulnerable in the Western Maharashtra State, India. The economy of the state depends on the agronomic productivity of this region. So, it is necessary to regulate the effects of existing and upcoming hydro-meteorological advances in various strata. This study investigates and maps the surface water resources availability and vegetation, their decadal deviations with multi-temporal LANDSAT images; and finally quantifies the agricultural adaptations. This work involves the utilization of Remote Sensing and GIS with Hydrological modeling. First, climatic trend analysis is carried out with NCEP dataset. Then, multi-temporal LANDSAT images are classified to determine the decadal LULC changes and correlated to the community level hydrological demand. Finally, NDVI, NDWI and SWAT model analysis are accomplished to determine irrigated and non-irrigated cropping area for identifying the agricultural adaptations. The analysis shows that the mean value of annual and monsoon rainfall is significantly decreasing, whereas the mean value of annual and summer temperature is increasing significantly and the winter temperature is decreasing. The analysis of LANDSAT images shows that the surface water availability is highly dependent on climatic conditions. Barren-lands are most dynamic during the study period followed by, vegetation, and water bodies. The spatial extent of barren-lands is increased drastically during the climate vulnerable years replacing the vegetation and surface water bodies. Hence, the barren lands are constantly increasing and the vegetation cover is linearly decreasing, whereas the water extent is changing either way in a random fashion. There appears a positive correlation between surface water and vegetation occurrence; as they are fluctuating in a similar fashion in all the years. The vegetation cover is densely replenished around the dams and natural water bodies which serve as the

  14. Temporal dynamics of stomatal conductance of plants under water deficit: can homeostasis be improved by more complex dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Maia Souza

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study we hypothesized that chaotic or complex behavior of stomatal conductance could improve plant homeostasis after water deficit. Stomatal conductance of sunflower and sugar beet leaves was measured in plants grown either daily irrigation or under water deficit using an infrared gas analyzer. All measurements were performed under controlled environmental conditions. In order to measure a consistent time series, data were scored with time intervals of 20s during 6h. Lyapunov exponents, fractal dimensions, KS entropy and relative LZ complexity were calculated. Stomatal conductance in both irrigated and non-irrigated plants was chaotic-like. Plants under water deficit showed a trend to a more complex behaviour, mainly in sunflower that showed better homeostasis than in sugar beet. Some biological implications are discussed.Este estudo testou a hipótese de que a condutância estomática de uma população de estômatos em uma folha poderia apresentar um comportamento caótico ou complexo sob diferentes condições hídricas, o que poderia favorecer a capacidade homeostática das plantas. A condutância estomática em folhas de girassol e de beterraba cultivadas com irrigação diária e sob deficiência hídrica foi medida com um analisador de gás por infra-vermelho em condições controladas. Os dados foram registrados a cada 20s durante 6h. As séries temporais obtidas foram analisadas por meio dos coeficientes de Lyapunov, dimensão fractal, entropia KS e complexidade LZ relativa. A condutância estomática nas plantas cultivadas com e sem deficiência hídrica exibiu um comportamento provavelmente caótico. As plantas sob estresse hídrico mostraram uma tendência para um comportamento mais complexo, principalmente as plantas de girassol cuja capacidade homeostática foi superior. Algumas implicações biológicas destes comportamentos são discutidas no texto.

  15. Estimation of Paddy Rice Variables with a Modified Water Cloud Model and Improved Polarimetric Decomposition Using Multi-Temporal RADARSAT-2 Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice growth monitoring is very important as rice is one of the staple crops of the world. Rice variables as quantitative indicators of rice growth are critical for farming management and yield estimation, and synthetic aperture radar (SAR has great advantages for monitoring rice variables due to its all-weather observation capability. In this study, eight temporal RADARSAT-2 full-polarimetric SAR images were acquired during rice growth cycle and a modified water cloud model (MWCM was proposed, in which the heterogeneity of the rice canopy in the horizontal direction and its phenological changes were considered when the double-bounce scattering between the rice canopy and the underlying surface was firstly considered as well. Then, three scattering components from an improved polarimetric decomposition were coupled with the MWCM, instead of the backscattering coefficients. Using a genetic algorithm, eight rice variables were estimated, such as the leaf area index (LAI, rice height (h, and the fresh and dry biomass of ears (Fe and De. The accuracy validation showed the MWCM was suitable for the estimation of rice variables during the whole growth season. The validation results showed that the MWCM could predict the temporal behaviors of the rice variables well during the growth cycle (R2 > 0.8. Compared with the original water cloud model (WCM, the relative errors of rice variables with the MWCM were much smaller, especially in the vegetation phase (approximately 15% smaller. Finally, it was discussed that the MWCM could be used, theoretically, for extensive applications since the empirical coefficients in the MWCM were determined in general cases, but more applications of the MWCM are necessary in future work.

  16. Temporal Improvements in Long-Term Outcome in Care Among HIV Infected Children Enrolled in Public ART Care: An Analysis of Outcomes From 2004-2012 in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makadzange, A Tariro; Dougherty, Leanne; Birri, Rutendo; Kupakuwana, Gillian; van Dijk, Janneke; Bwakura Dangarembizi, Mutsa; Mothobi, Nomvuyo; Phelps, Benjamin; Ojikutu, Bisola; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E

    2018-01-18

    Increasing numbers of children are requiring long-term HIV care and antiretroviral treatment (ART) in public ART programs in Africa but temporal trends and long-term outcomes in care remain poorly understood. We analyzed outcomes in a longitudinal cohort of infants (enrolling in a public tertiary ART center in Zimbabwe over an eight-year period (2004-2012). The clinic enrolled 1644 infants and children; the median age at enrollment was 39 months (IQR 14-79), with a median CD4% of 17.0 (IQR 11, 24) in infants and 15.0 (9, 23% in children (p=0.0007). Among those linked to care 33.5% dropped out of care within the first 3-months of enrollment. Following implementation of revised guidelines in 2009, decentralization of care and increased access to PMTCT services, we observed an increase in infants (48.9% to 68.3%, penrolled from 2009 were younger, had lower WHO clinical stage, improved baseline CD4 counts than those who enrolled in 2004-2008. Long-term retention in care also improved with decreasing risk of loss from care at 36-months for infants enrolled from 2009 (aHR 0.57 (95%CI: 0.34-0.95), p=0.031). ART eligibility at enrollment was a significant predictor of long-term retention in care while delayed ART initiation after age 5 years resulted in failure to fully reconstitute CD4 counts to age-appropriate levels despite prolonged ART. Significant improvements have been made in engaging and retaining children in care in public ART programs in Zimbabwe. Guideline and policy changes that increase access and eligibility will likely to continue to support improvement in pediatric HIV outcomes.

  17. Project Temporalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell; Justesen, Lise; Mouritsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how animals can become stakeholders in interaction with project management technologies and what happens with project temporalities when new and surprising stakeholders become part of a project and a recognized matter of concern to be taken...... into account. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on a qualitative case study of a project in the building industry. The authors use actor-network theory (ANT) to analyze the emergence of animal stakeholders, stakes and temporalities. Findings – The study shows how project temporalities can...... multiply in interaction with project management technologies and how conventional linear conceptions of project time may be contested with the emergence of new non-human stakeholders and temporalities. Research limitations/implications – The study draws on ANT to show how animals can become stakeholders...

  18. Temporal bone dissection practice using a chicken egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez García, José Manuel; Araujo Da Costa, Ana Sofía; Rivera Schmitz, Teresa; Chiesa Estomba, Carlos Miguel; Hamdan Zavarce, Miriam Ileana

    2014-07-01

    Temporal bone drilling practice constitutes an essential stage in training for the surgical approach to this complex anatomic structure. To facilitate adaptation and surgical skills in otologic surgery, we recall the easy cost-effective practice of drilling a chicken egg. The resident in training must master the use of the surgical microscope, the burr, and fine drilling instruments used in dissection. Animal models, plastic temporal bones, prototyped temporal bones, and virtual reality temporal bones have all been used. This article describes a method of training residents' otologic skills by drilling a chicken egg. We used basic support materials found in a typical temporal bone dissection laboratory, with a surgical microscope, a desk, and a drilling system. Practice includes drilling and dissection of the eggshell, preserving the natural eggshell membrane. Learning temporal bone drilling on an egg, using basic materials, allows the surgeon to simulate surgery on a physical model using the same instrumentation that is used in surgery, obviating the need for laboratory conditions required for cadaveric dissection. Simulation is emerging as a mandatory component of surgical training. The egg is an excellent cost-effective model for drilling and dissection training and helps in improving surgical skills, enables learning of fine motor skills, and allows repeated practice. Although this method of training does help one control a drill and manual instrumentation, it does not help with temporal bone anatomy knowledge.

  19. Using the urtA Gene to Profile Nitrogen Stress Adaptation and Spatio-Temporal Abundance of Synechococcus Clades in the California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, T.; Shilova, I. N.; Zehr, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among the planet's most abundant photosynthetic groups, the picocyanobacteria Synechococcus contributes nearly a quarter of our global oxygen supply. Urea, from both natural and anthropogenic sources, is an important alternative to the preferred yet limited sources of reduced nitrogen for cyanobacteria in the marine environment. While urea uptake activity has been observed during nitrogen (N) limitation, this stress adaptation is not well-studied in natural habitats. We propose the urtAgene, which encodes the substrate-binding subunit of the urea-uptake ABC transporter, as a molecular marker to profile cell abundance and stress response in relation to N fluctuation. Strains prevalent in temperate waters of the California Current System - Synechococcus CC9311 (clade I), CC9605 (clade II) and CC9902/BL107 (clade IV) - were targeted by clade-specific qPCR assays to measure urtA gene copy abundance in samples from different geographical stations and a time-series. Spatial and seasonal patterns in clade abundance resembled those previously reported by studies using other Synechococcus marker genes, thus validating urtA as a strong marker. Synechococcus clades I and IV were most abundant in coastal and transitional stations, while the more oligotrophic clade II was detected near open waters. Synechococcus abundances were highest before and after the annual upwelling season, as supported by a non clade-specific rbcL-qPCR assay. A lack of correlation between abundance and nitrate availability indicated utilization of alternative nitrogen sources like urea, which was further evidenced by the detection of clade IV urtA transcripts at the station closest to shore. Urea concentrations tend to be highest in coastal environments due to fertilizer runoff, which can stimulate phytoplankton blooms including harmful algal blooms. This study adds to insight on how such environmental factors are related to N-cycling and patterns of urea-assimilating microbial populations like

  20. A temporal-omic study of Propionibacterium freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1 adaptation strategies in conditions mimicking cheese ripening in the cold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium freudenreichii is used as a ripening culture in Swiss cheese manufacture. It grows when cheeses are ripened in a warm room (about 24°C. Cheeses with an acceptable eye formation level are transferred to a cold room (about 4°C, inducing a marked slowdown of propionic fermentation, but P. freudenreichii remains active in the cold. To investigate the P. freudenreichii strategies of adaptation and survival in the cold, we performed the first global gene expression profile for this species. The time-course transcriptomic response of P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1(T strain was analyzed at five times of incubation, during growth at 30°C then for 9 days at 4°C, under conditions preventing nutrient starvation. Gene expression was also confirmed by RT-qPCR for 28 genes. In addition, proteomic experiments were carried out and the main metabolites were quantified. Microarray analysis revealed that 565 genes (25% of the protein-coding sequences of P. freudenreichii genome were differentially expressed during transition from 30°C to 4°C (P1. At 4°C, a general slowing down was observed for genes implicated in the cell machinery. On the contrary, P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1(T strain over-expressed genes involved in lactate, alanine and serine conversion to pyruvate, in gluconeogenesis, and in glycogen synthesis. Interestingly, the expression of different genes involved in the formation of important cheese flavor compounds, remained unchanged at 4°C. This could explain the contribution of P. freudenreichii to cheese ripening even in the cold. In conclusion, P. freudenreichii remains metabolically active at 4°C and induces pathways to maintain its long-term survival.

  1. Improvement of adaptive GAs and back propagation ANNs performance in condition diagnosis of multiple bearing system using grey relational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulandhari, Lili A; Wibowo, Antoni; Desa, Mohammad I

    2014-01-01

    Condition diagnosis of multiple bearings system is one of the requirements in industry field, because bearings are used in many equipment and their failure can result in total breakdown. Conditions of bearings commonly are reflected by vibration signals data. In multiple bearing condition diagnosis, it will involve many types of vibration signals data; thus, consequently, it will involve many features extraction to obtain precise condition diagnosis. However, large number of features extraction will increase the complexity of the diagnosis system. Therefore, in this paper, we presented a diagnosis method which is hybridization of adaptive genetic algorithms (AGAs), back propagation neural networks (BPNNs), and grey relational analysis (GRA) to diagnose the condition of multiple bearings system. AGAs are used in the diagnosis algorithm to determine the best initial weights of BPNNs in order to improve the diagnosis accuracy. In addition, GRA is applied to determine and select the dominant features from the vibration signal data which will provide good diagnosis of multiple bearings system in less features extraction. The experiments results show that AGAs-BPNNs with GRA approaches can increase the accuracy of diagnosis in shorter processing time, compared with the AGAs-BPNNs without the GRA.

  2. AAV-mediated RLBP1 gene therapy improves the rate of dark adaptation in Rlbp1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian W Choi

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in RLBP1 cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa in which the retina, before its degeneration leads to blindness, abnormally slowly recovers sensitivity after exposure to light. To develop a potential gene therapy for this condition, we tested multiple recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAVs composed of different promoters, capsid serotypes, and genome conformations. We generated rAAVs in which sequences from the promoters of the human RLBP1, RPE65, or BEST1 genes drove the expression of a reporter gene (green fluorescent protein. A promoter derived from the RLBP1 gene mediated expression in the retinal pigment epithelium and Müller cells (the intended target cell types at qualitatively higher levels than in other retinal cell types in wild-type mice and monkeys. With this promoter upstream of the coding sequence of the human RLBP1 gene, we compared the potencies of vectors with an AAV2 versus an AAV8 capsid in transducing mouse retinas, and we compared vectors with a self-complementary versus a single-stranded genome. The optimal vector (scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 had serotype 8 capsid and a self-complementary genome. Subretinal injection of scAAV8-pRLBP1-hRLBP1 in Rlbp1 nullizygous mice improved the rate of dark adaptation based on scotopic (rod-plus-cone and photopic (cone electroretinograms (ERGs. The effect was still present after 1 year.

  3. Improving high carbon dioxide tolerance and carbon dioxide fixation capability of Chlorella sp. by adaptive laboratory evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dengjin; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2015-06-01

    CO2 capture by microalgae is a promising method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is critical to construct a highly efficient way to obtain a microalgal strain tolerant to high CO2 concentrations with high CO2 fixation capability. In this study, two evolved Chlorella sp. strains, AE10 and AE20 were obtained after 31 cycles of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) under 10% and 20% CO2, respectively. Both of them grew rapidly in 30% CO2 and the maximal biomass concentration of AE10 was 3.68±0.08g/L, which was 1.22 and 2.94 times to those of AE20 and original strain, respectively. The chlorophyll contents of AE10 and AE20 were significantly higher than those of the original one under 1-30% CO2. The influences of ALE process on biochemical compositions of Chlorella cells were also investigated. This study proved that ALE was an effective approach to improve high CO2 tolerance of Chlorella sp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An Alternative Evacuation Framework to Improve Protective-action Strategies Following a Nuclear Power Accident: The Adaptive Protective Action Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Gregory D.

    Within the U.S. current protective-action strategies to safeguard the public following a nuclear power accident have remained largely unchanged since their implementation in the early 1980s. In the past thirty years, new technologies have been introduced allowing faster computations, better modeling of predicted radiological consequences, and improved accident mapping with geographic information systems (GIS). Utilizing these new technologies, we evaluate the efficacy of alternative strategies, called adaptive protective action zones (APAZs), that use site-specific and event-specific data to dynamically determine evacuation boundaries with simple heuristics in order to better inform protective action decisions (rather than relying on pre-event regulatory bright lines). Several candidate APAZs were developed and then compared to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's keyhole evacuation strategy (and full evacuation of the emergency planning zone). Two of the APAZs were better on average than existing NRC strategies at reducing either the radiological exposure, the population evacuated, or both. These APAZs are especially effective for larger radioactive plumes and at high population sites; one of them is better at reducing radiation exposure, while the other is better at reducing the population evacuated. However, should policy makers decide that the benefits of APAZs outweigh the costs of implementation, APAZ adoption by U.S. regulatory agencies should be accompanied by a revision to the nuclear-power plant emergency planning basis, and revisions to local nuclear power emergency response planning areas.

  5. Image quality improvement in adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy assisted capillary visualization using B-spline-based elastic image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of B-spline-based elastic image registration on adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO)-assisted capillary visualization. AO-SLO videos were acquired from parafoveal areas in the eyes of healthy subjects and patients with various diseases. After nonlinear image registration, the image quality of capillary images constructed from AO-SLO videos using motion contrast enhancement was compared before and after B-spline-based elastic (nonlinear) image registration performed using ImageJ. For objective comparison of image quality, contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRS) for vessel images were calculated. For subjective comparison, experienced ophthalmologists ranked images on a 5-point scale. All AO-SLO videos were successfully stabilized by elastic image registration. CNR was significantly higher in capillary images stabilized by elastic image registration than in those stabilized without registration. The average ratio of CNR in images with elastic image registration to CNR in images without elastic image registration was 2.10 ± 1.73, with no significant difference in the ratio between patients and healthy subjects. Improvement of image quality was also supported by expert comparison. Use of B-spline-based elastic image registration in AO-SLO-assisted capillary visualization was effective for enhancing image quality both objectively and subjectively.

  6. Cross Layer Adaptation of Check Intervals in Low Power Listening MAC Protocols for Lifetime Improvement in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Cristina Marinescu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Preamble sampling-based MAC protocols designed forWireless Sensor Networks (WSN are aimed at prolonging the lifetime of the nodes by scheduling their times of activity. This scheduling exploits node synchronization to find the right trade-off between energy consumption and delay. In this paper we consider the problem of node synchronization in preamble sampling protocols. We propose Cross Layer Adaptation of Check intervals (CLAC, a novel protocol intended to reduce the energy consumption of the nodes without significantly increasing the delay. Our protocol modifies the scheduling of the nodes based on estimating the delay experienced by a packet that travels along a multi-hop path. CLAC uses routing and MAC layer information to compute a delay that matches the packet arrival time. We have implemented CLAC on top of well-known routing and MAC protocols for WSN, and we have evaluated our implementation using the Avrora simulator. The simulation results confirm that CLAC improves the network lifetime at no additional packet loss and without affecting the end-to-end delay.

  7. Adapting source grid parameters to improve the condition of the magnetostatic linear inverse problem of estimating nanoparticle distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichardt, Roland; Baumgarten, Daniel; Petković, Bojana; Wiekhorst, Frank; Trahms, Lutz; Haueisen, Jens

    2012-10-01

    The problem of estimating magnetic nanoparticle distributions from magnetorelaxometric measurements is addressed here. The objective of this work was to identify source grid parameters that provide a good condition for the related linear inverse problem. The parameters investigated here were the number of sources, the extension of the source grid, and the source direction. A new measure of the condition, the ratio between the largest and mean singular value of the lead field matrix, is proposed. Our results indicated that the source grids should be larger than the sensor area. The sources and, consequently, the magnetic excitation field, should be directed toward the Z-direction. For underdetermined linear inverse problems, such as in our application, the number of sources affects the condition to a relatively small degree. Overdetermined magnetostatic linear inverse problems, however, benefit from a reduction in the number of sources, which considerably improves the condition. The adapted source grids proposed here were used to estimate the magnetostatic dipole from simulated data; the L2-norm, residual, and distances between the estimated and simulated sources were significantly reduced.

  8. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D improves chest CT image quality and reduces radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuneo Yamashiro

    Full Text Available To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT.Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D. Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic to 5 (excellent, three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease, and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts. Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test.At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001 and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01. For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001, and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA.For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%.

  9. Neocortical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Eduard; Kumar, Balagobal Santosh; Mirsattari, Seyed M.

    2012-01-01

    Complex partial seizures (CPSs) can present with various semiologies, while mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) is a well-recognized cause of CPS, neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy (nTLE) albeit being less common is increasingly recognized as separate disease entity. Differentiating the two remains a challenge for epileptologists as many symptoms overlap due to reciprocal connections between the neocortical and the mesial temporal regions. Various studies have attempted to correctly localize the seizure focus in nTLE as patients with this disorder may benefit from surgery. While earlier work predicted poor outcomes in this population, recent work challenges those ideas yielding good outcomes in part due to better localization using improved anatomical and functional techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the diagnostic workup, particularly the application of recent advances in electroencephalography and functional brain imaging, in neocortical temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22953057

  10. Improvement in the spatio-temporal distribution of surface solar radiation data over Belgium by merging ground-based and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journée, M.; Bertrand, C.

    2010-09-01

    Appropriate information on solar resources is very important for a variety of technological areas, such as: agriculture, meteorology, forestry engineering, water resources and in particular in the designing and sizing of solar energy systems. As an example, time-and space-dependent global solar radiation on horizontal surface at the location of interest is the most critical input parameter employed in the design and prediction of the performance of a solar energy device. Solar radiation is observed by means of networks of meteorological stations. Costs for installation and maintenance of such networks are very high and national networks comprise only few stations. Consequently the availability of observed solar radiation measurements has proven to be spatially and temporally inadequate for many applications. Mapping the solar radiation by interpolation/extrapolation of measurements is possible but leads to large errors, except if the network is dense. A global coverage of solar radiation can however be inferred from space-based observations. In the present study, we evaluate the potential benefit of merging global solar radiation measurements from the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMIB) solar measurements network with the operationally derived surface incoming global short-wave radiation products from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites imageries to improve the spatio-temporal resolution of the surface global solar radiation data over Belgium. Within the Satellite Application Facility (SAF) network supported by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (Eumetsat), the downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface of Belgium is operationally retrieved from MSG imageries by two decentralized SAFs: the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF) and the Land Surface Analysis Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF). To retrieve the same parameter, the different SAFs use their own algorithms and

  11. A retroactive spatial cue improved VSTM capacity in mild cognitive impairment and medial temporal lobe amnesia but not in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Rachel N; Duarte, Audrey; Pun, Carson; Smith, Victoria M; Ferber, Susanne; Barense, Morgan D

    2015-10-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is a vital cognitive ability, connecting visual input with conscious awareness. VSTM performance declines with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and medial temporal lobe (MTL) amnesia. Many studies have shown that providing a spatial retrospective cue ("retrocue") improves VSTM capacity estimates for healthy young adults. However, one study has demonstrated that older adults are unable to use a retrocue to inhibit irrelevant items from memory. It is unknown whether patients with MCI and MTL amnesia will be able to use a retrocue to benefit their memory. We administered a retrocue and a baseline (simultaneous cue, "simucue") task to young adults, older adults, MCI patients, and MTL cases. Consistent with previous findings, young adults showed a retrocue benefit, whereas healthy older adults did not. In contrast, both MCI patients and MTL cases showed a retrocue benefit--the use of a retrocue brought patient performance up to the level of age-matched controls. We speculate that the patients were able to use the spatial information from the retrocue to reduce interference and facilitate binding items to their locations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The importance of training strategy adaptation: a learner-oriented approach for improving older adults' memory and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiroli, Sara; Cavallini, Elena; Dunlosky, John; Vecchi, Tomaso; Hertzog, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the benefits of strategy-adaptation training for promoting transfer effects. This learner-oriented approach--which directly encourages the learner to generalize strategic behavior to new tasks--helps older adults appraise new tasks and adapt trained strategies to them. In Experiment 1, older adults in a strategy-adaptation training group used 2 strategies (imagery and sentence generation) while practicing 2 tasks (list and associative learning); they were then instructed on how to do a simple task analysis to help them adapt the trained strategies for 2 different unpracticed tasks (place learning and text learning) that were discussed during training. Two additional criterion tasks (name-face associative learning and grocery-list learning) were never mentioned during training. Two other groups were included: A strategy training group (who received strategy training and transfer instructions but not strategy-adaptation training) and a waiting-list control group. Both training procedures enhanced older adults' performance on the trained tasks and those tasks that were discussed during training, but transfer was greatest after strategy-adaptation training. Experiment 2 found that strategy-adaptation training conducted via a manual that older adults used at home also promoted transfer. These findings demonstrate the importance of adopting a learner-oriented approach to promote transfer of strategy training. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Temporal variations of the fractal properties of seismicity in the western part of the north Anatolian fault zone: possible artifacts due to improvements in station coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Öncel

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismically-active fault zones are complex natural systems exhibiting scale-invariant or fractal correlation between earthquakes in space and time, and a power-law scaling of fault length or earthquake source dimension consistent with the exponent b of the Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude relation. The fractal dimension of seismicity is a measure of the degree of both the heterogeneity of the process (whether fixed or self-generated and the clustering of seismic activity. Temporal variations of the b-value and the two-point fractal (correlation dimension Dc have been related to the preparation process for natural earthquakes and rock fracture in the laboratory These statistical scaling properties of seismicity may therefore have the potential at least to be sensitive short- term predictors of major earthquakes. The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ is a seismicallyactive dextral strike slip fault zone which forms the northern boundary of the westward moving Anatolian plate. It is splayed into three branches at about 31oE and continues westward toward the northern Aegean sea. In this study, we investigate the temporal variation of Dc and the Gutenberg-Richter b-value for seismicity in the western part of the NAFZ (including the northern Aegean sea for earthquakes of Ms > 4.5 occurring in the period between 1900 and 1992. b ranges from 0.6-1.6 and Dc from 0.6 to 1.4. The b-value is found to be weakly negatively correlated with Dc (r=-0.56. However the (log of event rate N is positively correlated with b, with a similar degree of statistical significance (r=0.42, and negatively correlated with Dc (r=-0.48. Since N increases dramatically with improved station coverage since 1970, the observed negative correlation between b and Dc is therefore more likely to be due to this effect than any underlying physical process in this case. We present this as an example of how man-made artefacts of recording can have similar statistical effects to

  14. Trajectory analysis of land use and land cover maps to improve spatial-temporal patterns, and impact assessment on groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomlot, Z.; Verbeiren, B.; Huysmans, M.; Batelaan, O.

    2017-11-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) change is a consequence of human-induced global environmental change. It is also considered one of the major factors affecting groundwater recharge. Uncertainties and inconsistencies in LULC maps are one of the difficulties that LULC timeseries analysis face and which have a significant effect on hydrological impact analysis. Therefore, an accuracy assessment approach of LULC timeseries is needed for a more reliable hydrological analysis and prediction. The objective of this paper is to assess the impact of land use uncertainty and to improve the accuracy of a timeseries of CORINE (coordination of information on the environment) land cover maps by using a new approach of identifying spatial-temporal LULC change trajectories as a pre-processing tool. This ensures consistency of model input when dealing with land-use dynamics and as such improves the accuracy of land use maps and consequently groundwater recharge estimation. As a case study the impact of consistent land use changes from 1990 until 2013 on groundwater recharge for the Flanders-Brussels region is assessed. The change trajectory analysis successfully assigned a rational trajectory to 99% of all pixels. The methodology is shown to be powerful in correcting interpretation inconsistencies and overestimation errors in CORINE land cover maps. The overall kappa (cell-by-cell map comparison) improved from 0.6 to 0.8 and from 0.2 to 0.7 for forest and pasture land use classes respectively. The study shows that the inconsistencies in the land use maps introduce uncertainty in groundwater recharge estimation in a range of 10-30%. The analysis showed that during the period of 1990-2013 the LULC changes were mainly driven by urban expansion. The results show that the resolution at which the spatial analysis is performed is important; the recharge differences using original and corrected CORINE land cover maps increase considerably with increasing spatial resolution. This study indicates

  15. Improving education due to the need to adapt it to the requirements of the economic development and of the labor market - issues of past history and contemporary features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Nistor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving education has been and continues to be a necessary condition in any society. Education contributes to increase the level of civilization, to develop the individual personality, but also to increase the level of the economic development. Organization and subsequent reorganization of the Romanian education system has been pursuing desiring to adapt better it better to the labor market needs and to adapt it to the international education system. The management strategies which are applied in this area should be considered adapting it to the domestic and international labor market conditions to the new education methods and techniques, used at the international level. The new trends desiring to transform the economy into a green economy require increased investments in education, in order to train the specialists in new green areas.

  16. An Improved Method for Producing High Spatial-Resolution NDVI Time Series Datasets with Multi-Temporal MODIS NDVI Data and Landsat TM/ETM+ Images

    OpenAIRE

    Yuhan Rao; Xiaolin Zhu; Jin Chen; Jianmin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Due to technical limitations, it is impossible to have high resolution in both spatial and temporal dimensions for current NDVI datasets. Therefore, several methods are developed to produce high resolution (spatial and temporal) NDVI time-series datasets, which face some limitations including high computation loads and unreasonable assumptions. In this study, an unmixing-based method, NDVI Linear Mixing Growth Model (NDVI-LMGM), is proposed to achieve the goal of accurately and efficiently bl...

  17. Prediction of flood abnormalities for improved public safety using a modified adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, M; Kita, I; Yano, A; Nishiyama, S

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted that an efficient flood alarm system may significantly improve public safety and mitigate economical damages caused by inundations. In this paper, a modified adaptive neuro-fuzzy system is proposed to modify the traditional neuro-fuzzy model. This new method employs a rule-correction based algorithm to replace the error back propagation algorithm that is employed by the traditional neuro-fuzzy method in backward pass calculation. The final value obtained during the backward pass calculation using the rule-correction algorithm is then considered as a mapping function of the learning mechanism of the modified neuro-fuzzy system. Effectiveness of the proposed identification technique is demonstrated through a simulation study on the flood series of the Citarum River in Indonesia. The first four-year data (1987 to 1990) was used for model training/calibration, while the other remaining data (1991 to 2002) was used for testing the model. The number of antecedent flows that should be included in the input variables was determined by two statistical methods, i.e. autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation between the variables. Performance accuracy of the model was evaluated in terms of two statistical indices, i.e. mean average percentage error and root mean square error. The algorithm was developed in a decision support system environment in order to enable users to process the data. The decision support system is found to be useful due to its interactive nature, flexibility in approach, and evolving graphical features, and can be adopted for any similar situation to predict the streamflow. The main data processing includes gauging station selection, input generation, lead-time selection/generation, and length of prediction. This program enables users to process the flood data, to train/test the model using various input options, and to visualize results. The program code consists of a set of files, which can be modified as well to match other

  18. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  19. Fixed and adaptive beamforming improves speech perception in noise in cochlear implant recipients equipped with the MED-EL SONNET audio processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeder, Clemens; Liepins, Rudolfs; Arnoldner, Christoph; Šinkovec, Hana; Kaider, Alexandra; Vyskocil, Erich; Riss, Dominik

    2018-01-01

    To determine the impact of the fixed and adaptive beamforming technology of the new MED-EL SONNET cochlear implant audio processor on speech perception in noise. The study cohort comprises 18 postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant recipients with at least six months of experience. Speech reception thresholds were measured with the Oldenburg Sentence Test in continuous, speech-shaped noise. Target sentences were presented in front of the listener, with noise sources placed at -135° and 135°, respectively. Outcome measures were the differences in speech reception threshold using omnidirectional, fixed and adaptive beamformer microphone settings. The use of directional microphones significantly improved speech reception thresholds: fixed beamformer vs. omnidirectional: 4.3 dB (95%-CI [3.1; 5.5]), pprocessor. Cochlear implant users may be able to benefit from improved hearing performance especially in difficult listening situations.

  20. Forward Masking: Temporal Integration or Adaptation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewert, Stephan D.; Hau, Ole; Dau, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    Hearing – From Sensory Processing to Perception presents the papers of the latest "International Symposium on Hearing," a meeting held every three years focusing on psychoacoustics and the research of the physiological mechanisms underlying auditory perception. The proceedings provide an up...... and the physiological mechanisms of binaural processing in mammals; integration of the different stimulus features into auditory scene analysis; physiological mechanisms related to the formation of auditory objects; speech perception; and limitations of auditory perception resulting from hearing disorders....

  1. Temporal dimensions of human environmental research: Adaptive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental interactions, especially in light of not having available longitudinal data. We utilize a methodology that highlights the past, present, and future, in order to approximate these kinds of results in rural South Africa. The present is ...

  2. Forward Masking: Temporal Integration or Adaptation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewert, Stephan D.; Hau, Ole; Dau, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    Hearing – From Sensory Processing to Perception presents the papers of the latest "International Symposium on Hearing," a meeting held every three years focusing on psychoacoustics and the research of the physiological mechanisms underlying auditory perception. The proceedings provide an up-to-date...

  3. Frequency Adaptability and Waveform Design for OFDM Radar Space-Time Adaptive Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Glover, Charles Wayne [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We propose an adaptive waveform design technique for an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) radar signal employing a space-time adaptive processing (STAP) technique. We observe that there are inherent variabilities of the target and interference responses in the frequency domain. Therefore, the use of an OFDM signal can not only increase the frequency diversity of our system, but also improve the target detectability by adaptively modifying the OFDM coefficients in order to exploit the frequency-variabilities of the scenario. First, we formulate a realistic OFDM-STAP measurement model considering the sparse nature of the target and interference spectra in the spatio-temporal domain. Then, we show that the optimal STAP-filter weight-vector is equal to the generalized eigenvector corresponding to the minimum generalized eigenvalue of the interference and target covariance matrices. With numerical examples we demonstrate that the resultant OFDM-STAP filter-weights are adaptable to the frequency-variabilities of the target and interference responses, in addition to the spatio-temporal variabilities. Hence, by better utilizing the frequency variabilities, we propose an adaptive OFDM-waveform design technique, and consequently gain a significant amount of STAP-performance improvement.

  4. Adaptation Insights

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    be given greater access to relevant information to help them adapt their farming practices and socio- economic strategies to climate change? To address this challenge, the project “InfoClim,” led by Senegal's. Ecological Monitoring Centre. (CSE) with support from the. CCAA program, aims at improving the access of farmers ...

  5. An Investigation into the Factors Influencing Extreme-Response Style: Improving Meaning of Translated and Culturally Adapted Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.

    2006-01-01

    Translation and cultural adaptation of rating scales are two critical components in testing culturally and/or linguistically heterogeneous populations. Despite the proper use of these scales, challenges typically arise from respondents' language, culture, ratiocination, and characteristics of measurement processes. This study investigated factors…

  6. Identifying Optimal Temporal Scale for the Correlation of AOD and Ground Measurements of PM2.5 to Improve the Model Performance in a Real-time Air Quality Estimation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Faruque, Fazlay; Williams, Worth; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Crosson, William; Rickman, Douglas; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), an indirect estimate of particle matter using satellite observations, has shown great promise in improving estimates of PM 2.5 air quality surface. Currently, few studies have been conducted to explore the optimal way to apply AOD data to improve the model accuracy of PM 2.5 surface estimation in a real-time air quality system. We believe that two major aspects may be worthy of consideration in that area: 1) the approach to integrate satellite measurements with ground measurements in the pollution estimation, and 2) identification of an optimal temporal scale to calculate the correlation of AOD and ground measurements. This paper is focused on the second aspect on the identifying the optimal temporal scale to correlate AOD with PM2.5. Five following different temporal scales were chosen to evaluate their impact on the model performance: 1) within the last 3 days, 2) within the last 10 days, 3) within the last 30 days, 4) within the last 90 days, and 5) the time period with the highest correlation in a year. The model performance is evaluated for its accuracy, bias, and errors based on the following selected statistics: the Mean Bias, the Normalized Mean Bias, the Root Mean Square Error, Normalized Mean Error, and the Index of Agreement. This research shows that the model with the temporal scale of within the last 30 days displays the best model performance in this study area using 2004 and 2005 data sets.

  7. Adapting developing country epidemiological assessment techniques to improve the quality of health needs assessments in developed countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handy Deirdre

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We were commissioned to carry out three health assessments in urban areas of Dublin in Ireland. We required an epidemiologically robust method that could collect data rapidly and inexpensively. We were dealing with inadequate health information systems, weak planning data and a history of inadequate recipient involvement in health service planning. These problems had also been identified by researchers carrying out health assessments in developing countries. This paper reports our experience of adapting a cluster survey model originally developed by international organisations to assess community health needs and service coverage in developing countries and applying our adapted model to three urban areas in Dublin, Ireland Methods We adapted the model to control for socio-economic heterogeneity, to take account of the inadequate population list, to ensure a representative sample and to account for a higher prevalence of degenerative and chronic diseases. We employed formal as well as informal communication methods and adjusted data collection times to maximise participation. Results The model we adapted had the capacity to ascertain both health needs and health care delivery needs. The community participated throughout the process and members were trained and employed as data collectors. The assessments have been used by local health boards and non-governmental agencies to plan and deliver better or additional services. Conclusion We were able to carry out high quality health needs assessments in urban areas by adapting and applying a developing country health assessment method. Issues arose relating to health needs assessment as part of the planning cycle and the role of participants in the process.

  8. How urban system vulnerabilities to flooding could be assessed to improve resilience and adaptation in spatial planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Riccardo; Viavattene, Christophe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazards damage assets and infrastructure inducing disruptions to urban functions and key daily services. These disruptions may be short or long with a variable spatial scale of impact. From an urban planning perspective, measuring these disruptions and their consequences at an urban scale is fundamental in order to develop more resilient cities. Whereas the assessment of physical vulnerabilities and direct damages is commonly addressed, new methodologies for assessing the systemic vulnerability at the urban scale are required to reveal these disruptions and their consequences. Physical and systemic vulnerability should be measured in order to reflect the multifaceted fragility of cities in the face of external stress, both in terms of the natural/built environment and socio-economic sphere. Additionally, a systemic approach allows the consideration of vulnerability across different spatial scales, as impacts may vary and be transmitted across local, regional or national levels. Urban systems are spatially distributed and the nature of this can have significant effects on flood impacts. The proposed approach identifies the vulnerabilities of flooding within urban contexts, including both in terms of single elementary units (buildings, infrastructures, people, etc.) and systemic functioning (urban functions and daily life networks). Direct losses are appraised initially using conventional methodologies (e.g. depth-damage functions). This aims to both understand the spatial distribution of physical vulnerability and associated losses and, secondly, to identify the most vulnerable building types and ways to improve the physical adaptation of our cities, proposing changes to building codes, design principles and other municipal regulation tools. The subsequent systemic approach recognises the city as a collection of sub-systems or functional units (such as neighbourhoods and suburbs) providing key daily services for inhabitants (e.g. healthcare facilities

  9. Temporal Bone CT: Improved Image Quality and Potential for Decreased Radiation Dose Using an Ultra-High-Resolution Scan Mode with an Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, S; Diehn, F E; Lane, J I; Koeller, K K; Witte, R J; Carter, R E; McCollough, C H

    2015-09-01

    Radiation dose in temporal bone CT imaging can be high due to the requirement of high spatial resolution. In this study, we assessed whether CT imaging of the temporal bone by using an ultra-high-resolution scan mode combined with iterative reconstruction provides higher spatial resolution and lower image noise than a z-axis ultra-high-resolution mode. Patients with baseline temporal bone CT scans acquired by using a z-axis ultra-high-resolution protocol and a follow-up scan by using the ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction technique were identified. Images of left and right temporal bones were reconstructed in the axial, coronal, and Poschl planes. Three neuroradiologists assessed the spatial resolution of the following structures: round and oval windows, incudomallear and incudostapedial joints, basal turn spiral lamina, and scutum. The paired z-axis ultra-high-resolution and ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction images were displayed side by side in random order, with readers blinded to the imaging protocol. Image noise was compared in ROIs over the posterior fossa. We identified 8 patients, yielding 16 sets of temporal bone images (left and right). Three sets were excluded because the patient underwent surgery between the 2 examinations. Spatial resolution was comparable (Poschl) or slightly better (axial and coronal planes) with ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction than with z-axis ultra-high-resolution. A paired t test indicated that noise was significantly lower with ultra-high-resolution-iterative reconstruction than with z-axis ultra-high-resolution (P iterative reconstruction scan mode has similar or slightly better resolution relative to the z-axis ultra-high-resolution mode for CT of the temporal bone but significantly (P < .01) lower image noise, which may enable the dose to be reduced by approximately 50%. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  10. Discovering metric temporal constraint networks on temporal databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Miguel R; Félix, Paulo; Cariñena, Purificación

    2013-07-01

    the search space, which reduced the number of possible patterns from 2.1×10⁷ to 1219 and reduced the number of frequent patterns found from 1167 to 340, thereby increasing the efficiency of the mining algorithm. A temporal data mining technique for discovering frequent temporal patterns in collections of time-stamped event sequences is presented. The resulting patterns describe different and distinguishable temporal arrangements among sets of event types in terms of repetitive appearance and similarity of the dispositions between the same events. ASTPminer allows users to participate in the mining process by introducing domain knowledge in the form of a temporal pattern using the STP formalism. This knowledge constrains the search to patterns consistent with the provided pattern and improves the performance of the procedure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Adaptive-predictive organ localization using cone-beam computed tomography for improved accuracy in external beam radiotherapy for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's "library," and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith endorgans can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular-deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of one week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2–5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans. PMID:21374081

  13. An Experimental Investigation of Improving Human Problem-Solving Performance by Guiding Attention and Adaptively Providing Details on Information Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    1S. SUBJECT TERMS cognitive model, empirical studies, information display design , eye tracking 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18...basic experimental research of how a cognitive model could be applied to adaptive information display design , and how such displays affected human...create a reactive information display design toolkit to make the process of prototyping and evaluating such displays easier in future. 4. Long Term

  14. Effectiveness of an Adaptive Quizzing System as an Institutional-Wide Strategy to Improve Student Learning and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Campbell, Eʼ Loria; Phelan, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Exploring ways to help students achieve success in nursing programs is critical to increase retention and the number of nurse graduates. This study examined the impact of an adaptive quizzing system implemented as a strategy to support student persistence and performance measured by use, grades, and graduation. Results indicated that use of the system increased course content mastery and predicted final course grades. Retention and program completion rates were also positively influenced.

  15. How Can Students' Academic Performance in Statistics Be Improved? Testing the Influence of Social and Temporal-Self Comparison Feedback in a Web-Based Training Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaval, Marine; Michinov, Nicolas; Le Bohec, Olivier; Le Hénaff, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how social or temporal-self comparison feedback, delivered in real-time in a web-based training environment, could influence the academic performance of students in a statistics examination. First-year psychology students were given the opportunity to train for a statistics examination during a semester by…

  16. Assessment of right ventricular adaptability to loading conditions can improve the timing of listing to transplantation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandel, Michael; Knosalla, Christoph; Kemper, Dagmar; Stein, Julia; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Right ventricle (RV) performance is load dependent, and right-sided heart failure (RHF) is the main cause of death in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Prediction of RV worsening for timely identification of patients needing transplantation (Tx) is paramount. Assessment of RV adaptability to load has proved useful in certain clinical circumstances. This study assessed its predictive value for RHF-free and Tx-free outcome with PAH. Between 2006 and 2012, all potential Tx candidates with PAH, without RHF at the first evaluation, were selected for follow-up (except congenital heart diseases). At selection and at each follow-up, N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and the 6-minute walk distance were measured, and RV adaptability to load was assessed by echocardiography. Collected data were tested for the ability to predict RV stability and Tx-free survival. During a 12-month to 92-month follow-up, RHF developed in 23 of 79 evaluated patients, despite similar medication and no differences in initial RV size and ejection fraction compared with the patients who remained stable. However, unstable patients had an initially lower RV load-adaptation index and afterload-corrected peak global systolic longitudinal strain-rate values as well as higher RV dyssynchrony, tricuspid regurgitation, and NT-proBNP levels (p ≤ 0.01). At certain cutoff values, these variables appeared predictive for 1-year and 3-year freedom from RHF and 3-year Tx-free survival. An RV load-adaptation index reduction of ≥20% showed the highest predictive value (90.0%) for short-term (≤1 year) RV decompensation. Assessment of RV adaptability to load allows prediction of RV function and Tx-free survival with severe PAH during the next 1 to 3 years. This can improve the timing of listing for Tx. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. IMPROVEMENT OF ACCURACY OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER DIFFERENTIAL APPROXIMATION METHOD FOR MULTI DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF AUTO-ADAPTABLE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential approximation is derived from radiation transfer equation by averaging over the solid angle. It is one of the more effective methods for engineering calculations of radia- tive heat transfer in complex three-dimensional thermal power systems with selective and scattering media. The new method for improvement of accuracy of the differential approximation based on using of auto-adaptable boundary conditions is introduced in the paper. The  efficiency  of  the  named  method  is  proved  for  the  test  2D-systems.  Self-consistent auto-adaptable boundary conditions taking into consideration the nonorthogonal component of the incident to the boundary radiation flux are formulated. It is demonstrated that taking in- to consideration of the non- orthogonal incident flux in multi-dimensional systems, such as furnaces, boilers, combustion chambers improves the accuracy of the radiant flux simulations and to more extend in the zones adjacent to the edges of the chamber.Test simulations utilizing the differential approximation method with traditional boundary conditions, new self-consistent boundary conditions and “precise” discrete ordinates method were performed. The mean square errors of the resulting radiative fluxes calculated along the boundary of rectangular and triangular test areas were decreased 1.5–2 times by using auto- adaptable boundary conditions. Radiation flux gaps in the corner points of non-symmetric sys- tems are revealed by using auto-adaptable boundary conditions which can not be obtained by using the conventional boundary conditions.

  18. Improved fatigue resistance in Gsα-deficient and aging mouse skeletal muscles due to adaptive increases in slow fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2011-01-01

    Genetically modified mice with deficiency of the G protein α-subunit (Gsα) in skeletal muscle showed metabolic abnormality with reduced glucose tolerance, low muscle mass, and low contractile force, along with a fast-to-slow-fiber-type switch (Chen M, Feng HZ, Gupta D, Kelleher J, Dickerson KE, Wang J, Hunt D, Jou W, Gavrilova O, Jin JP, Weinstein LS. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 296: C930–C940, 2009). Here we investigated a hypothesis that the switching to more slow fibers is an adaptive response with specific benefit. The results showed that, corresponding to the switch of myosin isoforms, the thin-filament regulatory proteins troponin T and troponin I both switched to their slow isoforms in the atrophic soleus muscle of 3-mo-old Gsα-deficient mice. This fiber-type switch involving coordinated changes of both thick- and thin-myofilament proteins progressed in the Gsα-deficient soleus muscles of 18- to 24-mo-old mice, as reflected by the expression of solely slow isoforms of myosin and troponin. Compared with age-matched controls, Gsα-deficient soleus muscles with higher proportion of slow fibers exhibited slower contractile and relaxation kinetics and lower developed force, but significantly increased resistance to fatigue, followed by a better recovery. Gsα-deficient soleus muscles of neonatal and 3-wk-old mice did not show the increase in slow fibers. Therefore, the fast-to-slow-fiber-type switch in Gsα deficiency at older ages was likely an adaptive response. The benefit of higher fatigue resistance in adaption to metabolic deficiency and aging provides a mechanism to sustain skeletal muscle function in diabetic patients and elderly individuals. PMID:21680879

  19. Adaptive cone-beam CT planning improves long-term biochemical disease-free survival for (125)I prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, M; Smit Duijzentkunst, D A; Westendorp, H; van de Pol, S M G; Kattevilder, R; Schellekens, A; van der Voort van Zyp, J R N; Moerland, M A; van Vulpen, M; Hoekstra, C J

    Determining the independent effect of additional intraoperative adaptive C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) planning vs. transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided interactive planning alone in (125)I brachytherapy for prostate cancer (PCa) on biochemical disease-free survival (BDFS). T1/T2-stage PCa patients receiving TRUS-guided brachytherapy from 2000 to 2014 were analyzed. From October 2006, patients received additional intraoperative adaptive CBCT planning for dosimetric evaluation and subsequent remedial seed placement in underdosed areas. Patients were stratified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk classification. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate BDFS (primary outcome), overall survival, and PCa-specific survival (secondary outcomes). Cox regression was used to assess the relation between CBCT use and biochemical failure (BF) and overall mortality. In all, 1623 patients were included. Median followup was 99 months (interquartile range 70-115) for TRUS patients (n = 613) and 51 months (interquartile range 29-70) for CBCT patients (n = 1010). BF occurred 203 times and 206 patients died, 26 from PCa. For TRUS and CBCT patients, 7-year BDFS was 87.2% vs. 93.5% (log rank: p = 0.04) for low, 75.9% vs. 88.5% (p brachytherapy leads to a significant increase in BDFS in all NCCN risk groups. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptive VFH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, Iñigo; Lazkano, Elena; Sierra, Basi

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates the improvement of the Vector Field Histogram (VFH) local planning algorithm for mobile robot systems. The Adaptive Vector Field Histogram (AVFH) algorithm has been developed to improve the effectiveness of the traditional VFH path planning algorithm overcoming the side effects of using static parameters. This new algorithm permits the adaptation of planning parameters for the different type of areas in an environment. Genetic Algorithms are used to fit the best VFH parameters to each type of sector and, afterwards, every section in the map is labelled with the sector-type which best represents it. The Player/Stage simulation platform has been chosen for making all sort of tests and to prove the new algorithm's adequateness. Even though there is still much work to be carried out, the developed algorithm showed good navigation properties and turned out to be softer and more effective than the traditional VFH algorithm.

  1. Relief of knee flexion contracture and gait improvement following adaptive training for an assist device in a transtibial amputee: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sol-Bi; Ko, Chang-Yong; Son, Jinho; Kang, Sungjae; Ryu, Jeicheong; Mun, Museong

    2017-01-01

    Management of a knee contracture is important for regaining gait ability in transtibial amputees. However, there has been little study of prosthesis training for enhancing mobility and improving range of motion in cases of restricted knee extension. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of adaptive training for an assist device (ATAD) for a transtibial amputee with a knee flexion contracture (KFC). A male transtibial amputee with KFC performed 4 months of ATAD with a multidisciplinary team. During the ATAD, the passive range of motion (PROM) in the knee, amputee mobility predictor (AMP) assessment, center of pressure (COP) on a force plate-equipped treadmill, gait features determined by three-dimensional motion analysis, and Short-Form 36 Item Health Survey (SF-36) scores were evaluated. Following ATAD, PROM showed immediate improvement (135.6 ± 2.4° at baseline, 142.5 ± 1.7° at Step 1, 152.1 ± 1.8° at Step 2, 165.8 ± 1.9° at Step 3, and 166.0 ± 1.4° at Step 4); this was followed by an enhanced COP. Gradually, gait features also improved. Additionally, the AMP score (5 at baseline to 29 at Step 4) and K-level (K0 at baseline to K3 at Step 4) increased after ATAD. Along with these improvements, the SF-36 score also improved. ATAD could be beneficial for transtibial amputees by relieving knee contractures and improving gait.

  2. A Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Streaming Algorithm for Reducing Entropy Rate of DASH Bitrate Fluctuation to Improve Mobile Quality of Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh Van Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic adaptive streaming over Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP is an advanced technology in video streaming to deal with the uncertainty of network states. However, this technology has one drawback as the network states frequently and continuously change. The quality of a video streaming fluctuates along with the network changes, and it might reduce the quality of service. In recent years, many researchers have proposed several adaptive streaming algorithms to reduce such changes. However, these algorithms only consider the current state of a network. Thus, these algorithms might result in inaccurate estimates of a video quality in the near term. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method using fuzzy logic and a mathematics moving average technique, in order to reduce mobile video quality fluctuation in Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH. First, we calculate the moving average of the bandwidth and buffer values for a given period. On the basis of differences between real and average values, we propose a fuzzy logic system to deduce the value of the video quality representation for the next request. In addition, we use the entropy rate of a bandwidth measurement sequence to measure the predictable/stabilization of our method. The experiment results show that our proposed method reduces video quality fluctuation as well as improves 40% of bandwidth utilization compared to existing methods.

  3. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence...

  4. A Temporal Domain Decomposition Algorithmic Scheme for Large-Scale Dynamic Traffic Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Nava

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a temporal decomposition scheme for large spatial- and temporal-scale dynamic traffic assignment, in which the entire analysis period is divided into Epochs. Vehicle assignment is performed sequentially in each Epoch, thus improving the model scalability and confining the peak run-time memory requirement regardless of the total analysis period. A proposed self-turning scheme adaptively searches for the run-time-optimal Epoch setting during iterations regardless of the characteristics of the modeled network. Extensive numerical experiments confirm the promising performance of the proposed algorithmic schemes.

  5. Multi-Regional Adaptation in Human Auditory Association Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Malinowska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In auditory cortex, neural responses decrease with stimulus repetition, known as adaptation. Adaptation is thought to facilitate detection of novel sounds and improve perception in noisy environments. Although it is well established that adaptation occurs in primary auditory cortex, it is not known whether adaptation also occurs in higher auditory areas involved in processing complex sounds, such as speech. Resolving this issue is important for understanding the neural bases of adaptation and to avoid potential post-operative deficits after temporal lobe surgery for treatment of focal epilepsy. Intracranial electrocorticographic recordings were acquired simultaneously from electrodes implanted in primary and association auditory areas of the right (non-dominant temporal lobe in a patient with complex partial seizures originating from the inferior parietal lobe. Simple and complex sounds were presented in a passive oddball paradigm. We measured changes in single-trial high-gamma power (70–150 Hz and in regional and inter-regional network-level activity indexed by cross-frequency coupling. Repetitive tones elicited the greatest adaptation and corresponding increases in cross-frequency coupling in primary auditory cortex. Conversely, auditory association cortex showed stronger adaptation for complex sounds, including speech. This first report of multi-regional adaptation in human auditory cortex highlights the role of the non-dominant temporal lobe in suppressing neural responses to repetitive background sounds (noise. These results underscore the clinical utility of functional mapping to avoid potential post-operative deficits including increased listening difficulties in noisy, real-world environments.

  6. A culturally adapted telecommunication system to improve physical activity, diet quality, and medication adherence among hypertensive African-Americans: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migneault, Jeffrey P; Dedier, Julien J; Wright, Julie A; Heeren, Timothy; Campbell, Marci Kramish; Morisky, Donald E; Rudd, Peter; Friedman, Robert H

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is more prevalent and clinically severe among African-Americans than whites. Several health behaviors influence blood pressure (BP) control, but effective, accessible, culturally sensitive interventions that target multiple behaviors are lacking. We evaluated a culturally adapted, automated telephone system to help hypertensive, urban African-American adults improve their adherence to their antihypertensive medication regimen and to evidence-based guidelines for dietary behavior and physical activity. We randomized 337 hypertensive primary care patients to an 8-month automated, multi-behavior intervention or to an education-only control. Medication adherence, diet, physical activity, and BP were assessed at baseline and every 4 months for 1 year. Data were analyzed using longitudinal modeling. The intervention was associated with improvements in a measure of overall diet quality (+3.5 points, p telecommunications systems can promote self-management of diet and energy balance in urban African-Americans.

  7. Evaluation of spatial and temporal patterns of insect damage and aflatoxin level in the pre-harvest corn fields to improve management tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xinzhi; Wilson, Jeffrey P; Toews, Michael D; Buntin, G David; Lee, R Dewey; Li, Xin; Lei, Zhongren; He, Kanglai; Xu, Wenwei; Li, Xianchun; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of insect damage in relation to aflatoxin contamination in a corn field with plants of uniform genetic background are not well understood. After previous examination of spatial patterns of insect damage and aflatoxin in pre-harvest corn fields, we further examined both spatial and temporal patterns of cob- and kernel-feeding insect damage, and aflatoxin level with two samplings at pre-harvest in 2008 and 2009. The feeding damage by each of the ear/kernel-feeding insects (i.e., corn earworm/fall armyworm damage on the silk/cob, and discoloration of corn kernels by stink bugs) and maize weevil population were assessed at each grid point with five ears. Sampling data showed a field edge effect in both insect damage and aflatoxin contamination in both years. Maize weevils tended toward an aggregated distribution more frequently than either corn earworm or stink bug damage in both years. The frequency of detecting aggregated distribution for aflatoxin level was less than any of the insect damage assessments. Stink bug damage and maize weevil number were more closely associated with aflatoxin level than was corn earworm damage. In addition, the indices of spatial-temporal association (χ) demonstrated that the number of maize weevils was associated between the first (4 weeks pre-harvest) and second (1 week pre-harvest) samplings in both years on all fields. In contrast, corn earworm damage between the first and second samplings from the field on the Belflower Farm, and aflatoxin level and corn earworm damage from the field on the Lang Farm were dissociated in 2009. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Evidence for Cerebellar Contributions to Adaptive Plasticity in Speech Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, Sara; Holt, Lori L; Laurent, Patryk; Lim, Sung-Joo; Fiez, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Human speech perception rapidly adapts to maintain comprehension under adverse listening conditions. For example, with exposure listeners can adapt to heavily accented speech produced by a non-native speaker. Outside the domain of speech perception, adaptive changes in sensory and motor processing have been attributed to cerebellar functions. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates whether adaptation in speech perception also involves the cerebellum. Acoustic stimuli were distorted using a vocoding plus spectral-shift manipulation and presented in a word recognition task. Regions in the cerebellum that showed differences before versus after adaptation were identified, and the relationship between activity during adaptation and subsequent behavioral improvements was examined. These analyses implicated the right Crus I region of the cerebellum in adaptive changes in speech perception. A functional correlation analysis with the right Crus I as a seed region probed for cerebral cortical regions with covarying hemodynamic responses during the adaptation period. The results provided evidence of a functional network between the cerebellum and language-related regions in the temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Consistent with known cerebellar contributions to sensorimotor adaptation, cerebro-cerebellar interactions may support supervised learning mechanisms that rely on sensory prediction error signals in speech perception. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Temporal aspects of copper homeostasis and its crosstalk with hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola ePeñarrubia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To cope with the dual nature of copper as being essential and toxic for cells, plants temporarily adapt the expression of copper homeostasis components to assure its delivery to cuproproteins while avoiding the interference of potential oxidative damage derived from both copper uptake and photosynthetic reactions during light hours. The circadian clock participates in the temporal organization of coordination of plant nutrition adapting metabolic responses to the daily oscillations. This timely control improves plant fitness and reproduction and holds biotechnological potential to drive increased crop yields. Hormonal pathways, including those of abscisic acid, gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, and jasmonates are also under direct clock and light control, both in mono and dicotyledons. In this review, we focus on copper transport in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa and the presumable role of hormones in metal homeostasis matching nutrient availability to growth requirements and preventing metal toxicity. The presence of putative hormone-dependent regulatory elements in the promoters of copper transporters genes suggests hormonal regulation to match special copper requirements during plant development. Spatial and temporal processes that can be affected by hormones include the regulation of copper uptake into roots, intracellular trafficking and compartmentalisation, and long-distance transport to developing vegetative and reproductive tissues. In turn, hormone biosynthesis and signalling are also influenced by copper availability, which suggests reciprocal regulation subjected to temporal control by the central oscillator of the circadian clock. This transcriptional regulatory network, coordinates environmental and hormonal signalling with developmental pathways to allow enhanced micronutrient acquisition efficiency.

  10. Coping with climate change uncertainty for adaptation planning: An improved criterion for decision making under uncertainty using UKCP09

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Green

    2014-01-01

    Analyses using sub-samples of the complete probabilistic dataset showed that the Green Z-score had comparable reproducibility to Laplace and improved reproducibility compared to other current decision criteria, and unlike Laplace is able to accommodate different risk attitudes.

  11. Managing project complexity : A study into adapting early project phases to improve project performance in large engineering projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch-Rekveldt, M.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Engineering projects become increasingly more complex and project complexity is assumed to be one of the causes for projects being delivered late and over budget. However, what this project complexity actually comprised of was unclear. To improve the overall project performance, this study focuses

  12. Studying Implementation within a Continuous Continuous-Improvement Process: What Happens When We Design with Adaptations in Mind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichnor-Wagner, Ariel; Allen, Danielle; Socol, Allison Rose; Cohen-Vogel, Lora; Rutledge, Stacey A.; Xing, Qi W.

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: This study examines the implementation of an academic and social-emotional learning innovation called Personalization for Academic and Social-Emotional Learning, or PASL. The innovation was designed, tested, and implemented using a continuous continuous-improvement model. The model emphasized a top-and-bottom process in which…

  13. Improved respiratory efficiency of 3D late gadolinium enhancement imaging using the continuously adaptive windowing strategy (CLAWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Jennifer; Jhooti, Permi; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Drivas, Peter; Ernst, Sabine; Firmin, David N

    2014-03-01

    Acquisition durations of navigator-gated high-resolution three-dimensional late gadolinium enhancement studies may typically be up to 10 min, depending on the respiratory efficiency and heart rate. Implementation of the continuously adaptive windowing strategy (CLAWS) could increase respiratory efficiency, but the resulting non-smooth k-space acquisition order during gadolinium wash-out could result in increased artifact. Navigator-gated three-dimensional late gadolinium enhancement acquisitions were performed in 18 patients using tracking end-expiratory accept/reject (EE-ARA) and CLAWS algorithms in random order. Retrospective analysis of the stored navigator data shows that CLAWS scan times are very close to (within 1%) or equal to the fastest achievable scan times while EE-ARA significantly extends the acquisition duration (P Image quality scores for CLAWS and EE-ARA acquisitions are not significantly different (4.1 ± 0.6 compared to 4.3 ± 0.6, P = ns). Numerical phantom simulations show that the non-uniform k-space ordering introduced by CLAWS results in slight, but not statistically significant, reductions in both blood signal-to-noise ratio (10%) and blood-myocardium contrast-to-noise ratio (12%). CLAWS results in markedly reduced acquisition durations compared to EE-ARA without significant detriment to the image quality. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Particle system based adaptive sampling on spherical parameter space to improve the MDL method for construction of statistical shape models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Hara, Takeshi; Kido, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum description length (MDL) based group-wise registration was a state-of-the-art method to determine the corresponding points of 3D shapes for the construction of statistical shape models (SSMs). However, it suffered from the problem that determined corresponding points did not uniformly spread on original shapes, since corresponding points were obtained by uniformly sampling the aligned shape on the parameterized space of unit sphere. We proposed a particle-system based method to obtain adaptive sampling positions on the unit sphere to resolve this problem. Here, a set of particles was placed on the unit sphere to construct a particle system whose energy was related to the distortions of parameterized meshes. By minimizing this energy, each particle was moved on the unit sphere. When the system became steady, particles were treated as vertices to build a spherical mesh, which was then relaxed to slightly adjust vertices to obtain optimal sampling-positions. We used 47 cases of (left and right) lungs and 50 cases of livers, (left and right) kidneys, and spleens for evaluations. Experiments showed that the proposed method was able to resolve the problem of the original MDL method, and the proposed method performed better in the generalization and specificity tests.

  15. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heukelom, Jolien; Hamming, Olga; Bartelink, Harry; Hoebers, Frank; Giralt, Jordi; Herlestam, Teresa; Verheij, Marcel; van den Brekel, Michiel; Vogel, Wouter; Slevin, Nick; Deutsch, Eric; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lambin, Philippe; Rasch, Coen

    2013-02-22

    Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and (89)Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m(2) for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250 mg/m(2) weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m(2)) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment.Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible.Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function

  16. Farmer innovation driven by needs and understanding: building the capacities of farmer groups for improved cooking stove construction and continued adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckert, G.; Hafner, J.; Graef, F.; Hoffmann, H.; Kimaro, A.; Sererya, O.; Sieber, S.

    2017-12-01

    Enhancing food security is one of the main goals of subsistence farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigates the implementation of improved loam-made cooking stoves and its contribution to coping and livelihood strategies. Controlled combustion, air as well as smoke flue, and heat insulation facilitate the more efficient fuel consumption of improved cooking stoves compared to traditional stoves—namely three stone fires. Although the majority of small-scale farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa rely on the free public good of firewood, the increasing time needed for collecting firewood implies high opportunity costs for productive members of the family. The primary outcomes for users of improved stoves are reduced fuel consumption, greater safety, saved time, and reduced smoke in the kitchen. The paper illustrates part of the output, outcome, and impact of a participatory action research approach for implementing improved cooking stoves. Special emphasis was put on enabling the villagers to construct their stoves without external support, hence having locally manufactured stoves made of mud, bricks, and dried grass. The impact pathway of improved cooking stoves followed the training-of-trainers concept, where members of the initially established farmer groups were trained to construct stoves on their own. Special focus was given to knowledge exchange and knowledge transfer in order to increase firewood efficiency and overall satisfaction of users of improved cook stoves. Encouraging the members to further adapt the stoves enabled them to scale-up the construction of improved cooked stoves into a business model and increase dissemination while creating income. Although many important benefits, like time and knowledge gain, were identified by the farmers after adoption of the new technology, we found adoption rates differed significantly between regions.

  17. Stay-green traits to improve wheat adaptation in well-watered and water-limited environments

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher, John (Jack) T.; Christopher, Mandy J.; Borrell, Andrew K.; Fletcher, Susan; Chenu, Karine

    2016-01-01

    A stay-green phenotype enables crops to retain green leaves longer after anthesis compared with senescent types, potentially improving yield. Measuring the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) during the whole senescence period allows quantification of component stay-green traits contributing to a stay-green phenotype. These objective and standardized traits can be compared across genotypes and environments. Traits examined include maximum NDVI near anthesis (Nmax), senescence rate (...

  18. Development of gradient descent adaptive algorithms to remove common mode artifact for improvement of cardiovascular signal quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Micheli-Tzanakou, Evangelia

    2007-07-01

    Common-mode noise degrades cardiovascular signal quality and diminishes measurement accuracy. Filtering to remove noise components in the frequency domain often distorts the signal. Two adaptive noise canceling (ANC) algorithms were tested to adjust weighted reference signals for optimal subtraction from a primary signal. Update of weight w was based upon the gradient term of the steepest descent equation: [see text], where the error epsilon is the difference between primary and weighted reference signals. nabla was estimated from Deltaepsilon(2) and Deltaw without using a variable Deltaw in the denominator which can cause instability. The Parallel Comparison (PC) algorithm computed Deltaepsilon(2) using fixed finite differences +/- Deltaw in parallel during each discrete time k. The ALOPEX algorithm computed Deltaepsilon(2)x Deltaw from time k to k + 1 to estimate nabla, with a random number added to account for Deltaepsilon(2) . Deltaw--> 0 near the optimal weighting. Using simulated data, both algorithms stably converged to the optimal weighting within 50-2000 discrete sample points k even with a SNR = 1:8 and weights which were initialized far from the optimal. Using a sharply pulsatile cardiac electrogram signal with added noise so that the SNR = 1:5, both algorithms exhibited stable convergence within 100 ms (100 sample points). Fourier spectral analysis revealed minimal distortion when comparing the signal without added noise to the ANC restored signal. ANC algorithms based upon difference calculations can rapidly and stably converge to the optimal weighting in simulated and real cardiovascular data. Signal quality is restored with minimal distortion, increasing the accuracy of biophysical measurement.

  19. Development and applications of coherent imaging with improved temporal and spatial resolution; Developpement et applications de l'imagerie coherente aux rayons X a tres haute resolution spatiale et temporelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokso, Rajmund

    2006-07-01

    This work has 2 purposes: the improvement of both temporal and spatial resolution of X-ray tomography. The first part is devoted to the technical aspects of the tomographic technique, particularly at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) beamline ID19, and the application of the new acquisition scheme to the imaging of liquid foams. We have improved the temporal resolution and field of view of the setup, which allowed to obtain for the first time experimental data with good statistics on three dimensional liquid foams. In the second part of the thesis we have described the Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing system and its first applications. In terms of stability and image quality the developments presented in this part of the thesis provide valuable evidence for the feasibility of phase contrast tomography in magnifying geometry. Since the ultimate goal of this research is to improve the spatial resolution in tomography for applications, four different contributions are important for the characterization of the imaging system: 1) the thermal stability and mechanical imperfections, 2) effects of distortion induced by mirror imperfections, 3) effects of refraction on sample borders, and 4) phase propagation effects with the influence of the magnification. Each of these factors has been studied.

  20. Temporal Glare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias; Ihrke, Matthias; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2009-01-01

    and attractive renderings of bright light sources. Based on the anatomy of the human eye, we propose a model that enables real-time simulation of dynamic glare on a GPU. This allows an improved depiction of HDR images on LDR media for interactive applications like games, feature films, or even by adding movement......Glare is a consequence of light scattered within the human eye when looking at bright light sources. This effect can be exploited for tone mapping since adding glare to the depiction of high-dynamic range (HDR) imagery on a low-dynamic range (LDR) medium can dramatically increase perceived contrast...

  1. Adaptive Activation of a Stress Response Pathway Improves Learning and Memory Through Gs and β-Arrestin-1-Regulated Lactate Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun-Hong; Wang, Yi-Jing; Cui, Min; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Wen-Shuai; Ma, Ming-Liang; Yang, Fan; He, Dong-Fang; Hu, Qiao-Xia; Zhang, Dao-Lai; Ning, Shang-Lei; Liu, Chun-Hua; Wang, Chuan; Wang, Yue; Li, Xiang-Yao; Yi, Fan; Lin, Amy; Kahsai, Alem W; Cahill, Thomas Joseph; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2017-04-15

    Stress is a conserved physiological response in mammals. Whereas moderate stress strengthens memory to improve reactions to previously experienced difficult situations, too much stress is harmful. We used specific β-adrenergic agonists, as well as β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and arrestin knockout models, to study the effects of adaptive β2AR activation on cognitive function using Morris water maze and object recognition experiments. We used molecular and cell biological approaches to elucidate the signaling subnetworks. We observed that the duration of the adaptive β2AR activation determines its consequences on learning and memory. Short-term formoterol treatment, for 3 to 5 days, improved cognitive function; however, prolonged β2AR activation, for more than 6 days, produced harmful effects. We identified the activation of several signaling networks downstream of β2AR, as well as an essential role for arrestin and lactate metabolism in promoting cognitive ability. Whereas Gs-protein kinase A-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein signaling modulated monocarboxylate transporter 1 expression, β-arrestin-1 controlled expression levels of monocarboxylate transporter 4 and lactate dehydrogenase A through the formation of a β-arrestin-1/phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α ternary complex to upregulate lactate metabolism in astrocyte-derived U251 cells. Conversely, long-term treatment with formoterol led to the desensitization of β2ARs, which was responsible for its decreased beneficial effects. Our results not only revealed that β-arrestin-1 regulated lactate metabolism to contribute to β2AR functions in improved memory formation, but also indicated that the appropriate management of one specific stress pathway, such as through the clinical drug formoterol, may exert beneficial effects on cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  2. Polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperly, T D; Moore, K E; Harrover, J D

    2000-08-15

    Polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis are closely related inflammatory conditions that affect different cellular targets in genetically predisposed persons. Compared with temporal arteritis, polymyalgla rheumatica is much more common, affecting one in 200 persons older than 50 years. Temporal arteritis, however, is more dangerous and can lead to sudden blindness. The diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica is based on the presence of a clinical syndrome consisting of fever, nonspecific somatic complaints, pain and stiffness in the shoulder and pelvic girdles, and an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Temporal arteritis typically presents with many of the same findings as polymyalgia rheumatica, but patients also have headaches and tenderness to palpation over the involved artery. Arterial biopsy usually confirms the diagnosis of temporal arteritis. Early diagnosis and treatment of polymyalgia rheumatica or temporal arteritis can dramatically improve patients' lives and return them to previous functional status. Corticosteroid therapy provides rapid and dramatic improvement of the clinical features of both conditions. Therapy is generally continued for six to 24 months. Throughout treatment, clinical condition is assessed periodically. Patients are instructed to see their physician immediately if symptoms recur or they develop new headache, jaw claudication or visual problems.

  3. Short-term heat acclimation training improves physical performance: a systematic review, and exploration of physiological adaptations and application for team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Samuel; Esterman, Adrian; Eston, Roger; Bowering, K Jane; Norton, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Studies have demonstrated that longer-term heat acclimation training (≥8 heat exposures) improves physical performance. The physiological adaptations gained through short-term heat acclimation (STHA) training suggest that physical performance can be enhanced within a brief timeframe. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if STHA training (≤7 heat exposures) can improve physical performance in healthy adults. MEDLINE, PubMed, and SPORTDiscus™ databases were searched for available literature. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: STHA intervention, performance measure outcome, apparently healthy participants, adult participants (≥18 years of age), primary data, and human participants. A modified McMaster critical appraisal tool determined the level of bias in each included study. Eight papers met the inclusion criteria. Studies varied from having a low to a high risk of bias. The review identified aerobic-based tests of performance benefit from STHA training. Peak anaerobic power efforts have not been demonstrated to improve. At the review level, this systematic review did not include tolerance time exercise tests; however, certain professions may be interested in this type of exercise (e.g. fire-fighters). At the outcome level, the review was limited by the moderate level of bias that exists in the field. Only two randomized controlled trials were included. Furthermore, a limited number of studies could be identified (eight), and only one of these articles focused on women participants. The review identified that aerobic-based tests of performance benefit from STHA training. This is possibly through a number of cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic adaptations improving the perception of effort and fatigue through a reduction in anaerobic energy release and elevation of the anaerobic threshold. These results should be viewed with caution due to the level of available evidence, and the limited number of papers that

  4. Modified compensation algorithm of lever-arm effect and flexural deformation for polar shipborne transfer alignment based on improved adaptive Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongda; Cheng, Jianhua; Guan, Dongxue; Kang, Yingyao; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lever-arm effect and flexural deformation in the practical application of transfer alignment (TA), the TA performance is decreased. The existing polar TA algorithm only compensates a fixed lever-arm without considering the dynamic lever-arm caused by flexural deformation; traditional non-polar TA algorithms also have some limitations. Thus, the performance of existing compensation algorithms is unsatisfactory. In this paper, a modified compensation algorithm of the lever-arm effect and flexural deformation is proposed to promote the accuracy and speed of the polar TA. On the basis of a dynamic lever-arm model and a noise compensation method for flexural deformation, polar TA equations are derived in grid frames. Based on the velocity-plus-attitude matching method, the filter models of polar TA are designed. An adaptive Kalman filter (AKF) is improved to promote the robustness and accuracy of the system, and then applied to the estimation of the misalignment angles. Simulation and experiment results have demonstrated that the modified compensation algorithm based on the improved AKF for polar TA can effectively compensate the lever-arm effect and flexural deformation, and then improve the accuracy and speed of TA in the polar region.

  5. Improved Transient Performance of a Fuzzy Modified Model Reference Adaptive Controller for an Interacting Coupled Tank System Using Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asan Mohideen Khansadurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to design a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC with improved transient performance. A modification to the standard direct MRAC called fuzzy modified MRAC (FMRAC is used in the paper. The FMRAC uses a proportional control based Mamdani-type fuzzy logic controller (MFLC to improve the transient performance of a direct MRAC. The paper proposes the application of real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA to tune the membership function parameters of the proposed FMRAC offline so that the transient performance of the FMRAC is improved further. In this study, a GA based modified MRAC (GAMMRAC, an FMRAC, and a GA based FMRAC (GAFMRAC are designed for a coupled tank setup in a hybrid tank process and their transient performances are compared. The results show that the proposed GAFMRAC gives a better transient performance than the GAMMRAC or the FMRAC. It is concluded that the proposed controller can be used to obtain very good transient performance for the control of nonlinear processes.

  6. Improving Interactions between a Power-Assist Robot System and Its Human User in Horizontal Transfer of Objects Using a Novel Adaptive Control Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Mizanoor Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Power assist systems are usually used for rehabilitation, healthcare, and so forth.This paper puts emphasis on the use of power assist systems for object transfer and thus brings a novelty in the power-assist applications. However, the interactions between the systems and the human users are usually not satisfactory because human features are not included in the control design. In this paper, we present the development of a 1-DOF power assist system for horizontal transfer of objects. We included human features such as weight perception in the system dynamics and control. We then simulated the system using MATLAB/Simulink for transferring objects with it and (i determined the optimum maneuverability conditions for object transfer, (ii determined psychophysical relationships between actual and perceived weights, and (iii analyzed load forces and motion features. We then used the findings to design a novel adaptive control scheme to improve the interactions between the user and the system. We implemented the novel control (simulated the system again using the novel control, the subjects evaluated the system, and the results showed that the novel control reduced the excessive load forces and accelerations and thus improved the human-system interactions in terms of maneuverability, safety, and so forth. Finally, we proposed to use the findings to develop power assist systems for manipulating heavy objects in industries that may improve interactions between the systems and the users.

  7. Quantifying the Adaptive Cycle | Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adaptive cycle was proposed as a conceptual model to portray patterns of change in complex systems. Despite the model having potential for elucidating change across systems, it has been used mainly as a metaphor, describing system dynamics qualitatively. We use a quantitative approach for testing premises (reorganisation, conservatism, adaptation) in the adaptive cycle, using Baltic Sea phytoplankton communities as an example of such complex system dynamics. Phytoplankton organizes in recurring spring and summer blooms, a well-established paradigm in planktology and succession theory, with characteristic temporal trajectories during blooms that may be consistent with adaptive cycle phases. We used long-term (1994–2011) data and multivariate analysis of community structure to assess key components of the adaptive cycle. Specifically, we tested predictions about: reorganisation: spring and summer blooms comprise distinct community states; conservatism: community trajectories during individual adaptive cycles are conservative; and adaptation: phytoplankton species during blooms change in the long term. All predictions were supported by our analyses. Results suggest that traditional ecological paradigms such as phytoplankton successional models have potential for moving the adaptive cycle from a metaphor to a framework that can improve our understanding how complex systems organize and reorganize following collapse. Quantifying reorganization, conservatism and

  8. Using blue-green light at night and blue-blockers during the day to improves adaptation to night work: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasseville, Alexandre; Hébert, Marc

    2010-10-01

    Bright light at night paired with darkness during the day seem to facilitate adaptation to night work. Considering the biological clock sensitive to short wavelengths, we investigated the possibility of adaptation in shift workers exposed to blue-green light at night, combined with using blue-blockers during the day. Four sawmill shift workers were evaluated during two weeks of night shifts (control and experimental) and one week of day shifts. Throughout the experimental week, ambient light (approximately 130 lx) was supplemented with blue-green light (200 lx) from 00:00 h to: 05:00 h on Monday and Tuesday, 06:00 h on Wednesday and 07:00 h on Thursday. Blue-blockers had to be worn outside from the end of the night shift until 16:00 h. For circadian assessment, salivary melatonin profiles were obtained between 00:00 h and 08:00 h, before and after 4 experimental night shifts. Sleep was continuously monitored with actigraphy and subjective vigilance was measured at the beginning, the middle and the end of each night and day shifts. The error percentage in wood board classification was used as an index of performance. Through experimental week, melatonin profiles of 3 participants have shifted by at least 2 hours. Improvements were observed in sleep parameters and subjective vigilance from the third night (Wednesday) as performance increased on the fourth night (Thursday) from 5.14% to 1.36% of errors (p=0.04). Strategic exposure to short wavelengths at night, and/or daytime use of blue-blocker glasses, seemed to improve sleep, vigilance and performance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing a new case based computer-aided detection scheme and an adaptive cueing method to improve performance in detecting mammographic lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Wang, Yunzhi; Zheng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new method to improve performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of screening mammograms with two approaches. In the first approach, we developed a new case based CAD scheme using a set of optimally selected global mammographic density, texture, spiculation, and structural similarity features computed from all four full-field digital mammography images of the craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views by using a modified fast and accurate sequential floating forward selection feature selection algorithm. Selected features were then applied to a ‘scoring fusion’ artificial neural network classification scheme to produce a final case based risk score. In the second approach, we combined the case based risk score with the conventional lesion based scores of a conventional lesion based CAD scheme using a new adaptive cueing method that is integrated with the case based risk scores. We evaluated our methods using a ten-fold cross-validation scheme on 924 cases (476 cancer and 448 recalled or negative), whereby each case had all four images from the CC and MLO views. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was AUC  =  0.793  ±  0.015 and the odds ratio monotonically increased from 1 to 37.21 as CAD-generated case based detection scores increased. Using the new adaptive cueing method, the region based and case based sensitivities of the conventional CAD scheme at a false positive rate of 0.71 per image increased by 2.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The study demonstrated that supplementary information can be derived by computing global mammographic density image features to improve CAD-cueing performance on the suspicious mammographic lesions.

  10. Towards General Temporal Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boehlen, Michael H.; Gamper, Johann; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2008-01-01

    Most database applications manage time-referenced, or temporal, data. Temporal data management is difficult when using conventional database technology, and many contributions have been made for how to better model, store, and query temporal data. Temporal aggregation illustrates well the problem...

  11. Improvement in ethanol productivity of engineered E. coli strain SSY13 in defined medium via adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilani, Syed Bilal; Venigalla, Siva Sai Krishna; Mattam, Anu Jose; Dev, Chandra; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2017-09-01

    E. coli has the ability to ferment both C5 and C6 sugars and produce mixture of acids along with small amount of ethanol. In our previous study, we reported the construction of an ethanologenic E. coli strain by modulating flux through the endogenous pathways. In the current study, we made further changes in the strain to make the overall process industry friendly; the changes being (1) removal of plasmid, (2) use of low-cost defined medium, and (3) improvement in consumption rate of both C5 and C6 sugars. We first constructed a plasmid-free strain SSY13 and passaged it on AM1-xylose minimal medium plate for 150 days. Further passaging was done for 56 days in liquid AM1 medium containing either glucose or xylose on alternate days. We observed an increase in specific growth rate and carbon utilization rate with increase in passage numbers until 42 days for both glucose and xylose. The 42nd day passaged strain SSK42 fermented 113 g/L xylose in AM1 minimal medium and produced 51.1 g/L ethanol in 72 h at 89% of maximum theoretical yield with ethanol productivity of 1.4 g/L/h during 24-48 h of fermentation. The ethanol titer, yield and productivity were 49, 40 and 36% higher, respectively, for SSK42 as compared to unevolved SSY13 strain.

  12. Food Legumes and Rising Temperatures: Effects, Adaptive Functional Mechanisms Specific to Reproductive Growth Stage and Strategies to Improve Heat Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Sita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperatures are predicted to rise in the future owing to several reasons associated with global climate changes. These temperature increases can result in heat stress- a severe threat to crop production in most countries. Legumes are well-known for their impact on agricultural sustainability as well as their nutritional and health benefits. Heat stress imposes challenges for legume crops and has deleterious effects on the morphology, physiology, and reproductive growth of plants. High-temperature stress at the time of the reproductive stage is becoming a severe limitation for production of grain legumes as their cultivation expands to warmer environments and temperature variability increases due to climate change. The reproductive period is vital in the life cycle of all plants and is susceptible to high-temperature stress as various metabolic processes are adversely impacted during this phase, which reduces crop yield. Food legumes exposed to high-temperature stress during reproduction show flower abortion, pollen and ovule infertility, impaired fertilization, and reduced seed filling, leading to smaller seeds and poor yields. Through various breeding techniques, heat tolerance in major legumes can be enhanced to improve performance in the field. Omics approaches unravel different mechanisms underlying thermotolerance, which is imperative to understand the processes of molecular responses toward high-temperature stress.

  13. Identifying Optimal Temporal Scale for the Correlation of AOD and Ground Measurements of PM2.5 to Improve the Modeling Performance in a Real-Time Air Quality Estimation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li,Hui; Faruque, Fazlay; Williams, Worth; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Luvall, Jeffrey; Crosson, William; Rickman, Douglas; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), derived from satellite measurements using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), offers indirect estimates of particle matter. Research shows a significant positive correlation between satellite-based measurements of AOD and ground-based measurements of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5). In addition, satellite observations have also shown great promise in improving estimates of PM2.5 air quality surface. Research shows that correlations between AOD and ground PM2.5 are affected by a combination of many factors such as inherent characteristics of satellite observations, terrain, cloud cover, height of the mixing layer, and weather conditions, and thus might vary widely in different regions, different seasons, and even different days in a same location. Analysis of correlating AOD with ground measured PM2.5 on a day-to-day basis suggests the temporal scale, a number of immediate latest days for a given run's day, for their correlations needs to be considered to improve air quality surface estimates, especially when satellite observations are used in a real-time pollution system. The second reason is that correlation coefficients between AOD and ground PM2.5 cannot be predetermined and needs to be calculated for each day's run for a real-time system because the coefficients can vary over space and time. Few studies have been conducted to explore the optimal way to apply AOD data to improve model accuracies of PM2.5 surface estimation in a real-time air quality system. This paper discusses the best temporal scale to calculate the correlation of AOD and ground particle matter data to improve the results of pollution models in real-time system.

  14. Culturally adaptive storytelling intervention versus didactic intervention to improve hypertension control in Vietnam: a cluster-randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L; Allison, Jeroan J; Ha, Duc A; Chiriboga, Germán; Ly, Ha N; Tran, Hanh T; Nguyen, Cuong K; Dang, Diem M; Phan, Ngoc T; Vu, Nguyen C; Nguyen, Quang P; Goldberg, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Vietnam is experiencing an epidemiologic transition with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Novel, large-scale, effective, and sustainable interventions to control hypertension in Vietnam are needed. We report the results of a cluster-randomized feasibility trial at 3 months follow-up conducted in Hung Yen province, Vietnam, designed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of two community-based interventions to improve hypertension control: a "storytelling" intervention, "We Talk about Our Hypertension," and a didactic intervention. The storytelling intervention included stories about strategies for coping with hypertension, with patients speaking in their own words, and didactic content about the importance of healthy lifestyle behaviors including salt reduction and exercise. The didactic intervention included only didactic content. The storytelling intervention was delivered by two DVDs at 3-month intervals; the didactic intervention included only one installment. The trial was conducted in four communes, equally randomized to the two interventions. The mean age of the 160 study patients was 66 years, and 54% were men. Most participants described both interventions as understandable, informative, and motivational. Between baseline and 3 months, mean systolic blood pressure declined by 8.2 mmHg (95% CI 4.1-12.2) in the storytelling group and by 5.5 mmHg (95% CI 1.4-9.5) in the didactic group. The storytelling group also reported a significant increase in hypertension medication adherence. Both interventions were well accepted in several rural communities and were shown to be potentially effective in lowering blood pressure. A large-scale randomized trial is needed to compare the effectiveness of the two interventions in controlling hypertension. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02483780.

  15. Stay-green traits to improve wheat adaptation in well-watered and water-limited environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, John T; Christopher, Mandy J; Borrell, Andrew K; Fletcher, Susan; Chenu, Karine

    2016-09-01

    A stay-green phenotype enables crops to retain green leaves longer after anthesis compared with senescent types, potentially improving yield. Measuring the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) during the whole senescence period allows quantification of component stay-green traits contributing to a stay-green phenotype. These objective and standardized traits can be compared across genotypes and environments. Traits examined include maximum NDVI near anthesis (Nmax), senescence rate (SR), a trait integrating senescence (SGint), plus time from anthesis to onset (OnS), mid-point (MidS), and near completion (EndS) of senescence. The correlation between stay-green traits and yield was studied in eight contrasting environments ranging from well watered to severely water limited. Environments were each classified into one of the four major drought environment types (ETs) previously identified for the Australian wheat cropping system. SGint, OnS, and MidS tended to have higher values in higher yielding environments for a given genotype, as well as for higher yielding genotypes within a given environment. Correlation between specific stay-green traits and yield varied with ET. In the studied population, SGint, OnS, and MidS strongly correlated with yield in three of the four ETs which included well-watered environments (0.43-0.86), but less so in environments with only moderate water-stress after anthesis (-0.03 to 0.31). In contrast, Nmax was most highly correlated with yield under moderate post-anthesis water stress (0.31-0.43). Selection for particular stay-green traits, combinations of traits, and/or molecular markers associated with the traits could enhance genetic progress toward stay-green wheats with higher, more stable yield in both well-watered and water-limited conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Correlation of deglutition in subacute ischemic stroke patients with peripheral blood adaptive immunity: Essential amino acid improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilani, Roberto; Emilio, Benevolo; Dossena, Maurizia; Baiardi, Paola; Testa, Amidio; Boschi, Federica; Viglio, Simona; Iadarola, Paolo; Pasini, Evasio; Verri, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    associated with improved neuro-function tests with evidence that this association is enhanced by supplementing EAAs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Seeing is believing: effects of visual contextual cues on learning and transfer of locomotor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Oviedo, Gelsy; Bastian, Amy J

    2010-12-15

    Devices such as robots or treadmills are often used to drive motor learning because they can create novel physical environments. However, the learning (i.e., adaptation) acquired on these devices only partially generalizes to natural movements. What determines the specificity of motor learning, and can this be reliably made more general? Here we investigated the effect of visual cues on the specificity of split-belt walking adaptation. We systematically removed vision to eliminate the visual-proprioceptive mismatch that is a salient cue specific to treadmills: vision indicates that we are not moving while leg proprioception indicates that we are. We evaluated the adaptation of temporal and spatial features of gait (i.e., timing and location of foot landing), their transfer to walking over ground, and washout of adaptation when subjects returned to the treadmill. Removing vision during both training (i.e., on the treadmill) and testing (i.e., over ground) strongly improved the transfer of treadmill adaptation to natural walking. Removing vision only during training increased transfer of temporal adaptation, whereas removing vision only during testing increased the transfer of spatial adaptation. This dissociation reveals differences in adaptive mechanisms for temporal and spatial features of walking. Finally training without vision increased the amount that was learned and was linked to the variability in the behavior during adaptation. In conclusion, contextual cues can be manipulated to modulate the magnitude, transfer, and washout of device-induced learning in humans. These results bring us closer to our ultimate goal of developing rehabilitation strategies that improve movements beyond the clinical setting.

  18. Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of Visual Cue Training to Improve Adaptability of Walking after Stroke: Multi-Centre, Single-Blind Randomised Control Pilot Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L Hollands

    Full Text Available Given the importance of vision in the control of walking and evidence indicating varied practice of walking improves mobility outcomes, this study sought to examine the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of varied walking practice in response to visual cues, for the rehabilitation of walking following stroke.This 3 arm parallel, multi-centre, assessor blind, randomised control trial was conducted within outpatient neurorehabilitation services.Community dwelling stroke survivors with walking speed <0.8m/s, lower limb paresis and no severe visual impairments.Over-ground visual cue training (O-VCT, Treadmill based visual cue training (T-VCT, and Usual care (UC delivered by physiotherapists twice weekly for 8 weeks.Participants were randomised using computer generated random permutated balanced blocks of randomly varying size. Recruitment, retention, adherence, adverse events and mobility and balance were measured before randomisation, post-intervention and at four weeks follow-up.Fifty-six participants participated (18 T-VCT, 19 O-VCT, 19 UC. Thirty-four completed treatment and follow-up assessments. Of the participants that completed, adherence was good with 16 treatments provided over (median of 8.4, 7.5 and 9 weeks for T-VCT, O-VCT and UC respectively. No adverse events were reported. Post-treatment improvements in walking speed, symmetry, balance and functional mobility were seen in all treatment arms.Outpatient based treadmill and over-ground walking adaptability practice using visual cues are feasible and may improve mobility and balance. Future studies should continue a carefully phased approach using identified methods to improve retention.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01600391.

  19. Kronecker PCA based spatio-temporal modeling of video for dismount classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenewald, Kristjan H.; Hero, Alfred O.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the application of KronPCA spatio-temporal modeling techniques1, 2 to the extraction of spatiotemporal features for video dismount classification. KronPCA performs a low-rank type of dimensionality reduction that is adapted to spatio-temporal data and is characterized by the T frame multiframe mean μ and covariance ∑ of p spatial features. For further regularization and improved inverse estimation, we also use the diagonally corrected KronPCA shrinkage methods we presented in.1 We apply this very general method to the modeling of the multivariate temporal behavior of HOG features extracted from pedestrian bounding boxes in video, with gender classification in a challenging dataset chosen as a specific application. The learned covariances for each class are used to extract spatiotemporal features which are then classified, achieving competitive classification performance.

  20. The optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomographic imaging plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm can improve the superior mesenteric vessel image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Zuo, Zi-Wei; Xu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Jia-Ning; Liu, Huai-Jun; Liang, Guang-Lu; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of the optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomography (CT) plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the improvement of the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The gemstone spectral CT angiographic data of 25 patients were reconstructed in the following three groups: 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic imaging, and the optimal monochromatic plus 40%iterative reconstruction mode. The CT value, image noises (IN), background CT value and noises, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image scores of the vessels and surrounding tissues were analyzed. In the 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic images plus 40% iterative reconstruction group, the mean scores of image quality were 3.86, 4.24 and 4.25 for the superior mesenteric artery and 3.46, 3.78 and 3.81 for the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The image quality scores for the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction groups were significantly greater than for the 70KeV group (Piterative reconstruction group than in the 70KeV group. The optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction group had significantly (Piterative reconstruction using low-contrast agent dosage and low injection rate can significantly improve the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of the citrus CsTIP2;1 gene improves tobacco plant growth, antioxidant capacity and physiological adaptation under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Cristina P S; Neves, Diana M; Cidade, Luciana C; Mendes, Amanda F S; Silva, Delmira C; Almeida, Alex-Alan F; Coelho-Filho, Mauricio A; Gesteira, Abelmon S; Soares-Filho, Walter S; Costa, Marcio G C

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of the citrus CsTIP2;1 improves plant growth and tolerance to salt and drought stresses by enhancing cell expansion, H 2 O 2 detoxification and stomatal conductance. Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are a subfamily of aquaporins, belonging to the major intrinsic protein family. In a previous study, we have shown that a citrus TIP isoform, CsTIP2;1, is highly expressed in leaves and also transcriptionally regulated in leaves and roots by salt and drought stresses and infection by 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', the causal agent of the Huanglongbing disease, suggesting its involvement in the regulation of the flow of water and nutrients required during both normal growth and stress conditions. Here, we show that the overexpression of CsTIP2;1 in transgenic tobacco increases plant growth under optimal and water- and salt-stress conditions and also significantly improves the leaf water and oxidative status, photosynthetic capacity, transpiration rate and water use efficiency of plants subjected to a progressive soil drying. These results correlated with the enhanced mesophyll cell expansion, midrib aquiferous parenchyma abundance, H2O2 detoxification and stomatal conductance observed in the transgenic plants. Taken together, our results indicate that CsTIP2;1 plays an active role in regulating the water and oxidative status required for plant growth and adaptation to stressful environmental conditions and may be potentially useful for engineering stress tolerance in citrus and other crop plants.

  2. Adaptive evolution of the lager brewing yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus for improved growth under hyperosmotic conditions and its influence on fermentation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Jukka; Rautio, Jari; Mattinen, Laura; Vidgren, Virve; Londesborough, John; Gibson, Brian R

    2013-05-01

    An adaptive evolution method to obtain stable Saccharomyces pastorianus brewing yeast variants with improved fermentation capacity is described. The procedure involved selection for rapid growth resumption at high osmotic strength. It was applied to a lager strain and to a previously isolated ethanol-tolerant strain. Fermentation performance of strains was compared at 15 °P wort strength. A selected osmotolerant variant of the ethanol-tolerant strain showed significantly shorter fermentation time than the parent strain, producing 6.45% alcohol by volume beer in 4-5 days with mostly similar organoleptic properties to the original strain. Diacetyl and pentanedione contents were 50-75% and 3-methylbutyl acetate and 2-phenylethyl acetate 50% higher than with the original strain, leading to a small flavour change. The variant contained significantly less intracellular trehalose and glycogen than the parent. Transcriptional analysis of selected genes at 24 h revealed reduced transcription of hexose transport genes and increased transcription of the MALx1 and MALx2 genes, responsible for α-glucoside uptake and metabolism. It is suggested that an attenuated stress response contributes to the improved fermentation performance. Results show that sequential selection for both ethanol tolerance and rapid growth at high osmotic strength can provide strains with enhanced fermentation speed with acceptable product quality. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Leveraging open-source technology and adapting open eLearning content to improve the knowledge and motivation of Ghana’s rural nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mwaikambo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Access to training opportunities is strongly correlated with health workers’ motivation because it enables health workers to take on more challenging duties. Mobile technology can be leveraged for professional development support by providing access to open education resources. Community Health Nurses (CHNs in Ghana are the frontline health workers of the Ghana Health Service (GHS and play a vital role in extending maternal and child health care to rural communities. However, as the lowest credentialed nurses, they are at the bottom of the GHS hierarchy. CHNs have limited opportunities for career advancement and report challenges with isolation and lack of resources. Leveraging open-source technology platforms and open eLearning content, the Care Community Hub (CCH project sought to address these barriers in CHN motivation by developing and deploying a mobile application (app, CHN on the Go, to CHNs in five rural districts. The app supports CHNs through tools for continuous learning, diagnostic decision-making, and improved nurse-supervisor interactions. This paper focuses on the adaptation and use of the open eLearning content to address CHNs’ motivation challenges and, ultimately, improve their knowledge and job performance as a result of having access to open education resources.

  4. Cultural adaptation, compounding vulnerabilities and conjunctures in Norse Greenland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew J. Dugmore; Thomas H. McGovern; Orri Vésteinsson; Jette Arneborg; Richard Streeter; Christian Keller

    2012-01-01

    ... understood as a complex socioenvironmental system that includes local and interregional interactions operating at different geographic and temporal scales and recognizes the cultural limits to adaptation...

  5. Cultural adaptation, compounding vulnerabilities and conjunctures in Norse Greenland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew J. Dugmore; Thomas H. McGovern; Orri Vésteinsson; Jette Arneborg; Richard Streeter; Christian Keller

    2012-01-01

    ... truly understood as a complex socioenvironmental system that includes local and interregional interactions operating at different geographic and temporal scales and recognizes the cultural limits to adaptation...

  6. Adapting the Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs) approach to explore the acceptability and feasibility of nutrition and parenting recommendations: what works for low-income families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickin, Katherine L; Seim, Gretchen

    2015-10-01

    Interventions to prevent childhood obesity must consider not only how child feeding behaviours are related to child weight status but also which behaviours parents are willing and able to change. This study adapted Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs) to assess acceptability and feasibility of nutrition and parenting recommendations, using in-depth interviews and household trials to explore families' experiences over time. A diverse sample of 23 low-income parents of 3-11-year-olds was recruited following participation in nutrition and parenting education. Parents chose nutrition and parenting practices to try at home and were interviewed 2 weeks and 4-6 months later about behaviour change efforts. Qualitative analysis identified emergent themes, and acceptability and feasibility were rated based on parents' willingness and ability to try new practices. The nutrition goal parents chose most frequently was increasing children's vegetable intake, followed by replacing sweetened beverages with water or milk, and limiting energy-dense foods. Parents were less inclined to reduce serving sizes. The parenting practices most often selected as applicable to nutrition goals were role-modelling; shaping home environments, often with other adults; involving children in decisions; and providing positive feedback. Most recommendations were viewed as acceptable by meaningful numbers of parents, many of whom tried and sustained new behaviours. Food preferences, habits and time were common barriers; family resistance or food costs also constrained some parents. Despite challenges, TIPs was successfully adapted to evaluate complex nutrition and parenting practices. Information on parents' willingness and ability to try practices provides valuable guidance for childhood obesity prevention programmes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Improved physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oral exposures to chromium in mice, rats, and humans to address temporal variation and sensitive populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, C R; Suh, M; Proctor, D M; Hays, S M

    2017-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in mice, rats, and humans developed previously (Kirman et al., 2012, 2013), was updated to reflect an improved understanding of the toxicokinetics of the gastrointestinal tract following oral exposures. Improvements were made to: (1) the reduction model, which describes the pH-dependent reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in the gastrointestinal tract under both fasted and fed states; (2) drinking water pattern simulations, to better describe dosimetry in rodents under the conditions of the NTP cancer bioassay; and (3) parameterize the model to characterize potentially sensitive human populations. Important species differences, sources of non-linear toxicokinetics, and human variation are identified and discussed within the context of human health risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokdal, Lars; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud; Haie-Meder, Christine; Tan, Li Tee; Gillham, Charles; Šegedin, Barbara; Jürgenliemk-Schultz, Ina; Kirisits, Christian; Hoskin, Peter; Pötter, Richard; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicators. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the impact on local control and late morbidity of application of combined IS/IC brachytherapy in a large multicentre population. 610 patients with LACC from the retroEMBRACE study were included. Patients were divided into an IC group (N=310) and an IC/IS group (N=300). The IC/IS group was defined from the time point, when a centre performed IC/IS brachytherapy in more than 20% of cases. With systematic usage of IC/IS the D90 of CTV HR increased from 83±14Gy to 92±13Gy (p<0.01). No difference in doses to organs at risk was found. The 3-year local control rate in patients having a CTV HR volume⩾30cm 3 was 10% higher (p=0.02) in the IC/IS group. No difference was found for CTV HR <30cm 3 (p=0.50). No significant difference in late morbidity was found between the IC/IS group and IC group. Combined IC/IS brachytherapy improves the therapeutic ratio in LACC by enabling a tumour specific dose escalation resulting in significantly higher local control in large tumours without adding treatment related late morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    National Research Council Canad