WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute thermal stress

  1. Early Age Thermal Conditioning Improves Broiler Chick's Response to Acute Heat Stress at Marketing Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Acute heat stress at marketing age especially in broiler chickens raised in open houses with reduced means of heat exchange leads to economic losses. The objective of this study was to determine beneficial effects of early age thermal conditioning in reducing adverse effects of acute heat stress and decrease losses. Approach: Ninety one day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to one of three treatments (n = 30: (1 control (normally raised, (2 early age thermal conditioning (exposed to temperature of 40±1°C for 24 h at 5th day of age, then raised as control chicks and (3 chronic stress (exposed to 33±2°C from day one till 6 weeks of age. At 42nd day of age, all chicks were subjected to acute heat stress of 39±2°C for 2 h. Blood samples were collected from all groups before and after exposure to acute heat stress. Results: Blood pH increased in both controls and thermally-conditioned chicks after exposure to acute heat stress coinciding with significant decrease in blood carbon dioxide pressure (pCo2 in controls only. Blood potassium level decreased in controls, while in thermally-conditioned or chronically-stressed no significant changes were observed. Blood sodium level showed a trend toward decreased levels in controls while a trend toward increased levels was observed in both thermally-conditioned and chronically-stressed birds. Importantly, significant reductions were observed in total erythrocyte count and hemoglobin level in chronically-stressed birds as compared to other groups before and after acute stress exposure. Hetrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased in both controls and thermally-conditioned chicks after acute heat exposure, but not in chronically-stressed birds. Conclusion: When exposed to acute heat stress at marketing age, chicks subjected to early age thermal conditioning responded very similar to birds adapted to chronic heat stress indicating a protective role of early age thermal conditioning.

  2. Sensitivity of gypsy moth neurosecretory neurons to acute thermal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilijin Larisa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In gypsy moth caterpillars exposed to a temperature of 35°C (for 1, 12 and 24 h and caterpillars that were exposed to elevated temperature for 12 h and were allowed to recover for 12 h at 23°C, changes in the brain protein profiles and morphometric characteristics of A1’ medial and L2 lateral protocerebral neurosecretory neurons were analyzed. In all groups, protein bands with a molecular mass corresponding to that of members of heat-shock protein families were detected, indicating that acute exposure to this temperature likely induced the synthesis of HSP. Increased morphometric parameters of A1’ neurons and the large amount of neurosecretory material in the neuron body implicate that the temperature of 35°C is not in the temperature range that exerts stimulatory effects on growth and survival. Changes in the morphometric characteristics of L2 neurosecretory neurons from the lateral part of the protocerebrum, and retention of neurosecretory material in their cytoplasm indicate a low level of secretion.

  3. Consequences of acclimation on the resistance to acute thermal stress: Proteomic focus on mussels from pristine site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péden, Romain; Rocher, Béatrice; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; Poret, Agnès; Olivier, Stéphanie; Le Foll, Frank; Bultelle, Florence

    2016-10-01

    Climate change constitutes an additional threat for intertidal species that already have to cope with a challenging environment. The present study focuses on the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and aims at investigating the importance of thermal acclimation in heat stress response. Microcosm exposures were performed with mussels submitted to an identical acute thermal stress following two thermal summer acclimations standing for present or future temperature conditions. Gill proteomes were analyzed by 2DE and 96 differentially expressed proteoforms were identified. Our results show that cell integrity appears to be maintained by the rise in molecular protective systems (i.e. Heat Shock Proteins), and by the reallocation of energy production via a switch to anaerobic metabolism and the setting up of alternative energy pathways. Finally, our results indicate that the response of mussels to acute thermal stress is conditioned by the acclimation temperature with an improved response in organisms acclimated to higher temperatures.

  4. Rapid changes in cell physiology as a result of acute thermal stress house sparrows, Passer domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana G; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-12-01

    Given that our climate is rapidly changing, Physiological Ecologists have the critical task of identifying characteristics of species that make them either resilient or susceptible to changes in their natural air temperature regime. Because climate change models suggest that heat events will become more common, and in some places more extreme, it is important to consider how extreme heat events might affect the physiology of a species. The implications of more frequent heat wave events for birds have only recently begun to be addressed, however, the impact of these events on the cellular physiology of a species is difficult to assess. We have developed a novel approach using dermal fibroblasts to explore how short-term thermal stress at the whole animal level might affect cellular rates of metabolism. House sparrows, Passer domesticus were separated into a "control group" and a "heat shocked" group, the latter acclimated to 43°C for 24h. We determined the plasticity of cellular thermal responses by assigning a "recovery group" that was heat shocked as above, but then returned to room temperature for 24h. Primary dermal fibroblasts were grown from skin of all treatment groups and the pectoralis muscle was collected. We found that glycolysis (ECAR) and oxygen consumption rates (OCR), measured using a Seahorse XF 96 analyzer, were significantly higher in the fibroblasts from the heat shocked group of House sparrows compared with their control counterparts. Additionally, muscle fiber diameters decreased and, in turn, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase maximal activity in the muscle significantly increased in heat shocked sparrows compared with birds in the control group. All of these physiological alterations due to short-term heat exposure were reversible within 24h of recovery at room temperature. These results show that acute exposure to heat stress significantly alters the cellular physiology of sparrows, but that this species is plastic enough to recover from such a thermal

  5. Effects of acute thermal stress on the survival, predator avoidance, and physiology of juvenile fall Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, M.G.; Weiland, L.K.; Wagner, P.

    2002-01-01

    We subjected juvenile fall chinook salmon from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River to acute thermal stressors in the laboratory that were derived from field data. We assessed the effects of thermal stress on: (1) the extent of direct mortality; (2) the vulnerability of fish to predation by smallmouth bass; and (3) some general physiological stress responses and synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70). Thermally-stressed fish showed little direct mortality and no increases in vulnerability to predation. However, these fish showed transient increases in plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucose, and lactate, and a dramatic (25-fold higher than controls) and persistent (lasting 2 wk) increase in levels of liver hsp70. Our results indicate that exposure of Hanford Reach juvenile fall chinook salmon to such stressors did not lead to significant increases in direct mortality or vulnerability to predation, but did alter physiological homeostasis, which should be of concern to those managing this resource. Because our fish received only a single exposure to one of the stressors we examined, we are also concerned about the consequences of exposing fish to multiple, cumulative stressors - a likely scenario for fish in the wild.

  6. Theory of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Bruno A

    1997-01-01

    Highly regarded text presents detailed discussion of fundamental aspects of theory, background, problems with detailed solutions. Basics of thermoelasticity, heat transfer theory, thermal stress analysis, more. 1985 edition.

  7. Acute stress disorder revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardeña, Etzel; Carlson, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) was introduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) taxonomy in 1994 to address the lack of a specific diagnosis for acute pathological reactions to trauma and the role that dissociative phenomena play both in the short- and long-term reactions to trauma. In this review, we discuss the history and goals of the diagnosis and compare it with the diagnoses of acute stress reaction, combat stress reaction, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We also evaluate the research on the validity and limitations of ASD as a diagnosis, the relationship between peritraumatic dissociation and other symptomatology, the extent to which PTSD is predicted by previous ASD or peritraumatic dissociation, and other important issues such as impairment and risk factors related to ASD. We conclude with our recommendations for changes in DSM-5 criteria and the development of more sophisticated research that considers ASD as but one of two or possibly three common acute posttraumatic syndromes. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved

  8. Comparative expression profile of NOD1/2 and certain acute inflammatory cytokines in thermal-stressed cell culture model of native and crossbred cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprakash, V.; Singh, Umesh; Sengar, Gyanendra Singh; Raja, T. V.; Sajjanar, Basavraj; Alex, Rani; Kumar, Sushil; Alyethodi, R. R.; Kumar, Ashish; Sharma, Ankur; Kumar, Suresh; Bhusan, Bharat; Deb, Rajib

    2017-05-01

    Thermotolerance depends mainly on the health and immune status of the animals. The variation in the immune status of the animals may alter the level of tolerance of animals exposed to heat or cold stress. The present study was conducted to investigate the expression profile of two important nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) (NOD1 and NOD2) and their central signalling molecule RIP2 gene during in vitro thermal-stressed bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of native (Sahiwal) and crossbred (Sahiwal X HF) cattle. We also examined the differential expression profile of certain acute inflammatory cytokines in in vitro thermal-stressed PBMC culture among native and its crossbred counterparts. Results revealed that the expression profile of NOD1/2 positively correlates with the thermal stress, signalling molecule and cytokines. Present findings also highlighted that the expression patterns during thermal stress were comparatively superior among indigenous compared to crossbred cattle which may add references regarding the better immune adaptability of Zebu cattle.

  9. Comparative expression profile of NOD1/2 and certain acute inflammatory cytokines in thermal-stressed cell culture model of native and crossbred cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuprakash, V.; Singh, Umesh; Sengar, Gyanendra Singh; Raja, T. V.; Sajjanar, Basavraj; Alex, Rani; Kumar, Sushil; Alyethodi, R. R.; Kumar, Ashish; Sharma, Ankur; Kumar, Suresh; Bhusan, Bharat; Deb, Rajib

    2016-11-01

    Thermotolerance depends mainly on the health and immune status of the animals. The variation in the immune status of the animals may alter the level of tolerance of animals exposed to heat or cold stress. The present study was conducted to investigate the expression profile of two important nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain receptors (NLRs) (NOD1 and NOD2) and their central signalling molecule RIP2 gene during in vitro thermal-stressed bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of native (Sahiwal) and crossbred (Sahiwal X HF) cattle. We also examined the differential expression profile of certain acute inflammatory cytokines in in vitro thermal-stressed PBMC culture among native and its crossbred counterparts. Results revealed that the expression profile of NOD1/2 positively correlates with the thermal stress, signalling molecule and cytokines. Present findings also highlighted that the expression patterns during thermal stress were comparatively superior among indigenous compared to crossbred cattle which may add references regarding the better immune adaptability of Zebu cattle.

  10. Encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses is an important interdisciplinary reference work.  In addition to topics on thermal stresses, it contains entries on related topics, such as the theory of elasticity, heat conduction, thermodynamics, appropriate topics on applied mathematics, and topics on numerical methods. The Encyclopedia is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and engineers. It brings together well established knowledge and recently received results. All entries were prepared  by leading experts from all over the world, and are presented in an easily accessible format. The work is lavishly illustrated, examples and applications are given where appropriate, ideas for further development abound, and the work will challenge many students and researchers to pursue new results of their own. This work can also serve as a one-stop resource for all who need succinct, concise, reliable and up to date information in short encyclopedic entries, while the extensive references will be of inte...

  11. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  12. Thermal anomalies in stressed Teflon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Wulff, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    In the course of testing polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) as a calorimetric gasketing material, serendipity revealed a thermal anomaly in stressed film that occurs concomitantly with the well-documented 25 C transition. The magnitude of the excess energy absorption - about 35 cal/g - is suggested to be related to the restricted thermal expansion of the film.

  13. Thermal stress and human performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, A E; Hygge, S

    1990-01-01

    There is evidence that the thermal stress encountered in many work environments may negatively affect various aspects of human performance and behavior. Evaluation of the empirical research is, however, complicated by differences in both the methodology and the definition of the basic stimulus. Effects of heat and cold stress are briefly reviewed, with particular regard to theoretical considerations.

  14. Thermal Stresses in Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the transient temperature fields and the hereby induced deformations and stressses in a butt-welded mild steel plate modelledrespectively in 2D plane stress state (as well as plane strain state) and in full 3D have been done. The model has been implemented in the generalpurpose FE...

  15. Imaging acute thermal burns by photoacoustic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hao F.; Maslov, Konstantin; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-01-01

    The clinical significance of a burn depends on the percentage of total body involved and the depth of the burn. Hence a noninvasive method that is able to evaluate burn depth would be of great help in clinical evaluation. To this end, photoacoustic microscopy is used to determine the depth of acute thermal burns by imaging the total hemoglobin concentration in the blood that accumulates along the boundaries of injuries as a result of thermal damage to the vasculature. We induce acute thermal ...

  16. Residual thermal stresses in injection molded products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetelief, W.F.; Douven, L.F.A.; Ingen Housz, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Nonisothermal flow of a polymer melt in a cold mold cavity introduces stresses that are partly frozen-in during solidification. Flow-induced stresses cause anisotropy of mechanical, thermal, and optical properties, while the residual thermal stresses induce warpage and stress-cracking. In this study

  17. Pharm GKB: Acute stress reaction NOS [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeSH: Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute (D040701) SnoMedCT: Acute stress reaction NOS (268657003) UMLS: C02...36816 (C0236816) MedDRA: Acute reaction to stress (10001039) NDFRT: Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute [Dise...ase/Finding] (N0000011158) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute stress reaction NOS ...

  18. Thermal Stress and Residual Stress Control of Thermally Sprayed 80Ni20Cr Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Setoguchi, Katsuya; Hiraki, Kunihiro

    1999-01-01

    In order to find an effective method to control the residual coating stress after thermal spraying, an analysis and experiment were carried out on a cylindrical member of 80Ni20Cr/SUS304. Temperature measurements during the processes of thermal spraying, heating and cold thermal shock were carried out. Using these measured results, thermal stress analyses were perfomed by the finite element method(FEM) and a proposed simplified method for estimating the coating stress. Thermal stress of the c...

  19. Alleviative effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on acute heat stress-induced thermal panting and the level of plasma nonesterified fatty acids in hypothyroid broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Y

    2012-01-01

    1. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of α-lipoic acid on hypothyroidism-induced negative growth performance and whether α-lipoic acid alleviates acute heat stress in relation to hypothyroid status. 2. Female broiler chickens (14 d-old) were fed diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg) and an antithyroid substance, propylthiouracil (200 mg/kg), for 20 d under thermoneutral conditions (25°C). At 42 d of age, chickens were exposed to a high ambient temperature (36°C, 60% RH) for 4 h. 3. Under the thermoneutral condition, propylthiouracil administration decreased feed efficiency and concomitantly increased adipose tissue and thyroid gland weights. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids and triacylglycerol were also increased by propylthiouracil administration. However, α-lipoic acid supplementation did not affect the hypothyroidism-induced effects. 4. In hypothyroid chickens, the rise in respiratory rate induced by heat exposure was greatly inhibited by α-lipoic acid administration at 1 h, but this effect had disappeared at 4 h. In addition, a similar inhibitory effect on the concentrations of plasma nonesterified fatty acids was subsequently observed at 4 h. 5. Therefore, the present study suggested that α-lipoic acid alleviates acute heat stress if chickens are in a hypothyroid status.

  20. Contribution to encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Jan; Ocłoń, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    This paper lists the contribution in the international interdisciplinary reference - Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses (ETS). The ETS, edited by the world famous expert in field of Thermal Stresses - Professor Richard Hetnarski from Rochester Institute of Technology, was published by Springer in 2014. This unique Encyclopedia, subdivided into 11 volumes is the most extensive and comprehensive work related to the Thermal Stresses topic. The entries were carefully prepared by specialists in the field of thermal stresses, elasticity, heat conduction, optimization among others. The Polish authors' contribution within this work is significant; over 70 entries were prepared by them.

  1. Thermal stress relaxation in magnesium composites during thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trojanova, Z.; Lukac, P. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)); Kiehn, J.; Kainer, K.U.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany))

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that the internal friction of Mg - Saffil metal matrix composites can be influenced by thermal stresses, if MMCc are submitted to thermal cycling between room temperature and an upper temperature of cycling. These stresses can be accommodated by generation and motion of dislocations giving the formation of the microplastic zones. The thermal stress relaxation depends on the upper temperature of cycling, the volume fraction of reinforcement and the matrix composition and can result in plastic deformation and strain hardening of the matrix without applied stress. The internal friction measurements can be used for non destructive investigation of processes which influence the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  2. Thermal Stress Awareness, Self-Study #18649

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Thermal stresses can expose individuals to a variety of health hazards at work, home, and play. Every year thermal stresses cause severe injuries and death to a large range of people, from elderly people in cities during summer heat waves to young people engaged in winter mountaineering. Awareness is the key to preventing the health hazards associated with thermal stresses. This course is designed for personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). It addresses both heat and cold stresses and discusses their factors, signs and symptoms, treatments, and controls.

  3. Starch gelatinization under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroongsarng, D; Wongpoowarak, W; Mitrevej, A

    1999-01-01

    The behavior under thermal stress of starch dispersed in water was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to estimate the heat transported through the aqueous medium in gelatinization, and to characterize the range of gelatinization temperatures. In DSC scanning mode, the endotherm of 10% starch in aqueous dispersion showed the tracing of gelatinization at between 67 and 80 degrees C, having an onset at approximately 69 degrees C. In the isothermal mode, characteristically distinct isothermal heat flow profiles were revealed. It was hypothesized that the thermal influx proposed as being analogous to the diffusion process may affect the profiles. The profiles were transformed and nonlinearly fitted according to the square root of time model to characterize a so-called t-parameter, which was related to mean square displacement of molecular distribution. The t-parameter of starch in excess of water decreased compared to that of water only. The plot of difference in these t-parameters, expressed as delta, against temperature showed a dramatically decreased delta at the temperature between 66.7 and 75.2 degrees C, which coincided with the findings from scanning mode DSC. It was further hypothesized that the decreased delta may be due to the gelatinizing process. According to the theory of polymer solution, the critical temperature (theta) at 75.2 degrees C, where the free energy became theoretically negative, i.e., the starch became spontaneously dissolved, was drawn. This theta was located within the range of gelatinizing temperatures. It was deduced that starch polymer may have dissolved during gelatinization. The dissolution from acetaminophen tablets prepared by starch paste was lower compared with that of negative controls (without paste). Moreover, the paste prepared at gelatinizing temperature (70 degrees C) seemed to inhibit acetaminophen dissolution from tablet matrices more than that prepared at subgelatinizing temperature (50 degrees C).

  4. Thermal stresses around an uncased production well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, R.

    1986-01-01

    Equations are presented to calculate the thermal stresses around an uncased production well. To calculate the thermal stresses, a simple method has been developed to determine the distribution of temperature around an uncased wellbore at any time. A method of determining temperature around the wellbore during the drilling period has been adopted from the literature and is extended to the production period by superpositioning in the time domain the effect of temperature change. The validity of the method is demonstrated by comparison with Carslaw and Jaeger's solution of the heat conduction equation for a solid circular cylinder. The method is then used to develop simplified equations for determining the thermal stresses around an uncased wellbore during the drilling and the production periods. Example calculations show that the thermal stresses can significantly alter the total stresses around a wellbore.

  5. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  6. Dynamic residual stress in thermal sprayed coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiping; Yang Yuanyuan

    2005-01-01

    With the modified Almen method, the forming and development process of residual stress in a thermal sprayed coating has been obtained. The test results identify that the residual stress in a coating is depend on coating material properties, technique and coating thickness. The paper pays much attention to the hysteresis between the coating temperature and residual stress in the coating or between the applied stress and the strain of the coating, and confirms that the fact is resulted from the"Gas Fix" character of a thermal sprayed coating.

  7. Thermal Stress Analysis of Security Injection Tank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the thermal stress analysis of the security injection tank is to make sure whether the tank can withstand the concerned thermal load or not on all the conditions conforming to the concerned code prescripts and the design requirements.

  8. Rotor thermal stress monitoring in steam turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonín, Bouberle; Jan, Jakl; Jindřich, Liška

    2015-11-01

    One of the issues of steam turbines diagnostics is monitoring of rotor thermal stress that arises from nonuniform temperature field. The effort of steam turbine operator is to operate steam turbine in such conditions, that rotor thermal stress doesn't exceed the specified limits. If rotor thermal stress limits are exceeded for a long time during machine operation, the rotor fatigue life is shortened and this may lead to unexpected machine failure. Thermal stress plays important role during turbine cold startup, when occur the most significant differences of temperatures through rotor cross section. The temperature field can't be measured directly in the entire rotor cross section and standardly the temperature is measured by thermocouple mounted in stator part. From this reason method for numerical solution of partial differential equation of heat propagation through rotor cross section must be combined with method for calculation of temperature on rotor surface. In the first part of this article, the application of finite volume method for calculation of rotor thermal stress is described. The second part of article deals with optimal trend generation of thermal flux, that could be used for optimal machine loading.

  9. Retrieval practice protects memory against acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy M; Floerke, Victoria A; Thomas, Ayanna K

    2016-11-25

    More than a decade of research has supported a robust consensus: Acute stress impairs memory retrieval. We aimed to determine whether a highly effective learning technique could strengthen memory against the negative effects of stress. To bolster memory, we used retrieval practice, or the act of taking practice tests. Participants first learned stimuli by either restudying or engaging in retrieval practice. Twenty-four hours later, we induced stress in half of the participants and assessed subsequent memory performance. Participants who learned by restudying demonstrated the typical stress-related memory impairment, whereas those who learned by retrieval practice were immune to the deleterious effects of stress. These results suggest that the effects of stress on memory retrieval may be contingent on the strength of the memory representations themselves. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-YuKing

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time,the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly (within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large(radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop, its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  11. THERMAL STRESS IN METEOROIDS BY AERODYNAMIC HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Yu King

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stress in meteoroids by aerodynamic heating is calculated for the ideal case of an isotropic,homogeneous,elastic sphere being heated at the surface with a constant heattransfer coefficient. Given enough time, the tensile stress in the interior of the meteoroid can be as high as 10 kb. This stress value is greater than estimated tensile strengths of meteoroids and the aerodynamic compression they encounter. Significant thermal stress(1 kb) can develop quickly within a few tens of seconds) in a small(radius<10 cm) stony meteoroid and a somewhat large radius<l m)metallic meteoroid,and thus may cause tensile fracture to initiate in the meteotoid's interior. Fracture by thermal stress may have contributed to such observations as the existence of dust particles in upper atmosphere,the breakup of meteoroids at relatively low altitudes, the angular shape of meteorites and their wide scattering in a strewn field,and the explosive features of impact craters. In large meteoroids that require longer heating for thermal stress to fully develop,its effect is probably insignificant. The calculated stress values may be upper limits for real meteoroids which suffer melting and ablation at the surface.

  12. Acute Stress Response in Critically Ill Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. den Brinker (Marieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe understanding of the endocrine changes in critically ill children is important, as it provides insights in the pathophysiology of the acute stress in children and its differences compared with adults. Furthermore, it delineates prognostic factors for survival and supports the rati

  13. Acute heat stress induces oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai; Decuypere, Eddy; Buyse, Johan

    2006-05-01

    The stress responses and possible oxidative damage in plasma, liver and heart were investigated in broiler chickens acutely exposed to high temperature. Eighty 5-week old broiler chickens were exposed to 32 degrees C for 6h. The extent of lipid peroxidation, activities of superoxide dismutase and total antioxidant power in plasma, liver and heart tissues were investigated. Meanwhile, the blood metabolites such as glucose, urate, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, corticosterone, ceruloplasmin and creatine kinase were measured before and after 3 and 6h of heat exposure. The results showed that oxidative stress could be induced in 5-week old broiler chickens by acute heat exposure (32 degrees C, 6h). The results suggest that the elevated body temperature can induce the metabolic changes that are involved in the induction of oxidative stress. The liver is more susceptible to oxidative stress than heart during acute heat exposure in broiler chickens. The oxidative stress should be considered as part of the stress response of broiler chickens to heat exposure.

  14. Acute stress may induce ovulation in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to gather information either supporting or rejecting the hypothesis that acute stress may induce ovulation in women. The formulation of this hypothesis is based on 2 facts: 1 estrogen-primed postmenopausal or ovariectomized women display an adrenal-progesterone-induced ovulatory-like luteinizing hormone (LH surge in response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH administration; and 2 women display multiple follicular waves during an interovulatory interval, and likely during pregnancy and lactation. Thus, acute stress may induce ovulation in women displaying appropriate serum levels of estradiol and one or more follicles large enough to respond to a non-midcycle LH surge. Methods A literature search using the PubMed database was performed to identify articles up to January 2010 focusing mainly on women as well as on rats and rhesus monkeys as animal models of interaction between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axes. Results Whereas the HPA axis exhibits positive responses in practically all phases of the ovarian cycle, acute-stress-induced release of LH is found under relatively high plasma levels of estradiol. However, there are studies suggesting that several types of acute stress may exert different effects on pituitary LH release and the steroid environment may modulate in a different way (inhibiting or stimulating the pattern of response of the HPG axis elicited by acute stressors. Conclusion Women may be induced to ovulate at any point of the menstrual cycle or even during periods of amenorrhea associated with pregnancy and lactation if exposed to an appropriate acute stressor under a right estradiol environment.

  15. Thermal exchanges and temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal comfort during space flight is discussed. Heat production of man during space flight and wear loss as a mean of dissipating heat are described. Water cooled garments are also considered, along with tolerance for extreme heat and body heat storage. Models of human temperature regulation are presented in the form of documented FORTRAN programs.

  16. Thermal Residual Stresses in Multilayered Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiancheng ZHANG; Binshi XU; Haidou WANG; Yixiong WU

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical integrity and reliability of coated devices are strongly affected by the residual stresses in thin films and coatings. However, due to the metallurgical complexity of materials, it is rather difficult to obtain a closed-form solution of residual stresses within multilayered coatings (e.g. functionally graded coatings, FGCs). In this paper,an analytical model is developed to predict the distribution of residual stresses within multilayered coatings. The advantage of this model is that the solution of residual stresses is independent of the number of layers. Specific results are obtained by calculating elastic thermal stresses in ZrO2/NiCoCrAIY FGCs, which consist of different material layers. Furthermore, the residual stress distribution near the edges and the stress-induced failure modes of coating are also analyzed. The topics discussed provide some insights into the development of a methodology for designing fail-safe coating systems.

  17. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  18. Thermal Stress Relaxation of Nonhomogeneous Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Nonhomogeneous coatings (NCs) are new type of engineering structures that is not yet fully understood. One important aspect in the mechanical analysis of NCs is to determine the gradient distribution that creates the maximum thermal stress relaxation. This paper employs numerical analysis using the finite element metho d and experimental analysis using moire interference to study the stress distrib ution in NCs. Attention focused on the edge effect stresses in the coating/subst rate structures and their dependence on the different gradient distributions of this new kind of composite structure.

  19. Memory for stress-associated acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedney, Jeffrey J; Logan, Henrietta

    2004-03-01

    Negative emotions (eg, tension, anxiety, fear, anger) influence acute pain recall. Given reliance on patient-provided pain reports across the care continuum, an understanding of factors that modulate pain memory processing become important to patients, clinicians, and health care organizations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of negative emotions on the prediction of 6-month pain recall by using an experimental stress manipulation (speech task) + pain (forehead cold pressor) versus nonstress control + pain crossover design (n = 68). Results showed that (1) negative emotions were greater in the stress session than the nonstress session, and experienced pain levels did not differ by condition or sex; (2) the level negative emotions at the time of the pain stimuli mediated the ability of experienced pain to predict pain recall; and (3) women recalled more stress session pain than men, and nonstress pain was accurately recalled. Integrating these findings with those of others, we present a model of acute pain memory recall in which negative emotions influence pain memory processing wherein the level of experienced pain predicts short-term recall and affective state at the time of the experience becomes a powerful predictor for the long-term recall of experienced pain level. After 6 months the level of recalled experimental pain delivered within a stressful context becomes exaggerated. Negative emotions at the time of the painful stimuli and at recall influenced the prediction of the level of recalled pain. Emotional arousal may influence how memory for pain is encoded, processed, and retrieved.

  20. Coral thermal tolerance: tuning gene expression to resist thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Bellantuono

    Full Text Available The acclimatization capacity of corals is a critical consideration in the persistence of coral reefs under stresses imposed by global climate change. The stress history of corals plays a role in subsequent response to heat stress, but the transcriptomic changes associated with these plastic changes have not been previously explored. In order to identify host transcriptomic changes associated with acquired thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub-lethal temperature of 3°C below bleaching threshold temperature were compared to both non-preconditioned corals and untreated controls using a cDNA microarray platform. After eight days of hyperthermal challenge, conditions under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant maintained Symbiodinium density, a clear differentiation in the transcriptional profiles was revealed among the condition examined. Among these changes, nine differentially expressed genes separated preconditioned corals from non-preconditioned corals, with 42 genes differentially expressed between control and preconditioned treatments, and 70 genes between non-preconditioned corals and controls. Differentially expressed genes included components of an apoptotic signaling cascade, which suggest the inhibition of apoptosis in preconditioned corals. Additionally, lectins and genes involved in response to oxidative stress were also detected. One dominant pattern was the apparent tuning of gene expression observed between preconditioned and non-preconditioned treatments; that is, differences in expression magnitude were more apparent than differences in the identity of genes differentially expressed. Our work revealed a transcriptomic signature underlying the tolerance associated with coral thermal history, and suggests that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind physiological acclimatization would be critical for the modeling of reefs

  1. 40 CFR 91.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Procedures § 91.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a)(1) The purpose of the evaluation procedure specified in this section is to determine the effect of thermal stress on catalyst...

  2. 40 CFR 90.427 - Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress resistance... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.427 Catalyst thermal stress resistance evaluation. (a) The purpose of... catalyst conversion efficiency for Phase 1 engines. The thermal stress is imposed on the test catalyst...

  3. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for... thermal stress test is not required for engine families certified to the Phase 2 standards....

  4. Bibliography on thermal stresses in shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetnarski, R.B.; Keene, F.W. (Rochester Institute of Technology, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A total of 778 references on the thermal stress behavior of shells are compiled in a bibliography covering the period 1952-1990. The documents included were either originally published in English or had been translated. A general alphabetical listing (by author) with abstracts (where available) is followed by two sections arranged by subject category (under the rubrics geometry and mechanical behavior), an author index, and a list of the journals in which the articles appeared.

  5. Thermal Stress Analysis of Welded Joint in 1420 Al-Li Alloy Induced by Thermal Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbin GENG; Song HE; Dezhuang YANG

    2003-01-01

    A model of double grains under plane stress state has been established. According to the double grain model, thermal stress induced by thermal cycling in welding fusion zone is numerically simulated by finite element method, and the microstructures before

  6. Heat transfer and thermal stress analysis in grooved tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Veysel Özceyhan; Necdet Altuntop

    2005-08-01

    Heat transfer and thermal stresses, induced by temperature differencesin the internally grooved tubes of heat transfer equipment, have been analysed numerically. The analysis has been conducted for four different kinds of internally grooved tubes and three different mean inlet water velocities. Constant temperature was applied from the external surface of the tube. Energy and governing flow equations were solved using finite difference scheme. Finite element method (FEM) was used to compute the thermal stress fields. Grooving effects on the thermal stress ratio have been discussed. As a result, maximum thermal stress occurs in the case of $p = d$ for all water inlet velocities. The maximum thermal stress ratio positions inside the tube have been indicated as MX for all investigated cases. In the light of the thermal stress values, various designs can be applied to reduce thermal stress in grooved tubes.

  7. Acute psychosocial stress reduces pain modulation capabilities in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2014-11-01

    Anecdotes on the ability of individuals to continue to function under stressful conditions despite injuries causing excruciating pain suggest that acute stress may induce analgesia. However, studies exploring the effect of acute experimental stress on pain perception show inconsistent results, possibly due to methodological differences. Our aim was to systematically study the effect of acute stress on pain perception using static and dynamic, state-of-the-art pain measurements. Participants were 29 healthy men who underwent the measurement of heat-pain threshold, heat-pain intolerance, temporal summation of pain, and conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Testing was conducted before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), inducing acute psychosocial stress. Stress levels were evaluated using perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction. Although pain threshold and pain intolerance were unaffected by stress, an increase in temporal summation of pain and a decrease in CPM were observed. These changes were significantly more robust among individuals with stronger reaction to stress ("high responders"), with a significant correlation between the perception of stress and the performance in the pain measurements. We conclude that acute psychosocial stress seems not to affect the sensitivity to pain, however, it significantly reduces the ability to modulate pain in a dose-response manner. Considering the diverse effects of stress in this and other studies, it appears that the type of stress and the magnitude of its appraisal determine its interactions with the pain system.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Thermal Stresses in Ceramic/Metal Gradient Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING Pingshun; XIAO Jinsheng; LIU Jie; ZHOU Xiaoqin

    2005-01-01

    This paper studied the thermal stresses of ceramic/metal gradient thermal barrier coating which combines the conceptions of ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and functionally gradient material (FGM). Thermal stresses and residual thermal stresses were calculated by an ANSYS finite element analysis software. Negative thermal expansion coefficient method was proposed and element birth and death method was applied to analyze the residual thermal stresses which have non-uniform initial temperature field. The numerical results show a good agreement with the analytical results and the experimental results.

  9. Thermal imprinting modifies adult stress and innate immune responsiveness in the teleost sea bream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Ana Patrícia; Costa, Rita A; Cardoso, João C R; Andree, Karl B; Estévez, Alicia; Gisbert, Enric; Power, Deborah M

    2017-06-01

    The impact of thermal imprinting on the plasticity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis and stress response in an adult ectotherm, the gilthead sea bream (Sparusaurata, L.), during its development was assessed. Fish were reared under 4 thermal regimes, and the resulting adults exposed to acute confinement stress and plasma cortisol levels and genes of the HPI axis were monitored. Changes in immune function, a common result of stress, were also evaluated using histomorphometric measurements of melanomacrophages centers (MMCs) in the head kidney and by monitoring macrophage-related transcripts. Thermal history significantly modified the HPI responsiveness in adult sea bream when eggs and larvae were reared at a higher than optimal temperature (HT, 22°C), and they had a reduced amplitude in their cortisol response and significantly upregulated pituitary pomc and head kidney star transcripts. Additionally, after an acute stress challenge, immune function was modified and the head kidney of adult fish reared during development at high temperatures (HT and LHT, 18-22°C) had a decreased number of MMCs and a significant downregulation of dopachrome tautomerase. Thermal imprinting during development influenced adult sea bream physiology and increased plasma levels of glucose and sodium even in the absence of an acute stress in fish reared under a high-low thermal regime (HLT, 22-18°C). Overall, the results demonstrate that temperature during early development influences the adult HPI axis and immune function in a teleost fish. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Ozbaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress.

  11. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbaki, Jamile; Goudarzi, Iran; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress. PMID:27635201

  12. Physiological Responses to Thermal Stress and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyota, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Akira; Yamagata, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Kawabata, Takashi

    The simple and noninvasive measuring methods of bioinstrumentation in humans is required for optimization of air conditioning and management of thermal environments, taking into consideration the individual specificity of the human body as well as the stress conditions affecting each. Changes in human blood circulation were induced with environmental factors such as heat, cold, exercise, mental stress, and so on. In this study, the physiological responses of human body to heat stress and exercise were investigated in the initial phase of the developmental research. We measured the body core and skin temperatures, skin blood flow, and pulse wave as the indices of the adaptation of the cardiovascular system. A laser Doppler skin blood flowmetry using an optical-sensor with a small portable data logger was employed for the measurement. These results reveal the heat-stress and exercise-induced circulatory responses, which are under the control of the sympathetic nerve system. Furthermore, it was suggested that the activity of the sympathetic nervous system could be evaluated from the signals of the pulse wave included in the signals derived from skin blood flow by means of heart rate variability assessments and detecting peak heights of velocity-plethysmogram.

  13. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  14. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing...

  15. Stress kinase inhibition modulates acute experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Fleischer; R. Dabew; B. Goke; ACC Wagner

    2001-01-01

    AIM To examine the role of p38 during acute experimental cerulein pancreatitis.METHODS Rats were treated with cerulein with or without a specific JNK inhibitor (CEP1347)andy or a specific p38 inhbitor (SB203380) and pancreatic stress kinase activity wasdetermined. Parameters to assess pancreatitis included trypsin, amylase, lipase, pancreatic weight and histology.RESULTS JNK inhibition with CEP1347ameliorated pancreatitis, reducing pancreatic edema. In contrast, p38 inhibition with SB203580aggravated pancreatitis with higher trypsinlevels and, with induction of acinar necrosis not normally found after cerulein hyperstimulation.Simultaneous treatment with both CEP1347 and SB203580 mutually abolished the effects of either compound on cerulein pancreatitis.CONCLUSION Stress kinases modulatepancreatitis differentially. JNK seems to promote pancreatitis development, possibly by supporting inflammatory reactions such as edema formation while its inhibition ameliorates pancreatitis. In contrast, p38 may help reduce organ destruction while inhibition of p38 during induction of cerulein pancreatitis leads to the occurrence of acinar necrosis.

  16. Mitigation method of thermal transient stress by a total analysis of thermal hydraulic and structural phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Naoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Jinbo, Masakazu [Toshiba Co., Tokyo (Japan); Hosogai, Hiromi [Joyo Industry Co., Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    This study proposes a mitigation method of thermal transient loads in fast reactor components by utilizing relationships among plant system parameters and resulting thermal stresses. Conventional design procedure against thermal transient loads has two independent steps: thermal hydraulic analysis to determine conservative thermal transient conditions considering variation of the system parameters and structural analysis to check structural integrity under given conditions. On the other hand, a total analysis procedure of thermal hydraulic and structural phenomena can grasp the relationship among system parameters and thermal stresses. It enables the mitigation of thermal transient loads by adjusting system parameters. (author)

  17. Entropy Generation Analysis of Human Thermal Stress Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Boregowda, Satish C.; Choate, Robert E.; Rodney Handy

    2012-01-01

    The present study involves application of an open system entropy generation formulation to analyze human thermal stress responses. The time-series human thermal stress response data are obtained by conducting a simulation using a validated finite-element human thermal model (FEHTM). These simulated human thermal response data are used as an input to the entropy generation expression to obtain human entropy generation (HEG) values. The effects of variables such as air temperature, relative hum...

  18. Deciphering neuronal population codes for acute thermal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Phuong Sieu Tong, Ai; Manders, Toby R.; Wang, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. Current pain research mostly focuses on molecular and synaptic changes at the spinal and peripheral levels. However, a complete understanding of pain mechanisms requires the physiological study of the neocortex. Our goal is to apply a neural decoding approach to read out the onset of acute thermal pain signals, which can be used for brain-machine interface. Approach. We used micro wire arrays to record ensemble neuronal activities from the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in freely behaving rats. We further investigated neural codes for acute thermal pain at both single-cell and population levels. To detect the onset of acute thermal pain signals, we developed a novel latent state-space framework to decipher the sorted or unsorted S1 and ACC ensemble spike activities, which reveal information about the onset of pain signals. Main results. The state space analysis allows us to uncover a latent state process that drives the observed ensemble spike activity, and to further detect the ‘neuronal threshold’ for acute thermal pain on a single-trial basis. Our method achieved good detection performance in sensitivity and specificity. In addition, our results suggested that an optimal strategy for detecting the onset of acute thermal pain signals may be based on combined evidence from S1 and ACC population codes. Significance. Our study is the first to detect the onset of acute pain signals based on neuronal ensemble spike activity. It is important from a mechanistic viewpoint as it relates to the significance of S1 and ACC activities in the regulation of the acute pain onset.

  19. The role of inflammatory stress in acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈成兴; 陈灏珠; 葛均波

    2004-01-01

    Objective To summarize current understanding of the roles of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome and to postulate the novel concept of inflammation stress as the most important factor triggering acute coronary syndrome. Moreover, markers of inflammation stress and ways to block involved pathways are elucidated.Data sources A literature search (MEDLINE 1997 to 2002) was performed using the key words "inflammation and cardiovascular disease". Relevant book chapters were also reviewed.Study selection Well-controlled, prospective landmark studies and review articles on inflammation and acute coronary syndrome were selected.Data extraction Data and conclusions from the selected articles providing solid evidence to elucidate the mechanisms of inflammation and acute coronary syndrome were extracted and interpreted in the light of our own clinical and basic research.Data synthesis Inflammation is closely linked to atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome. Chronic and long-lasting inflammation stress, present both systemically or in the vascular walls, can trigger acute coronary syndrome.Conclusions Inflammation stress plays an important role in the process of acute coronary syndrome. Drugs which can modulate the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory processes and attenuate inflammation stress, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin Ⅱ receptor blockers, statins, and cytokine antagonists may play active roles in the prevention and treatment of acute coronary syndrome when used in addition to conventional therapies (glycoprotein Ⅱb/Ⅲa receptor antagonists, mechanical intervention strategies, etc).

  20. Acute Stress Influences Neural Circuits of Reward Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony John Porcelli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available People often make decisions under aversive conditions such as acute stress. Yet, less is known about the process in which acute stress can influence decision-making. A growing body of research has established that reward-related information associated with the outcomes of decisions exerts a powerful influence over the choices people make and that an extensive network of brain regions, prominently featuring the striatum, is involved in the processing of this reward-related information. Thus, an important step in research on the nature of acute stress’ influence over decision-making is to examine how it may modulate responses to rewards and punishments within reward-processing neural circuitry. In the current experiment, we employed a simple reward processing paradigm – where participants received monetary rewards and punishments – known to evoke robust striatal responses. Immediately prior to performing each of two task runs, participants were exposed to acute stress (i.e., cold pressor or a no stress control procedure in a between-subjects fashion. No stress group participants exhibited a pattern of activity within the dorsal striatum and orbitofrontal cortex consistent with past research on outcome processing – specifically, differential responses for monetary rewards over punishments. In contrast, acute stress group participants’ dorsal striatum and orbitofrontal cortex demonstrated decreased sensitivity to monetary outcomes and a lack of differential activity. These findings provide insight into how neural circuits may process rewards and punishments associated with simple decisions under acutely stressful conditions.

  1. Modeling delamination due to thermal stress in optical storage media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, M. A.; Evans, K. E.

    1990-04-01

    Finite element analysis is used to calculate the shape of blisters formed in bilayer optical storage media due to the buildup of thermal stresses during laser writing. It is shown that practically usable blisters may be expected to form in a time period of about 15 ns. Such a thermal stress delamination process may also precede melting in conventional pit formation processes.

  2. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  3. Perceived stress at work is associated with attenuated DHEA-S response during acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, Anna-Karin; Theorell, Töres; Kushnir, Mark M; Bergquist, Jonas; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H

    2013-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) have been suggested to play a protective role during acute psychosocial stress, because they act as antagonists to the effects of the stress hormone cortisol. This study aims to investigate whether prolonged psychosocial stress, measured as perceived stress at work during the past week, is related to the capacity to produce DHEA and DHEA-S during acute psychosocial stress. It also aims to investigate whether prolonged perceived stress affects the balance between production of cortisol and DHEA-S during acute psychosocial stress. Thirty-six healthy subjects (19 men and 17 women, mean age 37 years, SD 5 years), were included. Perceived stress at work during the past week was measured by using the Stress-Energy (SE) Questionnaire. The participants were divided into three groups based on their mean scores; Low stress, Medium stress and High stress. The participants underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and blood samples were collected before, directly after the stress test, and after 30 min of recovery. General Linear Models were used to investigate if the Medium stress group and the High stress group differ regarding stress response compared to the Low stress group. Higher perceived stress at work was associated with attenuated DHEA-S response during acute psychosocial stress. Furthermore, the ratio between the cortisol production and the DHEA-S production during the acute stress test were higher in individuals reporting higher perceived stress at work compared to individuals reporting low perceived stress at work. There was no statistical difference in DHEA response between the groups. This study shows that prolonged stress, measured as perceived stress at work during the past week, seems to negatively affect the capacity to produce DHEA-S during acute stress. Given the protective functions of DHEA-S, attenuated DHEA-S production during acute stress may lead to higher risk for adverse

  4. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute cardiac syndrome induced by stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Annette Maria; Bang, Lia E; Holmvang, Lene

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is an acute cardiac syndrome, characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction often following a stressful event in post-menopausal women. Symptoms are indistinguishable from myocardial infarction. However, TTC patients do not have a culprit lesion on acute...

  5. Effect of thermal shield and gas flow on thermal elastic stresses in 300 mm silicon crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yu; XIAO Qinghua; ZHOU Qigang; DAI Xiaolin; TU Hailing

    2006-01-01

    The thermal elastic stresses induced in 300 mm Si crystal may be great troubles because it can incur the generation of dislocations and undesirable excessive residual stresses.A special thermal modeling tool, CrysVUn, was used for numerical analysis of thermal elastic stresses and stress distribution of 300 mm Si crystal under the consideration of different thermal shields and gas flow conditions.The adopted governing partial equations for stress calculation are Cauchy's first and second laws of motion.It is demonstrated that the presence and shape of thermal shield, the gas pressure and velocity can strongly affect von Mises stress distribution in Si crystal.With steep-wall shield, however, the maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are relatively low.With slope-wall shield or without shield, both maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are increased in evidence.Whether thermal shields are used or not, the increase of gas flow velocity could raise the stress level.In contrast, the increase of gas pressure cannot result in so significant effect.The influence of thermal shield and gas flow should be attributed to the modification of heat conduction and heat radiation by them.

  6. Acute and post-traumatic stress disorder after spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, S V; James, L C; Solursh, D S; Yancey, M K; Epperly, T D; Folen, R A; Masone, M

    2000-03-15

    When a spontaneous abortion is followed by complicated bereavement, the primary care physician may not consider the diagnosis of acute stress disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. The major difference between these two conditions is that, in acute stress disorder, symptoms such as dissociation, reliving the trauma, avoiding stimuli associated with the trauma and increased arousal are present for at least two days but not longer than four weeks. When the symptoms persist beyond four weeks, the patient may have post-traumatic stress disorder. The symptoms of distress response after spontaneous abortion include psychologic, physical, cognitive and behavioral effects; however, patients with distress response after spontaneous abortion often do not meet the criteria for acute or post-traumatic stress disorder. After spontaneous abortion, as many as 10 percent of women may have acute stress disorder and up to 1 percent may have post-traumatic stress disorder. Critical incident stress debriefing, which may be administered by trained family physicians or mental health practitioners, may help patients who are having a stress disorder after a spontaneous abortion.

  7. Response Inhibition and Cognitive Appraisal in Clients with Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass Abolghasemi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to compare response inhibition and cognitive appraisal in clients with acute stress disorder, clients with posttraumatic stress disorder, and normal individuals .Method:This was a comparative study. The sample consisted of 40 clients with acute stress disorder, 40 patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, and 40 normal individuals from Mazandaran province selected through convenience sampling method. Data were collected using Composite International Diagnostic Interview, Stroop Color-Word Test, Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory, and the Impact of Event Scale. Results:Results showed that individuals with acute stress disorder are less able to inhibit inappropriate responses and have more impaired cognitive appraisals compared to those with posttraumatic stress disorder. Moreover, results showed that response inhibition and cognitive appraisal explain 75% of the variance in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and 38% of the variance in posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms .Conclusion:The findings suggest that response inhibition and cognitive appraisal are two variables that influence the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder symptoms. Also, these results have important implications for pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder

  8. Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Induces Hypothermia During Acute Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis R; Govus, Andrew; Hewson, David; Taylor, Lee

    2017-08-01

    Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter drug used to treat pain and fever, but it has also been shown to reduce core temperature (T c) in the absence of fever. However, this side effect is not well examined in humans, and it is unknown if the hypothermic response to acetaminophen is exacerbated with cold exposure. To address this question, we mapped the thermoregulatory responses to acetaminophen and placebo administration during exposure to acute cold (10 °C) and thermal neutrality (25 °C). Nine healthy Caucasian males (aged 20-24 years) participated in the experiment. In a double-blind, randomised, repeated measures design, participants were passively exposed to a thermo-neutral or cold environment for 120 min, with administration of 20 mg/kg lean body mass acetaminophen or a placebo 5 min prior to exposure. T c, skin temperature (T sk), heart rate, and thermal sensation were measured every 10 min, and mean arterial pressure was recorded every 30 min. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models. Differences in thermal sensation were analysed using a cumulative link mixed model. Acetaminophen had no effect on T c in a thermo-neutral environment, but significantly reduced T c during cold exposure, compared with a placebo. T c was lower in the acetaminophen compared with the placebo condition at each 10-min interval from 80 to 120 min into the trial (all p  0.05). This preliminary trial suggests that acetaminophen-induced hypothermia is exacerbated during cold stress. Larger scale trials seem warranted to determine if acetaminophen administration is associated with an increased risk of accidental hypothermia, particularly in vulnerable populations such as frail elderly individuals.

  9. Thermal Indices and Thermophysiological Modeling for Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenith, George; Fiala, Dusan

    2015-12-15

    The assessment of the risk of human exposure to heat is a topic as relevant today as a century ago. The introduction and use of heat stress indices and models to predict and quantify heat stress and heat strain has helped to reduce morbidity and mortality in industrial, military, sports, and leisure activities dramatically. Models used range from simple instruments that attempt to mimic the human-environment heat exchange to complex thermophysiological models that simulate both internal and external heat and mass transfer, including related processes through (protective) clothing. This article discusses the most commonly used indices and models and looks at how these are deployed in the different contexts of industrial, military, and biometeorological applications, with focus on use to predict related thermal sensations, acute risk of heat illness, and epidemiological analysis of morbidity and mortality. A critical assessment is made of tendencies to use simple indices such as WBGT in more complex conditions (e.g., while wearing protective clothing), or when employed in conjunction with inappropriate sensors. Regarding the more complex thermophysiological models, the article discusses more recent developments including model individualization approaches and advanced systems that combine simulation models with (body worn) sensors to provide real-time risk assessment. The models discussed in the article range from historical indices to recent developments in using thermophysiological models in (bio) meteorological applications as an indicator of the combined effect of outdoor weather settings on humans.

  10. Evaluation of properties and thermal stress field for thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王良; 齐红宇; 杨晓光; 李旭

    2008-01-01

    In order to get thermal stress field of the hot section with thermal barrier coating (TBCs), the thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of top-coat are the physical key properties. The porosity of top-coat was tested and evaluated under different high temperatures. The relationship between the microstructure (porosity of top-coat) and properties of TBCs were analyzed to predict the thermal properties of ceramic top-coat, such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The temperature and stress field of the vane with TBCs were simulated using two sets of thermal conductivity data and elastic modulus, which are from literatures and this work, respectively. The results show that the temperature and stress distributions change with thermal conductivity and elastic modulus. The differences of maximum temperatures and stress are 6.5% and 8.0%, respectively.

  11. Acute stress does not affect risky monetary decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sokol-Hessner

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous and intense nature of stress responses necessitate that we understand how they affect decision-making. Despite a number of studies examining risky decision-making under stress, it is as yet unclear whether and in what way stress alters the underlying processes that shape our choices. This is in part because previous studies have not separated and quantified dissociable valuation and decision-making processes that can affect choices of risky options, including risk attitudes, loss aversion, and choice consistency, among others. Here, in a large, fully-crossed two-day within-subjects design, we examined how acute stress alters risky decision-making. On each day, 120 participants completed either the cold pressor test or a control manipulation with equal probability, followed by a risky decision-making task. Stress responses were assessed with salivary cortisol. We fit an econometric model to choices that dissociated risk attitudes, loss aversion, and choice consistency using hierarchical Bayesian techniques to both pool data and allow heterogeneity in decision-making. Acute stress was found to have no effect on risk attitudes, loss aversion, or choice consistency, though participants did become more loss averse and more consistent on the second day relative to the first. In the context of an inconsistent previous literature on risk and acute stress, our findings provide strong and specific evidence that acute stress does not affect risk attitudes, loss aversion, or consistency in risky monetary decision-making.

  12. Does acute psychological stress increase perception of oesophageal acid?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmink, G. J. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.; Timmer, R.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    P>Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients often report an increase in their reflux symptoms during stressful situations. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of acute psychological stress on oesophageal acid perception. In 15 healthy volunteers and 10 GORD patients with a posi

  13. Acute stress does not affect risky monetary decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol-Hessner, Peter; Raio, Candace M; Gottesman, Sarah P; Lackovic, Sandra F; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    The ubiquitous and intense nature of stress responses necessitate that we understand how they affect decision-making. Despite a number of studies examining risky decision-making under stress, it is as yet unclear whether and in what way stress alters the underlying processes that shape our choices. This is in part because previous studies have not separated and quantified dissociable valuation and decision-making processes that can affect choices of risky options, including risk attitudes, loss aversion, and choice consistency, among others. Here, in a large, fully-crossed two-day within-subjects design, we examined how acute stress alters risky decision-making. On each day, 120 participants completed either the cold pressor test or a control manipulation with equal probability, followed by a risky decision-making task. Stress responses were assessed with salivary cortisol. We fit an econometric model to choices that dissociated risk attitudes, loss aversion, and choice consistency using hierarchical Bayesian techniques to both pool data and allow heterogeneity in decision-making. Acute stress was found to have no effect on risk attitudes, loss aversion, or choice consistency, though participants did become more loss averse and more consistent on the second day relative to the first. In the context of an inconsistent previous literature on risk and acute stress, our findings provide strong and specific evidence that acute stress does not affect risk attitudes, loss aversion, or consistency in risky monetary decision-making.

  14. Acute stress affects risk taking but not ambiguity aversion

    OpenAIRE

    Buckert, Magdalena; Schwieren, Christiane; Brigitte M. Kudielka; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2014-01-01

    Economic decisions are often made in stressful situations (e.g., at the trading floor), but the effects of stress on economic decision making have not been systematically investigated so far. The present study examines how acute stress influences economic decision making under uncertainty (risk and ambiguity) using financially incentivized lotteries. We varied the domain of decision making as well as the expected value of the risky prospect. Importantly, no feedback was provided to investigat...

  15. Effect of severe environmental thermal stress on redox state in salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Toshiki; Kameda, Masumi; Shoji, Yui; Hayashi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiyasu; Sato, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fish are exposed to many kinds of environmental stressors and the chances of succumbing to infectious diseases may be increased a result. For example, an acute increase in temperature can induce numerous physiological changes in the body. In the present study, we examined the redox state in response to a severe acute stress resulting from heat shock in teleost coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The plasma lipid peroxides levels in fish gradually increased after heat shock treatment. By 2.5 h post-heat stress, plasma glutathione (GSH) levels had decreased, but they had returned to basal levels by 17.5 h post-stress. Plasma superoxide dismutase activities in stressed fish were significantly increased compared with those in control fish at 17.5 h post-stress, but had returned to basal levels by 48 h post-stress. Expression levels of hepatic GSH and heat shock protein 70 gradually increased after heat shock treatment. These results concerning the changing patterns of multiple important redox-related biomarkers suggest that severe thermal stressors can affect the redox state and induce oxidative stress in ectothermal animals, such as fish, in vivo. Hence, manipulation of appropriate thermal treatment may possibly be useful to control fish fitness.

  16. Effect of severe environmental thermal stress on redox state in salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Nakano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish are exposed to many kinds of environmental stressors and the chances of succumbing to infectious diseases may be increased a result. For example, an acute increase in temperature can induce numerous physiological changes in the body. In the present study, we examined the redox state in response to a severe acute stress resulting from heat shock in teleost coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch. The plasma lipid peroxides levels in fish gradually increased after heat shock treatment. By 2.5 h post-heat stress, plasma glutathione (GSH levels had decreased, but they had returned to basal levels by 17.5 h post-stress. Plasma superoxide dismutase activities in stressed fish were significantly increased compared with those in control fish at 17.5 h post-stress, but had returned to basal levels by 48 h post-stress. Expression levels of hepatic GSH and heat shock protein 70 gradually increased after heat shock treatment. These results concerning the changing patterns of multiple important redox-related biomarkers suggest that severe thermal stressors can affect the redox state and induce oxidative stress in ectothermal animals, such as fish, in vivo. Hence, manipulation of appropriate thermal treatment may possibly be useful to control fish fitness.

  17. Insect population differentiation in response to enviromental thermal stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bing; KANG Le

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies reported the adaptation strategies adopted by ecthotherms to survive under environmental thermal stress. Geographic and seasonal variations in the thermal stress tolerance, which is closely associated with species' climatic adaptation and allopatric speciation, have been extensively investigated in insects. The variation patterns suggest directional selection for species' adaptive straits, and are used to predict the origin, distribution and dynamics of insect populations. These studies are becoming more and more important in the context of global warming. This paper discusses the process of adaptation to environmental thermal stress and the mechanisms underlying the differentiation in related adaptive straits of insect populations.

  18. Acute psychological stress reduces working memory-related activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.; Hermans, E.J.; Marle, H.J.F. van; Luo, J.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute psychological stress impairs higher-order cognitive function such as working memory (WM). Similar impairments are seen in various psychiatric disorders that are associated with higher susceptibility to stress and with prefrontal cortical dysfunctions, suggesting that acute stress

  19. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  20. Stressed memories: How acute stress affects memory formation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M.J.A.G.; Hermans, E.J.; Pu, Z.; Joels, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Stressful, aversive events are extremely well remembered. Such a declarative memory enhancement is evidently beneficial for survival, but the same mechanism may become maladaptive and culminate in mental diseases such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Stress hormones are known to enhance

  1. Mindfulness-based stress reduction and physiological activity during acute stress: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyklicek, I.; Mommersteeg, P.M.; Beugen, S. van; Ramakers, C.; Boxtel, G.J. Van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to examine the effects of a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention on cardiovascular and cortisol activity during acute stress. METHOD: Eighty-eight healthy community-dwelling individuals reporting elevated stress levels were randomly assigned to the MBSR proto

  2. Combustion characteristics of thermally stressed hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Colin William

    Liquid propelled propulsion systems, which range from rocket systems to hypersonic scramjet and ramjet engines, require active cooling in order to prevent additional payload requirements. In these systems, the liquid fuel is used as a coolant and is delivered through micro-channels that surround the combustion chambers, nozzles, as well as the exterior surfaces in order to extract heat from these affected areas. During this process, heat exchange occurs through phase change, sensible heat extraction, and endothermic reactions experienced by the liquid fuel. Previous research has demonstrated the significant modifications in fuel composition and changes to the fuel's physical properties that can result from these endothermic reactions. As a next step, we are experimentally investigating the effect that endothermic reactions have on fundamental flame behavior for real hydrocarbon fuels that are used as rocket and jet propellants. To achieve this goal, we have developed a counter-flow flame burner to measure extinction limits of the thermally stressed fuels. The counter-flow flame system is to be coupled with a high pressure reactor, capable of subjecting the fuel to 170 atm and 873 K, effectively simulating the extreme environment that cause the liquid fuel to experience endothermic reactions. The fundamental flame properties of the reacted fuels will be compared to those of unreacted fuels, allowing us to determine the role of endothermic reactions on the combustion behavior of current hydrocarbon jet and rocket propellants. To quantify the change in transport properties and chemical kinetics of the reacting mixture, simultaneous numerical simulations of the reactor portion of the experiment coupled with a counterflow flame simulation are performed using n-heptane and n-dodecane.

  3. Individual differences in delay discounting under acute stress: the role of trait perceived stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina M. Lempert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Delay discounting refers to the reduction of the value of a future reward as the delay to that reward increases. The rate at which individuals discount future rewards varies as a function of both individual and contextual differences, and high delay discounting rates have been linked with problematic behaviors, including drug abuse and gambling. The current study investigated the effects of acute anticipatory stress on delay discounting, while considering two important factors: individual perceptions of stress and whether the stressful situation is future-focused or present-focused. Half of the participants experienced acute stress by anticipating giving a videotaped speech. This stress was either future-oriented (speech about future job or present-oriented (speech about physical appearance. They then performed a delay discounting task, in which they chose between smaller, immediate rewards and larger, delayed rewards. Their scores on the Perceived Stress Scale were also collected. The way in which one appraises a stressful situation interacts with acute stress to influence choices; under stressful conditions, delay discounting rate was highest in individuals with low perceived stress and lowest for individuals with high perceived stress. This result might be related to individual variation in reward responsiveness under stress. Furthermore, the time orientation of the task interacted with its stressfulness to affect the individual’s propensity to choose immediate rewards. These findings add to our understanding of the intermediary factors between stress and decision making.

  4. Thermal stresses in composite tubes using complementary virtual work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of thermally induced stresses in layered, fiber-reinforced composite tubes subjected to a circumferential gradient. The paper focuses on using the principle of complementary virtual work, in conjunction with a Ritz approximation to the stress field, to study the influence on the predicted stresses of including temperature-dependent material properties. Results indicate that the computed values of stress are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the matrix-direction compliance and matrix-direction thermal expansion in the plane of the lamina. There is less sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the other material properties.

  5. Thermal stresses in multilayer optical-storage media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, M. A.; Evans, K. E.

    1989-07-01

    Previously, it has been shown that thermal stresses may have a significant role to play in optical-storage media. Calculations have shown that thermal stresses are produced in single-layer optical-storage thin films sufficient to cause interlayer failure and blister formation. In this paper, more realistic multilayer thin films are modeled and it is shown that considerably higher stresses can be produced depending on the layer geometry and material properties. These effects are important both in the initial writing process and in subsequent reading or writing processes, and may result in long-term-accumulated, stress-induced damage.

  6. Acute stress impairs set-shifting but not reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, K A; Floresco, S B; Phillips, A G

    2013-09-01

    The ability to update and modify previously learned behavioral responses in a changing environment is essential for successful utilization of promising opportunities and for coping with adverse events. Valid models of cognitive flexibility that contribute to behavioral flexibility include set-shifting and reversal learning. One immediate effect of acute stress is the selective impairment of performance on higher-order cognitive control tasks mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not the hippocampus. Previous studies show that the mPFC is required for set-shifting but not for reversal learning, therefore the aim of the present experiment is to assess whether exposure to acute stress (15 min of mild tail-pinch stress) given immediately before testing on either a set-shifting or reversal learning tasks would impair performance selectively on the set-shifting task. An automated operant chamber-based task, confirmed that exposure to acute stress significantly disrupts set-shifting but has no effect on reversal learning. Rats exposed to an acute stressor require significantly more trials to reach criterion and make significantly more perseverative errors. Thus, these data reveal that an immediate effect of acute stress is to impair mPFC-dependent cognition selectively by disrupting the ability to inhibit the use of a previously relevant cognitive strategy.

  7. Acute stress selectively impairs learning to act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berker, Archy O; Tirole, Margot; Rutledge, Robb B; Cross, Gemma F; Dolan, Raymond J; Bestmann, Sven

    2016-07-20

    Stress interferes with instrumental learning. However, choice is also influenced by non-instrumental factors, most strikingly by biases arising from Pavlovian associations that facilitate action in pursuit of rewards and inaction in the face of punishment. Whether stress impacts on instrumental learning via these Pavlovian associations is unknown. Here, in a task where valence (reward or punishment) and action (go or no-go) were orthogonalised, we asked whether the impact of stress on learning was action or valence specific. We exposed 60 human participants either to stress (socially-evaluated cold pressor test) or a control condition (room temperature water). We contrasted two hypotheses: that stress would lead to a non-selective increase in the expression of Pavlovian biases; or that stress, as an aversive state, might specifically impact action production due to the Pavlovian linkage between inaction and aversive states. We found support for the second of these hypotheses. Stress specifically impaired learning to produce an action, irrespective of the valence of the outcome, an effect consistent with a Pavlovian linkage between punishment and inaction. This deficit in action-learning was also reflected in pupillary responses; stressed individuals showed attenuated pupillary responses to action, hinting at a noradrenergic contribution to impaired action-learning under stress.

  8. Stress dependent thermal pressurization of a fluid-saturated rock

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2008-01-01

    Temperature increase in saturated porous materials under undrained conditions leads to thermal pressurization of the pore fluid due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the solid matrix. This increase in the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. The equations governing the phenomenon of thermal pressurization are presented and this phenomenon is studied experimentally for a saturated granular rock in an undrained heating test under constant isotropic stress. Careful analysis of the effect of mechanical and thermal deformation of the drainage and pressure measurement system is performed and a correction of the measured pore pressure is introduced. The test results are modelled using a non-linear thermo-poro-elastic constitutive model of the granular rock with emphasis on the stress-dependent character of the rock compressibility. The effects of stress and temperature on therma...

  9. Cannabinoids & Stress: impact of HU-210 on behavioral tests of anxiety in acutely stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinden, Renee; Zhang, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most prevalent classes of mental disorders affecting the general population, but current treatment strategies are restricted by their limited efficacy and side effect profiles. Although the cannabinoid system is speculated to be a key player in the modulation of stress responses and emotionality, the vast majority of current research initiatives had not incorporated stress exposure into their experimental designs. This study was the first to investigate the impact of exogenous cannabinoid administration in an acutely stressed mouse model, where CD1 mice were pre-treated with HU-210, a potent CB1R agonist, prior to acute stress exposure and subsequent behavioral testing. Exogenous cannabinoid administration induced distinct behavioral phenotypes in stressed and unstressed mice. While low doses of HU-210 were anxiolytic in unstressed subjects, this effect was abolished when mice were exposed to an acute stressor. The administration of higher HU-210 doses in combination with acute stress exposure led to severe locomotor deficits that were not previously observed at the same dose in unstressed subjects. These findings suggest that exogenous cannabinoids and acute stress act synergistically in an anxiogenic manner. This study underlies the importance of including stress exposure into future anxiety-cannabinoid research due to the differential impact of cannabinoid administration on stressed and unstressed subjects.

  10. Acute stress affects risk taking but not ambiguity aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckert, Magdalena; Schwieren, Christiane; Kudielka, Brigitte M; Fiebach, Christian J

    2014-01-01

    Economic decisions are often made in stressful situations (e.g., at the trading floor), but the effects of stress on economic decision making have not been systematically investigated so far. The present study examines how acute stress influences economic decision making under uncertainty (risk and ambiguity) using financially incentivized lotteries. We varied the domain of decision making as well as the expected value of the risky prospect. Importantly, no feedback was provided to investigate risk taking and ambiguity aversion independent from learning processes. In a sample of 75 healthy young participants, 55 of whom underwent a stress induction protocol (Trier Social Stress Test for Groups), we observed more risk seeking for gains. This effect was restricted to a subgroup of participants that showed a robust cortisol response to acute stress (n = 26). Gambling under ambiguity, in contrast to gambling under risk, was not influenced by the cortisol response to stress. These results show that acute psychosocial stress affects economic decision making under risk, independent of learning processes. Our results further point to the importance of cortisol as a mediator of this effect.

  11. Acute stress affects risk taking but not ambiguity aversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena eBuckert

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Economic decisions are often made in stressful situations (e.g., at the trading floor, but the effects of stress on economic decision making have not been systematically investigated so far. The present study examines how acute stress influences economic decision making under uncertainty (risk and ambiguity using financially incentivized lotteries. We varied the domain of decision making as well as the expected value of the risky prospect. Importantly, no feedback was provided to investigate risk taking and ambiguity aversion independent from learning processes. In a sample of 75 healthy young participants, 55 of whom underwent a stress induction protocol (Trier Social Stress Test for Groups, we observed more risk seeking for gains. This effect was restricted to a subgroup of participants that showed a robust cortisol response to acute stress (n = 26. Gambling under ambiguity, in contrast to gambling under risk, was not influenced by the cortisol response to stress. These results show that acute psychosocial stress affects economic decision making under risk, independent of learning processes. Our results further point to the importance of cortisol as a mediator of this effect.

  12. Acute stress affects risk taking but not ambiguity aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckert, Magdalena; Schwieren, Christiane; Kudielka, Brigitte M.; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2014-01-01

    Economic decisions are often made in stressful situations (e.g., at the trading floor), but the effects of stress on economic decision making have not been systematically investigated so far. The present study examines how acute stress influences economic decision making under uncertainty (risk and ambiguity) using financially incentivized lotteries. We varied the domain of decision making as well as the expected value of the risky prospect. Importantly, no feedback was provided to investigate risk taking and ambiguity aversion independent from learning processes. In a sample of 75 healthy young participants, 55 of whom underwent a stress induction protocol (Trier Social Stress Test for Groups), we observed more risk seeking for gains. This effect was restricted to a subgroup of participants that showed a robust cortisol response to acute stress (n = 26). Gambling under ambiguity, in contrast to gambling under risk, was not influenced by the cortisol response to stress. These results show that acute psychosocial stress affects economic decision making under risk, independent of learning processes. Our results further point to the importance of cortisol as a mediator of this effect. PMID:24834024

  13. Finite element analysis of thermal stresses in optical storage media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, K. E.; Nkansah, M. A.; Abbott, S. J.

    1988-10-01

    Finite element techniques are used to calculate the thermal stresses generated in single-layer, optical storage thin films. The calculations predict that the thermal stresses generated by laser heating may reach values well beyond the strength of the media in times much less than that for pit formation by melting. Both dye-polymer and metal-based systems are considered with either air or substrate incident laser sources.

  14. Triathletes Lose Their Advantageous Pain Modulation under Acute Psychosocial Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-02-01

    Triathletes, who constantly engage in intensely stressful sport, were recently found to exhibit greater pain tolerance and more efficient pain inhibition capabilities than nonathletes. However, pain inhibition correlated negatively with retrospective reports of mental stress during training and competition. The aim of the current study was to test pain inhibition capabilities of triathletes under acute, controlled psychological stress manipulation. Participants were 25 triathletes and ironman triathletes who underwent the measurement of pain threshold, pain intolerance, tonic suprathreshold pain, and conditioned pain modulation before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). Perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol levels were obtained as indices of stress. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction manifested in the subjective and objective indices. Overall, a significant reduction in pain threshold and in conditioned pain modulation efficacy was observed after the MIST, which reached the baseline levels observed previously in nonathletes. Paradoxically, the magnitude of this stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) correlated negatively with the magnitude of the stress response; low-stress responders exhibited greater SIH than high-stress responders. The results suggest that under acute psychological stress, triathletes not only react with SIH and a reduction in pain modulation but also lose their advantageous pain modulation over nonathletes. The stronger the stress response recorded, the weaker the SIH. It appears that triathletes are not resilient to stress, responding with an increase in the sensitivity to pain as well as a decrease in pain inhibition. The possible effects of athletes' baseline pain profile and stress reactivity on SIH are discussed.

  15. Substrate size mediates thermal stress in the rocky intertidal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedan, Keryn B; Bernhardt, Joanna; Bertness, Mark D; Leslie, Heather M

    2011-03-01

    Variation in physical factors, such as slope, orientation, and wind exposure, shapes thermal conditions. Variation in substrate size is common in many habitats, but its thermal consequences for organisms are not well characterized. Larger substrates should remain more thermally stable and act as thermal refuges for associated organisms during short, thermally stressful periods such as midday temperature peaks or tidal exposure. In observations and a transplant and thermal integration experiment, we found that larger rock substrates stayed cooler and facilitated greater survival of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides in the high intertidal relative to small substrates during the hot summer months in southern New England, USA. However, in thermally benign northern New England, rock substrate size had no effect on barnacle distributions, indicating that the thermal effects of substrate size are mediated by regional climate.

  16. Acute stress selectively reduces reward sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa H Berghorst

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress may promote the onset of psychopathology by disrupting reward processing. However, the extent to which stress impairs reward processing, rather than incentive processing more generally, is unclear. To evaluate the specificity of stress-induced reward processing disruption, 100 psychiatrically healthy females were administered a probabilistic stimulus selection task enabling comparison of sensitivity to reward-driven (Go and punishment-driven (NoGo learning under either ‘no stress’ or ‘stress’ (threat-of-shock conditions. Cortisol samples and self-report measures were collected. Contrary to hypotheses, the groups did not differ significantly in task performance or cortisol reactivity. However, further analyses focusing only on individuals under ‘stress’ who were high responders with regard to both cortisol reactivity and self-reported negative affect revealed reduced reward sensitivity relative to individuals tested in the ‘no stress’ condition; importantly, these deficits were reward-specific. Overall, findings provide preliminary evidence that stress-reactive individuals show diminished sensitivity to reward but not punishment under stress. While such results highlight the possibility that stress-induced anhedonia might be an important mechanism linking stress to affective disorders, future studies are necessary to confirm this conjecture.

  17. Acute stress impairs cognitive flexibility in men, not women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Trainor, Brian C; Lam, Jovian C W; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    Psychosocial stress influences cognitive abilities, such as long-term memory retrieval. However, less is known about the effects of stress on cognitive flexibility, which is mediated by different neurobiological circuits and could thus be regulated by different neuroendocrine pathways. In this study, we randomly assigned healthy adults to an acute stress induction or control condition and subsequently assessed participants' cognitive flexibility using an open-source version of the Wisconsin Card Sort task. Drawing on work in rodents, we hypothesized that stress would have stronger impairing effects on cognitive flexibility in men than women. As predicted, we found that stress impaired cognitive flexibility in men but did not significantly affect women. Our results thus indicate that stress exerts sex-specific effects on cognitive flexibility in humans and add to the growing body of research highlighting the need to consider sex differences in effects of stress.

  18. Microstructural Evolution and Residual Stresses of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Cho, Hyun; Yi, Dong-Kee; Paik, Ungyu

    Microstructural evolution and fracture behavior of zirconia (ZrO2)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated under thermal exposure. New ZrO2 granule with 8 wt.% yttria (Y2O3) with a deformed hollow morphology was developed through a spray drying process and employed to prepare TBCs. The thermal exposure tests were conducted at 1210°C with a dwell time of 100 h till 800 h. The residual stress at the interface between top coat and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer was measured using a nanoindentation technique before and after thermal exposure. Vertical cracks on the top coat were newly formed and interlamellar cracks at the interface were enhanced after the thermal exposure of 800 h. Especially, partial delamination was observed at the interface after the thermal exposure of 800 h in TBC samples tested. The microstructural evolution in the top coat could be defined through load-displacement curves, showing a higher load or a less displacement after the thermal exposure of 800 h. The stress state was strongly dependent on the TGO geometry, resulting in the compressive stresses at the "valleys" or the "troughs," and the tensile stresses at the "crests" or peak areas, in the ranges of -500 to -75 MPa and of +168 to + 24 MPa, respectively. These stress terms incorporated with resintering during thermal exposure affected the mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus of the top coat.

  19. Thermally developing forced convection and the corresponding thermal stresses in a porous plate channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao; LIU Xuemei

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Darcy fluid model, by considering the effects of viscous dissipation due to the interaction between solid skeleton and pore fluid flow and thermal conduction in the direction of the fluid flow, the thermally developing forced convection of the local thermal equili- brium and the corresponding thermal stresses in a semi- infmite saturated porous plate channel are investigated in this paper. The expressions of temperature, local Nusselt number and corresponding thermal stresses are obtained by means of the Fourier series, and the distributions of the same are also shown. Furthermore, influences of the Péclet number (Pe) and Brinkman number (Br) on temperature, Nusselt number (Nu) and thermal stress are revealed numerically.

  20. Acute stress and working memory in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Almela, Mercedes; Puig-Perez, Sara; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that acute stress affects working memory (WM) in young adults, but the effect in older people is understudied. As observed in other types of memory, older people may be less sensitive to acute effects of stress on WM. We performed two independent studies with healthy older men and women (from 55 to 77 years old) to investigate the effects of acute stress (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and cortisol on WM. In study 1 (n = 63), after the TSST women (but not men) improved their performance on Digit Span Forward (a measure of the memory span component of WM) but not on Digit Span Backward (a measure of both memory span and the executive component of WM). Furthermore, in women, cortisol levels at the moment of memory testing showed a positive association with the memory span component of WM before and after the TSST, and with the executive component of WM only before the stress task. In study 2 (n = 76), although participants showed a cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) response to the TSST, stress did not affect performance on Letter-Number Sequencing (LNS; a task that places a high demand on the executive component of WM). Cortisol and sAA were not associated with WM. The results indicate that circulating cortisol levels at the moment of memory testing, and not the stress response, affect memory span in older women, and that stress and the increase in cortisol levels after stress do not affect the executive component of WM in older men and women. This study provides further evidence that older people may be less sensitive to stress and stress-induced cortisol response effects on memory processes.

  1. Acute psychosocial stress and children's memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Veld, Danielle M J; Riksen-Walraven, J Marianne; de Weerth, Carolina

    2014-07-01

    We investigated whether children's performance on working memory (WM) and delayed retrieval (DR) tasks decreased after stress exposure, and how physiological stress responses related to performance under stress. About 158 children (83 girls; Mage = 10.61 years, SD = 0.52) performed two WM tasks (WM forward and WM backward) and a DR memory task first during a control condition, and 1 week later during a stress challenge. Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) and cortisol were assessed during the challenge. Only WM backward performance declined over conditions. Correlations between physiological stress responses and performance within the stress challenge were present only for WM forward and DR. For WM forward, higher cortisol responses were related to better performance. For DR, there was an inverted U-shape relation between cortisol responses and performance, as well as a cortisol × sAA interaction, with concurrent high or low responses related to optimal performance. This emphasizes the importance of including curvilinear and interaction effects when relating physiology to memory.

  2. A new model for analysing thermal stress in granular composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑茂盛; 金志浩; 浩宏奇

    1995-01-01

    A double embedding model of inletting reinforcement grain and hollow matrix ball into the effective media of the particulate-reinforced composite is advanced. And with this model the distributions of thermal stress in different phases of the composite during cooling are studied. Various expressions for predicting elastic and elastoplastic thermal stresses are derived. It is found that the reinforcement suffers compressive hydrostatic stress and the hydrostatic stress in matrix zone is a tensile one when temperature decreases; when temperature further decreases, yield area in matrix forms; when the volume fraction of reinforcement is enlarged, compressive stress on grain and tensile hydrostatic stress in matrix zone decrease; the initial temperature difference of the interface of reinforcement and matrix yielding rises, while that for the matrix yielding overall decreases.

  3. Detecting drought stress in longan tree using thermal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Winai Wiriya-Alongko

    2013-01-01

    Thailand is the world’s number-one producer of longan fruit. In general, longan production takes place during the dry season under irrigation. Recently, more attention has been given to water-efficient irrigation. Water stress detection by thermal imaging, which is a non-invasive and rapid assessment method, may be an interesting tool for improved irrigation planning. In this study, four potted longan trees were subjected to water stress. Stress responses in terms of stomatal resistance (rs) ...

  4. Analytical method for thermal stress analysis of plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J. H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-10-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of plasma facing materials (PFMs) to heat loads from the fusion plasma is one of the crucial issues in fusion technology. In this work, a fully analytical description of the thermal stress distribution in armour tiles of plasma facing components is presented which is expected to occur under typical high heat flux (HHF) loads. The method of stress superposition is applied considering the temperature gradient and thermal expansion mismatch. Several combinations of PFMs and heat sink metals are analysed and compared. In the framework of the present theoretical model, plastic flow and the effect of residual stress can be quantitatively assessed. Possible failure features are discussed.

  5. Deficiency of antinociception and excessive grooming induced by acute immobilization stress in Per1 mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhouqiao; Zhou, Linglin; Li, Huili; Teng, Huajing; Dai, Wei; Wang, Yongqing; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2011-01-14

    Acute stressors induce changes in numerous behavioral parameters through activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Several important hormones in paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) play the roles in these stress-induced reactions. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and corticosterone are considered as molecular markers for stress-induced grooming behavior. Oxytocin in PVN is an essential modulator for stress-induced antinociception. The clock gene, Per1, has been identified as an effecter response to the acute stresses, but its function in neuroendocrine stress systems remains unclear. In the present study we observed the alterations in grooming and nociceptive behaviors induced by acute immobilization stress in Per1 mutant mice and other genotypes (wild types and Per2 mutant). The results displayed that stress elicited a more robust effect on grooming behavior in Per1 mutant mice than in other genotypes. Subsequently, the obvious stress-induced antinociception was observed in the wild-type and Per2 mutant mice, however, in Per1 mutant, this antinociceptive effects were partially-reversed (mechanical sensitivity), or over-reversed to hyperalgesia (thermal sensitivity). The real-time qPCR results showed that in PVN, there were stress-induced up-regulations of Crh, Avp and c-fos in all of genotypes; moreover, the expression change of Crh in Per1 mutant mice was much larger than in others. Another hormonal gene, Oxt, was up-regulated induced by stress in wild-type and Per2 mutant but not in Per1 mutant. In addition, the stress significantly elevated the serum corticosterone levels without genotype-dependent differences, and accordingly the glucocorticoid receptor gene, Nr3c1, expressed with a similar pattern in PVN of all strains. Taken together, the present study indicated that in acute stress treated Per1 mutant mice, there are abnormal hormonal responses in PVN, correlating with the aberrant

  6. Photo-elastic effect, thermal lensing and depolarization in a-cut tetragonal laser crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumashev, K. V.; Zakharova, A. N.; Loiko, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    We report on analytical description of thermal lensing effect in tetragonal crystals cut along the [1 0 0] crystallographic axis, for the two principal light polarizations, E ┴ c and E || c, under diode-pumping (plane stress approximation). Within this approach, we take into account anisotropy of elastic, photo-elastic, thermal and optical properties of the material. Expressions for the ‘generalized’ thermo-optic coefficient χ are presented. It is shown that astigmatism of thermal lens is determined both by the photo-elastic and end-bulging effects. The sign of the photo-elastic term χ″ can be either positive or negative affecting significantly the sign of the thermal lens. Depolarization loss in a-cut tetragonal crystals is few orders of magnitude lower than that in cubic crystals. Calculations are performed for a-cut tetragonal molybdates, Nd:CaMoO4, Nd:PbMoO4 and Nd:NaBi(MoO4)2.

  7. Thermal residual stresses and stress distributions under tensile and compressive loadings of short fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The thermal residual stresses and the stress distributions of short fiber reinforced metal matrix composite under tensile and compressive loadings were studied using large strain axisymmetric elasto-plastic finite element method. It is demonstrated that the thermal residual stresses can result in asymmetrical stress distributions and matrix plasticity. The thermal residual stresses decrease the stress transfer in tension and enhance the stress transfer in compression. The fiber volume fraction has more important effects on the thermal residual stresses and the stress distributions under tensile and compressive loadings than the fiber aspect ratio and the fiber end distance.

  8. Effects of hemin and thermal stress exposure on JWA expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming; CHEN Rui; LI Aiping; ZHOU Jianwei

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the expression of JWA after hemin and (or) thermal stress exposure,we treated K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia cells) cells with different doses of hemin and thermal stress using different exposure times.The expression of JWA protein was determined by Western blot analysis.Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out to determine JWA mRNA expression.JWA promoter transcription activity analysis was performed by chloramphenicol acetyl transferase-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (CAT-ELISA).The expression of JWA protein was significantly increased by up to (3.23 +0.57) folds compared to the control in K562 cells after hemin treatment (50 μM for one week),and a similar pattern was observed in the cells after treatment with thermal stress (42℃) for 2 hours [increased by (8.00+ 1.73) folds].The expression of JWA mRNA was also significantly elevated by up to (1.37 + 0.06)folds in K562 cells treated with hemin (30 μM for 48 hours),and a similar regulatory pattern [increased by (1.87±0.13)folds] was observed with thermal stress exposure (42℃) for 30 minutes.However,a combined antagonistic effect was observed in the treatment of K562 cells with hemin (30 μM,48 h) followed by thermal stress (42℃,30 min).CAT-ELISA further confirmed that either hemin or thermal stress treatment could up-regulate JWA transcription activity,however,the effects could be counteracted partly by treatment with a combination of both.Hemin and thermal stress might regulate JWA expression via distinct intracellular signal transduction pathways.

  9. Residual Stress Analysis of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coating Based on Thermal Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki; Wada, Eiji; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    Residual stress is generated in ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which were sprayed by a plasma spray technology, due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion between the coating and the substrate. Previous experimental results obtained by the X-ray diffraction method indicated that the residual stress at the ceramic coating surface is tensile and could lead to TBC failure such as cracking and spalling of the ceramic coating. In this study, a numerical model that can predict the residual stress exactly is proposed by taking into account a thermal spray process. This numerical model is a layer-buildup model based on a shear-lag theory, and the residual stress contribution comes from two kinds of the following stress components: (1) quenching stress, which was generated in molten spray particles impinged onto the substrate, and (2) thermal stress, which was generated due to differences in thermal expansion between the deposited particle and the underlying substrate. It is shown herein that residual stress predicted by the proposed numerical model coincided with the experimental one obtained by the strain gage technique, with a good level of accuracy.

  10. Converging, Synergistic Actions of Multiple Stress Hormones Mediate Enduring Memory Impairments after Acute Simultaneous Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuncai; Molet, Jenny; Lauterborn, Julie C; Trieu, Brian H; Bolton, Jessica L; Patterson, Katelin P; Gall, Christine M; Lynch, Gary; Baram, Tallie Z

    2016-11-02

    Stress influences memory, an adaptive process crucial for survival. During stress, hippocampal synapses are bathed in a mixture of stress-released molecules, yet it is unknown whether or how these interact to mediate the effects of stress on memory. Here, we demonstrate novel synergistic actions of corticosterone and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on synaptic physiology and dendritic spine structure that mediate the profound effects of acute concurrent stresses on memory. Spatial memory in mice was impaired enduringly after acute concurrent stresses resulting from loss of synaptic potentiation associated with disrupted structure of synapse-bearing dendritic spines. Combined application of the stress hormones corticosterone and CRH recapitulated the physiological and structural defects provoked by acute stresses. Mechanistically, corticosterone and CRH, via their cognate receptors, acted synergistically on the spine-actin regulator RhoA, promoting its deactivation and degradation, respectively, and destabilizing spines. Accordingly, blocking the receptors of both hormones, but not each alone, rescued memory. Therefore, the synergistic actions of corticosterone and CRH at hippocampal synapses underlie memory impairments after concurrent and perhaps also single, severe acute stresses, with potential implications to spatial memory dysfunction in, for example, posttraumatic stress disorder. Stress influences memory, an adaptive process crucial for survival. During stress, adrenal corticosterone and hippocampal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) permeate memory-forming hippocampal synapses, yet it is unknown whether (and how) these hormones interact to mediate effects of stress. Here, we demonstrate novel synergistic actions of corticosterone and CRH on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spine structure that mediate the memory-disrupting effects of stress. Combined application of both hormones provoked synaptic function collapse and spine disruption

  11. Nonlinear/linear unified thermal stress formulations - Transfinite element approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1987-01-01

    A new unified computational approach for applicability to nonlinear/linear thermal-structural problems is presented. Basic concepts of the approach including applicability to nonlinear and linear thermal structural mechanics are first described via general formulations. Therein, the approach is demonstrated for thermal stress and thermal-structural dynamic applications. The proposed transfinite element approach focuses on providing a viable hybrid computational methodology by combining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element schemes in conjunction with transform techniques and the classical Bubnov-Galerkin schemes. Comparative samples of numerical test cases highlight the capabilities of the proposed concepts.

  12. Effect of Thermal Stress on Cardiac Function

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body heating decreases pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and cerebral vascular conductance, and causes an inotropic shift in the Frank-Starling curve. Whole-body cooling increases pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and cerebral vascular conductance without changing systolic function. These and other data indicate factors affecting cardiac function may mechanistically contribute to syncope during heat stress and improvements in orthostatic tolerance during cold stress.

  13. X-ray residual stress analysis of a ceramic thermal barrier coating undergoing thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D.W. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Faber, K.T. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States))

    1993-11-25

    The residual stress of a ZrO[sub 2]-8%Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] thermal barrier coating was determined as a function of thermal cycling. Samples were thermally cycled from 400 C to 1000 C in air. After a few cycles the samples exhibited a value of compressive residual stress consistent with that determined by considering the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate. Stress relief occurs in the ZrO[sub 2]-Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] coating, increasing in both frequency and magnitude with increasing number of thermal cycles. This behavior is explained in terms of a model of failure of coatings in compression. (orig.)

  14. Does Acute Stress Disorder Predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Following Bank Robbery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask

    2013-01-01

    Unfortunately, the number of bank robberies is increasing and little is known about the subsequent risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Several studies have investigated the prediction of PTSD through the presence of acute stress disorder (ASD). However, there have only been a few studies following nonsexual assault. The present study…

  15. Oxidative stress during acute FIV infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Craig; Lehman, Tracy; McCord, Kelly; Avery, Paul; Dow, Steven

    2008-03-15

    Oxidative stress is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of HIV infection in humans. For example, CD4(+) T cells are particularly affected in HIV patients and oxidative stress may also contribute to impairment of neutrophil function in HIV/AIDS patients. Since cats infected with FIV develop many of the same immunological abnormalites as HIV-infected humans, we investigated effects of acute FIV infection on oxidative stress in cats. Cats were infected with a pathogenic strain of FIV and viral load, changes in neutrophil number, total blood glutathione, malondiadehye, antioxidant enzyme concentrations, and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration in leukocytes were measured sequentially during the first 16 weeks of infection. We found that superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase concentrations in whole blood increased significantly during acute FIV infection. In addition, neutrophil numbers increased significantly during this time period, though their intracellular GSH concentrations did not change. In contrast, the numbers of CD4(+) T cells decreased significantly and their intracellular GSH concentration increased significantly, while intracellular GSH concentrations were unchanged in CD8(+) T cells. However, by 16 weeks of infection, many of the abnormalities in oxidative balance had stabilized or returned to pre-inoculation values. These results suggest that acute infection with FIV causes oxidative stress in cats and that CD4(+) T cells appear to be preferentially affected. Further studies are required to determine whether early treatment with anti-oxidants may help ameliorate the decline in CD4(+) T cell number and function associated with acute FIV infection in cats.

  16. Acute Stress Disorder: Conceptual Issues and Treatment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koucky, Ellen M.; Galovski, Tara E.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

    2012-01-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) was included as a diagnosis to the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a way of describing pathological reactions in the first month following a trauma. Since that time, ASD has been the focus of some controversy, particularly regarding the theoretical basis…

  17. Predicting Performance Under Acute Stress : The Role of Individual Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahaij, R.; Dam, K. van; Gaillard, A.W.K.; Soeters, J.

    2011-01-01

    This prospective study examined how differences in coping style, coping self-efficacy, and metacognitive awareness influence coping behavior and performance during a realistic acute stressful exercise in 2 military samples (n = 122 and n = 132). Results showed that coping self-efficacy and coping st

  18. Residual Stress in TGO and Interfacial Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating after Thermal Exposure and Cyclic Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shijie; Fukuda, Kunihisa; Osaki, Toru

    The local stress distributions in thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer of thermal barrier coating before and after thermal exposure were measured by photo-stimulated luminescence spectrum. The effect of isothermal oxidation on the residual stress in the TGO was investigated. It was found that the compressive stress in the TGO increased with an increase in thermal exposure time up to 100 hours and then decreased. The residual stresses in the TGO were also influenced by interfacial damage introduced by cyclic indentation.

  19. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Acute Stress Disorder II: Considerations for Treatment and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is a common and often chronic and disabling anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to highly stressful events characterized by actual or threatened harm to the self or others. This is the second of two invited articles summarizing the nature and treatment of PTSD and the associated condition of acute stress disorder (ASD). The present article reviews evidence for the efficacy of psychological and pharmacological treatments for PTSD and ASD. In summary, ...

  20. Acute myocardial infarction and stress cardiomyopathy following the Christchurch earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christina; Elliott, John; Troughton, Richard; Frampton, Christopher; Smyth, David; Crozier, Ian; Bridgman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Christchurch, New Zealand, was struck by 2 major earthquakes at 4:36 am on 4 September 2010, magnitude 7.1 and at 12:51 pm on 22 February 2011, magnitude 6.3. Both events caused widespread destruction. Christchurch Hospital was the region's only acute care hospital. It remained functional following both earthquakes. We were able to examine the effects of the 2 earthquakes on acute cardiac presentations. Patients admitted under Cardiology in Christchurch Hospital 3 week prior to and 5 weeks following both earthquakes were analysed, with corresponding control periods in September 2009 and February 2010. Patients were categorised based on diagnosis: ST elevation myocardial infarction, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction, stress cardiomyopathy, unstable angina, stable angina, non cardiac chest pain, arrhythmia and others. There was a significant increase in overall admissions (pearthquake. This pattern was not seen after the early afternoon February earthquake. Instead, there was a very large number of stress cardiomyopathy admissions with 21 cases (95% CI 2.6-6.4) in 4 days. There had been 6 stress cardiomyopathy cases after the first earthquake (95% CI 0.44-2.62). Statistical analysis showed this to be a significant difference between the earthquakes (pearthquake triggered a large increase in ST elevation myocardial infarction and a few stress cardiomyopathy cases. The early afternoon February earthquake caused significantly more stress cardiomyopathy. Two major earthquakes occurring at different times of day differed in their effect on acute cardiac events.

  1. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  2. Lipid biomarkers in Symbiodinium dinoflagellates: new indicators of thermal stress

    KAUST Repository

    Kneeland, J.

    2013-08-30

    Lipid content and fatty acid profiles of corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts are known to vary in response to high-temperature stress. To better understand the heat-stress response in these symbionts, we investigated cultures of Symbiodinium goreauii type C1 and Symbiodinium sp. clade subtype D1 grown under a range of temperatures and durations. The predominant lipids produced by Symbiodinium are palmitic (C16) and stearic (C18) saturated fatty acids and their unsaturated analogs, the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6, n-3; DHA), and a variety of sterols. Prolonged exposure to high temperature causes the relative amount of unsaturated acids within the C18 fatty acids in Symbiodinium tissue to decrease. Thermal stress also causes a decrease in abundance of fatty acids relative to sterols, as well as the more specific ratio of DHA to an algal 4-methyl sterol. These shifts in fatty acid unsaturation and fatty acid-to-sterol ratios are common to both types C1 and D1, but the apparent thermal threshold of lipid changes is lower for type C1. This work indicates that ratios among free fatty acids and sterols in Symbiodinium can be used as sensitive indicators of thermal stress. If the Symbiodinium lipid stress response is unchanged in hospite, the algal heat-stress biomarkers we have identified could be measured to detect thermal stress within the coral holobiont. These results provide new insights into the potential role of lipids in the overall Symbiodinium thermal stress response. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  3. The physician's role in managing acute stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavan, Michael G; Elsasser, Gary N; Barone, Eugene J

    2012-10-01

    Acute stress disorder is a psychiatric diagnosis that may occur in patients within four weeks of a traumatic event. Features include anxiety, intense fear or helplessness, dissociative symptoms, reexperiencing the event, and avoidance behaviors. Persons with this disorder are at increased risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder. Other risk factors for posttraumatic stress disorder include current or family history of anxiety or mood disorders, a history of sexual or physical abuse, lower cognitive ability, engaging in excessive safety behaviors, and greater symptom severity one to two weeks after the trauma. Common reactions to trauma include physical, mental, and emotional symptoms. Persistent psychological distress that is severe enough to interfere with psychological or social functioning may warrant further evaluation and intervention. Patients experiencing acute stress disorder may benefit from psychological first aid, which includes ensuring the patient's safety; providing information about the event, stress reactions, and how to cope; offering practical assistance; and helping the patient to connect with social support and other services. Cognitive behavior therapy is effective in reducing symptoms and decreasing the future incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing aims to mitigate emotional distress through sharing emotions about the traumatic event, providing education and tips on coping, and attempting to normalize reactions to trauma. However, this method may actually impede natural recovery by overwhelming victims. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of drugs in the treatment of acute stress disorder. Short-term pharmacologic intervention may be beneficial in relieving specific associated symptoms, such as pain, insomnia, and depression.

  4. REPEATED ACUTE STRESS INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN RAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute stress induced alterations in the activity levels of rate limiting enzymes and concentration of intermediates of different pathways of carbohydrate metabolism have been studied. Adult male Wistar rats were restrained (RS for 1 h and after an interval of 4 h they were subjected to forced swimming (FS exercise and appropriate controls were maintained. Five rats were killed before the commencement of the experiment (initial controls, 5 control and equal number of stressed rats were killed 2 h after RS and remaining 5 rats in each group were killed 4 h after FS. There was a significant increase in the adrenal 3β- hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity following RS, which showed further increase after FS compared to controls and thereby indicated stress response of rats. There was a significant increase in the blood glucose levels following RS which showed further increase and reached hyperglycemic condition after FS. The hyperglycemic condition due to stress was accompanied by significant increases in the activities of glutamate- pyruvate transaminase, glutamate- oxaloacetate transaminase, glucose -6- phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase and significant decrease in the glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, whereas pyruvate kinase activity did not show any alteration compared to controls. Further, the glycogen and total protein contents of the liver were decreased whereas those of pyruvate and lactate showed significant increase compared to controls after RS as well as FS.The results put together indicate that acute stress induced hyperglycemia results due to increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis without alteration in glycolysis. The study first time reveals that after first acute stress exposure, the subsequent stressful experience augments metabolic stress response leading to hyperglycemia. The results have relevance to human health as human beings are exposed to several stressors in a day and

  5. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress.

  6. Human thermal bioclimatic conditions associated with acute cardiovascular syndromes in Crete Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleta, Anastasia G.; Nastos, Panagiotis T.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the association between bioclimatic conditions and daily counts of admissions for non-fatal acute cardiovascular (acute coronary syndrome, arrhythmia, decompensation of heart failure) syndromes (ACS) registered by the two main hospitals in Heraklion, Crete Island, during a five-year period 2008-2012. The bioclimatic conditions analyzed are based on human thermal bioclimatic indices such as the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). Mean daily meteorological parameters, such as air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and cloudiness, were acquired from the meteorological station of Heraklion (Hellenic National Meteorological Service). These parameters were used as input variables in modeling the aforementioned thermal indices, in order to interpret the grade of the thermo-physiological stress. The PET and UTCI analysis was performed by the use of the radiation and bioclimate model, "RayMan", which is well-suited to calculate radiation fluxes and human biometeorological indices. Generalized linear models (GLM) were applied to time series of daily numbers of outpatients with ACS against bioclimatic variations, after controlling for possible confounders and adjustment for season and trends. The interpretation of the results of this analysis suggests a significant association between cold weather and increased coronary heart disease incidence, especially in the elderly and males. Additionally, heat stress plays an important role in the configuration of daily ACS outpatients, even in temperate climate, as that in Crete Island. In this point it is worth mentioning that Crete Island is frequently affected by Saharan outbreaks, which are associated in many cases with miscellaneous phenomena, such as Föhn winds - hot and dry winds - causing extreme bioclimatic conditions (strong heat stress). Taking into consideration the projected increased ambient temperature in the future, ACS

  7. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chambers, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  8. Thermal stress weathering and the spalling of Antarctic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamp, J. L.; Marchant, D. R.; Mackay, S. L.; Head, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Using in situ field measurements, laboratory analyses, and numerical modeling, we test the potential efficacy of thermal stress weathering in the flaking of millimeter-thick alteration rinds observed on cobbles and boulders of Ferrar Dolerite on Mullins Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV). In particular, we examine whether low-magnitude stresses, arising from temperature variations over time, result in thermal fatigue weathering, yielding slow crack propagation along existing cracks and ultimate flake detachment. Our field results show that during summer months clasts of Ferrar Dolerite experience large-temperature gradients across partially detached alteration rinds (>4.7°C mm-1) and abrupt fluctuations in surface temperature (up to 12°C min-1); the latter are likely due to the combined effects of changing solar irradiation and cooling from episodic winds. The results of our thermal stress model, coupled with subcritical crack growth theory, suggest that thermal stresses induced at the base of thin alteration rinds 2 mm thick, common on rocks exposed for 105 years, may be sufficient to cause existing cracks to propagate under present-day meteorological forcing, eventually leading to rind detachment. The increase in porosity observed within alteration rinds relative to unaltered rock interiors, as well as predicted decreases in rind strength based on allied weathering studies, likely facilitates thermal stress crack propagation through a reduction of fracture toughness. We conclude that thermal stress weathering may be an active, though undervalued, weathering process in hyperarid, terrestrial polar deserts such as the stable upland region of the MDV.

  9. Stress hyperglycemia and acute ischemic stroke in-hospital outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Dimitriou, Panagiotis; Bouziana, Stella D; Spanou, Marianna; Kostaki, Stavroula; Angelopoulou, Stella-Maria; Papadopoulou, Maria; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

    2017-02-01

    Stress hyperglycemia is frequent in patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, it is unclear whether stress hyperglycemia only reflects stroke severity or if it is directly associated with adverse outcome. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of stress hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively studied 790 consecutive patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke (41.0% males, age 79.4±6.8years). The severity of stroke was assessed at admission with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Stress hyperglycemia was defined as fasting serum glucose levels at the second day after admission ≥126mg/dl in patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The outcome was assessed with adverse outcome rates at discharge (modified Rankin scale between 2 and 6) and with in-hospital mortality. In the total study population, 8.6% had stress hyperglycemia. Patients with stress hyperglycemia had more severe stroke. Independent predictors of adverse outcome at discharge were age, prior ischemic stroke and NIHSS at admission whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of adverse outcome were age, heart rate at admission, prior ischemic stroke, log-triglyceride (TG) levels and stress hyperglycemia, whereas treatment with statins prior to stroke was associated with favorable outcome. Independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were atrial fibrillation (AF), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum log-TG levels and NIHSS at admission. When the NIHSS was removed from the multivariate model, independent predictors of in-hospital mortality were age, AF, DBP, log-TG levels and stress hyperglycemia. Stress hyperglycemia does not appear to be directly associated with the outcome of acute ischemic stroke. However, given that patients with stress hyperglycemia had higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors than

  10. Dynamic changes in saliva after acute mental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A.; Sandulescu, Tudor; Bochnig, Clemens; Khatib, Philipp Al; Lee, Wing-Kee; Zimmer, Stefan; Arnold, Wolfgang H.

    2014-01-01

    Stress-related variations of fluoride concentration in supernatant saliva and salivary sediment, salivary cortisol, total protein and pH after acute mental stress were assessed. The hypothesis was that stress reactions have no influence on these parameters. Thirty-four male students were distributed into two groups: first received the stress exposure followed by the same protocol two weeks later but without stress exposure, second underwent the protocol without stress exposure followed by the stress exposure two weeks later. The stressor was a public speech followed by tooth brushing. Saliva was collected before, immediately after stress induction and immediately, at 10, 30 and 120 min. after tooth brushing. Cortisol concentrations, total protein, intraoral pH, and fluoride content in saliva were measured. The data were analyzed statistically. Salivary sediment was ca 4.33% by weight of whole unstimulated saliva. Fluoride bioavailability was higher in salivary sediment than in supernatant saliva. The weight and fluoride concentration was not altered during 2 hours after stress exposure. After a public speech, the salivary cortisol concentration significantly increased after 20 minutes compared to the baseline. The salivary protein concentration and pH also increased. Public speaking influences protein concentration and salivary pH but does not alter the fluoride concentration of saliva. PMID:24811301

  11. Thermal cycling stresses in W-monofilament reinforced copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoebel, Michael; Jonke, Johannes; Degischer, H. Peter [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology (Austria); Herrmann, Aurelia; Brendel, Annegret [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wimpory, Robert [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Wannsee (Germany); Buslaps, Thomas [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2011-08-15

    New materials have to be developed for fusion reactor systems to withstand the high thermal load and heavy irradiation under service conditions. The divertor element collects the residuals of the nuclear reaction and withdraws heat from the reaction chamber into a heat sink. A thermal flux of {approx}20 W mK{sup -1} can be expected in such components. A plasma facing W plate is attached to a CuCrZr heat sink suffering CTE mismatch stresses at the interface due to pulsed operation required for the Tokamak reactor design. Fiber reinforced metal matrix composites are applied as an interlayer to reduce macroscopic interfacial stresses in these components. W-wire reinforced copper is a promising material for this application due to a good fiber-matrix bonding strength which is further increased by surface etching or graded interface designs. Thermal stresses in between the matrix and the wires are responsible for thermal fatigue damage within the constituents and at their interface. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction was performed in situ during thermal cycling to determine the micro stress amplitudes and their changes under simulated service conditions. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Thermal Stresses in a Cylinder Block Casting Due to Coupled Thermal and Mechanical Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; KANG Jinwu; HUANG Tianyou; HU Yongyi

    2008-01-01

    Thermal stress in castings results from nonuniform cooling. The thermal stress and the deforma-tion can change the casting and mold contact conditions which then alter the heat transfer between the cast-ing and the mold. The contact element method was used to study the interaction between a sand mold and a casting. The contact status was then fed back to the heat transfer analysis between the sand mold and the casting to re-evaluate the heat transfer coefficient based on the gap size or pressure between surfaces. The thermal and mechanical phenomena are then coupled in two directions. The method was applied to analyze stress in a stress frame specimen casting and a cylinder block. The results are more accurate than without consideration of the contact effects on the heat transfer.

  13. Detecting drought stress in longan tree using thermal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winai Wiriya-Alongko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thailand is the world’s number-one producer of longan fruit. In general, longan production takes place during the dry season under irrigation. Recently, more attention has been given to water-efficient irrigation. Water stress detection by thermal imaging, which is a non-invasive and rapid assessment method, may be an interesting tool for improved irrigation planning. In this study, four potted longan trees were subjected to water stress. Stress responses in terms of stomatal resistance (rs and leaf water potential (LWP were monitored and compared with a non-stressed control. Based on thermal imaging, the crop water stress index (CWSI was determined throughout the experiment for all trees and correlations with classical parameters were investigated. A field experiment was also carried out with 20 field-grown longan trees, either subjected to water stress treatment or serving as controls; trees were monitored for rs, LWP and CWSI. Under controlled conditions there was a high correlation between CWSI and both rs and LWP during the entire experimental period. In the field experiment it was found that CWSI was best correlated with rs when images were taken from the shaded side of the leaves. A threshold value of 0.7 for CWSI is proposed to distinguish between stressed and non-stressed longan trees.

  14. EFFECTS OF ACUTE THERMAL STRESS ON HSP70 MRNA, PHYSIOLOGY AND NONSPECIFIC IMMUNITY IN SIBERIAN STURGEON (ACIPENSER BAERII)%急性热应激对西伯利亚鲟HSP70mRNA表达、血清皮质醇和非特异性免疫的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田照辉; 徐绍刚; 王巍; 胡红霞; 马国庆

    2013-01-01

    The effect of acute thermal stress on HSP1Q mRNA expression, physiology and nonspecific immunity were investigated in Siberian sturgeon. In the experiment, ten fish were transferred froml7.5℃ to 27.5℃ water, then data were measured at lh and 3h. Fish in 17.5℃ water were taken as Oh group. Respiratory rate increased from 80-90 breaths/min to 210 breaths/min, then decreased to 180 breaths/min after 0.5h. Among the three tissues including gill, spleen and brain, the HSP70 mRNA expression in gill rose most quickly after lh stress, and was about 1.63 fold compared with the Oh group (P<0.05), then remained this level to 3h; The HSP10 mRNA expression in spleen and brain had nearly no change in lh thermal stress, then rose quickly from lh to 3h in the two tissues, especially in brain at 3h rose most quickly to about 1.77 fold compared with the lh group (P<0.05). Compared with the Oh group, serum cortisol increased quickly and was 5.14 fold (PO.05) at lh, then decreased quickly to 2.1 fold at 3h. Spleen macrophage respiratory burst achieved the maximum (P<0.05) at lh, then reduced to the Oh group level. Serum complement C3 increased at lh and decreased significantly at 3h (P<0.05). Serum lysozyme activity firstly elevated then decreased but had no significant differences. Serum SOD activity decreased when thermal stress time prolonged, and achieved the minimum at 3h (P<0.05). Serum MDA content decreased when thermal stress time prolonged and had no significant difference. The results showed that lh acute thermal stress promoted the nonspecific immunity and tolerance, but 3h acute thermal stress decreased it.%为研究西伯利亚鲟(Acipenser baerii)对急性热应激的抗逆机理,将体质量为(155.47±19.50) g的鱼从17.5 ℃迅速转至27.5 ℃水中,在1h和3h取样测定HSP70 mRNA表达变化、血清皮质醇和非特异性免疫指标.结果显示:急性热应激时鳃、脾和脑的HSP70 mRNA表达量升高,具有组织特异性,热应激1h时

  15. Fluoxetine and diazepam acutely modulate stress induced-behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Ana Cristina V V; Abreu, Murilo S; Giacomini, Luidia V; Siebel, Anna M; Zimerman, Fernanda F; Rambo, Cassiano L; Mocelin, Ricieri; Bonan, Carla D; Piato, Angelo L; Barcellos, Leonardo J G

    2016-01-01

    Drug residue contamination in aquatic ecosystems has been studied extensively, but the behavioral effects exerted by the presence of these drugs are not well known. Here, we investigated the effects of acute stress on anxiety, memory, social interaction, and aggressiveness in zebrafish exposed to fluoxetine and diazepam at concentrations that disrupt the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal (HPI) axis. Stress increased the locomotor activity and time spent in the bottom area of the tank (novel tank). Fluoxetine and diazepam prevented these behaviors. We also observed that stress and fluoxetine and diazepam exposures decreased social interaction. Stress also increased aggressive behavior, which was not reversed by fluoxetine or diazepam. These data suggest that the presence of these drugs in aquatic ecosystems causes significant behavioral alterations in fish.

  16. The relationship between bioclimatic thermal stress and subjective thermal sensation in pedestrian spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlmutter, David; Jiao, Dixin; Garb, Yaakov

    2014-12-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort has important implications for urban planning and energy consumption in the built environment. To better understand the relation of subjective thermal experience to bioclimatic thermal stress in such contexts, this study compares micrometeorological and perceptual data from urban spaces in the hot-arid Negev region of Israel. Pedestrians reported on their thermal sensation in these spaces, whereas radiation and convection-related data were used to compute the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS) and physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The former is a straightforward characterization of energy exchanges between the human body and its surroundings, without any conversion to an "equivalent temperature." Although the relation of ITS to subjective thermal sensation has been analyzed in the past under controlled indoor conditions, this paper offers the first analysis of this relation in an outdoor setting. ITS alone can account for nearly 60 % of the variance in pedestrians' thermal sensation under outdoor conditions, somewhat more than PET. A series of regressions with individual contextual variables and ITS identified those factors which accounted for additional variance in thermal sensation, whereas multivariate analyses indicated the considerable predictive power ( R-square = 0.74) of models including multiple contextual variables in addition to ITS. Our findings indicate that pedestrians experiencing variable outdoor conditions have a greater tolerance for incremental changes in thermal stress than has been shown previously under controlled indoor conditions, with a tapering of responses at high values of ITS. However, the thresholds of ITS corresponding to thermal "neutrality" and thermal "acceptability" are quite consistent regardless of context.

  17. Minimizing Thermal Stress for Data Center Servers through Thermal-Aware Relocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, T. C.; Hussain, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in inlet air temperature may lower the rate of heat dissipation from air cooled computing servers. This introduces a thermal stress to these servers. As a result, the poorly cooled active servers will start conducting heat to the neighboring servers and giving rise to hotspot regions of thermal stress, inside the data center. As a result, the physical hardware of these servers may fail, thus causing performance loss, monetary loss, and higher energy consumption for cooling mechanism. In order to minimize these situations, this paper performs the profiling of inlet temperature sensitivity (ITS) and defines the optimum location for each server to minimize the chances of creating a thermal hotspot and thermal stress. Based upon novel ITS analysis, a thermal state monitoring and server relocation algorithm for data centers is being proposed. The contribution of this paper is bringing the peak outlet temperatures of the relocated servers closer to average outlet temperature by over 5 times, lowering the average peak outlet temperature by 3.5% and minimizing the thermal stress. PMID:24987743

  18. Minimizing Thermal Stress for Data Center Servers through Thermal-Aware Relocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tayyab Chaudhry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rise in inlet air temperature may lower the rate of heat dissipation from air cooled computing servers. This introduces a thermal stress to these servers. As a result, the poorly cooled active servers will start conducting heat to the neighboring servers and giving rise to hotspot regions of thermal stress, inside the data center. As a result, the physical hardware of these servers may fail, thus causing performance loss, monetary loss, and higher energy consumption for cooling mechanism. In order to minimize these situations, this paper performs the profiling of inlet temperature sensitivity (ITS and defines the optimum location for each server to minimize the chances of creating a thermal hotspot and thermal stress. Based upon novel ITS analysis, a thermal state monitoring and server relocation algorithm for data centers is being proposed. The contribution of this paper is bringing the peak outlet temperatures of the relocated servers closer to average outlet temperature by over 5 times, lowering the average peak outlet temperature by 3.5% and minimizing the thermal stress.

  19. Thermal stresses in functionally graded materials caused by a laser thermal shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elperin, T.; Rudin, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pearlstone Center for Aeronautical Engineering Studies Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2002-08-01

    Mathematical simulation of a thermal shock method for reliability testing of functionally graded material (FGM) is performed with the end to determine operating parameters of the testing device (power of a laser, laser beam radius, duration of heating) and to investigate the effect of the composition of FGM on a magnitude of thermal stresses in a coating. An analytical method for solution of the thermal elasticity problem is developed whereby the approach of a multilayer plate is used for determining temperature and thermal stresses distributions in a coating. We considered the limiting case of the obtained solution when the thickness of a layer is infinitesimally small and the number of layers tends to infinity. This procedure allowed us to obtain the thermal stresses distribution in a FGM coating. The results for the FGM coating composed of WC (tungsten carbide) ceramics and HS-steel are presented. It is showed that variation of the volume content of ceramics strongly affects thermal stresses in a coating and they decrease significantly in the case of the uniform spatial distribution of ceramics. (orig.)

  20. The measurement of thermal stress distributions along the flow path in injection-molded flat plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hastenberg, C.H.V.; Wildervanck, P.C.; Leenen, A.J.H.; Schennink, G.G.J.

    1992-01-01

    Internal stresses in injection-molded parts are the result of thermal, flow, and pressure histories. Internal stresses can be roughly divided into thermal and flow-induced stresses. In this paper, a modified layer-removal method is presented to determine thermal stress distributions in injection-mol

  1. Acute consolidation stress enhances reality monitoring in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, T; Sijstermans, K; Gijsen, C; Peters, M; Jelicic, M; Merckelbach, H

    2008-05-01

    Source monitoring refers to cognitive processes involved in making attributions about the origins of memories, knowledge, and beliefs. One particular type of source monitoring with ample practical significance is reality monitoring, i.e., the ability to discriminate between internally vs. externally generated memories. Abundant evidence indicates that exposure to acute stress enhances declarative memory consolidation. To date, no study has looked at whether exposure to acute stress during the consolidation phase may promote reality monitoring performance. The authors examined this by administering cold pressor stress (CPS) or a control procedure to participants (N = 80) after they had either performed or only imagined performing simple motor acts, and assessing reality monitoring 24 h later. When compared with the control condition, CPS significantly elevated salivary free cortisol concentrations and enhanced reality monitoring. Stress-induced cortisol responses, however, were found not to be related to improved reality monitoring performance. Our findings are consistent with the view that post-learning stress hormone-related activity may modulate source memory consolidation.

  2. Detection and classification of stress using thermal imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kan; Yuen, Peter; Chen, Tong; Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Kam, Firmin; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark; Oxford, William; Piper, Jonathan; Thomas, Francis; Lightman, Stafford

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports how Electro-Optics (EO) technologies such as thermal and hyperspectral [1-3] imaging methods can be used for the detection of stress remotely. Emotional or physical stresses induce a surge of adrenaline in the blood stream under the command of the sympathetic nerve system, which, cannot be suppressed by training. The onset of this alleviated level of adrenaline triggers a number of physiological chain reactions in the body, such as dilation of pupil and an increased feed of blood to muscles etc. The capture of physiological responses, specifically the increase of blood volume to pupil, have been reported by Pavlidis's pioneer thermal imaging work [4-7] who has shown a remarkable increase of skin temperature in the periorbital region at the onset of stress. Our data has shown that other areas such as the forehead, neck and cheek also exhibit alleviated skin temperatures dependent on the types of stressors. Our result has also observed very similar thermal patterns due to physical exercising, to the one that induced by other physical stressors, apparently in contradiction to Pavlidis's work [8]. Furthermore, we have found patches of alleviated temperature regions in the forehead forming patterns characteristic to the types of stressors, dependent on whether they are physical or emotional in origin. These stress induced thermal patterns have been seen to be quite distinct to the one resulting from having high fever.

  3. [Thermal dissipation pathway in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yong-xi; Sun, Jin; Wang, Li-ping; Shu, Sheng; Guo, Shi-rong

    2011-03-01

    A water culture experiment was conducted to study the relationship between photosynthetic thermal dissipation and xanthophyll cycle in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress (the dissolved oxygen concentration in nutrient solution was 0.9-1.1 mg x L(-1)). Under the hypoxia stress, there was a significant decrease in the quantum yield of PS II photochemistry rate (phi(PS II)), net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under saturation light intensity, quanta yield (AQY), and maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), suggesting that the photoinhibition of the seedling leaves was induced. Meanwhile, the thermal dissipation (NPQ) and the allocation of dissipation energy (D) by antenna increased, but the photochemical quenching apparent (q(p)) decreased, suggesting the enhancement of thermal dissipation in cucumber leaves under hypoxia stress. A positive correlation was observed between NPQ and xanthophyll de-epoxidation state (DEPS), and both of them were promoted by ascorbic acid (AsA) and inhibited by 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT), suggesting that xanthophyll cycle was the major pathway of photosynthetic thermal dissipation in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress.

  4. One-dimensional models of thermal activation under shear stress

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of thermal activation under shear stress in three- and even two-dimensional models presents unresolved problems. The analysis of one-dimensional models presented here may illuminate the study of more realistic models. For the model...

  5. Thermal injury and ozone stress affect soybean lipoxygenases expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of thermal injury (cold and heat shock) and ozone treatment on lipoxygenases 1 (LOX-1) and 2 (LOX-2) of soybean seedlings have been investigated. Cold stress led to a decrease of the specific activities of both isoenzymes, attributable at least in part to a down-regulation of gene expres

  6. Can cortisol be used to assess acute stress in moose?

    OpenAIRE

    Lundstein, Line Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the serum concentration of cortisol was measured in 78 hunted moose (Alces alces) shot by rifle. All animals died within 5 minutes after being shot and blood samples were collected. Blood levels of cortisol have been used to assess acute stress and evaluate animal welfare in wild animals, but the animals have been influenced by people during physical or chemical restraint. Little is known about physiology of cortisol in free-ranging moose, and studying these animals without dis...

  7. Personality and physiological reactions to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbey, Adam; Carroll, Douglas; Roseboom, Tessa J; Phillips, Anna C; de Rooij, Susanne R

    2013-10-01

    Stable personality traits have long been presumed to have biological substrates, although the evidence relating personality to biological stress reactivity is inconclusive. The present study examined, in a large middle aged cohort (N=352), the relationship between key personality traits and both cortisol and cardiovascular reactions to acute psychological stress. Salivary cortisol and cardiovascular activity were measured at rest and in response to a psychological stress protocol comprising 5min each of a Stroop task, mirror tracing, and a speech task. Participants subsequently completed the Big Five Inventory to assess neuroticism, agreeableness, openness to experience, extraversion, and conscientiousness. Those with higher neuroticism scores exhibited smaller cortisol and cardiovascular stress reactions, whereas participants who were less agreeable and less open had smaller cortisol and cardiac reactions to stress. These associations remained statistically significant following adjustment for a range of potential confounding variables. Thus, a negative personality disposition would appear to be linked to diminished stress reactivity. These findings further support a growing body of evidence which suggests that blunted stress reactivity may be maladaptive.

  8. Acute myocardial infarction and stress cardiomyopathy following the Christchurch earthquakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Christchurch, New Zealand, was struck by 2 major earthquakes at 4:36 am on 4 September 2010, magnitude 7.1 and at 12:51 pm on 22 February 2011, magnitude 6.3. Both events caused widespread destruction. Christchurch Hospital was the region's only acute care hospital. It remained functional following both earthquakes. We were able to examine the effects of the 2 earthquakes on acute cardiac presentations. METHODS: Patients admitted under Cardiology in Christchurch Hospital 3 week prior to and 5 weeks following both earthquakes were analysed, with corresponding control periods in September 2009 and February 2010. Patients were categorised based on diagnosis: ST elevation myocardial infarction, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction, stress cardiomyopathy, unstable angina, stable angina, non cardiac chest pain, arrhythmia and others. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in overall admissions (p<0.003, ST elevation myocardial infarction (p<0.016, and non cardiac chest pain (p<0.022 in the first 2 weeks following the early morning September earthquake. This pattern was not seen after the early afternoon February earthquake. Instead, there was a very large number of stress cardiomyopathy admissions with 21 cases (95% CI 2.6-6.4 in 4 days. There had been 6 stress cardiomyopathy cases after the first earthquake (95% CI 0.44-2.62. Statistical analysis showed this to be a significant difference between the earthquakes (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The early morning September earthquake triggered a large increase in ST elevation myocardial infarction and a few stress cardiomyopathy cases. The early afternoon February earthquake caused significantly more stress cardiomyopathy. Two major earthquakes occurring at different times of day differed in their effect on acute cardiac events.

  9. Glutamatergic Mechanisms of Comorbidity Between Acute Stress and Cocaine Self-administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Kupchik, Yonatan; Gipson, Cassandra D; Brown, Robyn M; Spencer, Sade; Bollati, Flavia; Esparza, Maria A; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug; Heinsbroek, Jasper; Bobadilla, Ana-Clara; Cancela, Liliana M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial comorbidity between stress disorders and substance use disorders (SUDs), and acute stress augments the locomotor stimulant effect of cocaine in animal models. Here we endeavor to understand the neural underpinnings of comorbid stress disorders and drug use by determining if the glutamatergic neuroadaptations that characterize cocaine self-administration are induced by acute stress. Rats were exposed to acute (2 h) immobilization stress and 3 weeks later the nucleus accumbens core was examined for changes in glutamate transport, glutamate mediated synaptic currents, and dendritic spine morphology. We also determined if acute stress potentiated the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Acute stress produced an enduring reduction in glutamate transport, and potentiated excitatory synapses on medium spiny neurons. Acute stress also augmented the acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Importantly, by restoring glutamate transport in the accumbens core with ceftriaxone the capacity of acute stress to augment the acquisition of cocaine self-administration was abolished. Similarly, ceftriaxone treatment prevented stress-induced potentiation of cocaine-induced locomotor activity. However, ceftriaxone did not reverse stress-induced synaptic potentiation, indicating that this effect of stress exposure did not underpin the increased acquisition of cocaine self-administration. Reversing acute stress-induced vulnerability to self-administer cocaine by normalizing glutamate transport poses a novel treatment possibility for reducing comorbid SUDs in stress disorders. PMID:26821978

  10. Comparison of the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on metabolic features in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatemeh ROSTAMKHANI; Homeira ZARDOOZ; Saleh ZAHEDIASL; Babak FARROKHI

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to compare the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on metabolic factors.Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into control and stressed groups.Stress was applied by a communication box acutely (1 d) and chronically (15 and 30 d).Blood sampling was carried out by retro-orbital-puncture method.The plasma levels of glucose,cholesterol,triglyceride,insulin,and corticosterone were measured.In addition,feed and water intake,latency to eat and drink,adrenal and body weights were determined.Acute and chronic psychological stress did not significantly change basal plasma corticosterone levels.However,immediately (1 min) after acute exposure to stress,plasma corticosterone level increased compared to that before stress exposure.Acute stress increased plasma insulin levels significantly.Fifteen days of stress exposure resulted in plasma glucose increase.Chronic stress significantly increased feed intake,latency to eat,and adrenal weight compared to acute stress.The body weights of both control and stressed groups increased markedly during the experiment.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index did not change significantly in the stressed group.In conclusion,application of acute and chronic psychological stress leads to different metabolic and/or behavioral changes but the metabolic changes resulting from acute exposure to stress seem to be more pronounced.

  11. Does acute stress disorder predict posttraumatic stress disorder following bank robbery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Elklit, A.

    2013-01-01

    on the Acute Stress Disorder scale. ASD severity accounted for 40% and the inclusion of other risk factors accounted for 50% of the PTSD severity variance. In conclusion, results indicated that ASD appears to predict PTSD differently following nonsexual assault than other trauma types. ASD severity...

  12. Acute stress impairs the retrieval of extinction memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raio, Candace M; Brignoni-Perez, Edith; Goldman, Rachel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    Extinction training is a form of inhibitory learning that allows an organism to associate a previously aversive cue with a new, safe outcome. Extinction does not erase a fear association, but instead creates a competing association that may or may not be retrieved when a cue is subsequently encountered. Characterizing the conditions under which extinction learning is expressed is important to enhancing the treatment of anxiety disorders that rely on extinction-based exposure therapy as a primary treatment technique. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which plays a critical role in the expression of extinction memory, has been shown to be functionally impaired after stress exposure. Further, recent work in rodents has demonstrated that exposure to stress leads to deficits in extinction retrieval, although this has yet to be tested in humans. To explore how stress might influence extinction retrieval in humans, participants underwent a differential aversive learning paradigm, in which one image was probabilistically paired with an aversive shock while the other image denoted safety. Extinction training directly followed, at which point reinforcement was omitted. A day later, participants returned to the lab and either completed an acute stress manipulation (i.e., cold pressor), or a control task, before undergoing an extinction retrieval test. Skin conductance responses and salivary cortisol concentrations were measured throughout each session as indices of fear arousal and neuroendocrine stress response, respectively. The efficacy of our stress induction was established by observing significant increases in cortisol for the stress condition only. We examined extinction retrieval by comparing conditioned responses during the last trial of extinction (day 1) with that of the first trial of re-extinction (day 2). Groups did not differ on initial fear acquisition or extinction, however, a day later participants in the stress group (n=27) demonstrated significantly

  13. Acute Stress Reactions in Couples after a Burn Event to Their Young Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.; Van Loey, N.E.; Van der Heijden, P.G.M.; Van Son, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This multicenter study examines acute stress reactions in couples following a burn event to their preschool child. Methods Participants were 182 mothers and 154 fathers, including 143 couples, of 193 children (0–4 years) with acute burns. Parents’ self-reported acute stress reactions and e

  14. Bond strength, bond stress and spallation mechanisms of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Krishnakumar, V.; McCarron, K.; Barber, B.; Sohn, Y.-H. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metall. and Mater. Eng.; Eric, J. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Tolpygo, V.K.

    1999-11-01

    Five production thermal barrier coatings were thermally cycled between room temperature and 1121 C (2050 F) to determine relative spallation life. Bond strength measurements were made using a modified ASTM direct pull-test. Bond stress measurements were made in the thermally grown oxide using a laser photoluminescence technique. Bond strength and bond stress measurements were conducted on two electron beam physical vapor deposition coatings as a function of thermal cycling. Each coating showed characteristic values of as-coated strength and stress and changes in strength and stress with thermal cycling. These variations in strength and stress with thermal cycling are related to oxidation and micro-debonding effects. (orig.)

  15. Single and combined effects of acute and chronic non-thermal stressors on rat interscapular brown adipose tissue metabolic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether the thermogenic potential of rat interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT changes in response to acute and/or chronic exposure to non-thermal stressors (immobilization and isolation, by measuring the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1 content, MAO-A, SOD and CAT activities, as well as the number of IBAT sympathetic noradrenaline-containing nerve fibers. Both acute immobilization (2 h and chronic isolation (21 days, as well as their combined effects, significantly increased the IBAT UCP-1 content in comparison to non-stressed animals. When applied individually, stressors increased the number of sympathetic fibers in comparison to controls, whereas in combination they decreased it. The activity of IBAT monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A decreased under the influence of each stressor independent of its type or duration. SOD activity coincided with MAO-A decrement, whereas CAT activity had an opposite pattern of changes. We conclude that acute and chronic exposure to non-thermal stressors, immobilization and isolation, respectively, affect the metabolic potential of rat IBAT, judging by the increase in UCP-1 content and sympathetic outflow. However, when acute immobilization was applied as a novel stressor to previously chronically isolated animals, an increase in the UCP-1 content was accompanied by a lower IBAT sympathetic outflow, suggesting that IBAT metabolic function under various stress condition is not solely dependent on SNS activity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173023

  16. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Coefficient of thermal expansion of stressed thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-dao; JIANG Shao-qing

    2006-01-01

    A new technique was proposed to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of thin films at low temperature. Different pre-stress could be applied and the elastic modulus of materials at different temperatures was measured with CTE simultaneously to eliminate the influence of mechanical deformation caused by the pre-stress. By using this technique,the CTEs of polyimide/silica nanocomposite films with different silica doping levels were experimentally studied at temperature from 77 K to 287 K,and some characteristics related to this new technique were discussed.

  18. ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT THERMAL STRESS IN CYLINDRICALLY ORTHOTROPIC TUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌道盛

    2003-01-01

    The incorrect deduction of equations in the research works devoted to the studies of transient stress in cylindrically orthotropic tubes and done by Kardomateas ( Journal of Applied Mechanics, 1989, 1990) leads to the wrong results. The errata (1991) correct the deduction error, but do not give the right numerical results. All errors are corrected, and the Mathematica is adopted to solve the large argument problem for Bessel function. A theoretical solution of the transient thermal stresses in tubes with uniform form is presented,and a numerical example is studied.

  19. Thermal stress, human performance, and physical employment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Stephen S; Lee, Jason K W; Oksa, Juha

    2016-06-01

    Many physically demanding occupations in both developed and developing economies involve exposure to extreme thermal environments that can affect work capacity and ultimately health. Thermal extremes may be present in either an outdoor or an indoor work environment, and can be due to a combination of the natural or artificial ambient environment, the rate of metabolic heat generation from physical work, processes specific to the workplace (e.g., steel manufacturing), or through the requirement for protective clothing impairing heat dissipation. Together, thermal exposure can elicit acute impairment of work capacity and also chronic effects on health, greatly contributing to worker health risk and reduced productivity. Surprisingly, in most occupations even in developed economies, there are rarely any standards regarding enforced heat or cold safety for workers. Furthermore, specific physical employment standards or accommodations for thermal stressors are rare, with workers commonly tested under near-perfect conditions. This review surveys the major occupational impact of thermal extremes and existing employment standards, proposing guidelines for improvement and areas for future research.

  20. Acute central cord syndrome: injury mechanisms and stress features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Feng; Dai, Li-Yang

    2010-09-01

    Numerical techniques were used to study the mechanisms of acute central cord syndrome. To analyze the features of stress distribution in the cervical cord under different injury conditions using finite element model of the cervical cord and to improve the understanding of the possible pathogenesis of acute central cord syndrome. Acute central cord spinal injury was initially attributed to hemorrhagic damage to the central portion of the spinal cord, but recent histopathologic studies showed that it was predominantly a white matter injury. The precise anatomic location of neuronal injury and the etiology of the clinical manifestation were poorly understood. Cervical cord injury was simulated using a finite element model of the cervical enlargement described previously, with the model loaded under 3 traumatic postures: neutral, flexion, and extension. Five traumatic conditions were simulated and analyzed: hyperextension with the pinch force directed to the anterior (A) or posterior (B); flexion injuries (C), vertical compression with the pinch force directed to the anterior (D) or posterior (E). After simulation, several representative cross-sections of each traumatic pattern were selected. In each cross-section, the average von Mises stress of 9 regions, such as anterior funiculus, lateral part of the lateral funiculus, medial part of the lateral funiculus, lateral part of the posterior funiculus, medial part of the posterior funiculus, anterior horn, the bottom of anterior horn, the cervix cornu posterioris, the caput cornu posterioris, and the apex cornu posterioris was recorded. High localized stress occurred at the portion under compression injury and the level above it. High localized stress tended to occur at the lateral part of the anterior horn motor neurons innervating the hand muscles in traumatic conditions A and D. Under conditions A, D, and E, the average localized stress at the anterior and posterior horn of the gray matter was higher than that at the

  1. RAAS and stress markers in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Back, C.; Thiesen, K L; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade has neuroprotective effects in animal stroke models, but no effects in clinical stroke trials. We evaluated cerebral and peripheral changes in the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) and stress responses in acute ischemic stroke patients....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood from a jugular and cubital vein was collected within 48 h of stroke onset, after 24 and 48 h, and renin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, aldosterone, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and cortisol were measured. Post-stroke cubital vein samples were collected after 8 (4.7-10) months......-stroke. No differences in RAAS were detected between jugular and cubital plasma levels. Jugular venous plasma levels of epinephrine and cortisol were elevated in the acute phase compared to cubital levels (P cortisol levels in the jugular vein blood may reflect a higher...

  2. Thermal Viscoelastic Analysis of Plastic Components Considering Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chel Woo; Jeoung, Kab Sik; Moon, Hyung-Il; Kim, Heon Young

    Plastics is commonly used in consumer electronics because of it is high strength per unit mass and good productivity, but plastic components may often become distorted after injection molding due to residual stress after the filling, packing, and cooling processes. In addition, plastic deteriorates depending on various temperature conditions and the operating time, which can be characterized by stress relaxation and creep. The viscoelastic behavior of plastic materials in the time domain can be expressed by the Prony series using the ABAQUS commercial software package. This paper suggests a process for predicting post-production deformation under cyclic thermal loading. The process was applied to real plastic panels, and the deformation predicted by the analysis was compared to that measured in actual testing, showing the possibility of using this process for predicting the post-production deformation of plastic products under thermal loading.

  3. Influence of thermal stress on marginal integrity of restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Sérgio Cenci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thermal stress on the marginal integrity of restorative materials with different adhesive and thermal properties. Three hundred and sixty Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 180 bovine incisors. Cervical and incisal walls were located in dentin and enamel, respectively. Specimens were restored with resin composite (RC; glass ionomer (GI or amalgam (AM, and randomly assigned to 18 groups (n=20 according to the material, number of cycles (500 or 1,000 cycles and dwell time (30 s or 60 s. Dry and wet specimens served as controls Specimens were immersed in 1% basic fuchsine solution (24 h, sectioned, and microleakage was evaluated under x40 magnification. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests: Thermal cycling regimens increased leakage in all AM restorations (p<0.05 and its effect on RC and GI restorations was only significant when a 60-s dwell time was used (p<0.05. Marginal integrity was more affected in AM restorations under thermal cycling stress, whereas RC and GI ionomer restoration margins were only significantly affected only under longer dwell times.

  4. Acute Anteroseptal Myocardial Infarction after a Negative Exercise Stress Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Al-Alawi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A myocardial infarction is a rare complication which can occur after an exercise stress test. We report a 48-year-old male who was referred to the Mildura Cardiology Practice, Victoria, Australia, in August 2014 with left-sided chest pain. He underwent an exercise stress test which was negative for myocardial ischaemia. However, the patient presented to the Emergency Department of the Mildura Base Hospital 30 minutes after the test with severe retrosternal chest pain. An acute anteroseptal ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was observed on electrocardiography. After thrombolysis, he was transferred to a tertiary hospital where coronary angiography subsequently revealed significant left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis. Thrombus aspiration and a balloon angioplasty were performed. The patient was discharged three days after the surgical procedure in good health.

  5. Increased oxidative stress following acute and chronic high altitude exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Simoni, Jan; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Swenson, Erik R; Wesson, Donald E; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Johnson, Richard J; Hurtado, Abdias

    2004-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species is typically associated with hyperoxia and ischemia reperfusion. Recent evidence has suggested that increased oxidative stress may occur with hypoxia. We hypothesized that oxidative stress would be increased in subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia. We studied 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (sea level), at baseline and following 48 h exposure to high altitude (4300 m). To assess the effects of chronic altitude exposure, we studied 25 adult males resident in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m). We also studied 27 subjects living in Cerro de Pasco who develop excessive erythrocytosis (hematocrit > 65%) and chronic mountain sickness. Acute high altitude exposure led to increased urinary F(2)-isoprostane, 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.31 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 2.15 +/- 1.1, p = 0.001) and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.37 +/- 0.09, p = 0.002), with a trend to increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 63.8 +/- 27, p = NS). High altitude residents had significantly elevated levels of urinary 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.3 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 4.1 +/- 3.4, p = 0.007), plasma TBARS (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 85 +/- 28, p = 0.008), and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.55 +/- 0.19, p < 0.0001) compared to sea level. High altitude residents with excessive erythrocytosis had higher levels of oxidative stress compared to high altitude residents with normal hematological adaptation. In conclusion, oxidative stress is increased following both acute exposure to high altitude without exercise and with chronic residence at high altitude.

  6. Effects of acute and chronic heat stress on plasma metabolites, hormones and oxidant status in restrictedly fed broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Lin, Xi; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2015-07-01

    Heat tolerance can be improved by feed restriction in broiler chickens. It is unknown whether the same is true for broiler breeders, which are restrictedly fed. Therefore, the current study was conducted to study the effects of heat stress on plasma metabolites, hormones, and oxidative status of restricted fed broiler breeders with special emphases on the temperature and latency of heat exposure. In trial 1, 12 broiler breeders were kept either in a thermoneutral chamber (21°C, control, n = 6) or in a chamber with a step-wise increased environmental temperature from 21 to 33°C (21, 25, 29, 33°C, heat-stressed, n = 6). Changes in plasma total cholesterol, glucose, and triiodothyronine (T3) were closely related to the environmental temperature. When the temperature reached 29°C, plasma T3 (P stressed birds, whereas plasma glucose (P stressed birds than controls regardless of the temperatures applied. In Trial 2, 24 broiler breeders were divided into 2 groups and raised under 21°C and 32°C for 8 weeks, respectively. Total cholesterol was increased in chronic heat-stressed broiler breeders after 4 weeks. Plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, P = 0.047) and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT, P = 0.036) was up-regulated after 6 weeks of thermal treatment, whereas plasma CK (P = 0.009) was increased at the end of thermal treatment. Plasma malonaldehyde, protein carbonyl content, activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), and corticosterone content were not altered after acute and prolonged heat challenges. Taken together, acute heat stress primarily resulted in disturbance of plasma metabolites, whereas chronic heat stress caused tissue damage reflected by increased plasma LDA, GOT, and CK. During acute heat stress, plasma metabolites were minimally disturbed in broiler breeders until the environmental temperature reached 33°C. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Effects of displacement boundary conditions on thermal deformation in thermal stress problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Kwak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Most computational structural engineers are paying more attention to applying loads rather than to DBCs (Displacement Boundary Conditions because most static stable mechanical structures are working under already prescribed displacement boundary conditions. In all of the computational analysis of solving a system of algebraic equations, such as FEM (Finite Element Method, three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom (DOF should be constrained (by applying DBCs before solving the system of algebraic equation in order to prevent rigid body motions of the analysis results (singular problem. However, it is very difficult for an inexperienced engineer or designer to apply proper DBCs in the case of thermal stress analysis where no prescribed DBCs or constraints exist, for example in water quenching for heat treatment. Moreover, improper DBCs cause incorrect solutions in thermal stress analysis, such as stress concentration or unreasonable deformation phases. To avoid these problems, we studied a technique which performs the thermal stress analysis without any DBCs; and then removes rigid body motions from the deformation results in a post process step as the need arises. The proposed technique makes it easy to apply DBCs and prevent the error caused by improper DBCs. We proved it was mathematically possible to solve a system of algebraic equations without a step of applying DBCs. We also compared the analysis results with those of a traditional procedure for real castings.

  8. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  9. Dynamic changes in DNA methylation of stress-associated genes (OXTR, BDNF ) after acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unternaehrer, E; Luers, P; Mill, J; Dempster, E; Meyer, A H; Staehli, S; Lieb, R; Hellhammer, D H; Meinlschmidt, G

    2012-08-14

    Environmentally induced epigenetic alterations are related to mental health. We investigated quantitative DNA methylation status before and after an acute psychosocial stressor in two stress-related genes: oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF ). The cross sectional study took place at the Division of Theoretical and Clinical Psychobiology, University of Trier, Germany and was conducted from February to August 2009. We included 83 participants aged 61-67 years. Thereof, 76 participants completed the full study procedure consisting of blood sampling before (pre-stress), 10 min after (post-stress) and 90 min after (follow-up) the Trier social stress test. We assessed quantitative DNA methylation of whole-blood cells using Sequenom EpiTYPER. Methylation status differed between sampling times in one target sequence of OXTR (POXTR (P=0.034), where it lost statistical significance when blood cell count was statistically controlled. We did not detect any time-associated differences in methylation status of the examined BDNF region. The results suggest a dynamic regulation of DNA methylation in OXTR-which may in part reflect changes in blood cell composition-but not BDNF after acute psychosocial stress. This may enhance the understanding of how psychosocial events alter DNA methylation and could provide new insights into the etiology of mental disorders.

  10. Transition from stress-driven to thermally activated stress relaxation in metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, J. C.; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhao, L. Z.; Dai, L. H.; Crespo, D.; Pelletier, J. M.; Keer, L. M.; Yao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The short-range ordered but long-range disordered structure of metallic glasses yields strong structural and dynamic heterogeneities. Stress relaxation is a technique to trace the evolution of stress in response to a fixed strain, which reflects the dynamic features phenomenologically described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. The KWW equation describes a broad distribution of relaxation times with a small number of empirical parameters, but it does not arise from a particular physically motivated mechanistic picture. Here we report an anomalous two-stage stress relaxation behavior in a Cu46Zr46Al8 metallic glass over a wide temperature range and generalize the findings in other compositions. Thermodynamic analysis identifies two categories of processes: a fast stress-driven event with large activation volume and a slow thermally activated event with small activation volume, which synthetically dominates the stress relaxation dynamics. Discrete analyses rationalize the transition mechanism induced by stress and explain the anomalous variation of the KWW characteristic time with temperature. Atomistic simulations reveal that the stress-driven event involves virtually instantaneous short-range atomic rearrangement, while the thermally activated event is the percolation of the fast event accommodated by the long-range atomic diffusion. The insights may clarify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the phenomenological description and shed light on correlating the hierarchical dynamics and structural heterogeneity of amorphous solids.

  11. Financial stress and outcomes after acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin J Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the association between financial stress and health care outcomes. Our objective was to examine the association between self-reported financial stress during initial hospitalization and long-term outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used prospective registry evaluating myocardial infarction: Event and Recovery (PREMIER data, an observational, multicenter US study of AMI patients discharged between January 2003 and June 2004. Primary outcomes were disease-specific and generic health status outcomes at 1 year (symptoms, function, and quality of life (QoL, assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ] and Short Form [SF]-12. Secondary outcomes included 1-year rehospitalization and 4-year mortality. Hierarchical regression models accounted for patient socio-demographic, clinical, and quality of care characteristics, and access and barriers to care. RESULTS: Among 2344 AMI patients, 1241 (52.9% reported no financial stress, 735 (31.4% reported low financial stress, and 368 (15.7% reported high financial stress. When comparing individuals reporting low financial stress to no financial stress, there were no significant differences in post-AMI outcomes. In contrast, individuals reporting high financial stress were more likely to have worse physical health (SF-12 PCS mean difference -3.24, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: -4.82, -1.66, mental health (SF-12 MCS mean difference: -2.44, 95% CI: -3.83, -1.05, disease-specific QoL (SAQ QoL mean difference: -6.99, 95% CI: -9.59, -4.40, and be experiencing angina (SAQ Angina Relative Risk = 1.66, 95%CI: 1.19, 2.32 at 1 year post-AMI. While 1-year readmission rates were increased (Hazard Ratio = 1.50; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.86, 4-year mortality was no different. CONCLUSIONS: High financial stress is common and an important risk factor for worse long-term outcomes post-AMI, independent of access and barriers to care.

  12. Thermal imaging to detect physiological indicators of stress in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Carl B.; Skipper, Julie A.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2013-05-01

    Real-time, stand-off sensing of human subjects to detect emotional state would be valuable in many defense, security and medical scenarios. We are developing a multimodal sensor platform that incorporates high-resolution electro-optical and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras and a millimeter-wave radar system to identify individuals who are psychologically stressed. Recent experiments have aimed to: 1) assess responses to physical versus psychological stressors; 2) examine the impact of topical skin products on thermal signatures; and 3) evaluate the fidelity of vital signs extracted from thermal imagery and radar signatures. Registered image and sensor data were collected as subjects (n=32) performed mental and physical tasks. In each image, the face was segmented into 29 non-overlapping segments based on fiducial points automatically output by our facial feature tracker. Image features were defined that facilitated discrimination between psychological and physical stress states. To test the ability to intentionally mask thermal responses indicative of anxiety or fear, subjects applied one of four topical skin products to one half of their face before performing tasks. Finally, we evaluated the performance of two non-contact techniques to detect respiration and heart rate: chest displacement extracted from the radar signal and temperature fluctuations at the nose tip and regions near superficial arteries to detect respiration and heart rates, respectively, extracted from the MWIR imagery. Our results are very satisfactory: classification of physical versus psychological stressors is repeatedly greater than 90%, thermal masking was almost always ineffective, and accurate heart and respiration rates are detectable in both thermal and radar signatures.

  13. Thermal/residual stress in an electron beam physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.; Jordan, E.H.; Barber, B.; Gell, M. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1998-10-09

    Elastic-plastic finite element models are used to define the thermal/residual stress state responsible for the observed failure behavior of an electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating on a Pt-Al bond coat. The failures were observed to start at grain boundary ridges, some of which evolved into oxide filled cavities. Finite element models are made of the actual interface geometries through the use of metallographic sectioning and imaging processing. There is a one to one correspondence of calculated tension in the oxide layer and the observed localized damage. Purely elastic analysis failed to show some important tensile regions associated with the observed failure.

  14. Modeling Residual Stress Development in Thermal Spray Coatings: Current Status and Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Abba A.; Arif, Abul Fazal M.; Al-Athel, Khaled S.; Akhtar, S. Sohail; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2017-08-01

    An overview of analytical and numerical methods for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings is presented. The various sources and mechanisms underlying residual stress development in thermal spray coatings are discussed, then the various difficulties associated with experimental residual stress measurement in thermal spray coatings are highlighted. The various analytical and numerical models used for prediction of residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are thoroughly discussed. While analytical models for prediction of postdeposition thermal mismatch stresses are fully developed, analytical quenching and peening stress models still require extensive development. Various schemes for prediction of residual stresses using the finite element method are identified. The results of the various numerical and analytical models are critically analyzed, and their accuracy and validity, when compared with experiments, are discussed. Issues regarding the accuracy and applicability of the models for predicting residual stresses in thermal spray coatings are highlighted, and several suggestions for future development of the models are given.

  15. Virtual Mold Technique in Thermal Stress Analysis during Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Young Kwak; Jae-Wook Baek; Jeong-Ho Nam; Jeong-Kil Choi

    2008-01-01

    It is important to analyse the casting product and the mold at the same time considering thermal contraction of the casting and thermal expansion of the mold. The analysis considering contact of the casting and the mold induces the precise prediction of stress distribution and the defect such as hot tearing. But it is difficult to generate FEM mesh for the interface of the casting and the mold. Moreover the mesh for the mold domain spends lots of computational time and memory for the analysis due to a number of meshes. Consequently we proposed the virtual mold technique which only uses mesh of the casting part for thermal stress analysis in casting process. The spring bar element in virtual mold technique is used to consider the contact of the casting and the mold. In general, a volume of the mold is much bigger than that of casting part, so the proposed technique decreases the number of mesh and saves the computational memory and time greatly. In this study, the proposed technique was verified by the comparison with the traditional contact technique on a specimen. And the proposed technique gave satisfactory results.

  16. Thermal Stresses in an Anisotropic Thin Plate Subjected to Moving Line Heat Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak Naji

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this present study is to investigate thermal stresses inside a thin anisotropic mild steal plate during moving line heat source. The parabolic heat conduction model is used for the prediction of the temperature history. The temperature distributions are determined numerically using finite difference method. Thermal stresses are computed numerically. It is found that the thermal conductivity ratio affect in both temperature and thermal stresses distributions, in additional to the speed and heat source intensity.

  17. Thermal stress impacts reproductive development and grain yield in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muhammad Shakeel; Farooq, Muhammad; Asch, Folkard; Krishna, Jagadish S V; Prasad, P V Vara; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2017-03-16

    Rice is highly sensitive to temperature stress (cold and heat), particularly during the reproductive and grain-filling stages. In this review, we discuss the effects of low- and high-temperature sensitivity in rice at various reproductive stages (from meiosis to grain development) and propose strategies for improving the tolerance of rice to terminal thermal stress. Cold stress impacts reproductive development through (i) delayed heading, due to its effect on anther respiration, which increases sucrose accumulation, protein denaturation and asparagine levels, and decreases proline accumulation, (ii) pollen sterility owing to tapetal hypertrophy and related nutrient imbalances, (iii) reduced activity of cell wall bound invertase in the tapetum of rice anthers, (iv) impaired fertilization due to inhibited anther dehiscence, stigma receptivity and ability of the pollen tube to germinate through the style towards the ovary, and (v) floret sterility, which increases grain abortion, restricts grain size, and thus reduces grain yield. Heat stress affects grain formation and development through (i) poor anther dehiscence due to restricted closure of the locules, leading to reduced pollen dispersal and fewer pollen on the stigma, (ii) changes in pollen proteins resulting in significant reductions in pollen viability and pollen tube growth, leading to spikelet sterility, (iii) delay in heading, (iv) reduced starch biosynthesis in developing grain, which reduces starch accumulation, (v) increased chalkiness of grain with irregular and round-shaped starch granules, and (vi) a shortened grain-filling period resulting in low grain weight. However, physiological and biotechnological tools, along with integrated management and adaptation options, as well as conventional breeding, can help to develop new rice genotypes possessing better grain yield under thermal stress during reproductive and grain-filling phases.

  18. FEM ANALYSIS OF THERMAL STRESSES IN GRADIENT THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS PRODUCED BY EB-PVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.B. Guo; H.B. Xu; S.K. Gong

    2001-01-01

    Gradient thermal barrier coatings (GTBCs) produced by co-deposition of mixtures ofAl-Al2 O3-YSZ onto metallic bond coat exhibited longer lifetimes than the two-layeredTBCs. The finite element method (FEM) numerical models were used to investigatestress and strain states in the GTBCs and traditional two-layered TBCs as they cooledto 750℃ from a stress-free state at 850℃.

  19. Effect of thermal stress and water deprivation on the acetylcholinesterase activity of the pig brain and hypophyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejumo, D. O.; Egbunike, G. N.

    1988-06-01

    The effects of direct exposure of boars to thermal stress for 1 h daily for 5 days and to acute water deprivation for 24 or 48 h were studied on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity of porcine brain and hypophysial regions. Mean ambient temperatures, respiratory rates and rectal temperatures in the open were significantly higher than inside the pen. Heat stress induced a rise in AChE activities in the pons, cerebellum, amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, mid-brain and medulla oblongata. However, no significant changes were observed in the cerebral cortex, adenohypophysis and neurohypophysis. Water deprivation significantly ( Padenohypophysis and neurohypophysis were relatively unaffected.

  20. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  1. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, Ivana; Cigasova, Julia; Stevulova, Nadezda

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution) and physically (by ultrasonic procedure) treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  2. Impairments of spatial working memory and attention following acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, James S; Pinney, Myra; Maruff, Paul; Norman, Trevor R

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the effect of an acute psychosocial stress paradigm on impaired attention and working memory in humans. Further, the duration of any stress-related cognitive impairment remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an acute psychosocial stress paradigm, the Trier Social Stress, on cognitive function in healthy volunteers. Twenty-three healthy male and female subjects were exposed to an acute psychosocial stress task. Physiological measures (salivary cortisol, heart rate and blood pressure) and subjective stress ratings were measured at baseline, in anticipation of stress, immediately post-stress and after a period of rest. A neuropsychological test battery including spatial working memory and verbal memory was administered at each time point. Acute psychosocial stress produced significant increases in cardiovascular and subjective measures in the anticipatory and post-stress period, which recovered to baseline after rest. Salivary cortisol steadily declined over the testing period. Acute psychosocial stress impaired delayed verbal recall, attention and spatial working memory. Attention remained impaired, and delayed verbal recall continued to decline after rest. Acute psychosocial stress is associated with an impairment of a broad range of cognitive functions in humans and with prolonged abnormalities in attention and memory.

  3. Surface Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds: Pre- and Post-Thermal Stress Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the residual stresses present in titanium friction stir welds and if a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle would be effective in minimizing those weld-induced residual stresses. Surface residual stresses in titanium 6Al-4V alloy friction stir welds were measured in butt joint thicknesses ranging from 3 to 12 mm. The residual stress states were also evaluated after the welds were subjected to a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle of 760 °C for 45 min. High (300-400 MPa) tensile residual stresses were observed in the longitudinal direction prior to stress relief and compressive residual stresses were measured in the transverse direction. After stress relief, the residual stresses were decreased by an order of magnitude to negligible levels.

  4. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  5. Electrical signaling in Aloe vera induced by localized thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Lang, Ryan D; Volkova-Gugeshashvili, Maia I

    2007-11-01

    Action potentials in higher plants are theorized as the information carriers in intercellular and intracellular communication in the presence of environmental stressors. Among the most common stressors is heat shock. Under stressful conditions, the response reactions of plant tissues and organs can be local or transmitted over long distances. In this article, the speeds of propagation of thermally induced action potentials in green plants are discussed, and their speeds were found to be comparable to those occurring in various mammalian species. These rapid action potentials in green plants were recorded in real time using modern data acquisition techniques. According to our measurements, a single application of localized heat stress induces fast action potentials in Aloe vera (67 m/s). Electrical signals propagated along all leaves of the A. vera plants were studied. Possible pathways for electrical signal propagation in vascular plants are also discussed.

  6. Factor Structure of the Acute Stress Disorder Scale in a Sample of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Donald; Mills, Mary Alice; Park, Crystal L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute stress disorder (ASD) is a poorly understood and controversial diagnosis (A. G. Harvey & R. A. Bryant, 2002). The present study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to test the factor structure of the most widely used self-report measure of ASD, the Acute Stress Disorder Scale (R. A. Bryant, M. L. Moulds, & R. M. Guthrie, 2000),…

  7. Acute phase proteins in cattle after exposure to complex stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, S. R.; Nielsen, L. R.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Stressors such as weaning, mixing and transportation have been shown to lead to increased blood concentrations of acute phase proteins (APP), including serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin, in calves. This study was therefore undertaken to assess whether SAA and haptoglobin levels...... in blood mirror stress in adult cattle. Six clinically healthy Holstein cows and two Holstein heifers were transported for four to six hours to a research facility, where each animal was housed in solitary tie stalls. Blood samples for evaluation of leukocyte counts and serum SAA and haptoglobin...... concentrations were obtained before (0-sample) and at 8, 24 and 48 hours after the start of transportation. Upon arrival the animals gave the impression of being anxious, and they appeared to have difficulty coping with isolation and with being tied on the slippery floors of the research stable. Serum...

  8. Acute short-term mental stress does not influence salivary flow rate dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella A Naumova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Results of studies that address the influence of stress on salivary flow rate and composition are controversial. The aim of this study was to reveal the influence of stress vulnerability and different phases of stress reactivity on the unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rate. We examined that acute mental stress does not change the salivary flow rate. In addition, we also examined the salivary cortisol and protein level in relation to acute mental stress stimuli. METHODS: Saliva of male subjects was collected for five minutes before, immediately, 10, 30 and 120 min after toothbrushing. Before toothbrushing, the subjects were exposed to acute stress in the form of a 2 min public speech. Salivary flow rate and total protein was measured. The physiological stress marker cortisol was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To determine the subjects' psychological stress reaction, the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory State questionnaire (STAI data were obtained. The subjects were divided into stress subgroup (S1 (psychological reactivity, stress subgroup (S2 (psychological and physiological reactivity and a control group. The area under the curve for salivarycortisol concentration and STAI-State scores were calculated. All data underwent statistical analysis using one-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Immediately after stress exposure, all participants exhibited a psychological stress reaction. Stress exposure did not change the salivary flow rate. Only 69% of the subjects continued to display a physiological stress reaction 20 minutes after the public talk. There was no significant change in the salivary flow rate during the psychological and the physiological stress reaction phases relative to the baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Acute stress has no impact on the salivary flow rate; however, there may be other responses through salivary proteins that are increased with the acute stress stimuli. Future studies are needed to examine

  9. Acute stress disorder in hospitalised victims of 26/11-terror attack on Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasinorwala, Vanshree Patil; Shah, Nilesh

    2010-11-01

    The 26/11 terror attacks on Mumbai have been internationally denounced. Acute stress disorder is common in victims of terror. To find out the prevalence and to correlate acute stress disorder, 70 hospitalised victims of terror were assessed for presence of the same using DSM-IV TR criteria. Demographic data and clinical variables were also collected. Acute stress disorder was found in 30% patients. On demographic profile and severity of injury, there were some interesting observations and differences between the victims who developed acute stress disorder and those who did not; though none of the differences reached the level of statistical significance. This study documents the occurrence of acute stress disorder in the victims of 26/11 terror attack.

  10. Physiological Response of Siderastrea siderea to Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno-Laureano, Y.; Mercado-Molina, A. E.; Fonseca, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Warming of the ocean water is one of the major causes of coral bleaching, a phenomenon that disrupt the obligate endosymbiotic relationships that corals has with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Because it is predicted that sea surface temperature are going to increase 1-3°C in the next 10 years, it is important to understand how coral species will respond to such changes. It is known that the coral Siderastrea siderea is a scleractinian coral common to the Caribbean reefs that has shown to be very resistant to environmental stressors such as sedimentation and water contamination. However, little is known about its capacity to overcome high temperatures. But several studies suggest that Siderastrea siderea can recover faster than other corals from thermal-stress. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the physiology S. siderea varies with respect to an increase in water temperature. We conducted a controlled laboratory experiments where the coral were exposed to typical (27.5°C) and elevated temperatures (31.5°C). We quantified the densities of the endosymbiotic Symbiodinium spp. as well as physiological parameters such as protein and chlorophyll concentration to determine whether they change in response to an increase in temperature. Results show no significant differences or a direct relation between the thermal stress and the physiological mechanisms studied. Which would suggest that S. siderea indeed has the mechanisms to cope to high temperature scenarios.

  11. Burrowing, byssus, and biomarkers: behavioral and physiological indicators of sublethal thermal stress in freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Jennifer M.; Cope, W. Gregory; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has elucidated the acute lethal effects of elevated water temperatures to glochidia (larvae), juvenile, and adult life stages of freshwater mussels (Order Unionida), but few studies have focused on sublethal effects of thermal stress. We evaluated the sublethal effects of elevated temperature on burrowing behavior and byssus production in juveniles, and on enzymatic biomarkers of stress in adults in acute (96 h) laboratory experiments in sediment, with two acclimation temperatures (22 and 27 °C) and two experimental water levels (watered and dewatered) as proxies for flow regime. Increasing temperature significantly reduced burrowing in all five species tested, and the dewatered treatment (a proxy for drought conditions) reduced burrowing in all but Amblema plicata. Production of byssal threads was affected most drastically by flow regime, with the probability of byssus presence reduced by 93–99% in the dewatered treatment, compared to the watered treatment (a proxy for low flow conditions); increasing temperature alone reduced byssus by 18–35%. Alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly affected by treatment temperature in the 27 °C acclimation, watered test (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). Our results are important in the context of climate change, because stream temperature and flow are expected to change with increasing air temperature and altered precipitation patterns.

  12. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Xi, Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours) or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks) high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (Pheat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05) and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (Pheat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (Pheat challenge (Pheat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052) and 90 (P = 0.054) gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  13. Prognostics Approach for Power MOSFET Under Thermal-Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Jose Ramon Celaya; Saxena, Abhinav; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The prognostic technique for a power MOSFET presented in this paper is based on accelerated aging of MOSFET IRF520Npbf in a TO-220 package. The methodology utilizes thermal and power cycling to accelerate the life of the devices. The major failure mechanism for the stress conditions is dieattachment degradation, typical for discrete devices with leadfree solder die attachment. It has been determined that dieattach degradation results in an increase in ON-state resistance due to its dependence on junction temperature. Increasing resistance, thus, can be used as a precursor of failure for the die-attach failure mechanism under thermal stress. A feature based on normalized ON-resistance is computed from in-situ measurements of the electro-thermal response. An Extended Kalman filter is used as a model-based prognostics techniques based on the Bayesian tracking framework. The proposed prognostics technique reports on preliminary work that serves as a case study on the prediction of remaining life of power MOSFETs and builds upon the work presented in [1]. The algorithm considered in this study had been used as prognostics algorithm in different applications and is regarded as suitable candidate for component level prognostics. This work attempts to further the validation of such algorithm by presenting it with real degradation data including measurements from real sensors, which include all the complications (noise, bias, etc.) that are regularly not captured on simulated degradation data. The algorithm is developed and tested on the accelerated aging test timescale. In real world operation, the timescale of the degradation process and therefore the RUL predictions will be considerable larger. It is hypothesized that even though the timescale will be larger, it remains constant through the degradation process and the algorithm and model would still apply under the slower degradation process. By using accelerated aging data with actual device measurements and real

  14. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  15. Comparative Research of Oil-paper Aging Characteristics Under Thermal Stress and Combined Thermo-electrical Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shi-qiang; WU Feng-jiao; XU Hao; ZHANG Guan-jun

    2011-01-01

    During the operation of power transformer, its oil-paper insulation is continuously subjected to various stresses, e. g. , the thermal, electrical, mechanical, and chemical stresses, which cause insulation aging gradually. It has been considered that the combined thermal and electrical stresses are the most important and unavoidable factors that induce insulation materials aging. In this work, accelerated aging experiments of oil-impregnated pressboards un der combined thermal (130℃) and electrical stresses (4 kV/mm) are performed, while the aging experiments under single thermal stress are also carried out at the corresponding temperature (130 ℃). The electrical and physic-chemical properties of oil, including dielectric losses factor tanδ resistivity, acid value and pH value etc. , are measured during the aging process. Dissolved gasses in oil and polymerization degree of cellulose are also measured. The relationship between these properties of oil-paper insulation and aging time is investigated. The results show that dissolved gases in oil, resistivity, tanδ of oil under combined thermal and electrical stresses are obviously different from that under thermal stress during aging process while some other properties show similar changing :trend. For cellulose, compared with the single thermal aging results, it even shows a slower degradation rate in the presence of elec trical stress.

  16. Analysis of thermal stresses in horizontal delivery water heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, A. V.; Plotnikov, P. N.

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of thermal stresses in tubes and a compensator, taking into account water heating in each heater bunch and temperature at which its mounting is implemented, and of stresses on pressure is presented. The 3D-model of the horizontal delivery water heater of PSG-4900-0.3-1.14 type is used. The tube plate is represented as the 3D-body with 6863 holes with offset center of the perforated area, the steam space shell is represented as a cylindrical casing, the bottoms of water chambers are considered as elliptical casings, the four-lens compensator is represented in the form of toroidal casings, and the tubes are considered as beams operating in tensile-compression and bending in two planes. Calculations were carried out for different temperatures of superheated steam and a steam space shell, respectively, as well as designs with compensator and without it. Various temperature values of the tubes on the passes were calculated and set. The studies were carried out taking into account nonaxis-symmetrical spacing the tube plate and compensator deformation. The calculation results of tensile-compression stresses in the tubes are presented. Furthermore, the central tubes experience compressive stresses, whose maximal values take place on the border between the tubes of the fourth and of the first passes. For its decrease, it is recommended to increase the distance between the tubes of these passes. The tension stresses in the peripheral tubes are the maximal stresses. To reduce the stresses and, therefore, increase service life of the delivery water heater at using wet or superheated (not more than by 30-50°C) steam in it (the larger value refers to the brass tubes and the water pressure of 1.6-2.5 MPa), it is necessary to recommend the noncompensatory design at using the steam superheated by more than 30-50°C (at Ural Turbine Works, it is the turbines of T-250/300-23.5 and T-113/145-12.4 types with intermediate superheating) and to recommend the installation of the

  17. Evaluation of thermally induced non-Fourier stress wave disturbances via tailored hybrid transfinite element formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate solutions have been obtained for a class of non-Fourier models in dynamic thermoelasticity which are relevant to the understanding of thermally-induced stress wave disturbances. The method employs tailored hybrid formulations based on the transfinite element approach. The results show that significant thermal stresses may arise due to non-Fourier effects, especially when the speeds of propagation of the thermal and stress waves are equal.

  18. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others

    OpenAIRE

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via...

  19. Review of VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline on management of acute stress and interventions to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Nash, MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the recommendations of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA/Department of Defense (DOD VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Post-Traumatic Stress that pertain to acute stress and the prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder, including screening and early interventions for acute stress states in various settings. Recommended interventions during the first 4 days after a potentially traumatic event include attending to safety and basic needs and providing access to physical, emotional, and social resources. Psychological first aid is recommended for management of acute stress, while psychological debriefing is discouraged. Further medical and psychiatric assessment and provision of brief, trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy are warranted if clinically significant distress or functional impairment persists or worsens after 2 days or if the criteria for a diagnosis of acute stress disorder are met. Follow-up monitoring and rescreening are endorsed for at least 6 months for everyone who experiences significant acute posttraumatic stress. Four interventions that illustrate early intervention principles contained in the VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline are described.

  20. Thermal Stress Analysis of Medium-Voltage Converters for Smart Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Markus; Ma, Ke; De Carne, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    . To address this concern, this work conducts thermal stress analysis for a modular multilevel converter (MMC), which is a promising solution for the medium voltage stage of the ST. The focus is put on the mission profiles of the transformer and the impact on the thermal stress of power semiconductor devices....... Normal operation at different power levels and medium voltage grid faults in a feeder fed by a traditional transformer are considered as well as the electrical and the thermal stress of the disconnection and the reconnection procedures. For the validation, the thermal stress of one MMC cell is reproduced...

  1. Acute stress differentially affects spatial configuration learning in high and low cortisol-responding healthy adults

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Thomas; Smeets, Tom; Giesbrecht, Timo; Quaedflieg, Conny W. E. M.; Merchelbach, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress and stress hormones modulate memory formation in various ways that are relevant to our understanding of stress-related psychopathology, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Particular relevance is attributed to efficient memory formation sustained by the hippocampus and parahippocampus. This process is thought to reduce the occurrence of intrusions and flashbacks following trauma, but may be negatively affected by acute stress. Moreover, recent evidence suggests th...

  2. [Effect of opioid receptors on acute stress-induced changes in recognition memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Yu-Wei; Qian, Zhao-Qiang; Yan, Cai-Fang; Fan, Ka-Min; Xu, Jin-Hui; Li, Xiao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-12-25

    Although ample evidence has shown that acute stress impairs memory, the influences of acute stress on different phases of memory, such as acquisition, consolidation and retrieval, are different. Experimental data from both human and animals support that endogenous opioid system plays a role in stress, as endogenous opioid release is increased and opioid receptors are activated during stress experience. On the other hand, endogenous opioid system mediates learning and memory. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute forced swimming stress on recognition memory of C57 mice and the role of opioid receptors in this process by using a three-day pattern of new object recognition task. The results showed that 15-min acute forced swimming damaged the retrieval of recognition memory, but had no effect on acquisition and consolidation of recognition memory. No significant change of object recognition memory was found in mice that were given naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, by intraperitoneal injection. But intraperitoneal injection of naloxone before forced swimming stress could inhibit the impairment of recognition memory retrieval caused by forced swimming stress. The results of real-time PCR showed that acute forced swimming decreased the μ opioid receptor mRNA levels in whole brain and hippocampus, while the injection of naloxone before stress could reverse this change. These results suggest that acute stress may impair recognition memory retrieval via opioid receptors.

  3. Leptin concentrations in response to acute stress predict subsequent intake of comfort foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, A Janet; Schamarek, Imke; Lustig, Robert H; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Puterman, Eli; Havel, Peter J; Epel, Elissa S

    2012-08-20

    Both animals and humans show a tendency toward eating more "comfort food" (high fat, sweet food) after acute stress. Such stress eating may be contributing to the obesity epidemic, and it is important to understand the underlying psychobiological mechanisms. Prior investigations have studied what makes individuals eat more after stress; this study investigates what might make individuals eat less. Leptin has been shown to increase following a laboratory stressor, and is known to regulate satiety. This study examined whether leptin reactivity accounts for individual differences in stress eating. To test this, we exposed forty women to standardized acute psychological laboratory stress (Trier Social Stress Test) while blood was sampled repeatedly for measurements of plasma leptin. We then measured food intake after the stressor. Increasing leptin during the stressor predicted lower intake of comfort food. These initial findings suggest that acute changes in leptin may be one of the factors modulating down the consumption of comfort food following stress.

  4. [Study of long-lasting effects of acute prenatal stress induced forced swimming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodina, M A; Sebentsova, E A; Levitskaia, N G; Kamenskiĭ, A A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess long-lasting effects of acute prenatal stress in white rats. Forced swimming in cold water on the 7th or the 14th gestational day was used as a prenatal stressor. The prenatal stress led to low birthweight of offspring and their delayed growth rate during the second month of life. Prenatally stressed animals showed abnormalities in exploratory behavior and anxiety, increased emotionality and impaired learning capabilities at the age of 1-2 month. Consequently, acute stress on the 7th and at the 14th day of pregnancy induced long-lasting negative behavioral changes in offspring of stressed white rats.

  5. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xie

    Full Text Available Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (P<0.05. However, oxidation status of lipid and protein and expression of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs and heat shock proteins (HSPs 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05 and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (P<0.05. During chronic heat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (P<0.05 and HSP 90 mRNA (P<0.05 was decreased. In the liver, oxidation of protein was alleviated during acute heat challenge (P<0.05, however, gene expression HSF2, 3 and 4 and HSP 70 were highly induced (P<0.05. HSP90 expression was increased by chronic thermal treatment (P<0.05. In the muscle, both types of heat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052 and 90 (P = 0.054 gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  6. The effect of water on thermal stresses in polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1994-01-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamic theory of mixtures and continuum thermochemistry are reviewed for a mixture of condensed water and polymer. A specific mixture which is mechanically elastic with temperature and water concentration gradients present is considered. An expression for the partial pressure of water in the mixture is obtained based on certain assumptions regarding the thermodynamic state of the water in the mixture. Along with a simple diffusion equation, this partial pressure expression may be used to simulate the thermostructural behavior of polymer composite materials due to water in the free volumes of the polymer. These equations are applied to a specific polymer composite material during isothermal heating conditions. The thermal stresses obtained by the application of the theory are compared to measured results to verify the accuracy of the approach.

  7. Thermal stresses in hexagonal materials - heat treatment influence on their mechanical behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloaguen, D.; Freour, S.; Guillen, R.; Royer, J. [Nantes Univ., GeM, Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique, Ecole Centrale de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6183, 44 (France); Francois, M. [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Lab. des Systemes Mecaniques et d' Ingenierie Simultanee (LASMIS), 10 - Troyes (France)

    2004-12-01

    Internal stresses due to anisotropic thermal and plastic properties were investigated in rolled zirconium and titanium. The thermal stresses induced by a cooling process were predicted using a self-consistent model and compared with experimental results obtained by X-ray diffraction. The study of the elastoplastic response during uniaxial loading was performed along the rolling and the transverse direction of the sheet, considering the influence of the texture and the thermal stresses on the mechanical behaviour. An approach in order to determine the thermal behaviour of phases embedded in two-phase materials is also presented. For zirconium, the residual stresses due to thermal anisotropy are rather important (equivalent to 35% of the yield stress) and consequently they play an important role on the elastoplastic transition contrary to titanium. The study of two-phase material shows the influence and the interaction of the second phase on the thermal behaviour in the studied phase.

  8. Thermal stress in SiC element used in heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI He-song; MEI Chi

    2005-01-01

    An especial snake SiC pipe was designed for collecting losing heat from furnaces. The three-dimensions thermal, fluid and thermal stress coupled field of heat exchanger was analyzed by using the commercial engineering computer package ANSYS. The structural and operational parameters of heat exchanger, the junction between standpipe and snake pipe, the diameter of snake pipe, ratio of thickness to diameter of pipe, velocity of inlet air were optimized for thermal stress. The computed results show that the large thermal stress exits in the SiC, and the stand pipe should be ellipse for the least thermal stress; the optimal ratio of thickness to diameter of pipe is 6, the velocity of inlet air is 25 m/s. The most thermal stress is in inverse proportion to diameter of pipe and velocity of inlet air.

  9. Evidence for the stress-thermal rule in an elastomer subjected to simple elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broerman, A. W.; Venerus, D. C.; Schieber, J. D.

    1999-10-01

    Anisotropic thermal diffusivity is examined in a cross-linked silicone elastomer deformed in simple elongation. Thermal diffusivity both parallel and perpendicular to the stretch direction is measured using an optical technique called forced Rayleigh scattering. The thermal diffusivity is found to increase linearly with stretch ratio to a value 10% larger than the equilibrium value for a stretch ratio of two. Measurements of the birefringence and tensile stress were used to evaluate the stress-optic rule, which was found to be valid. The difference between measured thermal diffusivities parallel and perpendicular to the stretch direction and tensile stress data were used to show the thermal conductivity and stress tensors are linearly related. These data appear to be the first direct evaluation of the stress-thermal rule in a deformed polymeric material.

  10. The effect of acute stress on memory depends on word valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Tom; Jelicic, Marko; Merckelbach, Harald

    2006-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of acute stress on working memory and memory for neutral, emotionally negative, and emotionally positive words in healthy undergraduates. Participants (N=60) were exposed to either the Trier Social Stress Test (stress group) or a non-stressful task (control group). Analyses of salivary cortisol samples taken throughout the study showed elevated glucocorticoid levels after the experimental manipulation in the stress group, but not in the control group. Recall performance was impaired in the stress group, but only so for neutral words. No differences between the stress and control group were found on working memory measures. For the stress group, digit span forward and digit span total scores were associated with correct recall of neutral words. All in all, this study lends further support to the notion that the memory effects of exposure to acute stress depend on the valence of the memory material.

  11. Exploring the use of thermal infrared imaging in human stress research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Engert

    Full Text Available High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints. Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle.

  12. Derivation and test of elevated temperature thermal-stress-free fastener concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, J. W.; Blosser, M. L.; Mcwithey, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Future aerospace vehicles must withstand high temperatures and be able to function over a wide temperature range. New composite materials are being developed for use in designing high-temperature lightweight structures. Due to the difference between coefficients of thermal expansion for the new composite materials and conventional high-temperature metallic fasteners, innovative joining techniques are needed to produce tight joints at all temperatures without excessive thermal stresses. A thermal-stress-free fastening technique is presented that can be used to provide structurally tight joints at all temperatures even when the fastener and joined materials have different coefficients of thermal expansion. The derivation of thermal-stress-free fasteners and joint shapes is presented for a wide variety of fastener materials and materials being joined together. Approximations to the thermal-stress-free shapes that result in joints with low-thermal-stresses and that simplify the fastener/joint shape are discussed. The low-thermal-stress fastener concept is verified by thermal and shear tests in joints using oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy fasteners in carbon-carbon material. The test results show no evidence of thermal stress damage for temperatures up to 2000 F and the resulting joints carried shear loads at room temperature typical of those for conventional joints.

  13. Thermal stability of nafion membranes under mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintilii, M.; Struis, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of adequately modified fluoro-ionomer membranes (NAFION{sup R}) is demonstrated for the selective separation of methanol synthesis products from the raw reactor gas at temperatures around 200{sup o}C. For an economically relevant application of this concept on a technical scale the Nafion membranes should be thin ({approx_equal}10 {mu}m) and thermally stable over a long period of time (1-2 years). In cooperation with industry (Methanol Casale SA, Lugano (CH)), we test the thermal stability of Nafion hollow fibers and supported Nafion thin sheet membranes at temperatures between 160 and 200{sup o}C under mechanical stress by applying a gas pressure difference over the membrane surface ({Delta}P{<=} 40 bar). Tests with the hollow fibers revealed that Nafion has visco-elastic properties. Tests with 50 {mu}m thin Nafion sheets supported by a porous metal carrier at 200{sup o}C and {Delta}P=39 bar showed no mechanical defects over a period of 92 days. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  14. Thermal Stress Effect on Density Changes of Hemp Hurds Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzova Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the behavior of prepared biocomposites based on hemp hurds as a filling agent in composite system. In addition to the filler and water, an alternative binder, called MgO-cement was used. For this objective were prepared three types of samples; samples based on untreated hemp hurds as a referential material and samples based on chemically (with NaOH solution and physically (by ultrasonic procedure treated hemp hurds. The thermal stress effect on bulk density changes of hemp hurds composites was monitored. Gradual increase in temperature led to composites density reduction of 30-40 %. This process is connected with mass loss of the adsorbed moisture and physically bound water and also with degradation of organic compounds present in hemp hurds aggregates such as pectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose. Therefore the changes in the chemical composition of treated hemp hurds in comparison to original sample and its thermal decomposition were also studied.

  15. Thermally induced rock stress increment and rock reinforcement response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [KMS Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Stroem, J.; Nujiten, G.; Uotinen, L. [Rockplan, Helsinki (Finland); Siren, T.; Suikkanen, J.

    2014-07-15

    This report describes a detailed study of the effect of thermal heating by the spent nuclear fuel containers on the in situ rock stress, any potential rock failure, and associated rock reinforcement strategies for the Olkiluoto underground repository. The modelling approach and input data are presented together repository layout diagrams. The numerical codes used to establish the effects of heating on the in situ stress field are outlined, together with the rock mass parameters, in situ stress values, radiogenic temperatures and reinforcement structures. This is followed by a study of the temperature and stress evolution during the repository's operational period and the effect of the heating on the reinforcement structures. It is found that, during excavation, the maximum principal stress is concentrated at the transition areas where the profile changes and that, due to the heating from the deposition of spent nuclear fuel, the maximum principal stress rises significantly in the tunnel arch area of NW/SW oriented central tunnels. However, it is predicted that the rock's crack damage (CD, short term strength) value of 99 MPa will not be exceeded anywhere within the model. Loads onto the reinforcement structures will come from damaged and loosened rock which is assumed in the modelling as a free rock wedge - but this is very much a worst case scenario because there is no guarantee that rock cracking would form a free rock block. The structural capacity of the reinforcement structures is described and it is predicted that the current quantity of the rock reinforcement is strong enough to provide a stable tunnel opening during the peak of the long term stress state, with damage predicted on the sprayed concrete liner. However, the long term stability and safety can be improved through the implementation of the principles of the Observational Method. The effect of ventilation is also considered and an additional study of the radiogenic heating effect on the

  16. Simulation of thermal and sodium expansion stress in aluminum reduction cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; WU Yu-yun; LAI Yan-qing; LIU Wei; WANG Zhi-gang; LIU Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2008-01-01

    Two finite element(FE) models were built up for analysis of stress field in the lining of aluminum electrolysis cells. Distribution of sodium concentration in cathode carbon blocks was calculated by one FE model of a cathode block. Thermal stress field was calculated by the other slice model of the cell at the end of the heating-up. Then stresses coupling thermal and sodium expansion were considered after 30 d start-up. The results indicate that sodium penetrates to the bottom of the cathode block after 30 d start-up. The semi-graphitic carbon block has the largest stress at the thermal stage. After 30 d start-up the anthracitic carbon has the greatest sodium expansion stress and the graphitized carbon has the lowest sodium expansion stress. Sodium penetration can cause larger deformation and stress in the cathode carbon block than thermal expansion.

  17. Heat-shock protein 70 expression in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhenyu; JIAO Chuanzhen; XIANG Jianhai

    2004-01-01

    Using western immunoblotting, we obtained heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction data and distribution in different tissues from shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stresses. This is probably the first report of the effects of various stressors on the expression of HSP70 in shrimp. HSP70 was prominently induced in hepatopancreas and gills, but not in muscle, eyestalk and hemolymph, when the shrimp were exposed to heat shock and Vibrio anguillavium-challenged stresses. Cold shock and WSSV treatment had no significant effects on the levels of HSP70 expression in all tissues examined. HSP70 induction was greatest after 2 h exposure to heat shock stress, which was elevated after acute heat shock exposure of 10℃ above ambient temperature.

  18. Stress analysis in curved composites due to thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, Jared Cornelius

    Many structures in aircraft, cars, trucks, ships, machines, tools, bridges, and buildings, consist of curved sections. These sections vary from straight line segments that have curvature at either one or both ends, segments with compound curvatures, segments with two mutually perpendicular curvatures or Gaussian curvatures, and segments with a simple curvature. With the advancements made in multi-purpose composites over the past 60 years, composites slowly but steadily have been appearing in these various vehicles, compound structures, and buildings. These composite sections provide added benefits over isotropic, polymeric, and ceramic materials by generally having a higher specific strength, higher specific stiffnesses, longer fatigue life, lower density, possibilities in reduction of life cycle and/or acquisition cost, and greater adaptability to intended function of structure via material composition and geometry. To be able to design and manufacture a safe composite laminate or structure, it is imperative that the stress distributions, their causes, and effects are thoroughly understood in order to successfully accomplish mission objectives and manufacture a safe and reliable composite. The objective of the thesis work is to expand upon the knowledge of simply curved composite structures by exploring and ascertaining all pertinent parameters, phenomenon, and trends in stress variations in curved laminates due to thermal loading. The simply curved composites consist of composites with one radius of curvature throughout the span of the specimen about only one axis. Analytical beam theory, classical lamination theory, and finite element analysis were used to ascertain stress variations in a flat, isotropic beam. An analytical method was developed to ascertain the stress variations in an isotropic, simply curved beam under thermal loading that is under both free-free and fixed-fixed constraint conditions. This is the first such solution to Author's best knowledge

  19. Acute stress differentially affects spatial configuration learning in high and low cortisol-responding healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Meyer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress and stress hormones modulate memory formation in various ways that are relevant to our understanding of stress-related psychopathology, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Particular relevance is attributed to efficient memory formation sustained by the hippocampus and parahippocampus. This process is thought to reduce the occurrence of intrusions and flashbacks following trauma, but may be negatively affected by acute stress. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that the efficiency of visuo-spatial processing and learning based on the hippocampal area is related to PTSD symptoms. Objective: The current study investigated the effect of acute stress on spatial configuration learning using a spatial contextual cueing task (SCCT known to heavily rely on structures in the parahippocampus. Method: Acute stress was induced by subjecting participants (N = 34 to the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST. Following a counterbalanced within-subject approach, the effects of stress and the ensuing hormonal (i.e., cortisol activity on subsequent SCCT performance were compared to SCCT performance following a no-stress control condition. Results: Acute stress did not impact SCCT learning overall, but opposing effects emerged for high versus low cortisol responders to the MAST. Learning scores following stress were reduced in low cortisol responders, while high cortisol-responding participants showed improved learning. Conclusions: The effects of stress on spatial configuration learning were moderated by the magnitude of endogenous cortisol secretion. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which cortisol responses serve an adaptive function during stress and trauma, and this may prove to be a promising route for future research in this area.

  20. Thermal elasto-plastic stress analysis during laser heating of a metal plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanbei; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2008-03-01

    During laser heating of a metal material, the continuity of material confines its free expansion, thermal stresses arise. On one hand the thermal expansion of the heated zone of the material increases with the increase of temperature, the thermal stress level increases correspondingly; on the other hand the mechanical properties of the material will change with the increase of temperature, especially the elastic modulus, yield strength and tensile strength drop significantly, which is the so-called thermal softening problem. Due to the effect of the two factors, as the heating time or the intensity of the laser beam increases, it is possible that the stress levels of the heated zone of the material exceed the yield strength, which leads the material to come into a plastic stage. Thus, a thermal plastic problem occurs. In this study, thermal elasto-plastic stresses during laser heating of a metal plate are computed by the finite element method (FEM) based on thermal elasto-plastic constitutive theory. The mechanical behaviors of the metal material during the laser heating are analyzed. By the analysis of the results, it is found that thermal expansion leads to the increase of stress level early during the laser irradiating, and thermal softening causes the decrease of stress levels in the plastic zone and the slow growth and even decrease of stress levels in elastic zone later. The radial stresses are all compressive stresses, and the hoop stresses are compressive stresses within about the laser spot and are tensile stresses at other place. This work may be beneficial to the laser processing of metal materials.

  1. On thermal stress failure of the SNAP-19A RTG heat shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, W. C.; Anderson, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a study on thermal stress problems in an amorphous graphite heat shield that is part of the launch-abort protect system for the SNAP-19A radio-isotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) that will be used on the Viking Mars Lander are presended. The first result is from a thermal stress analysis of a full-scale RTG heat source that failed to survive a suborbital entry flight test, possibly due to thermal stress failure. It was calculated that the maximum stress in the heat shield was only 50 percent of the ultimate strength of the material. To provide information on the stress failure criterion used for this calculation, some heat shield specimens were fractured under abort entry conditions in a plasma arc facility. It was found that in regions free of stress concentrations the POCO graphite heat shield material did fracture when the local stress reached the ultimate uniaxial stress of the material.

  2. Solution accuracies of finite element reentry heat transfer and thermal stress analyses of Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Accuracies of solutions (structural temperatures and thermal stresses) obtained from different thermal and structural FEMs set up for the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) are compared and discussed. For studying the effect of element size on the solution accuracies of heat-transfer and thermal-stress analyses of the SSO, five SPAR thermal models and five NASTRAN structural models were set up for wing midspan bay 3. The structural temperature distribution over the wing skin (lower and upper) surface of one bay was dome shaped and induced more severe thermal stresses in the chordwise direction than in the spanwise direction. The induced thermal stresses were extremely sensitive to slight variation in structural temperature distributions. Both internal convention and internal radiation were found to have equal effects on the SSO.

  3. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS OF THERMAL STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN PLASTIC ENCAPSULATED INTEGRATED CIRCUIT PACKAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉岚; 王彪; 王殿富

    2003-01-01

    Due to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion of slicon chip and the surrounding plastic encapsulation materials, the induced thermal stress is the main cause for die and encapsulant rupture. The corner geometry is simplified as the semi-infinite wedge. Then the two-dimensional thermal stress distribution around the corner was obtained explicitly. Based on the stress calculation, the strain energy density factor criterion is used to evaluate the strength of the structure, which can not only give the critical condition for the stresses, but also determine the direction of fracture initiation around the corner.

  4. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS OF THERMAL STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN PLASTIC ENCAPSULATED INTEGRATED CIRCUIT PACKAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYu-lan; WANGBiao; WANGDian-fu

    2003-01-01

    Due to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal epansion of slicon chip and the surrounding plastic encapsulation materials,the induced thermal stress is the main cause for die and encapsulant rupture.The corner geometry is simplified as the semi-infinite wedge.The the two-dimensional thermal stress distribution around the coner was obtained explicitly.Based on the stress calculation,the strain energy density factor criterion is used to evaluate the strength of the structure,which can not only give the critical condition for the stresses,but also determine the direction of fracture iuntiation around the corner.

  5. Oxidative stress and Kawasaki disease: how is oxidative stress involved from the acute stage to the chronic stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Tomoyo; Hamaoka, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are closely related. Further, oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathology of inflammation-based Kawasaki disease. An excessive in vivo production of reactive oxygen species increases oxidative stress in the body, which triggers an endless vicious spiral of inflammation reactions and reactive oxygen metabolites. This presumably forms diffuse vasculitis in the acute phase. Acute inflammation and oxidative stress can be rapidly controlled by treatments; however, they may remain for a long time. This has recently been identified as a problem in the chronic phase of Kawasaki disease. Generally, the presence of vascular inflammation and oxidative stress impairs blood vessels, leading to the onset of atherosclerosis, which is a widely recognized risk. The current discussion focuses on whether the same is valid for blood vessels in the chronic phase of Kawasaki disease.

  6. Child Anxiety Symptoms Related to Longitudinal Cortisol Trajectories and Acute Stress Responses: Evidence of Developmental Stress Sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Gilliam, Kathryn S.; Wright, Dorianne B.; Fisher, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that individuals at risk for internalizing disorders show differential activation levels and/or dynamics of stress-sensitive physiological systems, possibly reflecting a process of stress sensitization. However, there is little longitudinal research to clarify how the development of these systems over time relates to activation during acute stress, and how aspects of such activation map onto internalizing symptoms. We investigated children’s (n=107) diurnal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity via salivary cortisol (morning and evening levels) across 29 assessments spanning 6+ years, and related longitudinal patterns to acute stress responses at the end of this period (age 9–10). Associations with child psychiatric symptoms at age 10 were also examined to determine internalizing risk profiles. Increasing morning cortisol levels across assessments predicted less of a cortisol decline following interpersonal stress at age 9, and higher cortisol levels during performance stress at age 10. These same profiles of high and/or sustained cortisol elevation during psychosocial stress were associated with child anxiety symptoms. Results suggest developmental sensitization to stress—reflected in rising morning cortisol and eventual hyperactivation during acute stress exposure—may distinguish children at risk for internalizing disorders. PMID:25688433

  7. Thermal Volume Change of Unsaturated Silt under Different Stress States and Suction Magnitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCartney John S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of the thermal volume change of compacted specimens of the same type of silt under a wide range of stress states, initial void ratios, and suction magnitudes. Stress states include both isotropic and anisotropic conditions with varying principal stress ratios, as well as normally consolidated and overconsolidated conditions. Initial void ratios range from 0.60 to 0.86, spanning very dense to loose conditions. Suctions evaluated range from saturated conditions, to low suctions in the funicular range, to suctions corresponding to residual saturation conditions. For the same soil, wide variations in thermal volume change are observed. Thermal contraction is observed for normally consolidated conditions regardless of the initial degree of saturation. Different mechanisms of thermal volume change can be used to explain the results, ranging from thermally-induced pore water pressure dissipation, to thermal collapse, to thermally-accelerated creep.

  8. Teratogenic actions of thermally-stressed culinary oils in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indart, Ana; Viana, Marta; Grootveld, Martin C; Silwood, Christopher J L; Sanchez-Vera, Isabel; Bonet, Bartolomé

    2002-10-01

    Lipid oxidation products (LOPs), generated in culinary oils during episodes of thermal stressing can give rise to cellular damage. The aims of this study were to determine whether orally-administered, LOP-containing thermally-stressed safflower oil exerts teratogenic actions in rats, and whether this effect could be prevented by co-administration of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOH). Safflower oil was heated for a period of 20 min according to standard frying practices and stored at -20 degrees C under N2. Four experimental groups of pregnant Wistar rats were employed; two received 0.30 ml of pre-heated oil (HO), one of which was also supplemented with 150 mg of alpha-TOH (HOE), and two served as controls, one treated with the non-heated oil (O) and the other without any treatment (C). The oil was administered daily by gavage from day 1 of pregnancy to day 11.5, when the animals were killed and the embryos examined. LOPs and alpha-TOH were determined both in the heated and non-heated oils. The percentage of embryo malformations and reabsorptions were determined in the above four experimental groups. Heating the oil substantially increased its concentration of LOPs and decreased its alpha-TOH content. The percentage of embryo malformations in the HO group was 21.73%, compared with 5.6 and 7% in the O and C groups, respectively. Supplementation of the pre-heated oil with alpha-TOH was found to decrease the percentage of malformations to 7%. The results obtained from these investigations indicate that LOPs detectable at millimolar levels in the heated cooking oils administered (e.g. saturated and alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, and/or their conjugated hydroperoxydiene precursors) exert potent teratogenic actions in experimental animals which are at least partially circumventable by co-administration of the chain-breaking antioxidant alpha-TOH. Plausible mechanisms for these processes and their health relevance to humans regarding diet and methods of frying/cooking are

  9. Acute effects of cigarette smoke on inflammation and oxidative stress : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, H; Postma, DS; Timens, W; Ten Hacken, NHT

    2004-01-01

    Compared with the effects of chronic smoke exposure on lung function and airway inflammation, there are few data on the acute effects of smoking. A review of the literature identified 123 studies investigating the acute effects of cigarette smoking on inflammation and oxidative stress in human, anim

  10. Amygdala-Hippocampal Connectivity Changes During Acute Psychosocial Stress: Joint Effect of Early Life Stress and Oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan; Pestke, Karin; Feeser, Melanie; Aust, Sabine; Pruessner, Jens C; Böker, Heinz; Bajbouj, Malek; Grimm, Simone

    2015-11-01

    Previous evidence shows that acute stress changes both amygdala activity and its connectivity with a distributed brain network. Early life stress (ELS), especially emotional abuse (EA), is associated with altered reactivity to psychosocial stress in adulthood and moderates or even reverses the stress-attenuating effect of oxytocin (OXT). The neural underpinnings of the interaction between ELS and OXT remain unclear, though. Therefore, we here investigate the joint effect of ELS and OXT on transient changes in amygdala-centered functional connectivity induced by acute psychosocial stress, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subject crossover design. Psychophysiological interaction analysis in the placebo session revealed stress-induced increases in functional connectivity between amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Regression analysis showed that EA was positively associated with stress-induced changes in connectivity between amygdala and hippocampus. Moreover, hierarchical linear regression showed that this positive association between EA and stress-induced amygdala-hippocampal connectivity was moderated after the administration of intranasal OXT. Amygdala-hippocampal connectivity in the OXT session correlated negatively with cortisol stress responses. Our findings suggest that altered amygdala-hippocampal functional connectivity during psychosocial stress may have a crucial role in the altered sensitivity to OXT effects in individuals who have experienced EA in their childhood.

  11. The Genetic Basis of Local Adaptation to Thermal Stress in the Intertidal Copepod Tigriopus Californicus /

    OpenAIRE

    Sefton, Margaret Marie

    2013-01-01

    Populations of the intertidal copepod, Tigriopus californicus, vary in their tolerance to thermal stress. In this study, the genetic basis of these differences was examined by generating interpopulation hybrids between a northern and southern population; hybrids were then exposed them to multiple generations of heat stress. At each generation, changes in allele frequency of six candidate genes were monitored. Although allelic frequencies did not change in response to thermal stress, there was...

  12. Influence of Interlayer Design on Residual Thermal Stresses in Trilayered and Graded All-Ceramic Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bruno; Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C. M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana; Zhang, Yu; Fredel, Márcio

    2017-01-01

    Residual thermal stresses are formed in dental restorations during cooling from high temperature processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of constructive design variables (composition and interlayer thickness) on residual stresses in alumina- and zirconia-graded restorations. Restorations' real-like cooling conditions were simulated using finite elements method and temperature-dependent material properties were used. Three different designs were evaluated: a bilayered restoration (sharp transition between materials); a trilayered restoration with a homogenous interlayer between core and veneer; and a trilayered restoration with a graded interlayer. The interlayer thickness and composition were varied. Zirconia restorations presented overall higher thermal stress values than alumina ones. Thermal stresses were significantly reduced by the presence of a homogeneous interlayer. The composition of the interlayer showed great influence on the thermal stresses, with the best results for homogeneous interlayers being observed for porcelain contents in the composite ranging between 30%-50% (vol.%), for both alumina and zirconia restorations. The interlayer's thickness showed a minor contribution in the thermal stress reduction. The graded interlayer showed an optimized reduction in restorations' thermal stresses. The use of graded interlayer, favoring enhanced thermal stress distributions and lower magnitude is expected to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure. PMID:27987657

  13. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect. PMID:27611438

  14. Influence of interlayer design on residual thermal stresses in trilayered and graded all-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bruno; Fabris, Douglas; Souza, Júlio C M; Silva, Filipe S; Mesquita-Guimarães, Joana; Zhang, Yu; Fredel, Márcio

    2017-02-01

    Residual thermal stresses are formed in dental restorations during cooling from high temperature processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of constructive design variables (composition and interlayer thickness) on residual stresses in alumina- and zirconia-graded restorations. Restorations' real-like cooling conditions were simulated using finite elements method and temperature-dependent material properties were used. Three different designs were evaluated: a bilayered restoration (sharp transition between materials); a trilayered restoration with a homogenous interlayer between core and veneer; and a trilayered restoration with a graded interlayer. The interlayer thickness and composition were varied. Zirconia restorations presented overall higher thermal stress values than alumina ones. Thermal stresses were significantly reduced by the presence of a homogeneous interlayer. The composition of the interlayer showed great influence on the thermal stresses, with the best results for homogeneous interlayers being observed for porcelain contents in the composite ranging between 30%-50% (vol.%), for both alumina and zirconia restorations. The interlayer's thickness showed a minor contribution in the thermal stress reduction. The graded interlayer showed an optimized reduction in restorations' thermal stresses. The use of graded interlayer, favoring enhanced thermal stress distributions and lower magnitude is expected to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors Influencing Residual Stresses in Yttria Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrann, Roy T. R.; Rybicki, Edmund F.; Shadley, John R.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    To improve gas turbine and diesel engine performance using thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) requires an understanding of the factors that influence the in-service behavior of thermal barrier coatings. One of the many factors related to coating performance is the state of stress in the coating. The total stress state is composed of the stresses due to the in-service loading history and the residual stresses. Residual stresses have been shown to affect TBC life, the bond strength of thermal spray coatings, and the fatigue life of tungsten carbide coatings. Residual stresses are first introduced in TBC's by the spraying process due to elevated temperatures during processing and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of the top coat, bond coat, and substrate. Later, the residual stresses can be changed by the in-service temperature history due to a number of time and temperature dependent mechanisms, such as oxidation, creep, and sintering. Silica content has also been shown to affect sintering and the cyclic life of thermal barrier coatings. Thus, it is important to understand how the spraying process, the in-service thermal cycles, and the silica content can create and alter residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings.

  16. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiels, H A; Galli, G L J; Block, B A

    2015-02-07

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation-contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of acute psychological stress on cardiovascular risk factors in face of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kristian T; Shelton, Richard C; Wan, Jun; Li, Li

    2016-11-01

    Individuals with insulin resistance (IR) are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Psychological stress may contribute to develop CVD in IR, although mechanisms are poorly understood. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that individuals with IR have enhanced emotional and physiological responses to acute psychological stress, leading to increased CVD risk. Sixty participants were enrolled into the study, and classified into IR group (n = 31) and insulin sensitive group (n = 29) according to the Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, which was calculated based on an oral glucose tolerance test. The Trier social stress test, a standardized experimental stress paradigm, was performed on each participant, and emotional and physiological responses were examined. Blood was collected from each subject for insulin, cytokines, and cortisol measurements. Compared with the insulin-sensitive group, individuals with IR had significantly lower ratings of energy and calm, but higher fatigue levels in response to acute stressors. Individuals with IR also showed blunted heart rate reactivity following stress. In addition, the IR status was worsened by acute psychological stress as demonstrated by further increased insulin secretion. Furthermore, individuals with IR showed significantly increased levels of leptin and interleukin-6, but decreased levels of adiponectin, at baseline, stress test, and post-stress period. Our findings in individuals with IR under acute stress would allow a better understanding of the risks for developing CVD and to tailor the interventions for better outcomes.

  18. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  19. Acute immobilization stress following contextual fear conditioning reduces fear memory: timing is essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaya, Akemi; Lee, Hyunjin; Park, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hosung; Muto, Junko; Nakajima, Sanae; Ohta, Shigeo; Mikami, Toshio

    2016-02-24

    Histone acetylation is regulated in response to stress and plays an important role in learning and memory. Chronic stress is known to deteriorate cognition, whereas acute stress facilitates memory formation. However, whether acute stress facilitates memory formation when it is applied after fear stimulation is not yet known. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of acute stress applied after fear training on memory formation, mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), epigenetic regulation of BDNF expression, and corticosterone level in mice in vivo. Mice were subjected to acute immobilization stress for 30 min at 60 or 90 min after contextual fear conditioning training, and acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 14 (H3K14) and level of corticosterone were measured using western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. A freezing behavior test was performed 24 h after training, and mRNA expression of BDNF was measured using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Different groups of mice were used for each test. Freezing behavior significantly decreased with the down-regulation of BDNF mRNA expression caused by acute immobilization stress at 60 min after fear conditioning training owing to the reduction of H3K14 acetylation. However, BDNF mRNA expression and H3K14 acetylation were not reduced in animals subjected to immobilization stress at 90 min after the training. Further, the corticosterone level was significantly high in mice subjected to immobilization stress at 60 min after the training. Acute immobilization stress for 30 min at 60 min after fear conditioning training impaired memory formation and reduced BDNF mRNA expression and H3K14 acetylation in the hippocampus of mice owing to the high level of corticosterone.

  20. Acute stress in residents during emergency care: a study of personal and situational factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Roger Daglius; Scalabrini Neto, Augusto

    2017-05-01

    Providing care for simulated emergency patients may induce considerable acute stress in physicians. However, the acute stress provoked in a real-life emergency room (ER) is not well known. Our aim was to assess acute stress responses in residents during real emergency care and investigate the related personal and situational factors. A cross-sectional observational study was carried out at an emergency department of a tertiary teaching hospital. All second-year internal medicine residents were invited to voluntarily participate in this study. Acute stress markers were assessed at baseline (T1), before residents started their ER shift, and immediately after an emergency situation (T2), using heart rate, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, salivary α-amylase activity, salivary interleukin-1 β, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-s and STAI-t). Twenty-four residents were assessed during 40 emergency situations. All stress markers presented a statistically significant increase between T1 and T2. IL-1 β presented the highest percent increase (141.0%, p stress in residents. Resident experience, trait anxiety, and number of emergency procedures were independently associated with acute stress response.

  1. Tensile stress and creep in thermally grown oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Boyd W; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Hou, Peggy Y

    2006-05-01

    Structural components that operate at high temperatures (for example, turbine blades) rely on thermally grown oxide (TGO), commonly alumina, for corrosion protection. Strains that develop in TGOs during operation can reduce the protectiveness of the TGO. However, the occurrence of growth strains in TGOs, and mechanisms that cause them, are poorly understood. It is accepted that compressive strains can develop as oxygen and metal atoms meet to form new growth within constrained oxide. More controversial is the experimental finding that large tensile stresses, close to 1 GPa, develop during isothermal growth conditions in alumina TGO formed on a FeCrAlY alloy. Using a novel technique based on synchrotron radiation, we have confirmed these previous results, and show that the tensile strain develops as the early oxide, (Fe,Cr,Al)(2)O(3), converts to alpha-Al2O3 during the growth process. This allows us to model the strain behaviour by including creep and this diffusion-controlled phase change.

  2. The relationship between acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in severely injured trauma survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan L; Pattison, Phillipa

    2004-03-01

    This prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the relationship between acute stress disorder (ASD) and the subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a population of severely injured hospitalised trauma survivors. Symptoms of ASD were assessed just prior to discharge in 307 consecutive admissions to a Level 1 Trauma Centre, with PTSD assessments completed at 3 and 12 months post-injury. A well-established structured clinical interview was adopted for both assessments. Only 1% of the sample met criteria for an ASD diagnosis (at a mean of 8 days post-injury), while the incidence of PTSD was 9% at 3 months and 10% at 12 months. Although all ASD symptom clusters contributed to the prediction of subsequent PTSD severity, logistic regression indicated that only re-experiencing and arousal predicted a categorical PTSD diagnosis. The dissociative symptoms that form the core of ASD were rarely endorsed and showed high specificity but low sensitivity, resulting in a high proportion of false negative diagnoses. Reducing the number of dissociative symptoms required for a diagnosis ameliorated, but did not resolve, the problem. In this particular population, the low sensitivity of the ASD diagnosis renders it a poor screening test for use in identifying high risk individuals for early intervention and prevention strategies.

  3. Histamine is not released in acute thermal injury in human skin in vivo: a microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Pedersen, Juri Lindy; Skov, Per Stahl

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models have shown histamine to be released from the skin during the acute phase of a burn injury. The role of histamine during the early phase of thermal injuries in humans remains unclear. PURPOSE: The objectives of this trial were to study histamine release in human skin during...... the acute phase of a standardized thermal injury in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Histamine concentrations in human skin were measured by skin microdialysis technique. Microdialysis fibers were inserted into the dermis in the lower leg in male healthy volunteers. A standardized superficial thermal injury...... was elicited by a heating thermode (49 degrees C) applied to the skin for 5 min. Histamine in dialysate was analyzed for up to 2 h after the injury using two different analytical methods. RESULTS: Spectrofluorometric assay of histamine showed no histamine release in separate studies using 2-min samples over 20...

  4. Effect of Thermal Stresses on the Failure Criteria of Fiber Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Martin Klitgaard; Sankar, Bhavani V.

    2010-01-01

    When composite laminates are operated at cryogenic temperatures, thermal stresses arise. This is due to the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion of different plies and also between the fiber and matrix. While the former is taken into account in the composite structural analysis......, the latter, called micro-thermal stresses, has not been given much attention. In this paper the Direct Micromechanics Method is used to investigate the effects of micro-thermal stresses on the failure envelope of composites. Using FEA the unit-cell of the composite is analyzed. Assuming the failure criteria...... for the fiber and matrix are known, the exact failure envelope is developed. Using the micromechanics results, the Tsai-Wu failure envelope is modified to account for the micro-thermal stresses. The approach is demonstrated using two example structures at cryogenic temperature....

  5. Cognitive Processing Therapy for Acute Stress Disorder Resulting from an Anti-Gay Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysen, Debra; Lostutter, Ty W.; Goines, Marie A.

    2005-01-01

    This case study describes Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) with a 30-year-old gay man with symptoms of acute stress disorder (ASD) following a recent homophobic assault. Treatment addressed assault-related posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms. Also addressed were low self-esteem, helplessness, and high degrees of…

  6. Predicting Child Ptsd: The Relationship between Acute Stress Disorder and PTSD in Injured Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Winston, Flaura Koplin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in injured children and to evaluate the utility of ASD as a predictor of PTSD. Method: Children hospitalized for injuries sustained in a traffic crash were enrolled in a prospective study. ASD was assessed in 243 children within 1 month…

  7. Infusion of glucose and lipids at physiological rates causes acute endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Guenther; Song, Weiwei; Duan, Xunbao; Cheung, Peter; Kresge, Karen; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim

    2011-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has recently been implicated as a cause for obesity-related insulin resistance; however, what causes ER stress in obesity has remained uncertain. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that macronutrients can cause acute (ER) stress in rat liver. Examined were the effects of intravenously infused glucose and/or lipids on proximal ER stress sensor activation (PERK, eIF2-α, ATF4, Xbox protein 1 (XBP1s)), unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins (GRP78, calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), stress kinases (JNK, p38 MAPK) and insulin signaling (insulin/receptor substrate (IRS) 1/2 associated phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)) in rat liver. Glucose and/or lipid infusions, ranging from 23.8 to 69.5 kJ/4 h (equivalent to between ~17% and ~50% of normal daily energy intake), activated the proximal ER stress sensor PERK and ATF6 increased the protein abundance of calnexin, calreticulin and PDI and increased two GRP78 isoforms. Glucose and glucose plus lipid infusions induced comparable degrees of ER stress, but only infusions containing lipid activated stress kinases (JNK and p38 MAPK) and inhibited insulin signaling (PI3K). In summary, physiologic amounts of both glucose and lipids acutely increased ER stress in livers 12-h fasted rats and dependent on the presence of fat, caused insulin resistance. We conclude that this type of acute ER stress is likely to occur during normal daily nutrient intake.

  8. Acute Immobilization Stress Modulate GABA Release from Rat Olfactory Bulb: Involvement of Endocannabinoids—Cannabinoids and Acute Stress Modulate GABA Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Delgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of cannabinoids and acute immobilization stress on the regulation of GABA release in the olfactory bulb. Glutamate-stimulated 3H-GABA release was measured in superfused slices. We report that cannabinoids as WIN55, 212-2, methanandamide, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol were able to inhibit glutamate- and KCl-stimulated 3H-GABA release. This effect was blocked by the CB1 antagonist AM281. On the other hand, acute stress was able per se to increase endocannabinoid activity. This effect was evident since the inhibition of stimulated GABA release by acute stress was reversed with AM281 and tetrahydrolipstatin. Inhibition of the endocannabinoid transport or its catabolism showed reduction of GABA release, antagonized by AM281 in control and stressed animals. These results point to endocannabinoids as inhibitory modulators of GABA release in the olfactory bulb acting through an autocrine mechanism. Apparently, stress increases the endocannabinoid system, modulating GABAergic synaptic function in a primary sensory organ.

  9. Symptoms of peritraumatic and acute traumatic stress among victims of an industrial disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmes, Philippe J; Brunet, Alain; Coppin-Calmes, Dominique; Arbus, Christophe; Coppin, Dominique; Charlet, Jean-Paul; Vinnemann, Nathalie; Juchet, Henri; Lauque, Dominique; Schmitt, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have examined peritraumatic distress, peritraumatic dissociation, and acute stress disorder as predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors examined whether these three predictors were associated with PTSD symptoms when considered simultaneously. Two-hundred victims of a factory explosion in Toulouse, France, were surveyed two and six months after the event with use of retrospective self-reports of peritraumatic distress, peritraumatic dissociation, and acute stress disorder. A hierarchical multiple regression predicting PTSD symptoms six months posttrauma indicated that all three constructs explained unique variance, accounting for up to 62 percent. Peritraumatic distress and dissociation and acute stress disorder appear conceptually different from one another and show promise in identifying who is at risk of PTSD.

  10. Assessment of oxidative stress parameters of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice in acute stress model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Hacioglu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Exposing to stress may be associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, high level of oxidative stress may eventually give rise to accumulation of oxidative damage and development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. It has been presented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF supports neurons against various neurodegenerative conditions. Lately, there has been growing evidence that changes in the cerebral neurotrophic support and especially in the BDNF expression and its engagement with ROS might be important in various disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we aimed to investigate protective effects of BDNF against stress-induced oxidative damage. Materials and Methods: Five- to six-month-old male wild-type and BDNF knock-down mice were used in this study. Activities of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD enzymes, and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA were assessed in the cerebral homogenates of studied groups in response to acute restraint stress. Results: Exposing to acute physiological stress led to significant elevation in the markers of oxidative stress in the cerebral cortexes of experimental groups. Conclusion: As BDNF-deficient mice were observed to be more susceptible to stress-induced oxidative damage, it can be suggested that there is a direct interplay between oxidative stress indicators and BDNF levels in the brain.

  11. Plasma omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status and monounsaturated fatty acids are altered by chronic social stress and predict endocrine responses to acute stress in titi monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disturbances in fatty acid (FA) metabolism may link chronic psychological stress, endocrine responsiveness, and psychopathology. Therefore, lipid metabolome-wide responses and their relationships with endocrine (cortisol; insulin; adiponectin) responsiveness to acute stress (AS) were assessed in a ...

  12. Acute restraint stress and corticosterone transiently disrupts novelty preference in an object recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-López, Viviana; Torres-Berrio, Angélica; González-Martínez, Lina; Múnera, Alejandro; Lamprea, Marisol R

    2015-09-15

    The object recognition task is a procedure based on rodents' natural tendency to explore novel objects which is frequently used for memory testing. However, in some instances novelty preference is replaced by familiarity preference, raising questions regarding the validity of novelty preference as a pure recognition memory index. Acute stress- and corticosterone administration-induced novel object preference disruption has been frequently interpreted as memory impairment; however, it is still not clear whether such effect can be actually attributed to either mnemonic disruption or altered novelty seeking. Seventy-five adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task and subjected to either acute stress or corticosterone administration to evaluate the effect of stress or corticosterone on an object recognition task. Acute stress was induced by restraining movement for 1 or 4h, ending 30 min before the sample trial. Corticosterone was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before the test trial which was performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial. Four-hour, but not 1-h, stress induced familiar object preference during the test trial performed 1h after the sample trial; however, acute stress had no effects on the test when performed 24h after sample trial. Systemic administration of corticosterone before the test trial performed either 1 or 24h after the sample trial also resulted in familiar object preference. However, neither acute stress nor corticosterone induced changes in locomotor behaviour. Taken together, such results suggested that acute stress probably does not induce memory retrieval impairment but, instead, induces an emotional arousing state which motivates novelty avoidance.

  13. Media's role in broadcasting acute stress following the Boston Marathon bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, E Alison; Garfin, Dana Rose; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2014-01-07

    We compared the impact of media vs. direct exposure on acute stress response to collective trauma. We conducted an Internet-based survey following the Boston Marathon bombings between April 29 and May 13, 2013, with representative samples of residents from Boston (n = 846), New York City (n = 941), and the remainder of the United States (n = 2,888). Acute stress symptom scores were comparable in Boston and New York [regression coefficient (b) = 0.43; SE = 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), -2.36, 3.23], but lower nationwide when compared with Boston (b = -2.21; SE = 1.07; 95% CI, -4.31, -0.12). Adjusting for prebombing mental health (collected prospectively), demographics, and prior collective stress exposure, six or more daily hours of bombing-related media exposure in the week after the bombings was associated with higher acute stress than direct exposure to the bombings (continuous acute stress symptom total: media exposure b = 15.61 vs. direct exposure b = 5.69). Controlling for prospectively collected prebombing television-watching habits did not change the findings. In adjusted models, direct exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the Sandy Hook School shootings were both significantly associated with bombing-related acute stress; Superstorm Sandy exposure wasn't. Prior exposure to similar and/or violent events may render some individuals vulnerable to the negative effects of collective traumas. Repeatedly engaging with trauma-related media content for several hours daily shortly after collective trauma may prolong acute stress experiences and promote substantial stress-related symptomatology. Mass media may become a conduit that spreads negative consequences of community trauma beyond directly affected communities.

  14. Acute social stress and cardiac electrical activity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, A; Stilli, D; de Boer, SF; Koolhaas, JM; Musso, E

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of experiments aimed at describing electrocardiographic responses to different acute social stressors in healthy male rats. Electrocardiograms were telemetrically recorded during maternal aggression, social defeat, and psychosocial stimulation, as obtained using the

  15. Context-dependent enhancement of declarative memory performance following acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, T; Giesbrecht, T; Jelicic, M; Merckelbach, H

    2007-09-01

    Studies on how acute stress affects learning and memory have yielded inconsistent findings, with some studies reporting enhancing effects while others report impairing effects. Recently, Joëls et al. [Joëls, M., Pu, Z., Wiegert, O., Oitzl, M.S., Krugers, H.J., 2006. Learning under stress: how does it work? Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10, 152-158] argued that stress will enhance memory only when the memory acquisition phase and stressor share the same spatiotemporal context (i.e., context-congruency). The current study tested this hypothesis by looking at whether context-congruent stress enhances declarative memory performance. Undergraduates were assigned to a personality stress group (n=16), a memory stress group (n=18), or a no-stress control group (n=18). While being exposed to the acute stressor or a control task, participants encoded personality- and memory-related words and were tested for free recall 24h later. Relative to controls, stress significantly enhanced recall of context-congruent words, but only for personality words. This suggests that acute stress may strengthen the consolidation of memory material when the stressor matches the to-be-remembered information in place and time.

  16. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production by fish muscle mitochondria: Potential role in acute heat-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Sheena; Wiens, Lilian; Sotiri, Emianka; Treberg, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Acute heat challenge is known to induce cell-level oxidative stress in fishes. Mitochondria are well known for the capacity to make reactive oxygen species (ROS) and as such are often implicated as a source of the oxidants associated with this thermally-induced oxidative stress. This implication is often asserted, despite little direct data for mitochondrial ROS metabolism in fishes. Here we characterize mitochondrial ROS metabolism in three Actinopterygian fish species at two levels, the capacity for superoxide/H2O2 production and the antioxidant thiol-reductase enzyme activities. We find that red muscle mitochondria from all three species have measurable ROS production and respond to different assay conditions consistent with what might be anticipated; assuming similar relative contributions from difference ROS producing sites as found in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria. Although there are species and assay specific exceptions, fish mitochondria may have a greater capacity to produce ROS than that found in the rat when either normalized to respiratory capacity or determined at a common assay temperature. The interspecific differences in ROS production are not correlated with thiol-based antioxidant reductase activities. Moreover, mimicking an acute in vivo heat stress by comparing the impact of increasing assay temperature on these processes in vitro, we find evidence supporting a preferential activation of mitochondrial H2O2 production relative to the increase in the capacity of reductase enzymes to supply electrons to the mitochondrial matrix peroxidases. This supports the contention that mitochondria may be, at least in part, responsible for the ROS that lead to oxidative stress in fish tissues exposed to acute heat challenge.

  17. Relationship between acute stress and sleep disorder in grass-root military personnel: mediating effect of social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Jun; Zhang, Qiao-Li; Sun, Xin-Yang; Zhang, Li-Yi; Zhang, Si-Yuan; Yao, Gao-Feng; Chen, Chun-Xia; Kong, Ling-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorder induced by acute stress has always been an important topic for study among the general population. However, the mediating effect of social support between acute stress and sleep disorder has rarely been reported before. A total of 2,411 grass-root military personnel were randomly selected by cluster sampling, and administered the Chinese Military Personnel Sleep Disorder Scale, Military Acute Stress Scale and Social Support Rating Scale. The total score of acute stress scale was positively correlated with the total score and factor scores of sleep disorder scale (r = 0.209 ~ 0.465, P military personnel. Well-established social support could alleviate sleep disorder induced by acute stress. Lack of social support was a partial mediator between acute stress and sleep disorder.

  18. Physiological Responses to Acute Exercise-Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    environment is the most primitive of the thermoregulatory responses. and is seen in all vertebrates, including fish and reptiles which, given the... thermoregulation involves conscious willed activity, it is more complex than physiological temperature regulation. and is less well characterized. Thermal...sensation and thermal discomfort presumably represent the motivation for behavioral thermoregulation . and in human subjects. can be measured by

  19. Habitat pollution and thermal regime modify molecular stress responses to elevated temperature in freshwater mussels (Anodonta anatina: Unionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falfushynska, H.; Gnatyshyna, L.; Yurchak, I. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, Kryvonosa Str 2, 46027 Ternopil (Ukraine); Ivanina, A. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Stoliar, O. [Research Laboratory of Comparative Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ternopil National Pedagogical University, Kryvonosa Str 2, 46027 Ternopil (Ukraine); Sokolova, I., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Elevated temperature and pollution are common stressors in freshwater ecosystems. We study cellular stress response to acute warming in Anodonta anatina (Unionidae) from sites with different thermal regimes and pollution levels: a pristine area and an agriculturally polluted site with normal temperature regimes (F and A, respectively) and a polluted site with elevated temperature (N) from the cooling pond of an electrical power plant. Animals were exposed to different temperatures for 14 days and stress response markers were measured in gills, digestive gland and hemocytes. Mussels from site N and A had elevated background levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity indicating higher reliance on anaerobic metabolism for ATP production and/or redox maintenance. Exposure to 25 °C and 30 °C induced oxidative stress (indicated by elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products) in digestive gland and gills of mussels from A and F sites, while in mussels from N sites elevated oxidative stress was only apparent at 30 °C. Temperature-induced changes in levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, metallothioneins and glutathione) were tissue- and population-specific. Acute warming led to destabilization of lysosomal membranes and increased frequencies of nuclear lesions in mussels from F and A sites but not in their counterparts from N site. Elevated temperature led to an increase in the frequency of micronuclei in hemocytes in mussels from F and A sites at 25 °C and 30 °C and in mussels from N site at 30 °C. The mussels from N site also demonstrated better survival at elevated temperature (30 °C) than their counterparts from the F and A sites. Taken together, these data indicate that long-term acclimation and/or adaptation of A. anatina to elevated temperatures result in increased thermotolerance and alleviate stress response to moderate temperature rise. In contrast, extreme warming (30 °C) is harmful to mussels from all populations indicating limit to this induced

  20. On plane stress state and stress free deformation of thick plate with FGM interface under thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szubartowski, Damian; Ganczarski, Artur

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates the plane stress state and the stress free thermo-elastic deformation of FGM thick plate under thermal loading. First, the Sneddon-Lockett theorem on the plane stress state in an isotropic infinite thick plate is generalized for a case of FGM problem in which all thermo-mechanical properties are optional functions of depth co-ordinate. The proof is based on application of the Iljushin thermo-elastic potential to displacement type system of equations that reduces it to the plane stress state problem. Then an existence of the purely thermal deformation is proved in two ways: first, it is shown that the unique solution fulfils conditions of simultaneous constant temperature and linear gradation of thermal expansion coefficient, second, proof is based directly on stress type system of equations which straightforwardly reduces to compatibility equations for purely thermal deformation if only stress field is homogeneous in domain and at boundary. Finally, couple examples of application to an engineering problem are presented.

  1. Effects of dark chocolate consumption on the prothrombotic response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, R; Meister, R E; Stutz, M; Kummer, P; Arpagaus, A; Huber, S; Ehlert, U; Wirtz, P H

    2014-12-01

    Flavanoid-rich dark chocolate consumption benefits cardiovascular health, but underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated the acute effect of dark chocolate on the reactivity of prothrombotic measures to psychosocial stress. Healthy men aged 20-50 years (mean ± SD: 35.7 ± 8.8) were assigned to a single serving of either 50 g of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate (n=31) or 50 g of optically identical flavonoid-free placebo chocolate (n=34). Two hours after chocolate consumption, both groups underwent an acute standardised psychosocial stress task combining public speaking and mental arithmetic. We determined plasma levels of four stress-responsive prothrombotic measures (i. e., fibrinogen, clotting factor VIII activity, von Willebrand Factor antigen, fibrin D-dimer) prior to chocolate consumption, immediately before and after stress, and at 10 minutes and 20 minutes after stress cessation. We also measured the flavonoid epicatechin, and the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine in plasma. The dark chocolate group showed a significantly attenuated stress reactivity of the hypercoagulability marker D-dimer (F=3.87, p=0.017) relative to the placebo chocolate group. Moreover, the blunted D-dimer stress reactivity related to higher plasma levels of the flavonoid epicatechin assessed before stress (F=3.32, p = 0.031) but not to stress-induced changes in catecholamines (p's=0.35). There were no significant group differences in the other coagulation measures (p's≥0.87). Adjustments for covariates did not alter these findings. In conclusion, our findings indicate that a single consumption of flavonoid-rich dark chocolate blunted the acute prothrombotic response to psychosocial stress, thereby perhaps mitigating the risk of acute coronary syndromes triggered by emotional stress.

  2. Effects of Acute and Chronic Cold Stress on Antioxidant Function in Intestinal Tracts of Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ming; Yu Xian-yi; Li Jin-long; Han Yan-hui; Li Shu; Xu Shi-wen

    2012-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of cold stress on the contents of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in duodenum, jejunum and ileum of chickens. A total of 80 15-dayold male chickens were treated by cold stress with the duration of the acute cold stress being 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, and the chronic cold stress was 5, 10, and 20 days, respectively. Cold stress temperature was (12±1)℃. The chemical colorimetric method was used to detect the changes of the T-AOC, SOD activities and MDA contents. The results showed that compared with the corresponding control group, effects of acute cold stress on the T-AOC in duodenum, jejunum and ileum of chickens significantly (P〈0.05) increased firstly and then decreased. Under chronic cold stress, the T-AOC significantly (P〈0.05) decreased. Under acute cold stress and chronic cold stress, the MDA contents significantly (P〈0.05) increased in duodenum, jejunum and ileum of chickens. The effects of acute cold stress on the SOD activities in duodenum, jejunum and ileum of chickens significantly (P〈0.05) increased firstly and then decreased Under chronic cold stress the SOD activities significantly (P〈0.05) decreased in jejunum and ileum, but significantly (P〈0.05) decreased firstly and then increased in duodenum.

  3. The influence of acute stress on the regulation of conditioned fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace M. Raio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fear learning and regulation is a prominent model for describing the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders and stress-related psychopathology. Fear expression can be modulated using a number of regulatory strategies, including extinction, cognitive emotion regulation, avoidance strategies and reconsolidation. In this review, we examine research investigating the effects of acute stress and stress hormones on these regulatory techniques. We focus on what is known about the impact of stress on the ability to flexibly regulate fear responses that are acquired through Pavlovian fear conditioning. Our primary aim is to explore the impact of stress on fear regulation in humans. Given this, we focus on techniques where stress has been linked to alterations of fear regulation in humans (extinction and emotion regulation, and briefly discuss other techniques (avoidance and reconsolidation where the impact of stress or stress hormones have been mainly explored in animal models. These investigations reveal that acute stress may impair the persistent inhibition of fear, presumably by altering prefrontal cortex function. Characterizing the effects of stress on fear regulation is critical for understanding the boundaries within which existing regulation strategies are viable in everyday life and can better inform treatment options for those who suffer from anxiety and stress-related psychopathology.

  4. Thermal stress analysis of the NASA Dryden hypersonic wing test structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Present interest in hypersonic vehicles has resulted in a renewed interest in thermal stress analysis of airframe structures. While there are numerous texts and papers on thermal stress analysis, practical examples and experience on light gage aircraft structures are fairly limited. A research program has been undertaken at General Dynamics to demonstrate the present state of the art, verify methods of analysis, gain experience in their use, and develop engineering judgement in thermal stress analysis. The approach for this project has been to conduct a series of analyses of this sample problem and compare analysis results with test data. This comparison will give an idea of how to use our present methods of thermal stress analysis, and how accurate we can expect them to be.

  5. Thermal-stress effects on enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity of linear bipolar circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; SCHWANK,JAMES R.; WITCZAK,STEVEN C.; RIEWE,LEONARD CHARLES; WINOKUR,PETER S.; HASH,GERALD L.; PEASE,R.L.; FLEETWOOD,D.M.

    2000-02-17

    Thermal-stress effects are shown to have a significant impact on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity of linear bipolar circuits. Implications of these results on hardness assurance testing and mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Reducing thermal mismatch stress in anodically bonded silicon-glass wafers: theoretical estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinev, Leonid S.; Ryabov, Vladimir T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical study and estimations of thermal mismatch stress reduction in anodically bonded silicon-glass stacks by justifiable selection of bonding temperature and glass thickness. This can be done only after prior thorough study of temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the glass and silicon to be used. We show by analyzing such a dependence of several glass brands that the usual idea of decreasing the bonding process temperature as a solution to the thermal mismatch stress problem can be a failure. Interchanging glass brands during device design is shown to produce very contrasting changes in residual stresses. These results are in good agreement with finite-element modeling. This paper reports there is proportion between glass and silicon wafer thicknesses minimizing thermal mismatch stress at unbonded side of the silicon independently of the bonding or working temperatures chosen.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Transient Thermal Stress Field for Laser Metal Deposition Shaping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Risheng; LIU Weijun

    2006-01-01

    To decrease thermal stress during laser metal deposition shaping (LMDS) process, it is of great importance to learn the transient thermal stress distribution regularities. Based on the "element life and death" technique of finite element analysis (FEA), a three-dimensional multi-track and multi-layer numerical simulation model for LMDS is developed with ANSYS parametric design language (APDL) for the first time, in which long-edge parallel reciprocating scanning paths is introduced. Through the model, detailed simulations of thermal stress during whole metal cladding process are conducted, the generation and distribution regularities of thermal stress are also discussed in detail. Using the same process parameters, the simulation results show good agreement with the features of samples which fabricated by LMDS.

  8. Temperature and thermal stress evolutions in sapphire crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wencheng; Zhao, Wenhan; Wu, Ming; Ding, Guoqiang; Liu, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    Transient numerical calculations were carried out to predict the evolutions of temperature and thermal stress in sapphire single crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method (HEM). Internal radiation in the semitransparent sapphire crystal was taken into account using the finite volume method (FVM) in the global heat transfer model. The numerical results seem to indicate that the narrow bottom region of the sapphire crystal is subjected to high thermal stress during the cooling process, which could be responsible for the seed cracking of the as-grown crystal, while the thermal stress is relatively small in the central main body of the crystal, and is less than 10 MPa during the whole cooling process. The fast decrease of the thermal stress in the bottom region of the crystal during the initial stage of cooling process is dominated by the reduction of the cooling helium gas in the heat exchanger shaft, and is not significantly affected by the heating power reduction rate.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Field and Thermal Stress Field of Work Roll During Hot Strip Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chang-sheng; YU Hai-liang; DENG Guan-yu; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    Based on the thermal conduction equations, the three-dimensional (3D) temperature field of a work roll was investigated using finite element method (FEM). The variations in the surface temperature of the work roll during hot strip rolling were described, and the thermal stress field of the work roll was also analyzed. The results showed that the highest roll surface temperature is 593 ℃, and the difference between the minimum and maximum values of thermal stress of the work roll surface is 145.7 MPa. Furthermore, the results of this analysis indicate that temperature and thermal stress are useful parameters for the investigation of roll thermal fatigue and also for improving the quality of strip during rolling.

  10. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  11. Personal and situational factors that predict coping strategies for acute stress among basketball referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissidis-Rodafinos, A; Anshel, M H; Porter, A

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the ways in which coping style and situational appraisals are related to the consistency of using approach and avoidance coping strategies for skilled Australian basketball referees (n = 133) after three game-related stressful events. The events, 'making a mistake', 'aggressive reactions by coaches or players' and 'presence of important others', were determined from previous research on sources of acute stress among basketball officials. Our findings indicated that: referees exhibited consistent avoidance, but not approach, coping styles; they used more avoidance than approach strategies; and they perceived stress to be positively correlated with approach, and negatively associated with avoidance, coping strategies. These findings suggest that individual differences exist in perceptions of stress (i.e. situational appraisals), controllability and coping styles among moderately and highly skilled basketball referees. The implications for teaching cognitive and behavioural strategies for effective coping with acute stress in basketball officiating are discussed.

  12. Role of spinal GABAA receptor reduction induced by stress in rat thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuelian; Bao, Weiying; Wang, Xiujun; Wang, Zhilong; Liu, Qiaoran; Yao, Zhenyu; Zhang, Di; Jiang, Hong; Cui, Shuang

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) remain poorly understood. Recent findings have provided strong evidence indicating that SIH could be related, at least in part, to alterations in spinal cord GABA activity. In the present study, we first investigated how acute restraint stress impacted pain responses as assessed using the tail flick immersion test. These results showed that rats developed hyperalgesia at 6 h after being subjected to 1-h acute restraint stress. Second, we measured the activation of spinal neurons and alterations in expression of GABAA receptor β2 and β3 subunits as related to stress-induced hyperalgesia. Results from Western blot and immunofluorescence assays showed that c-fos protein increased in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord and GABAA receptor β2 and β3 subunit proteins decreased significantly at 6 h after exposure to 1 h of acute restraint stress. Finally, the effects of spinal GABAA receptor alteration on SIH were evaluated. These results showed that intrathecal administration of muscimol inhibited hyperalgesia induced by stress while bicuculline enhanced hyperalgesia in the control groups. Taken together, the present data reveal that GABAA receptor β2 and β3 decrease following 1 h of acute restraint stress and may play a critical role in SIH.

  13. Rigid patterns of effortful choice behavior after acute stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Evan E; Stolyarova, Alexandra; Conoscenti, Michael A; Minor, Thomas R; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Physical effort is a common cost of acquiring rewards, and decreased effort is a feature of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Stress affects performance on several tests of cognition and decision making in both humans and nonhumans. Only a few recent reports show impairing effects of stress in operant tasks involving effort and cognitive flexibility. Brain regions affected by stress, such as the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala, are also implicated in mediating effortful choices. Here, we assessed effort-based decision making after an acute stress procedure known to induce persistent impairment in shuttle escape and elevated plasma corticosterone. In these animals, we also probed levels of polysialyted neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), a marker of structural plasticity, in medial frontal cortex and amygdala. We found that animals that consistently worked for high magnitude rewards continued to do so, even after acute shock stress. We also found that PSA-NCAM was increased in both regions after effortful choice experience but not after shock stress alone. These findings are discussed with reference to the existing broad literature on cognitive effects of stress and in the context of how acute stress may bias effortful decisions to a rigid pattern of responding.

  14. Being a grump only makes things worse: a transactional account of acute stress on mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinski, Melaina T; Watter, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The current work investigates the influence of acute stress on mind wandering. Participants completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule as a measure of baseline negative mood, and were randomly assigned to either the high-stress or low-stress version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task as a measure of mind-wandering behavior. In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high-stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood. These effects diminished throughout task performance, suggesting that acute stress induces a temporary mind-wandering state in participants with a negative mood. The temporary affect-dependent deficits observed in Experiment 1 were replicated in Experiment 2, with the high negative mood participants demonstrating limited resource availability (indicated by pupil diameter) immediately following stress induction. These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

  15. The estrous cycle of the ewe is resistant to disruption by repeated, acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Breen, Kellie M; Oakley, Amy E; Tilbrook, Alan J; Karsch, Fred J

    2010-06-01

    Five experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that psychosocial stress interferes with the estrous cycle of sheep. In experiment 1, ewes were repeatedly isolated during the follicular phase. Timing, amplitude, and duration of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge were not affected. In experiment 2, follicular-phase ewes were subjected twice to a "layered stress" paradigm consisting of sequential, hourly application of isolation, restraint, blindfold, and predator cues. This reduced the LH pulse amplitude but did not affect the LH surge. In experiment 3, different acute stressors were given sequentially within the follicular phase: food denial plus unfamiliar noises and forced exercise, layered stress, exercise around midnight, and transportation. This, too, did not affect the LH surge. In experiment 4, variable acute psychosocial stress was given every 1-2 days for two entire estrous cycles; this did not disrupt any parameter of the cycle monitored. Lastly, experiment 5 examined whether the psychosocial stress paradigms of experiment 4 would disrupt the cycle and estrous behavior if sheep were metabolically stressed by chronic food restriction. Thirty percent of the food-restricted ewes exhibited deterioration of estrous cycle parameters followed by cessation of cycles and failure to express estrous behavior. However, disruption was not more evident in ewes that also encountered psychosocial stress. Collectively, these findings indicate the estrous cycle of sheep is remarkably resistant to disruption by acute bouts of psychosocial stress applied intermittently during either a single follicular phase or repeatedly over two estrous cycles.

  16. OSO paradigm--A rapid behavioral screening method for acute psychosocial stress reactivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzózka, M M; Unterbarnscheidt, T; Schwab, M H; Rossner, M J

    2016-02-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress is an important environmental risk factor for the development of psychiatric diseases. However, studying the impact of chronic psychosocial stress in mice is time consuming and thus not optimally suited to 'screen' increasing numbers of genetically manipulated mouse models for psychiatric endophenotypes. Moreover, many studies focus on restraint stress, a strong physical stressor with limited relevance for psychiatric disorders. Here, we describe a simple and a rapid method based on the resident-intruder paradigm to examine acute effects of mild psychosocial stress in mice. The OSO paradigm (open field--social defeat--open field) compares behavioral consequences on locomotor activity, anxiety and curiosity before and after exposure to acute social defeat stress. We first evaluated OSO in male C57Bl/6 wildtype mice where a single episode of social defeat reduced locomotor activity, increased anxiety and diminished exploratory behavior. Subsequently, we applied the OSO paradigm to mouse models of two schizophrenia (SZ) risk genes. Transgenic mice with neuronal overexpression of Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) type III showed increased risk-taking behavior after acute stress exposure suggesting that NRG1 dysfunction is associated with altered affective behavior. In contrast, Tcf4 transgenic mice displayed a normal stress response which is in line with the postulated predominant contribution of TCF4 to cognitive deficits of SZ. In conclusion, the OSO paradigm allows for rapid screening of selected psychosocial stress-induced behavioral endophenotypes in mouse models of psychiatric diseases.

  17. Being a Grump Only Makes Things Worse: A Transactional Account of Acute Stress on Mind Wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melaina T Vinski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The current work investigates the influence of acute stress on mind wandering. Participants completed the Positive and Negative Affect Scale as a measure of baseline negative mood, and were randomly assigned to either the high stress or low stress version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART as a measure of mind wandering behaviour. In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood. These effects diminished throughout task performance, suggesting that acute stress induces a temporary mind wandering state in participants with a negative mood. The temporary affect-dependent deficits observed in Experiment 1 were replicated in Experiment 2, with the high negative mood participants demonstrating limited resource availability (indicated by pupil diameter immediately following stress induction. These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally-oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

  18. Measuring Thermal Stress of Dairy Cattle Based on Temperature Humidity Index (THI) in Tropical Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiono; Dewi Hardiningtyas; Rudy Soenoko

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort for workers is very important factor to increase their performance, as well as the comfort level of dairy cattle will influence in milk productivity. The purposes of the paper is to measure the level of heat stress and then use the information to design the dairy cattle house for increasing thermal comfort. The research is started with literature review of heat stress and early survey of environment condition e.g. temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. The next step is...

  19. Thermally induced interfacial stresses in a thin film on an infinite substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucheta, R A

    1991-06-01

    The thermally induced stresses in a thin film deposited on an infinite substrate is approximated by means of the theory of elasticity and strain energy minimization. The results are applied to the growth of a thick layer of zinc selenide onto a film of polycrystalline diamond. The conclusion is that the thermally induced stresses alone will be much higher than normally encountered in coating work.

  20. Prediction of Stress Concentration effect under Thermal and Dynamic loads on a High Pressure Turbine Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Nagendra Babu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Geometric discontinuities cause a large variation of stress and produce a significant increase in stress. The high stress due to the variation of geometry is called as ‘stress concentration’. This will increase when the loads are further applied. There are many investigators who have studied the stress distribution around the notches, grooves, and other irregularities of various machine components. This paper analyses the effects of thermal and fatigue load on a steam turbine rotor under the operating conditions. Stresses due to thermal and dynamic loads of High Pressure Steam Turbine Rotor of 210MW power station are found in two stages. A source code is developed for calculating the nominal stress at each section of HPT rotor. Maximum stress is obtained using FEA at the corresponding section. Thermal and Fatigue Stress Concentration Factors at each section are calculated. It is observed that the SCFdue to the combined effect of thermal and dynamic loads at the temperatures beyond 5400C is exceeding the safe limits.

  1. Moderate Thermal Stress Causes Active and Immediate Expulsion of Photosynthetically Damaged Zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium from Corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Fujise

    Full Text Available The foundation of coral reef biology is the symbiosis between corals and zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium. Recently, coral bleaching, which often results in mass mortality of corals and the collapse of coral reef ecosystems, has become an important issue around the world as coral reefs decrease in number year after year. To understand the mechanisms underlying coral bleaching, we maintained two species of scleractinian corals (Acroporidae in aquaria under non-thermal stress (27°C and moderate thermal stress conditions (30°C, and we compared the numbers and conditions of the expelled Symbiodinium from these corals. Under non-thermal stress conditions corals actively expel a degraded form of Symbiodinium, which are thought to be digested by their host coral. This response was also observed at 30°C. However, while the expulsion rates of Symbiodinium cells remained constant, the proportion of degraded cells significantly increased at 30°C. This result indicates that corals more actively digest and expel damaged Symbiodinium under thermal stress conditions, likely as a mechanism for coping with environmental change. However, the increase in digested Symbiodinium expulsion under thermal stress may not fully keep up with accumulation of the damaged cells. There are more photosynthetically damaged Symbiodinium upon prolonged exposure to thermal stress, and corals release them without digestion to prevent their accumulation. This response may be an adaptive strategy to moderate stress to ensure survival, but the accumulation of damaged Symbiodinium, which causes subsequent coral deterioration, may occur when the response cannot cope with the magnitude or duration of environmental stress, and this might be a possible mechanism underlying coral bleaching during prolonged moderate thermal stress.

  2. Exposure to acute stress enhances decision-making competence: Evidence for the role of DHEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Lam, Jovian C W; Trainor, Brian C; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to acute stress can impact performance on numerous cognitive abilities, but little is known about how acute stress affects real-world decision-making ability. In the present study, we induced acute stress with a standard laboratory task involving uncontrollable socio-evaluative stress and subsequently assessed decision-making ability using the Adult Decision Making Competence index. In addition, we took baseline and post-test saliva samples from participants to examine associations between decision-making competence and adrenal hormones. Participants in the stress induction group showed enhanced decision-making competence, relative to controls. Further, although both cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) reactivity predicted decision-making competence when considered in isolation, DHEA was a significantly better predictor than cortisol when both hormones were considered simultaneously. Thus, our results show that exposure to acute stress can have beneficial effects on the cognitive ability underpinning real-world decision-making and that this effect relates to DHEA reactivity more than cortisol.

  3. Divergent responses of inflammatory mediators within the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Haley A; Gandhi, Chaitanya P; Gray, J Megan; Morena, Maria; Hassan, Kowther I; Hill, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    There is now a growing body of literature that indicates that stress can initiate inflammatory processes, both in the periphery and brain; however, the spatiotemporal nature of this response is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an acute psychological stress on changes in mRNA and protein levels of a wide range of inflammatory mediators across a broad temporal range, in key corticolimbic brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response (amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, medial prefrontal cortex). mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators were analyzed immediately following 30min or 120min of acute restraint stress and protein levels were examined 0h through 24h post-termination of 120min of acute restraint stress using both multiplex and ELISA methods. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that exposure to acute psychological stress results in an increase in the protein level of several inflammatory mediators in the amygdala while concomitantly producing a decrease in the protein level of multiple inflammatory mediators within the medial prefrontal cortex. This pattern of changes seemed largely restricted to the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, with stress producing few changes in the mRNA or protein levels of inflammatory mediators within the hippocampus or hypothalamus. Consistent with previous research, stress resulted in a general elevation in multiple inflammatory mediators within the circulation. These data indicate that neuroinflammatory responses to stress do not appear to be generalized across brain structures and exhibit a high degree of spatiotemporal specificity. Given the impact of inflammatory signaling on neural excitability and emotional behavior, these data may provide a platform with which to explore the importance of inflammatory signaling within the prefrontocortical-amygdala circuit in the regulation of the neurobehavioral responses to stress.

  4. Acute psychological stress as a precipitant of acute coronary syndromes in patients with undiagnosed ischemic heart disease: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Melanie L

    2009-01-01

    Acute psychological stress causes a number of physiologic responses that can trigger acute coronary syndromes in individuals with silent coronary artery disease. The mechanisms behind this phenomena have been the subject of much speculation. The following is a case report and brief review of the literature. A PubMed search was undertaken using the key words stress and myocardial infarction, stress and ischemia, mental stress and coronary artery disease, psychological stress and acute coronary syndrome, and mental stress and plaque destabilization. Articles were restricted to the English language and those dating through December 2007. Acute coronary syndrome is thought to be the end result of a complex mechanism involving platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. Several studies have shown that acute mental stress leads to enhanced platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanism behind this involves both the autonomic nervous system and the neuroendocrine response. Acute psychological stress may lead to acute coronary syndromes in patients with previously silent disease. Physicians should inquire about cardiac symptoms in patients with cardiac risk factors who are experiencing psychological distress. Further research will hopefully lead to an improved understanding of the mechanism behind this process to improve therapeutic interventions.

  5. Effects of Melatonin on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Sheep Granulosa Cells under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Fu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cross-talk between oocyte and somatic cells plays a crucial role in the regulation of follicular development and oocyte maturation. As a result, granulosa cell apoptosis causes follicular atresia. In this study, sheep granulosa cells were cultured under thermal stress to induce apoptosis, and melatonin (MT was examined to evaluate its potential effects on heat-induced granulosa cell injury. The results demonstrated that the Colony Forming Efficiency (CFE of granulosa cells was significantly decreased (heat 19.70% ± 1.29% vs. control 26.96% ± 1.81%, p < 0.05 and the apoptosis rate was significantly increased (heat 56.16% ± 13.95% vs. control 22.80% ± 12.16%, p < 0.05 in granulosa cells with thermal stress compared with the control group. Melatonin (10−7 M remarkably reduced the negative effects caused by thermal stress in the granulosa cells. This reduction was indicated by the improved CFE and decreased apoptotic rate of these cells. The beneficial effects of melatonin on thermal stressed granulosa cells were not inhibited by its membrane receptor antagonist luzindole. A mechanistic exploration indicated that melatonin (10−7 M down-regulated p53 and up-regulated Bcl-2 and LHR gene expression of granulosa cells under thermal stress. This study provides evidence for the molecular mechanisms of the protective effects of melatonin on granulosa cells during thermal stress.

  6. Stress and Strain During the Process of Thermal Stabilization of Modified Pan Precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wang-xi; WANG Yan-zhi; PAN Wei

    2007-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analysis, FT- IR, WAXD and some conventional measurements, such as densities and mechanical properties, were used to characterize the effect of the modification using KMnO4 and SnCl4 on the thermal mechanical behaviors and structural changes dining the process of thermal stabilization of modified PAN precursors. to the unmodified original PAN precursors, some conclusions were drawn that the thermal stabilization starts at a lower temperature for modified PAN fibers, for example, the peak of thermal stress changes for modified PAN precursors using KMnO4 displays a decrease of 20℃ and a increase of 30% in the ultimate thermal stress, that chemical modification makes structural transformation perfect and increases by 25% of the thermal stress at the temperature range of 230℃- 300℃, that the modified PAN fibers display an increase of 100% in the thermal strain, once after pre-oxidized, show an increase of 7.8% in orientation index, and a decrease of 9.9% in crystal size for identical preload in the region of 13.1 - 14.5 MPa. It was also concluded that the modification using SnCl4 would alleviate the changes in physical and chemical stress regimes and result in improvement in structure and decrease in defects.

  7. A diagnostic interview for acute stress disorder for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alisa; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; Reich, Wendy; Saxe, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a semistructured clinical interview for assessing acute stress disorder (ASD) in youth and test its psychometric properties. Youth (N = 168) with an acute burn or injury were administered the acute stress disorder module of the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents (DICA-ASD). The DICA-ASD demonstrated strong psychometric properties, including high internal consistency (alpha = .97) and perfect diagnostic interrater agreement (kappa = 1.00). Participants diagnosed with ASD scored significantly higher than those not diagnosed on validated traumatic stress symptomatology measures but not on other symptomatology measures, providing evidence of convergent and discriminant validity. Preliminary evidence supports the reliability and validity of the first semistructured clinical interview for diagnosing ASD in youth.

  8. Mechanical and thermal stresses analysis in diesel engine exhaust valve with and without thermal coating layer on valve face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi,Sahib Shihab Ahmed, Nabeel Abdulhadi Ghayadh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates mechanical and thermal stresses that arise in the exhaust valve due to its operating with and without thermal coating layer (ceramic on face exhaust valve. Three dimensional models of an exhaust valve four cylinders, four stroke, and direct injection diesel engine have been presented. The governing equations were discretized using a finite-volume method (FVM and solved using multi-physics COMSOL package Version 5. The engine’s exhaust valve crown is coated with various materials in different thermal conductivity such as (Gd2Zr2O7, over a 150μm thickness of bond coat. The maximum thickness of coating is about 300 μm. Results indicate that after creating a coating layer exhaust valve the temperature distribution, temperature gradients distribution, von-Mises stress distribution and displacement distribution are decreased.

  9. The double-end-pumped cubic Nd:YVO4 laser: Temperature distribution and thermal stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Elahi; S Morshedi

    2010-01-01

    Thermal effects of a double-end-pumped cubic Nd:YVO4 laser crystal are investigated in this paper. A detailed analysis of temperature distribution and thermal stress in cubic crystal with circular shape pumping is discussed. It has been shown that by considering the total input powers as constant, the double-end-pumped configurations with equal pump power can be considered as having a minimum thermal effect with respect to the other end-pumped configuration.

  10. Acute stress-related psychological impact in children following devastating natural disaster, the Sikkim earthquake (2011), India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rakesh Mondal; Sumantra Sarkar; Indira Banerjee; Avijit Hazra; Debabrata Majumder; Tapas Sabui; Sudip Dutta; Abhisek Saren; Partha Pan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychological stress following natural disaster is common. Despite several earthquakes in India, data on evaluation of acute stress among the child victims in the early postdisaster period is scarce...

  11. Acute stress-related psychological impact in children following devastating natural disaster, the Sikkim earthquake (2011), India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mondal, Rakesh; Sarkar, Sumantra; Banerjee, Indira; Hazra, Avijit; Majumder, Debabrata; Sabui, Tapas; Dutta, Sudip; Saren, Abhisek; Pan, Partha

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress following natural disaster is common. Despite several earthquakes in India, data on evaluation of acute stress among the child victims in the early postdisaster period is scarce...

  12. The Role of Posttraumatic Stress in Acute Postconcussive Symptoms following Blast Injury in Combat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-21

    Hovda DA, Giza CC: The molecular pathophysiology of concussive brain injury . Clin Sports Med 2011; 30: 33–48. 7 World Health Organisation, ICD-10...following blast injury in combat 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Richard Bryant /Monty Baker, Jim...personnel are managed in the acute aftermath of a blast injury . Management of PCS needs to recognize the role of acute posttraumatic stress responses in

  13. Optical stimulation of the hearing and deaf cochlea under thermal and stress confinement condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M.; Baumhoff, P.; Kallweit, N.; Sato, M.; Krüger, A.; Ripken, T.; Lenarz, T.; Kral, A.

    2014-03-01

    There is a controversy, to which extend cochlear stimulation with near infrared laser pulses at a wavelength of 1860 nm is based on optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells or -in contrast- is based on direct stimulation of the nerve cells in absence of functional hair cells. Thermal and stress confinement conditions apply, because of the pulse duration range (5 ns, 10 μs-20 ms) of the two lasers used. The dependency of the signal characteristics on pulse peak power and pulse duration was investigated in this study. The compound action potential (CAP) was measured during stimulation of the cochlea of four anaesthetized guinea pigs, which were hearing at first and afterwards acutely deafened using intracochlear neomycin-rinsing. For comparison hydrophone measurements in a water tank were performed to investigate the optoacoustic signals at different laser interaction regimes. With rising pulse peak power CAPs of the hearing animals showed first a threshold, then a positively correlated and finally a saturating dependency. CAPs also showed distinct responses at laser onset and offset separated with the pulse duration. At pulse durations shorter than physiological response times the signals merged. Basically the same signal characteristics were observed in the optoacoustic hydrophone measurements, scaled with the sensitivity and response time of the hydrophone. Taking together the qualitative correspondence in the signal response and the absence of any CAPs in deafened animals our results speak in favor of an optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells rather than a direct stimulation of nerve cells.

  14. Thermal residual stress analysis of coated diamond grits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-qian Huang; Bo Xiang; Yue-hui He; Bai-yun Huang

    2009-01-01

    Residual stresses of coated diamond grits were analyzed by a finite element unit cell model.Diamond grits coated with four types of metals, W, Mo, Ti, and Cr, were considered.The numerical results show that compressive stress occurs in the diamond particles and tensile stress occurs in the metal matrix; compressive stress is concentrated in the diamond sharp comer; interface stresses decrease by more than 1000 MPa with a metal interlayer; plastic deformation of the matrix begins near the sharp comer of diamond grits and extends toward the peripheral zone.Stress concentration dramatically decreases due to plastic deformation of the matrix.The deposition of transition metals on a diamond surface can dramatically promote the adhesion between diamond grits and the metal bond.

  15. Analytical model of transient temperature and thermal stress in continuous wave double-end-pumped laser rod: Thermal stress minimization study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Khalid S Shibib; Mayada M Tahir; Haqi I Qatta

    2012-08-01

    A time-dependent analytical thermal model of the temperature and the corresponding induced thermal stresses in continuous wave double-end-pumped laser rod are derived from the first principle using the integral transform method. The aim of the paper is to study the effect of increasing the pumping powers while the laser crystals are still in the safe zone (i.e. far away from failure stress) and to suitably choose a crystal that achieves this task. The result of this work is compared with a well-verified finite element solution and a good agreement has been found. Some conclusions are obtained: Tm:YAP crystal, which has high thermal conductivity, low expansion coefficient, low absorption coefficient, low thermal factor and low product of /(1−), is the best choice to reduce induced stress although it is responded and brought to thermal equilibrium faster than the other types of crystal usually used in the end-pumped solid-state laser.

  16. History of chronic stress modifies acute stress-evoked fear memory and acoustic startle in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeltzer, Sarah N; Vollmer, Lauren L; Rush, Jennifer E; Weinert, Mychal; Dolgas, Charles M; Sah, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Chronicity of trauma exposure plays an important role in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Thus, exposure to multiple traumas on a chronic scale leads to worse outcomes than acute events. The rationale for the current study was to investigate the effects of a single adverse event versus the same event on a background of chronic stress. We hypothesized that a history of chronic stress would lead to worse behavioral outcomes than a single event alone. Male rats (n = 14/group) were exposed to either a single traumatic event in the form of electric foot shocks (acute shock, AS), or to footshocks on a background of chronic stress (chronic variable stress-shock, CVS-S). PTSD-relevant behaviors (fear memory and acoustic startle responses) were measured following 7 d recovery. In line with our hypothesis, CVS-S elicited significant increases in fear acquisition and conditioning versus the AS group. Unexpectedly, CVS-S elicited reduced startle reactivity to an acoustic stimulus in comparison with the AS group. Significant increase in FosB/ΔFosB-like immunostaining was observed in the dentate gyrus, basolateral amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex of CVS-S rats. Assessments of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a stress-regulatory transmitter associated with chronic PTSD, revealed selective reduction in the hippocampus of CVS-S rats. Collectively, our data show that cumulative stress potentiates delayed fear memory and impacts defensive responding. Altered neuronal activation in forebrain limbic regions and reduced NPY may contribute to these phenomena. Our preclinical studies support clinical findings reporting worse PTSD outcomes stemming from cumulative traumatization in contrast to acute trauma.

  17. Dual-task performance under acute stress in female adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Koenig, Julian; Resch, Franz; Brunner, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Research to elucidate early alterations of higher cognitive processes in adolescents with BPD is rare. This study investigated differences in dual-task performance in adolescents with BPD during stress and non-stress conditions. The study sample comprised 30 female adolescents with BPD and 34 healthy controls. The impact of stress on dual-task performance was measured using a standardized stressor. Self-reports of distress and measures of heart rate (HR) were obtained to measure stress reactivity. There were no group differences in task performance. Under stress conditions, the performance on the auditory task decreased in both groups but without significant group differences. Healthy controls showed an increase of mean HR after stress induction compared to no change in the BPD group. The finding of attenuated HR response to acute stress in adolescent patients with BPD may contradict current theories that the affective hyperresponsivity in BPD is based on a biologically determined mechanism.

  18. Myocardial stress in patients with acute cerebrovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Christian M; Fischer Hansen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Signs of myocardial involvement are common in patients with acute cerebrovascular events. ST segment deviations, abnormal left ventricular function, increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), prolonged QT interval, and/or raised troponins are observed in up to one third...

  19. Differential gene expression during thermal stress and bleaching in the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSalvo, M K; Voolstra, C R; Sunagawa, S; Schwarz, J A; Stillman, J H; Coffroth, M A; Szmant, A M; Medina, M

    2008-09-01

    The declining health of coral reefs worldwide is likely to intensify in response to continued anthropogenic disturbance from coastal development, pollution, and climate change. In response to these stresses, reef-building corals may exhibit bleaching, which marks the breakdown in symbiosis between coral and zooxanthellae. Mass coral bleaching due to elevated water temperature can devastate coral reefs on a large geographical scale. In order to understand the molecular and cellular basis of bleaching in corals, we have measured gene expression changes associated with thermal stress and bleaching using a complementary DNA microarray containing 1310 genes of the Caribbean coral Montastraea faveolata. In a first experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes by comparing experimentally bleached M. faveolata fragments to control non-heat-stressed fragments. In a second experiment, we identified differentially expressed genes during a time course experiment with four time points across 9 days. Results suggest that thermal stress and bleaching in M. faveolata affect the following processes: oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, cytoskeletal organization, cell death, calcification, metabolism, protein synthesis, heat shock protein activity, and transposon activity. These results represent the first medium-scale transcriptomic study focused on revealing the cellular foundation of thermal stress-induced coral bleaching. We postulate that oxidative stress in thermal-stressed corals causes a disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which in turn leads to cytoskeletal and cell adhesion changes, decreased calcification, and the initiation of cell death via apoptosis and necrosis.

  20. Stress Analysis and Failure Mechanisms of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiasheng; Wang, Liang; Li, Dachuan; Zhong, Xinghua; Zhao, Huayu; Tao, Shunyan

    2017-06-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by plasma spraying and heat-treated at 1100 °C for 50, 100, 150, and 200 h in air, respectively. Mechanical properties including microhardness and Young's modulus were evaluated using the nanoindentation test. Residual stresses in the ceramic topcoat and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer were measured using Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence piezo-spectroscopy (PLPS) techniques, respectively. The results showed that both the modulus and hardness increased with the thermal exposure time up to 100 h and then gradually decreased. The accumulated tensile stress in the as-sprayed topcoat changed to compressive stress after thermal exposure, and the compressive stress in the topcoat increased with an increase of thermal exposure time up to 150 h. The average compressive stresses in the TGO layer were higher than that of the cross-sectional topcoat, and the measured in-plane compressive stress increased firstly and then gradually decreased with increasing exposure time. The local interface geometry strongly affect the nature and evolution of hydrostatic stresses in the TGO. Finally, the crack initiation and propagation at the topcoat/TGO/bondcoat interface has been discussed with respect to the residual stresses in the plasma-sprayed TBC system.

  1. Acute stress and episodic memory retrieval: neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Stephanie A; Wagner, Anthony D

    2016-04-01

    Episodic retrieval allows people to access memories from the past to guide current thoughts and decisions. In many real-world situations, retrieval occurs under conditions of acute stress, either elicited by the retrieval task or driven by other, unrelated concerns. Memory under such conditions may be hindered, as acute stress initiates a cascade of neuromodulatory changes that can impair episodic retrieval. Here, we review emerging evidence showing that dissociable stress systems interact over time, influencing neural function. In addition to the adverse effects of stress on hippocampal-dependent retrieval, we consider how stress biases attention and prefrontal cortical function, which could further affect controlled retrieval processes. Finally, we consider recent data indicating that stress at retrieval increases activity in a network of brain regions that enable reflexive, rapid responding to upcoming threats, while transiently taking offline regions supporting flexible, goal-directed thinking. Given the ubiquity of episodic memory retrieval in everyday life, it is critical to understand the theoretical and applied implications of acute stress. The present review highlights the progress that has been made, along with important open questions.

  2. Some physiological and biochemical methods for acute and chronic stress evaluation in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bertoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress factors are so numerous and so diverse in their strength and duration that the consequences on animal welfare can be quite varied. The first important distinction concerns the characterization of acute and chronic stress conditions. Acute stress is a short-lived negative situation that allows a quick and quite complete recovery of the physiological balance (adaptation, while chronic stress is a long lasting condition from which the subject cannot fully recover (maladaptation. In the latter case, the direct effects of the stress factors (heat, low energy, anxiety, suffering etc., as well as the indirect ones (changes occurring at endocrinological, immune system or function level can be responsible for pre-pathological or pathological consequences which reduce animal welfare. To evaluate the possible chronic stress conditions in single animals or on a farm (in particular a farm of dairy cows, some parameters of the direct or indirect effects can be utilised. They are physiological (mainly hormone changes: cortisol, β-endorphin, behavioural (depression, biochemical (metabolites, acute phase proteins, glycated proteins etc., as well as performance parameters (growing rate, milk yield, fertility, etc.. Special attention has been paid to the interpretation of cortisol levels and to its changes after an ACTH challenge. Despite fervent efforts, well established and accepted indices of chronic stress (distress are currently lacking; but without this objective evaluation, the assessment of animal welfare and, therefore, the optimization of the livestock production, could prove more difficult.

  3. Acute Psychosocial Stress and Emotion Regulation Skills Modulate Empathic Reactions to Pain in Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eBuruck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test, an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one’s emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior.

  4. Acute psychosocial stress and emotion regulation skills modulate empathic reactions to pain in others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruck, Gabriele; Wendsche, Johannes; Melzer, Marlen; Strobel, Alexander; Dörfel, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial stress affects resources for adequate coping with environmental demands. A crucial question in this context is the extent to which acute psychosocial stressors impact empathy and emotion regulation. In the present study, 120 participants were randomly assigned to a control group vs. a group confronted with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), an established paradigm for the induction of acute psychosocial stress. Empathy for pain as a specific subgroup of empathy was assessed via pain intensity ratings during a pain-picture task. Self-reported emotion regulation skills were measured as predictors using an established questionnaire. Stressed individuals scored significantly lower on the appraisal of pain pictures. A regression model was chosen to find variables that further predict the pain ratings. These findings implicate that acute psychosocial stress might impair empathic processes to observed pain in another person and the ability to accept one's emotion additionally predicts the empathic reaction. Furthermore, the ability to tolerate negative emotions modulated the relation between stress and pain judgments, and thus influenced core cognitive-affective functions relevant for coping with environmental challenges. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the necessity of reducing negative emotions in terms of empathic distress when confronted with pain of another person under psychosocial stress, in order to be able to retain pro-social behavior.

  5. [Biological function prediction of mir-210 in the liver of acute cold stress rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Jin; Lian, Shuai; Guo, Jing-Ru; Zhai, Jun-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Li, Yue; Zhen, Li; Ji, Hong; Yang, Huan-Min

    2016-04-25

    The study was aimed to observe mir-210 expression in liver tissue of acute cold stress rat and predict the function of mir-210 in cold stress. Thirty SPF Wistar male rats which were 12-week-old and weighed (340 ± 20) g were used. The rats were pre-fed in normal room temperature for one week, and then were randomly divided into acute cold stress group at (4 ± 0.1) °C and normal control group at (24 ± 0.1) °C. After the rats were treated with cold stress for 12 h, the liver tissue was extracted and the gene expression of mir-210 was assayed using qRT-PCR. The results demonstrated that the gene expression of mir-210 was significantly enhanced in acute cold stress group compared with that in normal control group (n = 3, P kinds of target genes such as E2F3, RAD52, ISCU and Ephrin-A3 are more relative with liver cold stress. ISCU regulates the cell respiratory metabolism and Ephrin-A3 is related with cell proliferation and apoptosis. On the other hand, up-regulated mir-210 affects the DNA repairing mechanism which usually leads to genetic instabilities. Our results suggest that cold stress-induced up-regulation of mir-210 in liver harmfully influences cell growth, energy metabolism and hereditary.

  6. Acute stress affects heart rate variability during sleep

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Martica; Vasko, Raymond; Buysse, Daniel; Ombao, Hernando; Chen, Qingxia; Cashmere, J David; Kupfer, David; Thayer, Julian F

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, we used autoregressive spectral analysis of the electrocardiogram (EKG) interbeat interval sequence to characterize stress-related changes in heart rate variability during sleep in 59 healthy men and women. Participants (N = 59...

  7. Stress among nurses working in an acute hospital in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Stress among nurses leads to absenteeism, reduced efficiency, long-term health problems and a decrease in the quality of patient care delivered. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted. The study\\'s aim was to identify perceived stressors and influencing factors among nurses working in the critical and non-critical care practice areas. A convenience sample of 200 nurses were invited to complete the Bianchi Stress Questionnaire. Information was collected on demographics and daily nursing practice. Findings indicated that perceived stressors were similar in both groups. The most severe stressors included redeployment to work in other areas and staffing levels. Results from this study suggest that age, job title, professional experience and formal post-registration qualifications had no influence on stress perception. These results will increase awareness of nurses\\' occupational stress in Ireland.

  8. Measurements of thermal residual stresses in SiC/Ti-15-3 composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobet, J.-L.; Masuda, C. [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    Residual stresses present in an as received and thermally cycled SCS-6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite (MMC) have been approached via X-ray diffraction (sin{sup 2}{psi}) experiments. Determination of stress profiles have been achieved by successive removal of the matrix from the composite surface by electropolishing. Axial and hoop stresses in the matrix were tensile (higher on the surface) and those measured in the fiber were compressive (about -500 to -600 MPa). A stress gradient normal to the surface of the composite was found. Measurement of residual stress levels in the composite subjected to thermal cycling from 400degC to 800degC in an inert atmosphere or in vacuum revealed a huge stress relaxation after only 200 cycles. (author)

  9. Temperature and Thermal Stress Distribution for Metal Mold in Squeeze Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.H.Chang; G.C.Jang; C.H.Lee; S.H.Lee

    2008-01-01

    In the squeeze casting process, loaded high pressure (over approximately 100 MPa) and high temperature influence the thermo-mechanical behavior and performance of the used metal mold. Therefore, to safely maintain the metal molds, the thermo-mechanical characteristics (temperature and thermal stress) of metal mold in the squeeze casting must be investigated. In this paper, temperature and thermal stress distribution of steel mold in squeeze casting process were investigated by using a three-dimensional non-steady heat conduction analysis and a three-dimensional thermal elastic-plastic analysis considering temperature-dependent thermo- physical and mechanical properties of the steel mold.

  10. Habitat pollution and thermal regime modify molecular stress responses to elevated temperature in freshwater mussels (Anodonta anatina: Unionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falfushynska, H; Gnatyshyna, L; Yurchak, I; Ivanina, A; Stoliar, O; Sokolova, I

    2014-12-01

    Elevated temperature and pollution are common stressors in freshwater ecosystems. We study cellular stress response to acute warming in Anodonta anatina (Unionidae) from sites with different thermal regimes and pollution levels: a pristine area and an agriculturally polluted site with normal temperature regimes (F and A, respectively) and a polluted site with elevated temperature (N) from the cooling pond of an electrical power plant. Animals were exposed to different temperatures for 14 days and stress response markers were measured in gills, digestive gland and hemocytes. Mussels from site N and A had elevated background levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity indicating higher reliance on anaerobic metabolism for ATP production and/or redox maintenance. Exposure to 25°C and 30°C induced oxidative stress (indicated by elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products) in digestive gland and gills of mussels from A and F sites, while in mussels from N sites elevated oxidative stress was only apparent at 30°C. Temperature-induced changes in levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, metallothioneins and glutathione) were tissue- and population-specific. Acute warming led to destabilization of lysosomal membranes and increased frequencies of nuclear lesions in mussels from F and A sites but not in their counterparts from N site. Elevated temperature led to an increase in the frequency of micronuclei in hemocytes in mussels from F and A sites at 25°C and 30°C and in mussels from N site at 30°C. The mussels from N site also demonstrated better survival at elevated temperature (30°C) than their counterparts from the F and A sites. Taken together, these data indicate that long-term acclimation and/or adaptation of A. anatina to elevated temperatures result in increased thermotolerance and alleviate stress response to moderate temperature rise. In contrast, extreme warming (30°C) is harmful to mussels from all populations indicating limit to this induced

  11. Effect of neonatal handling on adult rat spatial learning and memory following acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, A; Pondiki, S; Kitraki, E; Diamantopoulou, A; Panagiotaropoulos, T; Raftogianni, A; Stylianopoulou, F

    2008-03-01

    Brief neonatal handling permanently alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function resulting in increased ability to cope with stress. Since stress is known to affect cognitive abilities, in the present study we investigated the effect of brief (15 min) handling on learning and memory in the Morris water maze, following exposure to an acute restraint stress either before training or recall. Exposure of non-handled rats to the acute stress prior to training resulted in quicker learning of the task, than in the absence of the stressor. When acute stress preceded acquisition, male handled rats showed an overall better learning performance, and both sexes of handled animals were less impaired in the subsequent memory trial, compared to the respective non-handled. In addition, the number of neurons immunoreactive for GR was higher in all areas of Ammon's horn of the handled rats during the recall. In contrast, the number of neurons immunoreactive for MR was higher in the CA1 and CA2 areas of the non-handled males. When the acute restraint stress was applied prior to the memory test, neonatal handling was not effective in preventing mnemonic impairment, as all animal groups showed a similar deficit in recall. In this case, no difference between handled and non-handled rats was observed in the number of GR positive neurons in the CA2 and CA3 hippocampal areas during the memory test. These results indicate that early experience interacts with sex and acute stress exposure in adulthood to affect performance in the water maze. Hippocampal corticosterone receptors may play a role in determining the final outcome.

  12. Thermal Super-Pixels for Bimodal Stress Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Dhall, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a response to time pressure or negative environmental conditions. If its stimulus iterates or stays for a long time, it affects health conditions. Thus, stress recognition is an important issue. Traditional systems for this purpose are mostly contact-based, i.e., they require a sensor t...

  13. Glucocorticoids are necessary for enhancing the acquisition of associative memories after acute stressful experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylin, Anna V; Shors, Tracey J

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to acute stressful experience can enhance the later ability to acquire new memories about associations between stimuli. This enhanced learning is observed during classical eyeblink conditioning of both hippocampal-dependent and -independent learning. It can be induced within minutes of the stressful event and persists for days. Here we examined the role of the major stress hormones glucocorticoids in the enhancement of learning after stress. In the first two experiments, it was determined that adrenalectomy (ADX), with and without replacement of basal levels of corticosterone, prevented the stress-induced enhancement of trace conditioning, a task that is dependent on the hippocampus for acquisition. In a third experiment, demedullation, which removes the adrenal medulla but leaves the adrenal cortex and corticosterone levels intact, did not affect the enhancement of learning after stress. In a fourth experiment, ADX prevented the stress-induced enhancement of delay conditioning, a hippocampal-independent task. In a final experiment, it was determined that one injection of stress levels of corticosterone enhanced new learning within minutes but not new learning 24 h later. Together these results suggest that endogenous glucocorticoids are necessary and sufficient for transiently enhancing acquisition of new associative memories and necessary but insufficient for persistently enhancing their acquisition after exposure to an acute stressful experience.

  14. The effect of mild acute stress during memory consolidation on emotional recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Brittany; Weinberg, Lisa; Duarte, Audrey

    2017-08-21

    Stress during consolidation improves recognition memory performance. Generally, this memory benefit is greater for emotionally arousing stimuli than neutral stimuli. The strength of the stressor also plays a role in memory performance, with memory performance improving up to a moderate level of stress and thereafter worsening. As our daily stressors are generally minimal in strength, we chose to induce mild acute stress to determine its effect on memory performance. In the current study, we investigated if mild acute stress during consolidation improves memory performance for emotionally arousing images. To investigate this, we had participants encode highly arousing negative, minimally arousing negative, and neutral images. We induced stress using the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST) in half of the participants and a control task to the other half of the participants directly after encoding (i.e. during consolidation) and tested recognition 48 hours later. We found no difference in memory performance between the stress and control group. We found a graded pattern among confidence, with responders in the stress group having the least amount of confidence in their hits and controls having the most. Across groups, we found highly arousing negative images were better remembered than minimally arousing negative or neutral images. Although stress did not affect memory accuracy, responders, as defined by cortisol reactivity, were less confident in their decisions. Our results suggest that the daily stressors humans experience, regardless of their emotional affect, do not have adverse effects on memory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Acute stress blocks the caffeine-induced enhancement of contextual memory retrieval in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Chistophe; Krazem, Ali; Henkous, Nadia; Decorte, Laurence; Béracochéa, Daniel

    2015-08-15

    This study investigated in mice the dose-effect of caffeine on memory retrieval in non-stress and stress conditions. C57 Bl/6 Jico mice learned two consecutive discriminations (D1 and D2) in a four-hole board which involved either distinct contextual (CSD) or similar contextual (SSD) cues. All mice received an i.p. injection of vehicle or caffeine (8, 16 or 32mg/kg) 30min before the test session. Results showed that in non-stress conditions, the 16mg/kg caffeine dose induced a significant enhancement of D1 performance in CSD but not in SSD. Hence, we studied the effect of an acute stress (electric footshocks) administered 15min before the test session on D1 performance in caffeine-treated mice. Results showed that stress significantly decreased D1 performance in vehicle-treated controls and the memory-enhancing effect induced by the 16mg/kg caffeine dose in non-stress condition is no longer observed. Interestingly, whereas caffeine-treated mice exhibited weaker concentrations of plasma corticosterone as compared to vehicles in non-stress condition, stress significantly increased plasma corticosterone concentrations in caffeine-treated mice which reached similar level to that of controls. Overall, the acute stress blocked both the endocrinological and memory retrieval enhancing effects of caffeine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Finite element analysis of thermal stress distribution in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cavity was restored with three different materials (Group I: Resin composite, Group II: ... Introduction. In restorative dentistry, the preferred method of treatment for cervical ... cold liquids. The cavity environment can be exposed to thermal.

  17. Investigating the molecular basis of local adaptation to thermal stress: population differences in gene expression across the transcriptome of the copepod Tigriopus californicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoville Sean D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographic variation in the thermal environment impacts a broad range of biochemical and physiological processes and can be a major selective force leading to local population adaptation. In the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, populations along the coast of California show differences in thermal tolerance that are consistent with adaptation, i.e., southern populations withstand thermal stresses that are lethal to northern populations. To understand the genetic basis of these physiological differences, we use an RNA-seq approach to compare genome-wide patterns of gene expression in two populations known to differ in thermal tolerance. Results Observed differences in gene expression between the southern (San Diego and the northern (Santa Cruz populations included both the number of affected loci as well as the identity of these loci. However, the most pronounced differences concerned the amplitude of up-regulation of genes producing heat shock proteins (Hsps and genes involved in ubiquitination and proteolysis. Among the hsp genes, orthologous pairs show markedly different thermal responses as the amplitude of hsp response was greatly elevated in the San Diego population, most notably in members of the hsp70 gene family. There was no evidence of accelerated evolution at the sequence level for hsp genes. Among other sets of genes, cuticle genes were up-regulated in SD but down-regulated in SC, and mitochondrial genes were down-regulated in both populations. Conclusions Marked changes in gene expression were observed in response to acute sub-lethal thermal stress in the copepod T. californicus. Although some qualitative differences were observed between populations, the most pronounced differences involved the magnitude of induction of numerous hsp and ubiquitin genes. These differences in gene expression suggest that evolutionary divergence in the regulatory pathway(s involved in acute temperature stress may offer at

  18. The Effect of Thermal Stress on Asphalt Workers’ Function and Their Physiological Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    RAMAZAN MIRZAEI; ROOHALAH HAJIZADEH; KEYKAOUS AZRAH; MOHAMMADHOSEIN BEHESHTI

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress effects on physical and mental health of workers and decreases human function. Asphalt workers are both exposed to the heat of their working process and to the sun heat. This study aimed at evaluating thermal stress and its following function fall and the effect of asphalt work on the degree of heat stress and asphalt workers’ physiological parameters. The present study was done at the work location of 29 asphalt workers in Qum City,  central  Iran.  The  degree  of  thermal stres...

  19. Thermal residual stress analysis of diamond coating on graded cemented carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zi-qian; HE Yue-hui; CAI Hai-tao; WU Cong-hai; XIAO Yi-feng; HUANG Bai-yun

    2008-01-01

    Finite element model was developed to analyze thermal residual stress distribution of diamond coating on graded and homogeneous substrates. Graded cemented carbides were formed by carburizing pretreatment to reduce the cobalt content in the surface layer and improve adhesion of diamond coating. The numerical calculation results show that the surface compressive stress of diamond coating is 950 MPa for graded substrate and 1 250 MPa for homogenous substrate, the thermal residual stress decreases by around 24% due to diamond coating. Carburizing pretreatment is good for diamond nucleation rate, and can increase the interface strength between diamond coating and substrate.

  20. Temperature propagation in prismatic lithium-ion-cells after short term thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Pamina; Liebig, Gerd; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a 3D model based on the thermal material characteristics of an automotive prismatic Li-NiMnCoO2 (NMC) cell was created in COMSOL Multiphysics® in order to simulate the temperature propagation in the cell during short term thermal stress. The thermal characteristics of the battery components were experimentally determined via laser flash analysis (LFA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and used as an input parameter for the models. In order to validate the modelling approach, an experimental setup was built to measure the temperature propagation during thermal stresses within a dummy cell, equipped with temperature sensors. After validating, the model is used to describe the temperature propagation after a short-term temperature stress on automotive prismatic lithium-ion cells, simulating welding of the contact leads.

  1. A polymorphic position in electron transfer flavoprotein modulates kinetic stability as evidenced by thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Bárbara J; Fisher, Mark T; Bross, Peter; Gomes, Cláudio M

    2011-02-04

    The electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) is a hub interacting with at least 11 mitochondrial flavoenzymes and linking them to the respiratory chain. Here we report the effect of the ETFα-T/I171 polymorphism on protein conformation and kinetic stability under thermal stress. Although variants have comparable thermodynamic stabilities, kinetically their behavior is rather distinct as ETFα-T171 displays increased susceptibility to cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) loss and enhanced kinetics of inactivation during thermal stress. Mimicking a fever episode yields substantial activity loss. However, the presence of substoichiometric concentrations of GroEL is sufficient to act as an effective buffer against long-term thermal denaturation. Our investigations are compatible with the notion that the ETFα-T171 variant displays an altered conformational landscape that results in reduced protein function under thermal stress.

  2. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱大焕; 王坤; 王先平; 陈俊凌; 方前锋

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  3. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dahuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Xianping; Chen, Junling; Fang, Qianfeng

    2012-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  4. Analytical Predictions of Thermal Stress in the Stardust PICA Heatshield Under Reentry Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Thomas; Milos, Frank; Agrawal, Parul

    2009-01-01

    We performed finite element analyses on a model of the Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) heatshield from the Stardust sample return capsule (SRC) to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA material during reentry. The heatshield on the Stardust SRC was a 0.83 m sphere cone, fabricated from a single piece of 5.82 cm-thick PICA. The heatshield performed successfully during Earth reentry of the SRC in January 2006. Material response analyses of the full, axisymmetric PICA heatshield were run using the Two-Dimensional Implicit Ablation, Pyrolysis, and Thermal Response Program (TITAN). Peak surface temperatures were predicted to be 3385K, while the temperature at the PICA backface remained at the estimated initial cold-soak temperature of 278K. Surface recession and temperature distribution results from TITAN, at several points in the reentry trajectory, were mapped onto an axisymmetric finite element model of the heatshield. We used the finite element model to predict the thermal stresses in the PICA from differential thermal expansion. The predicted peak compressive stress in the PICA heatshield was 1.38 MPa. Although this level of stress exceeded the chosen design limit for compressive stresses in PICA tiles for the design of the Orion crew exploration vehicle heatshield, the Stardust heatshield exhibited no obvious mechanical failures from thermal stress. The analyses of the Stardust heatshield were used to assess and adjust the level of conservatism in the finite element analyses in support of the Orion heatshield design.

  5. The effects of cortisol increase on long-term memory retrieval during and after acute psychosocial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tollenaar, M.S.; Elzinga, B.M.; Spinhoven, P.; Everaerd, W.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the effects of stress-induced cortisol increases on long-term memory retrieval during and after acute psychosocial stress were examined. Seventy male students were exposed to either a psychosocial stress task or to a non-stressful control task. During and after this task, retrieval was

  6. Effect of Rotor Diameter on the Thermal Stresses of a Turbine Rotor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, J. O.; García, J. C.; Urquiza, G.; Castro-Gómez, L. L.; Rodríguez, J. A.; De Santiago, O.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stresses in a simplified steam turbine rotor model during a cold startup are analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA). In order to validate the numerical model, an experimental array is developed in which a hollow cylinder is heated with hot air in the external surface. At the thick wall of the cylinder, temperature distribution is measured in real time, while at the same time an algorithm computes thermal stresses. Additional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations are made to obtain magnitudes of velocity and pressure in order to compute convective heat transfer coefficient. The experimental results show good agreement with the FEA computations. To evaluate the effect of rotor diameter size, FEA computations with variation in external and internal diameters are performed. Results show that thermal stresses are proportional to rotor diameter size. Also, zones of higher stress concentration are found in the external and internal surfaces of the rotor.

  7. Finite-element analysis of thermal-induced stresses around a cased injection well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferla, A [Department of Civil Engineering, Catholic University of Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 40, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Lavrov, A; Fjaer, E, E-mail: andries_ferla@hotmail.co [Formation Physics Department, SINTEF Petroleum Research, 7465 Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-08-01

    Injection of surface fluids (sea water, CO{sub 2}, steam) into hydrocarbon reservoirs induces thermal stresses in the wellbore structures and in the near-well area. These stresses may endanger the integrity of the casing, the cement and the surrounding formation. Therefore, an accurate assessment of injection-induced thermal stresses and the associated risk of failure are of utmost importance for a safe and environmentally secure oil production. A coupled finite-element model has been developed and tested as a tool for assessing the probability and extent of failure caused by thermal-induced stresses around a cased wellbore. A feature of the model is an option for an automatic mesh refinement using Nikishkov elements and a quad-tree data structure. The refinement is automatically provided in the regions of rapid change of the nodal variables (displacements, temperature).

  8. Aerobic Fitness Level Affects Cardiovascular and Salivary Alpha Amylase Responses to Acute Psychosocial Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Thomas; Boesch, Maria; Roos, Lilian; Tschopp, Céline; Frei, Klaus M; Annen, Hubert; La Marca, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Good physical fitness seems to help the individual to buffer the potential harmful impact of psychosocial stress on somatic and mental health. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of physical fitness levels on the autonomic nervous system (ANS; i.e. heart rate and salivary alpha amylase) responses to acute psychosocial stress, while controlling for established factors influencing individual stress reactions. The Trier Social Stress Test for Groups (TSST-G) was executed with 302 male recruits during their first week of Swiss Army basic training. Heart rate was measured continuously, and salivary alpha amylase was measured twice, before and after the stress intervention. In the same week, all volunteers participated in a physical fitness test and they responded to questionnaires on lifestyle factors and personal traits. A multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to determine ANS responses to acute psychosocial stress from physical fitness test performances, controlling for personal traits, behavioural factors, and socioeconomic data. Multiple linear regression revealed three variables predicting 15 % of the variance in heart rate response (area under the individual heart rate response curve during TSST-G) and four variables predicting 12 % of the variance in salivary alpha amylase response (salivary alpha amylase level immediately after the TSST-G) to acute psychosocial stress. A strong performance at the progressive endurance run (high maximal oxygen consumption) was a significant predictor of ANS response in both models: low area under the heart rate response curve during TSST-G as well as low salivary alpha amylase level after TSST-G. Further, high muscle power, non-smoking, high extraversion, and low agreeableness were predictors of a favourable ANS response in either one of the two dependent variables. Good physical fitness, especially good aerobic endurance capacity, is an important protective factor against health

  9. Plasma cortisol levels in malnourished children with and without superimposed acute stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisey, R. B.; Angers, Marielena; Frenk, S.

    1973-01-01

    Plasma cortisol levels were measured in 13 children with marasmus, in 7 with kwashiorkor, and in 24 normal children. Cortisol levels in the malnourished children did not differ from those of the normal group, either before or after 15 or 30 days of treatment, unless there was superimposed acute stress. Stress caused by complications such as hypoglycaemia, infection, hypothermia, or acidosis led to raised plasma cortisol levels. PMID:4733640

  10. Acute stress response and recovery after whiplash injuries. A one-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Bendix, Tom; Qerama, Erisela

    2007-01-01

    Chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a major medical and psycho-social problem. The typical symptomatology presented in WAD is to some extent similar to symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. In this study we examined if the acute stress reaction following a whiplash injury ...... be important to consider in the early management of whiplash injury. However, the emotional response did not predict chronicity in individuals....

  11. Acute stress induces increases in salivary IL-10 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Yvette Z; Newton, Tamara L; Miller, James J; Lyle, Keith B; Fernandez-Botran, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stress-reactivity of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in saliva and to determine how salivary IL-10 levels change in relation to those of IL-1β, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, following stress. Healthy young adults were randomly assigned to retrieve a negative emotional memory (n = 46) or complete a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test (n = 45). Saliva samples were taken 10 min before (baseline) and 50 min after (post-stressor) onset of a 10-min stressor, and were assayed using a high sensitivity multiplex assay for cytokines. Measurable IL-10 levels (above the minimum detectable concentration) were found in 96% of the baseline samples, and 98% of the post-stressor samples. Flow rate-adjusted salivary IL-10 levels as well as IL-1β/IL-10 ratios showed moderate but statistically significant increases in response to stress. Measurement of salivary IL-10 and pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokine ratios may be useful, noninvasive tools, in stress research.

  12. Dissociating effects of acute photic stress on spatial, episodic-like and working memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passecker, Johannes; Barlow, Sally; O'Mara, Shane M

    2014-10-01

    Adaptively responding to acute stress has been of great importance for human and animal survival. However, for our species, stress-related disorders are putting an ever-increasing burden on healthcare systems. It is thus crucial to understand the basic processes and cognitive changes associated with acute stress. Here, we examined the effects of acute stress exposure on spatial (water maze) and memory (delayed match to sample and episodic-memory-like tasks) performance. We found striking performance deficits in stressed animals navigating in the water maze. We also found, in an episodic-like memory task, striking object-location deficits, but not in temporal-object association learning in stressed animals. Finally, no differences were apparent for any delay periods (up to 30s) in a delayed match to sample task. Taken together, these results show a strong differential effect of acute stress on differing memory processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Influence of Non-Uniform High Heat Flux on Thermal Stress of Thermoelectric Power Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingzhen Ming

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A thermoelectric generator (TEG device which uses solar energy as heat source would achieve higher efficiency if there is a higher temperature difference between the hot-cold ends. However, higher temperature or higher heat flux being imposed upon the hot end will cause strong thermal stress, which will have a negative influence on the life cycle of the thermoelectric module. Meanwhile, in order to get high heat flux, a Fresnel lens is required to concentrate solar energy, which will cause non-uniformity of heat flux on the hot end of the TEG and further influence the thermal stress of the device. This phenomenon is very common in solar TEG devices but seldom research work has been reported. In this paper, numerical analysis on the heat transfer and thermal stress performance of a TEG module has been performed considering the variation on the power of the heat flux being imposed upon the hot-end; the influence of non-uniform high heat flux on thermal stress has also been analyzed. It is found that non-uniformity of high heat flux being imposed upon the hot end has a significant effect on the thermal stress of TEG and life expectation of the device. Taking the uniformity of 100% as standard, when the heating uniformity is 70%, 50%, 30%, and 10%, respectively, the maximum thermal stress of TEG module increased by 3%, 6%, 12%, and 22% respectively. If we increase the heat flux on the hot end, the influence of non-uniformity on the thermal stress will be more remarkable.

  14. Validation of Reef-Scale Thermal Stress Satellite Products for Coral Bleaching Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott F. Heron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite monitoring of thermal stress on coral reefs has become an essential component of reef management practice around the world. A recent development by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Watch (NOAA CRW program provides daily global monitoring at 5 km resolution—at or near the scale of most coral reefs. In this paper, we introduce two new monitoring products in the CRW Decision Support System for coral reef management: Regional Virtual Stations, a regional synthesis of thermal stress conditions, and Seven-day Sea Surface Temperature (SST Trend, describing recent changes in temperature at each location. We describe how these products provided information in support of management activities prior to, during and after the 2014 thermal stress event in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI. Using in situ survey data from this event, we undertake the first quantitative comparison between 5 km satellite monitoring products and coral bleaching observations. Analysis of coral community characteristics, historical temperature conditions and thermal stress revealed a strong influence of coral biodiversity in the patterns of observed bleaching. This resulted in a model based on thermal stress and generic richness that explained 97% of the variance in observed bleaching. These findings illustrate the importance of using local benthic characteristics to interpret the level of impact from thermal stress exposure. In an era of continuing climate change, accurate monitoring of thermal stress and prediction of coral bleaching are essential for stakeholders to direct resources to the most effective management actions to conserve coral reefs.

  15. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M Buechel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/ stress hormone/ allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation, and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 mo. and aged (21 mo. male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress groups (n = 9-12/ group. We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the three hour restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 hours after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  16. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechel, Heather M; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9-12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  17. Investigation of effective factors of transient thermal stress of the MONJU-System components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Masaaki; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kimitaka; Jinbo, M. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Transient thermal stress of each system Component in the fast breeder reactor is an uncertain factor on it's structural design. The temperature distribution in a system component changes over a wide range in time and in space. An unified evaluation technique of thermal, hydraulic, and structural analysis, in which includes thermal striping, temperature stratification, transient thermal stress and the integrity of the system components, is required for the optimum design of tho fast reactor plant. Thermal boundary conditions should be set up by both the transient thermal stress analysis and the structural integrity evaluation of each system component. The reasonable thermal boundary conditions for the design of the MONJU and a demonstration fast reactor, are investigated. The temperature distribution analysis models and the thermal boundary conditions on the Y-piece structural parts of each system component, such as reactor vessel, intermediate heat exchanger, primary main circulation pump, steam generator, superheater and upper structure of reactor core, are illustrated in the report. (M. Suetake)

  18. Acute stress does not impair long-term memory retrieval in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M; Almela, Mercedes; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Puig-Perez, Sara; Salvador, Alicia

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that stress-induced cortisol increases impair memory retrieval in young people. This effect has not been studied in older people; however, some findings suggest that age-related changes in the brain can affect the relationships between acute stress, cortisol and memory in older people. Our aim was to investigate the effects of acute stress on long-term memory retrieval in healthy older people. To this end, 76 participants from 56 to 76 years old (38 men and 38 women) were exposed to an acute psychosocial stressor or a control task. After the stress/control task, the recall of pictures, words and stories learned the previous day was assessed. There were no differences in memory retrieval between the stress and control groups on any of the memory tasks. In addition, stress-induced cortisol response was not associated with memory retrieval. An age-related decrease in cortisol receptors and functional changes in the amygdala and hippocampus could underlie the differences observed between the results from this study and those found in studies performed with young people.

  19. Acute Stress Fracture of the Pelvis after Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Oluwaseun; Tyagi, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Acute hip pain following total hip arthroplasty (THA) could have numerous causes to include stress fracture of the pelvis. Stress fractures of the pelvis are rare and have been reported to involve the medial wall and the pubic ramus. A unique case is presented demonstrating the clinical presentation and management of an acute stress fracture of ilium and anterior column following a THA. A 72-year-old man underwent an uncomplicated right THA. He was noted to have femoral head resorption and thin osteoporotic bone intraoperatively. He initially did well postoperatively and ambulating without pain or assistive devices. Within 1 month of surgery, he returned with acute right hip pain without any traumatic event. Radiographs showed migration of the acetabular component and computed tomography scan confirmed a fracture through the ilium. The patient underwent revision surgery, where the fracture was reduced and internal fixation was achieved with a reconstruction plate and acetabular cage construct. At 9 months postoperatively, the patient remained pain-free with full weight bearing and with stable radiographs. Elderly patients who undergo THA may have low bone mineral density. These patients can develop stress fractures in their pelvis after surgery. These fractures may involve the medial wall, posterior column, or posterior wall. In patients who develop atraumatic pain postoperatively, it is important to consider for potential stress fractures of the ilium and evaluate appropriately with imaging. In these cases, revision surgery can be necessary to provide fixation of the stress fracture.

  20. Biochemical and biomolecular aspects of oxidative stress due to acute and severe hypoxia in human muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G G; Sessego, R; Velluti, C; Salvi, M

    1995-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress was investigated in severe and acute hypoxia and in reperfusion applied to human muscle tissues. The biochemical and biomolecular relationship between the response of the respiratory-chain enzymic complexes and the metabolism of specific hypoxia stress proteins (HSP) suggest an adaptive mechanism which antagonizes the oxidative damage due to acute and severe tissue hypoxia.

  1. Thermal Stress Analysis of RCG-Tempered TUFI Tile TPS for Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Squire, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents detailed results from linear and nonlinear finite-element thermal stress analyses of a new tile, Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) concept. A very thin coating of Reaction Cured Glass (RCG) is used to "temper" the surface of Toughened Uni-Piece Fibrous Insulation (TUFI) tiles to improve resistance to thermal shock and thermal cycling effects. The coating also serves to reduce catalytic heating and may improve waterproofing. Calculations include trajectory-based aerothermal heating environments for X-34 wing leading edge TPS designs and arc jet environments for TPS test articles. The nonlinear analyses include the high temperature plasticity of RCG to demonstrate the reuseability of the material.

  2. Thermal stress analysis of laminated LCDs for aircraft cockpits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qibin; Hua, Yikui; Lv, Guoqiang; Lu, Xiaosong

    2012-10-01

    Different from common liquid crystal displays (LCDs), LCDs in aircraft cockpits have to satisfy some special requirements, including high luminance, high contrast ration, anti-reflection (AR), and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Indium-tin oxide (ITO) glasses are usually attached on the top surface of LC cells by optical adhesive for AR and EMC, forming laminated structure. The characteristics of optical adhesive and lamination processing have direct effects on display. This paper creates a finite-element-analysis model of the laminated LC cell with ITO glass. The simulation results show that the stress concentration happens in the case that there are defects (bubbles, cracks, nonuniform thickness) in the optical adhesive when the operation temperature raises to 70º C. Based on the analysis of the stress on the top surface of the LC cell in Y direction, it is found that the location of the stress concentration is just under where the defects exit. The comparison on the stress of 3 possible defects shows that the concentrated stress caused by the cracks are far more large than the stress by the bubbles and nonuniform thickness of optical adhesives, which should try best to avoid.

  3. Phenomenological vs. biophysical models of thermal stress in aquatic eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Benjamin T; Pike, Andrew; John, Sara N; Hamda, Natnael; Roberts, Jason; Lindley, Steven T; Danner, Eric M

    2017-01-01

    Predicting species responses to climate change is a central challenge in ecology. These predictions are often based on lab-derived phenomenological relationships between temperature and fitness metrics. We tested one of these relationships using the embryonic stage of a Chinook salmon population. We parameterised the model with laboratory data, applied it to predict survival in the field, and found that it significantly underestimated field-derived estimates of thermal mortality. We used a biophysical model based on mass transfer theory to show that the discrepancy was due to the differences in water flow velocities between the lab and the field. This mechanistic approach provides testable predictions for how the thermal tolerance of embryos depends on egg size and flow velocity of the surrounding water. We found support for these predictions across more than 180 fish species, suggesting that flow and temperature mediated oxygen limitation is a general mechanism underlying the thermal tolerance of embryos.

  4. Cooling-dominated cracking in thermally stressed volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of thermally induced cracking in rocks have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and the mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesized to be different from those formed during heating. We present in situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution in a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. Results show that both the rate and the energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills, and lava flows.

  5. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Branco, L.G.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leite-Panissi, C.R.A. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-19

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  6. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carvalho-Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO, which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO, participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group using the analgesia index (AI in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  7. The effect of acute and chronic stress on growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sävendahl, Lars

    2012-10-23

    Impaired bone growth is observed in many children exposed to stress, but whether the underlying cause is psychological or secondary to a variety of chronic disorders is unclear. The growth plate is specifically targeted by stress through many different mechanisms, including increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and cortisol, as well as impaired actions of the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis. Both glucocorticoids, such as cortisol, and proinflammatory cytokines adversely affect several aspects of chondrogenesis in the growth plate, and these effects can be ameliorated by raising local IGF-1 concentrations. However, this intervention does not completely normalize growth. In children with stress related to chronic inflammation, the cornerstone of improving stress-impaired growth remains the judicious use of glucocorticoids while ensuring effective control of the disease process. Specific immunomodulatory therapy that targets the actions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) is at least partially effective at rescuing linear growth in many children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Patients who do not respond to anti-TNF treatment may be candidates for therapeutic agents that target other proinflammatory cytokines and for GH intervention. Although GH treatment rescues linear growth in some patients with JIA, it is unknown whether GH can rescue growth in those patients who do not respond to anticytokine therapy. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to explore these and other new potential treatment strategies that could improve bone growth in patients who do not respond to conventional therapy.

  8. Autobiographical memory after acute stress in healthy young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tollenaar, M.S.; Elzinga, B.M.; Spinhoven, P.; Everaerd, W.

    2009-01-01

    Autobiographical memories have been found to be less specific after hydrocortisone administration in healthy men, resembling memory deficits in, for example, depression. This is the first study to investigate the effects of stress-induced elevated cortisol levels on autobiographic memory specificity

  9. The Acute Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Measures of Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Inza L.; And Others

    The immediate response of stress to aerobic exercise was measured by utilizing the Palmar Sweat Index (PSI) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Forty subjects (20 male and 20 female) from the ages of 18-30 sustained a single bout of aerobic activity for 30 minutes at 60 percent of their maximum heart rate. Pre-treatment procedures…

  10. Crack prediction in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings based on the simulation of residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. W.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Ma, J.

    2016-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings systems (TBCs) are widely used in the field of aerospace. The durability and insulating ability of TBCs are highly dependent on the residual stresses of top coatings, thus the investigation of the residual stresses is helpful to understand the failure mechanisms of TBCs. The simulation of residual stresses evolution in electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) TBCs is described in this work. The interface morphology of TBCs subjected to cyclic heating and cooling is observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). An interface model of TBCs is established based on thermal elastic-plastic finite method. Residual stress distributions in TBCs are obtained to reflect the influence of interfacial roughness. Both experimental and simulation results show that it is feasible to predict the crack location by stress analysis, which is crucial to failure prediction.

  11. Thermal evolution of residual stress in IN718 alloy subjected to laser peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suqiang; Huang, Shu; Meng, Xiankai; Sheng, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2017-07-01

    The thermal relaxation behaviors of residual stresses induced by laser peening (LP) in IN718 alloy were investigated using an integrated numerical simulation and experimental approach. LP and heat treatments (HT) were carried out after which the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was employed in measuring the residual stresses. Micro-structures were observed using an optic microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Dislocations induced by LP were also observed by TEM and characterized using the XRD technique. The effects of the applied temperature and the exposure time on residual stress and micro-structures were investigated. The results show that the extent of the residual stresses relaxation increased accordingly with the increase in the applied temperature. The relaxation rate was initially high and tended to stabilize for a longer exposure time. Grain size evolution during the process was subsequently discussed. Furthermore, a conceivable mechanism of residual stresses thermal relaxation behavior was obtained.

  12. Residual stress analysis of the thermal barrier coating system by considering the plasma spraying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Jae; Lee, Byung Chai [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jang Gyun; Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The residual stress is the key factor causing the reliability problem of thermal barrier coating (TBC). The failure of plasma spray coatings due to residual stresses is a serious and recurring problem of TBC. The difference of thermal expansion coefficient between the substrate and each coating combined with temperature evolution and temperature gradients during deposition process determine the residual stress for the whole TBC system. The magnitudes and distributions of the residual stresses are affected by deposition process and deposition characteristics. Most of FEA (finite element analysis) has been performed under the assumption that the multilayer coating system is stacked at once without considering the deposition process during plasma spraying. In this research, FEA for a coupled heat transfer and elastic-plastic thermal stress was performed to obtain the more detailed and reliable result of residual stress of the TBC system using the element activation/deactivation technique. The residual stress variation from the start of plasma spraying to cooling stage with room temperature was obtained systematically considering the deposition process. It can be used as reference data to improve the performance of TBC. In addition, the relationship between residual stress and coating conditions such as cooling rate and time is also examined thoroughly.

  13. Sex differences in subcellular distribution of delta opioid receptors in the rat hippocampus in response to acute and chronic stress

    OpenAIRE

    Sanoara Mazid; Hall, Baila S.; Odell, Shannon C.; Khalifa Stafford; Dyer, Andreina D.; Van Kempen, Tracey A.; Jane Selegean; McEwen, Bruce S.; Elizabeth M. Waters; Milner, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction requires associative learning processes that critically involve hippocampal circuits, including the opioid system. We recently found that acute and chronic stress, important regulators of addictive processes, affect hippocampal opioid levels and mu opioid receptor trafficking in a sexually dimorphic manner. Here, we examined whether acute and chronic stress similarly alters the levels and trafficking of hippocampal delta opioid receptors (DORs). Immediately after acute immobili...

  14. The Effects of Acute Stress on Cognitive Performance. A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Determining the relationship of acute stress, anxiety, and salivary a-amylase level with performance of student nurse anesthesiologists during...Philippa, H, Miller , D.L., Gregory, K.B., Smith, R.M., Weldon, K.J., Co, E.L., McNally, K.L., and Lebacqz, J.V.(1994). Fatigue in operational settings

  15. Effects of hyperflexion on acute stress responses in ridden dressage horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, J.W.; Beekmans, M; van Dalum, M; van Dierendonck, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of hyperflexion on the welfare of dressage horses have been debated. This study aimed to investigate acute stress responses of dressage horses ridden in three different Head-and-Neck-positions (HNPs). Fifteen dressage horses were ridden by their usual rider in a standardised 10-min dress

  16. The Additive Benefit of Hypnosis and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Treating Acute Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Richard A.; Moulds, Michelle L.; Guthrie, Rachel M.; Nixon, Reginald D. V.

    2005-01-01

    This research represents the first controlled treatment study of hypnosis and cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT) of acute stress disorder (ASD). Civilian trauma survivors (N = 87) who met criteria for ASD were randomly allocated to 6 sessions of CBT, CBT combined with hypnosis (CBT-hypnosis), or supportive counseling (SC). CBT comprised exposure,…

  17. A Study of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers and Effect of Oral Antioxidant Supplementation in Severe Acute Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Ghone, Rahul A.; Suryakar, Adinath N.; Kulhalli, P. M.; Bhagat, Sonali S.; Padalkar, Ramchandra K.; Karnik, Aarti C.; Hundekar, Prakash S.; Sangle, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition represents one of the most severe health problems in India. Free radicals play an important role in immunological response, which induces the oxidative surplus in severe acute malnutrition. Severe dietary deficiency of nutrients leads to increased oxidative stress in cellular compartments.

  18. Systolic blood pressure reactivity during submaximal exercise and acute psychological stress in youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Studies in youth show an association between systolic blood-pressure (SBP) reactivity to acute psychological stress and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT). However, it has not yet been determined whether SBP reactivity during submaximal exercise is also associated with CIMT i...

  19. Effects of acute heat stress on gene expression of brain-gut neuropeptides in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, L; Hepeng, L; Xianlei, L; Hongchao, J; Hai, L; Sheikhahmadi, A; Yufeng, W; Zhigang, S

    2013-11-01

    Heat stress-induced reduction in feed intake is an annoyance of the poultry industry. Feed intake is regulated by complex mechanisms in which brain-gut neuropeptides are involved, but the changes in such neuropeptides in broiler chickens during heat exposure remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute heat stress (35°C, 6 h, and 65% relative humidity) on the gene expression of appetite-regulating peptides in the hypothalamus and gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens at 42 d of age. The hypothalamic mRNA levels of neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, pro-opiomelanocortin, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, corticotropin-releasing hormone, melanocortin 4 receptor, melanin-concentrating hormone, prepro-orexin, cholecystokinin (CCK), and ghrelin did not significantly change (P>0.05) in the heat-exposed broiler chickens. However, the mRNA levels of ghrelin in the glandular stomach, duodenum, and jejunum significantly increased and the mRNA level of CCK in the duodenum significantly decreased. The results indicate that acute heat stress had no effect on the gene expression of central appetite-regulating peptides under current experimental conditions; however, some gastrointestinal tract peptides (e.g., ghrelin and CCK) might play a role in the regulation of appetite in acute heat-exposed broiler chickens. Furthermore, ghrelin in the glandular stomach, duodenum, and jejunum might be the main regulative target of acute heat stress induced anorexia.

  20. Acute and reversible cardiomyopathy provoked by stress in a Chinese woman

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Lian-ming; ZHANG Jian; DOU Ke-fei; XU Zhi-min; GAO Xiao-jin; YANG Yue-jin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Areversible cardiomyopathy triggered by psychologically stressful events occurs in older women and may mimic evolving acute myocardial infarction or coronary syndrome.This condition is characterized by a distinctive form of systolic dysfunction that predominantly affects the distal left ventricle chamber and a favourable outcome with appropriate medical therapy.

  1. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  2. The Nature of Trauma Memories in Acute Stress Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, C. H.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Glucksman, E.; Thompson, P.; Dalgleish, T.; Smith, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is increasing theoretical, clinical and research evidence for the role of trauma memory in the aetiology of acute pathological stress responses in adults. However, research into the phenomenology of trauma memories in young people is currently scarce. Methods: This study compared the nature of trauma narratives to narratives of…

  3. The Nature of Trauma Memories in Acute Stress Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, C. H.; Meiser-Stedman, R.; Glucksman, E.; Thompson, P.; Dalgleish, T.; Smith, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is increasing theoretical, clinical and research evidence for the role of trauma memory in the aetiology of acute pathological stress responses in adults. However, research into the phenomenology of trauma memories in young people is currently scarce. Methods: This study compared the nature of trauma narratives to narratives of…

  4. Salivary MUC5B-mediated adherence (ex vivo) of Heliocobacter pylori during acute stress.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bosch; E.J.C. de Geus; T.J.M. Ligtenberg; K. Nazmi; E.C.I. Veerman; J. Hoogstraten; A.V. Amerongen Nieuwland

    2000-01-01

    Biochemical host defenses at mucosal sites, such as the oral cavity, play a key role in the regulation of microbial ecology and the prevention of infectious disease. This study investigated the effects of acute stress on the salivary levels of the carbohydrate structure sulfo-Lewis-super(a ) (SL), w

  5. Initial evaluation of floor cooling on lactating sows under severe acute heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives were to evaluate an acute heat stress protocol for lactating sows and evaluate preliminary estimates of water flow rates required to cool sows. Twelve multiparous sows were provided with a cooling pad built with an aluminum plate surface, high-density polyethylene base and copper pipe...

  6. Influence of acute stress on response inhibition in healthy men: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierolf, Angelika Margarete; Fechtner, Julia; Böhnke, Robina; Wolf, Oliver T; Naumann, Ewald

    2017-02-07

    The current study investigated the influence of acute stress and the resulting cortisol increase on response inhibition and its underlying cortical processes, using EEG. Before and after an acute stressor or a control condition, 39 healthy men performed a go/no-go task while ERPs (N2, P3), reaction times, errors, and salivary cortisol were measured. Acute stress impaired neither accuracy nor reaction times, but differentially affected the neural correlates of response inhibition; namely, stress led to enhanced amplitudes of the N2 difference waves (N2d, no-go minus go), indicating enhanced response inhibition and conflict monitoring. Moreover, participants responding to the stressor with an acute substantial rise in cortisol (high cortisol responders) showed reduced amplitudes of the P3 of the difference waves (P3d, no-go minus go) after the stressor, indicating an impaired evaluation and finalization of the inhibitory process. Our findings indicate that stress leads to a reallocation of cognitive resources to the neural subprocesses of inhibitory control, strengthening premotor response inhibition and the detection of response conflict, while concurrently diminishing the subsequent finalization process within the stream of processing.

  7. Acute stress affects free recall and recognition of pictures differently depending on age and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Vanesa; Pulopulos, Matias M; Puig-Perez, Sara; Espin, Laura; Gomez-Amor, Jesus; Salvador, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about age differences in the effects of stress on memory retrieval. Our aim was to perform an in-depth examination of acute psychosocial stress effects on memory retrieval, depending on age and sex. For this purpose, data from 52 older subjects (27 men and 25 women) were reanalyzed along with data from a novel group of 50 young subjects (26 men and 24 women). Participants were exposed to an acute psychosocial stress task (Trier Social Stress Test) or a control task. After the experimental manipulation, the retrieval of positive, negative and neutral pictures learned the previous day was tested. As expected, there was a significant response to the exposure to the stress task, but the older participants had a lower cortisol response to TSST than the younger ones. Stress impaired free recall of emotional (positive and negative) and neutral pictures only in the group of young men. Also in this group, correlation analyses showed a marginally significant association between cortisol and free recall. However, exploratory analyses revealed only a negative relationship between the stress-induced cortisol response and free recall of negative pictures. Moreover, stress impaired recognition memory of positive pictures in all participants, although this effect was not related to the cortisol or alpha-amylase response. These results indicate that both age and sex are critical factors in acute stress effects on specific aspects of long-term memory retrieval of emotional and neutral material. They also point out that more research is needed to better understand their specific role.

  8. Acute exercise improves endothelial function despite increasing vascular resistance during stress in smokers and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Cherie R; McCully, Kevin K; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of acute exercise on flow mediated dilation (FMD) and reactivity to neurovascular challenges among female smokers and nonsmokers. FMD was determined by arterial diameter, velocity, and blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography after forearm occlusion. Those measures and blood pressure and heart rate were also assessed in response to forehead cold and the Stroop Color-Word Conflict Test (CWT) before and after 30 min of rest or an acute bout of cycling exercise (∼50% VO₂ peak). Baseline FMD and stress responses were not different between smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to passive rest, exercise increased FMD and decreased arterial velocity and blood flow responses during the Stroop CWT and forehead cold in both groups. Overall, acute exercise improved endothelial function among smokers and nonsmokers despite increasing vascular resistance and reducing limb blood flow during neurovascular stress.

  9. Human Thermal Comfort and Heat Stress in an Outdoor Urban Arid Environment: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abdel-Ghany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To protect humans from heat stress risks, thermal comfort and heat stress potential were evaluated under arid environment, which had never been made for such climate. The thermal indices THI, WBGT, PET, and UTCI were used to evaluate thermal comfort and heat stress. RayMan software model was used to estimate the PET, and the UTCI calculator was used for UTCI. Dry and wet bulb temperatures (Td, Tw, natural wet bulb temperature (Tnw, and globe temperature (Tg were measured in a summer day to be used in the calculation. The results showed the following. (i The thermal sensation and heat stress levels can be evaluated by either the PET or UTCI scales, and both are valid for extremely high temperature in the arid environment. (ii In the comfort zone, around 75% of individuals would be satisfied with the surrounding environment and feel comfortable during the whole day. (iii Persons are exposed to strong heat stress and would feel uncomfortable most of the daytime in summer. (iv Heat fatigue is expected with prolonged exposure to sun light and activity. (v During the daytime, humans should schedule their activities according to the highest permissible values of the WBGT to avoid thermal shock.

  10. Research of thermal stress between long linear MCT arrays and lead board using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Dafu

    2010-10-01

    For the long wavelength infrared detection, HgCdTe (MCT) photoconductive devices are selected as the core of next-generation meteorological because of its mature fabrication technique and stable performance. During the assembly process, an innovative multilayer ceramic board providing mechanical support is designed as the electrical interconnection between MCT chips and external circuits for cryogenic application. Furthermore, due to its brittleness, long linear MCT device is normally glued to sapphire substrates on the multilayer ceramic board with cryogenic glue. Thus, it can be seen clearly that the assembly structure is a multilayer configuration which comprises various kinds of materials, including ceramic broad, sapphire, MCT and glues. As a result, the difference in Thermal Expansion Coefficient (TEC) between the layers could create the potential to introduce thermal stress at working environmental temperature (approximately 70K), which could result in device performance degradation, even die crack. This article analyzes the thermal stress between long linear MCT devices and a multilayer ceramic board by using Finite Element Method (FEM). According to analysis results, two factors are revealed as the most significant causes for introducing thermal stress: one is the sapphire substrate thickness; the other is the parameters of various materials, for instance Yong's modulus and TEC. Since the structure of MCT detector is determined by system requirements and is under the limitation of manufacture technology, this article reveals two effective approaches to reduce the unavoidable thermal stress: first, choosing the appropriate thickness of ceramic board which is made by Al2O3; second, adding another metal cushion Invar. With the above considerations, the distribution of thermal stress is simulated using FEM under different parameter conditions. Based on the results of simulations, an optimal design of package structure which could improve the reliability of

  11. Thermal Stability of Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojevic, A.; Angerer, P.; Oberwinkler, B.

    2016-03-01

    The need for light weight design while maintaining a high safety is essential for many components, especially in the aircraft industry. Therefore, it's important to consider every aspect to reduce weight, improve fatigue life and maintain safety of crucial components. Residual stresses are a major factor which can positively influence components and fulfil all three requirements. However, due to the inconstancy of the behaviour of residual stresses during the life time of a component, residual stresses are often neglected. If the behaviour of residual stresses could be described reliably over the entire life time of a component, residual stresses could be taken into account and components could be optimized even further. Mechanical and thermal loads are the main reason for relaxation of residual stresses. This work covers the thermal stability of residual stresses in Ti-6Al-4V components. Therefore, exposure tests at raised temperatures were performed on specimens with different surface conditions. Residual stresses were measured by x-ray diffraction before and after testing. Creep tests were also carried out to describe the creep behaviour and thereby the ability for residual stress relaxation. A correlation between the creep rate and amount of relaxed stress was found. The creep behaviour of the material was described by using a combination of the Norton Power law and the Arrhenius equation. The Zener-Wert-Avrami model was used to describe the residual stress relaxation. With these models a satisfying correlation between measured and calculated data was found. Hence, the relaxation of residual stresses due to thermal load was described reliably.

  12. Regulation of apoptotic pathways by Stylophora pistillata (Anthozoa, Pocilloporidae to survive thermal stress and bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagit Kvitt

    Full Text Available Elevated seawater temperatures are associated with coral bleaching events and related mortality. Nevertheless, some coral species are able to survive bleaching and recover. The apoptotic responses associated to this ability were studied over 3 years in the coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat subjected to long term thermal stress. These include caspase activity and the expression profiles of the S. pistillata caspase and Bcl-2 genes (StyCasp and StyBcl-2-like cloned in this study. In corals exposed to thermal stress (32 or 34°C, caspase activity and the expression levels of the StyBcl-2-like gene increased over time (6-48 h and declined to basal levels within 72 h of thermal stress. Distinct transcript levels were obtained for the StyCasp gene, with stimulated expression from 6 to 48 h of 34°C thermal stress, coinciding with the onset of bleaching. Increased cell death was detected in situ only between 6 to 48 h of stress and was limited to the gastroderm. The bleached corals survived up to one month at 32°C, and recovered back symbionts when placed at 24°C. These results point to a two-stage response in corals that withstand thermal stress: (i the onset of apoptosis, accompanied by rapid activation of anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic mediators that block the progression of apoptosis to other cells and (ii acclimatization of the coral to the chronic thermal stress alongside the completion of symbiosis breakdown. Accordingly, the coral's ability to rapidly curb apoptosis appears to be the most important trait affecting the coral's thermotolerance and survival.

  13. Having your cake and eating it too: A habit of comfort food may link chronic social stress exposure and acute stress-induced cortisol hyporesponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress has been tied to changes in eating behavior and food choice. Previous studies in rodents have shown that chronic stress increases palatable food intake which, in turn, increases mesenteric fat and inhibits acute stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The effect of...

  14. Relationships between the history of thermal stress and the relative risk of diseases of Caribbean corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, C J; Jordan-Garza, A G; Muller, E M; Van Woesik, R

    2014-07-01

    The putative increase in coral diseases in the Caribbean has led to extensive declines in coral populations. Coral diseases are a consequence of the complex interactions among the coral hosts, the pathogens, and the environment. Yet, the relative influence that each of these components has on the prevalence of coral diseases is unclear. Also unknown is the extent to which historical thermal-stress events have influenced the prevalence of contemporary coral diseases and the potential adjustment of coral populations to thermal stress. We used a Bayesian approach to test the hypothesis that in 2012 the relative risk of four signs of coral disease (white signs, dark spots, black bands, and yellow signs) differed at reef locations with different thermal histories. We undertook an extensive spatial study of coral diseases at four locations in the Caribbean region (10(3) km), two with and two without a history of frequent thermal anomalies (approximately 4-6 years) over the last 143 years (1870-2012). Locations that historically experienced frequent thermal anomalies had a significantly higher risk of corals displaying white signs, and had a lower risk of corals displaying dark spots, than locations that did not historically experience frequent thermal anomalies. By contrast, there was no relationship between the history of thermal stress and the relative risk of corals displaying black bands and yellow signs, at least at the spatial scale of our observations.

  15. Early detection of oil-induced stress in crops using spectral and thermal responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emengini, Ebele Josephine; Blackburn, George Alan; Theobald, Julian Charles

    2013-01-01

    Oil pollution is a major source of environmental degradation, and requires accurate monitoring and timely detection for an effective control of its occurrence. This paper examines the potential of a remote sensing approach using the spectral and thermal responses of crops for the early detection of stress caused by oil pollution. In a glasshouse, pot-grown maize was treated with oil at sublethal and lethal applications. Thereafter, leaf thermal, spectral and physiological measurements were taken every two to three days to monitor the development of stress responses. Our results indicate that absolute leaf temperature was a poor indicator of developing stress. However, a derived thermal index (IG) responded consistently in the early stages of physiological damage. Various spectral reflectance features were highly sensitive to oil-induced stress. A narrow-band index using wavelengths in the near-infrared and red-edge region, (R755-R716)/(R755+R716), was optimal for previsual detection of oil-induced stress. This index had a strong linear relationship with photosynthetic rate. This indicates that by detecting vegetation stress, thermal and hyperspectral remote sensing has considerable potential for the timely detection of oil pollution in the environment.

  16. Discrimination of plant stress caused by oil pollution and waterlogging using hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emengini, Ebele Josephine; Blackburn, George Alan; Theobald, Julian Charles

    2013-01-01

    Remote sensing of plant stress holds promise for detecting environmental pollution by oil. However, in oil-rich delta regions, waterlogging is a frequent source of plant stress that has similar physiological effects to oil pollution. This study investigated the capabilities of remote sensing for discriminating between these two sources of plant stress. Bean plants were subjected to oil pollution, waterlogging, and combined oil and waterlogging treatments. Canopy physiological, hyperspectral, and thermal measurements were taken every two to three days after treatment to follow the stress responses. For plants treated with oil, spectral and thermal responses were evident six days before symptoms could be observed visually. In waterlogged plants, only spectral responses were observed, but these were present up to eight days before visual symptoms. A narrowband reflectance ratio was efficient in detecting stress caused by oil and waterlogging. Canopy temperature and a thermal index were good indicators of oil and combined oil and waterlogging stress, but insensitive to waterlogging alone. Hence, this study provides evidence that combined hyperspectral and thermal remote sensing of vegetation has potential for monitoring oil pollution in environments that are also subjected to waterlogging.

  17. Phase composition and residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Ashmarin, A. A.; Ryabenko, B. V.; Ivanova, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray study of the phase composition and residual stresses distribution in two-layer APS coatings showed that the ceramic layer consists of t-ZrO2 phase with tetragonal lattice and the metal underlayer γ-solid solution based on nickel. In the transition zone thickness of ∼ 100 pm as the distance from the surface was revealed a gradual transition from t-ZrO2 to γ-solid solution. Increase in the specific volume of the metal underlayer resulting TGO growing leads to the formation of this layer high compressive stresses up to 600 MPa. In this case, the ceramic layer contains tensile stress up to 200 MPa.

  18. Effects of sub-chronic nandrolone administration on hormonal adaptive response to acute stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racca, Silvia; Piccione, Francesca; Spaccamiglio, Angela; Carriero, Vitina M A; De Francia, Silvia; Cangemi, Luigi; Esculapio, Paola; Papotti, Mauro; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Portaleone, Paolo; Di Carlo, Francesco; Abbadessa, Giuliana

    2012-08-01

    Androgenic-anabolic steroid (AAS) misuse has been associated with depression. It has been proposed that stress has a role in depression and that serotonin is involved in both endocrine responses to stress and depressive physiopathology. Although reports demonstrate that AAS chronic administration modifies components of stress-responsive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), no study has evaluated AAS effect on the response to stressful stimuli. We studied the effects of the subchronic administration (once a day for 14 days in rats) of a supratherapeutical dose of nandrolone decanoate (ND) on HPAA and cortical serotoninergic system response to acute restraint stress (RS). Acute RS produced the following effects: increase in CORT (in blood) and ACTH (both in blood and in pituitary corticotropes), GR depletion in hippocampus and hypothalamus cytosol and GR translocation in hippocampus nuclear fraction, cortical serotonin re-uptake stimulation and hippocampus cytosolic ERK2 activation. ND by itself, i.e. in non-stressed rats, did not modify these parameters, except for a decrease of plasma CORT and ACTH levels and an increase in hippocampus cytosolic phospho-ERK1/2. On the contrary, in stressed rats ND affected stress-induced plasma ACTH increase and prevented all other above reported stress effects, except the increase in pituitary ACTH positive cell density. Our results show that the prolonged administration of a supratherapeutical dose of ND in rats, albeit did not affect in a notable way HPAA and serotonin transporter activity in the absence of stress, may deregulate the stress-induced hormonal cascade which plays a crucial role in depressive psychopathology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal stress measurement in continuous welded rails using the hole-drilling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuan; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    The absence of expansion joints in Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) has created the need for the railroad industry to determine the in-situ level of thermal stresses so as to prevent train accidents caused by rail buckling in hot weather and by rail breakage in cold weather. The development of non-destructive or semi-destructive methods for determining the level of thermal stresses in rails is today a high research priority. This study explores the known hole-drilling method as a possible solution to this problem. A new set of calibration coefficients to compute the relieved stress field with the finer hole depth increments was determined by a 3D Finite Element Analysis that modeled the entire hole geometry, including the mechanics of the hole bottom and walls. To compensate the residual stress components, a linear relationship was experimentally established between the longitudinal and the vertical residual stresses of two common sizes of rails, the 136RE and the 141RE, with statistical significance. This result was then utilized to isolate the longitudinal thermal stress component in hole-drilling tests conducted on the 136RE and 141RE thermally-loaded rails at the Large-scale CWR Test-bed of UCSD's Powell Research Laboratories. The results from the Test-bed showed that the hole-drilling procedure, with the appropriate residual stress compensation, can indeed estimate the in-situ thermal stresses to achieve a +/-5°F accuracy of Neutral Temperature determination with a 90% statistical confidence, which is the desired industry gold standard.

  20. When depth is no refuge: cumulative thermal stress increases with depth in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, B. P.; Condit, C.; Liu, G.; dos Santos, S.; Kahru, M.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kline, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are increasingly affected by high-temperature stress events and associated bleaching. Monitoring and predicting these events have largely utilized sea surface temperature data, due to the convenience of using large-scale remotely sensed satellite measurements. However, coral bleaching has been observed to vary in severity throughout the water column, and variations in coral thermal stress across depths have not yet been well investigated. In this study, in situ water temperature data from 1999 to 2011 from three depths were used to calculate thermal stress on a coral reef in Bahia Almirante, Bocas del Toro, Panama, which was compared to satellite surface temperature data and thermal stress calculations for the same area and time period from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Watch Satellite Bleaching Alert system. The results show similar total cumulative annual thermal stress for both the surface and depth-stratified data, but with a striking difference in the distribution of that stress among the depth strata during different high-temperature events, with the greatest thermal stress unusually recorded at the deepest measured depth during the most severe bleaching event in 2005. Temperature records indicate that a strong density-driven temperature inversion may have formed in this location in that year, contributing to the persistence and intensity of bleaching disturbance at depth. These results indicate that depth may not provide a stress refuge from high water temperature events in some situations, and in this case, the water properties at depth appear to have contributed to greater coral bleaching at depth compared to near-surface locations. This case study demonstrates the importance of incorporating depth-stratified temperature monitoring and small-scale oceanographic and hydrologic data for understanding and predicting local reef responses to elevated water temperature events.

  1. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis.

  2. Acute stress increases neuropsin mRNA expression in the mouse hippocampus through the glucocorticoid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akiko; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Komai, Shoji

    2008-05-01

    Stress affects synaptic plasticity and may alter various types of behaviour, including anxiety or memory formation. In the present study, we examined the effects of acute stress (1 h restraint with or without tail-shock) on mRNA levels of a plasticity-related serine protease neuropsin (NP) in the hippocampus using semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. We found that NP mRNA expression was dramatically increased shortly after exposure to the acute restraint tail-shock stress and remained at high level for at least 24 h. The level of NP mRNA would be correlated to the elevated plasma concentration of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT) and to the stress intensity. Application of CORT either onto primary cultured hippocampal neurons (5 nM) or in vivo to adrenalectomized (ADX) mice (10 mg/kg B.W., s.c.) mimicked the effect of stress and significantly elevated NP mRNA. These results suggest that the upregulation of NP mRNA after stress is CORT-dependent and point to a role for neuropsin in stress-induced neuronal plasticity.

  3. Perceived Thermal Discomfort and Stress Behaviours Affecting Students’ Learning in Lecture Theatres in the Humid Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaraukuro Tammy Amasuomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between students’ perceived thermal discomfort and stress behaviours affecting their learning in lecture theatres in the humid tropics. Two lecture theatres, LTH-2 and 3, at the Niger Delta University, Nigeria, were used for the study. Two groups of students from the Faculties of Agriculture and Engineering and the Department of Technology Education constituted the population. The sample size selected through random sampling for Groups A and B was 210 and 370 students, respectively. Objective and self-report instruments were used for data collection. The objective instrument involved physical measurement of the two lecture theatres and of the indoor temperature, relative humidity and air movement. The self-report instrument was a questionnaire that asked for the students perceived indoor thermal discomfort levels and the effect of indoor thermal comfort level on perceived stress behaviours affecting their learning. The objective indoor environmental data indicated thermal discomfort with an average temperature of 29–32 °C and relative humidity of 78% exceeding the ASHARE [1] and Olgyay [2].The students’ experienced a considerable level of thermal discomfort and also perceived that stress behaviours due to thermal discomfort affected their learning. Further, there were no significant differences in the perceived thermal discomfort levels of the two groups of students in LTH-2 and 3. Furthermore, stress behaviours affecting learning as perceived by the two groups of students did not differ significantly. In addition, no correlation existed between the perceived indoor thermal discomfort levels and stress behaviour levels affecting learning for students in LTH-2, because the arousal level of the students in the thermal environment was likely higher than the arousal level for optimal performance [3,4]. However, a correlation existed in the case of students in LTH-3, which was expected because it only

  4. Acute kidney injury mediated by oxidative stress in Egyptian horses with exertional rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Ashker, Maged R

    2011-06-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiologic process of acute renal failure associated with exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) in Egyptian horses. ER was tentatively diagnosed in 31 Baladi horses based on case history, physical examination findings and confirmed by elevation of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and urine myoglobin concentrations. According to severity of the condition, the diseased horses were categorized into two main groups; the first group included 18 horses with minimal clinical signs and plasma CK horses with overt clinical signs and plasma CK >100 000 IU/L). It was found that plasma creatol (CTL) was positively correlated (p stress in renal injury associated with severe rhabdomyolysis in horses. It is suggested that exaggeration of oxidative stress associated with increased muscle membrane leakage plays a key role in acute kidney injury in Baladi horses with severe rhabdomyolysis.

  5. The Latent Factor Structure of Acute Stress Disorder following Bank Robbery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Lasgaard, M.; Elklit, A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Acute stress disorder (ASD) was introduced into the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) to identify posttraumatic stress reactions occurring within the first month after a trauma and thus help...... for the ASD diagnosis in the pending DSM-5, there is a profound need for empirical studies that investigate the latent structure of ASD prior to the DSM-5 being finalized. DESIGN: Based on previous factor analytic research, the DSM-IV, and the proposed DSM-5 formulation of ASD, four different models...... of the latent structure of ASD were specified and estimated. METHOD: The analyses were based on a national study of bank robbery victims (N = 450) using the acute stress disorder scale. RESULTS: The results of the confirmatory factor analyses showed that the DSM-IV model provided the best fit to the data. Thus...

  6. Disordered eating behaviour is associated with blunted cortisol and cardiovascular reactions to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, Annie T; Phillips, Anna C; Higgs, Suzanne; Heaney, Jennifer L J; Carroll, Douglas

    2012-05-01

    Research suggests a potential dysregulation of the stress response in individuals with bulimia nervosa. This study measured both cardiovascular and cortisol reactions to a standardised laboratory stress task in individuals identified as showing disordered eating behaviour to determine whether dysregulation of the stress response is characteristic of the two branches of the stress response system. Female students (N=455) were screened using two validated eating disorder questionnaires. Twelve women with disordered eating, including self-induced vomiting, and 12 healthy controls were selected for laboratory stress testing. Salivary cortisol and cardiovascular activity, via Doppler imaging and semi-automatic blood pressure monitoring, were measured at resting baseline and during and after exposure to a 10-min mental arithmetic stress task. Compared to controls the disordered eating group showed blunted cortisol, cardiac output, heart rate, and stroke volume reactions to the acute stress, as well as an attenuated vasodilatory reaction. These effects could not be accounted for in terms of group differences in stress task performance, subjective task impact/engagement, age, BMI, neuroticism, cardio-respiratory fitness, or co-morbid exercise dependence. Our findings suggest that disordered eating is characterised by a dysregulation of the autonomic stress-response system. As such, they add further weight to the general contention that blunted stress reactivity is characteristic of a number of maladaptive behaviours and states.

  7. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-guo Jiang; Shi-li Jin; Gong-ying Li; Qing-qing Li; Zhi-ruo Li; Hong-xia Ma; Chuan-jun Zhuo; Rong-huan Jiang; Min-jie Ye

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry andin situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no signiifcant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our ifndings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  8. Work stress and workload of full-time anesthesiologists in acute care hospitals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kazuyoshi; Sekimoto, Miho; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2009-01-01

    The number of anesthesiologists per population in Japan is small compared with that in Europe and North America. While there is a growing concern that hard work causes anesthesiologists' fatigue and may compromise patient safety, the workload and physical stress, as well as the impact of staff support on physicians' stress have not been assessed in detail. The goal of this study was to evaluate the working environment, anesthesia workload, and occupational stress of anesthesiologists in Japan. A questionnaire survey was performed targeting 1010 members of the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists working as anesthesiologists affiliated with acute care hospitals in Japan. Data on background information, working environment, operation anesthesia duties, and stress were collected, and the relationship of work stress with background, environment, and anesthesia duties was evaluated by linear regression analysis. Responses were obtained from 383 full-time anesthesiologists (response rate, 43.9%). The total anesthesia time per week was 23.6 h on average. The work stress score was 114.3 +/- 30.2 (mean +/- SD) when the average workers' work stress score in Japan was 100. The work stress score was significantly associated with "years of experience" (with experience or = 20 years: beta = -0.15, P = 0.04), "hospital with > or = 500 beds" (with a hospital with stress" (beta = 0.21, P stress among anesthesiologists is related to workload and other factors.

  9. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-guo Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  10. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-Guo; Jin, Shi-Li; Li, Gong-Ying; Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Zhi-Ruo; Ma, Hong-Xia; Zhuo, Chuan-Jun; Jiang, Rong-Huan; Ye, Min-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no significant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our findings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  11. Repeated exposure to conditioned fear stress increases anxiety and delays sleep recovery following exposure to an acute traumatic stressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N Greenwood

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated stressor exposure can sensitize physiological responses to novel stressors and facilitate the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders including anxiety. Disruptions in diurnal rhythms of sleep-wake behavior accompany stress-related psychiatric disorders and could contribute to their development. Complex stressors that include fear-eliciting stimuli can be a component of repeated stress experienced by humans, but whether exposure to repeated fear can prime the development of anxiety and sleep disturbances is unknown. In the current study, adult male F344 rats were exposed to either control conditions or repeated contextual fear conditioning for 22 days followed by exposure to either no, mild (10, or severe (100 acute uncontrollable tail shock stress. Exposure to acute stress produced anxiety-like behavior as measured by a reduction in juvenile social exploration and exaggerated shock-elicited freezing in a novel context. Prior exposure to repeated fear enhanced anxiety-like behavior as measured by shock-elicited freezing, but did not alter social exploratory behavior. The potentiation of anxiety produced by prior repeated fear was temporary; exaggerated fear was present 1 day but not 4 days following acute stress. Interestingly, exposure to acute stress reduced REM and NREM sleep during the hours immediately following acute stress. This initial reduction in sleep was followed by robust REM rebound and diurnal rhythm flattening of sleep / wake behavior. Prior repeated fear extended the acute stress-induced REM and NREM sleep loss, impaired REM rebound, and prolonged the flattening of the diurnal rhythm of NREM sleep following acute stressor exposure. These data suggest that impaired recovery of sleep / wake behavior following acute stress could contribute to the mechanisms by which a history of prior repeated stress increases vulnerability to subsequent novel stressors and stress-related disorders.

  12. Analysis on Interface Shear Stress of Thermally Insulated Ocean Pipelines Under Installation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shu-wang; TIAN Ying-hui; LIU Run; WANG Zhang-ling; WANG Jin-ying

    2006-01-01

    It has been proved that the thermally insulated ocean pipeline has advantages over the conventional pipe-in-pipe pipeline. The risk of using the thermally insulated pipeline is that the exterior layers covering the steel pipe may be pulled off if the shear stress on the interface induced by the pullout force from the tensioner is greater than the binding force between two neighboring layers during installation. This paper develops a procedure to calculate the shear stress on the interface. The binding force between two neighboring layers can be determined with full scale model tests. The safety of the thermally insulated pipe under installation can then be checked by comparison of the interface shear stress with the binding force.

  13. Prilimary result of temperature distribution and associated thermal stress in crust in Tianshui, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yao-wei; GAO An-tai; SHI Jin; SU He-jun

    2007-01-01

    The heat flow in crust and the thermal stress generated by the flow play a very important role in earthquake occurrence. Different crustal structure has different effect on heat distribution and associated thermal stress. In all of typical seismogenic crustal structure models, including the bulge of Moho surface, the deep-large fault in the mid-lower crust, low-velocity and high-conductive layer in the middle crust, and the typical crustal structure in mid-upper crust, the thermal stress produced by deep heat disturbance may move up to the mid-upper crust. This leads to upper brittle part of crust break and hence, strong earthquakes. This result is constructive in enhancing our understanding of the role of deep heat flow in curst in development of earthquake and its generation, as well as the generation mechanism of the shallow flowing fluid.

  14. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. This program evaluates the bond strength of yttria stabilized zirconia coatings with MCrAlY and Pt-Al bond coats utilizing diffraction and fluorescence methods.

  15. A Numerical Investigation of the Thermal Stresses of a Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pianko-Oprych

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A typical operating temperature of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is quite high above 750 °C and affects the thermomechanical behavior of the cell. Thermal stresses may cause microstructural instability and sub-critical cracking. Therefore, a joint analysis by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD and computational structural mechanics based on the finite element method (FEM was carried out to analyze thermal stresses in a planar SOFC and to predict potential failure locations in the cell. A full numerical model was based on the coupling of thermo-fluid model with the thermo-mechanical model. Based on a temperature distribution from the thermo-fluid model, stress distribution including the von Mises stress, shear stress as well as the operating principal stress were derived in the thermo-mechanical model. The FEM calculations were performed under different working conditions of the planar SOFC. The highest total stress was noticed at the lower operating voltage of 0.3 V, while the lowest total stress was determined at the voltage of 0.7 V. The obtained stress distributions allowed a better understanding of details of internal processes occurring within the SOFC and provided helpful guidance in the optimization of a new SOFC design.

  16. Thermal stress induced voids in nanoscale copper interconnects by in-situ TEM heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jin Ho

    Stress induced void formation in Cu interconnects, due to thermal stresses generated during the processing of semiconductors, is an increasing reliability issue in the semiconductor industry as Cu interconnects are being downscaled to follow the demand for faster chip speed. In this work, 1.8 micron and 180 nm wide Cu interconnects, fabricated by Freescale Semiconductors, were subjected to thermal cycles, in-situ in the TEM, to investigate the stress relaxation mechanisms as a function of interconnect linewidth. The experiments show that the 1.8 micron Cu interconnect lines relax the thermal stresses through dislocation nucleation and motion while the Cu interconnect 180 nm lines exhibit void formation. Void formation in 180 nm lines occurs predominantly at triple junctions where the Ta diffusion barrier meets a Cu grain boundary. In order to understand void formation in 180 nm lines, the grain orientation and local stresses are determined. In particular, Nanobeam Diffraction (NBD) in the TEM is used to obtain the diffraction pattern of each grain, from which the crystal orientation is evaluated by the ACT (Automated Crystallography for TEM) software. In addition, 2D Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations are performed using the Object Oriented Finite Modeling (OOF2) software to correlate grain orientation with local stresses, and consequently void formation. According to the experimental and simulation results obtained, void formation in 180nm Cu interconnects does not seem to be solely dependent on local stresses, but a combination of diffusion paths available, stress gradients and possibly the presence of defects. In addition, based on the in-situ TEM observations, void growth seems to occur through grain boundary and/or interfacial diffusion. However, in-situ STEM observations of fully opened voids post-failure show pileup of material at the Cu grain surfaces. This means that surface or interface diffusion is also very active during void growth in the presence

  17. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces, and implications for rock breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, J. L.; Byrne, S.; Le, J.-L.

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the macroscopic thermomechanical behavior of lunar boulders by modeling their response to diurnal thermal forcing. Our results reveal a bimodal, spatiotemporally-complex stress response. During sunrise, stresses occur in the boulders' interiors that are associated with large-scale temperature gradients developed due to overnight cooling. During sunset, stresses occur at the boulders' exteriors due to the cooling and contraction of the surface. Both kinds of stresses are on the order of 10 MPa in 1 m boulders and decrease for smaller diameters, suggesting that larger boulders break down more quickly. Boulders ≤ 30 cm exhibit a weak response to thermal forcing, suggesting a threshold below which crack propagation may not occur. Boulders of any size buried by regolith are shielded from thermal breakdown. As boulders increase in size (>1 m), stresses increase to several 10 s of MPa as the behavior of their surfaces approaches that of an infinite halfspace. As the thermal wave loses contact with the boulder interior, stresses become limited to the near-surface. This suggests that the survival time of a boulder is not only controlled by the amplitude of induced stress, but also by its diameter as compared to the diurnal skin depth. While stresses on the order of 10 MPa are enough to drive crack propagation in terrestrial environments, crack propagation rates in vacuum are not well constrained. We explore the relationship between boulder size, stress, and the direction of crack propagation, and discuss the implications for the relative breakdown rates and estimated lifetimes of boulders on airless body surfaces.

  18. Obesity-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced acute lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in diet-induced obese mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins, including protein kinase R-like ER kinase, inositol-requiring enzyme α, and activating transcription factor 6, in whole lung and in primary lung endothelial cells isolated from diet-induced obese mice. Furthermore, we found that primary lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of diet-induced obese mice, including an increase in expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and a decrease in expression of endothelial cell-cell junctional proteins. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole-lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation, indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in diet-induced obese mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium, leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the ER of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against acute respiratory distress syndrome in obese

  19. Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum buffers the effects of acute stress on innate immunity in house finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratto, Melanie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    When wild animals become infected, they still must cope with the rigors of daily life, and, thus, they still can be exposed to acute stressors. The suite of physiological responses to acute stress includes modifying the innate immune system, but infections can also cause similar changes. We examined the effects of an acute stressor (capture stress) on leukocyte abundance and bacteria-killing ability (BKA) in wild birds (house finches Haemorhous mexicanus) with and without a naturally occurring infection (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) to determine whether infection alters the typical immune response to stress. Birds were captured and bled within 3 min (baseline sample) and then held in paper bags for 2 h and bled again (stress sample). From blood smears made at both time points, we obtained estimates of total white blood cell (WBC) counts and relative numbers of each cell. We also measured BKA of plasma at both time points. In uninfected birds (n = 26), total WBC count decreased by 30% over time, while in infected birds (n = 9), it decreased by 6%. Relative numbers of heterophils did not change over time in uninfected birds but increased in infected birds. Combined with a reduction in lymphocyte numbers, this led to a threefold increase in heterophil-lymphocyte values in infected birds after the stressor, compared to a twofold increase in uninfected birds. There was a nonsignificant tendency for BKA to decline with stress in uninfected birds but not in diseased birds. Collectively, these results suggest that infections can buffer the negative effects of acute stress on innate immunity.

  20. Thermal-Induced Stress of Plasmonic Magnetic Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anh D.; Do, Nghia C.; Nga, Do T.

    2017-08-01

    We present theoretical calculations to interpret optical and mechanical properties of Ag@Fe3O4 nanoflowers. The microstructures and nature of optical peaks of nanoflowers are determined by means of the Mie theory associated with effective dielectric approximation and the experimental absorption spectrum. Under laser illumination, the thermal strain fields inside and outside the structure due to the absorbed optical energy are studied using continuum mechanics approach. Our findings provide simple but comprehensive description of the elastic behaviors of previous experiments.

  1. The effects of acute stress on episodic memory: A meta-analysis and integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Grant S; Sazma, Matthew A; McCullough, Andrew M; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2017-06-01

    A growing body of research has indicated that acute stress can critically impact memory. However, there are a number of inconsistencies in the literature, and important questions remain regarding the conditions under which stress effects emerge as well as basic questions about how stress impacts different phases of memory. In this meta-analysis, we examined 113 independent studies in humans with 6,216 participants that explored effects of stress on encoding, postencoding, retrieval, or postreactivation phases of episodic memory. The results indicated that when stress occurred prior to or during encoding it impaired memory, unless both the delay between the stressor and encoding was very short and the study materials were directly related to the stressor, in which case stress improved encoding. In contrast, postencoding stress improved memory unless the stressor occurred in a different physical context than the study materials. When stress occurred just prior to or during retrieval, memory was impaired, and these effects were larger for emotionally valenced materials than neutral materials. Although stress consistently increased cortisol, the magnitude of the cortisol response was not related to the effects of stress on memory. Nonetheless, the effects of stress on memory were generally reduced in magnitude for women taking hormonal contraceptives. These analyses indicate that stress disrupts some episodic memory processes while enhancing others, and that the effects of stress are modulated by a number of critical factors. These results provide important constraints on current theories of stress and memory, and point to new questions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Thermal Stresses in an Anisotropic Thin Plate Subjected to Moving Plane Heat Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak Naji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to numerically simulate the plane moving heat source through anisotropic mild steal thin plate. Heat conduction problems in anisotropic material, where the thermal conductivity varies with direction and involving a moving heat source have several industrial applications, such like metal cutting, flame or laser hardening of metals, welding and others. The parabolic heat conduction model is used for the prediction of the temperature history. The temperature distribution inside the plate is determined from the solution of heat equation. Thus, the heat equation is solved numerically using finite deference method and the temperature distributions are determined. The thermal stresses in this case are, also, investigated and computed numerically. It is found that the thermal conductivity ratio affect in both temperature and thermal stresses distributions, in additional to the speed and heat source intensity.

  3. Post-stress rumination predicts HPA axis responses to repeated acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianferante, Danielle; Thoma, Myriam V; Hanlin, Luke; Chen, Xuejie; Breines, Juliana G; Zoccola, Peggy M; Rohleder, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    Failure of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to habituate to repeated stress exposure is related with adverse health outcomes, but our knowledge of predictors of non-habituation is limited. Rumination, defined as repetitive and unwanted past-centered negative thinking, is related with exaggerated HPA axis stress responses and poor health outcomes. The aim of this study was to test whether post-stress rumination was related with non-habituation of cortisol to repeated stress exposure. Twenty-seven participants (n=13 females) were exposed to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) twice on consecutive afternoons. Post-stress rumination was measured after the first TSST, and HPA axis responses were assessed by measuring salivary cortisol 1 min before, and 1, 10, 20, 60, and 120 min after both TSSTs. Stress exposure induced HPA axis activation on both days, and this activation showed habituation indicated by lower responses to the second TSST (F=3.7, p=0.015). Post-stress rumination after the first TSST was associated with greater cortisol reactivity after the initial stress test (r=0.45, pHPA axis responses. This finding implicates rumination as one possible mechanism mediating maladaptive stress response patterns, and it might also offer a pathway through which rumination might lead to negative health outcomes.

  4. [Effect of melatonin on antioxidant enzyme activities in blood erythrocytes of rats during acute emotional stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsov, S S; Kalinichenko, L S; Koplik, E V; Nagler, L G; Alinkina, E S; Kozachenko, A I

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the epiphyseal hormone melatonin on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) was studied in peripheral blood erythrocytes of behaviorally passive and active Wistar rats. Acute emotional stress was modeled by immobilization of animals for1 h with simultaneous electrocutaneous stimulation. Basal activity of antioxidant glutathione enzymes in erythrocytes of behaviorally passive rats was higher than that in active animals. Administration of melatonin (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was accompanied by a decrease in the activity of GPx and GR in erythrocytes from non-stressed passive animals. After experimental stress, passive rats demonstrated a significant increase in the activity of Cu/Zn-SOD and GPx in peripheral blood erythrocytes. The absence of stress-induced changes in functional activity of antioxidant defense enzymes in the blood of behaviorally active animals suggests a relatively constant oxidative status of tissues in these animals under stress conditions. Melatonin administration had little effect on stress-induced changes in functional activity of the erythrocyte antioxidant system in passive rats. Active specimens pretreated with melatonin before stress exposure were characterized by activation of study antioxidant enzymes. Quantitative parameters of the erythrocyte antioxidant defense enzymes did not differ in behaviorally active and passive rats subjected to experimental stress after melatonin injection. Thus, exogenous melatonin abolishes differences in the activity of study antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes of animals with different behavioral parameters under basal conditions and after experimental stress. In passive rats melatonin mainly reduced the initial tension of oxidative processes. By contrast, administration of this hormone to active specimens is followed by an increase in functional activity of the antioxidant enzyme system under

  5. Thermal stress analysis of ceramic structures with NASTRAN isoparametric solid elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberson, S. E.; Paul, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of the NASTRAN level 16.0, twenty node, isoparametric bricks (CIHEX2) at thermal loading was studied. A free ceramic plate was modelled using twenty node bricks of varying thicknesses. The thermal loading for this problem was uniform over the surface with an extremely large gradient through the thickness. No mechanical loading was considered. Temperature-dependent mechanical properties were considered in this analysis. The NASTRAN results were compared to one dimensional stress distributions calculated by direct numerical integration.

  6. Inclusion of Thermal Protection Systems in Spacecraft Thermal-Stress Analysis using Concurrent Engineering Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Steven L.

    2002-07-01

    Creating compatible thermal and structural mathematical models is complicated by the different meshing requirements of the thermal and structural disciplines. Often times, the structural model is of significantly higher fidelity requiring the thermal model to grow to an intractable size if full compatibility is to be assured. Given that the structural finite element mesh can be transformed into a thermal model, the network description remains incomplete until the appropriate thermal protection system (TPS) features are added. For entry heating studies, a high fidelity TPS mesh is required to accurately predict structural temperatures. Additionally, local pressure, temperature and heating variations further complicate the analysis. A technique for the efficient extraction of thermal protection system thickness data from CAD geometry is presented. The technique allows for application of complicated TPS cross-sections consisting of different materials and permits local pressure and heating rate variations. The resulting process has been successfully demonstrated on the X-38 crew return vehicle configuration and serves as a prototype for concurrent engineering techniques using a combination of custom and commercial software tools.

  7. Waste Package Outer Barrier Stress Due to Thermal Expansion with Various Barrier Gap Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Lewis

    2001-11-27

    The objective of this activity is to determine the tangential stresses of the outer shell, due to uneven thermal expansion of the inner and outer shells of the current waste package (WP) designs. Based on the results of the calculation ''Waste Package Barrier Stresses Due to Thermal Expansion'', CAL-EBS-ME-000008 (ref. 10), only tangential stresses are considered for this calculation. The tangential stresses are significantly larger than the radial stresses associated with thermal expansion, and at the WP outer surface the radial stresses are equal to zero. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the tangential stresses the waste package outer shell is subject to due to the interference fit, produced by having two different shell coefficients of thermal expansions. The inner shell has a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than the outer shell, producing a pressure between the two shells. This calculation is associated with Waste Package Project. The calculations are performed for the 21-PWR (pressurized water reactor), 44-BWR (boiling water reactor), 24-BWR, 12-PWR Long, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF - Short (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel), 2-MCO/2-DHLW (multi-canister overpack), and Naval SNF Long WP designs. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the types of WPs considered in this calculation. This calculation is performed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for SR (Ref.7). The calculation is documented, reviewed, and approved in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref.1).

  8. Transcriptional response of two core photosystem genes in Symbiodinium spp. exposed to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P McGinley

    Full Text Available Mutualistic symbioses between scleractinian corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium spp. are the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. For many coral-algal symbioses, prolonged episodes of thermal stress damage the symbiont's photosynthetic capability, resulting in its expulsion from the host. Despite the link between photosynthetic competency and symbiont expulsion, little is known about the effect of thermal stress on the expression of photosystem genes in Symbiodinium. This study used real-time PCR to monitor the transcript abundance of two important photosynthetic reaction center genes, psbA (encoding the D1 protein of photosystem II and psaA (encoding the P(700 protein of photosystem I, in four cultured isolates (representing ITS2-types A13, A20, B1, and F2 and two in hospite Symbiodinium spp. within the coral Pocillopora spp. (ITS2-types C1b-c and D1. Both cultured and in hospite Symbiodinium samples were exposed to elevated temperatures (32°C over a 7-day period and examined for changes in photochemistry and transcript abundance. Symbiodinium A13 and C1b-c (both thermally sensitive demonstrated significant declines in both psbA and psaA during the thermal stress treatment, whereas the transcript levels of the other Symbiodinium types remained stable. The downregulation of both core photosystem genes could be the result of several different physiological mechanisms, but may ultimately limit repair rates of photosynthetic proteins, rendering some Symbiodinium spp. especially susceptible to thermal stress.

  9. Thermal stress response of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) aeroshell material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, I. M.; Hulbert, L. E.; Luce, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal stress test was conducted to determine the ability of the GPHS aeroshell 3 D FWPF material to maintain physical integrity when exposed to a severe heat flux such as would occur from prompt reentry of GPHS modules. The test was performed in the Giant Planetary Facility at NASA's Ames Research Center. Good agreement was obtained between the theoretical and experimental results for both temperature and strain time histories. No physical damage was observed in the test specimen. These results provide initial corroboration both of the analysis techniques and that the GPHS reentry member will survive the reentry thermal stress levels expected.

  10. Laser cutting of Kevlar laminates and thermal stress formed at cutting sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.

    2012-02-01

    Laser cutting of Kevlar laminates is carried out and thermal stress field developed in the cutting region is predicted using the finite element code. Temperature predictions are validated through the thermocouple data. The morphological changes in the cutting section are examined by incorporating optical and scanning electron microscopes. It is found that temperature predictions agree well with the thermocouple data. High values of von Mises stress are observed at the cutting edges and at the mid-thickness of the Kevlar laminate due to thermal compression formed in this region. The laser cut edges are free from whiskers; however, striation formation and some small sideways burning is observed at the kerf edges.

  11. Measuring Thermal Stress of Dairy Cattle Based on Temperature Humidity Index (THI in Tropical Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort for workers is very important factor to increase their performance, as well as the comfort level of dairy cattle will influence in milk productivity. The purposes of the paper is to measure the level of heat stress and then use the information to design the dairy cattle house for increasing thermal comfort. The research is started with literature review of heat stress and early survey of environment condition e.g. temperature, wind speed and relative humidity. The next step is using the information to determine the temperature humidity index (THI level for dairy cattle with maximum THI = 86 and 84 (moderate stress. The 3D CAD model and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD simulation are employed to looking for solution for reducing the discomfort thermal of dairy cattle. A scenario (fan air conditioning to get better condition of thermal comfort have been successfully presented with final THI index = 76 and 78 (mild stress. Finally, the paper shows how to reduce heat stress of cattle house by installation 3 exhaust fans in tropical climate.

  12. Acute stress in adulthood impoverishes social choices and triggers aggressiveness in preclinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eNosjean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult C57BL/6J mice are known to exhibit high level of social flexibility while mice lacking the β2 subunit of nicotinic receptors (β2-/- mice present social rigidity. We asked ourselves what would be the consequences of a restraint acute stress (45 min on social interactions in adult mice of both genotypes, hence the contribution of neuronal nicotinic receptors in this process. We therefore dissected social interaction complexity of stressed and not stressed dyads of mice in a social interaction task. We also measured plasma corticosterone levels in our experimental conditions. We showed that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood reduced and disorganized social interaction complexity in both C57BL/6J and β2-/- mice. These stress-induced maladaptive social interactions involved alteration of distinct social categories and strategies in both genotypes, suggesting a dissociable impact of stress depending on the functioning of the cholinergic nicotinic system. In both genotypes, social behaviors under stress were coupled to aggressive reactions with no plasma corticosterone changes. Thus, aggressiveness appeared a general response independent of nicotinic function. We demonstrate here that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood is sufficient to impoverish social interactions: stress impaired social flexibility in C57BL/6J mice whereas it reinforced β2-/- mice behavioral rigidity.

  13. Shot Peening and Thermal Stress Relaxation in 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Enwei; Chen, Guoxing; Tan, Ziming; Wu, Shuhui

    2015-11-01

    Shot peening is an effective process to enhance the fatigue performance of turbine blades. In this study, the effect of peening pressures was discussed in terms of the residual stress distribution and the surface morphology. Shot peening processes were designed at varying pressures on a 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel. The profiles of hardness and residual stress were characterized in the cross section. The thermal stress relaxation was further carried out to evaluate the stability of the compressive residual stress under service temperatures of turbine blades. Results show that a maximum stress depth is obtained with peening pressure of 0.40 MPa, and the residual stress can be maintained up to 400 °C, which ensures the service in low-pressure turbine blades.

  14. The behavioural, cognitive, and neural corollaries of blunted cardiovascular and cortisol reactions to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Douglas; Ginty, Annie T; Whittaker, Anna C; Lovallo, William R; de Rooij, Susanne R

    2017-02-27

    Recent research shows that blunted cardiovascular and cortisol reactions to acute psychological stress are associated with adverse behavioural and health outcomes: depression, obesity, bulimia, and addictions. These outcomes may reflect suboptimal functioning of the brain's fronto-limbic systems that are needed to regulate motivated behaviour in the face of challenge. In support of this, brain imaging data demonstrate fronto-limbic hypoactivation during acute stress exposure. Those demonstrating blunted reactions also show impairments of motivation, including lower cognitive ability, more rapid cognitive decline, and poorer performance on motivation-dependent tests of lung function. Persons exhibiting blunted stress reactivity display well established temperament characteristics, including neuroticism and impulsivity, characteristic of various behavioural disorders. Notably, the outcomes related to blunted stress reactivity are similar to those that define Reward Deficiency Syndrome. Accordingly, some individuals may be characterised by a broad failure in cardiovascular and cortisol responding to both stress and reward, reflecting fronto-limbic dysregulation. Finally, we proffer a model of blunted stress reactivity, its antecedents and sequelae, and identify future research priorities.

  15. Physiological parameters for thermal stress in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Calderaro Dalcin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to investigate changes in physiological parameters of dairy cows and understand which physiological parameters show greater reliability for verification of heat stress. Blood samples were collected for analysis and included hematocrit (Ht, erythrocyte count (ERY, and hemoglobin count (HEMO. In addition, physiological variables, including rectal temperature (RT, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, and panting score (PS were recorded in 38 lactating cows. These varied according to genetic group (1/2, 3/4, and pure bred Holstein (HO. Analysis of variance considering the effects of genetic group, days, and their interaction as well as linear and quadratic effect of the black globe humidity index (BGHI was performed, as well as broken-line regression. These values were higher in pure HO than in 3/4 and 1/2 groups. The average BGHI during the morning was 74, when 70, 43, and 13% of pure HO, 3/4, and 1/2, respectively, presented RR above reference value. The RR was the best indicator of heat stress and its critical value was 116 breaths/min for 1/2, 140 for 3/4, and 168 breaths/min for pure HO cows. In the HO group, physiological variables increased linearly with BGHI, without presenting inflection in the regression. The inflection point occurred at a higher BGHI for the 1/2 group compared with the other groups. Hematocrit and HEMO were different among genetic groups and did not vary with BGHI, showing that stress was not sufficient to alter these hematological parameters. The 1/2 HO group was capable of maintaining normal physiological parameters for at least 3 BGHI units above that of HO and 1 to 3 units higher than 3/4 HO for RR and RT, respectively. Respiratory rate is the physiological parameter that best predicts heat stress in dairy cattle, and the 1/2 Holstein group is the best adapted to heat stress.

  16. Influence of temperature in thermal and oxidative stress responses in estuarine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, D; Narciso, L; Cabral, H N; Vinagre, C; Diniz, M S

    2013-10-01

    The influence of increasing temperatures in thermal and oxidative stress responses were studied in the muscle of several estuarine fish species (Diplodus vulgaris, Diplodus sargus, Dicentrarchus labrax, Gobius niger and Liza ramada). Selected fish were collected in July at the Tagus estuary (24±0.9°C; salinity of 30±4‰; pH=8). Fish were subjected to a temperature increase of 1°C.h(-1) until they reached their Critical Thermal Maximum (CTMax), starting at 24°C (control temperature). Muscle samples were collected during the trial and results showed that oxidative stress biomarkers are highly sensitive to temperature. Results from stress oxidative enzymes show alterations with increasing temperature in all tested species. Catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) activity significantly increased in L. ramada, D. labrax and decreased in D. vulgaris. Glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) activity increased in L. ramada, D. sargus, D. vulgaris, and D. labrax. In G. niger it showed a cycle of increase-decrease. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) increased in L. ramada, D. sargus and D. labrax. With respect to correlation analysis (Pearson; Spearman r), the results showed that oxidation products and antioxidant defenses were correlated in L. ramada (LPO-CAT and LPO-GST, D. sargus (LPO-CAT), and D. labrax (LPO-CAT). Oxidative biomarkers were correlated with thermal stress biomarker (Hsp70) in L. ramada (CAT-Hsp70), D. vulgaris (LPO-Hsp70), D. labrax (GST-Hsp70) and G. niger (LPO-Hsp70). In conclusion, oxidative stress does occur with increasing temperatures and there seems to be a relation between thermal stress response and oxidative stress response. The results suggest that oxidative stress biomarkers should be applied with caution, particularly in field multi-species/multi-environment studies.

  17. Thermographic registration of thermal effects in plants exposed to cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovchavtcev A.P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In present paper the possibility of continuous measurement of thermal effects of plants by thermography was investigated. The problems of measurement precision decreasing and thermograph calibration to cold-restraint stress process temperature region was discussed. The possibility of fast temperature measurement of plants in cold-restraint stress process was investigated. The dead temperature region of winter wheat was find out.

  18. Thermal Stress Analysis of Laminated Composite Plates using Shear Flexible Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganapathi

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Using degree Centigrade shear flexible QUAD-9 plate element, stresses and deflections in composite laminated plates due to thermal loads analysed. A formulation based on first order shear deformation theory has been employed for the analysis. The effects of various parameters, such as ply-angle, number of layers, thickness and aspect ratios on stresses and deflections are brought out. The present formulation is being extended for studying composite shell structures.

  19. Thermal characteristics investigation of high voltage grounded gate-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Weifeng; Qian Qinsong; Wang Wen; Yi Yangbo, E-mail: swffrog@seu.edu.c [National ASIC System Engineering Research Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2009-10-15

    The thermal characteristics of high voltage gg-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions are investigated in detail based on the Sentaurus process and device simulators. The total heat and lattice temperature distributions along the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface under different stress conditions are presented and the physical mechanisms are discussed in detail. The influence of structure parameters on peak lattice temperature is also discussed, which is useful for designers to optimize the parameters of LDMSO for better ESD performance.

  20. Thermal characteristics investigation of high voltage grounded gate-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Weifeng; Qian Qinsong; Wang Wen; Yi Yangbo

    2009-01-01

    The thermal characteristics of high voltage gg-LDMOS under ESD stress conditions are investigated in detail based on the Sentaurus process and device simulators. The total heat and lattice temperature distributions along the Si-SiO_2 interface under different stress conditions are presented and the physical mechanisms are discussed in detail. The influence of structure parameters on peak lattice temperature is also discussed, which is useful for designers to optimize the parameters of LDMSO for better ESD performance.

  1. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi, E-mail: roudkenar@ibto.ir [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Halabian, Raheleh [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourani, Mohammad Reza [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masroori, Nasser [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Majid [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  2. Assessment of fructosamine concentrations in cats with acute and chronic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Fagundes Moraes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Fructosamine are glycated serum proteins that are formed continuously due to the reaction between glucose and circulating proteins, and corresponding to the blood glucose control assessment over the last one to two weeks in cats. The fructosamine concentration has been used for differentiation between persistent and transient hyperglycemia. Therefore, the determination of fructosamine is considered the gold standard for monitoring glycemia into control in diabetic cats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of acute and chronic stress of cats on serum fructosamine. 62 cats were selected from the Veterinary Hospital of FMVZ - UNESP, Botucatu campus. They were distributed into three groups: cats with a history of any illness or stress condition, excluding Diabetes Mellitus (DM, for a maximum of 48 hours (Group A, n = 21 or for a period exceeding 120 hours (Group B n = 27. The third group (Group C = control was formed by 14 health cats. The groups were evaluated for serum fructosamine, glucose, protein and albumin. In this study, there was a significant increase in the values of fructosamine in animals subjected to acute and chronic stress, but these values remained within the reference range. The animals were, on average, normoglycemic, despite the positive correlation between fructosamine and glucose concentrations. We conclude that the fructosamine concentration is influenced by acute and chronic stress in cats, remaining, however, within the reference range, and therefore, still useful in the diagnosis of DM.

  3. Transcriptome response to thermal stress in two key zooplankton species, Calanus finmarchicus and C. Glacialis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolina, I.; Kollias, S.; Møller, Eva Friis;

    dominated by C. glacialis. Temperature-mediated shifts in gene expression may be critical in thermal acclimation. Thus, in order to identify genes associated with thermal stress in Calanus spp. on a genome-wide scale, we conducted a whole transcriptome profiling using RNA-Seq. Samples of C. finmarchicus....... glacialis resulted in 4,894,166 and 3,412,784 reads respectively. Difference in the thermal responses of the two species is linked to acclimatory potential to ocean warming and possible changes in the marine communities....

  4. Depressive symptoms are associated with mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingkai Wei

    Full Text Available Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI, and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI.We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men age 38-60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task, and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS, obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores.There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30, p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56, p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress.Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological stress.

  5. Effects of thermal aging and stress triaxiality on PWSCC initiation susceptibility of nickel-based Alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Ji Hyun [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In present study, effects of thermal aging and triaxial stress were investigated in terms of primary water stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The thermal aging was applied via heat treatment at 400°C and triaxial stress was applied via notched tensile test specimen. The crack initiation time of each specimen were then measured by direct current potential drop method during slow strain rate test at primary water environment. Alloys with 10 years thermal aging exhibited the highest susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking and asreceived specimen shows lowest susceptibility. The trend was different with triaxial stress applied; 20 years thermal aging specimen shows highest susceptibility and as-received specimen shows lowest. It would be owing to change of precipitate morphology during thermal aging and different activated slip system in triaxial stress state.

  6. Elastoplastic analysis of process induced residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongxiong; Liang, Xiubing; Liu, Yan; Xu, Binshi

    2010-07-01

    The residual stresses induced from thermal spraying process have been extensively investigated in previous studies. However, most of such works were focused on the elastic deformation range. In this paper, an elastoplastic model for predicting the residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings was developed, in which two main contributions were considered, namely the deposition induced stress and that due to differential thermal contraction between the substrate and coating during cooling. The deposition induced stress was analyzed based on the assumption that the coating is formed layer-by-layer, and then a misfit strain is accommodated within the multilayer structure after the addition of each layer (plastic deformation is induced consequently). From a knowledge of specimen dimensions, processing temperatures, and material properties, residual stress distributions within the structure can be determined by implementing the model with a simple computer program. A case study for the plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY on Inconel 718 system was performed finally. Besides some similar phenomena observed from the present study as compared with previous elastic model reported in literature, the elastoplastic model also provides some interesting features for prediction of the residual stresses.

  7. Rockfall triggering by cyclic thermal stressing of exfoliation fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian; Stock, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Exfoliation of rock deteriorates cliffs through the formation and subsequent opening of fractures, which in turn can lead to potentially hazardous rockfalls. Although a number of mechanisms are known to trigger rockfalls, many rockfalls occur during periods when likely triggers such as precipitation, seismic activity and freezing conditions are absent. It has been suggested that these enigmatic rockfalls may occur due to solar heating of rock surfaces, which can cause outward expansion. Here we use data from 3.5 years of field monitoring of an exfoliating granite cliff in Yosemite National Park in California, USA, to assess the magnitude and temporal pattern of thermally induced rock deformation. From a thermodynamic analysis, we find that daily, seasonal and annual temperature variations are sufficient to drive cyclic and cumulative opening of fractures. Application of fracture theory suggests that these changes can lead to further fracture propagation and the consequent detachment of rock. Our data indicate that the warmest times of the day and year are particularly conducive to triggering rockfalls, and that cyclic thermal forcing may enhance the efficacy of other, more typical rockfall triggers.

  8. Rockfall triggering by cyclic thermal stressing of exfoliation fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Exfoliation of rock deteriorates cliffs through the formation and subsequent opening of fractures, which in turn can lead to potentially hazardous rockfalls. Although a number of mechanisms are known to trigger rockfalls, many rockfalls occur during periods when likely triggers such as precipitation, seismic activity and freezing conditions are absent. It has been suggested that these enigmatic rockfalls may occur due to solar heating of rock surfaces, which can cause outward expansion. Here we use data from 3.5 years of field monitoring of an exfoliating granite cliff in Yosemite National Park in California, USA, to assess the magnitude and temporal pattern of thermally induced rock deformation. From a thermodynamic analysis, we find that daily, seasonal and annual temperature variations are sufficient to drive cyclic and cumulative opening of fractures. Application of fracture theory suggests that these changes can lead to further fracture propagation and the consequent detachment of rock. Our data indicate that the warmest times of the day and year are particularly conducive to triggering rockfalls, and that cyclic thermal forcing may enhance the efficacy of other, more typical rockfall triggers.

  9. Mechanical spectroscopy of thermal stress relaxation in aluminium alloys reinforced with short alumina fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreno-Morelli, E.; Schaller, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Genie Atomique; Urreta, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    The mechanical behaviour under low temperature thermal cycling of aluminium-based composites reinforced with short Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} SAFFIL fibres has been investigated by mechanical spectroscopy (mechanical loss and elastic shear modulus measurements). A mechanical loss maximum has been observed during cooling which originates in the relaxation of thermal stresses at the interfaces due to the differential thermal expansion between matrix and reinforcement. The maximum height increases with the volumetric fibre content. In addition, if the matrix strength is increased by the appropriated choice of alloy and thermal treatment, the maximum diminishes and shifts to lower temperatures. No damage accumulation at the interfaces has been detected during long period thermal cycling in the range 100 to 500 K. A description of the damping behaviour is made in terms of the development of microplastic zones which surround the fibres. (orig.) 9 refs.

  10. Symptoms of Acute Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Patients With Acute Hand Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opsteegh, Lonneke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Postema, Klass; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in patients with hand injuries may delay return to work, even when criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV are not met. This study investigated which biomedical and psychosocial factors relate to symptoms of ac

  11. INFLUENCE OF ACUTE EXERCISE ON OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CHRONIC SMOKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Serdar

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The relative oxidative insult caused by exercise and smoking on biological systems are well documented, however, their cumulative influence needs to be clarified. In order to examine the collective effects of exercise and smoking on oxidant and antioxidant parameters, young male smokers (n=10 and non-smokers (n=10 made to perform a negative slope (10% cycling exercise for 30 minutes at individual load equivalent to 60% maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max. Pre- and post-exercise (post-ex haematocrit, haemoglobin, white blood cells, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA levels, protein carbonyl formation and non-HDL oxidation, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX activities, serum ceruloplasmin (CER and urinary cotinine concentrations were evaluated. Pre-ex CER and urinary cotinine concentrations of smokers were significantly higher (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively compared to that of non-smokers and pre-ex CER concentrations were significantly correlated with cotinine levels in all subjects (p<0.05. Significant (p<0.01 increases were observed in non-HDL oxidation following the exercise in both groups and the elevations were more pronounced in smokers. Pre-ex SOD and GPX activities were not different between the two groups, however post-ex enzyme activities were significantly reduced in smokers (p<0.05. MDA and protein carbonyl concentrations were not different between the two groups and there were not any significant changes due to exercise.In conclusion, according to the results of the present study, we suggest that erythrocyte antioxidants SOD and GPX and plasma non-HDL are more prone to the possible oxidant damage of acute physical exercise in chronic smokers.

  12. Coping with commitment: projected thermal stress on coral reefs under different future scenarios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D Donner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periods of anomalously warm ocean temperatures can lead to mass coral bleaching. Past studies have concluded that anthropogenic climate change may rapidly increase the frequency of these thermal stress events, leading to declines in coral cover, shifts in the composition of corals and other reef-dwelling organisms, and stress on the human populations who depend on coral reef ecosystems for food, income and shoreline protection. The ability of greenhouse gas mitigation to alter the near-term forecast for coral reefs is limited by the time lag between greenhouse gas emissions and the physical climate response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study uses observed sea surface temperatures and the results of global climate model forced with five different future emissions scenarios to evaluate the "committed warming" for coral reefs worldwide. The results show that the physical warming commitment from current accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could cause over half of the world's coral reefs to experience harmfully frequent (p> or =0.2 year(-1 thermal stress by 2080. An additional "societal" warming commitment, caused by the time required to shift from a business-as-usual emissions trajectory to a 550 ppm CO(2 stabilization trajectory, may cause over 80% of the world's coral reefs to experience harmfully frequent events by 2030. Thermal adaptation of 1.5 degrees C would delay the thermal stress forecast by 50-80 years. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that adaptation -- via biological mechanisms, coral community shifts and/or management interventions -- could provide time to change the trajectory of greenhouse gas emissions and possibly avoid the recurrence of harmfully frequent events at the majority (97% of the world's coral reefs this century. Without any thermal adaptation, atmospheric CO(2 concentrations may need to be stabilized below current levels to avoid the degradation of coral reef ecosystems

  13. Machine-Thermal Coupling Stresses Analysis of the Fin-Type Structural Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Yue, Hao; Chen, Dongbo; Qin, Delei; Chen, Zijian

    2017-02-01

    The design structure and heat-transfer mechanism of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) determine its body temperature state. Thermal stress and thermal deformation generated by the temperature variation directly affect the stress state of thermoelectric modules (TEMs). Therefore, the rated temperature and pressing force of TEMs are important parameters in TEG design. Here, the relationships between structural of a fin-type TEG (FTEG) and these parameters are studied by modeling and "machine-thermal" coupling simulation. An indirect calculation method is adopted in the coupling simulation. First, numerical heat transfer calculations of a three-dimensional FTEG model are conducted according to an orthogonal simulation table. The influences of structural parameters for heat transfer in the channel and outer fin temperature distribution are analyzed. The optimal structural parameters are obtained and used to simulate temperature field of the outer fins. Second, taking the thermal calculation results as the initial condition, the thermal-solid coupling calculation is adopted. The thermal stresses of outer fin, mechanical force of spring-angle pressing mechanism, and clamping force on a TEM are analyzed. The simulation results show that the heat transfer area of the inner fin and the physical parameters of the metal materials are the keys to determining the FTEG temperature field. The pressing mechanism's mechanical force can be reduced by reducing the outer fin angle. In addition, a corrugated cooling water pipe, which has cooling and spring functionality, is conducive to establishing an adaptable clamping force to avoid the TEMs being crushed by the thermal stresses in the body.

  14. Acute stress and working memory: The role of sex and cognitive stress appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandara, M; Garcia-Lluch, M; Pulopulos, M M; Hidalgo, V; Villada, C; Salvador, A

    2016-10-01

    Sex is considered a moderating factor in the relationship between stress and cognitive performance. However, sex differences and the impact of cognitive stress appraisal on working memory performance have not received much attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of physiological responses (heart rate and salivary cortisol) and cognitive stress appraisal in Working Memory (WM) performance in males and females. For this purpose, we subjected a comparable number of healthy young adult males (N=37) and females (N=45) to a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), and we evaluated WM performance before and after the stress task. Females performed better on attention and maintenance after the TSST, but males did not. Moreover, we found that attention and maintenance performance presented a negative relationship with cortisol reactivity in females, but not in males. Nevertheless, we observed that only the females who showed a cortisol decrease after the TSST performed better after the stress task, whereas females and males who showed an increase or no change in cortisol levels, and males who showed a cortisol decrease, did not change their performance over time. In females, we also found that the global indexes of cognitive stress appraisal and cognitive threat appraisal were negatively related to attention and maintenance performance, whereas the Self-concept of Own Competence was positively related to it. However, these relationships were not found in males. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hou, P.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  16. Early crisis intervention to patients with acute stress disorder in general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Hidehiro; Yamamoto, Kenji; Ichimura, Atsushi; Sato, Shinko; Teraoka, Naoko; Ozono, Hiroko; Kushino, Nobuhisa; Maruyama, Manabu; Matsumoto, Hideo; Yamazaki, Kosuke

    2003-04-01

    This report presents 2 patients who were diagnosed to have acute stress disorder (ASD), received early psychiatric intervention (crisis intervention as a short-term psychotherapy), and subsequently had good outcome. Encounter with an event that causes psychological trauma may induce post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the 2 patients described here have shown no particular mental symptoms for more than 2 years after the event and are leading normal lives. Psychological debriefing as a group used to be regarded as effective for the prevention of PTSD, but early identification of the stress-related disorder and intensive treatment of individual patients is recently considered to be more necessary. Both of the 2 patients presented here showed good outcome, and early crisis intervention in individual patients is suggested to be effective for the treatment of stress-related disorders and prevention of PTSD.

  17. Contrasting patterns of coral bleaching susceptibility in 2010 suggest an adaptive response to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Guest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral bleaching events vary in severity, however, to date, the hierarchy of susceptibility to bleaching among coral taxa has been consistent over a broad geographic range and among bleaching episodes. Here we examine the extent of spatial and temporal variation in thermal tolerance among scleractinian coral taxa and between locations during the 2010 thermally induced, large-scale bleaching event in South East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Surveys to estimate the bleaching and mortality indices of coral genera were carried out at three locations with contrasting thermal and bleaching histories. Despite the magnitude of thermal stress being similar among locations in 2010, there was a remarkable contrast in the patterns of bleaching susceptibility. Comparisons of bleaching susceptibility within coral taxa and among locations revealed no significant differences between locations with similar thermal histories, but significant differences between locations with contrasting thermal histories (Friedman = 34.97; p<0.001. Bleaching was much less severe at locations that bleached during 1998, that had greater historical temperature variability and lower rates of warming. Remarkably, Acropora and Pocillopora, taxa that are typically highly susceptible, although among the most susceptible in Pulau Weh (Sumatra, Indonesia where respectively, 94% and 87% of colonies died, were among the least susceptible in Singapore, where only 5% and 12% of colonies died. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pattern of susceptibility among coral genera documented here is unprecedented. A parsimonious explanation for these results is that coral populations that bleached during the last major warming event in 1998 have adapted and/or acclimatised to thermal stress. These data also lend support to the hypothesis that corals in regions subject to more variable temperature regimes are more resistant to thermal stress than those in less variable environments.

  18. Assessment of oxidative stress in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esfahani A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Many chemotherapeutic regimens used in the treatment of cancer generate free radicals that may be a part of their beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to assess the oxidative status in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML."n "nMethods: Thirty-eight patients with AML (17 female and 21 male patients with a mean age 34.05±12.49 years were included in the study. All the patients received cytarabine and daunorubicin as their standard induction therapy. Serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, and also the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured before and 14 days after chemotherapy."n "nResults: Plasma malondialdehyde concentrations increased significantly (from a former 2.68±0.89 nmol/ml to 3.14±1.29 nmol/ml 14 days post chemotherapy (p=0.04. Moreover, the total plasma antioxidant capacity changed from 1.09±0.15 mmol/L to 1.02±0.14 mmol/L (p=0.005. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity decreased over time from 1157.24±543.61 U/gHb to 984.01±419.09 U/gHb (p=0.04 and 46.96±13.70 U/gHb to 41.40±6.44 U/gHb (p=0.02, respectively."n "nConclusion: In this study, an increase in malondialdehyde levels and a decrease in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity were observed. It seems that chemotherapy by cytarabine and daunorubicin generates enormous amounts of free radicals in patients undergoing the treatment for AML. Use of antioxidant supplementation during chemotherapy i is discouraged as it may interfere with the generation of free radicals that may be a part of the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs.

  19. Analyses of thermal stress and fracture during cryopreservation of blood vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华泽钊; 徐红艳; 周国燕; 刘锦纷; 黄惠民; 丁文祥

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of fractures in the vessel wall has been a major problem for human blood vessel cryopreservation. The large volumetric expansion of water during crystallization produces great inner stresses. To solve these complicated heat transfer and thermal stress problems, a model and an analytic method are presented in this paper, with which transient temperature field, the transient stress field inside the blood vessels during freezing can be calculated and analyzed, and the probable cracks or fractures can be predicted. The analytic results of sheep thoracic artery are consistent with the experimental observations of fractures.

  20. Thermal Stress-Induced Birefringence in Borate Glass Irradiated by Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Ye; YU Bing-Kun; LU Bo; QIU Jian-Rong; YAN Xiao-Na; JIANG Xiong-Wei; ZHU Cong-Shan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Thermal stress-induced birefringence in borate glass which has been irradiated by 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses is observed under cross-polarized light. Due to the high temperature and pressure formed in the focal volume, the material at the edge of the micro-modified region is compressed between the expanding region and the unheated one, then stress emerges. Raman spectroscopy is used to investigate the stress distribution in the micro-modified region and indicates the redistributions of density and refractive index by Raman peak shift. We suggest that this technique can develop waveguide polarizers and Fresnel zone plates in integrated optics.

  1. Technological thermal stresses in the shrink fitting of cylindrical bodies with consideration of plastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dats, E. P.; Tkacheva, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a solution of a sequence of one-dimensional boundary-value problems of thermal stresses defining the elastic-plastic deformation processes used in the shrink fitting of cylindrical bodies. The initiation and development of plastic flow in the materials of the assembly elements are studied taking into account the temperature dependence of the yield stress of these materials. During temperature equalization, the flow can slow down, followed by unloading and formation of a residual stress field providing tension. The conditions of formation and motion of the boundaries of the elastic and plastic states in plastic flow and during unloading are determined.

  2. Cytokine profile of NALT during acute stress and its possible effect on IgA secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Meza, Juan Manuel; Jarillo-Luna, Rosa Adriana; Rivera-Aguilar, Victor; Miliar-García, Angel; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Stress stimuli affect the immune system responses that occur at mucosal membranes, particularly IgA secretion. It has been suggested that acute stress increases the levels of IgA and that sympathetic innervation plays an important role in this process. We herein explore in a murine model how acute stress affects the Th1/Th2/Treg cytokine balance in NALT, and the possible role of glucocorticoids in this effect. Nine-week-old male CD1 mice were divided into three groups: unstressed (control), stressed (subjected to 4h of immobilization), and stressed after pretreatment with a single dose of the corticosterone receptor antagonist RU-486. The parameters evaluated included plasma corticosterone and epinephrine, IgA levels in nasal fluid (by ELISA), the percentage of CD19(+)B220(+)IgA(+) lymphocytes and CD138(+)IgA(+) plasma cells, and the mRNA expression of heavy α chain, J chain and pIgR. Moreover, the gene and protein expression of Th1 cytokines (TNFα, IL-2 and INF-γ), Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5) and Treg cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ) were determined in nasal mucosa. The results show that acute stress generated a shift towards the dominance of an anti-inflammatory immune response (Th2 and Treg cytokines), evidenced by a significant rise in the amount of T cells that produce IL4, IL-5 and IL-10. This immune environment may favor IgA biosynthesis by CD138(+)IgA(+) plasma cells, a process mediated mostly by glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Superoxide radical production in chicken skeletal muscle induced by acute heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, A; Yoshiki, Y; Akiba, Y; Toyomizu, M

    2005-02-01

    Heat stress is of major concern for poultry, especially in the hot regions of the world because of the resulting poor growth performance, immunosuppression, and high mortality. To assess superoxide (O2*-) production in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of chickens (n = 4 to 8) exposed to acute heat stress, electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap agent and lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence (LDCL) method were applied. ESR spectra of suspensions containing mitochondria from control and acute heat-treated meat-type chickens showed similar hyperfine coupling constants (aN = 1.44 mT, aHbeta = 0.12 mT, and aHbeta = 0.11 mT) to those of DMPO-O2*- adducts observed in a hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system. Heat exposure resulted in enhancement of the DMPO-O2*- signal. The results using LDCL showed significantly enhanced superoxide production in heat stress-treated skeletal muscle mitochondria of meat-type chickens, whereas no such increase was observed in laying chickens. The enhancement of superoxide production in the former case was associated with heat-induced increments in rectal and muscle temperatures, leading to significant body weight loss. In contrast, the latter case showed no increase in temperatures, although there was a slight decrease in body weight gain. Percentage increases of superoxide production in the presence of carboxyatractylate, a specific inhibitor of adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), were the same for skeletal muscle mitochondria from meat- and laying-type chickens from the control or heat stress-treated group. This finding suggests the irrelevance of ANT in the regulation of reactive oxygen species flux under heat stress conditions. The study provides the first evidence of superoxide anion production in the skeletal muscle mitochondria of meat-type chickens in response to acute heat stress.

  4. Sleep quality but not sleep quantity effects on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Sarah M; Lupis, Sarah B; Gianferante, Danielle; Rohleder, Nicolas; Wolf, Jutta M

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-documented deleterious health effects, poor sleep has become a serious public health concern and increasing efforts are directed toward understanding underlying pathways. One potential mechanism may be stress and its biological correlates; however, studies investigating the effects of poor sleep on a body's capacity to deal with challenges are lacking. The current study thus aimed at testing the effects of sleep quality and quantity on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress. A total of 73 college-aged adults (44 females) were investigated. Self-reported sleep behavior was assessed via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and salivary cortisol responses to the Trier Social Stress Test were measured. In terms of sleep quality, we found a significant three-way interaction, such that relative to bad sleep quality, men who reported fairly good or very good sleep quality showed blunted or exaggerated cortisol responses, respectively, while women's stress responses were less dependent on their self-reported sleep quality. Contrarily, average sleep duration did not appear to impact cortisol stress responses. Lastly, participants who reported daytime dysfunctions (i.e. having trouble staying awake or keeping up enthusiasm) also showed a trend to blunted cortisol stress responses compared to participants who did not experience these types of daytime dysfunctions. Overall, the current study suggests gender-specific stress reactivity dysfunctions as one mechanism linking poor sleep with detrimental physical health outcomes. Furthermore, the observed differential sleep effects may indicate that while the body may be unable to maintain normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal functioning in an acute psychosocial stress situation after falling prey to low sleep quality, it may retain capacities to deal with challenges during extended times of sleep deprivation.

  5. Acute physiological stress promotes clustering of synaptic markers and alters spine morphology in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Sebastian

    Full Text Available GluA2-containing AMPA receptors and their association with protein kinase M zeta (PKMζ and post-synaptic density-95 (PSD-95 are important for learning, memory and synaptic plasticity processes. Here we investigated these synaptic markers in the context of an acute 1h platform stress, which can disrupt spatial memory retrieval for a short-term memory on the object placement task and long-term memory retrieval on a well-learned radial arm maze task. Acute stress increased serum corticosterone and elevated the expression of synaptic PKMζ while decreasing synaptic GluA2. Using co-immunoprecipitation, we found that this stressor promotes the clustering of GluA2, PKMζ and PSD-95, which is consistent with effects reported from overexpression of PKMζ in cell culture. Because PKMζ overexpression has also been shown to induce spine maturation in culture, we examined how stress impacts synaptic markers within changing spines across various hippocampal subfields. To achieve this, we employed a new technique combining Golgi staining and immmunohistochemistry to perform 3D reconstruction of tertiary dendrites, which can be analyzed for differences in spine types and the colocalization of synaptic markers within these spines. In CA1, stress increased the densities of long-thin and mushroom spines and the colocalization of GluA2/PSD-95 within these spines. Conversely, in CA3, stress decreased the densities of filopodia and stubby spines, with a concomitant reduction in the colocalization of GluA2/PSD-95 within these spines. In the outer molecular layer (OML of the dentate gyrus (DG, stress increased both stubby and long-thin spines, together with greater GluA2/PSD-95 colocalization. These data reflect the rapid effects of stress on inducing morphological changes within specific hippocampal subfields, highlighting a potential mechanism by which stress can modulate memory consolidation and retrieval.

  6. The impact of acute psychosocial stress on magnetoencephalographic correlates of emotional attention and exogenous visual attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludger Elling

    Full Text Available Stress-induced acute activation of the cerebral catecholaminergic systems has often been found in rodents. However, little is known regarding the consequences of this activation on higher cognitive functions in humans. Theoretical inferences would suggest increased distractibility in the sense of increased exogenous attention and emotional attention. The present study investigated the influence of acute stress responses on magnetoencephalographic (MEG correlates of visual attention. Healthy male subjects were presented emotional and neutral pictures in three subsequent MEG recording sessions after being exposed to a TSST-like social stressor, intended to trigger a HPA-response. The subjects anticipation of another follow-up stressor was designed to sustain the short-lived central catecholaminergic stress reactions throughout the ongoing MEG recordings. The heart rate indicates a stable level of anticipatory stress during this time span, subsequent cortisol concentrations and self-report measures of stress were increased. With regard to the MEG correlates of attentional functions, we found that the N1m amplitude remained constantly elevated during stressor anticipation. The magnetic early posterior negativity (EPNm was present but, surprisingly, was not at all modulated during stressor anticipation. This suggests that a general increase of the influence of exogenous attention but no specific effect regarding emotional attention in this time interval. Regarding the time course of the effects, an influence of the HPA on these MEG correlates of attention seems less likely. An influence of cerebral catecholaminergic systems is plausible, but not definite.

  7. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-12-20

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis.

  8. Effect of non-homogenous thermal stress during sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadura, N.; Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Subramaniam, R.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-03-01

    Pathogens could be inactivated via a light source coupled with a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). This project studied the effect of non-homogenous substrate on cell colony. The non-homogeneity could be controlled by iron oxide nano-particles doping in porous glassy substrates such that each cell would experience tens of hot spots when illuminated with additional light source. The substrate non-homogeneity was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure at Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source. Microscopy images of cell motion were used to study the motility. Laboratory cell colonies on non-homogenous substrates exhibit reduced motility similar to those observed with sub-lethal PCAT treatment. Such motility reduction on non-homogenous substrate is interpreted as the presence of thermal stress. The studied pathogens included E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Non-pathogenic microbes Bacillus subtilis was also studied for comparison. The results show that sub-lethal PACT could be effective with additional non-homogenous thermal stress. The use of non-uniform illumination on a homogeneous substrate to create thermal stress in sub-micron length scale is discussed via light correlation in propagation through random medium. Extension to sub-lethal PACT application complemented with thermal stress would be an appropriate application.

  9. Pipeline design and thermal stress analysis of a 10kW@20K helium refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D.; Gong, L. H.; Xu, P.; Liu, H. M.; Li, L. F.; Xu, X. D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on the devices and pipeline in the horizontal cryogenic cold-box of a 10kW@20K helium refrigerator developed by Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Four devices, six valves, supporting components and pipe lines are positioned in the cold-box. At operating state, the temperature of these devices and pipeline is far below the room temperature, and the lowest temperature is 14K. Due to different material and temperature, the shrinkage of devices and pipes is different. Finite element analysis software SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION was used to numerically simulate the thermal stress and deformation. The results show that the thermal stress of pipe A is a little large. So we should change the pipe route or use a bellows expansion joint. Bellows expansion joints should also be used in the pipes connected to three of the six valves to protect them by decreasing the deformation. At last, the effect of diameter, thickness and bend radius on the thermal stress was analyzed. The results show that the thermal stress of the pipes increases with the increase of the diameter and the decrease of the bend radius.

  10. Thermal stress analysis method considering geometric effect of risers in sand mold casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Y Kwak; HY Hwang; C Cho

    2014-01-01

    Solidification and fluid flow analysis using computer simulation is a current common practice. There is also a high demand for thermal stress analysis in the casting process because casting engineers want to control the defects related to thermal stresses, such as large deformation and crack generation during casting. The riser system is an essential part of preventing the shrinkage defects in the casting process, and it has a great influence on thermal phenomena. The analysis domain is dramatical y expanded by attaching the riser system to a casting product due to its large volume, and it makes FEM mesh generation difficult. However, it is difficult to study and solve the above proposed problem caused by riser system using traditional analysis methods which use single numerical method such as FEM or FDM. In this paper, some research information is presented on the effects of the riser system on thermal stress analysis using a FDM/FEM hybrid method in the casting process simulation. The results show the optimal conditions for stress analysis of the riser model in order to save computation time and memory resources.

  11. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stresses of large-sized castings in solidification processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    When heavy machines and large scaled receiver system of communication equipment are manufactured, it always needs to produce large- sized steel castings, aluminum castings and etc. Some defects of hot cracking by thermal stress often appear during solidification process as these castings are produced, which results in failure of castings.Therefore predicting the effects of technological parameters for production of castings on the thermal stress during solidification process becomes an important means. In this paper, the mathematical models have been established and numerical calculation of temperature fields by using finite difference method (FDM) and then thermal stress fields by using finite element method (FEM) during solidification process of castings have been carried out. The technological parameters of production have been optimized by the results of calculation and the defects of hot cracking have been eliminated. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stress during solidification processes of large-sized castings provided a scientific basis, which promoted further development of advanced manufacturing technique.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Jia, Fu-Xian; Tian, Chuan-Bei; Tian, Yi; Smagghe, Guy; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental variables affecting growth, reproduction and distribution of insects. The rise of comparative proteomics provides a powerful tool to explore the response in proteins to thermal stress. As an important worldwide pest, the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis causes severe economic losses to crops. To understand the response of B. dorsalis to thermal stress, we performed a comparative proteome analysis of this insect after exposure to extreme low and high temperatures using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Among the separated proteins, 51 diverse protein spots were present differently in response to extreme temperatures. Using tandem mass spectrometry sequencing analysis 39 proteins were successfully identified, which included 13 oxidoreductases, 10 binding proteins, 5 transferases, and 2 each of lyases, isomerases, ligases, and developmental proteins. Subsequently, the expression of these protein transcripts was studied by RT-qPCR to validate the proteomic results. In conclusion, this study provides a first look into the thermal stress response of B. dorsalis at the protein level, and thus it paves the way for further functional studies in the physiological mechanism related to thermal stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolite profiling of symbiont and host during thermal stress and bleaching in the coral Acropora aspera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Katie E.; Dias, Daniel A.; Lutz, Adrian; Wilkinson, Shaun P.; Roessner, Ute; Davy, Simon K.

    2017-03-01

    Rising seawater temperatures pose a significant threat to the persistence of coral reefs. Despite the importance of these systems, major gaps remain in our understanding of how thermal stress and bleaching affect the metabolic networks that underpin holobiont function. We applied gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics to detect changes in the intracellular free metabolite pools (polar and semi-polar compounds) of in hospite dinoflagellate symbionts and their coral hosts (and any associated microorganisms) during early- and late-stage thermal bleaching (a reduction of approximately 50 and 70% in symbiont density, respectively). We detected characteristic changes to the metabolite profiles of each symbiotic partner associated with individual cellular responses to thermal, oxidative and osmotic stress, which progressed with the severity of bleaching. Alterations were also indicative of changes to energy-generating and biosynthesis pathways in both partners, with a shift to the increased catabolism of lipid stores. Specifically, in symbiont intracellular metabolite pools, we observed accumulations of multiple free fatty acids, plus the chloroplast-associated antioxidant alpha-tocopherol. In the host, we detected a decline in the abundance of pools of multiple carbohydrates, amino acids and intermediates, in addition to the antioxidant ascorbate. These findings further our understanding of the metabolic changes that occur to symbiont and host (and its associated microorganisms) during thermal bleaching. These findings also provide further insight into the largely undescribed roles of free metabolite pools in cellular homeostasis, signalling and acclimation to thermal stress in the cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

  14. Immediate and long-term effects of meditation on acute stress reactivity, cognitive functions, and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Sharma, Ratna; Talwar, Anjana

    2012-01-01

    With the current globalization of the world's economy and demands for enhanced performance, stress is present universally. Life's stressful events and daily stresses cause both deleterious and cumulative effects on the human body. The practice of meditation might offer a way to relieve that stress. The research team intended to study the effects of meditation on stress-induced changes in physiological parameters, cognitive functions, intelligence, and emotional quotients. The research team conducted the study in two phases, with a month between them. Each participant served as his own control, and the first phase served as the control for the second phase. In phase 1, the research team studied the effects of a stressor (10 minutes playing a computer game) on participants' stress levels. In phase 2, the research team examined the effects of meditation on stress levels. The research team conducted the study in a lab setting at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India. The participants were 34 healthy, male volunteers who were students. To study the effects of long-term meditation on stress levels, intelligence, emotional quotients, and cognitive functions participants meditated daily for 1 month, between phases 1 and 2. To study the immediate effects of meditation on stress levels, participants meditated for 15 minutes after playing a computer game to induce stress. The research team measured galvanic skin response (GSR), heart rate (HR), and salivary cortisol and administered tests for the intelligence and emotional quotients (IQ and EQ), acute and perceived stress (AS and PS), and cognitive functions (ie, the Sternberg memory test [short-term memory] and the Stroop test [cognitive flexibility]). Using a pre-post study design, the team performed this testing (1) prior to the start of the study (baseline); (2) in phase 1, after induced stress; (3) in part 1 of phase 2, after 1 month of daily meditation, and (4) in part 2 of phase 2, after

  15. Acute exercise stress reveals cerebrovascular benefits associated with moderate gains in cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugniaux, Julien V; Marley, Christopher J; Hodson, Danielle A; New, Karl J; Bailey, Damian M

    2014-12-01

    Elevated cardiorespiratory fitness improves resting cerebral perfusion, although to what extent this is further amplified during acute exposure to exercise stress and the corresponding implications for cerebral oxygenation remain unknown. To examine this, we recruited 12 moderately active and 12 sedentary healthy males. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and prefrontal cortical oxyhemoglobin (cO(2)Hb) concentration were monitored continuously at rest and throughout an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Despite a subtle elevation in the maximal oxygen uptake (active: 52±9 ml/kg per minute versus sedentary: 33±5 ml/kg per minute, Pexercise. Collectively, these findings indicate that the long-term benefits associated with moderate increase in physical activity are not observed in the resting state and only become apparent when the cerebrovasculature is challenged by acute exertional stress. This has important clinical implications when assessing the true extent of cerebrovascular adaptation.

  16. Stronger cortisol response to acute psychosocial stress is correlated with larger decrease in temporal sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuxi Yao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As a fundamental dimension of cognition and behavior, time perception has been found to be sensitive to stress. However, how one’s time perception changes with responses to stress is still unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between stress-induced cortisol response and time perception. A group of 40 healthy young male adults performed a temporal bisection task before and after the Trier Social Stress Test for a stress condition. A control group of 27 male participants completed the same time perception task without stress induction. In the temporal bisection task, participants were first presented with short (400 ms and long (1,600 ms visual signals serving as anchor durations and then required to judge whether the intermediate probe durations were more similar to the short or the long anchor. The bisection point and Weber ratio were calculated and indicated the subjective duration and the temporal sensitivity, respectively. Data showed that participants in the stress group had significantly increased salivary cortisol levels, heart rates, and negative affects compared with those in the control group. The results did not show significant group differences for the subjective duration or the temporal sensitivity. However, the results showed a significant positive correlation between stress-induced cortisol responses and decreases in temporal sensitivity indexed by increases in the Weber ratio. This correlation was not observed for the control group. Changes in subjective duration indexed by temporal bisection points were not correlated with cortisol reactivity in both the groups. In conclusion, the present study found that although no significant change was observed in time perception after an acute stressor on the group-level comparison (i.e., stress vs. nonstress group, individuals with stronger cortisol responses to stress showed a larger decrease in temporal sensitivity. This finding may provide insight into the

  17. The dopaminergic response to acute stress in health and psychopathology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaessen, Thomas; Hernaus, Dennis; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse

    2015-09-01

    Previous work in animals has shown that dopamine (DA) in cortex and striatum plays an essential role in stress processing. For the first time, we systematically reviewed the in vivo evidence for DAergic stress processing in health and psychopathology in humans. All studies included (n studies=25, n observations=324) utilized DA D2/3 positron emission tomography and measured DAergic activity during an acute stress challenge. The evidence in healthy volunteers (HV) suggests that physiological, but not psychological, stress consistently increases striatal DA release. Instead, increased medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) DAergic activity in HV was observed during psychological stress. Across brain regions, stress-related DAergic activity was correlated with the physiological and psychological intensity of the stressor. The magnitude of stress-induced DA release was dependent on rearing conditions, personality traits and genetic variations in several SNPs. In psychopathology, preliminary evidence was found for stress-related dorsal striatal DAergic hyperactivity in psychosis spectrum and a blunted response in chronic cannabis use and pain-related disorders, but results were inconsistent. Physiological stress-induced DAergic activity in striatum in HV may reflect somatosensory properties of the stressor and readiness for active fight-or-flight behavior. DAergic activity in HV in the ventral striatum and mPFC may be more related to expectations about the stressor and threat evaluation, respectively. Future studies with increased sample size in HV and psychopathology assessing the functional relevance of stress-induced DAergic activity, the association between cortical and subcortical DAergic activity and the direct comparison of different stressors are necessary to conclusively elucidate the role of the DA system in the stress response.

  18. Effect of fiber distribution on residual thermal stress in titanium matrix composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马志军; 杨延清; 朱艳; 陈彦

    2004-01-01

    Residual thermal stresses (RTS) of SCS-6 SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb composite were analyzed by using finite element method (FEM). Three models of fiber array in the composite and the effect of fiber distance on the RTS were discussed. In all the three models compressive stress was found in the radial direction and tensile stress in the tangential direction. It is pointed out that, in real composite system, hexagonal fiber geometry is superior because the distribution and the magnitude of the residual stress are similar to those in single fiber model. In square fiber geometry, it is easier to make the matrix crack due to the larger residual tangential stress. RTS becomes very large and changes violently when the fiber distance is less than 15μm or so, therefore too high fiber volume is apt to result in matrix crack.

  19. Evaluation of Transverse Thermal Stresses in Composite Plates Based on First-Order Shear Deformation Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, R.; Noor, A. K.; Sparr, H.

    1998-01-01

    A postprocessing procedure is presented for the evaluation of the transverse thermal stresses in laminated plates. The analytical formulation is based on the first-order shear deformation theory and the plate is discretized by using a single-field displacement finite element model. The procedure is based on neglecting the derivatives of the in-plane forces and the twisting moments, as well as the mixed derivatives of the bending moments, with respect to the in-plane coordinates. The calculated transverse shear stiffnesses reflect the actual stacking sequence of the composite plate. The distributions of the transverse stresses through-the-thickness are evaluated by using only the transverse shear forces and the thermal effects resulting from the finite element analysis. The procedure is implemented into a postprocessing routine which can be easily incorporated into existing commercial finite element codes. Numerical results are presented for four- and ten-layer cross-ply laminates subjected to mechanical and thermal loads.

  20. Relationship between antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress in children with acute hepatitis A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Cemek; Semiha Dede; Fahri Bayiro(g)lu; Hüseyin (C)aksen; Fatma Cemek; Nihat Mert

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate in children with acute hepatitis A.According to our knowledge, there are no data about the blood levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, an indicator of oxidative stress) and nonenzymic antioxidants in children with acute hepatitis A.METHODS: Whole blood MDA and reduced glutathione (GSH), serum β-carotene, retinol, vitamin E and vitamin C levels were studied in 19 (10 females, 9 males)children with acute hepatitis A and in 29 (13 females, 16males) healthy control subjects.RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between patients and controls for all parameters (P <0.05). Lipid peroxidation marker MDA was significantly elevated (P < 0.001), while antioxidants β-carotene,retinol and GSH were significantly decreased (all P <0.001) in patients compared to healthy subjects. In addition, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid levels were significantly lower in patients when compared to age and sex matched controls (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, respectively).CONCLUSION: Our study shows that hepatitis A virus induces oxidative stress in childern with hepatitis A. This finding could be taken into consideration to improve the therapeutic approach in acute hepatitis A.

  1. Viscoelastic finite element stress analysis of the thermal compatibility of dental bilayer ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHoff, Paul H; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that viscoelastic finite element analyses can reliably predict the effect of geometry on maximum tensile stresses in bilayer screening tests that are used to determine thermal compatibility. Three-dimensional viscoelastic finite element models of a beam, cylinder, disk, sphere, central incisor crown, molar crown, and posterior three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD) were used to calculate residual stresses after simulated bench cooling. Four compatible and four incompatible systems were evaluated. The highest residual tensile stresses for all material combinations were associated with the three-unit FPD. Residual tensile stresses ranged from 5.4 MPa in the disk for a compatible combination to 262 MPa in the three-unit FPD for an incompatible system. Residual tensile stresses in the three-unit FPD ranged from 16.8 MPa to 44.0 MPa for the compatible systems and from 175 MPa to 262 MPa for the incompatible systems. Based on finite element calculations, it is predicted that all-ceramic dental prostheses with an average thermal contraction mismatch (500 degrees C to 25 degrees C) greater than +/- 1.0 ppm/K will likely exhibit a relatively high percentage of failures in clinical use compared with systems having smaller thermal contraction mismatch between core and veneering ceramics.

  2. Cross-Sectional Residual Stresses in Thermal Spray Coatings Measured by Moiré Interferometry and Nanoindentation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianguo; Xie, Huimin; Hu, Zhenxing; Chen, Pengwan; Zhang, Qingming

    2012-09-01

    A plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) was deposited on a stainless steel substrate. The residual stresses were firstly measured by moiré interferometry combined with a cutting relaxation method. The fringe patterns in the cross-section of the specimen clearly demonstrate the deformation caused by the residual stress in thermal spray coatings. However, restricted by the sensitivity of moiré interferometry, there are few fringes in the top coat, and large errors may exist in evaluating the residual stress in the top coat. Then, the nanoindentation technique was used to estimate the residual stresses across the coating thickness. The stress/depth profile shows that the process-induced stresses after thermal spray are compressive in the top coat and a tendency to a more compressive state toward the interface. In addition, the stress gradient in the substrate is nonlinear, and tensile and compressive stresses appear simultaneously for self-equilibrium in the cross-section.

  3. Gene expression under thermal stress varies across a geographical range expansion front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Lesley T; Dudaniec, Rachael Y; Chauhan, Pallavi; Wellenreuther, Maren; Svensson, Erik I; Hansson, Bengt

    2016-03-01

    Many ectothermic species are currently expanding their distributions polewards due to anthropogenic global warming. Molecular genetic mechanisms facilitating range expansion under these conditions are largely unknown, but understanding these could help mitigate expanding pests and disease vectors, or help explain why some species fail to track changing climates. Here, using RNA-seq data, we examine genomewide changes in gene expression under heat and cold stress in the range-expanding damselfly Ischnura elegans in northern Europe. We find that both the number of genes involved and levels of gene expression under heat stress have become attenuated during the expansion, consistent with a previously reported release from selection on heat tolerances as species move polewards. Genes upregulated under cold stress differed between core and edge populations, corroborating previously reported rapid adaptation to cooler climates at the expansion front. Expression of sixty-nine genes exhibited a region x treatment effect; these were primarily upregulated in response to heat stress in core populations but in response to cold stress at the range edge, suggesting that some cellular responses originally adapted to heat stress may switch to cold-stress functionality upon encountering novel thermal selection regimes during range expansion. Transcriptional responses to thermal stress involving heat-shock and neural function genes were largely geographically conserved, while retrotransposon, regulatory, muscle function and defence gene expression patterns were more variable. Flexible mechanisms of cold-stress response and the ability of some genes to shift their function between heat and cold stress might be key mechanisms facilitating rapid poleward expansion in insects.

  4. Thermal vibration of a single-layered graphene with initial stress predicted by semiquantum molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng; Jiang, Jingnong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet (RSLGS) with initial stress is investigated by a semiquantum molecular dynamics (SQMD) method on the basis of modified Langevin dynamics. The quantum effect in the thermal vibration of RSLGS is accounted by introducing a quantum thermal bath. The spectrum of the thermal vibration of RSLGSs is obtained both by SQMD and classical molecular dynamics (CMD). The RSLGS vibrates with the same frequencies via both the SQMD simulation and the CMD simulation. The root of mean squared (rms) amplitude obtained via the CMD is greater than that obtained via the SQMD. The energy in high order mode is frozen at very low temperature if quantum effect is taken into consideration. An elastic plate model with initial stress considering quantum effects is established to describe the thermal vibration of the RSLGS. The rms amplitude of RSLGS calculated by plate model with the law of energy equipartition and that obtained from the CMD coincide very well. The plate model considering the quantum effects provides accurate prediction of the rms amplitude of the RSLGS obtained from the SQMD. These results indicate that quantum effects cannot be neglected in the thermal vibration of the RSLGS at low temperature case.

  5. The acute effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on oxidative stress in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simić Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oxidative stress and oxygen free radicals are thought to play an important role in acute effects of a number of neurotoxic processes. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy, a ring substituted amphetamine derivate, has attracted a great deal of media attention in recent years due to its widespread abuse as recreational drug by the young generation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on oxidative stress parameters (index of lipid peroxidation - ILP, superoxide radicals O2-, superoxide dismutase - SOD and glutathione - GSH in frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus in Wistar rats. Materials and methods The study included 40 male Wistar rats (200-250 g, housed 4 per cage having free access to food and water. MDMA was dissolved in distillated water and administered peroraly at 5, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg. 8 hours following MDMA, the rats were killed by decapitation, their brains were rapidly removed and the brain structures were dissected out on ice and analyzed biochemically. Results Acute peroral administration of a single dose (5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg resulted in increase of ILP, O2-, SOD and decrease of GSH. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study suggest that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity and that the mechanism of MDMA neurotoxycity may vary between brain regions.

  6. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ming Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI.

  7. Mucus sugar content shapes the bacterial community structure in thermally stressed Acropora muricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonny T.M. Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the chemical composition of a coral’s mucus can influence the associated bacterial community. However, information on this topic is rare, and non-existent for corals that are under thermal stress. This study therefore compared the carbohydrate composition of mucus in the coral Acropora muricata when subjected to increasing thermal stress from 26°C to 31°C, and determined whether this composition correlated with any changes in the bacterial community. Results showed that, at lower temperatures, the main components of mucus were N-acetyl glucosamine and C6 sugars, but these constituted a significantly lower proportion of the mucus in thermally-stressed corals. The change in the mucus composition coincided with a shift from a γ-Proteobacteria- to a Verrucomicrobiae- and α-Proteobacteria-dominated community in the coral mucus. Bacteria in the class Cyanobacteria also started to become prominent in the mucus when the coral was thermally stressed. The increase in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobiae at higher temperature was strongly associated with a change in the proportion of fucose, glucose and mannose in the mucus. Increase in the relative abundance of α-Proteobacteria were associated with GalNAc and glucose, while the drop in relative abundance of γ-Proteobacteria at high temperature coincided with changes in fucose and mannose. Cyanobacteria were highly associated with arabinose and xylose. Changes in mucus composition and the bacterial community in the mucus layer occurred at 29°C, which were prior to visual signs of coral bleaching at 31°C. A compositional change in the coral mucus, induced by thermal stress could therefore be a key factor leading to a shift in the associated bacterial community. This, in turn, has the potential to impact the physiological function of the coral holobiont.

  8. Adaptive bimaterial lattices to mitigate thermal expansion mismatch stresses in satellite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Marina M.; Steeves, Craig A.

    2015-08-01

    Earth-orbiting satellites regularly pass from sunlight to shade and back; these transitions are typically accompanied by significant temperature changes. When adjoining parts of a satellite that are made of different materials are subjected to large temperature changes, thermal mismatch stresses arise that are a function of the temperature change and the difference in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) between the two materials. These thermal stresses are linked to undesirable deformation and, through long-term cycling, fatigue and failure of the structure. This paper describes a type of anisotropic lattice that can serve as a stress-free adaptor between two materials, eliminating thermal mismatch stresses and their concomitant consequences. The lattices consist of planar nonidentical anisotropic bimaterial cells, each designed based on a virtual triangle. Physically the cells consist of a triangle made of material with higher CTE surrounded by a hexagon made of material with lower CTE. Different skew angles of the hexagon make a particular cell and the whole lattice anisotropic. The cells can be designed and combined in a lattice in such a way that one edge of the lattice has CTE that coincides with the CTE of the first part of the structure (substrate 1), while the other edge of the lattice has CTE equal to the CTE of the second part of the structure (substrate 2). If all joints between the parts of each cell, neighbouring cells, and the lattice and the substrates are pinned, the whole structure will be free of thermal stresses. This paper will discuss the fundamental principles governing such lattices, their refinement for special circumstances, and opportunities for improving the structural performance of the lattices. This will be presented coupled to a rational strategy for lattice design.

  9. Thermal Stress Analysis for a Transfer Line of Hydrogen Moderator in J-Parc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Teshigawara, M.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Maekawa, F.; Kato, T.

    2008-03-01

    An intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1-MW proton beam was constructed, as one of the main experimental facilities in J-PARC. In JSNS, supercritical hydrogen (1.5 MPa, 20 K) was selected as a moderator material. Three kinds of hydrogen moderator are installed (coupled, decoupled, and poisoned) to provide pulsed neutron beam with higher neutronic performance. The moderators contain cryogenic hydrogen transfer lines located in a radioactive area. Therefore, the transfer lines should be designed to have minimum pipe size and elbow-type bend sections to reduce the potential for radiation dose by radiation streaming. The design should also consider mechanical stress concentrations, deformation, and touching between the pipes due to the thermal shrinkage at the cryogenic hydrogen temperature. A FEM code analysis determined the appropriate locations of piping supporting spacers to keep the thermal stress below the allowable stress and to also avoid touching between the pipes.

  10. Correlation of predicted and measured thermal stresses on an advanced aircraft structure with dissimilar materials. [hypersonic heating simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Additional information was added to a growing data base from which estimates of finite element model complexities can be made with respect to thermal stress analysis. The manner in which temperatures were smeared to the finite element grid points was examined from the point of view of the impact on thermal stress calculations. The general comparison of calculated and measured thermal stresses is guite good and there is little doubt that the finite element approach provided by NASTRAN results in correct thermal stress calculations. Discrepancies did exist between measured and calculated values in the skin and the skin/frame junctures. The problems with predicting skin thermal stress were attributed to inadequate temperature inputs to the structural model rather than modeling insufficiencies. The discrepancies occurring at the skin/frame juncture were most likely due to insufficient modeling elements rather than temperature problems.

  11. Effect of Shouldering Angle on Distribution of Thermal Stress in Sapphire Single Crystal Growth Using Improved Kyropoulos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional model was established in the rectangular co-ordinate to study the thermal stress in the sapphire single crystal grown by the improved Kyropoulos. In the simulation, the distribution, the maximum and minimum values of the thermal stress were calculated. In addition, the relationship between the thermal stress and the shouldering angles was obtained that for lower shouldering angles, the maximum of the thermal stress value is lower and the minimum value is higher. It indicates that the distribution of the thermal stress can be improved by decreasing the shouldering angles of the crystal during the growth process. To evaluate the model, the experiment was carried out and the results are in good agreement with the calculation.

  12. Marble burying as a test of the delayed anxiogenic effects of acute immobilisation stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Sonal; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2014-08-15

    A majority of rodent studies characterizing the anxiogenic effects of stress have utilized exploration-based models, such as the elevated plus-maze. An alternative strategy has relied on ethologically natural behavior such as defensive burying. One such paradigm, marble burying, has proven to be an effective behavioral assay of the anxiolytic effects of pharmacological manipulations, and of genetically modified mouse models. Relatively little, however, is known about the sensitivity of this test in assessing the anxiogenic effects of stress. Most of the earlier reports have examined the immediate, but not more long-term, effects of pharmacological or environmental manipulations in mice. Hence, we used the marble burying test to examine if acute immobilization stress leads to enhanced anxiety-like behavior in C57Bl/6 mice if the test is employed with a significant time delay. We find this test to be sensitive enough to detect the anxiogenic effects even 10 days after a single episode of 2-h immobilization stress. Our results suggest that the marble burying test could serve as a useful behavioral paradigm for not only estimating the gradual progression of the anxiogenic impact of stress over time, but also raises the possibility of using the temporal delay after stress to test the potential efficacy of post-stress interventions with anxiolytic drugs.

  13. EFFECT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION ON ACUTE STRESS-RELATED GASTRIC MUCOSAL DAMAGE OF SERIOUSLY ILL PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵超; 肖文; 叶光福; 周建平; 周其璋

    2002-01-01

    Emergency endoscopy studies have shown that the most of seriously ill patients develop acute stress-related mucosal damage and ulceration within 24 hours of admission, which manifest the upper gastrointestinal tract

  14. Acute stress response and recovery after whiplash injuries. A one-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Alice; Bendix, Tom; Qerama, Erisela; Kasch, Helge; Bach, Flemming W; Korsholm, Lars; Jensen, Troels S

    2008-05-01

    Chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a major medical and psycho-social problem. The typical symptomatology presented in WAD is to some extent similar to symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. In this study we examined if the acute stress reaction following a whiplash injury predicted long-term sequelae. Participants with acute whiplash-associated symptoms after a motor vehicle accident were recruited from emergency units and general practitioners. The predictor variable was the sum score of the impact of event scale (IES) completed within 10 days after the accident. The main outcome-measures were neck pain and headache, neck disability, general health, and working ability one year after the accident. A total of 737 participants were included and completed the IES, and 668 (91%) participated in the 1-year follow-up. A baseline IES-score denoting a moderate to severe stress response was obtained by 13% of the participants. This was associated with increased risk of considerable persistent pain (OR=3.3; 1.8-5.9), neck disability (OR=3.2; 1.7-6.0), reduced working ability (OR=2.8; 1.6-4.9), and lowered self-reported general health one year after the accident. These associations were modified by baseline neck pain intensity. It was not possible to distinguish between participants who recovered and those who did not by means of the IES (AUC=0.6). In conclusion, the association between the acute stress reaction and persistent WAD suggests that post traumatic stress reaction may be important to consider in the early management of whiplash injury. However, the emotional response did not predict chronicity in individuals.

  15. The stress-buffering effect of acute exercise: Evidence for HPA axis negative feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschucke, Elisabeth; Renneberg, Babette; Dimeo, Fernando; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    According to the cross-stressor adaptation hypothesis, physically trained individuals show lower physiological and psychological responses to stressors other than exercise, e.g. psychosocial stress. Reduced stress reactivity may constitute a mechanism of action for the beneficial effects of exercise in maintaining mental health. With regard to neural and psychoneuroendocrine stress responses, the acute stress-buffering effects of exercise have not been investigated yet. A sample of highly trained (HT) and sedentary (SED) young men was randomized to either exercise on a treadmill at moderate intensity (60-70% VO2max; AER) for 30 min, or to perform 30 min of "placebo" exercise (PLAC). 90 min later, an fMRI experiment was conducted using an adapted version of the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). The subjective and psychoneuroendocrine (cortisol and α-amylase) changes induced by the exercise intervention and the MIST were assessed, as well as neural activations during the MIST. Finally, associations between the different stress responses were analysed. Participants of the AER group showed a significantly reduced cortisol response to the MIST, which was inversely related to the previous exercise-induced α-amylase and cortisol fluctuations. With regard to the sustained BOLD signal, we found higher bilateral hippocampus (Hipp) activity and lower prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity in the AER group. Participants with a higher aerobic fitness showed lower cortisol responses to the MIST. As the Hipp and PFC are brain structures prominently involved in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, these findings indicate that the acute stress-buffering effect of exercise relies on negative feedback mechanisms. Positive affective changes after exercise appear as important moderators largely accounting for the effects related to physical fitness.

  16. The influence of acute stress on attention mechanisms and its electrophysiological correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eSänger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For the selection of relevant information out of a continuous stream of information, which is a common definition of attention, two core mechanisms are assumed: a competition-based comparison of the neuronal activity in sensory areas and the top-down modulation of this competition by frontal executive control functions. Those control functions are thought to bias the processing of information towards the intended goals. Acute stress is thought to impair these frontal functions through the release of cortisol.In the present study, subjects had to detect a luminance change of a stimulus and ignore more salient but task irrelevant orientation changes. Before the execution of this task, subjects underwent a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT or a non-stressful control situation. The SECPT revealed reliable stress response with a significant increase of cortisol and alpha-amylase. Stressed subjects showed higher error rates than controls, particularly in conditions which require top-down control processing to bias the less salient target feature against the more salient and spatially separated distracter.By means of the EEG, subjects who got stressed showed a reduced allocation to the relevant luminance change apparent in a modulation of the N1pc. The following N2pc, which reflects a re-allocation of attentional resources, supports the error pattern. There was only an N2pc in conditions, which required to bias the less salient luminance change. Moreover, this N2pc was decreased as a consequence of the induced stress. These results allow the conclusion that acute stress impairs the intention-based attentional allocation and enhances the stimulus-driven selection, leading to a strong distractibility during attentional information selection.

  17. The influence of acute stress on attention mechanisms and its electrophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sänger, Jessica; Bechtold, Laura; Schoofs, Daniela; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Wascher, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    FOR THE SELECTION OF RELEVANT INFORMATION OUT OF A CONTINUOUS STREAM OF INFORMATION, WHICH IS A COMMON DEFINITION OF ATTENTION, TWO CORE MECHANISMS ARE ASSUMED: a competition-based comparison of the neuronal activity in sensory areas and the top-down modulation of this competition by frontal executive control functions. Those control functions are thought to bias the processing of information toward the intended goals. Acute stress is thought to impair these frontal functions through the release of cortisol. In the present study, subjects had to detect a luminance change of a stimulus and ignore more salient but task irrelevant orientation changes. Before the execution of this task, subjects underwent a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT) or a non-stressful control situation. The SECPT revealed reliable stress response with a significant increase of cortisol and alpha-amylase. Stressed subjects showed higher error rates than controls, particularly in conditions which require top-down control processing to bias the less salient target feature against the more salient and spatially separated distracter. By means of the EEG, subjects who got stressed showed a reduced allocation to the relevant luminance change apparent in a modulation of the N1pc. The following N2pc, which reflects a re-allocation of attentional resources, supports the error pattern. There was only an N2pc in conditions, which required to bias the less salient luminance change. Moreover, this N2pc was decreased as a consequence of the induced stress. These results allow the conclusion that acute stress impairs the intention-based attentional allocation and enhances the stimulus-driven selection, leading to a strong distractibility during attentional information selection.

  18. Associations of acute stress and overnight heart rate with feed efficiency in beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, J C; Schenkel, F S; Physick-Sheard, P W; Fontoura, A B P; Miller, S P; Tennessen, T; Montanholi, Y R

    2017-03-01

    Proxies have the potential to accelerate feed efficiency (residual feed intake (RFI); kg dry matter/day) improvement, assisting with the reduction of beef cattle feed costs and environmental impact. Heart rate (HR) (beats per minute (BPM)) is associated with feed efficiency and influenced by autonomic activity and peripheral metabolism, suggesting HR could be used as a proxy for feed efficiency. Objectives were to assess associations between overnight HR, lying patterns and RFI, and between acute stress HR and RFI. Heifer calves (n=107; 408±28 days of age, 341±42.2 kg) and yearling heifers (n=36; 604±92 days of age, 539±52.2 kg) were exposed to a performance test to determine productive performance. Overnight HR (electrode based) and lying patterns (accelerometer based) were monitored on a subgroup of heifer calves (n=40; 20 lowest RFI; 20 highest RFI). In the 10-min acute stress assessment, all heifers were individually exposed to the opening and closing of an umbrella and HR before (HRBEF), in response to (HRMAX), after (HRAFT) and change (HRCHG; HRAFT-HRBEF) as a result of exposure were determined. Using polynomial regression, rate of HR decrease pre-exposure (β 1) and rates of HR increase (β 2) and decrease (β 3, β 4) post-exposure were determined. Heifer calves in the overnight assessment were classified into equal RFI groups (low RFI; high RFI) and HR means were treated as repeated measures and compared using multiple regression. In the acute stress assessment, heifers were classified within cattle category into equal RFI groups (low RFI; high RFI) and means and polynomial regression parameters were compared using multiple regression. Low-RFI heifer calves had a lower overnight HR (69.2 v. 72.6 BPM), similar HR change from lying to standing intervals (8.9 v. 9.2 BPM) and similar time lying (61.1% v. 64.5%) compared with high-RFI heifer calves. Low-RFI heifer calves had a higher absolute HRMAX (162.9 v. 145.7 BPM) and β 2 (-0.34 v. -0.20) than high

  19. Systolic blood pressure reactions to acute stress are associated with future hypertension status in the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Douglas; Ginty, Annie T; Painter, Rebecca C; Tessa J Roseboom; Phillips, Anna C.; de Rooij, Susanne R.

    2012-01-01

    These analyses examined the association between blood pressure reactions to acute psychological stress and subsequent hypertension status in a substantial Dutch cohort. Blood pressure was recorded during a resting baseline and during three acute stress tasks, Stroop colour word, mirror tracing and speech. Five years later, diagnosed hypertension status was determined by questionnaire. Participants were 453 (237 women) members of the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. In analysis adjusting for a n...

  20. Maintenance of a positive outlook during acute stress protects against pro-inflammatory reactivity and future depressive symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbacher, K.; Epel, E.; Wolkowitz, O.M.; Prather, A.A.; Puterman, E.; Dhabhar, F.S.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and affective responses to acute stress influence pro-inflammatory cytokine reactivity, and peripheral cytokines (particularly lnterleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)), can act on the brain to promote depressive symptoms. It is unknown whether acute stress-induced changes in positive affect and cognitions (POS) and pro-inflammatory reactivity predict future depressive symptoms. We examined acute stress responses among women, to determine prospective predictors of depressive symptoms. Hypotheses: 1) Stress-induced decreases in POS will be associated with stress-related increases in circulating IL-1β. 2) Acute stress-induced decreases in POS and increases in IL-1β reactivity will predict increases in depressive symptoms one year later. Thirty-five post-menopausal women were exposed to acute stress with the Trier Social Stress Task (TSST) and provided blood samples under resting conditions and 30 minutes after the conclusion of the TSST, which were assayed for IL-1β. IL-1β reactivity was quantified as post minus pre-TSST. Failure to maintain POS was quantified as the decrease in POS during the TSST. Change in depressive symptoms from the study baseline to the following year was determined. Greater acute stress-induced declines in POS were significantly associated with increased IL-1β reactivity (p≤.02), which significantly predicted increases in depressive symptoms over the following year (p<.01), controlling for age, body mass index, chronic stress, antidepressant use and baseline depressive symptoms. IL-1β reactivity was a significant mediator of the relationship between POS decline and future increases in depressive symptoms (p=.04). Difficulty maintaining positivity under stress and heightened pro-inflammatory reactivity may be markers and/or mechanisms of risk for future increases in depressive symptoms. PMID:22119400

  1. Reduction of spinal PGE2 concentrations prevents swim stress-induced thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Coram; Fernandez, Ana Cristina; Cardenas, Ricardo; Suarez-Roca, Heberto

    2015-03-30

    We evaluated the association between spinal PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia following repeated stress. Thermal nociception was determined in male Sprague-Dawley rats using the hot-plate test, before and after forced-swimming; non-conditioned rats served as controls. Animals were pretreated with ketoprofen or meloxicam, preferential COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors, respectively. After the second hot-plate test, we measured serum corticosterone (stress marker), and lumbar spinal PGE2 (neuroinflammation marker) under peripheral inflammation (1% formalin plantar injection). Stressed rats displayed response latencies 40% shorter and inflammatory spinal PGE2 levels 95% higher than controls. Pretreatment with ketoprofen or meloxicam prevented hyperalgesia and elevation of spinal PGE2, increasing the escape behavior time during forced swimming 95% respect to saline-treated rats. Corticosterone levels in stressed rats were 97% higher than controls; COX inhibitors reduced them by 84%. PGE2 could participate in stress-induced hyperalgesia, learned helplessness, and corticosterone production, supporting the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for persistent pain associated with chronic stress and depression.

  2. Residual Stress Analysis of Laser-Drilled Thermal Barrier Coatings Involving Various Bond Coats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinard, C.; Montay, G.; Guipont, V.; Jeandin, M.; Girardot, J.; Schneider, M.

    2015-01-01

    The gas turbine combustion chamber of aero-engines requires a thermal barrier coating (TBC) by thermal spraying. Further heat protection is achieved by laser drilling of cooling holes. The residual stresses play an important role in the mechanical behaviour of TBC. It could also affect the TBC response to delamination during laser drilling. In this work, studies of the cracking behaviour after laser drilling and residual stress distribution have been achieved for different bond coats by plasma spray or cold spray. From interface crack length measured pulse-by-pulse after laser percussion drilling at 20° angle, the role of the various bond coats on crack initiation and propagation are investigated. It is shown that the bond coat drastically influences the cracking behaviour. The residual stresses profiles were also determined by the incremental hole-drilling method involving speckle interferometry. An original method was also developed to measure the residual stress profiles around a pre-drilled zone with a laser beam at 90°. The results are discussed to highlight the influence of TBCs interfaces on the resulting residual stresses distribution before laser drilling, and also to investigate the modification around the hole after laser drilling. It is shown that laser drilling could affect the residual stress state.