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Sample records for acute subdural hematoma

  1. Acute Subdural Hematoma

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    Ellen Lester

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 21-year-old female with no past medical history presented to the ED after multiple tonic-clonic seizures over the previous 12 hours, the longest lasting 20 seconds. She returned to baseline after each seizure, had no obvious signs of trauma, and did not exhibit any focal neurologic deficits. She denied illicit drugs or new medications. A family member noted that she had fallen from her bed (approximately 3 feet high 2 days ago. Significant findings: Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT of the Head showed a dense extra-axial collection along the left frontal and parietal regions, extending superior to the vertex with mild mass effect, but no midline shift. Discussion: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is a term to describe any abnormal bleeding within the bony confines of the skull. Most commonly, subdural hemorrhages (SDH result from injury to the bridging veins that lead to bleeding between the dura and arachnoid maters. However, in 20%-30% of cases an arterial source of bleeding can be found.1 For adults, motor vehicle collisions and other unintentional head trauma are typically the provoking factors in developing SDH. Falls in the elderly are a common cause of SDH since diffuse cerebral atrophy leads to increased shear forces upon vasculature structures during the fall. The risk of SDH increases with the use of anti-thrombotic agents.2 Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic to coma (in 50 percent of acute SDH. Chronic SDH may present with headaches, light-headedness, cognitive impairment, and seizures.1 The risk of posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS is higher in acute SDH. Risk factors for acute SDH PTS include low Glasgow Coma Score and craniotomy, whereas risk factors for PTS in chronic SDH include alcohol abuse, change in mental status, previous stroke, and hematoma density on CT.3 CT is the most widely used imaging modality for identifying ICH. Acute SDH (within 1-2 days are visualized as hyperdense

  2. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Kenyatta National Hospital, University of Nairobi,. Nairobi, Kenya. 2. Department of Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Nairobi, Kenya. E-Mail Contact - KIBOI Julius Githinji : Mots-clés: Keywords: Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional recovery, ...

  3. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    Results. A total of 259 patients were diagnosed with acute subdural hematomas during the study period. The mean age was 41.1 years + 19.659 and 223 (86.1%) were men while 36 (13.9%) were women. The most common cause of injury was assault (44.8%) with road traffic and falls accounting for 24.7% and 30.5%.

  4. Endoscopic burr hole evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma.

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    Codd, Patrick J; Venteicher, Andrew S; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Kahle, Kristopher T; Jho, David H

    2013-12-01

    Acute subdural hematoma evacuations frequently necessitate large craniotomies with extended operative times and high relative blood loss, which can lead to additional morbidity for the patient. While endoscopic minimally invasive approaches to chronic subdural collections have been successfully demonstrated, this technique has not previously been applied to acute subdural hematomas. The authors report their experience with an 87-year-old patient presenting with a large acute right-sided subdural hematoma successfully evacuated via an endoscopic minimally invasive technique. The operative approach is outlined, and the literature on endoscopic subdural collection evacuation reviewed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia: Case Report

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    Besime Utku; Uygar Utku

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with neoplasm is a rare disorder. A rare case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with acute biphenotypic leukemia presented here. A 78-year-old woman who diagnosed as acute biphenotypic leukemia by hematology was complicated with a large chronic subdural hematoma. She presented to our emergency medicine service of hospital with left-sided weakness. Her non-contrast brain computerized tomography scan showed a non-traumatic right-sided, larg...

  6. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma in a patient with multiple myeloma

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    Abrar Ahad Wani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in a patient of multiple myeloma receiving chemotherapy is an unknown event, needing an urgent neurosurgical management. We report this patient who presented with progressive neurological deterioration and a low platelet count. She was successfully managed by craniotomy and evacuation of subdural hematoma with intraoperative transfusion of platelets. The acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in her was probably related to the bleeding diathesis due to thrombocytopenia associated with chemotherapy.

  7. Endoscopic Surgery for Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma

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    Hiroyuki Kon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is generally addressed by craniotomy under general anesthesia. We report a patient whose traumatic ASDH was treated under local anesthesia by one-burr-hole endoscopic surgery. This 87-year-old woman had undergone coil embolization for a ruptured right middle-cerebral artery aneurysm and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus 5 years earlier. Upon admission, she manifested consciousness disturbance after suffering head trauma and right hemiplegia. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (E2V2M4. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a thick, left-frontotemporal ASDH. Due to her advanced age and poor condition, we performed endoscopic surgery rather than craniotomy to evacuate the ASDH. Under local anesthesia, we made a burr hole in her left forehead and increased its size to 15 mm in diameter. After introducing a transparent sheath into the hematoma cavity with a rigid endoscope, the clot was evacuated with a suction tube. The arterial bleeding point was electrically coagulated. A postoperative CT scan confirmed the reduction of the hematoma. There was neither brain compression nor brain swelling. Her consciousness disturbance and right hemiplegia improved immediately. Endoscopic surgery may represent a viable method to address traumatic intracranial hematomas in some patients.

  8. Outcome of the acute subdural hematoma

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    Hayashi, Tatsuo; Yoshida, Yasuaki; Uno, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Hiroo; Shibata, Norio; Ueki, Shigetoshi; Suzuki, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Aiichiro (St. Marianna Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-five cases of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) were reviewed and divided into two groups of A and B according to the outcome. The findings of computed tomography (CT) and the time interval between head trauma and surgical intervention were investigated to know the factors that influence the prognosis in ASDH. Group A, 18 patients, had a poor outcome. Fifteen patients out of 18 had the removal of hematoma and decompression craniectomy with 10 deaths, 4 vegetative states and 1 severe disability. Three patients died without surgery. Group B, 17 patients, were treated surgically in the same way as in group A and all patients had a good recovery with 14 making a full recovery and 3 with a moderate disability. Surgical mortality was 31.3% and overall mortality was 37.1%. The features of the CT findings in 18 patients of group A were as follows. Eleven patients had midline shift of more than 15 mm, 9 had subdural high density area of more than 15 mm and 12 patients had bilateral collapse of the lateral ventricles. The charactaristic finding of CT recognized in all patients of group A was disappearance of the ambient cistern. On the contrary, in 17 patients of group B the displacement of the intracranial structure was not so severe as in group A. The midline shift of 14 patients was less than 7.5 mm, the width of subdural high density area of 15 patients was less than 7.5 mm and the ambient cistern was recognized in 12 patients. For 11 patients out of 15 in group A, the operation was performed within 6 hours following the onset of head trauma, however, 9 patients died, one in a vegetative state and one had severe disability postoperatively. Thirteen patients out of 17 in group B were operated on later than 6 hours after the onset of the head trauma, and yet took a good outcome.

  9. CT findings in a case of neonatal acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshu, K.; Horie, Y.; Hirashima, Y.; Endo, S.; Takaku, A.

    1981-01-01

    The CT findings in a case of neonatal accute subdural hematoma are presented. CT demonstrated a crescentic high density area in the subdural space over the left cerebral hemisphere and an oval high density area in the left occipital region. The latter was suspected of being an intracerebral hematoma. Emergency craniotomy revealed that the high density area was due to a subdural hematoma between the occipital lobe and the tentorium cerebelli. (orig.)

  10. Contralateral extradural hematoma following decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma (the value of intracranial pressure monitoring): a case report

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    Meguins, Lucas Crociati; Sampaio, Gustavo Botelho; Abib, Eduardo Cintra; Adry, Rodrigo Antônio Rocha da Cruz; Ellakkis, Richam Faissal El Hossain; Ribeiro, Filipe Webb Josephson; Maset, Ângelo Luiz; de Morais, Dionei Freitas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Decompressive surgery for acute subdural hematoma leading to contralateral extradural hematoma is an uncommon event with only few cases previously reported in the English medical literature. Case presentation The present study describes the case of a 39-year-old White Brazilian man who had a motorcycle accident; he underwent decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of acute subdural hematoma and evolved contralateral extradural hematoma following surgery. Conclusion The presen...

  11. Traumatic acute posterior fossa subdural hematoma – A case report and review of literature

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    Jaiswal Manish

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic subdural hematomas of the posterior fossa are rare but dangerous neurosurgical emergencies that require prompt diagnosis and management to avoid the uniformly poor outcome. We present a case of a teenager with severe TBI and acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa that deteriorated rapidly before surgery but eventually made a good recovery. We also the review the literature concerning traumatic posterior fossa subdural hematomas [PFSDH].

  12. Intracranial Myeloid Sarcoma Metastasis Mimicking Acute Subdural Hematoma

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    Amandip S. Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma, a rare consequence of myeloproliferative disorders, is rarely seen in the central nervous system, most commonly in the pediatric population. Although there are a handful of case reports detailing initial presentation of CNS myeloid sarcoma in the adult population, we have been unable to find any reports of CNS myeloid sarcoma presenting as a large mass lesion in a herniating patient. Here, we present the case of a patient transferred to our facility for a very large subdural hematoma. Based on imaging characteristics, it was felt to be a spontaneous hematoma secondary to coagulopathy. No coagulopathy was found. Interestingly, he did have a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML diagnosed 2 months previously, and intraoperatively he was found to have a confluent white mass invading both the subdural and subarachnoid spaces. There was minimal associated hemorrhage and final pathology showed myeloid sarcoma. This is the first report we are aware of in which CNS myeloid sarcoma presented as a subdural metastasis and also the first report in which we are aware of this etiology causing a herniation syndrome secondary to mass effect.

  13. Contralateral extradural hematoma following decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma (the value of intracranial pressure monitoring): a case report.

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    Meguins, Lucas Crociati; Sampaio, Gustavo Botelho; Abib, Eduardo Cintra; Adry, Rodrigo Antônio Rocha da Cruz; Ellakkis, Richam Faissal El Hossain; Ribeiro, Filipe Webb Josephson; Maset, Ângelo Luiz; de Morais, Dionei Freitas

    2014-05-16

    Decompressive surgery for acute subdural hematoma leading to contralateral extradural hematoma is an uncommon event with only few cases previously reported in the English medical literature. The present study describes the case of a 39-year-old White Brazilian man who had a motorcycle accident; he underwent decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of acute subdural hematoma and evolved contralateral extradural hematoma following surgery. The present case highlights the importance of close monitoring of the intracranial pressure of severe traumatic brain injury, even after decompressive procedures, because of the possible development of contralateral extradural hematoma.

  14. Predictors of rapid spontaneous resolution of acute subdural hematoma.

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    Fujimoto, Kenji; Otsuka, Tadahiro; Yoshizato, Kimio; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) usually requires emergency surgical decompression, but rare cases exhibit rapid spontaneous resolution. The aim of this retrospective study was to identify factors predictive of spontaneous ASDH resolution. A total of 366 consecutive patients with ASDH treated between January 2006 and September 2012 were identified in our hospital database. Patients with ASDH clot thickness >10mm in the frontoparietotemporal region and showing a midline shift >10mm on the initial computed tomography (CT) scan were divided into two groups according to subsequent spontaneous resolution. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors predictive of rapid spontaneous ASDH resolution. Fifty-six ASDH patients met study criteria and 18 demonstrated rapid spontaneous resolution (32%). Majority of these patients were not operated because of poor prognosis/condition and in accordance to family wishes. Univariate analysis revealed significant differences in use of antiplatelet agents before head injury and in the incidence of a low-density band between the hematoma and inner wall of the skull bone on the initial CT. Use of antiplatelet agents before head injury (OR 19.6, 95% CI 1.5-260.1, p=0.02) and the low-density band on CT images (OR 40.3, 95% CI 3.1-520.2, p=0.005) were identified as independent predictive factors by multivariate analysis. Our analysis suggested that use of antiplatelet agents before head injury and a low-density band between the hematoma and inner skull bone on CT images (indicative of cerebrospinal fluid infusion into the subdural space) increase the probability of rapid spontaneous resolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroendoscopic Removal of Acute Subdural Hematoma with Contusion: Advantages for Elderly Patients

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    Ryota Tamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Large craniotomy for acute subdural hematoma is sometimes too invasive. We report good outcomes for two cases of neuroendoscopic evacuation of hematoma and contusion by 1 burr hole surgery. Case Presentation. Both patients arrived by ambulance at our hospital with disturbed consciousness after falling. Case 1 was an 81-year-old man who took antiplatelet drugs for brain infarction. Case 2 was a 73-year-old alcoholic woman. CT scanning showed acute subdural hematoma and frontal contusion in both cases. In the acute stage, glycerol was administered to reduce edema; CTs after 48 and 72 hours showed an increase of subdural hematoma and massive contusion of the frontal lobe. Disturbed consciousness steadily deteriorated. The subdural hematoma and contusion were removed as soon as possible by neuroendoscopy under local anesthesia, because neither patient was a good candidate for large craniotomy considering age and past history. 40%~70% of the hematoma was removed, and the consciousness level improved. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic removal of acute subdural hematoma and contusion has advantages and disadvantages. For patients with underlying medical issues or other risk factors, it is likely to be effective.

  16. Nonsurgical acute traumatic subdural hematoma: what is the risk?

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    Bajsarowicz, Paul; Prakash, Ipshita; Lamoureux, Julie; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Feyz, Mitra; Maleki, Mohammad; Marcoux, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The Brain Trauma Foundation has published guidelines on the surgical management of traumatic subdural hematoma (SDH). However, no data exist on the proportion of patients with SDH that can be selected for conservative management and what is the outcome of these patients. The goals of this study were as follows: 1) to establish what proportion of patients are initially treated conservatively; 2) to determine what proportion of patients will deteriorate and require surgical evacuation; and 3) to identify risk factors associated with deterioration and delayed surgery. All cases of acute traumatic SDH (869 when inclusion criteria were met) presenting over a 4-year period were reviewed. For all conservatively treated SDH, the proportion of delayed surgical intervention and the Glasgow Outcome Scale score were taken as outcome measures. Multiple factors were compared between patients who required delayed surgery and patients without surgery. Of the 869 patients with acute traumatic SDH, 646 (74.3%) were initially treated conservatively. A good outcome was achieved in 76.7% of the patients. Only 6.5% eventually required delayed surgery, and the median delay for surgery was 9.5 days. Factors associated with deterioration were as follows: 1) thicker SDH (p<0.001); 2) greater midline shift (p<0.001); 3) location at the convexity (p=0.001); 4) alcohol abuse (p=0.0260); and 5) history of falls (p=0.018). There was no significant difference in regard to age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score, abnormal coagulation, use of blood thinners, and presence of cerebral atrophy or white matter disease. The majority of patients with SDH are treated conservatively. Of those, only 6.5% later required surgery, for raised intracranial pressure or SDH progression. Patients at risk can be identified and followed more carefully.

  17. Predictors for outcome after surgery for traumatic acute subdural hematoma

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    Atanasov Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute traumatic subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most frequent conditions in neurosurgery demanding emergency surgery. The aim of the study was to identify factors influencing outcome in patients who had surgery for evacuation of ASDH. Methods: From 2005 to 2012 eighty-five patients at age above 18 years had surgery for evacuation of ASDH. Outcome was measured according GOS at discharge and was dichotomized as “favorable outcome” (GOS 4 to 5 and “unfavorable outcome” (GOS 1 to 3. These factors were evaluated with univariate and logistic regression analysis for significance with outcome. Results: The mean age of the 85 patients was 62.7 years (SD±18.5. 45.9% patients were with favorable outcome and 54.1% had unfavorable outcome. Patients with GCS score 3-8 (54.1% had 80.4% unfavorable outcome whereas 78.6% of patients with GCS score 13-15 (32.9% had favorable outcome. All patients with nonreactive pupils (bilaterally or unilaterally - 31.8% had unfavorable outcome whereas patients (36.5% with both reactive pupils (36.5% had in 80.6% favorable outcome. All patients (40% with Rotterdam CT scores 5 and 6 had unfavorable outcome. The factors determining outcome were admission GSC score, Rotterdam CT scores, and prothrombin time. Conclusion: Patients who have GSC score of 3, unresponsive pupil(s or have Rotterdam CT scores 5 and 6 have little chance of survival. Patients with coagulopathy have two times more unfavorable outcome. The patients with ASDH should have surgery as soon as possible after correction of vital parameters in order to avoid deterioration which can be very rapid and irreversible.

  18. Re-estimation of acute subdural hematoma in children caused by trivial household head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify characteristics of acute subdural hematoma in children caused by a trivial household head trauma from a modem neurosurgical and medicolegal standpoint. We performed a retrospective study of 25 children younger than 48 months hospitalized for acute subdural hematoma from December 1, 1993, through February 28, 2003. Inclusion criteria were as follows: acute subdural hematoma caused by trivial household trauma and a history of trauma corroborated by a caretaker, absence of physical injuries consistent with child abuse, fundoscopic examinations performed by a pediatric ophthalmologist, absence of fractures on general bone survey, and child abuse ruled out by long-term follow-up (more than 5 years). Twenty-one of the patients were boys, and 4 were girls. The patients ranged in age from 6 to 17 months, with an average age of 8.5 months. In 17 of 25 patients trauma had been caused by falls to the floor while standing with support or while sitting. Most of the patients were admitted to the hospital because of generalized convulsions or seizures that had developed soon after a trivial household trauma. Fifteen of the 25 (60%) patients had retinal or preretinal hemorrhage and 9 patients had bilateral retinal hemorrhage. Computed tomography showed fluid-type acute subdural hematomas at the frontal convexity or in the interhemispheric fissure in 18 of 25 (72%) patients. Fourteen of 25 (56%) patients had pre-existing external hydrocephalus (enlargements of the subarachnoid space). The long-term outcomes included normal mental development (IQ≥80) in 18 cases, mild mental retardation (IQ<80) in 7 cases, and epilepsy in 3 cases. Acute subdural hematoma in children caused by trivial household trauma is a clinical entity distinct from acute subdural hematoma caused by child abuse or shaken-baby syndrome. (author)

  19. Spinal subdural hematoma associated with traumatic intracranial interhemispheric subdural hematoma.

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    Wajima, Daisuke; Yokota, Hiroshi; Ida, Yuki; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    A 78-year-old female fell and hit the back of her head on the floor. Head computed tomography (CT) showed right acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma (ISDH). Her left hemiparesis worsened, so partial removal of ISDH was performed. The hemiparesis was improved, but leg monoparesis persisted. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) at the S1-2 level. Nerve conduction velocity measurements at the knee joint to lower limb showed disappearance of the left peroneal nerve conduction wave, indicating that one of the causes of drop foot was common peroneal nerve palsy. With conservative therapy, her drop foot was gradually improved, then she recovered to walk with a stick and moved to a rehabilitation hospital. Lumbar MR imaging should be performed to rule out SSDH in a patient with posterior fossa subdural hematoma on initial head CT who develops leg palsy.

  20. Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma

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    Andersen-Ranberg, Nina Christine; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Bergholt, Bo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (bCSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition frequently associated with the need for retreatment. The reason for the high rate of retreatment has not been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the authors focused on determining which independent predictors...... are associated with the retreatment of bCSDH with a focus on surgical laterality. METHODS In a national database of CSDHs (Danish Chronic Subdural Hematoma Study) the authors retrospectively identified all bCSDHs treated in the 4 Danish neurosurgical departments over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2012...... that a separated hematoma density and the absence of postoperative drainage were independent predictors of retreatment. CONCLUSIONS In bCSDHs bilateral surgical intervention significantly lowers the risk of retreatment compared with unilateral intervention and should be considered when choosing a surgical...

  1. Outcome of burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Hironaka, Yasuhiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Asai, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishio, Kenji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma from April 2007 in twenty five patients. All patients were deep comatose and showed cerebral herniation sign with bilateral pupillary abnormalities. Burr hole surgeries were performed as soon as possible after CT evaluation. Continually decomporresive craiectomies were followed if clinical improvements were achieved and mild baribiturate-moderate hypothermia combined (MB-MH) therapy was induced postoperatively in some cases. The mean average was 65.6 years (range 16-93). The causes of head injuries were traffic accident in 9, fall down in 13 and unknown in 3. The mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission was 4.4 (range 3-9). The mean time interval from arrival to burr hole surgery was 33.5 minutes (range 21-50 minutes). Decompressive craniectomy was indicated in 14 cases and MB-MH therapy was induced in 13 cases. The overall clinical outcome consisted of good recovery in 3, moderate disability in 2, severe disability in 3, persistent vegetative state in 3 and death in 14. Favorable results can be expected even in patients with serious acute subdural hematoma. Emergent burr hole surgery was effective to decrease intracranial pressure rapidly and to save time. So active burr hole surgery in the emergency room is strongly recommended to all cases of severe acute subdural hematoma. (author)

  2. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma as an initial presentation of choriocarcinoma: A case report

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    Rocque Brandon G

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Diverse sequelae of central nervous system metastasis of choriocarcinoma have been reported, including infarction, intra or extra axial hemorrhages, aneurysm formation and carotid-cavernous fistula. Here we report a case of subdural hematoma as the first presentation of choriocarcinoma. Case presentation The patient is a 34-year-old woman whose initial presentation of widely metastatic choriocarcinoma was an acute subdural hematoma, requiring decompressive craniectomy. Histopathologic examination of the tissue showed no evidence of choriocarcinoma, but the patient was found to have diffuse metastatic disease and cerebrospinal fluid indices highly suggestive of intracranial metastasis. Conclusion Choriocarcinoma frequently metastasizes intracranially. We review the diverse possible manifestations of this process. In addition, the cerebrospinal fluid:serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin ratio is an important factor in diagnosing these cases. Finally, the role of the neurosurgeon is discussed.

  3. [Emergency Decompressive Craniotomy in the Emergency Room was Effective in Severe Acute Subdural Hematoma Treatment:Two Case Reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Nozawa, Masahiro; Okada, Michiko; Hiraizumi, Shiho; Kato, Fumitaka; Koseki, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Yoichi; Hino, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma is unfavorable. In particular, patients with levels of consciousness of Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)3 or 4 tend to be refractory to treatment. Decompressive craniotomy should be promptly performed to remove hematoma. However, if an operating room is not immediately available, emergency burr hole surgery is sometimes performed in the emergency room(primary care room)prior to craniotomy. A previous study has reported that the interval from injury to surgery influences the outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma. Therefore, emergency decompression is important to effectively treat patients with severe acute subdural hematoma. We present the cases of two patients with acute subdural hematomas. In both cases, emergency decompressive craniotomy(hematoma removal after craniotomy and external decompression)was performed in the emergency room of the Emergency and Critical Care Center. In both cases, the surgery was followed by favorable outcomes. Case 1 was a 36-year-old female. The patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 3. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 75 minutes. Surgery began 20 minutes after diagnosis. Case 2 was a 25-year-old male. The second patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 4. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 60 minutes. Surgery was begun 40 minutes after diagnosis. In both patients, we observed anisocoria and the loss of the light reflex. However, the postoperative course was favorable, and both patients were discharged. In summary, to treat severe acute subdural hematomas, early emergency decompressive craniotomy is optimal. Emergency decompressive surgery in the emergency room is independent of operating room or staff. Therefore, emergency decompressive craniotomy may improve the outcome of patients with severe acute subdural hematomas.

  4. Acute intracranial hematoma formation following excision of a cervical subdural tumor: a report of two cases and literature review.

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    Ma, Xuexiao; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ting; Li, Guizhi; Zhang, Guoqing; Khan, Hassan; Xiang, Hongfei; Chen, Bohua

    2014-01-01

    An intracranial hematoma is a rare, yet significant, complication following spinal surgery. The authors describe two cases with acute intracranial hematoma formation after excision of a cervical subdural schwannoma. One was a 14-year-old girl who developed bilateral intracranial extradural hematomas immediately following excision of the C4 subdural schwannoma. The other was a 59-year-old woman who had an acute cerebellar hematoma after removal of the C2-C5 subdural schwannoma. During the surgeries of both cases, spinal dura was partially removed together with the tumor and the dural sac could not be repaired, resulting in large amounts of intraoperative CSF loss and persistent postoperative CSF leakage. Both patients failed to regain consciousness from anesthesia after surgery, and a cranial CT scan identified large intracranial hematomas. Urgent hematoma evacuation was ultimately performed to save the patients. Based on the authors' experience and literature review, a conclusion was drawn that considerable CSF leakage and a sharp decrease of CSF pressure are common features during the excision of a spinal subdural tumor, which may lead to acute intracranial hematomas. Continual postoperative monitoring in patients with this condition should be of a very high priority. A CT or MRI should be immediately investigated to exclude intracranial hematomas for any patient with delayed emergence from anesthesia following spinal surgery. Hematoma evacuation is indispensable once an intracranial hematoma is identified in the patient who fails to regain consciousness from anesthesia post surgery. Furthermore, the possible pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the formation of an intracranial hematoma after spinal procedures, particularly after manipulations of a cervical subdural tumor, are discussed.

  5. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

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    Cui V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Cui,1 Timur Kouliev2 1Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Emergency Department, Beijing United Family Hospital, Beijing, China Abstract: Acute subdural hematoma (SDH resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. Keywords: head injury, oculomotor, palsy, subdural hematoma, trauma, tentorium, cerebral herniation, intracranial hemorrhage

  6. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension presenting without orthostatic headache complicated by acute subdural hematoma after drainage for chronic subdural hematoma--case report.

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    Kuramae, Takumi; Inamasu, Joji; Nakagawa, Yu; Nakatsukasa, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) manifesting as a bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) without orthostatic headache. He developed life-threatening acute SDH as a complication of CSDH drainage. Neurosurgeons should be aware that SIH patients do not always present with orthostatic headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium may be recommended for young adults with non-traumatic CSDH before drainage to exclude SIH, even if they do not present with orthostatic headache.

  7. Acute non-traumatic idiopathic spinal subdural hematoma: radiographic findings and surgical results with a literature review.

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    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-11-01

    Intraspinal hematoma is a serious condition, and early diagnosis is necessary to permit emergency treatment. Among such hematomas, non-traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is a rare occurrence. We have experienced three patients with surgically proven subdural spinal hematoma, and here we report these cases with a review of their clinical and imaging characteristics. All three cases were idiopathic with no history of disease, no coagulopathy, and no trauma. All had acute onset that brought about paralysis of the lower limbs with severe pain. Early surgery was performed, based on a relatively early diagnosis using thoracolumbar MRI and CT. Since the epidural fat is not affected by bleeding, the normal structure remains and the boundary between hematoma and fat is a significant feature in MRI and CT. Partial Gd enhancement in MRI and ring enhancement in contrast CT were also apparent. Two of the cases had subarachnoid hematomas. Preoperative diagnosis of spinal subarachnoid hematoma is difficult because there are no specific radiological findings and confirmation can only occur intraoperatively. In particular, one case had a massive hematoma causing canal stenosis, and it was difficult to distinguish between intradural and extradural hematoma. In all cases of subarachnoid or subdural hematoma, decompression was performed within 24 h after onset, and consequently, the patients had relatively good outcomes.

  8. Anesthetic management of a patient with hemophilia A with spontaneous acute subdural hematoma

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    Prakhar Gyanesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hemorrhage in patients with hemophilia is associated with high mortality and sequelae. We report the case of 50-year-old man with Hemophilia A, who presented with spontaneous acute subdural hematoma and underwent craniotomy for clot evacuation. The patient received Factor VIII infusions perioperatively along with other measures to decrease blood loss. The patient presented with signs of high intracranial tension and received 3% saline intraoperatively and postoperatively to prevent brain edema. Recommendations for perioperative preparation and management of hemophilia, especially in the setting of emergency major surgery are reviewed.

  9. Occult falcine meningioma unmasked following nearly complete hemorrhagic transformation with resultant spontaneous acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden-onset monoplegia with features of vomiting and headache usually signals an intracranial cerebrovascular event. We describe a 62-year-old man in whom this presentation was the result of the rare occurrence of an almost complete hemorrhagic transformation of a falcine meningioma with resultant acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma, and discuss the risk factors and possible mechanisms that may lead to such an event. The need for careful examination of the available radiology and aggressive tumor removal is stressed.

  10. Traumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Gon; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Kwan Ho; Chi, Moon Pyo

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma associated with intracranial subdural hematoma is a rare condition. Herein, we report the case of a 62-year-old man with lower back pain, radiating pain, and numbness in both lower extremities, without motor weakness, for 2 weeks. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed high signal intensity on T1-weighted image (WI), and low signal intensity on T2-WI from L2 to L5. Two weeks after conservative management, follow-up lumbar MRI did not show the hematoma and his symptoms were relieved and there was no neurological deficit; therefore, he was discharged. However, subsequently, intracranial subdural hematoma increased and upper extremity motor weakness appeared. This was treated surgically. If there is no neurological deficit, conservative treatment may be a good option. Follow-up evaluation for asymptomatic cranial subdural hematoma is necessary.

  11. Remote acute subarachnoid hemorrhage after drainage of chronic subdural hematoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangming; Yu, Jinlu

    2018-03-03

    Chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH) can be treated by a relatively simple burr hole surgery. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurring after surgery for CSDH has been reported as a rare but severe complication. An 88-year-old female complained of progressive headache and dizziness for one month. A right fronto-temporo-parietal CSDH with a shift in the midline structures and lateral ventricle compression was shown by computed tomography (CT) scans. Closed-system drainage of the hematoma was performed via one burr hole under general anesthesia. Two hours after we began draining the hematoma at the patient's bedside, the patient complained of headache and exhibited impaired consciousness that progressively degenerated. The drainage bag collected 200 ml of bloody liquid overa short time. A subsequent CT scan revealed SAH and an acute subdural hematoma. A CT angiogram excluded the presence of intracranial aneurysms. The patient died of hypostatic pneumonia after 15 days despite conservative medical management. Relevant literature was reviewed, and we believe that the occurrence of a hematoma in the opposite hemisphere and the hyperperfusion resulted from the rapid drainage of the hematoma, which caused the rupture of weak bridging veins during drainage. Slow decompression with closed-system drainage is recommended to avoid rapid dynamic intracranial changes during drainage of a subdural hematoma, including brain shift or restoration of normal perfusion,to prevent devastating complications. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

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    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  13. Craniotomy Versus Decompressive Craniectomy for Acute Subdural Hematoma: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Moore, Justin M; Griessenauer, Christoph; Dmytriw, Adam A; Scherman, Daniel B; Sheik-Ali, Sharaf; Adeeb, Nimer; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2017-05-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) is a major cause of morbidity after severe traumatic brain injury. Surgical evacuation of the hematoma, either via craniotomy or craniectomy, is the mainstay of treatment in patients with progressive neurologic deficits or significant mass effect. However, the decision to perform either procedure remains controversial. A literature search using major online databases and a manual search of references on the topic of craniotomy and craniectomy for evacuation of subdural hematoma until September 2016 was performed. The outcome variables were analyzed which included residual SDH, revision rate, and clinical outcome. Six comparison studies, with a total number of 2006 craniotomy and 451 craniectomy patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Patients who underwent craniectomy scored significantly lower on the Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of initial presentation. Postoperatively, the rate of residual SDH was significantly lower in the craniectomy group than the craniotomy group (P = 0.004), with no difference in the revision rate. The odds of a poor outcome at follow-up was found to be lower in the craniotomy group (50.1% vs. 60.1%, respectively; P = 0.004). Similarly, mortality rates was lower in the craniotomy group than the craniectomy group (P = 0.004). The safety and efficacy of craniotomy versus decompressive craniectomy in treatment of acute SDH remain controversial. In this study, craniectomy was associated with worse clinical presentation and postoperative outcome compared with craniotomy. However, craniectomy was associated with lower rate of residual SDH after treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prognostic significance of hematoma thickness to midline shift ratio in patients with acute intracranial subdural hematoma: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Wael Mohamed Mohamed; Khedr, Wael Mahmoud; Elwany, Amr Hamdy

    2018-04-01

    Acute intracranial subdural hematoma (ASDH) is commonly associated with a grave prognosis citing a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The parameters to decide on surgical evacuation of the hematoma are sometimes controversial. In this study, we theorized that the ratio between maximal hematoma thickness and midline shift would be varied by associated intrinsic brain pathology emanating from the trauma and would thus objectively evaluates the prognosis in ASDH. The records of patients diagnosed with ASDH who were submitted to surgical evacuation through a craniotomy were revised. Data collected included basic demographic data, preoperative general and neurological examinations, and radiological findings. The maximal thickness of the hematoma (H) on the preoperative CT brain was divided by the midline shift at the same level (MS) formulating the H/MS ratio. Postoperative data obtained included Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), and follow-up period. Sixty-seven eligible patients were included in the study, of which 53 (79.1%) patients were males. Mean age was 34 years. The H/MS ratio ranged from 0.69 to 1.8 with a mean of 0.93. Age above 50 years (P = 0.0218), admission GCS of less than 6 (0.0482), and H/MS ratio of 0.79 or less (P = 0.00435) were negative prognostic factors and correlated with a low postoperative GCS and GOS. H/MS ratio is a useful prognostic tool in patients diagnosed with ASDH and can be added to the armamentarium of data to improve the management decision in this cohort of patients.

  15. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chang Hyeun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Chi Heon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Chun Kee; Jung, Hee-Won; Yoo, Heon

    2015-07-01

    There is inconsistency among the perioperative management strategies currently used for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Moreover, postoperative complications such as acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence affect clinical outcome of cSDH surgery. This study evaluated the risk factors associated with acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence and identified an effective perioperative strategy for cSDH patients. A retrospective study of patients who underwent bur hole craniostomy for cSDH between 2008 and 2012 was performed. A consecutive series of 303 cSDH patients (234 males and 69 females; mean age 67.17 years) was analyzed. Postoperative acute intracranial bleeding developed in 14 patients (4.57%) within a mean of 3.07 days and recurrence was observed in 37 patients (12.21%) within a mean of 31.69 days (range 10-104 days) after initial bur hole craniostomy. The comorbidities of hematological disease and prior shunt surgery were clinical factors associated with acute bleeding. There was a significant risk of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus, but recurrence did not affect the final neurological outcome (p = 0.776). Surgical details, including the number of operative bur holes, saline irrigation of the hematoma cavity, use of a drain, and type of postoperative ambulation, were not significantly associated with outcome. However, a large amount of drainage was associated with postoperative acute bleeding. Bur hole craniostomy is an effective surgical procedure for initial and recurrent cSDH. Patients with hematological disease or a history of prior shunt surgery are at risk for postoperative acute bleeding; therefore, these patients should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage. Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence.

  16. Hematoma subdural agudo traumático: estudo de 110 pacientes Acute traumatic subdural haematomas: study of 110 cases

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    Nicandro de Figueiredo Neto

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma série consecutiva de 110 pacientes com hematoma subdural agudo traumático (HSDA admitidos no serviço de emergência do HBDF no período de 1°-janeiro a 1°-dezembro-1994. Todos os pacientes foram atendidos de acordo com o mesmo protocolo. Houve predominância do sexo masculino (79%, com idade variando entre 14 e 70 anos, sendo os atropelamentos (34% e os acidentes automobilísticos (20% as causas mais comuns. A maioria dos pacientes (85,7% foi admitida muito grave, com 8 pontos ou menos na Escala de Coma Glasgow (ECG, o que influenciou diretamente na mortalidade. A tomografia computadorizada de crânio foi o exame diagnóstico de escolha que mostrou serem as contusões e o inchaço cerebral ("swelling" as lesões intracranianas associadas mais freqüentes. A cirurgia foi realizada em 45,1% dos pacientes, e, em sua maioria, através de craniotomia fronto-têmporo-parietal ampla, com drenagem do hematoma, seguida de plástica da dura-mater. Em 54,9% as condições clínicas não permitiram a realização da cirurgia; neste grupo, cerca de 69,6% estavam em coma profundo à admissão, com 3 pontos na ECG. A letalidade cirúrgica foi de 61,2% e esteve diretamente relacionada à condição clínica inicial e à idade do paciente. A letalidade, incluindo todos os pacientes cirúrgicos e não cirúrgicos com HSDA, mesmo aqueles admitidos já com sinais de falência de tronco cerebral, foi de 79,5%. Além destes pacientes que faleceram, cerca de 7% evoluíram sem seqüelas ou com seqüelas mínimas; outros 11,4% com seqüelas de moderadas a paves e 2,1 % permaneceram em estado vegetativo persistente. Nossos dados estão de acordo com os da literatura no que se refere a elevada taxa de morbidade e mortalidade dos pacientes com HSDA.We report a series of 110 patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma (ASDH admitted at HBDF emergency within 1994 (January Is1 to December PJ.All patients were treated according to the same protocol

  17. Mozart's chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M E

    1993-11-01

    No commemoration of the bicentennial of Mozart's death would be complete without some consideration of that premature yet predictable demise. Mozart's premonitions of death are well known and apparently played a role in the composition of the K.626 Requiem and perhaps other works. His death has traditionally been ascribed to infectious causes, chiefly rheumatic fever or post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, exacerbated by intemperance and chronic penury. Pathology has been difficult because of his supposed burial in a pauper's grave, the location and contents of which were later supposedly lost. Mozart's burial place in St. Mark's Cemetery in Vienna was known and, in the parlance of the day, "reorganized" a decade later, as the occupants of plots were disinterred to make room for the more recently decreased. A skull believed to the Mozart's was saved by the successor of the gravedigger who had supervised Mozart's burial, and then passed into the collections of the anatomist Josef Hyrtl, the municipality of Salzburg, and the Mozarteum museum (Salzburg). Forensic reconstruction of soft tissues related to this skull reveals substantial concordance with Mozart's portraits. The skull suggests premature closure of the metopic suture, which has been suggested on the basis of his physiognomy. A left temporal fracture and concomitant erosions raise the question of chronic subdural hematoma, which would be consistent with several falls in 1789 and 1790 and could have caused the weakness, headaches, and fainting he experienced in 1790 and 1791. Aggressive bloodletting to treat suspected rheumatic fever could have decompensated such a lesion to produce his death on December 5, 1791.

  18. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  19. Mutism after evacuation of acute subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Yonaha, Hiroyasu; Okumoto, Katsuki; Uehara, Hidekatsu; Ie, Tomotsugu; Nagata, Yoshihiko; Suehiro, Eiichi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2005-03-01

    A 7-year-old boy was involved in a road traffic accident. A computed tomography scan revealed an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) of the posterior fossa, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and distortion of the brain stem. Removal of the ASDH was completed 3.5 h after injury. After extubation, the patient rapidly recovered consciousness. He was able to follow commands, although he did not speak. He began to utter 14 days after the injury. His speech became normal 39 days after injury. A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a post-contusional change in the right cerebellum and an ischemic lesion in the pons. Immediate removal of the hematoma is the only therapy for patients with ASDH of the posterior fossa. Although any lesions of the dentate nucleus, red nucleus, thalamus, cerebral cortex, and pons, all of which are involved in this case, are able to cause mutism, his mutism was primarily caused by the severe ASDH of the posterior fossa. The transient nature of this syndrome suggests that the cause of the mutism is trauma-related edema and/or transient ischemia of these structures.

  20. Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Vittorio; Zanconato, Giovanni; Lonati, Gisella; Baggio, Silvia; Gottin, Leonardo; Polati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia is an infrequent occurrence in the obstetric population. Nevertheless, it is a potentially life-threatening complication. In the majority of the cases, the first clinical symptom associated with intracranial subdural bleeding is severe headache, but the clinical course may have different presentations. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with an acute intracranial subdural hematoma shortly after spinal anesthe...

  1. Acute infratentorial traumatic subdural hematoma associated with a torn tentorium cerebelli in a one-year-old boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vielvoye, G.J.; Peters, A.C.B.; Dulken, H. van; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1982-01-01

    The case of a 1-year-old boy with an acute infratentorial subdural hematoma is presented. Surgical intervention revealed a bleeding vein at the edge of a right-sided tentorial tear. Traumatic tentorial tearing has been demonstrated previously only in neonates. Although computed tomography is the most effective method for recognition of this lesion, vertebral angiography may be mandatory for more accurate localization. (orig.)

  2. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishfaq, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Methodology: Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p <0.05 was utilized using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS version 17). Results: Median age of the 62 patients was 72 +-12.5 years. Headache was the most common symptom reported in both groups, (n=47,75.8%) patients. Median thickness of hematoma was 15 +-6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Conclusion: Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another. (author)

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subdural hygroma References Heegaard WG, Biros MH. Head injury. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  4. Plasma aldosterone and CT findings in head injury, especially in acute subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideaki

    1988-12-01

    As we have already reported, an increase in the plasma aldosterone level was regulary found after severe head injury. And the values of plasma aldosterone in unconscious patients with increased intracranial pressure were significantly higher than those in patients without unconsciousness. Thus, plasma aldosterone in acute phase of head injury seems to be a sensitive index of increased intracranial pressure. In the present study, we measured plasma aldosterone levels in three groups ; subdural hematoma with mid-line shift (group A), cerebral contusion without mid-line shift (group B) and cerebral conceussion (group C). In group A, the peak value of aldosterone was markedly high (283.9 +- 142.5). In B, the peak value (143.7 +- 27.8) was higher than in C (116.3 +- 35.0). And, correlation between the serum aldosterone levels and CT findings, especially the mid-line shift was found. As a conclusion, the serum levels of aldosterone seems to be associated with intracranial pressure.

  5. Lumbosacral Subdural Hematoma and Concomitant Acute Lower Extremity Monoparesis After Intracranial Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Chan Jong; Park, Cheol Wan

    2016-11-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs rarely and can cause neurologic deficits. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with SAH caused by rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated by coil embolization on the day of admission. After embolization, the patient's left lower extremity strength had decreased and a spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed subarachnoid hematoma and SDH with severe thecal sac compression at L4-S2. On postbleed day 6, L4-S1 laminectomy was performed, and the strength in all muscle of the left leg improved. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm may cause symptomatic SDH in the lumbosacral spine as well as subarachnoid hematoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  8. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images.

  9. [Computed tomographic semiotics of chronic subdural hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El'-Kadi, Kh A; Likhterman, L B; Kornichenko, V N

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the results of investigation of 72 patients with verified chronic subdural hematomas (CSH) has revealed their CT dense characteristics, the peculiarities of their structure compared with the time of their formation, the patients' age, the clinical stage of disease, and operative findings. Direct and indirect CT signs of uni- and bilateral hemispherical chronic subdural hematomas were described.

  10. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated to Duret hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Alves Martins, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SH is a neurosurgical emergency, usually caused by head trauma. Non-traumatic causes include aneurysm or arterial–venous malformation rupture, coagulopathy and others. We report the case of a 66 year-old man who developed apparently unprovoked signs of increased intracranial pressure. Brain computed tomography scan showed an acute spontaneous SH, surgically treated. Throughout surgery, a ruptured cortical artery with intensive bleeding appeared and was cauterized. After surgery, patient remained comatose and a new CT demonstrated Duret hemorrhage at the brainstem. Acute spontaneous SH of arterial origin is rare and highly lethal, in which a good prognosis relies on early diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Intervention of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xuan Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the intervention effect of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH. Methods: 160 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups, and the ASDH model rats were made by stereotactic autoblood injection, and sham operation group received craniotomy without blood injection. Sham operation group and model group were normally bred after model establishment, and 6 h after model establishment, the treatment group received intragastric administration of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction, and control group received intragastric administration of Piracetam Tablets, 1 time a day. On the 1d, 3d, 5d and 7d after model establishment, the general conditions of rats (activity, food intake and mental state were observed, blood was collected via auricula dextra, ELISA method was used to determine peripheral plasma NSE and S100毬 protein contents, routine HE staining was conducted after perfusion fixation, the neurons in blood injection side of brain tissue were counted, and the neuron damage was observed. Results: 26 rats were dead in the experiment. The general conditions of sham operation group were significantly better than those of other groups, treatment group was significantly better than model group and control group on the 5d group (P0.05; neuron count of sham operation group was basically stable, treatment group was not different from model group and control group on the 1d (P>0.05, treatment group was better than model group (P0.05 on the 3d, and treatment group was better than model group and control group on the 5d and 7d (P0.05, S100毬 protein and NSE contents decreased significantly on the 3d, and treatment group was significantly different from model group and control group (P<0.05, S100毬 protein and NSE contents increased on the 5d and 7d, the increase in treatment group was slower than that in model group and control group, and there was significant difference (P<0.05. Conclusion

  12. Chronic subdural hematomas caused by vibrating Chinese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We present two middle aged Nigerian patients who developed significant chronic subdural hematomas weeks after going on vibrating Chinese massage chairs. This complication of using the chairs has not been previously reported.

  13. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  14. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  15. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuko; Sorimachi, Takatoshi; Honda, Yumie; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2017-09-01

    Sex differences in various diseases recently have been recognized as an important factor in the approach to more efficient preventive and therapeutic medicine. We clarified sex differences in the clinical characteristics of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) by comparing men and women with CSDH, as there is a well-known male predominance in the prevalence of CSDH. Clinical factors and computed tomography findings were investigated retrospectively in 490 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital between 2006 and 2015 who were diagnosed with CSDH. On univariate analysis, women were significantly older than men (P hematoma, and death as outcomes at discharge were significantly more frequent than in men (P < 0.05). In contrast, women had less frequent instances of good recovery and less alcohol intake (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated female sex as an independent predictor of consciousness disturbance at admission. Female sex also was identified as a predictor of death at discharge. We demonstrated sex differences in the clinical characteristics of CSDH. In the future, management of patients with CSDH with regard to sex differences in disease characteristics could be expected to improve the outcomes of women, which have been worse than in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Subdural hematoma from a cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne J; Mitha, Alim P; Germain, Rasha; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of a cavernous malformation presenting with a subdural hematoma. A 27-year-old woman was admitted with progressively worsening headache, vomiting, weakness, and word-finding difficulties 1 week after she was discharged from an outside hospital, where she was managed conservatively for a presumed traumatic subdural hematoma. Computed tomography revealed an enlarging subacute left hemispheric subdural hematoma for which she underwent drill craniostomy. Postprocedural magnetic resonance imaging showed a posterior left temporal lobe mass consistent with a cavernous malformation juxtaposed with the subdural hematoma. Craniotomy for resection of the lesion was performed. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. The signs and symptoms, diagnostic imaging, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hematoma was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation, which is a rare finding associated with these malformations. The clinical course, radiologic, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reversible Parkinsonism secondary to chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajid Nazir Wani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary parkinsonism is attributable to a wide variety of causes including supratentorial mass lesions. While tumors are known to present with parkinsonism, chronic subdural hematoma is rarely seen presenting as rapidly deteriorating parkinsonian features with complete disappearance following evacuation of hematoma. The authors present two such patients-70- and 78-year-old males who presented with sudden onset of parkinsonism features. Both failed to recollect any significant head injury. Imaging diagnosed the presence of chronic subdural hematomas, being unilateral in one and bilateral in other. Surgical evacuation resulted in complete resolution of parkinsonian symptoms. These cases reinforce earlier studies for chronic subdural hematoma to be one of the causes of reversible parkinsonism apparently from distortion of basal ganglia mechanically and bringing changes in dopaminergic function, harming the susceptible aging brain.

  18. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma in capoeira sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoğlu, Erhan; Serbes, Gökhan; Sanli, Metin; Sari, Onur; Sekerci, Zeki

    2008-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas in young people is extremely rare and has some provoking factors such as V-P shunts, arachnoid cyst, anticoagulant drug usage, vigorous sports and coagulopathies. A static or dynamic mechanical load is almost always delivered to skull associated with either mild or severe head trauma. A 25-year old-man who was previously healthy has complained of intermittent headache for six months. He had been interested in capoiera (Brazilian exciting sport) for two years and has had no any evidence of head injury. After admission, he was operated immediately because of chronic subdural hematoma. We report a patient who is the first chronic subdural hematoma in the literature due to playing capoeira.

  20. Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, J; Sjåvik, K; Ståhl, F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a prevalent condition often seen in the elderly, with surgery being the treatment of choice when symptomatic. So far, few have explored the surgical outcomes in patients 90 years or older. The aim of this study was to investigate outcome after c...... neurosurgical centers. In a comparative analysis, the primary end-point was difference in hematoma recurrence rates between the ≥90 y/o and

  1. Bilateral Biconvex Frontal Chronic Subdural Hematoma Mimicking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities encountered in daily neurosurgical practice.[1] CSDH is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and arachnoid.[2] We discuss the clinical and radiological findings in a case of ...

  2. Craniotomy Versus Craniectomy for Acute Traumatic Subdural Hematoma in the United States: A National Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Barret; Rousseau, Justin; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Griesdale, Donald E

    2016-04-01

    The optimal surgical management of acute traumatic subdural hematoma (ASDH) is controversial; both craniectomy and craniotomy are performed. The purpose of this study was to determine the current management of ASDH in the United States. This retrospective cohort study used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the years 2006-2011 to examine patients with a primary diagnosis of ASDH. All patients ≥18 years old with a primary diagnosis of ASDH were included in the analysis. Patients with procedure codes for craniectomy and craniotomy were isolated from the database. Propensity score matching based on logistic regression was used to match craniotomy to craniectomy in a 1:1 fashion. There were 47,911,414 hospitalizations analyzed. Of 60,435 patients with ASDH identified, 1763 underwent craniotomy and 177 underwent craniectomy. The average age of patients who underwent craniectomy was 49.5 years (SD 20.8) compared with an average age of 68.9 years (SD 17.1) of patients who underwent craniotomy (P craniotomy (median duration 14.3 days [interquartile range 25] for craniectomy vs. 10.9 days [interquartile range 9] for craniotomy, P Craniotomy is the preferred surgical technique for management of ASDH in the United States, being performed 10 times more frequently than craniectomy. Craniectomy was associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality after propensity score matched analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    OpenAIRE

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resoluti...

  4. PATOBIOLOGÍA DEL HEMATOMA SUBDURAL CRÓNICO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Sabogal Barrios

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of subdural cronic hematoma in all ages is a therapeutic challenge. Chronic subdural hematoma is a disease that can be fatal without surgical treatment. A variety of treatment options like subdural tapping, endoscopic washout, shunting and craniotomy have been discussed. In chronic subdural hematoma, spontaneous resolution with conservative treatment is not an common therapeutic method because it has causes high mortality, requires long periods of time, and finally, many patients need surgical treatment. The etiology, physiopathology and surgical alternatives in the treatment of subdural chronic hematoma is discussed.

  5. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage.

  6. Two Cases of Subdural Hematoma in Spontaneous CSF Hypovolemia

    OpenAIRE

    島谷, 佳光; 井戸川, 美帆; 阿部, 剛典; 仁平, 敦子; 溝渕, 雅広; 佐光, 一也; 田中, 千春

    2007-01-01

    Two cases of subdural hematoma in spontaneous CSF hypovolemia. The typical orthostatic features were replaced by continuous, nonpositional headache. MEI showed subdural hematoma. These cases emphasize that spontaneous CSF hypovolemia is not an entirely benign condition and that subudural hematoma may accompany persistent intracranial hypotension.

  7. Pathogenesis of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, W.

    1990-01-01

    In a retrospective examination, the developmental process of chronic subdural haematomas (CSDH) was investigated by means of sequential CT studies. All CSDHs were found to arise from subdural hygromas by means of encapsulation and bleeding into the hygroma content: hypodense, isodense and 'mixed' hyper/hypodense CSDHs were shown to develop due to this mechanism. It is suggested that low intracranial pressure represents the main factor for membrane formation and the development of CSDH of traumatic as well as non-traumatic origin. It is hypothesised that CSDHs are space-filling rather than space-occupying and represent some sort of adaption process to intracranial hypotension. The developmental process described is well suited to explain specific features of CSDH, including membrane formation and the latent interval. (orig.) [de

  8. Calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishige, Naoki; Sunami, Kenro; Sato, Akira; Watanabe, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    A case of calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is reported. A left frontal subdural hematoma with left putaminal hemorrhage was incidentally found when a CT scan was performed to evaluate right hemiparesis and aphasia in a 55-year-old man. The putaminal hemorrhage was not very extensive, but his clinical symptoms were rather serious. Not only the putaminal hemorrhage, but also the presence of the calcified subdural hematoma was considered to have caused his clinical deterioration. The subtotal removal of the calcified subdural hematoma brought about a good result. (author)

  9. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Subdural Hygroma Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellingson Silva Paiva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Subdural hygroma is reported to occur in 5%–20% of all patients with closed head trauma, the treatment is controversial and in symptomatic cases surgical drainage is need. We report on a new case with remote acute epidural hematoma (AEH after subdural hygroma drainage. Case Presentation. A 38-year-old man suffered blunt head trauma and had diffuse axonal injury grade III in CT scan. A CT scan that was late performed showed an increasing subdural fluid collection with mild mass effect and some effacement of the left lateral ventricle. We perform a trepanation with drainage of a hypertensive subdural collection with citrine aspect. Postoperative tomography demonstrated a large left AEH. Craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma were performed. Conclusion. The mechanism of remote postoperative AEH formation is unclear. Complete reliance on neurologic monitoring, trust in an early CT scan, and a relative complacency after an apparently successful initial surgery for hygroma drainage may delay the diagnosis of this postoperative AEH.

  10. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, F. A. M.; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Rijn, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as

  11. Spontaneous resolution of post-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we present a case of spontaneously resolved post-traumatic bilateral chronic subdural hematoma within a period of one month in a 55-year-old male and we discuss the probable mechanisms of pathophysiology in the spontaneous resolution of chronic subdural hematoma. Keywords: Antiaggregation therapy, chronic ...

  12. Unintended Complication of Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Percutaneous Epidural Neuroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, Kee D.; Lim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty (PEN) is a known interventional technique for the management of spinal pain. As with any procedures, PEN is associated with complications ranging from mild to more serious ones. We present a case of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN requiring surgical evacuation. We review the relevant literature and discuss possible complications of PEN and patholophysiology of intracranial subdural hematoma after PEN.

  13. Association of Antithrombotic Drug Use With Subdural Hematoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Incidence of subdural hematoma has been reported to be increasing. To what extent this is related to increasing use of antithrombotic drugs is unknown. Objectives: To estimate the association between use of antithrombotic drugs and subdural hematoma risk and determine trends in subdural...... hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use in the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control study of 10 010 patients aged 20 to 89 years with a first-ever subdural hematoma principal discharge diagnosis from 2000 to 2015 matched by age, sex, and calendar year to 400...... 380 individuals from the general population (controls). Subdural hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use was identified using population-based regional data (population: 484 346) and national data (population: 5.2 million) from Denmark. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds...

  14. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Concomitant Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Yoshida, Yasuhisa

    2016-06-01

    Concomitant intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) are rare, and the etiology has yet to be elucidated. However, migration of the hematoma intracranially to a spinal site or coincidence of both intracranial and spinal CSDHs have been proposed as etiologies. We report a case of concomitant intracranial CSDH and spinal SDH in which spinal hematoma might have migrated from the cranial lesion. A previously healthy 58-year-old man with previous trauma to the occiput and lumbar spine suffered from headache, lumbago, and left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography revealed right-sided intracranial CSDH, and he underwent single burr-hole craniotomy. Although clinical symptoms tended to improve, left lower-limb weakness and lumbago remained. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3 days after craniotomy revealed SDH extending from T1-S1. Because conservative therapy had not improved clinical symptoms, hematoma evacuation was performed via a left L5 hemilaminectomy 1 week after craniotomy. The patient showed complete recovery immediately postoperatively. We reviewed the cases of 22 patients with concomitant intracranial CSDH and spinal SDH to discuss the features, etiology, and treatment strategy. Although surgical intervention was mainly selected for intracranial CSDH, conservative observation was mainly selected for spinal SDH. Outcomes were good in all patients. We created a new classification of spinal SDH shape using sagittal MRI. This classification indicates that cases with both ventral and dorsal SDH tend to require surgical intervention. This classification may help in deciding treatment strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Chronic subdural hematoma and transient neurologic deficits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, F; Milandre, L; Lemarquis, P; Bazan, M; Jau, P

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) revealed by transient neurological accidents are reported. Although well-known this condition is rare: 1 to 9 p. 100 of CSDHs. Questioning may bring out a history of cranial injury and headache, even minor ones, which are unusual in transient ischemic accidents (TIA). Transient phenomena, such as motor aphasia or speech interruption, point to the diagnosis, especially in male patients over 60 years of age. The finding at electroencephalography of a delta activity more than 48 hours after a TND should exclude the diagnosis of TIA until a CT scan is performed. Since the causes of neurological deficits regressing within less than 24 hours may be ischemia as well a hemorrhage or tumour, the term of transient neurological accident (TNA) should preferably be used, and an emergency CT scan should be performed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Owing to the possibility of another concomitant cause of TNA, the finding of a subdural haematoma should not deter from pursuing cardiovascular examinations. The mechanism of TNA probably involves a vascular factor, as suggested by I-123 IMP cerebral SPECT which shows an intercritical decrease in cerebral blood flow and/or an epileptic factor.

  17. Influence of Postoperative Thrombosis Prophylaxis on the Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Burr-Hole Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licci, Maria; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2018-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a commonly encountered disease in neurosurgic practice, whereas its increasing prevalence is compatible with the ageing population. Recommendations concerning postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and postoperative application of thrombosis prophylaxis. Retrospective, consecutive sample of patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma over 3 years. Single, academic medical center. All patients undergoing surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma with burr-hole drainage. Exclusion: patients under the age of 18 years, who presented with an acute subdural hematoma and those who underwent a craniotomy. We compared patients receiving thrombosis prophylaxis treatment after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma with those who were not treated. Primary outcome measure was reoperation of chronic subdural hematoma due to recurrence. Secondary outcome measures were thromboembolic and cardiovascular events, hematologic findings, morbidity, and mortality. In addition, a subanalysis comparing recurrence rate dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) was undertaken. Overall recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma was 12.7%. Out of the 234 analyzed patients, 135 (57.3%) received postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis (low-molecular-weight heparin) applied subcutaneously. Recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma occurred in the thrombosis prophylaxis group and control group in 12 patients (8.9%) and 17 patients (17.2%), respectively, showing no significant difference (odds ratio, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.21 - 1.04]). A subanalysis comparing recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) showed no significant difference either (odds ratio, 2.80 [95% CI, 0

  18. Chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Kübra Mehel; Güzel, Is Il; Oskovi, Aslı; Guzel, Ali Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia is a rare and life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is the postdural puncture headache. When severe and persistent headache after spinal anesthesia occur, differential diagnosis can be explored. In this report, we aimed to evaluate a patient with persistent headache following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a 31-year-old woman ,and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma.

  19. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  20. Assessment of drainage techniques for evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Sagberg, Lisa Millgård

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical procedures. The benefit of postoperative passive subdural drainage compared with no drains has been established, but other drainage techniques are common, and their effectiveness compared with passive s...

  1. Hematoma subdural crónico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Martínez Rozo

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 169 pacientes con diagnóstico de Hematoma Subdural Crónico (H.S.C. admitidos en el Servicio Neurocirugía del Hospital San Juan de Dios desde 1959 a 1980. Los datos clínicos y paraclínicos fueron recopilados en un formato precodificado y luego perforados en tarjetas de computador. Usando el Computador 360/40 disponible en el Centro de Cálculo de la Universidad Nacional y el Computador Intel de el DANE y utilizando el programa SPSS se clasificó, ordenó y depuró.la información. Se analizaron en cuadro y gráficas los resultados que son los siguientes: el 75% de los pacientes hospitalizados por T.C.E. tenían Hematomas Subdurales Crónicos. El mayor número de casos estaba entre 50 y 60 años. La incidencia de H.S.C. era más elevada en el grupo de los hombres. La cefalea ocurrió en el 75% de los casos, el antecedente traumático estaba presente en 83% de casos y la alteración de la conciencia en el 71%. El 90% de los pacientes consultó dentro de los primeros 4 meses. La angiografía continúa siendo el examen de elección con el 100% de positividad. En la T.A.C.la isodensidad en diferentes etapas de evolución del H.S.C. dificulta el diagnóstico. El E.E.G. tiene una positividad del 93% . La frecuencia de H.S.C. bilateral fue de 20%. La anisocoria fue un índice poco confiable para indicar el sitio del Hematoma porque hubo 11 casos de anisocoria por midriasis derecha que tenían el hematoma contralateral. El predominio parietal en la localización del H.S,C. creemos que se deba a su mecanismo de producción. Se analiza la mortalidad que fue en el estudio de 8% , las secuelas aumentaron con la edad de los pacientes. El estudio de seguimiento se hizo en el 40% de los pacientes que sobrevivieron y demostró la baja morbilidad del H.S.C.

  2. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1987-01-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed. (author)

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma with persistent hiccups: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Takemoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Supratentorial hiccup is a rare condition and no patients with persistent hiccups and chronic subdural hematoma have been reported. A 38-year-old man with intractable hiccups, headache, and nausea was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography revealed a supratentorial chronic subdural hematoma on the left side. After burr hole surgery to remove the hematoma his hiccups disappeared immediately and he was discharged home on the 3rd postoperative day with no neurological deficits. Although the role of the supratentorial nervous system in hiccups is not clearly understood, supratentorial areas play an important role in the stimulation or suppression of the hiccup centers. Chronic hiccups may be a presenting symptom of chronic subdural hematoma attending headache with nausea if it has no gastrointestinal abnormality.

  4. Traumatic Lumbar Subdural Hematoma in the Absence of Intracranial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jared; Gillick, John L; LaBagnara, Michael; Das, Kaushik; Hillard, Virany H

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is an exceedingly rare condition, with those occurring in the absence of intracranial disease being particularly uncommon. Only 13 such cases have been reported. Although theories exist to describe the pathophysiology of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma, the precise mechanism and guidelines for management remain unclear. This report describes a 37-year-old woman who suffered a traumatic assault who developed progressive low back pain with radicular symptoms 2 days after presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbar subdural hematoma extending from L1 to L5. No intracranial disease was detected on imaging. Definitive guidelines for management of this condition are uncertain; however, successful use of conservative management, lumbar drainage, and surgical evacuation has been reported. This patient underwent a lumbar laminectomy with evacuation of the hematoma, resulting in immediate pain relief and resolution of symptoms within 1 week of the procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Initial hematoma pressure and clinical recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma in cases where percutaneous subdural tapping was performed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Akitake; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Yoshioka, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Taro; Yonezawa, Koki

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous subdural tapping for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) can measure initial hematoma pressure, which cannot be measured using burr-hole craniotomy. Initial hematoma pressure has not been discussed as a risk factor for recurrence. We evaluated the clinical features for recurrence, which included initial hematoma pressure. The study involved 71 unilateral CSDH cases whose initial hematoma pressure was measured using percutaneous subdural tapping. Clinical recurrence was identified in 19 cases (23%). Age, sex, neurological grading, alcohol consumption, presence of head injury, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, antiplatelet, anticoagulant medication, hematoma volume on computed tomography (CT) images, and initial hematoma pressure were compared between non-recurrence and recurrence groups. The initial hematoma pressure was 12.6±4.5 cmH 2 O in the non-recurrence group, and 15.5±6.2 cmH 2 O in the recurrence group (p<0.05). The other factors did not differ significantly except hematoma volume on CT images (92±45 ml in the non-recurrence group and 123±43 ml in the recurrence group, p<0.05). Cases with high initial hematoma pressure should be closely observed. (author)

  6. Subdural Hematoma: A Rare Adverse Complication From Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nikul; Aymat-Torrente, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHA) are bone conduction hearing aids commonly implantated by Ear, Nose, and Throat surgeons. We present the first documented case of a subdural hematoma secondary to primary fixation of a BAHA. We present a 65-year-old male patient undergoing a left sided BAHA for bilateral chronic ear infections and difficulty wearing conventional hearing aids. The procedure was uneventful, however, the patient developed a postoperative large acute left temporoparietal intracerebral hematoma associated with an ipsilateral acute subdural hematoma. This required emergency transfer to the local tertiary neurosurgical center for a left decompressive craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. The patient required a prolonged stay on an intensive care unit and was eventually discharged to the community for on-going neurological rehabilitation. This is a rare and devastating complication BAHA surgery. Otologist, general ENT surgeons, and neurosurgeons should be aware of this life-threatening complication of BAHA surgery.

  7. Delayed Onset Intracranial Subdural Hematoma Following Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işik, Semra; Yilmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Akakin, Akin; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    In this case-based review, the authors analyzed relevant literature with an illustrative patient of theirs about subdural hematoma secondary to dural tear at spinal surgery. Intracranial hypotension is a condition of decreased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure. Even though intracranial hypotension is temporary and can be managed conservatively, it may progress and result in subdural fluid collections, hematoma formations, "brain sagging or slumping" states, syringohydromyelia, encephalopathy, coma, and even death. The authors present an 81-year-old man admitted with subdural hematoma 50 days following previous spinal surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. In his previous spinal surgery he had had dural tear, which had been closed primarily. To the literature, only 21 patients have been reported to develop subdural hematoma following spinal surgery. In patients with subdural hematoma following spinal surgery, the female:male ratio was 3:4 and the median age was 55 years. Surgical diagnoses for previous spinal surgeries were intervertebral disc herniation (5), spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis (6), failed back syndrome (2), tethered cord syndrome and myelodysplastic spine (2), spinal cord tumor, spinal epidural hematoma, vertebral dislocation, vertebral fracture, vertebral tumor, and inflammatory spine. Patients presented with signs and symptoms of subdural hematoma within 6 hours to 50 days following the spinal surgery. Source of cerebrospinal fluid leak was most commonly from lumbar region (13 patients, 62%). Ten of 21 (48%) patients were treated conservatively. Late-onset neurological findings should not prevent the evaluation of cranial vault with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal dural tear should be more aggressively treated instead of suture alone approach, when recognized in older patients during the spinal surgery.

  8. Chronic subdural hematoma fluid and its computerized tomographic density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuzawa, Hideaki; Sato, Jinichi; Kamitani, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Midori

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory and in vivo CT analysis were performed on 19 chronic subdural hematomas and five subdural hygromas. In these 25 hematoma samples, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, and hemoglobin (Hgb) varied greatly, though, these values correlated well with the CT densities. Plasma protein content was fairly constant with an average of 7.1+-0.8g/dl. There were four hematoma samples with RBC of less than 20x10 4 μl or Hgb of less than 2.0g/dl. Their CT values ranged between 18 and 23 H.U., which were considered close to the in vivo serum level CT density. Five hygroma fluid showed no RBC and very little protein content of less than 0.4g/dl. CT density ranged between -2 and 13 H.U. The edge effect of the skull was experimentally studied using a phantom skull filled with water. This revealed a remarkable overshoot of the CT values within ten pixels from the inner wall of the skull. Visual observation of the original CT pictures revealed four low density hematomas and seven mixed density ones. When compared to the density of the ventricular cavity, all of the low density hematomas and the supernatant part of the mixed density ones were clearly higher in density. All five hygromas appeared CSF dense or lower. In conclusion, because of the edge effect by the skull, thin subdural fluids could not be diagnosed by CT alone. Thick subdural fluids could be differentiated as either hematoma or hygroma by their CT densities. Subdural hematomas had in vivo CT densities of at least serum level or approximately 20 H.U., while subdural hygromas had densities close to CSF. These characteristics were best appreciated by visual observation of the CT scan films. (J.P.N.)

  9. Comparison Between Cerebral Tissue Oxygen Tension and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Engell, Susanne I; Johnsen, Rikke Aagaard

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An experimental swine model (n = 7) simulating an acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) was employed (1) to explore the relation between the brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO(2)) and the regional cerebral energy metabolism as obtained by microdialysis, and (2) to define the lowest level of PbtO(2...

  10. Analysis of infantile subdural hematoma caused by abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Nishio, Kenji; Fujimoto, Takatoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We report infantile subdural hematoma caused by abuse. Between January 2006 and December 2009, 10 cases of definite and highly suspicious abusive subdural hematoma in infants were treated at Nara Medical University Hospital. The mean age was 5.4 months. On CT examination, severe cerebral swelling was seen in 8 (80%) and wide spreading cerebral ischemia and atrophy in 9 (90%). Retinal hemorrhage was commonly seen in this series (90%). Subdural drainage and/or subdural-peritoneal shunt surgeries were performed in 6 cases, and intensive combined therapy of mild hypothermia and barbiturate was adapted in 7 cases. Favorable outcome was achieved in only 3 cases. In spite of aggressive treatment, clinical outcome are still bad. In our series, assailants were predominantly not father but mother. There were various and complex factors for child abuse. Cautious insight and suspicion are necessary to detect abusive injuries in infants. It is very important to endeavor to prevent recurrences of abusive injuries. (author)

  11. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  12. Clinical and computerized tomographic studies of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Takahiro; Maegawa, Mototsugu; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Tanikake, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    The authors' experience is based on 84 patients with chronic subdural hematomas verified by surgery. Analysis of CT findings of the chronic subdural hematoma led to a classification of four different types: low, iso-, mixed and high density. The mixed density type was classified into two subdivisions: Type I characterized by the sharp border between two compartments and Type II characterized by high density around the hematoma capsule. There was tendency in the high density type group for the clinical course from onset to be the most rapid, the mass effect for the brain the strongest and the period from onset to surgical intervention the shortest. They were slower, weaker and longer in order of the mixed, iso- and low density types. As a result of analysis of hematoma content, there was no correlation among Ca ion concentration, total protein volume and types of hematoma, but there were some significant correlations among hemoglobin, hematocrit and types of hematoma. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were highest in hematoma content of the high density type and were lower in the order of the high density part of the mixed density type, isodensity type and low density type. However, the hematoma content in the low density type showed the highest value of LDH. (author)

  13. Subdural hematoma cases identified through a Danish patient register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Halle, Bo; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the usefulness of Danish patient registers for epidemiological studies of subdural hematoma (SDH) and to describe clinical characteristics of validated cases. METHODS: Using a patient register covering a geographically defined area in Denmark, we retrieved...

  14. Hypothalamo-Pituitary Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hána, V.; Kosák, M.; Masopust, V.; Netuka, D.; Lacinová, Z.; Kršek, M.; Marek, J.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2012), s. 161-167 ISSN 0862-8408 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9794 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : hypopituitarism * subdural hematoma * brain injury * growth hormone deficiency Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  15. Predictors of Recurrence and Complications After Chronic Subdural Hematoma Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Kristiansson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of recurrence and moderate to severe complications after burr-hole surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian single-center population-based cohort of 759 adult patients with cSDH operated with...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in chronic subdural hematomas of early stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Naoto; Muraki, Masaaki; Ohishi, Haruyuki (Shinshiro Municipal Hospital, Aichi (Japan)); Ninchoji, Toshiaki; Uemura, Kenichi

    1990-10-01

    The characteristic findings to distinguish chronic subdural hematomas of early stages from subdural CSF collections or enlarged subarachnoid spaces, was assessed by magnetic resonance imagings (MRI). Three sets of MRI, pre- and post-contrast as well as delayed post-contrast T{sub 1}-weighted coronal images were obtained in 20 cases, in which low intensity subdural spaces were observed in 6 on the right, in 5 on the left and 9 bilaterally. The characteristic findings observed were as follows: a low signal intensity band between low intensity subdural space and cerebral surface at the precontrast MRI; linear enhancement at the outer surface of low intensity space at postcontrast MRI; and enhancement of the low intensity space at the delayed MRI. A combination of more than 2 of the above-mentioned findings was noted in 24 out of 29 low intensity spaces, 7 of which were confirmed by surgery as chronic subdural hematomas with outer membranes. In the remaining 17, low intensity spaces spontaneously regressed in 10, and increased their intensity and/or changed their sizes in 7. This data was obtained from follow-up MRI's. Such a combination in the initial MRI's may indicate developing chronic subdural hematomas. In 5 out of 29 low intensity spaces, neither intensity nor size changed, nor did enhancement show in delayed imagings in the follow-up MRI's, which may strongly suggest either subdural CSF collections or enlarged subarachnoid spaces. In conclusion, the low intensity band is speculated to be subarachnoid space shown up secondarily by the relative increase of intensity in the low intensity space; the linear enhancement is thought to be outer membrane formation, and the delayed-enhancement of low intensity spaces may be extravasation of contrast media from the outer membrane. (author).

  17. Neurological and functional outcomes of subdural hematoma evacuation in patients over 70 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mulligan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common disease entity treated by neurosurgical intervention. Although the incidence increases in the elderly population, there is a paucity of studies examining their surgical outcomes. Objectives: To determine the neurological and functional outcomes of patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical decompression for subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 45 patients above 70 years who underwent craniotomy or burr holes for acute, chronic or mixed subdural hematomas. We analyzed both neurological and functional status before and after surgery. Results: Forty-five patients 70 years of age or older were treated in our department during the study period. There was a significant improvement in the neurological status of patients from admission to follow up as assessed using the Markwalder grading scale (1.98 vs. 1.39; P =0.005, yet no improvement in functional outcome was observed as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Score. Forty-one patients were admitted from home, however only 20 patients (44% were discharged home, 16 (36% discharged to nursing home or rehab, 6 (13% to hospice and 3 (7% died in the postoperative period. Neurological function improved in patients who were older, had a worse pre-operative neurological status, were on anticoagulation and had chronic or mixed acute and chronic hematoma. However, no improvement in functional status was observed. Conclusion: Surgical management of SDH in patients over 70 years of age provides significant improvement in neurological status, but does not change functional status.

  18. Differential diagnostic problems in elderly chronic subdural hematoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Valentin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH are recognized as common in older people (over 70 years. They are produced in minor injuries (falls on the same level. These CSDH have minor symptoms (headache, memory disorders, balance disorders, cognitive disorders, etc. and are classified as signs for the onset of dementia, circulatory failure - basilar vertebra, Alzheimer, etc. A simple brain CT scan can highlight these hematomas and a neurosurgical intervention will achieve extremely favorable prognosis. There are many pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of CSH especially with strokes being so common at this age.

  19. [Bilateral subdural hematoma secondary to accidental dural puncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Sofía; Gredilla, Elena; Martínez, Blanca; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman, who received epidural analgesia for labour pain and subsequently presented post-dural puncture headache. Conservative treatment was applied and epidural blood patch was performed. In the absence of clinical improvement and due to changes in the postural component of the headache, a brain imaging test was performed showing a bilateral subdural hematoma. The post-dural puncture headache is relatively common, but the lack of response to established medical treatment as well as the change in its characteristics and the presence of neurological deficit, should raise the suspicion of a subdural hematoma, which although is rare, can be lethal if not diagnosed and treated at the right time. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Bilateral subdural hematoma secondary to accidental dural puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Sofía; Gredilla, Elena; Martínez, Blanca; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman, who received epidural analgesia for labor pain and subsequently presented post-dural puncture headache. Conservative treatment was applied and epidural blood patch was performed. In the absence of clinical improvement and due to changes in the postural component of the headache, a brain imaging test was performed showing a bilateral subdural hematoma. The post-dural puncture headache is relatively common, but the lack of response to established medical treatment as well as the change in its characteristics and the presence of neurological deficit, should raise the suspicion of a subdural hematoma, which although is rare, can be lethal if not diagnosed and treated at the right time. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. MR imaging evaluation of subdural hematomas in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, T.C.; Rumack, C.M.; Horgan, J.G.; Hyden, P.; Krugman, R.

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging is the most accurate modality for determining the presence, number, and aging of subdural hematomas. Based on seven patients studied with CT and MR imaging, MR imaging should be the gold standard in child abuse evaluations. Since the history of child abuse is often ambiguous, MR imaging can assist in dating when the injury occurred. MR imaging in two perpendicular planes is needed, with one plane having both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Chronic subdural hematomas on CT often have the same density as cerebrospinal fluid and may be misdiagnosed as atrophy or unrecognized. Therefore, the child may be returned into a dangerous situation and subjected to recurrent episodes of battering

  2. Giant unusual shaped chronic subdural hematoma in a patient with untreated congenital hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Arvind; Ojha, Bal. K.; Chandra, Anil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Singh, Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a well known complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion for hydrocephalus and usually spreads out over the cerebral convexity, and appears as a crescent shaped lesion on imaging. Chronic subdural hematoma in a case of untreated compensated congenital hydrocephalus has not been reported in English literature. We report the rare case of an adult with congenital hydrocephalus with a huge unusual shaped hemispheric subdural hematoma.

  3. Hypothermia for Patients Requiring Evacuation of Subdural Hematoma: Effect on Spreading Depolarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    randomized multi-center clinical study of very early hypothermia in patients with traumatic brain injury who require emergent surgical evacuation of a...injury (TBI) patients undergoing surgical evacuation of acute subdural hematomas (ASDH). The study is conducted under Exception From Informed Consent...electrode arrays will be placed on the brain after surgical ASDH evacuation, and spreading depolarizations will be monitored during the post-operative

  4. Bilateral subdural hematoma secondary to accidental dural puncture

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, Sofía; Gredilla, Elena; Martínez, Blanca; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 25-year-old woman, who received epidural analgesia for labor pain and subsequently presented post-dural puncture headache. Conservative treatment was applied and epidural blood patch was performed. In the absence of clinical improvement and due to changes in the postural component of the headache, a brain imaging test was performed showing a bilateral subdural hematoma. The post-dural puncture headache is relatively common, but the lack of response to established medic...

  5. Unoperated subdural hematomas. Long-term follow-up study by brain scan and electroencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusins, J.; Jaffe, R.; Bender, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors report nine patients selected from over 100 patients with subdural hematomas successfully treated without surgery. These patients were followed for as long as 5 years. All had angiographically demonstrated subdural hematomas. Electroencephalograms (EEG) documented well the clinical improvement of the patient, but were poor guides to the true size of the hematoma, since EEG returns to normal early in the patient's course. Static scans are a better guide to the presence of a subdural hematoma, but they lag behind clinical improvement and usually remain abnormal for considerable periods of time after a major portion of the hematoma has been reabsorbed, and the patient is asymptomatic

  6. A case report and technical tip of chronic subdural hematoma treated by the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres M. Alvarez-Pinzon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH tend to occur most commonly in the elderly population, usually resulting from minor or insignificant head trauma. The pathophysiology behind CSDH is often directly associated with cerebral atrophy, and other causes of cerebral atrophy such as alcoholism or dementia. Other predisposing factors include diabetes, coagulopathy, use of anticoagulants (including aspirin, seizure disorders, and CSF shunts. Considerable evidence supporting the use of external drainage after evacuation of primary CSDH is readily available in the literature. Case report: We report the case of a 72 year-old male with a history of recurrent left subdural hematoma presenting to the neurosurgical clinic with a two-day history of personality changes, difficulty speaking, urinary incontinence, and headaches. Burr hole evacuation was performed with the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt. At the one-month follow-up appointment, the patient had complete resolution of symptoms and CT scan showed no new recurrence of the subdural hematoma. Conclusions: Although several treatment options are available for the management of CSDH, recurrence of hematoma is a major and very common complication that may result in re-injury due to mass effect caused by chronic hematoma. However, placement of subdural peritoneal shunt for the treatment of CSDH can reduce the recurrence rate of CSDH and therefore, reduce the risk of brain re-injury. Keywords: Chronic subdural hematoma, CSDH, Subdural peritoneal shunt, Head trauma

  7. Chronic subdural hematomas: a review of 94 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yilmaz

    2015-03-01

    Material and Methods: Consecutive patients operated with a diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma between January 2003 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Etiology and medical status of the patients at the time of admission were noted. Exact localization of the chronic subdural hematoma was detected by computed tomography scans and follow-up was maintained with magnetic resonance imaging. The outcome of the patients was evaluated one month after injury, by assesing activities of daily living. Results: Ninety-four consecutive patients met the eligibility criteria for the study. The mean age was 65 (range 45 to 85 years. In 74 (78.7% patients, head injury was the supposed origin. In 20 (21.3% patients, no trauma was evident. Most common symptom reported at the time of admission was headache (100%, and the most common neurological finding was confusion (87.2%. The majority of the patients had a mild neurological deficit with a Glascow Coma Scale score over eight. In general, 90.4% of cases were sufficiently treated by a single operation, while 9.6% needed a second procedure. During the follow-up, 91.5% of the patients returned to daily living activities on the first month kontrol. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of chronic subdural haematoma can give a high rate of complete recovery to normal life. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 22-27

  8. Post-traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas of the spinal cord in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronarski, J.; Wozniak, E.; Kiwerski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostics of epi- and subdural hematomas of the spinal cord is discussed on the basis of 1992 records of Konstancin Rehabilitation Center. 54 patients with symptoms of partial or complete cord injury were submitted to MR imaging. In 4 cases (7.5%) epi- and subdural hematoma was found to contribute to neurological condition of the patient. MRI determines indications for surgical intervention. (author)

  9. Intracranial subdural hematoma as a cause of postoperative delirium and headache in cervical laminoplasty: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habunaga, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    To describe a rare case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma as a cause of postoperative delirium and headache following cervical spine surgery. Headache is uncommon following spinal surgery, but can be observed in cases of accidental tearing of the dura during surgery. The causes of headache after surgery are thought to include dural tear and CSF leakage. On the other hand, intracranial subdural hematoma can be a cause of headache and cognitive dysfunction. However, only 4 cases as a postoperative complication of spinal surgery have been reported in the literature. A 55-year-old man underwent re-explorative surgery due to postoperative hematoma causing hemiplegia following cervical laminoplasty. During this operation, accidental dural tear occurred and induced CSF leakage. On the following day, headache and delirium were noted. CSF leakage continued despite intraoperative repair of the dural laceration. Cranial CT at that time clearly demonstrated subdural hematoma. We reexplored the surgical site and attempted to stop the CSF leakage with meticulous suturing of the dural sac under microscopic observation. The intracranial subdural hematoma was carefully observed under consultation with a specialist neurosurgeon. Following this reexploration, the headache and delirium gradually improved, with spontaneous resolution of intracranial hematoma over a two-month period of observation. We have reported a rare case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma caused by CSF leakage following cervical spine surgery. This report demonstrates the possibility of intracranial hematoma as a cause of postoperative cognitive dysfunction or headache, especially when accidental tearing of the dura has occurred in spinal surgery.

  10. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the 51Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-01-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid

  11. Acute subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury in fatal road traffic accident victims: a clinico-pathological study of 15 patients Hematoma subdural agudo e lesão axonal difusa em vítimas fatais de acidente de trânsito: estudo clínico-patológico de 15 pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Nataniel Silva Gusmão

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although acute subdural hematoma (ASDH and diffuse axonal injury (DAI are commonly associated in victims of head injury due to road traffic accidents, there are only two clinico-pathological studies of this association. We report a clinical and pathological study of 15 patients with ASDH associated with DAI. METHOD: The patients were victims of road traffic accidents and were randomly chosen. The state of consciousness on hospital admission was evaluated by the Glasgow coma scale. For the identification of axons the histological sections of the brain were stained with anti-neurofilament proteins. RESULTS: Twelve of the 15 patients were admitted to hospital in a state of coma; in three patients, the level of consciousness was not evaluated, as they died before hospital admission. CONCLUSION: The poorer prognosis in patients with ASDH who lapse into coma immediately after sustaining a head injury, as described by several authors, can be explained by the almost constant association between ASDH and DAI in victims of fatal road traffic accidents.OBJETIVO: Embora o hematoma subdural agudo (HSDA e a lesão axonal difusa (LAD estejam frequentemente associados em vítimas de trauma crânio-encefálico causado por acidentes de trânsito, há somente dois estudos clínico-patológicos sobre esta associação. Relatamos o estudo clínico-patológico de 15 pacientes com HSDA associado com LAD. MÉTODO: Os pacientes, vítimas de acidentes de trânsito, foram selecionados aleatoriamente. O estado de consciência à admissão hospitalar foi avaliado pela escala de coma de Glasgow. Para a identificação dos axônios, os cortes histológicos do cérebro foram corados com antisoro anti-proteínas do neurofilamento. RESULTADOS: Doze dos 15 pacientes foram admitidos no hospital em estado de coma; em três pacientes, o nível de consciência não foi avaliado, pois eles faleceram antes da admissão hospitalar. CONCLUSÃO: O pior prognóstico em pacientes

  12. Kernohan-Woltman notch phenomenon and intention tremors in case of chronic subdural hematoma

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    Sasikala P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders are atypical and rare presentation of chronic subdural hematomas. We report a case of 60 year man who presented with intention tremors and altered sensorium. The patient had Kernohan-Woltman notch phenomenon on clinical examination. CT scan brain showed a large left fronto-temporo-parietal chronic subdural hematoma with significant mass effect and midline shift. His symptoms relieved completely after surgical evacuation of the hematoma.

  13. Treatment of chronic subdural hematoma by novel YL-1 hollow needle aspiration drainage system (697 cases report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Dong, L; She, L; Zhang, H Z; Wang, X D; Yan, Z C; Wu, W; Yang, L

    2017-01-01

    It is written to discuss the effect and syndromes of novel YL-1 hollow needle aspiration drainage system to treat chronic subdural hematoma. Collecting clinical data about 697 patients with chronic subdural hematoma in neurosurgery of People' Hospital in North Jiangsu from January 2004 to December 2014, including clinical manifestation, imaging data, operation time, postoperative complications and prognostic factors and so on. 593 patients got cured, 53 patients with recurrence, 19 patients with acute subdural hematoma, 13 patients with poor drainage, 9 case of patients with acute epidural hematoma, puncture failure in 6 cases, 3 cases of pulmonary infection, one got intracranial hemorrhage (brain stem and basal ganglia hemorrhage). The total time of the operation is 15-28 min, the mean time is 18 ± 3.6 min, the average retention time of novel YL-1 hollow needle aspiration drainage system was 2.6 ± 1.3 days, the average use of urokinase was 30,000 ± 2.10,000 units. It takes a short time for novel YL-1 hollow needle aspiration drainage system to treat chronic subdural hematoma without any syndromes like brain tissue injury, tension pneumocrania, intracranial infection and so on. The clinical cure rate is 85.08 %, recurrence rate is 7.6 %. Using novel YL-1 hollow needle aspiration drainage system to treat chronic subdural hematoma is such a minimally invasive surgical technology which has a higher curative rate, small damage, is also easy to operate with security and less severe complications.

  14. Chronic subdural hematoma: epidemiological and prognostic analysis of 176 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMIL FARHAT NETO

    Full Text Available Objective : To characterize patients with chronic subdural hematoma undergoing surgery and to identify prognostic indicators. Methods : We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH undergoing surgical treatment. We analyzed: age, period from trauma to diagnostic imaging, pre and postoperative Glasgow coma scale, type of surgery, associated comorbidities, use of postoperative drainage and outpatient treatment. Results : The sample consisted of 176 patients, 126 male and 50 female patients (ratio 2.5 : 1, ages ranged from six months to 97 years, with an average of 59.3 years. CSDH was caused by trauma in 52% of patients, with the time from trauma to imaging averaging 25.05 days; 37.7% were hypertensive patients and 20% had a neurological disease. Eighty-five (48.3% patients were elderly and altered consciousness was present in 63% of cases. Of the 91 (51.7% non-elderly patients, 44% presented with headache, altered consciousness occurred in 40% and motor abnormalities in 27.5%. The CSDH was located on the right in 41%, left in 43% and bilaterally in 16% of patients. Conclusion : the change of consciousness was the most common clinical alteration in the elderly and headache in non-elderly. The most associated comorbidity was the arterial hypertension and the most frequent cause, head trauma. The trepanation with two oriffices associated with a closed drainage system was the most used operating, with high efficacy and low complication rate.

  15. Spontaneous subdural hematoma and antiplatelet therapy: Does efficacy of Ticagrelor come with added risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattanagere Manjunatha Suryanarayana Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet therapy has established clinical benefit on cardiovascular outcome and has reduced the rates of re-infarction/in stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes. Major bleeding episodes can occur with antiplatelet therapy and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is one of the most feared complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Identification of high risk groups and judicious use of antiplatelet therapy reduces the bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is a newer P2Y12 receptor antagonist with established clinical benefit. However, risks of having an ICH with these newer molecules cannot be ignored. Here, we report a case of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma developing in a patient on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor. Early recognition, discontinuation of the medication and appropriate management resulted in resolution of hematoma and good clinical outcome. Authors have reviewed the antithrombotic drugs and their tendencies in causing intracranial bleeds from a neurophysicians perspective.

  16. Risk Factors for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Recurrence Identified Using Quantitative Computed Tomography Analysis of Hematoma Volume and Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinou, Pantelis; Katsigiannis, Sotirios; Lee, Jong Hun; Hamisch, Christina; Krischek, Boris; Mpotsaris, Anastasios; Timmer, Marco; Goldbrunner, Roland

    2017-03-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), a common condition in elderly patients, presents a therapeutic challenge with recurrence rates of 33%. We aimed to identify specific prognostic factors for recurrence using quantitative analysis of hematoma volume and density. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic and clinical data of 227 CSDHs in 195 consecutive patients who underwent evacuation of the hematoma through a single burr hole, 2 burr holes, or a mini-craniotomy. To examine the relationship between hematoma recurrence and various clinical, radiologic, and surgical factors, we used quantitative image-based analysis to measure the hematoma and trapped air volumes and the hematoma densities. Recurrence of CSDH occurred in 35 patients (17.9%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the percentage of hematoma drained and postoperative CSDH density were independent risk factors for recurrence. All 3 evacuation methods were equally effective in draining the hematoma (71.7% vs. 73.7% vs. 71.9%) without observable differences in postoperative air volume captured in the subdural space. Quantitative image analysis provided evidence that percentage of hematoma drained and postoperative CSDH density are independent prognostic factors for subdural hematoma recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma in a young male patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The chronic subdural hematoma is a common pathology in elderly patients. There is usually a history of head trauma. The diagnosis of chronic subdural hematomas in young patients is very rare and few cases have been reported in the literature. The authors present a case of a patient of 16 years old who presented headache of two months of evolution, which was conducted by tomography diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma. The patient had no history of mild trauma. Surgical management was performed, showing a satisfactory evolution.

  18. Selection of Treatment for Large Non-Traumatic Subdural Hematoma Developed during Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Hee Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old man with end-stage renal disease was admitted to the hospital with a severe headache and vomiting. On neurological examination the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score was 15 and his brain CT showed acute subdural hematoma over the right cerebral convexity with approximately 11-mm thickness and 9-mm midline shift. We chose a conservative treatment of scheduled neurological examination, anticonvulsant medication, serial brain CT scanning, and scheduled hemodialysis (three times per week without using heparin. Ten days after admission, he complained of severe headache and a brain CT showed an increased amount of hemorrhage and midline shift. Emergency burr hole trephination and removal of the hematoma were performed, after which symptoms improved. However, nine days after the operation a sudden onset of general tonic-clonic seizure developed and a brain CT demonstrated an increased amount of subdural hematoma. Under the impression of persistent increased intracranial pressure, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU in order to control intracranial pressure. Management at the ICU consisted of regular intravenous mannitol infusion assisted with continuous renal replacement therapy. He stayed in the ICU for four days. Twenty days after the operation he was discharged without specific neurological deficits.

  19. Thoracic spinal subdural hematoma complicating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protzman, Nicole M; Kapun, Jennifer; Wagener, Christopher

    2015-10-13

    A spinal subdural hematoma is a rare clinical entity with considerable consequences without prompt diagnosis and treatment. Throughout the literature, there are limited accounts of spinal subdural hematoma formation following spinal surgery. This report is the first to describe the formation of a spinal subdural hematoma in the thoracic spine following surgery at the cervical level. A 53-year-old woman developed significant paraparesis several hours after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5-6. Expeditious return to operating room for anterior cervical revision decompression was performed, and the epidural hematoma was evacuated without difficulty. Postoperative imaging demonstrated a subdural hematoma confined to the thoracic level, and the patient was returned to the operating room for a third surgical procedure. Decompression of T1-3, with evacuation of the subdural hematoma was performed. Postprocedure, the patient's sensory and motor deficits were restored, and, with rehabilitation, the patient gained functional mobility. Spinal subdural hematomas should be considered as a rare but potential complication of cervical discectomy and fusion. With early diagnosis and treatment, favorable outcomes may be achieved.

  20. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Historical and Clinical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Goshtasbi, Khodayar; Mahmoodi, Amin; Tran, Diem K; Chen, Jefferson W

    2017-12-01

    This review aims to highlight the clinical complexity of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) while presenting a brief historical discussion of cSDH. A thorough literature search of published English-language papers was performed in PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. cSDH affects 1-5.3 per 100,000 individuals annually, with the incidence expected to rise as the U.S. population ages. The symptoms of cSDH are often nonspecific, with headaches being the most common complaint. Other symptoms include weakness, balance and gait problems, and memory problems. A variety of clinical factors must be taken into account in the treatment of cSDH, and the multifaceted treatment paradigms continue to evolve. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma : a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    Object. In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods. The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting

  2. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  3. Analysis of Risk Factor for the Development of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Patients with Traumatic Subdural Hygroma

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jun Hyong; Jun, Hyo Sub; Kim, Ji Hee; Oh, Jae Keun; Song, Joon Ho; Chang, In Bok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although a high incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following traumatic subdural hygroma (SDG) has been reported, no study has evaluated risk factors for the development of CSDH. Therefore, we analyzed the risk factors contributing to formation of CSDH in patients with traumatic SDG. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients admitted to Hallym University Hospital with traumatic head injury from January 2004 through December 2013. A total of 45 patients with these injuri...

  4. Middle fossa arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma -a case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hyung Sik; Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh; Kim, Chang Jin

    1987-01-01

    Cysts overlying the temporal lobes have been well described in literature. These are often associated with agenesis of the temporal lobes, and of major neurosurgical interest due to their frequent association with subdural hematoma, a combination that is rarely seen with cysts in other regions. Full features of plain, angiographic, and CT findings of arachnoid cyst with temporal lobe agenesis accompanying isodense subdural hematoma are presented, being very rare in radiologic literature

  5. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  6. Iatrogenic Spinal Subdural Hematoma due to Apixaban: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Alba Colell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the clinical relevance for developing safer oral anticoagulants prompted the development of new classes of drugs that have shown a lower risk of life-threatening bleeding events as compared to standard warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma is an uncommon urgent complication that can be associated with the use of these agents. An unusual case of spinal subdural hematoma related to apixaban treatment for nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation is reported here.

  7. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH.

  8. Delayed intracranial subdural hematoma following removal of an intraspinal tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chieh Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old male underwent complete resection of a T12 intraspinal tumor and subsequently developed dizziness and loss of consciousness on postoperative day 2. A subdural hematoma (SDH of the left frontotemporoparietal space with uncal herniation was seen on computed tomography. This unusual case of acute intracranial SDH after spinal surgery is discussed, and literature review is performed. We aim to discuss the possible mechanism by which this complication occurred.

  9. [Factors Contributing to Surgical Intervention for Subacute Subdural Hematoma Enlargement in Patients with Mild Head Injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Sasaki, Tohru; Kanamori, Masayuki; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-09-01

    Delayed neurological deterioration following mild head injury(MHI)usually occurs within 24 hours. However, some cases require delayed surgical evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma(ASDH), owing to subacute progressive hematoma enlargement. This study aimed to determine radiological or clinical parameters associated with surgical intervention in ASDH cases in which surgery was not initially considered necessary. From 2010 to 2015, 64 patients were non-surgically treated for ASDH following MHI. We evaluated the various outcomes of eventual surgical ASDH evacuation after the first 48 hours following injury, due to hematoma enlargement and clinical deterioration. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to both the demographic and initial radiographic features to identify risk factors for ASDH progression and surgery. Overall, at the time of their last follow-up computed tomography, 57 patients(89%)demonstrated minimal ASDH or spontaneous hematoma resolution with conservative non-surgical management. The remaining 7 patients(11%)received delayed surgical ASDH evacuation a median of 5.1 days after the head trauma. There were no significant differences between the two groups for baseline characteristics, including age, prior history of anticoagulants, the presence of cerebral contusions, or subarachnoid hemorrhages. On multivariate analysis, use of antiplatelet drugs(p=0.013, OR=28, 95%CI=1.82-24)was independently associated with delayed hematoma evacuation. These data indicate that as much as 11% of patients with minimal ASDHs after MHI can deteriorate over the course of a week and then require surgical intervention, and that patients on concurrent antiplatelet medication require especially careful monitoring of hematoma progression.

  10. Postoperative subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hematoma after unruptured aneurysm surgery: age, sex, and aneurysm location as independent risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Cho, Jae-Hoon; Goh, Duck-Ho; Kang, Dong-Hun; Shin, Im Hee; Hamm, In-Suk

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the incidence and risk factors for the postoperative occurrence of subdural complications, such as a subdural hygroma and resultant chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), following surgical clipping of an unruptured aneurysm. The critical age affecting such occurrences and follow-up results were also examined. The case series included 364 consecutive patients who underwent aneurysm clipping via a pterional or superciliary keyhole approach for an unruptured saccular aneurysm in the anterior cerebral circulation between 2007 and 2013. The subdural hygromas were identified based on CT scans 6-9 weeks after surgery, and the volumes were measured using volumetry studies. Until their complete resolution, all the subdural hygromas were followed using CT scans every 1-2 months. Meanwhile, the CSDHs were classified as nonoperative or operative lesions that were treated by bur-hole drainage. The age and sex of the patients, aneurysm location, history of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and surgical approach (pterional vs superciliary) were all analyzed regarding the postoperative occurrence of a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The follow-up results of the subdural complications were also investigated. Seventy patients (19.2%) developed a subdural hygroma or CSDH. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.003), male sex (p 60 years, which achieved a 70% sensitivity and 69% specificity with regard to predicting such subdural complications. The female patients ≤ 60 years of age showed a negligible incidence of subdural complications for all aneurysm groups, whereas the male patients > 60 years of age showed the highest incidence of subdural complications at 50%-100%, according to the aneurysm location. The subdural hygromas detected 6-9 weeks postoperatively showed different follow-up results, according to the severity. The subdural hygromas that converted to a CSDH were larger in volume than the subdural hygromas that resolved

  11. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cincu Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration.

  12. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Manifesting as a Unilateral Subdural Hematoma with a Marked Midline Shift

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    Joji Inamasu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma. When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery.

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery.

  14. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Elderly Patients: Is This Disease Benign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Masaaki; Toi, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Satoshi

    2017-08-15

    As the world population becomes progressively older, the overall incidence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is increasing. Peak age of onset for CSDH has also increased, and recently the 80-year-old level has a peak. Many patients with CSDH have had prior treatment with anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, which have an accompanying risk of CSDH. In elderly patients with CSDH, symptoms of cognitive change (memory disturbance, urinary incontinence, and decreased activity) and disturbance of consciousness at admission were more frequent compared to younger patients with CSDH. The literature actually offers conflicting advice regarding CSDH treatment; however, burr hole surgery with drainage under local anesthesia is the most common surgical procedure, even in elderly patients. The recurrence rate of CSDH has not decreased over recent decades, and it has ranged from 0.36-33.3%. Outcomes in patients over 75 years old was significantly worse than for those younger than 75. Moreover, long-term outcomes for elderly patients with CSDH are poor. CSDH in the elderly is no longer a benign disease. In the future, it will be important for us to understand the mechanisms of onset and recurrence of CSDH and to develop more effective medical treatments and noninvasive surgical techniques for elderly patients.

  15. A case of late diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aygun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial subdural hematoma developing following spinal anesthesia is a rare but serious complication. We describe a case of subdural hematoma developing following spinal anesthesia and diagnosed late.A female patient receiving spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery 45 days prior to arrival at the emergency department presented to our hospital with non-severe headache persisting for 45 days after discharge. Computerized tomography (CT of the brain performed due to long-term persisting headache resistant to medical treatment and a history of spinal intervention revealed a hypodense chronic subdural hematoma in the left frontoparietal area and a shift from left to right in midline structures. The patient was operated and discharged without sequelae on the 7th day postoperatively.Care must be taken over subdural hematoma in the presence of headache after spinal anesthesia persisting despite fluid intake and medical treatment and exceeding 48 h in duration, and diagnosis must not be delayed. Keywords: Spinal anesthesia, Subdural hematoma, Headache

  16. Subdural Hematoma: An Adverse Event of Electroconvulsive Therapy—Case Report and Literature Review

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    Ranganath R. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is commonly used in the management of medication nonresponsive depressive disorder, with proven efficacy in psychiatric practice since many decades. A rare complication of intracranial bleed following this therapeutic procedure has been reported in sporadic case reports in the English literature. We report a case of such a complication in a 42-year-old male, a known case of nonorganic medication nonresponsive depressive disorder for the last two years who required ECT application. Presenting symptoms included altered mental state, urinary incontinence, and repeated episodes of vomiting; following ECT procedure with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain suggestive of bilateral acute subdural hematoma. Despite the view that it may be used in neurological conditions without raised intracranial tension, it will be worthwhile to be vigilant during post-ECT recovery for any emergent complications.

  17. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Ik; Son, Dong Wuk; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-09-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits.

  18. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with moyamoya phenomenon after radiotherapy for medulloblastoma; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuse, Takahisa; Takagi, Takuji; Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Mizuno, Shiroh; Hashimoto, Nobukazu; Suzuki, Osamu (Nagoya City Higashi General Hospital (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    A 9-year-old boy had been diagnosed at the age of 9 months as having a cerebellar medulloblastoma and had received 40 Gy of radiation therapy to the brain after removal of the tumor. Cerebral angiography at the time of initial diagnosis did not show any evidence of occlusive disease involving the internal carotid circulation. At the age of 6 years, the patient developed generalized seizures. On examination, he was drowsy and had right hemiparesis. CT scan demonstrated a low-density area in the left frontal lobe. Cerebral angiography showed a marked narrowing of the bilateral internal carotid arteries with moyamoya vessels. The patient was treated medically with aspirin (100 mg/day) and anticonvulsants. His neurological deficits improved gradually. At the age of 8 years, there was no recurrence of the tumor although a slight left subdural hematoma was seen on CT scan. On August 10, 1993, at the age of 9 years, he was admitted for treatment of a developing subdural hematoma. MRI showed a chronic subdural hematoma with thick outer and inner membranes. Cerebral angiography showed occlusion of the left internal carotid artery which fed the right frontal lobe through moyamoya vessels, marked narrowing of the right internal carotid artery distal to the ophthalmic artery, moyamoya vessels at the base, and cortical revascularization througth the ophthalmic, posterior cerebral and middle meningeal arteries. Trepanation and aspiration of the hematoma were performed. The outer membrane of the hematoma was about 2 mm thick and the hematoma cavity was filled with a partially organized hematoma. In this case, we speculate that development of the chronic subdural hematoma involved the following factors: (1) transdural external-internal carotid anastomosis after radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy; (2) repeated mild head trauma due to gait disturbance after removal of the cerebellar tumor; and (3) administration of acetylsalicylic acid. (author).

  19. Epileptic Seizures in Patients Following Surgical Treatment of Acute Subdural Hematoma-Incidence, Risk Factors, Patient Outcome, and Development of New Scoring System for Prophylactic Antiepileptic Treatment (GATE-24 score).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Sae-Yeon; Dubinski, Daniel; Herrmann, Eva; Cuca, Colleen; Strzelczyk, Adam; Seifert, Volker; Konczalla, Juergen; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-05-01

    Clinically evident or subclinical seizures are common manifestations in acute subdural hematoma (aSDH); however, there is a paucity of research investigating the relationship between seizures and aSDH. The purpose of this study is 2-fold: determine incidence and predictors of seizures and then establish a guideline in patients with aSDH to standardize the decision for prophylactic antiepileptic treatment. The author analyzed 139 patients with aSDH treated from 2007 until 2015. Baseline characteristics and clinical findings including Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at admission, 24 hours after operation, timing of operation, anticoagulation, and Glasgow Outcome Scale at hospital discharge and after 3 months were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to detect independent predictors of seizures, and a scoring system was developed. Of 139 patients, overall incidence of seizures was 38%, preoperatively 16% and postoperatively 24%. Ninety percent of patients with preoperative seizures were seizure free after operation for 3 months. Independent predictors of seizures were GCS <9 (odds ratio [OR] 3.3), operation after 24 hours (OR 2.0), and anticoagulation (OR 2.2). Patients with seizures had a significantly higher rate of unfavorable outcome at hospital discharge (P = 0.001) and in 3-month follow-up (P = 0.002). Furthermore, a score system (GATE-24) was developed. In patients with GCS <14, anticoagulation, or surgical treatment 24 hours after onset, a prophylactic antiepileptic treatment is recommended. Occurrence of seizures affected severity and outcomes after surgical treatment of aSDH. Therefore seizure prophylaxis should be considered in high-risk patients on the basis of the GATE-24 score to promote better clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Questionnaire Survey of Management Practice in India and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanali, Raghunath; Bhadran, Biju; Krishna Kumar, P; Vijayan, Abhishek; Arun, S; Musthafa, Aneeze M; Panchal, Sunil; Gopal, Vinu V

    2016-12-01

    To identify the current management modalities practiced by neurosurgeons in India for chronic subdural hematoma. A questionnaire was prepared for the survey and sent via e-mail to neurosurgeons. It covered the following aspects of managing chronic subdural hematoma: 1) demographic and institutional details; 2) choice of surgical procedure; 3) surgical adjutants such as placing a subdural drain; 4) pre- and postoperative care; and 5) recurrences and management. Responses obtained were entered in a SPSS data sheet and analyzed. Response rate of the survey was 9.3%. The majority of neurosurgeons (75%) preferred to do burr whole drainage for primary chronic subdural hematoma and also for recurrences. Only one third of routinely placed a subdural drain. Considerable practice variations exist for medical and perioperative management. Bedside twist drill drainage, which is effective and less costly than operative room procedures, has not gained popularity in practice. The present survey points towards the importance of making management guidelines for this common neurosurgical entity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intracranial subdural hematoma and pneumocephalus after spinal instrumentation of myelodysplastic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Roman; Maliszewski, Mariusz; Krawczyk, Lech

    2011-01-01

    To report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma, pneumocephalus, and pneumorachis, which occurred because of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a malpositioned transpedicular screw during spinal surgery for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis accompanied with hydrocephalus. Intracranial hemorrhage may occur as a consequence of dural sac penetration and CSF leakage after various medical procedures at the spinal level. The awareness of this severe complication is especially important during spinal instrumentation procedures in which inadvertent dural sac violation and CSF loss may be overlooked. A case report and literature review are presented here. A 12-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus underwent instrumentation for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis. Postoperatively, she became aphasic and increasingly somnolent. An urgent computed tomographic scan of the head and spine showed massive intracranial hematoma, pneumocephalus, pneumorachis, and a malpositioned pedicular screw that caused CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and bleeding remote from the surgical site. The patient needed neurosurgical cranial decompression and subsequent spinal reoperation with dural tear repair. The final outcome was an uneventful complete recovery. The increasing use of pedicular screws in spinal surgery carries a potential risk of occult dural sac violation with subsequent CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and the possibility of intracranial bleeding and pneumocephalus remote from the surgical site. This potentially fatal complication should always be considered after spinal surgery in the presence of early signs of neurological deterioration and necessitates an urgent cranial and spinal imaging to confirm the diagnosis and to make adequate treatment decisions.

  2. Subdural hematomas: glutaric aciduria type 1 or abusive head trauma? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vester, Marloes E. M.; Bilo, Rob A. C.; Karst, Wouter A.; Daams, Joost G.; Duijst, Wilma L. J. M.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is a rare metabolic disorder of glutaryl-CoA-dehydrogenase enzyme deficiency. Children with GA1 are reported to be predisposed to subdural hematoma (SDH) development due to stretching of cortical veins secondary to cerebral atrophy and expansion of CSF spaces.

  3. Perindopril and residual chronic subdural hematoma volumes six weeks after burr hole surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Munthe, Sune; Søe, Morten

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recurrence rates of between 5% and 25% have been reported following surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSH). A previous study showed that the treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors decreases the risk of recurrence. To test the effects of ACE inhibitors...

  4. The Swedish study of Irrigation-fluid temperature in the evacuation of Chronic subdural hematoma (SIC!)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartley, Andreas; Jakola, Asgeir S; Bartek, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most common conditions encountered in neurosurgical practice. Recurrence, observed in 5-30% of patients, is a major clinical problem. The temperature of the irrigation fluid used during evacuation of the hematoma might theoretically...... for warmed fluids during surgery. Our main aim is to investigate the effect of irrigation-fluid temperature on recurrence rates and clinical outcomes after cSDH evacuation using a multicenter randomized controlled trial design. METHODS: The study will be conducted in three neurosurgical departments...... and health-related quality of life. DISCUSSION: Irrigation-fluid temperature might influence recurrence rates in the evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas. We present a study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial investigating our hypothesis that irrigation fluid at body temperature...

  5. No Value of Routine Brain Computed Tomography 6 Weeks after Evacuation of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Bonde; Sundbye, Filippa; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2017-01-01

    Background  The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of planned control postoperative brain computed tomography (CT) scan performed 4 to 6 weeks after the evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma. Materials and Methods  This retrospective study examined 202 patients who during a 2-year period...... from 2011 and 2012 underwent surgical treatment for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Information on patient age, sex, alcohol consumption, anticoagulant/antiplatelet treatment, history of head trauma, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), neurological symptoms, laterality of CSDH, and surgical technique...... was retrieved from patient charts. Results  Overall, 27 out of 202 patients had a recurrence of CSDH and re-evacuation of the hematoma was performed. In all patients recurrence of neurological symptoms preceded the planned postoperative control brain CT 4 to 6 weeks after primary surgery. Conclusion  Routinely...

  6. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Kanamaru

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video.

  7. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video.

  8. Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Ohba, Eiichi; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-08-08

    Heyde syndrome is known as a triad of calcific aortic stenosis, anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, and acquired type 2A von Willebrand disease. This acquired hemorrhagic disorder is characterized by the loss of the large von Willebrand factor multimers due to the shear stress across the diseased aortic valve. The most frequently observed type of bleeding in these patients is mucosal or skin bleeding, such as epistaxis, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding. On the other hand, intracranial hemorrhage complicating Heyde syndrome is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman presented to our hospital with severe aortic stenosis and severe anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with Heyde syndrome. Although aortic valve replacement was performed without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, postoperative life-threatening acute subdural hematoma occurred with a marked midline shift. Despite prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, she did not recover consciousness and she died 1 month after the operation. Postoperative subdural hematoma is rare, but it should be kept in mind as a devastating hemorrhagic complication, especially in patients with Heyde syndrome.

  9. [Cranial subdural hematoma with intracranial hypotension related to epidural anesthesia and Trendelenburg position: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narisawa, Ayuka; Oda, Shinya; Iizawa, Kazue; Yokoo, Noriko; Nakane, Masaki; Kawamae, Kaneyuki

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of cranial subdural hematoma with intracranial hypotension. A 34-year-old woman had laparoscopic ovarial cysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural anesthesia. Two days later, she developed a severe headache and nausea. She underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, and was diagnosed with cranial subdural hematoma with intracranial hypotension. The patient had had no anticoagulant therapy before the surgery. She was managed conservatively with bed rest and additional intravenous infusion. Her symptoms gradually improved except a slight headache, and she was discharged on the 38th postoperative day. Intracranial hypotension is a syndrome characterized by orthostatic headaches and hypovolemia of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). There were typical findings on MRI, which include linear enhancement of the pachymeninges, pituitary hyperemia and subdural hemorrhage. We thought that these were due to epidural anesthesia first, but there was no evidence of dural puncture. It was also considered that it is influenced by change in CSF pressure, and intracranial venous engorgement may be due to Trendelenburg position for several hours. Because cranial subdural hematoma is a life-threatening complication, it is necessary to reconsider application of epidural anesthesia for laparoscopic surgery with Trendelenburg position.

  10. Correlation between CT and MRI findings of chronic subdural hematomas, and total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin concentrations in hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tane, Kazuyuki

    2000-01-01

    The authors investigated the correlation between the neuroradiological findings (computerized tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance (MR) image) of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) and the fractions in those hematomas (hemoglobin (Hb), oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb), and methemoglobin (met-Hb)). Thirty-three patients with a total of forty lesions were chosenas subjects, all with CSDH showing almost homogenous findings in CT scans and MR images. The density in the patients' CT scans was divided into high density, iso-density and low density. The intensity in their MR images was also divided into high intensity, isointensity and low intensity, and the correlation of these to the Hb, oxy-Hb and met-Hb concentrations calculated from the absorption spectrum of the hematoma sampled during the operation was examined. The CT findings were highly correlated to the Hb and oxy-Hb, concentrations and the CT scans of the hematomas with an Hb concentration above 9.4 g/dl all showed high density. The T1-weighted MR image and met-Hb concentration also showed a high correlation, and the images of the hematomas with a met-Hb concentration above 0.4 g/dl all showed high intensity. These results indicated that the fraction in the content of CSDH was predictable from the image findings. To obtain prior knowledge of the content of a hematoma seemed extremely useful for the clucidation of the pathogenesis of CSDH and for deciding its therapeutic policy. (author)

  11. HEMATOMA SUBDURAL EN PACIENTE CON LEUCEMIA MIELODE CRONICA: REPORTE DE CASO

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    Carlos Fernando Lozano-Tangua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El hematoma subdural cronico se define como una colección sanguíneo fibrinoide en el espacio existente entre las meninges duramadre y aracnoides, debido a traumas, infecciones (empiema y meningitis, coagulopatías u otras causas. En este se puede precisar durante la intervención quirúrgica la presencia de cápsula o membranas. Entre las diversas causas de hematoma subdural crónico se encuentra la leucemia mieloide crónica que es un síndrome mieloproliferativo, donde se ve una acentuada proliferación de glóbulos blancos de la serie granulocítica, que infiltran la sangre, médula ósea, cerebro entre otros tejidos. Presentamos brevemente un caso de esta interesante y no infrecuente asociación.

  12. Prognosis on follow-up CT of chronic subdural hematomas treated by burr hole evacuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higeta, Toshiaki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hakuji

    1986-01-01

    A consecutive series of 47 adult patients with chronic subdural hematoma was studied in respect to postoperative follow-up CT after burr hole evacuation. In 15 of our patients, the CT scan was normalized within 60 days. Six patients required reoperation because of reaccumulation or of poor re-expansion, and in 13 patients the follow-up CT showed a persisting subdural fluid collection even after 60 postoperative days. Further studying the correlation between the prognosis on follow-up CT and various factors, such as patient's age, preoperative neurological condition and CT findings or others, authors found that the elderly, especially older than 70 years, had a poor prognosis, and that the prognosis was correlated to the density and the thickness of hematoma on preoperative CT scan. (author)

  13. POSTSPINAL INTRACRANIAL SUBDURAL HEMATOMA AND CEREBRAL SINUS THROMBOSIS: REPORT OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ihsan Uysal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare but a serious complication of spinal anesthesia. It usually occurs in the presence of predisposing factors such as pregnancy, puerperium, use of oral contraceptive drugs, malignancies, thrombocytopenia and the most frequent symptom is headache. Twenty-two years of age, pregnant woman had a complaint of headache after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section and diagnosed as post-dural puncture headache, the treatment was begun. After detecting responsiveness to treatment, radiological imaging procedures were performed and subdural hematoma and transverse sinus thrombosis were detected. In this case report, it was concluded under current literatures that the subdural hematoma and transverse sinus thrombosis should be kept in mind during the diagnosis of post-dural puncture headache. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(2.000: 116-120

  14. Clinical usefulness of determination of NSE contents in drainage fluid of patients with chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Ruchang; Wu Jianyuan; Tao Zhiqiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) contents of serum and drainage fluid in patients with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods: Serum and drainage fluid NSE contents were determined with RIA right after and 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 hours after trephining in 28 patients with CSDH as well as 28 controls (once and serum only). Results: The serum contents of NSE in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). The drainage fluid contents of NSE were correlated with the patients concurrent own serum NSE contents (r=0.917) and were higher than the respective serum NSE value (P<0.01). All the NSE contents dropped continuously throughout the observation period. Conclusion: Changes of drainage fluid NSE contents might reflect progress of the degree of nervous tissue injury in patients with chronic subdural hematoma. (authors)

  15. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cameroon

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    Clovis Nkoke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological abnormalities including thrombocytopenia are common in patients living with HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection related thrombocytopenia present generally with only minor bleeding problems. But cases of subdural hematoma are very rare. A 61-year-old female with a history of HIV infection of 9 years’ duration presented with a 3-month history of generalized headache associated with visual blurring and anterograde amnesia. There was no history of trauma or fever. She was treated empirically for cerebral toxoplasmosis for 6 weeks without any improvement of the symptoms. One week prior to admission, she developed weakness of the left side of the body. Clinical examination revealed left-sided hemiparesis. Computed tomography scan of the brain showed a 25 mm chronic right frontoparietotemporal subdural hematoma compressing the lateral ventricle with midline shift. There was no appreciable cerebral atrophy. A complete blood count showed leucopenia and thrombocytopenia at 92,000 cells/mm3. Her CD4-positive cell count was 48 cells/mm3 despite receiving combination antiretroviral therapy for 9 years. A complete blood count analysis suggestive of thrombocytopenia should raise suspicion of possibilities of noninfectious focal brain lesions like subdural hematoma amongst HIV infected patients presenting with nonspecific neurological symptoms. This will enable prompt diagnosis and allow early appropriate intervention.

  16. Dengue fever with diffuse cerebral hemorrhages, subdural hematoma and cranial diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Nayomi Shermila; Thalagala, Eranga; Wattegama, Milanka; Thirumavalavan, Kanapathipillai

    2016-05-10

    Neurological manifestations in dengue fever occur in diabetes insipidus are extremely rare and had not been reported in published literature earlier, thus we report the first case. A 24 year old previously healthy lady was admitted on third day of fever with thrombocytopenia. Critical phase started on fifth day with evidence of pleural effusion and moderate ascites. Thirty one hours into critical phase she developed headache, altered level of consciousness, limb rigidity and respiratory depression without definite seizures. Non-contrast CT brain done at tertiary care level revealed diffuse intracranial haemorrhages and sub arachnoid haemorrhages in right frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and brainstem, cerebral oedema with an acute subdural hematoma in right temporo- parietal region. Her platelet count was 40,000 at this time with signs of vascular leakage. She was intubated and ventilated with supportive care. Later on she developed features of cranial diabetes insipidus and it responded to intranasal desmopressin therapy. In spite of above measures signs of brainstem herniation developed and she succumbed to the illness on day 8. Dengue was confirmed serologically. Exact pathophysiological mechanism of diffuse cerebral haemorrhages without profound thrombocytopenia is not well understood. Increased awareness and high degree of clinical suspicion is needed among clinicians for timely diagnosis of this extremely rare complication of dengue fever. We postulate that immunological mechanisms may play a role in pathogenesis. However further comprehensive research and studies are needed to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to this complication.

  17. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis complicated by subdural hematomas: Case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Paul T; Axelrod, Yekaterina K; Ji, Cheng; Ciporen, Jeremy N; Arshad, Syed T; Hawk, Mark W; Guppy, Kern H

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can cause elevated intracranial pressure, hemorrhagic venous infarct, and cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage. We present a case series and literature review to illustrate that CVST can also present with subdural hematoma (SDH). Chart review was completed on a retrospective case series of CVST with spontaneous SDH. We also conducted a literature search. Over a 6 year interval, three patients with CVST and SDH were admitted to the neurointensive care unit. A 38-year-old woman had both SDH and a hemorrhagic venous infarct associated with a transverse sinus thrombosis. She was managed conservatively with long-term anticoagulation. A 68-year-old woman presented with an acute SDH requiring craniotomy and a thrombosed cortical vein was noted intraoperatively. Computed tomography venography showed thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus. She had polycythemia vera with the V617 Jak2 gene mutation and was managed with aspirin and hydroxyurea. A 60-year-old male had recurrence of a spontaneous convexity SDH requiring reoperation. Neuroimaging identified ipsilateral transverse sinus thrombosis with retrograde flow into the opposite sinus. Manometry demonstrated elevated venous pressures and these normalized after thrombectomy. Angiography performed after endovascular treatment demonstrated a normal venous drainage pattern. There have been limited reports of SDH complicating CVST in the literature. This case series and literature review demonstrates that CVST can also present with spontaneous SDH with or without associated venous infarctions. Treatment must be individualized. This is the first published description of endovascular thrombectomy for recurrent symptomatic SDH due to CVST.

  18. The level of circulating endothelial progenitor cells may be associated with the occurrence and recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The onset of chronic subdural hematoma may be associated with direct or indirect minor injuries to the head or a poorly repaired vascular injury. Endothelial progenitor cells happen to be one of the key factors involved in hemostasis and vascular repair. This study was designed to observe the levels of endothelial progenitor cells, white blood cells, platelets, and other indicators in the peripheral blood of patients diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma to determine the possible relationship between the endothelial progenitor cells and the occurrence, development, and outcomes of chronic subdural hematoma. METHOD: We enrolled 30 patients with diagnosed chronic subdural hematoma by computer tomography scanning and operating procedure at Tianjin Medical University General Hospital from July 2009 to July 2011. Meanwhile, we collected 30 cases of peripheral blood samples from healthy volunteers over the age of 50. Approximately 2 ml of blood was taken from veins of the elbow to test the peripheral blood routine and coagulation function. The content of endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The level of endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood was significantly lower in preoperational patients with chronic subdural hematomas than in controls. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the blood routine and coagulation function. However, the levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells were significantly different between the recurrent group and the non-recurrent group. CONCLUSIONS: The level of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in chronic subdural hematoma patients was significantly lower than the level in healthy controls. Meanwhile, the level of endothelial progenitor cells in recurrent patients was significantly lower than the level in patients without recurrence. Endothelial progenitor cells may be related to the

  19. Chronic Subdural Hematoma development in Accelerated phase of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia presenting with seizure and rapid progression course with fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheja Amol

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH in leukemia is rare, and most reported cases occurred in relation with acute myeloid leukaemia; however, occurrence is extremely rare in accelerated phase of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML. Seizure as presentation of SDH development in CML cases is not reported in literature. Authors report an elderly male, who was diagnosed as CML, accelerated phase of developing SDH. Initially presented to local physician with seizure; urgent CT scan head was advised, but ignored and sensorium rapidly worsened over next day and reported to our emergency department in deeply comatose state, where imaging revealed chronic subdural hematoma with hypoxic brain injury with fatal outcome. Seizure, progressive worsening of headache, vomiting and papilloedema are harbinger of intracranial space occupying lesion and requires CT head in emergency medical department for exclusion, who are receiving treatment of haematological malignancy

  20. A Tortuous Process of Surgical Treatment for a Large Calcified Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiao-Gang; Li, Jing-Sheng; Liu, Bai-Yun; Wu, Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Calcified chronic subdural hematoma (CCSDH) is a rare disease for which no standard approach to treatment has been established. Reports covering both burr hole trepanation and craniotomy for CCSDH are rare. Furthermore, infection of CCSDH after the burr hole trepanation has not been reported in the literature. A 61-year-old man presented with left frontotemporoparietal CCSDH demonstrated on computed tomography (CT) scan. The patient underwent 2 separate burr hole trepanations with intraoperative irrigation and postoperative drainage. These procedures led to infection of the CCSDH. The patient eventually underwent an open craniotomy to provide complete removal of the hematoma. Owing to the complex contents of a CCSDH, burr hole trepanation cannot adequately drain the hematoma or relieve the mass effect. Craniotomy is a much more reliable approach for achieving complete resection of a CCSDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of Recurrence and Complications After Chronic Subdural Hematoma Surgery: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Kristiansson, Helena; Ståhl, Fredrik; Fornebo, Ida; Förander, Petter; Jakola, Asgeir S

    2017-10-01

    To investigate predictors of recurrence and moderate to severe complications after burr-hole surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian single-center population-based cohort of 759 adult patients with cSDH operated with burr-hole surgery between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2010. Possible predictors of recurrence and complications, assessed using a standardized reporting system of adverse events, were identified and analyzed in univariable analyses. Variables with a P value hematoma (odds ratio [OR], 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-3.35; P hematoma diameter in millimeters (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09; P 1 (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.10-4.75; P = 0.03) were independent predictors of moderate to severe complications. Recurrence after cSDH surgery is more often encountered in patients with radiologically more extensive disease reflected by bilateral hematoma and large hematoma diameter. On the other hand, moderate to severe complications are more often seen in patients in a worse clinical condition, reflected by decreased level of consciousness and more comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical study of cerebral blood flow in bilateral chronic subdural hematoma measured by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Tohru; Saito, Koji; Fukuyama, Kohichi; Yamamoto, Kouki; Morimoto, Mamoru; Aburano, Tamio

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 34 patients with bilateral chronic subdural hematoma was measured by 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT before operation. The regional CBF was measured in 26 regions of the 10 cortical regions, putamen, thalamus and cerebellar hemisphere on both sides. According to the thickness of subdural hematoma, the thicker hematoma side was measured and examined as the thick hematoma side, and the other side as the thin hematoma side. Thirty four cases with bilateral chronic subdural hematoma were classified into four groups on the basis of clinical symptoms :13 cases with headache (headache group), 10 cases with hemiparesis (hemiparesis group), 5 cases with tetraparesis (tetraparesis group) and 6 cases with consciousness disturbance or dementia (consciousness disturbance group), and into two groups according to the degree of midline brain shift on MRI: 14 cases of non-shifted group and 20 cases of shifted group. The average CBF of 34 patients in each region indicated a regional CBF reduction in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices on the thin hematoma side, and in the putamen on the thick hematoma side. In the headache group, the regional CBF reduction on the thin hematoma side was found in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices compared with the corresponding regions on the thick hematoma side, and in thalamus on the thick hematoma side. In the hemiparesis and tetraparesis groups, there was no statistically significant CBF reduction between the thick and thin hematoma sides. In the consciousness disturbance group, the CBF reduction in whole brain was remarkably significant. By the degree of the midline brain shift, the CBF reductions between the thick and thin hematoma sides were observed. Namely, in the shifted group, the CBF reductions were noted in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortices in the thin hematoma side, and in the putamen in the thick hematoma side. We concluded that the CBF reduction of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma was

  3. Hematoma subdural de medula espinhal associada ao uso de anticoagulante oral Hematoma subdural de la médula espinal asociado al uso de anticoagulante oral Spine subdural hematoma: a rare complication associated with vitamin K antagonist (VKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Adrian Prync Flato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O hematoma subdural de medula espinhal (HSDME é uma complicação rara decorrente do uso de antagonistas de vitamina K (AVK e de diagnostico difícil. Este artigo apresenta um caso com complicação ameaçadora à vida: um paciente octogenário portador de fibrilação atrial de início recente em uso de AVK. A história e o exame físico inicialmente se apresentavam normais, associados com a elevação dos valores de coagulograma supraterapêuticos (INR > 10. Após 24 horas da admissão hospitalar, o paciente apresentou tetraparesia progressiva, evidenciando na ressonância nuclear magnética (RNM de medula espinhal um HSDME (Figura 1. Após reversão completa da hipocoagulação e intervenção neurocirúrgica o paciente obteve melhora do quadro neurológico.El hematoma subdural espinal (HSE es una complicación rara proveniente del uso de antagonistas de vitamina K (AVK y de diagnostico difícil. Este artículo presenta un caso con complicación amenazadora para la vida: un paciente octogenario portador de fibrilación auricular de inicio reciente, en uso de AVK. Inicialmente, la historia y el examen físico se presentaban normales, asociados a la elevación de los valores de coagulograma supra terapéuticos (INR > 10. Tras 24 horas del ingreso hospitalario, el paciente presentó tetraparesia progresiva. Al realizarse una resonancia nuclear magnética (RNM de médula espinal, se evidenció un HSE (Figura 1. Tras reversión completa de la hipocoagulación e intervención neuroquirúrgica el paciente obtuvo mejora del cuadro neurológico.Spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH is a rare condition, which is difficult to diagnose, related to Vitamin K Antagonist. This a case report of a life-threatening situation in a octogenarian patient with a history of recent atrial fibrillation that received K-Vitamin Antagonist (KVA therapy. The history and the clinical assessment were normal at the admission, associated with increase in the coagulation parameters

  4. MR imaging of shaken baby syndrome manifested as chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yul; Lee, Kwan Seop; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, In Jae; Kim, Hyun Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2001-01-01

    Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is a form of child abuse that can cause significant head injuries, of which subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common manifestation. We report the MRI findings of chronic SDH in three cases of SBS, involving two-, three- and eight-month-old babies. The SDH signal was mostly low on T1-weighted images and high on T2-weighted images, suggesting chronic SDH. In chronic SDH, a focal high signal on T1-weighted images was also noted, suggesting rebleeding. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed diffuse dural enhancement

  5. Bilateral Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Diabetes Insipidus-Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Saquib A; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Singh, Manmohanjit; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-02-01

    Calcified chronic subdural hematomas are an occurrence rarely seen in neurosurgical clinical practice. And when they occur bilaterally, the radiologic image they present is fascinating, as is the clinical presentation, but their management may be challenging. They have been reported to present with a multitude of neurologic deficits but never with diabetes insipidus, which is described here. Due to the rarity of this pathology, the management protocol is not well defined, though there have been quite a few papers on this condition. This review article gathers information published over the years on this rare entity to suggest a treatment protocol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MR imaging of shaken baby syndrome manifested as chronic subdural hematoma

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    Lee, Yul; Lee, Kwan Seop; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, In Jae; Kim, Hyun Beom; Lee, Jae Young [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is a form of child abuse that can cause significant head injuries, of which subdural hematoma (SDH) is the most common manifestation. We report the MRI findings of chronic SDH in three cases of SBS, involving two-, three- and eight-month-old babies. The SDH signal was mostly low on T1-weighted images and high on T2-weighted images, suggesting chronic SDH. In chronic SDH, a focal high signal on T1-weighted images was also noted, suggesting rebleeding. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed diffuse dural enhancement.

  7. Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH is a rare but serious complication of spinal anesthesia. We report a case of intracranial SDH in a patient developing 11 days after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. The patient complained of headache on the 2nd post-operative day that was relieved by analgesics, bed rest and hydration. Later she presented with severe headache, vomiting, dizziness, dysarthria, irritability and somnolence. Diagnosis of the left sided SDH was confirmed radiologically and treated surgically. The patient recovered completely. The report highlights the need of considering the possibility of SDH in patients when postdural puncture headache is prolonged or recurs after a headache free period with neurological symptoms.

  8. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Zaarour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH. Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine.

  9. A case of chronic subdural hematoma showing a double-loculated type on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, Bin; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Taichiro; Nagai, Hajime; Takagi, Terumasa.

    1982-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman sustained a minor head trauma. One month later she came to the hospital complaining of right motor weakness. This slight right-sided hemiparesis almost completely improved, without surgical treatment, within several days. The same hemiparesis recurred 10 days later. A plain CT scan showed a double-loculated crescent lesion which was separated by a bandlike high-density line, over the left cerebral hemisphere. The outer crescent lesion was mixed in density, low density in the upper section and high-density in the lower portion. The inner crescent lesion was low density. Although a chronic subdural hematoma was found and evacuated at operation, fluid accumulated again 10 days later. The hematoma was thus evacuated again, and the thick neo-membranes were removed as extensively as possible. The outer most neo-membrane just under the dura mater and the intermediate neo-membrane coinciding with a high-density line on CT were in the same proliferation stage, consisting of loose connective tissue with hypertrophic fibroblasts, well-developed sinusoids, and numerous hemosiderine granules. They also showed partial calcium deposition, evidence that these neo-membranes were very old, pre-existing ones. Based on the above-mentioned facts, it was speculated that the outer hematoma was formed by a splitting of a pre-existing, old outer membrane of an inner hematoma due to multiple intra-membraneous bleedings. (J.P.N.)

  10. Cortical herniation through compressive subdural membrane in an infant with a history of a large bihemispheric subdural hematoma and subdural-peritoneal shunt: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoco, Aleka; Emily Bennett, E; Recinos, Violette

    2017-02-01

    Cortical herniation through subdural membrane formation is a rare complication of chronic subdural fluid collections and may occur following subdural shunting. The authors present a unique case of progressive cortical herniation through a compressive subdural membrane that occurred concomitant with a functioning subdural-peritoneal shunt.

  11. Challenging the Pathophysiologic Connection between Subdural Hematoma, Retinal Hemorrhage and Shaken Baby Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabaeff, Steven C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse experts use diagnostic findings of subdural hematoma and retinal hemorrhages as near-pathognomonic findings to diagnose shaken baby syndrome. This article reviews the origin of this link and casts serious doubt on the specificity of the pathophysiologic connection. The forces required to cause brain injury were derived from an experiment of high velocity impacts on monkeys, that generated forces far above those which might occur with a shaking mechanism. These forces, if present, would invariably cause neck trauma, which is conspicuously absent in most babies allegedly injured by shaking. Subdural hematoma may also be the result of common birth trauma, complicated by prenatal vitamin D deficiency, which also contributes to the appearance of long bone fractures commonly associated with child abuse. Retinal hemorrhage is a non-specific finding that occurs with many causes of increased intracranial pressure, including infection and hypoxic brain injury. The evidence challenging these connections should prompt emergency physicians and others who care for children to consider a broad differential diagnosis before settling on occult shaking as the de-facto cause. While childhood non-accidental trauma is certainly a serious problem, the wide exposure of this information may have the potential to exonerate some innocent care-givers who have been convicted, or may be accused, of child abuse. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(2:144-158.

  12. Misdiagnosis of Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension as a Risk Factor for Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Cho, Hyun-Young; Seo, Dong-Woo; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Kim, Won Young; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the association between misdiagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and subdural hematoma development. Although SIH is more prevalent than expected and causes potentially life-threatening complications including subdural hematoma (SDH), the association between misdiagnosis of SIH and SDH development is not yet evaluated. Retrospective observational study was conducted between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2014. Adult patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (age ≥ 18 years) were enrolled. Of the 128 patients with SIH, 111 (86.7%) were in no SDH group and 17 (13.3%) were in SDH group. Their clinical presentation did not show significant different between the two groups, except age, the days from symptom onset to correct diagnosis, and the number of misdiagnoses. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.23) and the number of times SIH was misdiagnosed (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.03-3.21) were independent risk factors for the development of SDH in SIH patients by multivariate logistic analysis. The clinical outcomes, including length of hospital stay and revisit rate, were similar in the two groups. The number of times SIH was misdiagnosed was associated with the later development of SDH perhaps because of delay in correct diagnosis of SIH. Clinicians would prevent the later complication of SDH in SIH patients by increasing the awareness and a high index of suspicion of SIH. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  13. Incidence and risk factors of chronic subdural hematoma after surgical clipping for unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jae; Jo, Kyung-Il; Yeon, Je Young; Hong, Seung-Chyul; Kim, Jong-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare complication of unruptured aneurysm clipping surgery. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors of postoperative CSDH after surgical clipping for unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. This retrospective study included 518 patients from a single tertiary institute from January 2008 to December 2013. CSDH was defined as subdural hemorrhage which needed surgical treatment. The degree of brain atrophy was estimated using the bicaudate ratio (BCR) index. We used uni- and multivariate analyses to identify risk factors correlated with CSDH. Sixteen (3.1%) patients experienced postoperative CSDH that required burr hole drainage surgery. In univariate analyses, male gender (p<0.001), size of aneurysm (p=0.030), higher BCR index (p=0.004), and the use of antithrombotic medication (p=0.006) were associated with postoperative CSDH. In multivariate analyses using logistic regression test, male gender [odds ratio (OR) 4.037, range 1.287-12.688], high BCR index (OR 5.376, range 1.170-25.000), and the use of antithrombotic medication (OR 4.854, range 1.658-14.085) were associated with postoperative CSDH (p<0.05). Postoperative subdural fluid collection and arachnoid plasty were not showed statistically significant difference in this study. The incidence of CSDH was 3.1% in unruptured anterior circulation aneurysm surgery. This study shows that male gender, degree of brain atrophy, and the use of antithrombotic medication were associated with postoperative CSDH.

  14. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

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    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  15. Aspirin is associated with an increased risk of subdural hematoma in normal-pressure hydrocephalus patients following shunt implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT: In this paper the authors investigate whether shunt-treated patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus receiving aspirin therapy are at increased risk of developing subdural hematoma (SDH). METHODS: Records from 80 consecutive patients who had undergone implantation of a cerebrospinal...

  16. Evaluation of awake burr hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma in geriatric patients: a retrospective analysis of 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Albayrak

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Surgical interventions under local anesthesia in geriatric patients with chronic subdural hematoma can provide short operation time, early mobilization, early oral intake, avoidance of possible general anesthesia complications. Herewith, this intervention decrease mortality and morbidity in this age group. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 69-73

  17. [A case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension without orthostatic headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kazuki; Ayuzawa, Satoshi; Masuda, Yosuke; Kin, Hidehiro; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-04-01

    We herein present a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma(bilateral CSDH)caused by spontaneous intracranial hypotension(SIH)without orthostatic headache. A 67-year-old male patient with mild head injury suffered from a chronic, non-postural headache. Computed tomography of the brain showed bilateral CSDH. The hematomas were surgically evacuated using a closed drainage method. His headache immediately disappeared, but it recurred after 2 weeks. We further performed hematoma irrigation;however, his neurological status deteriorated with the development of pneumocephalus. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium-DTPA showed diffuse pachymeningeal enhancement. His cerebrospinal fluid pressure was 3cmH2O, and radioisotope cisternography revealed cerebrospinal fluid leakage at the level of the cervicothoracic transition. No recurrence was found after 6 weeks of horizontal bed rest. The possibility of SIH should be considered in patients with CSDH, especially bilateral CSDH, even in elderly patients with a history of mild head trauma, and absence of orthostatic headache. Closed drainage method may be preferable in cases where surgical treatment is used.

  18. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Therapeutic Strategies and Outcomes of 55 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Mima, Tatsuo; Akiba, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) has increasingly been recognized, and it is well known that SIH is sometimes complicated by chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, 55 cases of SIH with SDH were retrospectively analyzed, focusing on therapeutic strategies and outcomes. Of 169 SIH cases (75 males, 84 females), 55 (36 males, 19 females) were complicated by SDH. SIH was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, neuroimaging, and/or low cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Presence of orthostatic headache and diffuse meningeal enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging were regarded as the most important criteria. Among 55 SIH with SDH cases, 13 improved with conservative treatment, 25 initially received an epidural blood patch (EBP), and 17 initially underwent irrigation of the hematomas. Of the 25 initially treated with EBP, 7 (28.0%) needed SDH surgery and 18 (72.0%) recovered fully without surgery. Of 17 SDH cases initially treated with surgery, 6 (35.7%) required no EBP therapy and the other 11 (64.3%) needed EBP and/or additional SDH operations. In the latter group, 2 cases had transient severe complications during and after the procedures. One of these 2 cases developed a hoarse voice complication. Despite this single, non-severe complication, all enrolled in this study achieved good outcomes. The present study suggests that patients initially receiving SDH surgery may need additional treatments and may occasionally have complications. If conservative treatment is insufficient, EBP should be performed prior to hematoma irrigation.

  19. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungsoo; Park, Ki-Su

    2015-08-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma.

  20. Clinical study of cerebral blood flow in unilateral chronic subdural hematoma measured by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Tohru; Saito, Koji; Fukuyama, Kohichi; Yamamoto, Kouki; Morimoto, Mamoru; Aburano, Tamio

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT before operation was studied in 60 patients with unilateral chronic subdural hematoma. The regional CBF was measured in 26 regions of the fronto-occipital 10 cortices, putamen, thalamus and cerebellar hemisphere on both sides. Sixty cases with unilateral chronic subdural hematoma were classified into four groups on the basis of clinical symptoms: 17 cases with headache (headache group), 34 cases with hemiparesis (hemiparesis group) and 9 cases with consciousness disturbance or dementia (consciousness disturbance group), and into three groups on the basis of the degree of midline brain shift on MRI: 7 cases of mild shift group, 24 cases of moderate shift group and 29 cases of severe shift group. The average CBF in 60 patients in each region indicated that the regional CBF was reduced in frontal, occipital cortices and cerebellum on the non-hematoma side, and in putamen and thalamus on the hematoma side. In the headache group, the regional CBF reduction on the non-hematoma side was found in only frontal and occipital cortices compared with the corresponding regions on the hematoma side. In the hemiparesis group, the regional CBF was reduced in frontal and occipital cortices on the non-hematoma side and in putamen and thalamus on the hematoma side. The part of CBF reduction in both hemispheres was also noted in the hemiparesis group. In the consciousness disturbance group, the CBF reduction was markedly noted in whole brain. The CBF reductions in frontal and occipital cortices on the non-hematoma side and in putamen, thalamus and cerebellum on the hematoma side was not mutually related with the degree of midline brain shift. We concluded that the disturbance of CBF in chronic subdural hematoma was started from frontal and occipital cortices on the non-hematoma side observed in the headache group, and which was extended to putamen and thalamus on the hematoma side and a part of both hemispheres observed in the

  1. Subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a head injury. For example, use hard hats, bicycle or motorcycle helmets, and seat belts. Older individuals ... Amit M. Shelat, DO, FACP, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School ...

  2. Factors Affecting Outcome in Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in ICU Patients: Impact of Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygielski, Jacek; Gund, Sina-Maria; Schwerdtfeger, Karsten; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and older age are the main risk factors for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Because the age of the population and use of anticoagulants are increasing, a growing number of CSDH cases is expected. To address this issue, we analyzed the impact of anticoagulants on postsurgical outcome in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Demographic data, coagulation parameters, surgical details, radiologic appearance of hematoma, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score on discharge were retrieved and retrospectively analyzed in 98 patients with CSDH treated in the neurosurgical ICU using correlation coefficient tests and multivariate analysis test. Overall outcome was good (GOS score 4 and 5) in 55.1% of patients. Overall mortality was 9.1%. There was a correlation between GCS score on admission and GOS score. There was no correlation between hematoma thickness/radiologic appearance and impaired coagulation. Disturbance in thrombocyte function (usually resulting from aspirin intake) correlated with improved outcome, whereas warfarin-related coagulopathy correlated with poor recovery. Nevertheless, patients with thrombocytopathy presented with better initial GCS scores. Neither hematoma size nor recurrence rate affected the outcome. The size of CSDH was not associated with poor outcome and is not necessarily determined by the use of anticoagulants. Coagulopathy does not rule out a good outcome, but the impact of anticoagulation on treatment results in CSDH varies between the main groups of drugs (warfarin vs. antiplatelet drugs). Patients in good neurologic condition on ICU admission have better chances of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency of conservatively managed traumatic acute subdural haematoma changing into chronic subdural haematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.; Aurangzeb, A.; Khan, S.A.; Ali, A.; Maqbool, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury represents a significant cause of mortality and permanent disability in the adult population. Acute subdural haematoma is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Knowledge on the natural history of the illness and the outcome of patients conservatively managed may help the neurosurgeon in the decision-making process. Methods: We prospectively analysed 27 patients with age ranges 15-90 years, in whom a CT scan diagnosis of acute subdural haematoma was made, and in whom craniotomy for evacuation was not initially performed, to the neurosurgery department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad (2008-2011). Patients with deranged bleeding profile, anticoagulant therapy, chronic liver disease, any other associated intracranial abnormalities, such as cerebral contusions, as shown on CT, were excluded from this study. All patients were followed by serial CT scans, and a neurological assessment was done. Results: There were 18 male and 9 female patients, Cerebral atrophy was present in over half of the sample. In 22 of our patients, the acute subdural haematoma resolved spontaneously, without evidence of damage to the underlying brain, as shown by CT or neurological findings. Four patients subsequently required burr hole drainage for chronic subdural haematoma. In each of these patients, haematoma thickness was greater than 10 mm. The mean delay between injury and operation in this group was 15-21 days. Among these patients 1 patient required craniotomy for haematoma removal due to neurological deterioration. Conclusion: Certain conscious patients with small acute subdural haematomas, without mass effect on CT, may be safely managed conservatively, but due to high risk of these acute subdural haematoma changing into chronic subdural haematoma these patients should be reinvestigated in case of neurological deterioration. (author)

  4. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  5. Double-layer appearance after evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucu, Hasan Kamil; Akar, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the reason for and the course of the double-layer appearance in the postoperative computed tomographies (CTs) of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDHs). We reviewed CSDH cases that were operated on during the last 3 years, between January 2008 and December 2010. We checked the preoperative, early postoperative, and late postoperative CTs of these patients. We investigated the relationship between the formation of a double-layer appearance and the prognoses and demographic characteristics of the patients. Our database included 119 cases. A double-layer appearance was found in the postoperative CTs of 34 cases. The mean age of double-layer cases was older (72.5 ± 12.1) than that of the remaining 85 cases (63.1 ± 17.8). We did not find any relationship between the double-layer appearance and the reoperation/recurrence/death rates. The double-layer appearance after evacuation of a CSDH might be caused by enlargement of the subarachnoid space and is not related to the presence of any residual hematoma. This appearance is not considered as a reason for reoperation.

  6. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Cheng, Henrich; Ko, Chin-Chu

    2012-11-01

    A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs) yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH). Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient's headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage). Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Is the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematomas dependent on the duration of drainage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Aydemir; Öz, İbrahim İlker; Gün, Eren Görkem; Kalaycı, Murat; Gül, Şanser

    2017-05-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is the most frequent type of intracranial hemorrhage which especially affects the elderly. Various surgical techniques have been reported for CSDH treatment; optimal treatment methods are still controversial. In this study, the effects of long drainage durations on results and recurrences were investigated in patients on whom closed system drainage with burr hole craniotomy was applied due to CSDH. 90 patients with 105 CSDH were operated between 2008 and 2016. Patients were divided into two groups based on the duration of drainage. Group A (n = 40) was determined as 2-4 days of closed-system drainage, while Group B (n = 50) was recorded as 5-7 days of closed-system drainage. Recurrence was defined as accumulation of blood in the operation area and recurrence of symptoms within the monitoring period of six months. Recurrence was observed in 7 (15.6) of the Group A patients and 2 (3.3%) of the Group B patients. There was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of recurrence rate (p = 0.04). Postoperative thickness of hematoma was measured in the first month follow-up computerized tomography. There was a statistically significant difference between groups in terms of postoperative thickness of residual hematoma (p = 0.05). 2-4 days of closed system drainage following burr hole craniotomy is an effective and reliable choice of treatment in CSDH. Nevertheless, increasing the duration of drainage to 5-7 days provided better results without increasing the risk of complication.

  8. Subdural and Cerebellar Hematomas Which Developed after Spinal Surgery: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Utku

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar hemorrhage following a spinal surgery is extremely rare; however, considering the localization, it can cause major clinical manifestations. While it is considered that these types of bleedings occur secondary to a venous infarct, the pathogenesis is still unclear. A 57-year-old male patient who underwent a laminectomy by exposing T12-L5 and had pedicle screws placed for ankylosing spondylitis developed a CSF leak due to a 2 mm dural tear. A hemorrhage with parallel streaks on the left cerebellar hemisphere was seen in CT scan, and a thin subdural hematoma at right frontotemporal region was seen on cranial MRI, performed after the patient developed intense headache, nausea, vomiting, and stiff neck in the early postoperative period. In this paper, a case of cerebellar and subdural hematomas following a spinal surgery is discussed with its clinical and radiologic findings.

  9. Occult cervical (C1-2) dural tear causing bilateral recurrent subdural hematomas and repaired with cervical epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvanendran, Asokumar; Byrne, Richard W; Kari, Maruti; Kroin, Jeffrey S

    2008-11-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old previously healthy man who presented with a 4-month history of postural headache accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The results of initial imaging studies of the brain were normal. Repeated MR imaging demonstrated bilateral subdural hematomas which were drained and reaccumulated over a period of time. Spinal myelography revealed a cerebrospinal fluid leak at the C1-2 level. A cervical epidural blood patch, with repeated injections of 10 ml autologous blood at the site of the leak, dramatically improved the headache within 24 hours and eliminated the recurrent subdural hematomas. The results of follow-up computed tomography of the brain at 1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks were normal, and at 1-year follow-up the patient was completely free of symptoms and working.

  10. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with sylvian arachnoid cyst in juvenile athletes: report of two cases and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZENG Tao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】The association of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH and arachnoid cyst (AC is uncommon. We reported 2 juvenile athletes with CSDH associated with AC which occurred in their daily sports activities and re- viewed the literature. Both of them were treated surgically, with satisfactory outcome. AC is a common predisposing factor in young patients with CSDH. The complication of intracranial bleeding is an indication for surgical management. Though there are still controversies in the treatment of asymptomatic AC, it is the consensus that the patients with AC should avoid violent sports so as to re- duce the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage resulted from head injuries. Key words: Hematoma, subdural, chronic; Arach- noid cysts; Adolescent; Athletes

  11. Differential diagnosis of frontal lobe atrophy from chronic subdural hematoma or subdural hygroma on CT in aged patients. Usefulness of CT cisternogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideaki

    1995-01-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternograms (CTC) were performed in order to examine the CSF passage to subarachnoid space, cerebral sulci and Sylvian fissure. The old aged 20 patients (from 63 to 88 years old) with the layer of low density area around bilateral frontal lobe (bi-frontal LDA) in plain CT finding were selected from 2000 aged patients hospitalized in Hanwa-Senboku Hospital. In these 20 patients, it was difficult to differentiate frontal lobe atrophy from the chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma. Conservative therapy was applied in 19 patients for their old age or their complicated diseases. Only 1 patient was operated for subdural hygroma. The 20 patients were investigated in EEGs, severity of dementia, disturbance of consciousness, activity of daily life, their clinical course and prognosis. Only 2 of the 11 patients with type 1 CTC findings (cerebral sulci, Sylvian fissure and bi-frontal LDA were simultaneously enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness and/or delirium for their serious somatic disorders. All of 6 patients with type 3 CTC findings (only bi-frontal LDA was not enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness. Three patients with type 2 CTC findings (atypical findings) were reported independently. Subdural disorder elevating intracranial pressure were clarified in the cases with type 3 CTC findings. (author)

  12. Differential diagnosis of frontal lobe atrophy from chronic subdural hematoma or subdural hygroma on CT in aged patients. Usefulness of CT cisternogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Hideaki [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternograms (CTC) were performed in order to examine the CSF passage to subarachnoid space, cerebral sulci and Sylvian fissure. The old aged 20 patients (from 63 to 88 years old) with the layer of low density area around bilateral frontal lobe (bi-frontal LDA) in plain CT finding were selected from 2000 aged patients hospitalized in Hanwa-Senboku Hospital. In these 20 patients, it was difficult to differentiate frontal lobe atrophy from the chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma. Conservative therapy was applied in 19 patients for their old age or their complicated diseases. Only 1 patient was operated for subdural hygroma. The 20 patients were investigated in EEGs, severity of dementia, disturbance of consciousness, activity of daily life, their clinical course and prognosis. Only 2 of the 11 patients with type 1 CTC findings (cerebral sulci, Sylvian fissure and bi-frontal LDA were simultaneously enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness and/or delirium for their serious somatic disorders. All of 6 patients with type 3 CTC findings (only bi-frontal LDA was not enhanced by metrizamide) showed disturbance of consciousness. Three patients with type 2 CTC findings (atypical findings) were reported independently. Subdural disorder elevating intracranial pressure were clarified in the cases with type 3 CTC findings. (author).

  13. Hematoma subdural intracraniano: uma rara complicação após raquianestesia: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O hematoma subdural intracraniano é uma complicação rara após raquianestesia. O diagnóstico é muitas vezes difícil porque os sintomas iniciais são os mesmos da cefaleia pós-punção da dura-máter. O objetivo é relatar o caso de um hematoma subdural diag nosticado precocemente, após uma raquianestesia realizada com agulha de calibre fino e punção única. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente de 48 anos, ASA I, submetida a raquianestesia para cirurgia de correção de incontinência urinária. Foi realizada a raquianestesia com agulha 27G Quincke e punção única. A cirurgia foi sem intercorrências, e a paciente recebeu alta hospitalar. Após 48 horas da punção raquidiana, a paciente relatou cefaleia de início súbito, de forte intensidade, acometendo principalmente a região orbitária, mas também a região temporal, com melhora importante no decúbito dorsal e acompanhada de dois episódios de vômitos. Foi solicitada tomografia de crânio que revelou a presença de um hematoma subdural agudo frontotemporoparietal esquerdo. Foi indicado tratamento conservador com analgésicos, dexametasoma e hidantoína. Após 17 dias, apresentou quadro de cefaleia intensa, acompanhada de dormência e paresia do membro superior direito, e distúrbio da fala e comportamento. O hematoma foi drenado cirurgicamente. A paciente evoluiu bem sem sequelas. CONCLUSÕES: A cefaleia é a complicação mais frequente após raquianestesia e é considerada de evolução benigna. Faz com que diagnósticos potencialmente fatais, como o hematoma subdural, não sejam feitos em muitos casos, ou sejam tardios. Este caso descreve uma ocorrência rara, um hematoma subdural agudo após uma raquianestesia com agulha fina em uma paciente sem fatores de risco para sangramento

  14. A case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm detected by cerebral computed angiotomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Keiji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Takeda, Sadanori; Kimura, Hideki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1986-01-01

    One case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with an unruptured cerebral aneurysm detected by cerebral computed angiotomography is reported. A 44-year-old female slipped and hit her head without loss of consciousness, one month ago. Recently she complained of headaches and visited the department of Neurosurgery, Washokai Sadamoto Hospital on May 21, 1985. There were no physical and neurological signs on examination. Plain CT scans showed a crescent-shaped high density area in the left frontal region with a slight mass sign. She was diagnosed as having a possible chronic subdural hematoma and further examination was recommended. Biplane ultrafast overlapping cerebral computed angiotomograms clearly demonstrated a so-called avascular area delineated by enhanced superficial cerebral vessels with contrast medium. Furthermore, a marked high density mass measuring 8 mm x 10 mm x 6 mm in diameters was simultaneously demonstrated around the right anterior clinoid process on the same image, suggesting a cerebral aneurysm. Right carotid angiograms showed a right internal carotid-posterior communicating junction aneurysm. The irrigation of the left chronic subdural hematoma was carried out on May 24 and the neck clipping of the right IC-PC junction aneurysm was done two weeks later. During the operation, there were no findings suggesting a previous subarachnoid hemorrhage from the aneurysm, but a bleb was found on the aneurysm. The post-operative course was uneventful. (J.P.N.)

  15. The efficacy and safety of burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma in children under 2 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kazuya; Akutsu, Nobuyuki; Otsuka, Kunitoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Kawamura, Atsufumi; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2016-12-01

    Various treatment modalities have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma (CSDH/SDHy) in children. However, few studies have examined burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage in such cases. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for CSDH/SDHy in children under 2 years old. We also aimed to determine the predictors of CSDH/SDHy recurrence. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 25 children under 2 years old who underwent burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for CSDH/SDHy at a pediatric teaching hospital over a 10-year period. We analyzed the relationship between CSDH/SDHy recurrence and factors such as abusive head trauma, laterality of CSDH/SDHy, and subdural fluid collection type (hematoma or hygroma). CSDH/SDHy recurred in 5 of the 25 patients (20 %), requiring a second operation at an average of 0.92 ± 1.12 months after the initial procedure. The mean follow-up period was 25.1 ± 28.6 months. There were no complications related to either operation. None of the assessed factors were statistically associated with recurrence. Burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for CSDH/SDHy appears safe in children aged under 2 years and results in a relatively low recurrence rate. No predictors of CSDH/SDHy recurrence were identified. Advantages of this method include avoiding external subdural drainage-related complications. However, burr-hole drainage may be more effective for CSDH, which our data suggests is more likely to recur than SDHy, providing the procedure is performed with specific efforts to reduce complications.

  16. Efficacy of Arachnoid-Plasty on Chronic Subdural Hematoma Following Surgical Clipping of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Chang-Young

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of arachnoid plasty (ARP) on chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) occurrence following clipping surgery. In total 217 patients (ARP, n = 97; non-ARP, n = 120) who had undergone unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) surgical clipping via the pterional approach were retrospectively assessed. Predisposing factors for CSDH development following the surgery were investigated. Thickness and volume of the subdural fluid collection (SDFC) were measured to determine whether ARP affects postoperative SDFC. The occurrence of postoperative CSDH was higher in patients without ARP compared to those with ARP (12.5 vs. 3.1%; P = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, having an SDFC volume ≥15 mL on postoperative day (POD) 8, (odds ratio [OR] = 15.113; range = 3.159-72.290), and male sex (OR = 4.274; range = 1.291-14.148) were identified as independent predictive factors. Having had ARP (OR = 0.228; range = 0.056-0.927) was, as an independent variable, negatively correlated with the occurrence of CSDH (P < 0.05). Moreover, SDFC volume ≥15 ml on POD 8 was significantly less common in the ARP group compared with the non-ARP group (P = 0.03). Patients who underwent ARPs developed fewer CSDHs following UIA clipping surgery. The factors that predicted the development of CSDH included male sex, SDFC volume on POD 8, and ARP. In addition, the ARP patients had lower SDFC volumes (<15 mL). These findings suggested that ARP reduced the incidence of CSDHs after surgical clippings in patients with unruptured aneurysms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic subdural hematoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiming; Bakker, Nicolaas A; Groen, Rob J M

    2014-09-01

    In this paper the authors systematically evaluate the results of different surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other databases were scrutinized according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) statement, after which only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs were included. At least 2 different neurosurgical procedures in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) had to be evaluated. Included studies were assessed for the risk of bias. Recurrence rates, complications, and outcome including mortality were taken as outcome measures. Statistical heterogeneity in each meta-analysis was assessed using the T(2) (tau-squared), I(2), and chi-square tests. The DerSimonian-Laird method was used to calculate the summary estimates using the fixed-effect model in meta-analysis. Of the 297 studies identified, 19 RCTs were included. Of them, 7 studies evaluated the use of postoperative drainage, of which the meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.36 (95% CI 0.21-0.60; p < 0.001) in favor of drainage. Four studies compared twist drill and bur hole procedures. No significant differences between the 2 methods were present, but heterogeneity was considered to be significant. Three studies directly compared the use of irrigation before drainage. A fixed-effects meta-analysis showed a pooled OR of 0.49 (95% CI 0.21-1.14; p = 0.10) in favor of irrigation. Two studies evaluated postoperative posture. The available data did not reveal a significant advantage in favor of the postoperative supine posture. Regarding positioning of the catheter used for drainage, it was shown that a frontal catheter led to a better outcome. One study compared duration of drainage, showing that 48 hours of drainage was as effective as 96 hours of drainage. Postoperative drainage has the advantage of reducing recurrence without increasing complications

  18. Optimal perioperative management of antithrombotic agents in patients with chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Toshiyuki; Takahara, Kenta; Maehara, Naoki; Shimogawa, Takafumi; Mukae, Nobutaka; Sayama, Tetsuro; Arihiro, Shoji; Arakawa, Shuji; Morioka, Takato; Haga, Sei

    2016-12-01

    The use of antithrombotic agents such as anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents is widespread, and the opportunities to treat patients with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) under antithrombotic therapy are growing. However, whether antithrombotic therapy contributes to postoperative complications and recurrences of CSDH and how these agents should be managed in the surgical treatment of CSDH remains unclear. We retrospectively analyzed 150 consecutive patients with CSDH who underwent neurosurgical interventions at Kyushu Rosai Hospital from 2011 to 2015 and followed them for more than 3 months. Of the 150 study patients, 44 received antithrombotic therapy. All anticoagulants and 76% of the antiplatelet agents were discontinued before surgical treatment of CSDH and resumed within 1 week except in 4 patients whose treatment was terminated and 7 patients who developed postoperative complications or underwent reoperations before resumption of these agents. Postoperative hemorrhagic complications associated with surgical treatment of CSDH occurred in 8 patients (5.3%), and there was no significant difference in the incidence of these complications between patients with and without antithrombotic therapy (6.8% vs. 4.7%, respectively; p=0.90). Postoperative thromboembolic complications occurred in 5 patients (5.4%), including 4 patients with antithrombotic therapy; these complications developed before resumption of antithrombotic agents in 2 patients. There was a significant difference in the incidence of postoperative thromboembolic complications between patients with and without antithrombotic therapy (9.1% vs. 0.9%, respectively; p=0.04). There were no significant differences in the incidence of radiographic deterioration or reoperation of ipsilateral or contralateral hematomas between patients with and without antithrombotic therapy after surgical treatment of unilateral CSDH. A history of antithrombotic therapy was significantly correlated with the incidence of

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa associated with cerebellar hemorrhage: report of rare disease with MRI findings Hematoma subdural crônico de fossa posterior associado a hemorragia cerebelar espontânea: relato de doença rara com achados de RNM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leodante B. Costa Jr

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior fossa is an uncommon entity, and spontaneous lesions are very rarely described, occurring mostly during anticoagulation therapy. The association of the posterior fossa chronic subdural hematoma with spontaneous parenchymal hemorrhage without anticoagulation therapy was never related in the literature, to our knowledge. We describe a case of a 64 year-old woman who suffered a spontaneous cerebellar hemorrhage, treated conservatively, and presented 1 month later with a chronic subdural posterior fossa hematoma.Hematomas subdurais da fossa posterior são lesões raras, mais comumente relacionadas com traumas graves. A ocorrência de hematomas subdurais crônicos na fossa posterior é muito rara, sendo descritos 15 casos até o momento, boa parte relacionada ao uso de anticoagulantes. Em nossa revisão da literatura, não pudemos encontrar nenhum relato da associação entre hematoma subdural crônico da fossa posterior e hemorragia cerebelar espontânea. Relatamos o caso de paciente de 64 anos com hematoma intraparenquimatoso cerebelar tratado conservadoramente e hematoma subdural crônico, tratado cirurgicamente, cerca de 1 mês após o acidente vascular cerebelar.

  20. Expression of Caspase Signaling Components in the Outer Membranes of Chronic Subdural Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuka, Koji; Watanabe, Yasuo; Usuda, Nobuteru; Aoyama, Masahiro; Iwami, Kenichiro; Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Watabe, Takeya; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2017-11-15

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is fundamentally treatable through surgery, although CSDH recurs in some cases. We have observed several cases of spontaneous resolution of CSDH outer membranes, including in trabecular CSDH, after trepanation surgery. In this study, we examined the expression of molecules involved in caspase signaling in CSDH outer membranes. Eight patients whose outer membranes were obtained successfully during trepanation surgery were included in this study. The expression of Fas; Fas-associated death domain (FADD); tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1-associated death domain (TRADD); receptor-interacting protein (RIP); caspases 3, 7, 8, and 9; poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP); DNA fragmentation factor 45 (DFF45) and β-actin was examined by Western blot analysis. The expression levels of PARP, caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-3 were also examined by immunohistochemistry. Fas; FADD; TRADD; RIP; caspases 3, 7, 8, and 9; PARP, and DFF45 were detected in nearly all samples. Caspase-3 and PARP were localized in the endothelial cells of vessels and in fibroblasts in CSDH outer membranes. In addition, cleaved caspase-3 was detected in fibroblasts. We detected molecules of the caspase signaling pathway in CSDH outer membranes. In particular, cleaved caspase-3 was detected, which suggests that apoptosis may occur within these membranes. Thus, during the growth of CSDH outer membranes, the caspase signaling pathway may be restrained. Once the pathway is activated, gradual resolution of CSDH outer membranes may occur. Therefore, these molecules may be novel therapeutic targets for intractable CSDH.

  1. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa, E-mail: t.sieswerda@amc.nl [Section of Forensic Pediatrics, Department of Forensic Medicine, Netherlands Forensic Institute, PO Box 24044, 2490 AA The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Postema, Floor A.M., E-mail: f.a.postema@amc.nl [Faculty of Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbaan, Dagmar, E-mail: d.verbaan@amc.nl [Department of Neurosurgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Majoie, Charles B., E-mail: c.b.majoie@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van, E-mail: r.r.vanrijn@amc.nl [Section of Forensic Pediatrics, Department of Forensic Medicine, Netherlands Forensic Institute, PO Box 24044, 2490 AA The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center/Emma Children' s Hospital, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. Methods: We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers independently screened the articles, assessed methodological quality and performed data extraction. Medians with interquartile ranges were calculated. Differences were tested with a Mann–Whitney U or Kruskal–Wallis H test. Results: We included 22 studies describing 973 SDHs on CT and 4 studies describing 83 SDHs on MRI. Data from 17 studies (413 SDHs) could be pooled. There were significant differences between time intervals for the different densities on CT (p < 0.001). Time interval differed significantly between children and adults for iso- and hypodensity (p = 0.000) and hyperdensity (p = 0.046). Time interval did not differ significantly between abused and non-abused children. On MRI, time intervals for different signal intensities on T1 and T2 did not differ significantly (p = 0.108 and p = 0.194, respectively). Conclusions: Most time intervals of the different appearances of SDHs on CT and MRI are broad and overlapping. Therefore CT or MRI findings cannot be used to accurately date SDHs.

  2. Computed tomography findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Seisuke; Awaya, Sakae; Teramoto, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in the future are rare. We studied the original events causing CSDH and the following mechanism by which CSDH was originated on the basis of our CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH. Nine patients with traumatic CSDH were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 48 to 89 years (mean 69.1 years). CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH were analyzed about both extracranial and intracranial lesions. All patients were divided into two groups; non-advanced age (under 70 years, n=5) and advanced age (over 70 years, n=4). All five patients in the non-advanced age group had abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT examined on the event originating CSDH. On the other hand, only one patient had abnormal findings on CT examined on the event originating CSDH in the advanced age group. It is fact that slight head injuries cause CSDH in the advanced age, but it is probably that not slight head injuries such as to reveal abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT cause CSDH in the non-advanced age. (author)

  3. Age determination of subdural hematomas with CT and MRI: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Postema, Floor A.M.; Verbaan, Dagmar; Majoie, Charles B.; Rijn, Rick R. van

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature on dating subdural hematomas (SDHs) on CT and MRI scans. Methods: We performed a systematic review in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane to search for articles that described the appearance of SDHs on CT or MRI in relation to time between trauma and scanning. Two researchers independently screened the articles, assessed methodological quality and performed data extraction. Medians with interquartile ranges were calculated. Differences were tested with a Mann–Whitney U or Kruskal–Wallis H test. Results: We included 22 studies describing 973 SDHs on CT and 4 studies describing 83 SDHs on MRI. Data from 17 studies (413 SDHs) could be pooled. There were significant differences between time intervals for the different densities on CT (p < 0.001). Time interval differed significantly between children and adults for iso- and hypodensity (p = 0.000) and hyperdensity (p = 0.046). Time interval did not differ significantly between abused and non-abused children. On MRI, time intervals for different signal intensities on T1 and T2 did not differ significantly (p = 0.108 and p = 0.194, respectively). Conclusions: Most time intervals of the different appearances of SDHs on CT and MRI are broad and overlapping. Therefore CT or MRI findings cannot be used to accurately date SDHs

  4. Postoperative anticoagulation in patients with mechanical heart valves following surgical treatment of subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Anubhav G; Ng, Julie; Hsu, Wesley; Pradilla, Gustavo; Raza, Shaan; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lim, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Thromboembolic events and anticoagulation-associated bleeding events represent frequent complications following cardiac mechanical valve replacement. Management guidelines regarding the timing for resuming anticoagulation therapy following a surgically treated subdural hematoma (SDH) in patients with mechanical valves remains to be determined. To determine optimal anticoagulation management in patients with mechanical heart valves following treatment of SDH. Outcomes were retrospectively reviewed for 12 patients on anticoagulation therapy for thromboembolic prophylaxis for mechanical cardiac valves who underwent surgical intervention for a SDH at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between 1995 and 2010. The mean age at admission was 71 years. All patients had St. Jude's mechanical heart valves and were receiving anticoagulation therapy. All patients had their anticoagulation reversed with vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma and underwent surgical evacuation. Anticoagulation was withheld for a mean of 14 days upon admission and a mean of 9 days postoperatively. The average length of stay was 19 days. No deaths or thromboembolic events occurred during the hospitalization. Average follow-up time was 50 months, during which two patients had a recurrent SDH. No other associated morbidities occurred during follow-up. Interruptions in anticoagulation therapy for up to 3 weeks pose minimal thromboembolic risk in patients with mechanical heart valves. Close follow-up after discharge is highly recommended, as recurrent hemorrhages can occur several weeks after the resumption of anticoagulation.

  5. Treatment and prognosis of subdural hematoma in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Wang, Yen-Feng; Li, Jie-Yuan; Chen, Shih-Pin; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Tung, Hsin; Chen, Po-Lin; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Fuh, Jong-Ling

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this article is to elucidate the outcome, prognostic predictors and timing of surgical intervention for subdural hematoma (SDH) in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Patients with SDH were identified retrospectively from 227 consecutive SIH patients. Data were collected on demographics, clinical courses, neuroimaging findings, and treatment of SDH, which was later divided into conservative treatment, epidural blood patches (EBP), and surgical intervention. Poor outcome was defined as severe neurological sequelae or death. Forty-five patients (20%) with SDH (mean maximal thickness 11.9 ± 6.2 mm) were recruited. All 15 patients with SDH <10 mm achieved good outcomes by either conservative treatment or EBP. Of 30 patients with SDH ≥10 mm, patients with uncal herniation (n = 3) had poor outcomes, even after emergent surgical evacuation (n = 2), compared to those without (n = 27) (100% vs. 0%, p < 0.001). Fourteen patients underwent surgical evacuation, resulting in good outcomes in all 12 who received early intervention and poor outcomes in the remaining two who received delayed intervention after Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≤8 (100% vs. 0%, p = 0.01). Uncal herniation results in poor outcomes in patients with SIH complicated with SDH. In individuals with SDH ≥10 mm and decreased GCS scores, early surgical evacuation might prevent uncal herniation. © International Headache Society 2015.

  6. Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma of intracranial origin presenting as back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Judy C; Layman, Kerri

    2014-11-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is an uncommon condition mainly associated with bleeding dyscrasias, use of anticoagulants, trauma, iatrogenic procedures, and vascular malformations. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are recommended to prevent progressive neurologic compromise. Spinal SDH concomitant with intracranial SDH is an even rarer entity, with few cases reported in the English literature. Here we present a case of spontaneous spinal SDH with intracranial SDH presenting as sacral back pain in a 70-year-old man. We also describe the potential mechanism, treatment, and prognosis of concomitant spinal and intracranial SDH. We report an unusual case of spontaneous spinal SDH concomitant with intracranial SDH and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, potential etiology, treatment, and prognosis of this disease. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Awareness of the association between spinal SDH and intracranial SDH can expedite appropriate imaging of both brain and spine, which can lead to a more complete diagnosis and require changes in patient management in the emergency setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computed tomography findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Masayoshi; Fukuda, Seisuke; Awaya, Sakae [Mejiro Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Teramoto, Akira [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) findings examined on an event which would originate chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in the future are rare. We studied the original events causing CSDH and the following mechanism by which CSDH was originated on the basis of our CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH. Nine patients with traumatic CSDH were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 48 to 89 years (mean 69.1 years). CT findings examined on the event originating CSDH were analyzed about both extracranial and intracranial lesions. All patients were divided into two groups; non-advanced age (under 70 years, n=5) and advanced age (over 70 years, n=4). All five patients in the non-advanced age group had abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT examined on the event originating CSDH. On the other hand, only one patient had abnormal findings on CT examined on the event originating CSDH in the advanced age group. It is fact that slight head injuries cause CSDH in the advanced age, but it is probably that not slight head injuries such as to reveal abnormal findings at least in the extracranial area on CT cause CSDH in the non-advanced age. (author)

  8. [Studies on the operative factors affecting the reduction of chronic subdural hematoma, with special reference to the residual air in the hematoma cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, K; Asano, T; Basugi, N; Tango, T; Takakura, K

    1989-01-01

    The authors previously reported the effect of preoperative factors affecting the reduction of chronic subdural hematoma. In this report, we evaluated some operative factors, including operative methods, duration of drainage, and residual air volume, with newly developed CT volumetry technique. As described before, the hematoma volume reduces exponentially. An exponential curve was fitted to the reduction curve using the least square method, and its half reduction days (HRD) was calculated. This HRD represents a mathematical indicator of the reduction rate of CSDH. Using this technique, the relationship between this HRD and operative method, the duration of drainage and the volume of the postoperative residual air were examined in 61 patients. Operative method (burr hole or small craniotomy) has no correlation with HRD. The duration of drainage also has no correlation. However, the volume of the residual air was highly correlated with the reduction rate of hematoma (r = 0.430; p less than 0.01). These results suggest that the residual air in the hematoma cavity may delay the reduction rate of the hematoma. Based on these results, the authors pay attention to the following points; 1) Less invasive burr hole method should be selected. 2) Patient's head position should be controlled to make the burr hole at the highest level in the operative field. 3) Hematoma cavity should be filled with saline as much as possible. 4) The inner membrane should never be injured, as it may cause tension pneumocephalus. Moreover, the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid may reduce the counter pressure and it leads to the delay of the hematoma reduction.

  9. Clinical investigation of chronic subdural hematoma with impending brain herniation on arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Hanayama, Hiroaki; Okada, Takashi; Sakurai, Yasuo; Minami, Hiroaki; Masuda, Atsushi; Tominaga, Shogo; Miyaji, Katsuya; Yamaura, Ikuya; Yoshida, Yasuhisa

    2018-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with brain herniation signs is rarely seen in the emergent department. As such, there are few cumulative data to analyze such cases. In this study, we evaluated the clinical features, risk factors, and rates of completion with impending brain herniation on arrival in a cohort study. We analyzed 492 consecutive patients with CSDH between January 2010 and October 2015. First, we analyzed the clinical factors and compared them between patients with or without brain herniation signs on admission. Second, we compared clinical factors between patients with or without completion of brain herniation after operation among patients who had brain herniation signs on arrival. Eleven (2.2%) patients showed brain herniation signs on arrival, and six patients (1.2%) progressed to complete brain herniation. Patients with brain herniation signs on arrival were significantly older (P = 0.03) and more frequently hospitalized with a concomitant illness (P computed tomography were also more frequently seen in patients with brain herniation signs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age older than 75 years (OR 2.16, P hospital (OR 52.6, P brain herniation signs on arrival. On the other hand, having a history of head injury (P = 0.02) and disappearance of the ambient cistern (P = 0.0009) were significantly associated with completion of brain herniation. The prognosis was generally poor if the patient had presented with brain herniation signs on admission. Our results demonstrate that the diagnosis is often made late, despite hospitalization for a concomitant illness. When the elderly show mild disturbance of consciousness, physicians except neurosurgeons need to consider the possibility of CSDH regardless of a recent history of head injury.

  10. Inhibitory Mechanism of the Outer Membrane Growth of Chronic Subdural Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuka, Koji; Watanabe, Yasuo; Usuda, Nobuteru; Aoyama, Masahiro; Iwami, Kenichiro; Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Watabe, Takeya; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2017-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) activates the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway in fibroblasts within the outer membranes of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), and the activation of this pathway may induce CSDH outer membrane growth. The inhibitory system for this signal transduction pathway is unknown. CSDH fluids were obtained from 10 patients during trepanation surgery as the case group, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained from seven patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on Day 1 as the control group. The concentrations of IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R), and soluble gp130 (sgp130) in CSDH fluid and CSF were measured using enzyme immunoassay kits. The co-localization of IL-6 and sgp130 in CSDH fluid was examined by immunoprecipitation. The expression levels of STAT3, JAK2, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), and protein inhibitor of activated Stat3 (PIAS3) in the outer membranes of CSDHs were examined by immunostaining. Soluble IL-6R and sgp130 concentrations in CSDH fluid were significantly higher than those in CSF after SAH. Sgp130 and IL-6 were co-immunoprecipitated from CSDH fluid. Immunostaining revealed STAT3, JAK2, SOCS3, and PIAS3 expression in fibroblasts located in the outer membranes of CSDHs. Soluble gp130 binds to IL-6/sIL-6R and acts as an antagonist of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. SOCS3 also binds to JAK and inhibits its signaling pathway. In addition, PIAS3 regulates STAT3 activation. These factors might down-regulate the IL-6/JAK/STAT signaling pathway in fibroblasts within CSDH outer membranes. Therefore, these molecules may be novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of CSDH growth.

  11. Steroids in chronic subdural hematomas (SUCRE trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henaux, Pierre-Louis; Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Laviolle, Bruno; Morandi, Xavier

    2017-06-05

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurological pathology, especially in older patients. The actual "gold standard" of treatment is surgical evacuation, with various techniques used across neurosurgical teams. Over the years, there has been growing evidence that inflammatory processes play a major role in the pathogenesis of CSDH. In that context, the use of corticosteroids has been proposed alone or as an adjuvant treatment to surgery. However, this practice remains very empirical and there is a need for high-quality-of-evidence studies to clarify the role of corticosteroids in the management of CSDH. We propose a double-blind, randomized controlled trial comparing methylprednisolone versus placebo in the treatment of CSDH without clinical and/or radiological signs of severity. The treatment will be administered daily for a duration of 3 weeks, at a dose of 1 mg/kg. The primary endpoint will be the delay of occurrence of surgical treatment at 1 month following the introduction of the treatment. Secondary endpoints will include the rate of recourse to surgery, survival rate, quality of life and functional assessments, occurrence of systemic secondary effects and radiological assessment of the response to treatment. This multimodal assessment will be done at 1, 3 and 6 months. Two hundred and two patients (101 per arm) are expected to be included considering our primary hypotheses. This trial started in June 2016; its results may open interesting alternatives to surgery in the management of patients harboring a CSDH, and may provide insights into the natural history of this common pathology. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02650609 . Registered on 4 January 2016. Graphical output of the OBF boundaries.

  12. Burr hole washout versus craniotomy for chronic subdural hematoma: patient outcome and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Worley, Emmagene; Shelburne, Christopher; Pullarkat, Ranjit; Watson, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH), which are frequently encountered in neurosurgical practice, are, in the majority of cases, ideally treated with surgical drainage. Despite this common practice, there is still controversy surrounding the best surgical procedure. With lack of clear evidence of a superior technique, surgeons are free to base the decision on other factors that are not related to patient care. A retrospective chart review of 119 patients requiring surgical drainage of CSDH was conducted at a large tertiary care center over a three-year period. Of the cases reviewed, 58 patients underwent craniotomy, while 61 patients underwent burr hole washout. The study focused on re-operation rates, mortality, and morbidity, as measured by Glasgow coma scores (GCS), discharge Rankin disability scores, and discharge disposition. Secondary endpoints included length of stay and cost of procedure. Burr hole washout was superior to craniotomy with respect to patient outcome, length of stay and recurrence rates. In both study groups, patients required additional surgical procedures (6.6% of burr hole patients and 24.1% of craniotomy patients) (P = 0.0156). Of the patients treated with craniotomy, 51.7% were discharged home, whereas 65.6% of the burr hole patients were discharged home. Patients who underwent burr hole washout spent a mean of 78.8 minutes in the operating suite while the patients undergoing craniotomy spent 129.4 minutes (P craniotomy group (P = 0.0465). Based on this retrospective study, burr hole washout is superior for both patients' clinical and financial outcome; however, prospective long-term multicenter clinical studies are required to verify these findings.

  13. Intravenous fluid administration may improve post-operative course of patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a retrospective study.

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    Miroslaw Janowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH is still charged of significant risk of hematoma recurrence. Patient-related predictors and the surgical procedures themselves have been addressed in many studies. In contrast, postoperative management has infrequently been subjected to detailed analysis. Moreover variable intravenous fluid administration (IFA was not reported in literature till now in the context of cSDH treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 45 patients with cSDH were operated in our department via two burr hole craniostomy within one calendar year. Downward drainage was routinely left in hematoma cavity for a one day. Independent variables selected for the analysis were related to various aspects of patient management, including IFA. Two dependent variables were chosen as measure of clinical course: the rate of hematoma recurrence (RHR and neurological status at discharge from hospital expressed in points of Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Hematoma recurrence with subsequent evacuation occurred in 7 (15% patients. Univariate regression analysis revealed that length of IFA after surgery influenced both dependent variables: RHR (p = 0.045 and GOS (p = 0.023. Multivariate regression performed by backward elimination method confirmed that IFA is a sole independent factor influencing RHR. Post hoc dichotomous division of patients revealed that those receiving at least 2000 ml/day over 3 day period revealed lower RHR than the group with less intensive IFA. (p = 0.031. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IFA has been found to be a sole factor influencing both: RHR and GOS. Based on those results we may recommend administration of at least 2000 ml per 3 days post-operatively to decrease the risk of hematoma recurrence.

  14. Pola Kejadian Hematoma Subdural Pada Bayi Yang dirawat di Ruang Rawat Intensif Anak Rumah Sakit Dr. Hasan Sadikin

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    Enny Harliany Alwi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH is a common condition in infancy and young children with a poor prognostic. The more studies related SDH with nonaccidental injury. With the aim to identify the characteristics of SDH in infants below 1 year, a retrospective study of infants below 1 year diagnosed as subdural hematoma who were admitted to PICU Hasan Sadikin General Hospital from Januari 2000 to Desember 2003 has been conducted. Infants less than 1 month and SDH developed after neurosurgery intervention were excluded. Fourteen infants met the inclusion criteria's, consisted of 5 (36% girls and 9 (64% boys, most of them were on 1 month of age (57%. Anemia was found on all cases, thrombocyte normal except in 1 case thrombocytopenia (53,000/mm3. PT prolonged in 9 (100% cases and PTT in 5 (56% from 9 cases. Bilirubin total/direct elevated in 4 (80% from 5 cases, SGOT/SGPT elevated in 5 (83% from 6 cases. From 11 cases, 9 (82% cases were IgG anti-CMV positive and 6 (55% cases were IgM anti CMV positive. Conclusions, SDH can be caused by various etiologies, thus a comprehensive examinations to exclude child abuse are needed. The role of CMV infection should be considered as one of SDH etiology.

  15. Burr hole trepanation for chronic subdural hematomas: is surgical education safe?

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    Maldaner, Nicolai; Sosnova, Marketa; Sarnthein, Johannes; Bozinov, Oliver; Regli, Luca; Stienen, Martin N

    2018-01-08

    There is a paucity of data concerning the safety and efficacy of surgical education for neurosurgical residents in the evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas (cSDH) by burr hole trepanation. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on consecutive patients receiving burr hole trepanation for uni- or bilateral cSDH. Patients operated by a supervised neurosurgery resident (teaching cases) were compared to patients operated by a board-certified faculty neurosurgeon (BCFN; non-teaching cases). The primary endpoint was surgical revision for any reason until the last follow-up. The secondary endpoint was occurrence of any complication until the last follow-up. Clinical status, type of complications, mortality, length of surgery (LOS), and hospitalization (LOH) were tertiary endpoints. A total of n = 253 cases were analyzed, of which n = 217 (85.8%) were teaching and n = 36 (14.2%) non-teaching cases. The study groups were balanced in terms of age, sex, surgical risk (ASA score), and preoperative status (Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)). The cohort was followed for a mean of 242 days (standard deviation 302). In multivariate analysis, teaching cases were as likely as non-teaching cases to require revision surgery (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.27-1.59; p = 0.348) as well as to experience any complication until the last follow-up (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.37-1.67; p = 0.532). Mean LOS was about 10 min longer in teaching cases (53.0 ± 26.1 min vs. 43.5 ± 17.8 min; p = 0.036), but LOH was similar. There were no group differences in clinical status, mortality and type of complication at discharge, and the last follow-up. Burr hole trepanation for cSDH can be safely performed by supervised neurosurgical residents enrolled in a structured training program, without increasing the risk for revision surgery, perioperative complications, or worse outcome.

  16. Outcomes of chronic subdural hematoma drainage in nonagenarians and centenarians: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lester; Ker, Justin; Ng, Hui Yu; Munusamy, Thangaraj; King, Nicolas Kon Kam; Kumar, Dinesh; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2016-02-01

    Chronic subdural hemorrhage (SDH) or hematoma is a condition that affects elderly individuals. With advances in medical care, the number of nonagenarians and centenarians will increase. However, surgical treatments in this age group are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Because no data are available on the rates of survival among elderly patients with chronic SDHs who undergo surgical drainage or receive only conservative care, the goal of this study was to determine survival rates in patients 90 years of age or older with symptomatic chronic SDHs. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of patient data that were collected at 3 hospitals over a 13-year period (from January 2001 to June 2013). The data from patients 90 years or older with symptomatic chronic SDHs and who were offered surgical treatment were included in the analysis. Patients who underwent surgical treatment were included in the surgical group and patients who declined an operation were included in the conservative care group. The patients' Charlson Comorbidity Index score, Karnofsky Performance Scale score, dates of death, presenting symptoms, Glasgow Coma Scale score, length of stay in the hospital, discharge location, side of the SDH, and neurological improvements at 30-day and 6-month follow-ups were recorded. Data were statistically analyzed with Fisher exact test, Kaplan-Meier curves, and logistic regression. In total, 101 patients met the inclusion criteria of this study; 70 of these patients underwent surgical drainage, and 31 received conservative care. Patients in the surgical group had statistically significantly (p < 0.001) higher survival at both the 30-day and 6-month follow-ups, with 92.9% and 81.4% of the patients in this group surviving for at least 30 days and 6 months, respectively, versus 58.1% and 41.9%, respectively, in the conservative care group. Moreover, the mean overall length of survival of 34.4 ± 28.7 months was longer in the surgical group

  17. Comparison of Subdural Hematoma Risk between Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Patients with ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Kuan; Cheng, Yu-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Li; Peng, Chiao-Ling; Chou, Che-Yi; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung Y

    2015-06-05

    This study compared the risk of subdural hematoma (SDH) and subsequent mortality in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with ESRD. Claims data were obtained from the National Health Insurance Administration Research Database in Taiwan. This retrospective cohort study comprised 10,136 PD patients and 10,136 HD patients with newly diagnosed ESRD from 1998 to 2010. Patients were matched by propensity score and year of dialysis initiation. Incidence rates and hazard ratios of SDH as well as odds ratios of subsequent 30-day deaths from SDH were evaluated from the date of the first dialysis session to the date when SDH was diagnosed, or the date of renal transplantation, death, withdraw from insurance, or the end of the follow-up period (December 31, 2011). Median (25th percentile, 75th percentile) follow-up times for SDH events were 3.61 years (1.91, 6.33) and 3.33 years (1.83, 5.66) in the HD and PD cohorts, respectively. The overall SDH incidence rate (95% confidence interval [95% CI]) was 61.4% higher in the HD cohort than in the PD cohort (34.7 [95% CI, 31.4 to 35.4] versus 21.5 [95% CI, 20.2 to 22.9] per 10,000 person-years, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.62 [95% CI, 1.17 to 2.33]). Approximately 152 of 253 (60%) of SDH events were associated with trauma. Subsequent 30-day SDH-related mortality was not statistically higher in HD patients than in PD patients (29.1% versus 25.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.70 to 2.41). HD patients have a higher risk of developing SDH than PD patients. Both patient groups have a high risk of mortality. Routine education on fall prevention is needed for dialysis patients. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Acute Epidural Hematoma: Case Series

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    Weijun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Although minimally invasive surgical treatment of acute epidural hematoma attracts increasing attention, no generalized indications for the surgery have been adopted. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery in acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes. Methods. Minimally invasive puncture and aspiration surgery were performed in 59 cases of acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes (13–145 mL; postoperative follow-up was 3 months. Clinical data, including surgical trauma, surgery time, complications, and outcome of hematoma drainage, recovery, and Barthel index scores, were assessed, as well as treatment outcome. Results. Surgical trauma was minimal and surgery time was short (10–20 minutes; no anesthesia accidents or surgical complications occurred. Two patients died. Drainage was completed within 7 days in the remaining 57 cases. Barthel index scores of ADL were ≤40 (n=1, 41–60 (n=1, and >60 (n=55; scores of 100 were obtained in 48 cases, with no dysfunctions. Conclusion. Satisfactory results can be achieved with minimally invasive surgery in treating acute epidural hematoma with hematoma volumes ranging from 13 to 145 mL. For patients with hematoma volume >50 mL and even cerebral herniation, flexible application of minimally invasive surgery would help improve treatment efficacy.

  19. Second-impact syndrome and a small subdural hematoma: an uncommon catastrophic result of repetitive head injury with a characteristic imaging appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Robert C; Gean, Alisa D

    2010-09-01

    There have been a handful of previously published cases of athletes who were still symptomatic from a prior head injury, and then suffered a second injury in which a thin, acute subdural hematoma (SDH) with unilateral hemisphere vascular engorgement was demonstrated on CT scan. In those cases, the cause of the brain swelling/dysautoregulation was ascribed to the presence of the acute SDH rather than to the acceleration/deceleration forces that caused the SDH. We believe that the brain swelling is due to "second-impact dysautoregulation," rather than due to the effect of the SDH on the underlying hemisphere. To support our hypothesis, we present 10 additional cases of acute hemispheric swelling in association with small SDHs in athletes who received a second head injury while still symptomatic from a previous head injury. The clinical history and the unique neuroimaging features of this entity on CT are described and illustrated in detail. The CT findings included an engorged cerebral hemisphere with initial preservation of grey-white matter differentiation, and abnormal mass effect and midline shift that appeared disproportionately greater than the size of the SDH. In addition, the imaging similarities between our patients and those with non-accidental head trauma (shaken-baby syndrome) will be discussed.

  20. Recovery of cerebral blood flow in unilateral chronic subdural hematoma. The correlation with cerebral re-expansion in elders

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    Nemoto, Akio [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2003-01-01

    CT and SPECT were used to investigate the relationship between cerebral re-expansion and changes in cerebral blood flow underneath hematoma in elderly patients after surgery for chronic unilateral subdural hematoma. I studied 22 patients with mild hematoma, aged 43 to 82 years (mean 67 years). The patients were placed in either Group A (under 70 years) or Group B (70 years or over) to observe postoperative changes. CT and SPECT examinations were conducted before surgery and 1, 7 and 30 days after surgery, 4 times in total. Cerebral re-expansion was represented by the re-expansion rate (PER) comparing the pre- and postoperative thickness of the maximal hematoma in CT images. The rate of cerebral re-expansion was slowed in Group B (p<0.01). Cerebral re-expansion was characterized by biphasic, rapid or gradual re-expansion on postoperative day 1 with a significant difference between groups (p<0.01). Before surgery, cerebral blood flow on the affected side correlated with age (p<0.01), thougn blood flow was diminished in both groups. After surgery, cerebral blood flow on the affected side exceeded that on the unaffected side in Group A and transiently increased on postoperative day 1. Cerebral blood flow improved after surgery in both groups, with a significant difference in those changes over time (p<0.01). In both groups, cerebral re-expansion on postoperative days 7 and 30 correlated with cerebral blood flow on the affected side (p<0.05). The present results suggest that improvement in cerebral blood flow on the affected side is delayed in elderly patients, due to slower postoperative cerebral re-expansion. (author)

  1. Concomitant Intracranial and Lumbar Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated by Fluoroscopic Guided Lumbar Puncture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Daisuke; Tochigi, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshihide; Suzuki, Tomoya; Takei, Jun; Hatano, Keisuke; Kajiwara, Ikki; Maruyama, Fumiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Tani, Satoshi; Murayama, Yuichi

    2018-02-23

    A 40-year-old man presented with a severe headache, lower back pain, and lower abdominal pain 1 month after a head injury caused by falling. Computed tomography (CT) of the head demonstrated bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with a significant amount in the left frontoparietal region. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine also revealed CSDH from L2 to S1 level. A simple drainage for the intracranial CSDH on the left side was performed. Postoperatively, the headache was improved; however, the lower back and abdominal pain persisted. Aspiration of the liquefied spinal subdural hematoma was performed by a lumbar puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. The clinical symptoms were dramatically improved postoperatively. Concomitant intracranial and spinal CSDH is considerably rare so only 23 cases including the present case have been reported in the literature so far. The etiology and therapeutic strategy were discussed with a review of the literature. Therapeutic strategy is not established for these two concomitant lesions. Conservative follow-up was chosen for 14 cases, resulting in a favorable clinical outcome. Although surgical evacuation of lumbosacral CSDH was performed in seven cases, an alteration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure following spinal surgery should be reminded because of the intracranial lesion. Since CSDH is well liquefied in both intracranial and spinal lesion, a less invasive approach is recommended not only for an intracranial lesion but also for spinal lesion. Fluoroscopic-guided lumbar puncture for lumbosacral CSDH following burr hole surgery for intracranial CSDH could be a recommended strategy.

  2. Risk Factors in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Comparison of Irrigation with Artificial Cerebrospinal Fluid and Normal Saline in a Cohort Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Akihiko; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Fujikawa, Atsushi; Machida, Toshio; Sueyoshi, Shigeo; Harigaya, Kenichi; Ono, Junichi; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is known to have a substantial recurrence rate. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACF) is an effective irrigation solution in general open craniotomy and endoneurosurgery, but no evidence of its use in burr-hole surgery exists. Objective To identify the potential of ACF irrigation to prevent CSDH recurrence. More specifically, to investigate the perioperative and intraoperative prognostic factors, and to identify controllable ones. Methods To examine various prognostic factors, 120 consecutive patients with unilateral CSDH treated with burr-hole drainage between September 2007 and March 2013 were analyzed. Intraoperative irrigation was performed with one of two irrigation solutions: normal saline (NS; n = 60) or ACF (n = 60). All patients were followed-up for at least 6 months postoperatively. We also examined the morphological alternations of the hematoma outer membranes after incubation with different solutions. Results Eleven patients (9.2%) had recurrence. Nine patients (15%) required additional surgery in the NS group, whereas only 2 patients (3.3%) in the ACF group required additional surgery. Among preoperative and intraoperative data, age (22.0, P = .037), laterality (right, P = .03), and irrigation solution (ACF, P = .027) were related to smaller recurrence rates by log-rank tests. Only the type of irrigation solution used significantly correlated with recurrence in favor of ACF in both Cox proportional hazards (relative hazard: 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04–0.99; P = .049) and logistic regression models (odds ratio, 0.17, 95% CI: 0.03–0.92; P = .04) using these factors. Histological examinations of the hematoma membranes showed that the membranes incubated with NS were loose and infiltrated by inflammatory cells compared with those incubated with ACF. Conclusion Irrigation with ACF decreased the rate of CSDH recurrence. PMID:25089621

  3. Spontaneous development of bilateral subdural hematomas in an infant with benign infantile hydrocephalus: color Doppler assessment of vessels traversing extra-axial spaces

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    Amodio, John; Spektor, Vadim; Pramanik, Bidyut; Rivera, Rafael; Pinkney, Lynne; Fefferman, Nancy [New York University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2005-11-01

    We present an infant with macrocrania, who initially demonstrated prominent extra-axial fluid collections on sonography of the brain, compatible with benign infantile hydrocephalus (BIH). Because of increasing macrocrania, a follow-up sonogram of the brain was performed; it revealed progressive enlargement of the extra-axial spaces, which now had echogenic debris. Color Doppler US showed bridging veins traversing these extra-axial spaces, so it was initially thought that these spaces were subarachnoid in nature (positive cortical vein sign). However, an arachnoid membrane was identified superior to the cortex, and there was compression of true cortical vessels beneath this dural membrane. An MRI of the brain showed the extra-axial spaces to represent bilateral subdural hematomas. The pathogenesis of spontaneous development of the subdural hematomas, in the setting of BIH, is discussed. We also emphasize that visualizing traversing bridging veins through extra-axial spaces does not necessarily imply that these spaces are subarachnoid in origin. (orig.)

  4. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma development in chronic myeloid leukemia cases at remission phase under maintenance therapy, management strategy - a series with literature review

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    Raheja Amol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is common squeal of trauma and rarely associated with anticoagulant therapy, antiplatelet, chemotherapeutic drugs, arteriovenous malformation, aneurysms and post-craniotomy. However its occurrence is very unusual with systemic haematological malignancy and mostly reported with acute myeloid leukemia; however incidence of SDH occurrence in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is very rare. CML is a haematological malignancy characterized by chromosomal alteration, pathologically represents increased proliferation of the granulocytic cell line without loss of capacity to differentiate. CML has three phases - remission phase, accelerated phase and blast crisis. About 85 % of patients present in remission phase of disease and carries a favorable prognosis. As intracranial, subdural hematoma usually occur in the accelerated phase or blast crisis phase or extremely uncommon during chronic remission phase, although only those affected, who are neglecting therapeutic medication or discontinued therapy or rarely as an adverse effect of medications. However, important role of neurosurgeon lies in early detection and correction of platelet count and associated hematological abnormality as quite sizeable proportion of cases may not need surgical intervention instead can be managed conservatively under regular supervision in association with oncologist colleague, but few cases may need urgent surgical intervention. So, selecting a subgroup of CML cases in the remission phase requiring surgical intervention, presenting with CSDH is not only challenging, as failure to make an informed and timely precise decision can lead to catastrophic worse outcome and even mortality. So, purpose of current article is to formulate the management therapeutic plan. Authors report three cases of CML in chronic remission phase, receiving treatment under guidance of Haemto-oncologist at our institute presented with spontaneous chronic SDH. The mean

  5. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008?2012

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    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical...

  6. CT findings in patients with infantile epilepsy on ACTH therapy. A report of 17 cases including one case of infantile spasm with subdural hematoma

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    Watanabe, K. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Hara, K.; Hakamada, A.; Miyazaki, S.

    1981-05-01

    A case of infantile spasms in which subdural hematoma developed after ACTH-Z therapy was reported. The results of CT evaluated before and after the therapy in 17 cases of infantile epilepsy including infantile spasms. Cerebral atrophy due to ACTH-Z therapy was remarkable, especially in the infants under one year old. We should vary careful in employing ACTH-Z therapy for infants of this age.

  7. Hematoma subdural crónico: Resultados quirúrgicos en 2 años de trabajo

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    Ángel Jesús Lacerda Gallardo

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Disminuir al máximo la mortalidad por hematoma subdural crónico (HSDC, es un reto que se debe alcanzar en todo centro neuroquirúrgico, en el que pueden influir el diagnóstico precoz y la adecuada selección del proceder quirúrgico. Se presentan 20 pacientes, 16 masculinos (80 % y 4 femeninos (20 %, con una edad promedio para el grupo de 66,55 años, tratados quirúrgicamente por medio de la trepanación múltiple con lavado de la cavidad y drenaje cerrado al exterior. La angiografía carotídea constituyó el examen más utilizado para el diagnóstico 14 (70 %, seguida por la tomografía axial computadorizada (TAC 8 (40 %. La escala de Bender se empleó para clasificar a los enfermos según el estado neurológico al ingreso, y se halló que el 80 % estaba en los grados I y II. Los resultados se evaluaron según la escala de resultados de Glasgow, y presentaron 17 (85 %, una buena recuperaciónTo reduce as much as possible mortality from chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is a goal that should be attained by every neurosurgical center. An early diagnosis and an adequate selection of the surgical procedure may influence on it. 20 patients, 16 males (80 % and 4 females (20 % with an average age by group of 66.55 years of age were surgically treated by multiple trephining with lavage of the cavity and closed drainage. The carotid angiography was the most used test for the diagnosis with 14 (70 %, followed by computerized axial tomography (CAT with 8 (40 %. Bender´s scale was utilized to classify the patients according to the neurological state at the time of admission . 80 % of them corresponded to degrees I and II. The results were evaluated by using the Glasgow´s scale. 17 (85 % had a good recovery

  8. Prospective assessment of concomitant lumbar and chronic subdural hematoma: is migration from the intracranial space involved in their manifestation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Rinko; Kim, Kyongsong; Mishina, Masahiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kobayashi, Shiro; Yoshida, Daizo; Morita, Akio

    2014-02-01

    Spinal subdural hematomas (SDHs) are rare and some are concomitant with intracranial SDH. Their pathogenesis and etiology remain to be elucidated although their migration from the intracranial space has been suggested. The authors postulated that if migration plays a major role, patients with intracranial SDH may harbor asymptomatic lumbar SDH. The authors performed a prospective study on the incidence of spinal SDH in patients with intracranial SDH to determine whether migration is a key factor in their concomitance. The authors evaluated lumbar MR images obtained in 168 patients (125 males, 43 females, mean age 75.6 years) with intracranial chronic SDH to identify cases of concomitant lumbar SDH. In all cases, the lumbar MRI studies were performed within the 1st week after surgical irrigation of the intracranial SDH. Of the 168 patients, 2 (1.2%) harbored a concomitant lumbar SDH; both had a history of trauma to both the head and the hip and/or lumbar area. One was an 83-year-old man with prostate cancer and myelodysplastic syndrome who suffered trauma to his head and lumbar area in a fall from his bed. The other was a 70-year-old man who had hit his head and lumbar area in a fall. Neither patient manifested neurological deficits and their hematomas disappeared under observation. None of the patients with concomitant lumbar SDH had sustained head trauma only, indicating that trauma to the hip or lumbar region is significantly related to the concomitance of SDH (p intracranial chronic SDH is rare and both patients in this study had sustained a direct impact to the head and hips, the authors suggest that the major mechanism underlying their concomitant SDH was double trauma. Another possible explanation is hemorrhagic diathesis and low CSF syndrome.

  9. The Effect of Irrigation Solutions on Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Consecutive Cohort Study of 234 Patients.

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    Kuwabara, Masashi; Sadatomo, Takashi; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Migita, Keisuke; Imada, Yasutaka; Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Hara, Takeshi; Oba, Hideo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2017-05-15

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) occur often in elderly persons and can occur with mild head trauma. With burr-hole irrigation as standard treatment, symptoms usually improve and can be cured, and outcomes are good, but postoperative recurrences are a common problem. This study investigated the effectiveness and recurrence rates when using artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACF) instead of normal saline (NS) as an irrigation solution for burr-hole irrigation in patients with CSDH. This prospective study included 234 consecutive patients who underwent initial surgical treatment by burr-hole irrigation for a CSDH between April 2008 and June 2015. The irrigation solution used was changed from NS to ACF in June 2011. Factors examined with regard to recurrence included age, sex, unilateral or bilateral surgery, computed tomography (CT) findings, antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug use, past history, and irrigation solution (NS or ACF). These were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Univariate analyses (chi-square test) with a significance level irrigation for CSDH, the use of ACF instead of NS as an irrigation solution significantly reduces recurrence rates.

  10. Treatment of irrigation through burr hole with siphonage drainage for chronic subdural hematoma: a report of 139 cases

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    She-peng WEI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of irrigation through burr hole with siphonage drainage on chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH.Methods The clinical data of 139 patients with CSDH(89 males and 50 females,aged from 48 to 87 with mean of 66.4 years hospitalized from Jan.2006 to Dec.2010 were retrospectively reviewed.All the patients were finally diagnosed by radiology,and divided into 3 groups according to the operative method,i.e.parietal burr hole irrigation with drainage group(group A,n=47,parietal burr hole irrigation and aspiration group(group B,n=41,and frontal burr hole irrigation with siphonage drainage group(group C,n=51.All the patients were treated with closed drainage for 2-6 days.The activity of daily living(ADL scores was measured before and 7 days after operation in all patients.The patients were followed-up for 12-36 months to observe the treatment results.Results No death occurred in the 3 groups during the follow-up period.The improvement of ADL was markedly better in group C than in group B(P 0.05.Conclusion The frontal burr hole irrigation with siphonage drainage has a definite treatment effect for CSDH with a low recurrence rate and less complications,and is appropriate to use in most of CSDH patients.

  11. Lumbosacral Subdural Hematoma After Glioblastoma Multiforme Resection: Possible Radiographic Evidence for the Downward Migration of Intracranial Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisan, Gabriella M; Buell, Thomas J; Raper, Daniel; Asthagiri, Ashok

    2017-12-01

    Spinal subdural hematomas (SSDHs) are rare and usually associated with bleeding diatheses, trauma, iatrogenic injury, spinal vascular malformations, or intraspinal tumors. We report a case of a 75-year-old man who developed a symptomatic lumbosacral SSDH after undergoing resection of a right temporal glioblastoma multiforme. The patient subsequently recovered and was discharged home. Over the next 2 weeks, he developed progressively worsening symptoms of lower back pain, lower extremity weakness, and urinary retention. Although the patient had no known risk factors for developing a SSDH, magnetic resonance imaging on postoperative day 16 revealed an extensive L2-sacrum SSDH. The patient underwent L2-L5 total laminectomies for evacuation of the SSDH. His symptoms resolved after surgery. Literature review produced 26 other cases of SSDHs after intracranial surgery in patients without obvious risk factors. In our case, the lumbosacral SSDH may have originated from downward migration of intracranial blood in a gravity-dependent fashion. Radiographic evidence of blood within the posterior thecal sac of the patient's cervical spine supports this hypothesis. In most cases, SSDHs after intracranial surgery resolve with conservative treatment; however, as shown in our case, surgery may be required if there is progressive neurologic decline. Neurosurgeons should be aware of this potential complication after intracranial surgery; a magnetic resonance imaging of the spine may be indicated if there is unexplained lower extremity pain or weakness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Case report: Extreme levels of serum S-100B in a patient with chronic subdural hematoma

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    Malin Elisabet Persson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The protein S-100B is a biomarker increasingly used within neurosurgery and neurointensive care. As a relatively sensitive, yet unspecific, indicator of CNS pathology, potential sources of error must be clearly understood when interpreting serum S-100B levels. This case report studied the course of a 46-year-old gentleman with a chronic subdural haemorrhage, serum S-100B levels of 22 μg/L and a history of malignant melanoma. Both intra- and extra-cranial sources of S-100B are evaluated and imply an unclear contribution of several sources to the total serum concentration. Potential sources of error when interpreting serum concentrations of S-100B are discussed

  13. The management and outcome for patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Paul M; Kolias, Angelos G; Joannides, Alexis J; Shapey, Jonathan; Marcus, Hani J; Gregson, Barbara A; Grover, Patrick J; Hutchinson, Peter J; Coulter, Ian C

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) will become an increasingly common presentation in neurosurgical practice as the population ages, but quality evidence is still lacking to guide the optimal management for these patients. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) was established by neurosurgical trainees in 2012 to improve research by combining the efforts of trainees in each of the United Kingdom (UK) and Ireland's neurosurgical units (NSUs). The authors present the first study by the BNTRC that describes current management and outcomes for patients with CSDH throughout the UK and Ireland. This provides a resource both for current clinical practice and future clinical research on CSDH. METHODS Data on management and outcomes for patients with CSDH referred to UK and Ireland NSUs were collected prospectively over an 8-month period and audited against criteria predefined from the literature: NSU mortality < 5%, NSU morbidity < 10%, symptomatic recurrence within 60 days requiring repeat surgery < 20%, and unfavorable functional status (modified Rankin Scale score of 4-6) at NSU discharge < 30%. RESULTS Data from 1205 patients in 26 NSUs were collected. Bur-hole craniostomy was the most common procedure (89%), and symptomatic recurrence requiring repeat surgery within 60 days was observed in 9% of patients. Criteria on mortality (2%), rate of recurrence (9%), and unfavorable functional outcome (22%) were met, but morbidity was greater than expected (14%). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that failure to insert a drain intraoperatively independently predicted recurrence and unfavorable functional outcome (p = 0.011 and p = 0.048, respectively). Increasing patient age (p < 0.00001), postoperative bed rest (p = 0.019), and use of a single bur hole (p = 0.020) independently predicted unfavorable functional outcomes, but prescription of high-flow oxygen or preoperative use of antiplatelet medications did not. CONCLUSIONS This

  14. Present epidemiology of chronic subdural hematoma in Japan: analysis of 63,358 cases recorded in a national administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Keita; Hirai, Satoshi; Takai, Hiroki; Hara, Keijiro; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Matsubara, Shunji; Otani, Makoto; Muramatsu, Keiji; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Uno, Masaaki

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aging of the population may lead to epidemiological changes with respect to chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The objectives of this study were to elucidate the current epidemiology and changing trends of CSDH in Japan. The authors analyzed patient information based on reports using a Japanese administrative database associated with the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) system. METHODS This study included patients with newly diagnosed CSDH who were treated in hospitals participating in the DPC system. The authors collected data from the administrative database on the following clinical and demographic characteristics: patient age, sex, and level of consciousness on admission; treatment procedure; and outcome at discharge. RESULTS A total of 63,358 patients with newly diagnosed CSDH and treated in 1750 DPC participation hospitals were included in this study. Analysis according to patient age showed that the most common age range for these patients was the 9th decade of life (in their 80s). More than half of patients 70 years old or older presented with some kind of disturbance of consciousness. Functional outcomes at discharge were good in 71.6% (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score 0-2) of cases and poor in 28.4% (mRS score 3-6). The percentage of poor outcomes tended to be higher in elderly patients. Approximately 40% of patients 90 years old or older could not be discharged to home. The overall recurrence rate for CSDH was 13.1%. CONCLUSIONS This study shows a chronological change in the age distribution of CSDH among Japanese patients, which may be affecting the prognosis of this condition. In the aging population of contemporary Japan, patients in their 80s were affected more often than patients in other age categories, and approximately 30% of patients with CSDH required some help at discharge. CSDH thus may no longer have as good a prognosis as had been thought.

  15. Hematoma subdural agudo espontâneo e hemorragia intracerebral em paciente com microangiopatia trombótica gestacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sâmia Yasin Wayhs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pré-eclâmpsia, síndrome HELLP (hemólise, elevação de enzimas hepáticas e plaquetopenia e fígado gorduroso agudo da gestação são as principais causas de microangiopatia trombótica e disfunção hepática grave durante a gestação, representando um spectrum do mesmo processo patológico. Relatou-se aqui o caso de uma gestante com 35 semanas internada em unidade de terapia intensiva no pós-operatório imediato de cesariana por morte fetal, com náuseas, vômitos e icterícia. Diagnosticaram-se pré-eclâmpsia pós-parto e fígado gorduroso agudo da gestação. Houve evolução tardia com hematoma subdural agudo e hemorragia intracerebral, sendo realizado tratamento neurocirúrgico. A paciente foi a óbito por anemia hemolítica refratária, com sangramento espontâneo em múltiplos órgãos. Pré-eclâmpsia, síndrome HELLP e fígado gorduroso agudo da gestação são processos patológicos que podem se sobrepor e se associar a complicações potencialmente fatais, como a hemorragia intracraniana aqui descrita. Sua detecção e diagnóstico precoces são fundamentais para a instituição de manejo adequado e sucesso do tratamento.

  16. Flow, Liver, Flow: A Retrospective Analysis of the Interplay of Liver Disease and Coagulopathy in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolcun, John Paul George; Gernsback, Joanna Elizabeth; Richardson, Angela Mae; Jagid, Jonathan Russell

    2017-06-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a common neurosurgical ailment, particularly in elderly patients. A recent study uncovered an association between liver disease and recurrence in patients with cSDH. Here, we explored that relationship to identify recurrence predictors in at-risk patients. We hypothesized that the association between liver disease and recurrence was attributable to coagulopathy secondary to liver disease. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with cSDH treated with burr-hole drainage by 2 surgeons between 2007 and 2015. Comorbidities and laboratory findings for each patient were examined by Pearson χ 2 analysis or Mann-Whitney U tests. We identified 261 cSDH in 215 patients. Patients were a mean age of 65.6 years, and 72% were male. Sixteen patients with cSDH required repeat surgery (6.1%). There were 123 coagulopathic patients (47.1%), and 14 with liver disease (5.4%), all of whom were coagulopathic (P < 0.001). Coagulopathic patients with liver disease were more likely to experience recurrence than patients with coagulopathy alone (relative risk = 4.09, P = 0.019). Patients with liver disease had significantly elevated prothrombin time (P = 0.013) and reduced platelet counts (P < 0.001). Platelets also were reduced in coagulopathic patients with liver disease, as compared with those with coagulopathy alone (P = 0.002). Thrombocytopenia remained significant in a multivariate analysis (P < 0.001). Liver disease is significantly associated with the recurrence of cSDH. Although coagulopathy alone does not predict recurrence, patients with coagulopathy and liver disease are at greater risk for recurrence than those with coagulopathy alone. Liver disease effects are reflected in certain hematologic laboratory values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Management of Patients with Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated with Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid: An International Survey of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Jehuda; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this international survey was to investigate the current management of patients undergoing surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) treated with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). We administered a survey via e-mail to neurosurgeons with questions relating to the surgical treatment of cSDH, emphasizing their practices with patients treated with low-dose ASA. We received 157 responses, with a response rate of 22.4%. Almost 80% of the responders discontinue ASA treatment at least 5 days before surgery and 80.7% resume treatment after 5 days or more, and 27.6% discontinue treatment for at least 30 days. The main factor influencing ASA resumption time is the indication for ASA (54.5%), and postoperative imaging is concluded in 71.7%, Postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis is administered by 60% of the responders, and 50% apply it 24 hours after surgery. Almost 95% of the responders believe that better evidence is needed for the management of patients with cSDH treated with ASA. Guidelines for these patients exist in only 24.3% of the institutes. Most neurosurgeons discontinue ASA treatment for at least 7 days in the perioperative period of surgical evacuation of cSDH, even though recent studies show that early ASA resumption might be safe. Thrombosis prophylaxis is administered by only 60%, even though patients with cSDH are at high risk of developing thromboembolic complications. Better evidence and guidelines are warranted because the incidence of patients with cSDH under the treatment of ASA is increasing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Burr-Hole Drainage for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Under Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid: A Comparative Risk Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Maria; Nevzati, Edin; Lutz, Katharina; Dolp, Armando; Fandino, Javier; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2017-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical diseases typically affecting older people. Many of these patients have coronary artery disease and receive antiplatelet therapy, usually acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Despite growing clinical relevance, there is still a lack of data focusing on the perioperative management of such patients. The aim of this study is to compare the perioperative and postoperative bleeding and cardiovascular complication rates of patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for cSDH with and without discontinuation of low-dose ASA. Of 963 consecutive patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for cSDH, 198 (20.5%) patients were receiving low-dose ASA treatment. In 26 patients (13.1%), ASA was not discontinued (ASA group; ASA discontinuation ≤7 days); in the remaining patients (n = 172; 86.9%), ASA was discontinued at least for 7 days (control group). The primary outcome measure was recurrent cSDH that required revision surgery owing to clinical symptoms, whereas secondary outcome measures were postoperative cardiovascular and thromboembolic events, other complications, operation and hospitalization time, morbidity, and mortality. No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups regarding recurrence of cSDH (P = 1). Cardiovascular event rates, surgical morbidity, and mortality did not significantly differ between patients with and without discontinuation of low-dose ASA. Given the lack of guidelines regarding perioperative management with antiplatelet therapy, our findings elucidate one issue, showing comparable recurrence rates with and without discontinuation of low-dose ASA in patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for cSDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Encapsulated subdural empyema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yoshiharu; Inoue, Masaru; Ishizaka, Hiroaki; Koga, Hiroaki; Kawano, Teruaki; Mori, Kazuo

    1985-01-01

    A case of encapsulated subdural empyema was reported. This 1.5-year-old boy was admitted with the increasing confusion and convulsion. Eight months prior to admission, he had craniotomy for traumatic acute epidural hematoma on the left side. Following a coagulation of the middle meningeal artery which was the bleeding source, the dura was opened but no cortical damage was noted at that time. The computed tomographic (CT) scan on admission revealed a large subdural collection with a thin enhancing rim on the left side. Emergency craniotomy revealed a collection of subdural pus, which was irrigated and a catheter was put for continuous drainage. Postoperatively, the patient did well, however, following removal of the catheter, three weeks after the first operation, the subdural empyema was reexpanded with a very thick enhancing rim on CT scan. Ultrasonography also clearly demonstrated the formation of the thick membranes. The large craniotomy was performed and empyema with the outer and inner memberanes of 8mm thick was totally excised. Post-operative CT scan did not show any enhancing rim, indicating that enchancement was caused by newly formed vessels within the membranes per se. This findings are totally different from those observed in the brain abscess in which ring enhancement on CT continues months to years following so-called extracapsular excision of abscess. In the brain abscess, surrounding glial tissue with plenty neovascularization is left intact, even after the operation. (author)

  20. [MRI semiotics features of experimental acute intracerebral hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenchev, D V; Skvortsova, V I; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Gubskiĭ, L V; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possibility of revealing intracerebral hematomas (ICH), using MRI, within the first hours after onset and to determine their MRI semiotics features. Thirty animals with experimental ICH were studied. A method of two-stage introduction of autologous blood was used to develop ICH as human spontaneous intracranial hematomas. Within 3-5h after blood introduction to the rat brain. The control MRI was performed in the 3rd and 7th days after blood injections. ICH were definitely identified in the first MRI scans. The MRI semiotics features of acute ICH and their transformations were assessed. The high sensitivity of MRI to ICH as well as the uniform manifestations in all animals were shown. In conclusion, the method has high specificity for acute ICH detection.

  1. The Swedish study of Irrigation-fluid temperature in the evacuation of Chronic subdural hematoma (SIC!): study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Andreas; Jakola, Asgeir S; Bartek, Jiri; Sundblom, Jimmy; Förander, Petter; Marklund, Niklas; Tisell, Magnus

    2017-10-11

    Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most common conditions encountered in neurosurgical practice. Recurrence, observed in 5-30% of patients, is a major clinical problem. The temperature of the irrigation fluid used during evacuation of the hematoma might theoretically influence recurrence rates since irrigation fluid at body temperature (37 o C) may beneficially influence coagulation and cSDH solubility when compared to irrigation fluid at room temperature. Should no difference in recurrence rates be observed when comparing irrigation-fluid temperatures, there is no need for warmed fluids during surgery. Our main aim is to investigate the effect of irrigation-fluid temperature on recurrence rates and clinical outcomes after cSDH evacuation using a multicenter randomized controlled trial design. The study will be conducted in three neurosurgical departments with population-based catchment areas using a similar surgical strategy. In total, 600 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria will randomly be assigned to either intraoperative irrigation with fluid at body temperature or room temperature. The power calculation is based on a retrospective study performed at our department showing a recurrence rate of 5% versus 12% when comparing irrigation fluid at body temperature versus fluid at room temperature (unpublished data). The primary endpoint is recurrence rate of cSDH analyzed at 6 months post treatment. Secondary endpoints are mortality rate, complications and health-related quality of life. Irrigation-fluid temperature might influence recurrence rates in the evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas. We present a study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial investigating our hypothesis that irrigation fluid at body temperature is superior to room temperature in reducing recurrence rates following evacuation of cSDH. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02757235 . Registered on 2 May 2016.

  2. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)

  3. Hematoma subdural intracraniano pós-anestesia subaracnóidea: relato de dois casos e revisão de 33 casos da literatura

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    Jane Auxiliadora Amorim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Hematoma subdural intracraniano é uma complicação rara pós-anestesia subaracnóidea. Relatamos dois casos de mulheres que desenvolveram hematoma subdural crônico pós-anestesia subaracnóidea, diagnosticados após a evolução clínica prolongada de cefaleia pós-punção dural (CPPD e analisamos outros 33 casos encontrados em revisão da literatura. RELATO DOS CASOS: Nos 35 pacientes (idade entre 20-88 anos, 19 homens, 14 tinham mais de 60 anos (40% sendo 12 (86% homens. A relação se inverte no grupo de pacientes mais jovens (< 60 anos, no qual há duas vezes mais mulheres (14:7. Dois picos de maior incidência foram observados: 30-39 anos (31% e 60-69 anos (29%. O período de tempo decorrido entre o início dos sintomas até o diagnóstico variou entre 4 horas e 29 semanas. Cefaleia foi referida por 26/35 (74,3% casos; alteração do nível de consciência em 14/35 (40,0%; vômitos em 11/35 (31,4%; hemiplegia ou hemiparesia em 8/35 (22,9%; diplopia ou paresia do VI nervo craniano em 5/35 (14,3%; e distúrbio da linguagem em 4/35 (11,4%. Os fatores contribuintes foram: gravidez, múltiplas punções, uso de anticoagulantes, anormalidades vasculares intracranianas e atrofia cerebral. Em 15 casos, não foi citado qualquer fator contribuinte. Quatro em 35 pacientes (11,4% ficaram com sequelas neurológicas e 4/35 (11,4% morreram. CONCLUSÕES: A presença de qualquer um desses sinais ou sintomas mencionados serve de alerta para a possibilidade de ocorrer hematoma subdural intracraniano como complicação da punção dural, principalmente naqueles pacientes que apresentaram CPPD por mais de uma semana, quando uma investigação por neuroimagem se faz necessária.

  4. Acute Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Orbit with Visual Impairment: An Unconventional Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maithani, T; Singh, V P; Pandey, A

    2016-01-01

    Acute subperiosteal hematoma of orbit is a rare condition and its presentation with rapid severe diminution of vision is even rarest. Urgent intervention is required for these patients presenting with visual compromise. Needle aspiration is safe and simple procedure for management of such hematoma provided the patient presents early and does not have any associated complications. We present one such rare case highlighting the importance of timely diagnosis and urgent management to overcome functional complications in acute subperiosteal hematoma. To best of our knowledge this is the first pediatric case presenting with acute subperiosteal hematoma accompanied by severely diminished vision within few hours of trauma.

  5. In vivo imaging of twist drill drainage for subdural hematoma: a clinical feasibility study on electrical impedance tomography for measuring intracranial bleeding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Meng; Li, Bing; Hu, Shijie; Xu, Canhua; Yang, Bin; Li, Jianbo; Fu, Feng; Fei, Zhou; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial bleeding is one of the most severe medical emergencies in neurosurgery. Early detection or diagnosis would largely reduce the rate of disability and mortality, and improve the prognosis of the patients. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) can non-invasively image the internal resistivity distribution within a human body using a ring of external electrodes, and is thus a promising technique to promptly detect the occurrence of intracranial bleedings because blood differs from other brain tissues in resistivity. However, so far there is no experimental study that has determined whether the intracranial resistivity changes in humans could be repeatedly detected and imaged by EIT. Hence, we for the first time attempt to clinically validate this by in vivo imaging the influx and efflux of irrigating fluid (5% dextrose in water, D5W) during the twist-drill drainage operation for the patients with subdural hematoma (SDH). In this study, six patients (four male, two female) with subacute or chronic SDH received the surgical operation in order to evacuate the hematoma around subdural region, and EIT measurements were performed simultaneously on each patient's head. The results showed that the resistivity significantly increased on the corresponding position of EIT images during the influx of D5W and gradually decreased back to baseline during the efflux. In the quantitative analysis, the average resistivity values demonstrated the similar results and had highly linear correlation (R(2) = 0.93 ± 0.06) with the injected D5W volumes, as well as the area of the resistivity gain(R(2) = 0.94 ± 0.05). In conclusion, it was clinically validated that intracranial resistivity changes in humans were detectable and quantifiable by the EIT method. After further technical improvements, EIT has the great potential of being a routine neuroimaging tool for early detection of intracranial bleedings.

  6. [Rapid resolution of acute subdural haematoma with significant impact on clinical outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capion, Tenna; Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Kelsen, Jesper

    2017-09-04

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to hospital due to anaemia. She suffered a minor head trauma and deteriorated to deep unconsciousness. A CT revealed an acute subdural haematoma (ASDH). Initially, she was not found to be a candidate for neurosurgical intervention, but within 24 hours her level of consciousness improved dramatically, and a renewed CT showed resolution of the ASDH. She underwent acute craniotomy with good outcome. This illustrates the importance of re-evaluation of patients with intracranial haemorrhage.

  7. Nonenhancing spinal subdural metastatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirakov, S.; Penev, L.; Georgieva-Kozarova, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: We describe a case of a spinal subdural metastatic tumor that became rapidly symptomatic after a minor trauma, as a result of severe cord compression and cord haemorrhage. Spinal subdural hematomas are most commonly caused by anticoagulant therapy, lumbar puncture, blood dyscrasias, spinal trauma, or spinal vascular malformations. Subdural metastatic tumors are very uncommon, and their presentation as spinal subdural hematomas is exceedingly rare. We describe a case of 59 years old woman with quadriparesis and her preoperative findings on MRI and the follow up

  8. Treatment of chronic subdural hematomas with subdural evacuating port system placement in the intensive care unit: evolution of practice and comparison with bur hole evacuation in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Alexander C; Chan, Sheila L; Rao, Vivek A; Efron, Allen D; Kalani, Maziyar A; Sheridan, William F

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The aims of this study were to evaluate a multiyear experience with subdural evacuating port system (SEPS) placement for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) in the intensive care unit at a tertiary neurosurgical center and to compare SEPS placement with bur hole evacuation in the operating room. METHODS All cases of cSDH evacuation were captured over a 7-year period at a tertiary neurosurgical center within an integrated health care delivery system. The authors compared the performance characteristics of SEPS and bur hole placement with respect to recurrence rates, change in recurrence rates over time, complications, length of stay, discharge disposition, and mortality rates. RESULTS A total of 371 SEPS cases and 659 bur hole cases were performed (n = 1030). The use of bedside SEPS placement for cSDH treatment increased over the 7-year period, from 14% to 80% of cases. Reoperation within 6 months was higher for the SEPS (15.6%) than for bur hole drainage (9.1%) across the full 7-year period (p = 0.002). This observed overall difference was due to a higher rate of reoperation during the same hospitalization (7.0% for SEPS vs 3.2% for bur hole; p = 0.008). Over time, as the SEPS procedure became more common and modifications of the SEPS technique were introduced, the rate of in-hospital reoperation after SEPS decreased to 3.3% (p = 0.02 for trend), and the difference between SEPS and bur hole recurrence was no longer significant (p = 0.70). Complications were uncommon and were similar between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Overall performance characteristics of bedside SEPS and bur hole drainage in the operating room were similar. Modifications to the SEPS technique over time were associated with a reduced reoperation rate.

  9. Bilateral asynchronous acute epidural hematoma : a case report

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    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bilateral extradural hematomas have only rarely been reported in the literature. Even rarer are cases where the hematomas develop sequentially, one after removal of the other. Among 187 cases of operated epidural hematomas during past 4 years in our hospital, we found one case of sequentially developed bilateral epidural hematoma. Case Presentation An 18-year-old conscious male worker was admitted to our hospital after a fall. After deterioration of his consciousness, an emergency brain CT scan showed a right temporoparietal epidural hematoma. The hematoma was evacuated, but the patient did not improve afterwards. Another CT scan showed contralateral epidural hematoma and the patient was reoperated. Postoperatively, the patient recovered completely. Conclusions This case underlines the need for monitoring after an operation for an epidural hematoma and the need for repeat brain CT scans if the patient does not recover quickly after removal of the hematoma, especially if the first CT scan has been done less than 6 hours after the trauma. Intraoperative brain swelling can be considered as a clue for the development of contralateral hematoma.

  10. Age related outcome in acute subdural haematoma following traumatic head injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanif, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute subdural haematoma (ASDH) is one of the conditions most strongly associated with severe brain injury. Reports prior to 1980 describe overall mortality rates for acute subdural haematomas (SDH\\'s) ranging from 40% to 90% with poor outcomes observed in all age groups. Recently, improved results have been reported with rapid diagnosis and surgical treatment. The elderly are predisposed to bleeding due to normal cerebral atrophy related to aging, stretching the bridging veins from the dura. Prognosis in ASDH is associated with age, time from injury to treatment, presence of pupillary abnormalities, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) or motor score on admission, immediate coma or lucid interval, computerized tomography findings (haematoma volume, degree of midline shift, associated intradural lesion, compression of basal cisterns), post-operative intracranial pressure and type of surgery. Advancing age is known to be a determinant of outcome in head injury. We present the results of a retrospective study carried out in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland\\'s national neurosurgical centre. The aim of our study was to examine the impact of age on outcome in patients with ASDH following severe head injury. Only cases with acute subdural haematoma requiring surgical evacuation were recruited. Mortality was significantly higher in older patients (50% above 70 years, 25.6% between 40 and 70 years and 26% below 40 years). Overall poor outcome (defined as Glasgow outcome scores 3-5) was also higher in older patients; 74.1% above 70 years, 48% between 40 and 70 years and 30% below 40 years. Poor outcome in traumatic acute subdural haematoma is higher in elderly patients even after surgical intervention.

  11. Hematoma subdural crônico: estudo de 161 pacientes operados e a relação com alterações no coagulograma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuda Clarissa Lin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é analisar a evolução de pacientes com hematoma subdural crônico em relação aos achados do coagulograma. Foram analisados 161 pacientes operados no Hospital das Clínicas-UNICAMP entre abril de 1994 e 2000. Foi detectado um predomínio do sexo masculino (86,3%, da cor branca (85,1% e da faixa etária na quinta década (mediana 57 anos. O estudo mostrou mortalidade maior no período pós-operatório entre os pacientes com valores de RNI (international normalized ratio superiores a 1,25 e/ou trombocitopenia (p<0,001 e p=0,004, respectivamente e mortalidade menor para os pacientes com antecedente de traumatismo cranioencefálico (76% (p=0,044. Os resultados ressaltam a importância da avaliação pré-operatória com o coagulograma a fim de se corrigir possíveis alterações.

  12. A comparison of head dynamic response and brain tissue stress and strain using accident reconstructions for concussion, concussion with persistent postconcussive symptoms, and subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeur, R Anna; Karton, Clara; Post, Andrew; Rousseau, Philippe; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Marshall, Shawn; Brien, Susan E; Smith, Aynsley; Cusimano, Michael D; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2015-08-01

    Concussions typically resolve within several days, but in a few cases the symptoms last for a month or longer and are termed persistent postconcussive symptoms (PPCS). These persisting symptoms may also be associated with more serious brain trauma similar to subdural hematoma (SDH). The objective of this study was to investigate the head dynamic and brain tissue responses of injury reconstructions resulting in concussion, PPCS, and SDH. Reconstruction cases were obtained from sports medicine clinics and hospitals. All subjects received a direct blow to the head resulting in symptoms. Those symptoms that resolved in 9 days or fewer were defined as concussions (n = 3). Those with symptoms lasting longer than 18 months were defined as PPCS (n = 3), and 3 patients presented with SDHs (n = 3). A Hybrid III headform was used in reconstruction to obtain linear and rotational accelerations of the head. These dynamic response data were then input into the University College Dublin Brain Trauma Model to calculate maximum principal strain and von Mises stress. A Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Tukey post hoc tests were used to compare head dynamic and brain tissue responses between injury groups. Statistical significance was set at p concussion group (149 g and 8111 rad/sec(2), respectively; p concussion with transient symptoms (low severity) and SDHs revealed a positive relationship between an increase in head dynamic response and the risk for more serious brain injury. This type of relationship was not found for brain tissue stress and strain results derived by finite element analysis. Future research should be undertaken using a larger sample size to confirm these initial findings. Understanding the relationship between the head dynamic and brain tissue response and the nature of the injury provides important information for developing strategies for injury prevention.

  13. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaj, Agon Y.; Morina, Arsim A.; Mekaj, Ymer H.; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Miftari, Ermira I.; Duci, Shkelzen B.; Hamza, Astrit R.; Gashi, Musli M.; Xhelaj, Mentor R.; Kelmendi, Fatos M.; Morina, Qamile Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008–2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Patients were analyzed in many aspects such as age, gender, etiological factors, clinical features, localization, diagnoses, methods of surgical interventions, recurrences and mortality of patients. Results: From 137 patients with CSDH, 106 (77.3%) were males and 31 (22.7%) females. Average age of patients was 62.85 years. Analyzed according to the decades, the highest number of causes with CSDH was between 70 and 79 years (46%). The head trauma has been responsible for CSDH in 88 patients (64.3%), while the main symptom was headache (92 patients or 67.1%). One burr-hole trepanation with closed drainage system has been used in majority of cases (in 101 patients or 73.7%). The recurrence of CSDH was 6.5%, whereas mortality 2.9%. Conclusion: CSDH is more common in elderly patients. The male-female ratio is 3.4:1. Like other authors we also think that treatment with one burr-hole and drainage is a method of choice, because of its simplicity and safety. PMID:25883478

  14. Surgical treatment of 137 cases with chronic subdural hematoma at the university clinical center of Kosovo during the period 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agon Y Mekaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is frequent pathology in neurosurgical practice. The aim of this study is to present the first series of patients with CSDH, who got surgically treated in Clinic of Neurosurgery, University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study that included 137 patients with CSDH who had been treated during the period 2008-2012. The data were collected and analyzed from the archives and protocols of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Patients were analyzed in many aspects such as age, gender, etiological factors, clinical features, localization, diagnoses, methods of surgical interventions, recurrences and mortality of patients. Results: From 137 patients with CSDH, 106 (77.3% were males and 31 (22.7% females. Average age of patients was 62.85 years. Analyzed according to the decades, the highest number of causes with CSDH was between 70 and 79 years (46%. The head trauma has been responsible for CSDH in 88 patients (64.3%, while the main symptom was headache (92 patients or 67.1%. One burr-hole trepanation with closed drainage system has been used in majority of cases (in 101 patients or 73.7%. The recurrence of CSDH was 6.5%, whereas mortality 2.9%. Conclusion: CSDH is more common in elderly patients. The male-female ratio is 3.4:1. Like other authors we also think that treatment with one burr-hole and drainage is a method of choice, because of its simplicity and safety.

  15. Mini-Craniotomy Under Local Anesthesia for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: An Effective Choice for Elderly Patients and for Patients in a Resource-Strained Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Shaikh Danish; Waqas, Muhammad; Baig, Mirza Zain; Darbar, Aneela

    2017-10-01

    Mini-craniotomy for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is associated with lower rates of recurrence. However, the procedure is performed mostly with the patient under general anesthesia (GA) and therefore frequently requires an intensive care unit (ICU) facility, especially in the elderly population. Because of the unavailability of ICU beds, and to avoid GA, we started to perform this procedure with the patient under local anesthesia (LA). This was a retrospective medical chart review conducted in the section of Neurosurgery at the Aga Khan Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. The study duration was 1 year. We included patients aged 55 years or older undergoing surgery for CSDH. Clinical characteristics, hospital stay, and recurrence rates were compared between 2 groups, local versus general anesthesia. Thirty-five patients underwent mini-craniotomy for CSDH in the study period. Sixteen patients underwent mini-craniotomy under LA versus 19 patients for GA. Median age for the LA group was 67 years compared with 70 years in the GA group. Four patients from the LA group experienced postoperative complications versus 7 from the GA group. Only one patient in the LA group required an ICU bed in the postoperative period. There was no recurrence in LA group. The overall recurrence was 2.86%. Mini-craniotomy for CSDH under LA is an equally effective procedure compared with mini-craniotomy under GA. In addition, it minimizes the risks of GA in the elderly population and obviates the need of a postoperative ICU bed. It also reduces operative time and hospital stay as compared with GA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Value of Targeted Epidural Blood Patch and Management of Subdural Hematoma in Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenmaier, Leigh A; Park, Brian J; Holland, Marshall T; Hamade, Youssef J; Garg, Shuchita; Rastogi, Rahul; Reddy, Chandan G

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a more common than previously noted condition (1-2.5 per 50,000 persons) typically caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Initial treatment involves conservative therapies, but the mainstay of treatment for patients who fail conservative management is the epidural blood patch (EBP). Subdural hematoma (SDH) is a common complication occurring with SIH, but its management remains controversial. In this report, we discuss a 62-year-old woman who presented with a 5-week history of orthostatic headaches associated with nausea, emesis, and neck pain. Despite initial imaging being negative, the patient later developed classic imaging evidence characteristic of SIH. Magnetic resonance imaging was unrevealing for the source of the CSF leak. Radionuclide cisternography showed possible CSF leak at the right-sided C7-T1 nerve root exit site. After failing a blind lumbar EBP, subsequent targeted EBP at C7-T1 improved the patient's symptoms. Two days later she developed a new headache with imaging evidence of worsening SDH with midline shift requiring burr hole drainage. This yielded sustained symptomatic relief and resolution of previously abnormal imaging findings at 2-month follow-up. A literature review revealed 174 cases of SIH complicated by SDH. This revealed conflicting opinions concerning the management of this condition. Although blind lumbar EBP is often successful, targeted EBP has a lower rate of patients requiring a second EBP or other further treatment. On the other hand, targeted EBP has a larger risk profile. Depending on the clinic situation, treatment of the SDH via surgical evacuation may be necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute dystonic reaction leading to lingual hematoma mimicking angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Özgür; Aydin, Ali Attila; Bilge, Sedat; Arslan, Fatih; Arslan, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Lingual hematoma is a severe situation, which is rare and endangers the airway. It can develop due to trauma, vascular abnormalities, and coagulopathy. Due to its sudden development, it can be clinically confused with angioedema. In patients who applied to the doctor with complaints of a swollen tongue, lingual hematoma can be confused with angioedema, in particular, at the beginning if the symptoms occurred after drug use. It should especially be considered that dystonia in the jaw can present as drug-induced hyperkinetic movement disorder. Early recognition of this rare clinical condition and taking precautions for providing airway patency are essential. In this case report, we will discuss mimicking angioedema and caused by a bite due to dystonia and separation of the tongue from the base of the mouth developing concurrently with lingual hematoma. PMID:29326495

  18. Thickening of the pulmonary artery wall in acute intramural hematoma of the ascending aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lardani Héctor

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of pulmonary artery obstruction in the course of acute aortic dissection is an unusual complication. The mechanism implicated is the rupture of the outer layer of the aorta and the subsequent hemorrhage into the adventitia of the pulmonary artery that causes its wall thickening and, at times, produces extrinsic obstruction of the vessel. There are no reports of this complication in acute intramural hematoma. Case presentation An 87-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital in shock after having had severe chest pain followed by syncope. An urgent transesophageal echocardiogram revealed the presence of acute intramural hematoma, no evidence of aortic dissection, severe pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade, and periaortic hematoma that involved the pulmonary artery generating circumferential wall thickening of its trunk and right branch with no evidence of flow obstruction. Urgent surgery was performed but the patient died in the operating room. The post mortem examination, in the operating room, confirmed that there was an extensive hematoma around the aorta and beneath the adventitial layer of the pulmonary artery, with no evidence of flow obstruction. Conclusion This is the first time that this rare complication is reported in the scenario of acute intramural hematoma and with the transesophageal echocardiogram as the diagnostic tool.

  19. Acute cervical epidural hematoma: case report Hematoma epidural cervical agudo: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUILHERME BORGES

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A 74 year-old patient with a nocturnal onset of neck and chest pain was brought to an emergency clinic. Physical examination and cardiac assessment were normal. Three hours after the addmittance, a flaccid paralysis of the four limbs supervened. Suspecting of an unusual onset of central nervous system infection, a lumbar puncture was performed, yielding 20 ml of normal cerebrospinal fluid. Thirty oinutes after the puncture, the patient completely regained neurological funcion. He was then referred to a General Hospital where a computed tomography (CT scan was done showing a large cervical epidural bleeding in the posterolateral region of C4/C5 extending to C7/Th1, along with a C6 vertebral body hemangioma. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed the same CT findings. A normal selective angiography of vertebral arteries, carotid arteries and thyreocervical trunk was carried out. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (ASSEH is a rare but dramatic cause of neurological impairment. In this article we report a fortunate case of complete recovery after an unusual spine cord decompression. We also review the current literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of ASSEH.Paciente de 74 anos acordou à noite sentindo fortes dores na região da nuca acompanhadas de ansiedade e desconforto torácico e respiratório. A internação emergencial em clinica cardiológica não demonstrou problemas cardíacos. Com a progressão do quadro neurológico traduzida por quadriplegia severa foi realizada uma punção lombar para afastar hipótese de meningite, sendo retirados cerca de 20 ml de liquor. Trinta minutos imediatamente após a punção lombar foi observada completa remissão do déficit neurológico. Transferido para um hospital geral a tomografia computadorizada demonstrou extenso hematoma epidural espinal em nivel C4/C5 com extensão a C7/Th1, bem como hemangioma do sexto corpo vertebral (C6. A ressonância magnética demonstrou as mesmas lesões. Observando

  20. Relationship of cerebral microbleeds with hematoma growth in elderly patients with acute hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-feng LIU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate whether cerebral microbleeds (CMBs can predict hematoma growth in elderly patients with acute hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.  Methods The clinical records of 98 elderly patients with acute hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage who underwent initial CT within 6 h and repeated CT and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI within 24 h of onset were analyzed. Based on the performance of SWI, patients were divided into microbleeds group and non-microbleeds group. Forward multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the predicting value of CMBs on the growth of intracerebral hematoma.  Results Among 98 patients, hematoma growth was found in 25 cases in the second CT scan. The ratio in microbleeds group was significantly higher than that in non-microbleeds group (43.75% vs 16.67%; χ2 = 8.319, P = 0.004. Multivariate Logistic regression showed that CMBs was independent risk factor for intracerebral hematoma (OR = 0.241, 95%CI: 0.065-0.861; P = 0.017.  Conclusions CMBs in patients with acute intracerebral hematoma can predict high risk of hemotoma growth, and effective treatment should be taken to improve the prognosis of patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.01.012

  1. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and the hematoma volume and stroke severity in acute intracerebral hemorrhage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaming; You, Shoujiang; Zhong, Chongke; Huang, Zhichao; Hu, Lifang; Zhang, Xia; Shi, Jijun; Cao, Yongjun; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) serves as a powerful inflammatory marker for predicting cardiovascular events. Here, we investigate whether admission NLR is associated with hematoma volume, stroke severity, and 3-month outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 352 patients with acute ICH were prospectively identified in this study. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle risk factors, NIHSS score, hematoma volumes, and other clinical features were recorded for all participants. Patients was divided into quartiles based on the admission NLR levels (Q1: hematoma volume, admission severity, or the outcomes after ICH. Median NIHSS scores for each quartile (Q1 to Q4) were 6.0, 6.0, 6.0, and 11.0 (P=.001), and median hematoma volumes were 9.5, 9.3, 9.1, and 15.0ml (P=.005), respectively. After adjusting the age, sex, and other potential risk factors, the patients in Q4 had higher NIHSS scores (P=.042) and larger hematoma volume (P=.014). After 3-month follow-up, 148 poor outcomes (mRS, 3-6) and 47 all-cause deaths were documented. There were more patients with poor outcomes in Q4 than Q1. However, compared with the patients in Q1, those in Q4 were not associated with poor outcomes (P-trend=0.379), and all-cause mortality (P-trend=0.843) after adjust for other risk factors. Higher admission NLR are associated with larger hematoma volume and more serious stroke, but not 3-month outcomes in patients with acute ICH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute pancreatitis secondary to intramural duodenal hematoma: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Kazue; Watanabe, Manabu; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Matsui, Teppei; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2010-07-28

    Nontraumatic intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH) is rare disease and it is generally related to coagulation abnormalities. Reports of nontraumatic IDH associated with pancreatic disease are relatively rare, and various conditions including acute or chronic pancreatitis are thought to be associated with nontraumatic IDH. However, the association between IDH and acute pancreatitis remains unknown. We report the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with vomiting and right hypochondrial pain. He had no medical history, but was a heavy drinker. The diagnosis of IDH was established by computed tomography, ultrasonography and endoscopy, and it was complicated by acute pancreatitis. The lesions resolved with conservative management. We discuss this case in the context of previously reported cases of IDH concomitant with acute pancreatitis. In our patient, acute pancreatitis occurred concurrently with hematoma, probably due to obstruction of the duodenal papilla, or compression of the pancreas caused by the hematoma. The present analysis of the published cases of IDH with acute pancreatitis provides some information on the pathogenesis of IDH and its relationship with acute pancreatitis.

  3. Spinal Epidural Hematoma as a Complication of Intravenous Thrombolysis in an Acute Ischemic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Liebkind

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old white male suffered a stroke, fell to the floor, and suffered acute right hemiparesis and facial palsy. After an intravenous alteplase infusion 2.5 h later, the patient first complained of numbness in his right arm, then neck pain, followed by left leg numbness and slowly progressing paraparesis. MRI of the spine demonstrated an acute spinal dorsal epidural hematoma extending from the C6 to the T6 level; 12 h later, he underwent hematoma evacuation and laminectomy. Three months after surgery, the patient was paraplegic with moderate sensory loss below mamillary level. Acute ischemic stroke is often associated with a sudden fall, which, after thrombolysis, may result in unusual hemorrhagic complications.

  4. [A case of acute intracranial epidural hematoma caused by chronic nasal sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Kazunori; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial acute epidural hematoma(EDH)is rare. It is mostly caused by coagulation disorders, dural metastasis, or vascular malformations of the dura. We report a case of non-traumatic acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis and review the literature comprising 10 cases of acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis. A 16-year-old boy visited our outpatient clinic with a 2-day history of severe headache. He did not have fever or neurological abnormalities and showed no evidence of head trauma. Cranial computed tomography(CT)revealed sphenoid sinusitis and a small amount of epidural air in the middle fossa, but no other intracranial abnormalities. After eight days with no subsequent history of trauma, radiological exams showed a massive acute epidural hematoma in the left middle fossa and temporal convexity without any vascular lesion or skull fracture. The patient underwent a hematoma evacuation that revealed neither a skull fracture nor a vascular abnormality. In this adolescent, chronic nasal sinusitis caused fragility of the meningeal artery wall, an air collection in the epidural space, and the detachment of the dura mater from the inner surface of the skull, thereby resulting in a non-traumatic acute EDH.

  5. The Safety and Efficacy of Dexmedetomidine versus Sufentanil in Monitored Anesthesia Care during Burr-Hole Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Retrospective Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is a very common clinical emergency encountered in neurosurgery. While both general anesthesia (GA and monitored anesthesia care (MAC can be used during CSDH surgery, MAC is the preferred choice among surgeons. Further, while dexmedetomidine (DEX is reportedly a safe and effective agent for many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, there have been no trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DEX vs. sufentanil in CSDH surgery. Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of DEX vs. sufentanil in MAC during burr-hole surgery for CSDH.Methods: In all, 215 fifteen patients underwent burr-hole surgery for CSDH with MAC and were divided into three groups: Group D1 (n=67, DEX infusion at 0.5 μg·kg–1 for 10 min, Group D2 (n=75, DEX infusion at 1 μg·kg–1 for 10 min, and Group S (n=73, sufentanil infusion 0.3 μg·kg–1 for 10 min. Ramsay sedation scale (RSS of all three groups was maintained at 3. Anesthesia onset time, total number of intraoperative patient movements, hemodynamics, total cumulative dose of DEX, time to first dose and amount of rescue midazolam or fentanyl, percentage of patients converted to alternative sedative or anesthetic therapy, postoperative recovery time, adverse events, and patient and surgeon satisfaction scores were recorded.Results: The anesthesia onset time was significantly less in group D2 (17.36±4.23 vs. 13.42±2.12 vs. 15.98±4.58 min, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. More patients in groups D1 and S required rescue midazolam to achieve RSS=3 (74.63% vs. 42.67% vs. 71.23%, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. However, the total dose of rescue midazolam was significantly higher in group D1 (2.8±0.3 vs. 1.9±0.3 vs. 2.0±0.4 mg, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. The time to first dose of rescue midazolam was significantly longer in group D2 (17.32±4.47 vs. 23.56±5.36 vs. 16.55±4.91 min, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. Significantly fewer

  6. Subperiosteal hematoma of the iliac bone: imaging features of acute and chronic stages with emphasis on pathophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillin, Raphael [Rennes University Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Rennes Cedex 2 (France); Moser, Thomas [Montreal University Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Montreal (Canada); Koob, Meriam [Strasbourg University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Strasbourg (France); Khoury, Viviane [Mc Gill University Health center, Department of Radiology, Montreal (Canada); Chapuis, Madeleine [Rennes University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Orthopedic Surgery, Rennes (France); Ropars, Mickael [Rennes University Hospital, Department of orthopedic surgery, Rennes (France); Cardinal, Etienne [Radiologie Laennec, Montreal (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The goal of this work is to describe the radiological appearance and clinical presentation of subperiosteal iliac hematoma and present a review of the literature. We retrospectively reviewed the radiological and clinical files of 19 patients (age range: 12-75; mean: 47) who presented with acute or chronic subperiosteal iliac hematomas. Imaging findings and relevant clinical information were recorded. A thorough literature search was performed to find additional cases of this rare condition. Three young patients presented with acute subperiosteal iliac hematoma following a fall. Clinical presentation was characterized by pain and gait disturbance presumed to result from crural nerve compression. Unilateral or bilateral lenticular hematomas deep in the iliacus muscle were demonstrated by CT for all patients while MRI was also available for two of them. In 16 asymptomatic patients, chronic ossified subperiosteal iliac hematomas were incidentally detected by CT. Progressive ossification of acute hematoma was demonstrated at follow-up in two patients. Subperiosteal iliac hematoma is rare but has typical imaging findings that may present acutely in adolescents or chronically in asymptomatic adults. (orig.)

  7. Subdural infusion of dexamethasone inhibits leukomyelitis after acute spinal cord injury in a rat model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kwiecien, J. M.; Jarocz, B.; Urdzíková, Lucia; Rola, R.; Dabrowski, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2015), s. 41-51 ISSN 1641-4640 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : spinal cord injury * leukomyelitis * macrophages * subdural infusion * dexamethasone Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.233, year: 2015

  8. Acute upper airway obstruction due to retropharyngeal hematoma in a dog with Anaplasma species: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Vieitez, Verónica; Martín-Cuervo, María; López-Ramis, Víctor; Ezquerra, Luis Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Retropharyngeal hematoma is a rare condition that is difficult to diagnose and may progress rapidly to airway obstruction. The authors report the first known case of acute upper airway obstruction resulting from retropharyngeal hematoma in a dog. Documented causes in human medicine have included coagulopathic states, trauma, infection, parathyroid adenoma rupture, and foreign body ingestion. Vague symptoms in humans such as sore throat, shortness of breath, dysphonia, dysphagia, an...

  9. 10 Levels thoracic no-intrumented laminectomy for huge spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma removal. Report of the first case and literature review

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    Visocchi Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, the present case is the most extensive laminectomy for a SSDH removal never described before. No postoperative instability occurs in 10 levels thoracic laminectomy in case the articular processes are spared. When major neurological deficits are documented, early decompressive laminectomy with evacuation of hematoma should be considered the best treatment for SSDH.

  10. Early diagnosis and treatment of acute or subacute spinal epidural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang-ping; Fan, Shun-wu; Yang, Hui-lin; Tang, Tian-si; Zhou, Feng; Zhao, Xing

    2007-08-05

    Despite low morbidity, acute or subacute spinal epidural hematoma may develop quickly with a high tendency to paralysis. The delay of diagnosis and therapy often leads to serious consequences. In this study we evaluated the effects of a series of methods for the diagnosis and treatment of the hematoma in 11 patients seen in our hospital. Of the 11 patients (8 males and 3 females), 2 had the hematoma involving cervical segments, 2 cervico-thoracic, 4 thoracic, 1 thoraco-lumbar, and 2 lumbar. Three patients had quadriplegia, including one with central cord syndrome; another had Brown-Sequard's syndrome; and the other seven had paraplegia. Five patients were diagnosed at our hospitals within 3 - 48 hours after appearance of symptoms, and 6 patients were transferred from community hospitals within 21 - 106 hours after development of symptoms. Key dermal points, key muscles and the rectal sphincter were determined according to the American Spinal Injury Society Impairment Scales as scale A in two patients, B in 5 and C in 4. Emergency MRI in each patient confirmed that the dura mater was compressed in the spinal canal, with equal intensity or hyperintensity on T(1) weighted image and mixed hyperintensity on T(2) weighted image. Preventive and curative measures were taken preoperatively and emergency operation was performed in all patients. Open laminoplasty was done at the cervical and cervico-thoracic segments, laminectomy at the thoracic segments, laminectomy with pedicle screw fixation at the thoraco-lumbar and lumbar segments involving multiple levels, and double-sided laminectomy with the integrity of articular processes at the lumbar segments involving only a single level. During the operation, special attention was given to hematoma evacuation, hemostasis and drainage tube placement. Neither uncontrollable hemorrhage nor postoperative complications occurred. All patients were followed up for 1 - 6 years. A marked difference was noted between postoperative and

  11. Decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural haematoma: An overview of current prognostic factors and a discussion about some novel prognostic parametres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalayci, M.; Gul, S.; Edebali, N.; Acikgoz, B.; Aktunc, E.; Hanci, V.; Cagavi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify specific factors that can be used to predict functional outcome and to assess the value of decompressive craniectomy in patients with acute subdural haematoma. Methods: The retrospective study was done at the Zonguldak Karaelwas University Practice and Research Hospital, Turkey, and included 34 trauma patients who had undergone decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural haematoma from 2001 to 2009. At the 30th day of the operation, the patients were grouped as survivors and non-survivors. Besides, based on their Glasgow Outcome Scale, which was calculated 6 months post-operatively, the patients were divided into two functional groups: favourable outcomes (4-5 on the scale), and unfavourable outcomes (1-3 on the scale). The characteristics of the groups were compared using SPSS 15 for statistical analysis. Results: One-month mortality was 38.2% (n=13) and 6-month total mortality reached 47% (n=16). Patients with higher pre-operative revised trauma score, Glasgow coma scale, partial anterial pressure of carbon dioxide, arterial oxygen pressure, Charlson co-morbidity index score, blood glucose level, blood urea nitrogen, and lower age had a higher rate of survival and consequently a favourable outcome. Higher platelet values were only found to be a determinant of higher survival at the end of the first month without having any significant effect on the favourable outcome. Conclusion: In patients of traumatic acute subdural haematoma whose Glasgow coma scale on arrival was < 8, a massive craniectomy along with the evacuation of the haematoma, may be considered as a treatment option for intra-operative and post-operative brain swelling. But in patients with a score of 3 on arrival and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils, decompressive craniectomy is unnecessary. (author)

  12. Very low cerebral blood volume predicts parenchymal hematoma in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermitte, Laure; Cho, Tae-Hee; Ozenne, Brice

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative Acute Stroke Study II criteria. Recanalization and reperfusion were assessed on 3-hour follow-up MRI. RESULTS: Of the 110 patients, hemorrhagic transformation occurred in 59 patients, including 7 PH. In univariate analysis, the acute National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (P=0...... hemorrhagic transformation or PH. CONCLUSION: Very low CBV was the only independent predictor of PH in patients with acute stroke.......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Parenchymal hematoma (PH) may worsen the outcome of patients with stroke. The aim of our study was to confirm the relationship between the volume of very low cerebral blood volume (CBV) and PH using a European multicenter database (I-KNOW). A secondary objective...

  13. Acute pancreatitis complicated by jejunal hematoma in a patient on anti-coagulants and anti-platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Vui Heng; Basir, Norwani; Yaakub, Aziman Bin

    2010-05-05

    Pancreatitis can be associated with significant complications. Bowel hematoma is a rare complication and the second part of the duodenum is the most commonly affected site. Hematomas affecting other parts of the bowel are extremely rare. A 53-year-old female with a history of atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease on anticoagulants and aspirin presented with abdominal pain of a few days duration which had worsened prior to presentation. This was associated with abdominal distension, vomiting and melena. Laboratory investigations showed elevated serum amylase, coagulopathy and severe anemia. Computed tomography imaging showed a jejunal hematoma and pancreatitis with peripancreatic inflammation. She responded to conservative treatment in addition to correction of the coagulopathy and a blood transfusion. Her symptoms were resolved within a few days and a repeat computed tomography scan two months later showed complete resolution of the hematoma and the pancreatitis. Our case demonstrates a rare complication of acute pancreatitis in a patient with risk factors.

  14. Aortic intramural hematoma : assessment of clinical and radiological features in comparison to acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Hwang, Jae Cheol; Lee, Jin Seong; Kang, Duk Hyun; Song, Jae Kwan; Song, Koun Sik; Lim, Tae Hwan

    1996-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological features of aortic intramural hematoma(IMH) to those of acute aortic dissection(AD). We analyzed the clinical and radiological features of 12 patients with aortic IMH and 43 patients with acute AD. In aortic IMH, the diagnoses were made by means of both CT and transesophageal echocardiography(TEE) and included two surgically proven cases. In acute AD, the diagnoses were made by means of CT and TEE and included 21 surgically proven cases. We compared patients ages, etiologies, the extent of the disease, the presence or absence of aortic branch involvement, complications, and outcomes. Aortic IMH tended to develop in older patients (67.8±7.9 vs. 50.4±13.4, P .05). In aortic IMH, there was no involvement of aortic branches, whereas in acute AD, 14(33%) patients showed involvement of one or more aortic branches. Complications of aortic IMH included pericardial effusion (n=2) and pleural effusion (n=4);in acute AD, pericardial effusion (n=7), pleural effusion (n=4), aortic insufficiency (n=8), cerebral infarction (n=3), renal infarction (n=4) and spinal infarction (n=1) were seen. There was one (8%) death due to aortic IMH and ten (23%) deaths due to acute AD (p<.01). Aortic IMH is characterized by its occurrence in older patients with hypertension, a less frequent incidence of complications, and a more favorable outcome than acute AD

  15. Predictive value of small ulcers in the evolution of acute type B intramural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastià, C.; Evangelista, A.; Quiroga, S.; Cuellar, H.; Aguilar, R.; Muntanyà, X.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the long-term evolution and predictive factors of type B intramural hematoma (IMH). Material and methods: 34 patients (33 men), mean age: 67 years (47–87) diagnosed with type B IMH by computed tomography (CT) and followed up clinically and by CT yearly. Mean follow-up was 5.9 years (2–13 years). Two evolution patterns were considered: (a) regression and (b) progression. Clinical and imaging variables were analyzed for assessing their predictor values. Results: Evolution at one year was to regression in 56% and to progression in 44% of cases. There were no association among age, sex, other aortic abnormalities, presence of atherosclerotic disease or blood pressure, initial maximum aortic diameter, indexed maximum aortic diameter, IMH thickness or length, presence or absence of mediastinal hematoma and the evolution of type B IMH. Ten patients had small aortic ulcers in the acute phase. The presence of ulcers was related with progression of IMH. No differences were observed in evolution between the control at first year and the last control. Conclusions: The presence of small ulcers is a strong predictor of evolution in acute type B IMH. In addition, the regression group remains completely stable after the first year of evolution.

  16. Acute upper airway obstruction due to retropharyngeal hematoma in a dog with Anaplasma species: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieitez, Verónica; Martín-Cuervo, María; López-Ramis, Víctor; Ezquerra, Luis Javier

    2015-10-09

    Retropharyngeal hematoma is a rare condition that is difficult to diagnose and may progress rapidly to airway obstruction. The authors report the first known case of acute upper airway obstruction resulting from retropharyngeal hematoma in a dog. Documented causes in human medicine have included coagulopathic states, trauma, infection, parathyroid adenoma rupture, and foreign body ingestion. Vague symptoms in humans such as sore throat, shortness of breath, dysphonia, dysphagia, and neck swelling may precede lethal airway obstruction. The authors report a case of an 18-month-old, intact female water spaniel with thrombocytopenia that developed a massive retropharyngeal hematoma and symptoms of airway compromise. The dog required tracheal intubation followed by surgical tracheostomy. Lateral cervical radiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the neck was consistent with a retropharyngeal hematoma compromising the airway. The retropharyngeal hematoma was managed conservatively. Retropharyngeal hematoma should be considered in patients presenting with abrupt respiratory distress. Magnetic resonance imaging allowed specific diagnosis of a rare condition that is otherwise difficult to diagnose.

  17. Relationship of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 and hematoma expansion in acute hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingwei; Zhuang, Xiaorong; Peng, Feng; Zheng, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and hematoma expansion (HE) in acute hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage (AHCH) (HE-in-AHCH). Patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage, confirmed by head computed tomography (CT) within 12 h of onset, were prospectively collected. Venous blood was sampled within 4 h of the confirmation to determine the serum MMP-9 concentration. The blood pressure and National Institute of Health Stroke Score of the patients were recorded on hospital admission. CT re-scanning was performed within 42-54 h of the first head CT examination or immediately after worsening of the patients' consciousness disorder. The relationship between MMP-9 level and HE was analyzed. A total of 186 patients were included. Of these patients, 41 had HE (22.0%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, in addition to the short interval between onset and the first CT examination, and the irregularity of hematoma shape, increasing MMP-9 level was an independent risk factor for HE-in-AHCH (OR value = 15.65, 95% CI: 5.30-46.15). Moreover, increasing plasma MMP-9 level was identified as an independent risk factor in patients with HE-in-AHCH.

  18. Influence of clot retraction on the short-T2 appearance of an acute hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.A.; Watanabe, A.T.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Roberts, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The short-T2 appearance of acute hematomas has been previously explained solely by water diffusing in and out of deoxyhemoglobin-containing red cells. According to this theory, the maximum effect occurs at a 50% hematocrit and should be absent at 100% hematocrit. This theory fails to take clot retraction per se into account. The authors have confirmed that the shortest T2 of heparinized blood (deoxyhemoglobin form by Raman spectroscopy) occurs at 50% hematocrit. Retraction of nonparamagnetic plasma and oxyhemogloblin clots over 24 hours shortens T2 by 10%-40% at 90 MHz, depending on the platelet concentration. The additional T2 shortening observed after formation of deoxyhemoglobin is thus primarily due to clot retraction

  19. Treatment policy on acute phase head injury in CT era. Discussion on prevention of rebleeding based on four cases of acute epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Makoto; Yamanouchi, Yasuo; Someda, Kuniyuki (Uwajima City Hospital, Uwajima, Ehime (Japan))

    1984-02-01

    In the treatment of head injuries, before the CT scan was generally used, the level of consciousness had long been considered to be of utmost importance in evaluating the clinical condition of patients, especially to differentiate intracranial hematoma. CT scan provides a very useful armamentarium for finding the intracranial pathology easily and safely. In three cases a very thin epidural hematoma, shown on the initial CT examination taken several hours after the trauma, had increased in size to such an extent that surgical intervention was necessary, and in one case, evacuation of an acute epidural hematoma on one side resulted in a massive epidural hematoma on the opposite side. In the two cases, hypertonic solution was given at another hospital after CT examination which revealed a very thin epidural hematoma. Both patients were reported to be alert then. After episodes of frequent vomiting, followed by a restless state in one case, their consciousness dropped to a semicoma. A second CT was taken immediately after the deterioration, to reveal a massive epidural hematoma. A patient, who was alert on admission and had a very thin intracranial clot on CT, taken 80 minutes after the trauma, vomited frequently during the routine X-ray examination and deteriorated rapidly into a semicomatous state with anisocoria 70 minutes after the initial CT examination. A massive epidural hematoma was noted in the second CT. Judging from the chronological sequence of the head injury, namely, initial CT examination, deterioration, and confirmation of a large amount of intracranial blood clots, it was obvious that bleeding started again after the initial CT examination, resulting in the massive hematoma.

  20. Swirl sign in traumatic acute epidural hematoma: prognostic value and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Cheng; Liu, Lin; Wang, Bing; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-12-01

    The swirl sign is identified as a small area of low attenuation within an intracranial hyperattenuating clot on non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of the brain, which represents active bleeding. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of the swirl sign among patients with acute epidural hematoma (AEDH) and to identify its prognostic value and impact on surgical treatment. A retrospective review was performed of patients with a diagnosis of traumatic EDH by CT scan who were surgically treated at the Department of Neurosurgery of the First People's Hospital of Jingmen between January 2010 and January 2014. Patients with combined or open craniocerebral injuries and those who did not undergo surgical treatment were excluded. Of the 147 patients evaluated, 21 (14%) exhibited the swirl sign on non-enhanced CT scans of the brain. Univariate analysis revealed a significant correlation between the occurrence of the swirl sign and preoperative Glasgow coma scale scores, preoperative mydriasis, time from injury to CT scan, and intraoperative hematoma volume. Compared with patients without this sign, those exhibiting the swirl sign had a higher mortality rate (24 vs. 6%, respectively; P = 0.028) and a worse outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score ≤ 3: 38 vs. 15%, respectively; P = 0.027) at 3 months. An adjusted analysis showed that the occurrence of the swirl sign was an independent predictor of poor outcome (death: odds ratio (OR) = 4.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34-15.82; P sign on the head CT scan of patients with AEDH was found to be significantly associated with poor outcome. Therefore, early identification of this sign and aggressive management with early surgical evacuation is crucial for improving patient outcome.

  1. Plasma osmolality in acute spontanious intra-cerebral hemorrhage: Does it influence hematoma volume and clinical outcome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjib Nag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neurological deterioration in acute spontaneous intra cerebral hemorrhage (ICH may depend on hematoma volume, electrolyte imbalances, hydration status and other physiological parameters. Plasma osmolality is a marker of hydration. This study has examined the relationship of plasma osmolality with hematoma volume and clinical outcome. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observational study included 75 patients with non-traumatic acute spontaneous ICH. Plasma osmolality, hematoma volume and clinical outcome in National Institute Health stroke scale (NIHSS were measured on admission and on day 7 after treatment. Mean plasma osmolality was compared between those who died before day 7 and those who died after day 7. Plasma osmolality was also compared between patients with NIHSS score >20 and patients with NIHSS score ≤20. Paired t test, Pearson correlation coefficient and independent sample t test were done using SPSS software (version 17 for Windows. Result: There is no significant correlation between hematoma volume and plasma osmolality. Higher admission plasma osmolality was associated with early death [312.0 (±16.0 mOsm/kg for those who died before day 7 versus 297.0 (±14.7 mOsm/kg for those who died after day 7, P value =0.031]. Higher admission plasma osmolality was associated with very severe stroke [311.5 (±14.1 mOsm/Kg for patients with NIHSS score >20 versus 293.6 (±11.3 mOsm/kg for patients with NIHSS score ≤20, P value =0.000. Conclusion: High plasma osmolality is a predictor of early mortality. Hematoma volume is not influenced by plasma osmolality.

  2. Non-traumatic acute epidural spinal hematomas diagnosed by magnetic resonance; Hematomas espinales epidurales agudos no traumaticos: diagnostico por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Pedraza, S.; Capellades, J.; Nos, C.; Alarcon, M.; Rovira, A. [Hospital Universitari Vall d' Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The non-traumatic spinal epidural hematoma (NTSEH) is a rare entity that can be the cause of an acute spinal compression syndrome. the objective of this review is to identify the characteristics by MRI and NTSEH and to analyze the factors that influence in its prognosis. In the years 1994 and 1999, 12 patients with NTSEH have been diagnosed in our hospital, and a MRI was performed during the acute phase. the characteristics of the lesions have been analyzed by MRI, with special emphasis on the topographic data and resonance signal and the factors that can influence in the clinical prognosis of the patients. Initially, all of the patients presented pain in the cervical dorsal or interscapular site, followed by a sensitive-motor deficit picture. The MRI showed a lesion of expansive character and posterior epidural location in every case that would produce varying degrees of compression on the spinal cord. The NTSEH should be considered as one of the causes of acute spinal cord compression. The clinical association of intense cervical, dorsal or interscapular pain followed by a sensomotor deficit picture should lead to the suspicion of this entity, that would require an immediate examination with MRI to verify its diagnosis. Both the clinical manifestations as well as the characteristics observed by MRI of the NTSEH have a prognostic value and determine the therapeutic decision. (Author) 34 refs.

  3. Hematoma subdural crônico como complicação do tratamento de paciente com a síndrome clínica da hidrocefalia de pressão normal (HPNdoi: 10.20513/2447-6595.2016v56n2p54-57

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Helder de Oliveira Junior

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As complicações da Derivação Ventriculoperitoneal (DVP podem variar de 6% a 40% nas séries da literatura, estando o hematoma subdural crônico (HSDC presente em até 24% de algumas dessas séries. Preconiza-se o uso de uma válvula de alta pressão, para evitar uma possível hiperdrenagem, nos casos de sintomatologia semelhante à hidrocefalia de pressão normal (HPN com grande aumento ventricular. Nesse caso, o paciente apresentou a tríade clássica de Hakim-Adams, sendo diagnosticado clinicamente com a hidrocefalia de pressão normal e submetido a uma derivação ventrículo-peritoneal com uma válvula de alta pressão. O paciente evoluiu com a formação de hematoma subdural crônico bilateral (HSDC, sendo necessária a drenagem da coleção sanguínea. O caso apresentado permite a observação das complicações presentes após esse procedimento e também uma revisão bibliográfica acerca da fisiopatologia da HPN.

  4. Association Factors for CT Angiography Spot Sign and Hematoma Growth in Korean Patients with Acute Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage : A Single-Center Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byung Hoo; Han, Young-Min; Jang, Kyung-Sool; Huh, Ryoong; Park, Young Sup

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to clarify the association factors and clinical significance of the CT angiography (CTA) spot sign and hematoma growth in Korean patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods We retrospectively collected the data of 287 consecutive patients presenting with acute ICH who arrived within 12 hours of ictus. Baseline clinical and radiological characteristics as well as the mortality rate within one month were assessed. A binary logistic regression was conducted to obtain association factors for the CTA spot sign and hematoma growth. Results We identified a CTA spot sign in 40 patients (13.9%) and hematoma growth in 78 patients (27.2%). An elapsed time to CT scan of less than 3 hours (OR, 5.14; 95% CI, 1.76-15.02; p=0.003) was associated with the spot sign. A CTA spot sign (OR, 5.70; 95% CI, 2.70-12.01; p40 IU (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.01-4.01; p=0.047), and an international normalized ratio ≥1.8 or warfarin medication (OR, 5.64; 95% CI, 1.29-24.57; p=0.021) were independent predictors for hematoma growth. Antiplatelet agent medication (OR, 4.92; 95% CI, 1.31-18.50; p=0.019) was significantly associated with hematoma growth within 6 hours of ictus. Conclusion As previous other populations, CTA spot sign was a strong predictor for hematoma growth especially in hyper-acute stage of ICH in Korea. Antithrombotics medication might also be associated with hyper-acute hematoma growth. In our population, elevated GPT was newly identified as a predictor for hematoma growth and its effect for hematoma growth is necessary to be confirmed through a further research. PMID:25371778

  5. Endovascular management of acute epidural hematomas: clinical experience with 80 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Carlos Michel A; Caldas, Jose Guilherme M P; Puglia, Paulo; de Andrade, Almir F; da Silva, Igor A F; Teixeira, Manoel J; Figueiredo, Eberval G

    2017-04-14

    OBJECTIVE Small acute epidural hematomas (EDHs) treated conservatively carry a nonmeasurable risk of late enlargement due to middle meningeal artery (MMA) lesions. Patients with EDHs need to stay hospitalized for several days, with neurological supervision and repeated CT scans. In this study, the authors analyzed the safety and efficacy of the embolization of the involved MMA and associated lesions. METHODS The study group consisted of 80 consecutive patients harboring small- to medium-sized EDHs treated by MMA embolization between January 2010 and December 2014. A literature review cohort was used as a control group. RESULTS The causes of head injury were falls, traffic-related accidents (including car, motorcycle, and pedestrian vs vehicle accidents), and assaults. The EDH topography was mainly temporal (lateral or pole). Active contrast leaking from the MMA was seen in 57.5%; arteriovenous fistulas between the MMA and diploic veins were seen in 10%; and MMA pseudoaneurysms were found in 13.6% of the cases. Embolizations were performed under local anesthesia in 80% of the cases, with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, polyvinyl alcohol particles, or gelatin sponge (or a combination of these), obtaining MMA occlusion and complete resolution of the vascular lesions. All patients underwent follow-up CT scans between 1 and 7 days after the embolization. In the 80 cases in this series, no increase in size of the EDH was observed and the clinical evolution was uneventful, without Glasgow Coma Scale score modification after embolization and with no need for surgical evacuation. In contrast, the control cohort from the literature consisted of 471 patients, 82 (17.4%) of whom shifted from conservative treatment to surgical evacuation. CONCLUSIONS This study suggests that MMA embolization is a highly effective and safe method to achieve size stabilization in nonsurgically treated acute EDHs.

  6. Encapsulated subdural empyema. A case report with special reference to CT findings and operative indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Yoshiharu; Inoue, Masaru; Ishizaka, Hiroaki; Koga, Hiroaki; Kawano, Teruaki; Mori, Kazuo

    1985-04-01

    A case of encapsulated subdural empyema was reported. This 1.5-year-old boy was admitted with the increasing confusion and convulsion. Eight months prior to admission, he had craniotomy for traumatic acute epidural hematoma on the left side. Following a coagulation of the middle meningeal artery which was the bleeding source, the dura was opened but no cortical damage was noted at that time. The computed tomographic (CT) scan on admission revealed a large subdural collection with a thin enhancing rim on the left side. Emergency craniotomy revealed a collection of subdural pus, which was irrigated and a catheter was put for continuous drainage. Postoperatively, the patient did well, however, following removal of the catheter, three weeks after the first operation, the subdural empyema was reexpanded with a very thick enhancing rim on CT scan. Ultrasonography also clearly demonstrated the formation of the thick membranes. The large craniotomy was performed and empyema with the outer and inner memberanes of 8mm thick was totally excised. Post-operative CT scan did not show any enhancing rim, indicating that enchancement was caused by newly formed vessels within the membranes per se. This findings are totally different from those observed in the brain abscess in which ring enhancement on CT continues months to years following so-called extracapsular excision of abscess. In the brain abscess, surrounding glial tissue with plenty neovascularization is left intact, even after the operation. (author).

  7. Suprarrenal hematoma Hematoma suprarrenal

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    Concepción Guardo B.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal asymptomatic suprarrenal hemorrhage is relatively frequent; sometimes it is detected only after resolution when a calcification is found; symptomatic forms are rare; most times hemorrhage and hematoma are due to an obstetric trauma and are related to macrosomia, breech presentation, maternal diabetes and neonatal hypoxia. Clinical picture is characterized by abdominal mass and anemia; diagnosis is confirmed by imagenology. Two patients with suprarrenal hematoma from the University Hospital at Cartagena, Colombia, are presented. Both were related with traumatic delivery and cephalohematoma; one of them had oral and gastric bleeding and the othersuffered hematoma infection; diagnosis was done with abdominal ecography and CAT. Both patients recovered with medical treatment. La hemorragia suprarrenal asintomática del neonato es relativamente frecuente y muchas veces se detecta como una calcificación local después de que se resuelve el hematoma. La forma sintomática es rara y, a menudo, se debe a un trauma obstétrico relacionado con la macrosomía fetal, la presentación podálica, la diabetes materna o la hipoxia perinatal. Las manifestaciones clínicas son, principalmente, una masa abdominal y anemia importante; el diagnóstico se confirma con la imaginología. Se presentan dos casos de hematoma suprarrenal derecho tratados en el Hospital Universitario de Cartagena, ambos relacionados con un parto traumático y acompañados de cefalohematomas; uno de ellos presentó sangrado gastrointestinal alto y el otro infección del hematoma suprarrenal. El diagnóstico se comprobó con la ecografía abdominal y se verificó con la tomografía. El tratamiento fue médico y no se requirió cirugía a pesar de la anemia severa que presentó uno de los pacientes.

  8. Intramyocardial Dissecting Hematoma after Acute Myocardial Infarction-Echocardiographic Features and Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; He, Yi Hua; Liu, Wen Xu; Sun, Lin; Han, Jian Cheng; Man, Ting Ting; Gu, Xiao Yan; Chen, Zhuo; Wen, Zhao Ying; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-07-01

    Intramyocardial dissecting hematoma (IDH) after acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a rare form of subacute cardiac rupture and hence management uncertainties. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical course of a small series of IDH patients and to review the available evidence for managing similar cases. Eight IDH patients from our center had echocardiographic, coronary angiographic and clinical outcome data reviewed. PubMed was also searched for IDH following MI. Cases were divided into three groups and compared according to the dissection location. In our 8 patients, 3 had septal, 1 right ventricular (RV), and 4 left ventricular (LV) dissection. Five were medically treated and 3 surgically repaired. Reviewing the literature revealed 68 IDH patients, of mean age 66 ± 10 years, 43 males. The percentage of IDH involving the LV free wall, septal, and RV free wall were 47%, 26.5%, and 26.5%, respectively. In the cohort as a whole, mortality was not different between surgically and medically treated patients (33.3% vs. 54.3%, P = 0.08), neither based on the IDH location (P = 0.49). While surgical and medical treatment of the LV free wall (20.0% vs. 40.9%, P = 0.25) and septal (46.2% vs. 60.0%, P = 0.60) were not different, surgical repair of RV free wall had significantly better survival (30.0% vs. 87.5%, P = 0.015). The LVEF (P = 0.82), mitral regurgitation (P = 0.49) failed to predict mortality. While survival following medical and surgical treatment of LV IDH is not different, patients with RV free wall dissection benefit significantly from surgical repair. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Acute pancreatitis and subdural haematoma in a patient with severe falciparum malaria: Case report and review of literature

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    Sathyendra Sowmya

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmodium falciparum infection is known to be associated with a spectrum of systemic complications ranging from mild and self-limiting to life-threatening. This case report illustrates a patient who had a protracted course in hospital due to several rare complications of falciparum malaria. A 21-year old man presented with a five-day history of high-grade fever, jaundice and abdominal pain and a two-day history of altered conscious state. A diagnosis of severe falciparum malaria was made based on the clinical presentation and a positive blood smear with parasitaemia of 45%. Despite adequate anti-malarial therapy with artesunate, the patient had persistent and worsening abdominal pain. Investigations suggested a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, a rare association with falciparum malaria. However, in spite of supportive therapy for acute pancreatitis and a 10-day course of intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline at recommended doses, he continued to be febrile with peripheral blood smear showing persistence of ring forms. Antimalarial therapy was, therefore, changed to quinine on the suspicion of possible artesunate resistance. On the 17th day of stay in hospital, the patient developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Computerized tomography of the brain showed bilateral fronto-parietal subdural haematomas that were surgically drained. His fever persisted beyond 30-days despite broad-spectrum antibiotics, quinine therapy and negative malarial smears. A possibility of drug fever was considered and all drugs were ceased. He subsequently became afebrile and was discharged on the 38th hospital admission day. Recognition of complications and appropriate management at each stage facilitated successful outcome. This report has been presented to highlight the occurrence of several rare complications of falciparum malaria in the same patient.

  10. Pancreatite aguda devida a hematoma intramural do duodeno por uso de anticoagulante Acute pancreatitis due to intramural hematoma of the duodenum by use of anticoagulant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer FARHOUD

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Racional - A hemorragia intramural espontânea do duodeno causada por complicações da terapêutica anticoagulante é rara e seu tratamento controverso. Objetivo -- Apresentar a experiência advinda do tratamento de doente com essa condição clínica. Relato do caso - Expõe-se o caso de uma mulher de 71 anos de idade, que há 3 meses fazia uso de anticoagulante oral para tratamento de trombose venosa profunda dos membros inferiores. Apresentou-se com cefaléia e dores abdominais intensas no andar superior do abdome, associadas a náuseas e vômitos. Os exames laboratoriais e de imagem comprovaram o diagnóstico de surto agudo de pancreatite, decorrente de hematoma intramural de duodeno. Os valores de protrombina (49,7 s e o sangramento de tecidos moles cervicais e urinário, sugeriam complicação da terapêutica anticoagulante. Resultados - A terapêutica conservadora foi efetiva, tendo a doente recebido alta, assintomática, no 10º dia de internação. Conclusão - É recomendado o emprego do anticoagulante em doses menores nos doentes de risco e adequado controle dos parâmetros da coagulação. Acredita-se ser ideal a conduta conservadora e recomenda-se a cirurgia somente nos casos que evoluem com complicações.Background - Spontaneous intramural hemorrhage of the duodenum due to anticoagulant therapy is rare and the treatment is controversial. Objective - To present the acquired knowledge with the treatment of these disease. Case report - A 71-year-old women receiving for a 3 month period an anticoagulant therapy presented cervical bleeding of soft tissues and symptoms of acute pancreatitis and high small bowel obstruction. Early noninvasive diagnosis by computed tomographic scan was possible and conservative therapy proved successful in complete resolution of the pancreatitis and obstructive symptoms, with resumption of oral intake in the fourth day of treatment. The frequency of bleeding in high risk patients during warfarin therapy

  11. Subdural haemorrhage following endoscopic third ventriculostomy. A rare complication.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    Subdural collections or hematomas are frequently observed after shunt placement [7-9, 13], but rarely after ETV [6]. A review of literature revealed 7 cases [1, 5, 6, 10, 12], of which only 1 was symptomatic [5]. We will discuss the causes, management, and methods of prevention of this complication and we will present a case of symptomatic subdural haematoma, following endoscopic third ventriculostomy for illustration.

  12. MR demonstration of spontaneous acute epidural hematoma of the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrahami, E.; Tadmor, R.; Feibel, M.; Itzhak, Y.; Tel Aviv Univ.; Ram, Z.; Tel Aviv Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Two patients with spontaneous epidural hematoma of the thoracic spine are presented. The magnetic resonance (MR) examination performed within the first hours following the onset of symptoms demonstrated an epidural elongated lesion impinging on the spinal cord, compatible with hematoma. In one of the patients this finding was surgically confirmed. The second patient improved under steroid treatment. The MR findings were highly suggestive of the pathological nature of the lesion. The MR examination should replace other diagnostic procedures, such as computerised tomography (CT) and myelography. (orig.)

  13. Prognostic value of sustained elevated C-reactive protein levels in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Takeshi; Kaji, Shuichiro; Kim, Kitae; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Tani, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Makoto; Furukawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate management of aortic intramural hematoma is still controversial, because a variety of aortic events can arise during follow-up in some patients. However, simplified identification of these patients remains challenging. The present study aimed to determine the prognostic significance of serial C-reactive protein measurements for the prediction of adverse events in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma. A total of 180 patients with aortic intramural hematoma were retrospectively reviewed. The C-reactive protein data were obtained at admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, and the maximum value was obtained during the acute phase. Adverse aorta-related events were defined by a composite of aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, and surgical or endovascular aortic repair. The C-reactive protein value was 3.0 ± 4.6, 8.7 ± 5.9, 9.0 ± 5.5, and 5.7 ± 4.5 mg/dL on admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, respectively. The maximal value of C-reactive protein was 12.4 ± 6.3 mg/dL at a mean of 4 days from the onset. Patients with elevated C-reactive protein levels (≥7.2 mg/dL) at 2 weeks had significantly greater rates of aorta-related events (P analysis, an elevated C-reactive protein level at 2 weeks (hazard ratio, 3.16; P value compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection (chi-square, 16.94 for ulcer-like projection only vs 34.32 with the addition of C-reactive protein at 2 weeks, P < .001). C-reactive protein was a simple and useful marker providing incremental prognostic information compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection in patients with aortic intramural hematoma. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bilateral Symmetrical Parietal Extradural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Amit

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of bilateral extradural hematomas (EDH) is an uncommon consequence of craniocerebral trauma, and acute symmetrical bilateral epidural hematomas are extremely rare. We discuss the technique adopted by us for the management of this rare entity. A 55-year-old patient presented with history of fall of branch of tree on her head. She had loss of consciousness since then and had multiple episodes of vomiting. Examination of the scalp was suggestive of diffuse subgaleal hematoma. Her ...

  15. Direct subdural scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keren, G.; Barzilay, Z.; Czerniak, P.; Cohen, B.E.

    1980-06-01

    We report a case of pneumococcal meningitis in an 8 weeks old female infant followed by persistent subdural effusion successsfully treated by repeated subdural taps. The initial delineation of the subdural effusion, the decrease in size and the disappearance of the fluid were demonstrated by direct subdural scintigraphy (D.S.S.). The literature of pneumoccocal meningitis, its diagnosis, treatment and complications are reviewed, and it is suggested that direct subdural scintigraphy should be employed as a diagnostic aid in the evaluation and follow up of subdural effusions.

  16. The challenges of managing acute extradural hematoma in a Nigerian neurosurgical center--still a long way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emejulu, Jude Kennedy C; Uche, Enoch Ogbonnaya; Nwankwo, Ezekiel Uche

    2014-12-01

    Acute extradural hematoma (EDH) is the collection of blood in the potential space between the dura mater and endocranium within 3 days of an incident. It is usually, but not always, a neurosurgical emergency, and early treatment reduces morbidity and mortality, although the outcome is still affected by some other determinants. In Nigeria, the National Health Insurance Scheme does not cover neurosurgical cases, and patients have to pay for all of their treatment regardless of the emergency status. We evaluate epidemiologic patterns, management protocols, and outcome, especially in relation to timely operative intervention, in patients with acute extradural hematoma who presented to our recently established neurosurgical service. This prospective study comprised cases managed in our center from May 2006 to July 2013. Data of all patients with acute EDH were collected on Microsoft Excel software and complemented with hospital charts and operative records. Demographic data, etiologic factors, time interval from injury to presentation in our service, time interval from presentation to definitive treatment, and outcome were collected and analyzed. Within the 86-month study period, 1648 patients presented to our service with head injuries. Acute EDH constituted 3.03%, with a mean of 7.14 cases per year. Among the cases of acute EDH, 92% involved male patients (male-to-female ratio, 11.5:1). Peak age incidence (42%) was 21-30 years (mean, 23 years), and motorcycle road traffic accident was the most common etiologic factor (72%). Operative treatment was performed in 84% of the cases (in 57.1%, operative treatment occurred within 1 week of presentation). Conservative management was employed in 10% of cases. Mortality was 14.9%; most (10%) had severe head injury, although 2.1% had mild injury known to be associated with 0% mortality. Acute EDH is a potentially fatal condition that is easily treatable if presentation, diagnosis, and treatment occur promptly. Our outcomes could

  17. Epidural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... accidents. Rapid bleeding causes a collection of blood (hematoma) that presses on the brain. The pressure inside the head ( intracranial pressure, ICP ) increases quickly. This pressure may result ...

  18. Degree and Timing of Intensive Blood Pressure Lowering on Hematoma Growth in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial-2 Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcel, Cheryl; Wang, Xia; Sato, Shoichiro; Stapf, Christian; Sandset, Else Charlotte; Delcourt, Candice; Arima, Hisatomi; Robinson, Thompson; Lavados, Pablo; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-06-01

    Degree and timing of blood pressure (BP) lowering treatment in relation to hematoma growth were investigated in the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial-2 (INTERACT2). INTERACT2 was an international clinical trial of intensive (target systolic BP [SBP], 6 hours (5.4 mL). The smallest mean absolute hematoma growth (2.0 mL) was in those achieving target SBP 5 to 8 times versus 3 to 4 (3.1 mL) and 0 to 2 times (5.2 mL). Intensive BP lowering with greater SBP reduction, which is achieved quickly and maintained consistently, seems to provide protection against hematoma growth for 24 hours. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00716079. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Rapid Spontaneous Resolution of Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Aydemir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural hematomas (EDH are pathologies in which the early diagnosis and treatment are important. Resolution under 24 hours is very rare. Case Report: An 11-month-old male patient was brought to the emergency department with head trauma from falling out of bed onto his back. There were no neurological deficits, except for the patient being somnolent. Computed tomography (CT of the patient revealed subgaleal edema in the right parietal region, linear fracture and image consistent with EDH with a thickness of about 9 mm underneath fracture. A control CT was performed after 3 hours as somnolence continued in follow-up of the patient. Hematoma in the epidural region was observed to completely resolve and edema in the subgaleal region was observed to gain hemorrhagic characteristics. Conclusion: In total, 15 cases have been reported, including our case, in the literature with resolution less than 24 hours. Our case has the fourth fastest resolution ever reported in the English literature. We think that the most important factor in the rapid spontaneous resolution is the presence of a connection between the epidural and epicranial space, either through a fracture or cranial sutures.

  20. Density measurements with computed tomography in patients with extra-axial hematoma can quantitatively estimate a degree of brain compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Li, Luyuan; Patel, Mohit; Mueller, Wade

    2016-10-01

    Extra-axial hematoma can cause significant brain compression. Guidelines for surgical evacuation include imaging findings (midline shift and hematoma thickness/volume) in conjunction with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores and/or intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Physiologically, overall brain density should also change with compression. In our observational study, we explored whether overall brain density, defined using computed tomography Hounsfield Units (CT HU), changes after surgical evacuation of extra-axial hematoma. Only patients with a surgical acute epidural hematoma or subacute/chronic subdural hematoma were considered. Other exclusion criteria were concurrent intraparenchymal pathology, bilateral pathology, or incomplete follow-up imaging. Between fall 2012 and spring 2015, 22 patients were included in the study. CT head imaging (preoperative, postoperative, and at ∼1- to 2-month clinic visit) were loaded into OsiriX (Pixmeo, Switzerland). All the intracranial regions were selected and all extra-axial features were removed; subsequently, software was used to calculate a global CT HU value. A repeated-measures ANOVA found significant time effect, p brain, can cause an elevation in global CT HU value; moreover, surgical decompression is associated with lower global CT HU values. The use of global CT HU values in selected populations may serve as an adjunct for the evaluation of surgical lesions. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. [Management of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa accompanied by subdural effusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrahmen, K; Saadaoui, K; Bouhoula, A; Boubaker, A; Jemel, H

    2012-10-01

    Subdural effusions are uncommon but known complications of arachnoid cysts of the middle cranial fossa. They mainly occur after minor head traumas in young patients. Here, we report eight cases of arachnoid cyst of the middle cranial fossa associated with subdural hematoma in five cases and hygroma in three cases. Major symptoms are signs of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan and MRI showed the cyst and the subdural effusion. An excellent therapeutic result was achieved with evacuation of the subdural fluid via burr holes in the five cases of subdural hematoma while in the two cases of hygroma a subduro-peritoneal shunt was necessary. In the last case, a temporal craniotomy was performed with evacuation of the hygroma and fenestration of the cyst. We suggest treating only the complicating event in the case of a subdural hematoma via burr holes evacuation. Whereas, in the case of hygroma we think that craniotomy with fenestration of the cyst or the use of a subdural shunt are more often needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Subdural abscess in infant and child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Eiichiro; Shigemori, Minoru; Hayashi, Takashi; Kuratomi, Akihiko; Kuramoto, Shinken

    1980-01-01

    Two cases of subdural abscess in infant and child treated with irrigation via burr holes were reported. The first case was a 1.4-year-old boy with right hemiparesis and mental retardation since severe head trauma at 9 months old. The patient with manifested with an acute onset of high fever followed by disturbance of consciousness and convulsive seizures 2.5 months prior to admission to our department. During admission in the other hospital, the diagnosis of septicemia caused by E. coli was made by blood cultures when CT scan demonstrated a huge lentiform low density area over the right hemisphere and contralateral crescent low density area. The low density area on the right side was well circumscribed by high density rim which was enhanced by contrast medium. Under the diagnosis of bilateral subdural abscess secondary to septicemia caused by E. coli, irrigation of the purulent cavity was carried out. The contralateral low density area was found to be chronic subdural effusion. The second case of 3-month-old infant who complained of high fever, neck stiffness, unconsciousness and right hemiconvulsions 8 days prior to admission. CT scan showed bilateral crescent low density areas indicating subdural effusion. Subdural punctures performed via the fontanelle revealed pus in the left subdural space and xanthocromic fluid in the right side. The low density area on CT scan was changed to the lentiform high density area circumscribed smooth high density rim during the course of the patient. The subdural abscess was treated with irrigation via burr holes. In this report, the etiology of the subdural abscess and route of infection in addition to follow up study of CT findings were presented with the literature. (author)

  3. Intracranial hypotension - a look beyond “bilateral subdural hematomas”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, B.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The intracranial hypotension (ICH) is a disorder due to spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leak and a low intracranial pressure. The clinical presentation is characterized by drug resistant orthostatic headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, neck pain and etc. The intracranial hypotension is defined as a benign disorder and the treatment is predominantly conservative. Due to this fact it is very important to differentiate this entity from subdural hematomas and hygromas which are treated surgically. Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of ICH. Nowadays there are a lot of clinical and imaging features of this disorder. Regardless of clinical varieties and atypical forms, MRI gives enough information for the correct or probable diagnosis in the vast majority of the cases. The initial imaging resemblance with posttraumatic subdural hematomas and hygromas can result in giving the wrong diagnosis and therefore performing unneeded surgical interventions. the aim of this presentation is to discuss the contemporary criteria, algorithm and imaging features of ICH

  4. Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodan Paramanathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinodan Paramanathan, Ardalan ZolnourianQueen's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire DE13 0RB, UKAbstract: Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma is an uncommon clinical entity seen in ophthalmology practice. It is poorly represented in the literature. Current evidence attributes it to orbital trauma, neoplasm, vascular malformations, acute sinusitis, and systemic abnormalities. A 65-year-old female presented with spontaneous intraorbital hematoma manifesting as severe ocular pains, eyelid edema, proptosis, and diplopia, without a history of trauma. Computer tomography demonstrated a fairly well defined extraconal lesion with opacification of the paranasal sinuses. The principal differential based on all findings was that of a spreading sinus infection and an extraconal tumor. An unprecedented finding of a spontaneous orbital hematoma was discovered when the patient was taken to theater. We discuss the rarity of this condition and its management.Keywords: hemorrhage, ophthalmology, spontaneous, intra-orbital, hematoma

  5. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort – Risks and Predictive Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Munch, Tina Noergaard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients. Methods The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996–2011. Information on potential predictors was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR) were estimated using Poisson regression. Results Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43–1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20–49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21–1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95% CI:1.04–1.37), surgical treatment (RR 1.76, 95% CI:1.58–1.96), trauma diagnoses (RR 1.14, 95% CI:1.03–1.27), and diabetes mellitus (RR 1.40, 95% CI:1.11–1.74). Out of a selected combination of risk factors, the highest cumulative 1-year recurrence risks for subdural hematoma of 25% (compared to 14% for all patients) was found in surgically treated males with diabetes mellitus. Conclusions The recurrence risk of subdural hematoma is largely limited to the first year. Patient characteristics including co-morbidities greatly influence the recurrence risk of SDH, suggesting that individualized prognostic guidance and follow-up is needed. PMID:26465602

  6. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Schmidt

    Full Text Available To estimate the risks of and identify predictors for recurrent subdural haematoma in surgically and conservatively treated patients.The cohort comprised all individuals diagnosed with a first-time subdural hematoma in Denmark 1996-2011. Information on potential predictors was retrieved from the Danish health registers. Cumulative recurrence risks were estimated using the Aalen-Johansen estimator. Rate ratios (RR were estimated using Poisson regression.Among 10,158 individuals with a subdural hematoma, 1,555 had a recurrent event. The cumulative risk of recurrent subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80, older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65, alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95% CI:1.04-1.37, surgical treatment (RR 1.76, 95% CI:1.58-1.96, trauma diagnoses (RR 1.14, 95% CI:1.03-1.27, and diabetes mellitus (RR 1.40, 95% CI:1.11-1.74. Out of a selected combination of risk factors, the highest cumulative 1-year recurrence risks for subdural hematoma of 25% (compared to 14% for all patients was found in surgically treated males with diabetes mellitus.The recurrence risk of subdural hematoma is largely limited to the first year. Patient characteristics including co-morbidities greatly influence the recurrence risk of SDH, suggesting that individualized prognostic guidance and follow-up is needed.

  7. CT findings of brain atrophy after chemotherapy in acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jun; Park, Seog Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University Medicine College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    A study was performed to evaluate the atrophic changes of the central nerve system after chemotherapy in the patients with acute leukemia. The computed tomographic findings and medical records of 20 proven acute leukemia patients under 35 years-old who developed various CNS symptoms and signs during and/or after 2 courses of chemotherapy were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1. Age distribution was from 14 to 5 years (mean was 26 years). Male was 15. 2. Presenting clinical symptoms and signs were headache (16/20), nausea and vomiting (11/20) and loss of consciousness (5/20). 3. Brain atrophy was noted in 16 patients including cortical and subcortical atrophy 15 cases and subcortical atrophy 1 case. 4. Two cases of hemorrhage, one each of intracranial hematoma and chronic subdural hematoma were found in addition to brain atrophy. This showed that chemotherapeutic agents cause brain atrophy in a considerable number of the patients with symptomatic acute leukemia.

  8. Hemobilia, intrahepatic hematoma and acute thrombosis with cavernomatous transformation of the portal vein after percutaneous thermoablation of a liver metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francica, G.; Marone, G.; D' Angelo, V. [Divisione di Gastroenterologia, Ospedale ' ' Cardinale Ascalesi' ' , Naples (Italy); Solbiati, L. [Divisione di Ecografia e Radiologia Interventistica, Ospedale Generale Busto Arsizio (Italy); Siani, A. [Servizio di Radiologia, Ospedale Civile ' ' S. Maria Delle Grazie' ' , Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    A 53-year-old-man underwent US-guided percutaneous thermal ablation with a cooled-tip needle of three liver metastases from gastric cancer. Six days later, the patient was re-admitted for melena, scleral jaundice, and anemia. Abdominal US disclosed echogenic material in the gallbladder lumen (hemobilia) and a focal lesion with mixed echotexture in segment III (hepatic hematoma). On day 5 portal cavernomatosis was diagnosed at US and confirmed by color Doppler and a helical CT exam. The case described emphasizes that radio-frequency interstitial hyperthermia may cause not only traumatic injury of the liver parenchyma but also thermally mediated damage of vascular structures. (orig.)

  9. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  10. Brown-Séquard syndrome and cervical post-traumatic subarachnoid hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón-Ramírez, Fernando; Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Trondin, Albert; Arredondo, M Javier

    2017-10-20

    Cervical Traumatic SSH are very rare in literature. They are usually caused by cardiopulmonary diseases that increase vascular pressure causing spinal vessels rupture. In thoracolumbar spine, the spinal puncture is the most common cause. The ventrolateral position is even more unusual. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), an abrupt extension-flexion movement could have caused the rupture of subarachnoid vessels. This, accompanied by the slowed blood "wash out" (probably due to the previous osteoarthrosis and spinal canal stenosis), led to the formation of an organized clot, which caused an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Cervical subarachnoid spinal hematoma can present as Brown-Séquard syndrome. The treatment is prompt surgical removal and decompression. The posterior approach (partial hemilaminectomy with or without laminoplasty) with microsurgical technique is feasible, fast and simple to evacuate the hematoma with good results. Surgical nuances in posterior approach are: small spinal canal, difficulty in mobilizing the cervical cord, these haematomas are wrapped and attached to the spinal cord or nerve roots by multiple arachnoid bands, requiring techniques of Microdissection for its evacuation unlike the epidural and subdural haematomas that are easily aspirated. Here, we report a unique case of a ventrolateral SSH due to TBI. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. The Value of Programmable Shunt Valves for the Management of Subdural Collections in Patients with Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Pachatouridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of electromagnetic programmable shunt valves for the treatment of subdural collections. Methods. Adult patients with hydrocephalus of various causes that were treated with programmable shunt valves during the last ten years were retrospectively studied. In 127 patients, 139 electromagnetic programmable shunt valves were implanted. Results. A nontraumatic subdural fluid collection was detected in 12 patients. The treatment of these patients consisted of reprogramming of the valve’s opening pressure. In 5 patients small subdural hematomas were detected; 4 of these patients were treated by raising the opening pressure alone and one patient required surgical drainage and change of the pressure setting. Traumatic chronic subdural hematomas were detected in 6 patients. These patients were treated by surgical drainage and readjustment of the valve’s opening pressure. Conclusion. The ability to treat a shunt-related complication, such as a subdural fluid collection, by reprogramming the valve’s opening pressure to a higher setting is an advantage over nonprogrammable valves, and it enables the opening pressure to be slowly lowered once the fluid collection is reabsorbed. Based on our results, we believe that programmable shunt valves should be preferred.

  12. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  13. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis presenting as subdural haematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Kumar, S.; Joseph, M.; Gnanamuthu, C.; Alexander, M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a 39-year-old woman who presented with intermittent, excruciating nuchal and occipital headache. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography scans showed bilateral subdural haematomas with veno-occlusive disease of the superficial and deep venous systems. There were bridging collaterals with scalp veins, bleeds from which could explain the subdural haematoma. There was acute on chronic veno-occlusive disease with an acute rise in intracranial pressure and a bleed from the vein of Galen Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  14. Unusual causes of chronic subdural hematoma | Ndubuisi | Orient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    investigated intra cranial lesion. Most times it is attributed to an obvious or trivial head injury, but it possibly may also be a presenting feature of a more serious underlying pathology. This article highlights three patients who presented with CSDH with ...

  15. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoroki, Koji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Kadota, Koki; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kanemaru, Reizou; Fujimoto, Toshirou; Yamamoto, Kunimitsu

    1987-12-01

    A sequential MR scan was performed on 21 patients with intracranial hematoma, and simultaneously the T/sub 1/ values of the hematomas were calculated. The T/sub 1/ value of a hematoma was found to be longer than that of the white matter in the acute phase, but it soon becomes as short as that of the white matter (7 - 10 day after). After several days, the T/sub 1/ value again gradually becomes longer. In the experiment, 30 ml of fresh blood (15 samples) were stored at room temperature, and a sequential MR scan and the calculation of the T/sub 1/ were performed over a period of 20 days. In vitro, most of the T/sub 1/ values were long, but there was much variation on the first day. A shortening of the T/sub 1/ was observed as well in vivo, and after this shortening, no prolongation of the T/sub 1/ was observed. Perhaps the shortening of T/sub 1/ was caused by the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin and by the coagulation of the blood. The lysis and absorption of the hematoma may, on the other hand, cause the prolongation of the T/sub 1/ in vitro. For the diagnosis of intracranial hematoma, CT was found to be a method superior to MRI, especially in the acute phase. However, MRI gives us more information about hematoma (concerning the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, the lysis and absorption of the hematoma, the range of hemorrhagic tissue and edema, etc.) than does CT. An IR (T/sub 1/-weighted) image shows a good contrast between the hematoma and the surrounding tissue (hemorrhagic tissue, edema) in the early phase. On the other hand, the SE (T/sub 2/-weighted) image informs us of the lesion when the hematoma is low approx. isodense on the CT in the chronic phase.

  17. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  18. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Recurrence of Subdural Haematoma in a Population-Based Cohort - Risks and Predictive Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Linnea; Gørtz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    subdural hematoma was 9% at 4 weeks after the primary bleeding, increasing to and stabilising at 14% after one year. Predictors associated with recurrence were: Male sex (RR 1.60, 95% CI:1.43-1.80), older age (>70 years compared to 20-49 years; RR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.65), alcohol addiction (RR 1.20, 95...

  20. Acute Management of Hemostasis in Patients With Neurological Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Brand, Anneke; Koopman, Maria M.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological injuries can be divided into those with traumatic and nontraumatic causes. The largest groups are traumatic brain injury (TBI) and nontraumatic stroke. TBI patients may present with intracranial hemorrhages (contusions, or subdural or epidural hematomas). Strokes are ischemic or

  1. Subdural hemorrhage: A unique case involving secondary vitamin K deficiency bleeding due to biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyao, Masashi; Abiru, Hitoshi; Ozeki, Munetaka; Kotani, Hirokazu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Kobayashi, Naho; Omae, Tadaki; Osamura, Toshio; Tamaki, Keiji

    2012-09-10

    Extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA) is a rare disease characterized by progressive and obliterative cholangiopathy in infants and is one of the major causes of secondary vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) due to cholestasis-induced fat malabsorption. Breast feeding increases the tendency of bleeding in EHBA patients because breast milk contains low amounts of vitamin K. A 2-month-old female infant unexpectedly died, with symptoms of vomiting and jaundice prior to death. She had been born by uncomplicated vaginal delivery and exhibited normal growth and development with breastfeeding. There was no history of trauma. She received vitamin K prophylaxis orally. In an emergency hospital, a CT scan showed a right intracranial hematoma and mass effect with midline shift to the left. In the postmortem examination, severe atresia was observed in the whole extrahepatic bile duct. Histologically, cholestasis, periductal fibrosis, and distorted bile ductules were noted. The gallbladder was not identified. A subdural hematoma and cerebellar tonsillar herniation were found; however, no traumatic injury in any part of the body was observed. Together, these findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by secondary vitamin K deficiency resulting from a combination of cholestasis-induced fat malabsorption and breastfeeding. Subdural hemorrhage by secondary VKDB sometimes occurs even when vitamin K prophylaxis is continued. This case demonstrated that intrinsic factors, such as secondary VKDB (e.g., EHBA, neonatal hepatitis, chronic diarrhea), should also be considered in infant autopsy cases presenting with subdural hemorrhage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CT guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive and traumatic intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hideki; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1983-01-01

    Recent advancement of CT system provides not only definite diagnosis and location of intracerebral hematoma but also coordinates of the center of the hematoma. Trials of stereotactic evacuation of the hematoma have been reported by some authors in the cases of subacute or chronic stages of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. In this series, similar surgery has been performed in 33 cases of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma including 22 cases in acute stage, and 2 cases of traumatic hematoma. Clinical outcomes were investigated and the results were considered to be equivalent or rather better in the conventional microsurgery with evacuation of hematoma under direct vision. However, there still remained controversial problems in the cases of threatened herniation signs, because in these cases regular surgery with total evacuation of the hematoma at one time might have been preferable. The benefits of this CT guided stereotactic approach for the evacuation of the hematoma were thought to be as follow: 1) the procedure is simple and safe, 2) operation is readily performed under local anesthesia, and 3) the hematoma was drained out totally by means of urokinase activity. It is our impression that this surgery not only is indicated as emergency treatment for the patients of high-age or in high risk, but also can institute as a routine surgery for the intracerebral hematomas in patients showing no herniation sign. (J.P.N.)

  3. Acute renal failure and arterial hypertension due to sub capsular hematoma: is percutaneous drainage a feasible treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobel, Marie Cæcilie; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Graumann, Ole

    Percutaneous drainage proved to be successful in managing a renal subcapsular haematoma that was causing acute renal failure and hypertension in a 74-year-old woman. The patient presented with oliguria, nausea and malaise 2 days after a ureteronephroscopic procedure with biopsies of a suspected......, but recent case reports have described successful management by laparoscopy-assisted and radiology-assisted drainage, as described in this case report....

  4. [Spontaneous hepatic hematoma in twin pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Carlos; Weber, Alejandro; Mendoza, Dalila; Garteiz, Denzil

    2012-02-01

    The hepatic hematoma or rupture appear in 1 of every 100,000 pregnancies. The most common causes of hepatic hematoma in pregnancy are severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome; some predisposing factors are seizures, vomiting, labor, preexistent hepatic disease and trauma. A 33 year old primigravid with a normal 33 week twin pregnancy presented abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock due to spontaneous subcapsular hepatic hematoma; laparoscopy was performed to evaluate the possibility of rupture, which was not found, later emergency cesarean section was carried out followed by hepatic hematoma drainage and abdominal packaging by laparoscopy. After surgery the flow through drainage was too high additionally hemodynamic instability and consumption coagulopathy. Abdominal panangiography was performed without identifying bleeding areas. Intesive care was given to the patient evolving satisfactorily, was discharged 19 days after the event. Seven months later she had laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to acute litiasic colecistitis. We found 5 cases in literatura about hepatic hematoma during pregnancy no related to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; these were related to hepatoma, amebian hepatic abscess, falciform cell anemia, cocaine consumption and molar pregnancy. Hepatics hematomas have high morbidity and mortality so is significant early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach.

  5. Subdural Empyema in Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, evaluated the occurrence, treatment, and outcome of subdural empyema as a complication of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in 28 (2.7% adults.

  6. Acute renal failure and arterial hypertension due to sub capsular hematoma: is percutaneous drainage a feasible treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobel, Marie Cæcilie; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Graumann, Ole

    Percutaneous drainage proved to be successful in managing a renal subcapsular haematoma that was causing acute renal failure and hypertension in a 74-year-old woman. The patient presented with oliguria, nausea and malaise 2 days after a ureteronephroscopic procedure with biopsies of a suspected...... urothelial neoplasm in the right renal pelvis. The left kidney had recently been removed due to renal cell carcinoma. At admission, the patient's blood pressure and plasma creatinine levels were massively elevated. Ultrasonography revealed a moderate right-sided renal subcapsular haematoma. When the patient...

  7. Hematoma epidural subagudo Subacute epidural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvei González Orlandi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente con hematoma epidural subagudo, temporoparietal derecho, secundario a una agresión física. En el cuadro clínico, a las 24 h, predominó la cefalea de intensidad moderada, con somnolencia y agitación psicomotora ligera. Las radiografías simples de cráneo no mostraron alteraciones. Los síntomas se mantuvieron a pesar del tratamiento médico, por lo que se realizó una tomografía axial simple de cráneo que mostró la presencia de un hematoma epidural subagudo temporoparietal derecho, con desplazamiento de estructuras de la línea media. Se realizó una craneotomía temporoparietal derecha para la evacuación del hematoma posterior. El paciente evolucionó satisfactoriamente y se recuperó por completo, tanto clínica como imaginológicamente.This is the case of a patient presenting with right temporoparietal subacute hematoma secondary to a physical act of aggression. In clinical picture at 24 hours there was predominance of headache of moderate intensity with drowsiness and slight psychomotor restlessness. The skull single radiographies didn't show alterations. Symptoms remained despite the medical treatment, thus a single skull axial tomography was carried out showing the presence of a right temporoparietal subacute epidural hematoma with displacement from the middle line structures. A right temporoparietal craniotomy was carried out to evacuation of the posterior hematoma. Patient evolved satisfactorily with a total recovery as much clinical as imaging.

  8. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Luken, M.G. III

    1983-01-01

    CT demonstrated posterior fossa epidural hematoma in three patients with head trauma in whom this diagnosis was not clinically apparent. No patient was in stupor or coma and no patient experienced a lucid interval. Only one patient had signs referable to the posterior fossa. Two patients had occipital skull fracture disclosed by plain radiographs. CT revealed a unilateral biconvex hematoma in two cases, and a bilateral hematoma with supratentorial extension in the third. All patients underwent suboccipital craniectomy and recovered. Therapeutic success in these cases was facilitated by early CT and the rapid disclosure of the unsuspected posterior fossa lesions. CT showing contiguous hematoma below and above the tentorium cerebelli after posterior head trauma is highly suggestive of epidural hematoma arising from the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  9. Delayed traumatic hematomas of the brain: the early manifestations of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuyan; Tang Guangjian; Fu Jiazhen; Xu Bing; Yin Yanyu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT manifestations of delayed traumatic hematomas of the brain and evaluate their diagnostic significance in predicting the delayed traumatic brain hematoma. Methods: The manifestations of initial CT studies and follow-up CT examinations of 31 delayed traumatic brain hematomas were analyzed. Another 50 CT studies of head trauma without delayed brain hematomas were included randomly as control. Results: The abnormal findings of CT studies of the 31 delayed traumatic brain hematomas included: (1) Decreased density of the local brain parenchyma and disappeared difference between gray and white matter of the same area in 18 cases; (2) Local subarachnoid space hemorrhage in 24 cases; (3) Slight mass effect of local brain parenchyma in 16 cases. (4) Subdural hematoma in 9 cases. The locations of the abnormalities were roughly the same with the delayed hematoma except one local subarachnoid space hemorrhage, which was in the opposite of the delayed hematoma. The appearing rate of those abnormal findings in the control group was low and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: The decrease of density of local brain parenchyma, the disappeared difference between the gray and white matter, local subarachnoid space hemorrhage, and local swollen of brain presented in the initial CT study of the patient with heat trauma should be taken as indicators of delayed hemorrhage of the same area of brain, and it is necessary to do follow-up CT studies to exclude it

  10. [Prevertebral hematoma and traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation with survival--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Kato, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Hidetake; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takanori; Otani, Naoki; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Yatsushige, Hiroshi

    2007-10-01

    Traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation is usually fatal. Few case reports surviving this injury appeared in the literature. We report a rare case of a retropharyngeal hematoma and an atlantooccipital dislocation with survival. A 31-year-old male fell from a motorcycle and was thrown. His neurological examination showed mild weakness (gr III) and numbness of the arms. Enlargement of retropharyngeal space on the lateral cervical radiography helped to recognize the diagnosis. The BAI-BDI method proposed by Harris et al. were useful for diagnosis. Additional imaging, including CT and MRI, was helpful. He was diagnosed atolantooccipital dislocation, retropharyngeal hematoma, cervical subdural hematoma, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and mandibular fracture. He was orally intubated and the Philadelphia cervical collar was replaced. Additionally, occipitocervical fusion with internal fixation was performed. We emphasize that the presence of retropharyngeal hematoma leads us to perform airway interventions and to suspect the presence of the upper cervical spine injury including atlantooccipital dislocation.

  11. Bilateral Symmetrical Parietal Extradural Hematoma | Agrawal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is an uncommon consequence of craniocerebral trauma, and acute symmetrical bilateral epidural hematomas are extremely rare. We discuss the technique ... A 55-year-old patient presented with history of fall of branch of tree on her head. She had loss of ... Initially, left parietal trephine craniotomy was performed and ...

  12. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F.; Meuli, R.

    2003-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  13. Spontaneous bilateral subdural haematomas in the posterior cranial fossa revealed by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollo, C.; Porchet, F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, R. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    A 52-year-old woman treated for acute myeloproliferative disease developed progressive stupor. CT showed obstructive hydrocephalus resulting from unexplained mass effect on the fourth ventricle. MRI revealed bilateral extra-axial collections in the posterior cranial fossa, giving high signal on T1- and T2-weighted images, suggesting subacute subdural haematomas. Subdural haematomas can be suspected on CT when there is unexplained mass effect. MRI may be essential to confirm the diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  14. Prediction and Observation of Post-Admission Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Intracerebral Haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eOvesen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH comprises a simultaneous major clinical problem and a possible target for medical intervention. In any case, the ability to predict and observe hematoma expansion is of great clinical importance. We review radiological concepts in predicting and observing post-admission hematoma expansion. Hematoma expansion can be observed within the first 24 hours after symptom onset, but predominantly occurs in the early hours. Thus capturing markers of on-going bleeding on imaging techniques could predict hematoma expansion. The spot sign observed on CTA is believed to represent on-going bleeding and is to date the most well investigated and reliable radiological predictor of hematoma expansion as well as functional outcome and mortality. On non-contrast CT, the presence of foci of hypoattenuation within the hematoma along with the hematoma-size is reported to be predictive of hematoma expansion and outcome. Because patients tend to arrive earlier to the hospital, a larger fraction of acute ICH-patients must be expected to undergo hematoma expansion. This renders observation and radiological follow-up investigations increasingly relevant. Transcranial duplex sonography has in recent years proven to be able to estimate hematoma volume with good precision and could be a valuable tool in bedside serial observation of acute ICH patients. Future studies will elucidate, if better prediction and observation of post-admission hematoma expansion can help select patients, who will benefit from haemostatic treatment.

  15. Prediction and Observation of Post-Admission Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovesen, Christian; Havsteen, Inger; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Christensen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) comprises a simultaneous major clinical problem and a possible target for medical intervention. In any case, the ability to predict and observe hematoma expansion is of great clinical importance. We review radiological concepts in predicting and observing post-admission hematoma expansion. Hematoma expansion can be observed within the first 24 h after symptom onset, but predominantly occurs in the early hours. Thus capturing markers of on-going bleeding on imaging techniques could predict hematoma expansion. The spot sign observed on computed tomography angiography is believed to represent on-going bleeding and is to date the most well investigated and reliable radiological predictor of hematoma expansion as well as functional outcome and mortality. On non-contrast CT, the presence of foci of hypoattenuation within the hematoma along with the hematoma-size is reported to be predictive of hematoma expansion and outcome. Because patients tend to arrive earlier to the hospital, a larger fraction of acute ICH-patients must be expected to undergo hematoma expansion. This renders observation and radiological follow-up investigations increasingly relevant. Transcranial duplex sonography has in recent years proven to be able to estimate hematoma volume with good precision and could be a valuable tool in bedside serial observation of acute ICH-patients. Future studies will elucidate, if better prediction and observation of post-admission hematoma expansion can help select patients, who will benefit from hemostatic treatment. PMID:25324825

  16. Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematomas. MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Baumgartner, R.W.; Zambaz, B.D.; Remonda, L.; Ozdoba, C.; Schroth, G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare clinical entity with a bleak outcome. The aim of our study was to establish the value of MR findings in the diagnosis of nontraumatic SEH. Material and Methods: Seven patients with nontraumatic SEH were examined by MR at 1.5 T. Two patients were under anticoagulation therapy with heparin, and 2 others were taking salicylic acid. One patient had lupus erythematodes with a marked thrombocytopenia. One patient had a spinal arteriovenous malformation. Results: MR imaging permitted the accurate localization of extradural intraspinal expansive lesions which exhibited the characteristic signal intensities of blood. Five patients underwent laminectomy and evacuation of the hematoma. In the acute phase, the hematomas appeared isointense when compared with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Later the hematomas were hyperintense on T1-weighted images and showed signals identical to those of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: MR imaging established the exact diagnosis and localization of SEH in all cases. MR also can provide useful information about the age of the hematomas. (orig.)

  17. Traumatic epidural retroclival hematoma with odontoid fracture and cardiorespiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bovet, J; Garcia-Armengol, R; Martín Ferrer, S

    2013-12-01

    Case report. To describe a case or traumatic retroclival hematoma with features not previously reported. Single center. Description of a case, in the context of relevant literature on the subject. Traumatic retroclival hematomas are a rare, typically pediatric, entity. Only four cases of epidural hematoma in adult patients have been reported. We describe an additional case, the first with a fatal course in the acute setting. It is also the first retroclival hematoma associated to an odontoid base fracture. Retroclival hematomas are a rare diagnosis, to be considered in pediatric patients with flexion-extension, high-energy injuries. Morphology is typically epidural. Brain stem and cranial nerve symptoms are typical. Treatment is usually conservative. Outcome is regarded as favorable, with partial recovery and neurologic sequelae. Adult cases are extremely rare. The case we describe adds new characteristics to the scarcity of cases.

  18. Calcified epidural hematoma in pediatric age group: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of calcified (ossified chronic epidural hematoma developed in a six-and-a-half-year-old female patient who was operated for cerebellar astrocytoma 6 months earlier. There was no history of trauma. Ossified epidural hematoma was seen as an incidental finding in the follow-up in computed tomography scan after 6 months of primary glioma surgery. Ossified chronic epidural hematoma with thick collagenous wall and newly formed bone on dura was excised. The development of calcified chronic subdural hematoma after decompressive intracranial surgery is a well-known occurrence, but the fact that a calcified epidural hematoma, which is rare and which can also develop after decompressive surgery, and the occurrence of calcified (ossified epidural hematoma after postfossa a glioma surgery is not yet reported. The second case is a 9-year-old male anemic child with a history of fall while playing 5 months earlier who presented with headache of 3 months duration. He had bifrontal calcified epidural hematoma operated by craniotomy and excision of calcified dural edge.

  19. Rapid enlargement of subdural haematoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavani R

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of subdural haematoma (SDH having atypical features (headache, vomiting, drowsiness but normal haematological and metabolic parameters and no localising neurological signs is reported. The SDH rapidly enlarged and liquefied in five days as evident on computerised tomographic (CT scan and operative findings. Rapid improvement was observed following this. Abnormally excessive fibrinolytic activity in the SDH is a possible cause.

  20. Hidroma subdural na fossa posterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Vasques

    1970-03-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam um caso de hidroma subdural na fossa craniana posterior conseqüente a traumatismo na região occipital. O paciente foi operado com pleno sucesso. A raridade da localização de hidroma na fossa posterior é salientada, sendo discutidos os possíveis mecanismos etio-patogênicos.

  1. First report of hepatic hematoma after presumed Bothrops envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Cristina Cunha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn Latin America, Bothrops envenomation is responsible for the majority of accidents caused by venomous snakes. Patients usually present local edema, bleeding and coagulopathy. Visceral hemorrhage is extremely rare and considered a challenge for diagnosis and management. We report the first case of hepatic hematoma owing to the bothropic envenomation in a 66-year-old man who was bitten in the left leg. He presented local edema, coagulopathy, and acute kidney injury. Radiological findings suggested hepatic hematoma, with a volume of almost 3 liters. The hepatic hematoma was gradually absorbed without the need for surgical intervention with complete resolution in 8 months.

  2. Intramural Hematoma of the Esophagus Complicating Severe Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Garzon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramural hematoma of the esophagus is a rare injury causing esophageal mucosal dissection. Forceful vomiting and coagulopathy are common underlying causes in the elderly population taking antiplatelets or anticoagulation agents. Acute retrosternal pain followed by hematemesis and dysphagia differentiates the hematoma from other cardiac or thoracic emergencies, including acute myocardial infarction or aortic dissection. Direct inspection by endoscopy is useful, but chest computed tomography best assesses the degree of obliteration of the lumen and excludes other differential diagnoses. Intramural hematoma of the esophagus is generally benign and most patients recover fully with conservative treatment. Bleeding can be managed medically unless in hemodynamically unstable patients, for whom surgical or angiographic treatment may be attempted; only rarely esophageal obstruction requires endoscopic decompression. We report an unusual case of esophageal hematoma, presenting in a young preeclamptic woman after surgical delivery of a preterm twin pregnancy, with a favorable outcome following medical management.

  3. Quantitative estimation of a ratio of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid volume to brain volume based on segmentation of CT images in patients with extra-axial hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Kurpad, Shekar; Mueller, Wade

    2017-02-01

    Background Diminishing volume of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with space-occupying masses have been attributed to unfavorable outcome associated with reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure and subsequent brain ischemia. Objective The objective of this article is to employ a ratio of CSF volume to brain volume for longitudinal assessment of space-volume relationships in patients with extra-axial hematoma and to determine variability of the ratio among patients with different types and stages of hematoma. Patients and methods In our retrospective study, we reviewed 113 patients with surgical extra-axial hematomas. We included 28 patients (age 61.7 +/- 17.7 years; 19 males, nine females) with an acute epidural hematoma (EDH) ( n = 5) and subacute/chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) ( n = 23). We excluded 85 patients, in order, due to acute SDH ( n = 76), concurrent intraparenchymal pathology ( n = 6), and bilateral pathology ( n = 3). Noncontrast CT images of the head were obtained using a CT scanner (2004 GE LightSpeed VCT CT system, tube voltage 140 kVp, tube current 310 mA, 5 mm section thickness) preoperatively, postoperatively (3.8 ± 5.8 hours from surgery), and at follow-up clinic visit (48.2 ± 27.7 days after surgery). Each CT scan was loaded into an OsiriX (Pixmeo, Switzerland) workstation to segment pixels based on radiodensity properties measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Based on HU values from -30 to 100, brain, CSF spaces, vascular structures, hematoma, and/or postsurgical fluid were segregated from bony structures, and subsequently hematoma and/or postsurgical fluid were manually selected and removed from the images. The remaining images represented overall brain volume-containing only CSF spaces, vascular structures, and brain parenchyma. Thereafter, the ratio between the total number of voxels representing CSF volume (based on values between 0 and 15 HU) to the total number of voxels

  4. Treatment of a subdural empyema complicated by intracerebral abscess due to Brucella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    Full Text Available A 55-year-old male presented with fever, stupor, aphasia, and left hemiparesis. A history of head trauma 3 months before was also reported. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed slight contrast enhancement of lesions under the right frontal skull plate and right frontal lobe. Because of deterioration in nutritional status and intracranial hypertension, the patient was prepared for burr hole surgery. A subdural empyema (SDE recurred after simple drainage. After detection of Brucella species in SDE, craniotomy combined with antibiotic treatment was undertaken. The patient received antibiotic therapy for 6 months (two doses of 2 g ceftriaxone, two doses of 100 mg doxycycline, and 700 mg rifapentine for 6 months that resulted in complete cure of the infection. Thus, it was speculated that the preexisting subdural hematoma was formed after head trauma, which was followed by a hematogenous infection caused by Brucella species.

  5. Chronic spinal subdural haematoma associated with intracranial subdural haematoma: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillich, M.; Kammerhuber, F.; Reittner, P.; Szolar, D.H.; Leber, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic spinal subdural haematoma is a uncommon. We describe the CT and MRI appearances of chronic spinal and intracranial subdural haematomas following minor trauma. The aetiology, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Chronic Encapsulated Expanding Thalamic Hematoma Associated with Obstructive Hydrocephalus following Radiosurgery for a Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic encapsulated intracerebral hematoma is a unique type of intracerebral hematoma accompanied by a capsule that is abundant in fragile microvasculature occasionally causing delayed regrowth. A 37-year-old man who had undergone radiosurgery for an arteriovenous malformation (AVM causing intracerebral hematoma in the left parietal lobe presented with headache, vomiting, and progressive truncal ataxia due to a cystic lesion that had been noted in the left thalamus, leading to progressive obstructive hydrocephalus. He underwent left frontal craniotomy via a transsylvian fissure approach, and the serous hematoma was aspirated. The hematoma capsule was easy to drain and was partially removed. Pathological findings demonstrated angiomatous fibroblastic granulation tissue with extensive macrophage invasion. The concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was high in the hematoma (12012 pg/mL. The etiology and pathogenesis of encapsulated hematoma are unclear, but the gross appearance and pathological findings are similar to those of chronic subdural hematoma. Based on the high concentration of VEGF in the hematoma, expansion of the encapsulated hematoma might have been caused by the promotion of vascular permeability of newly formed microvasculature in the capsule.

  7. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the early stages it typically presents as generalized abdominal pain, nausea, anorexia. The symptoms and signs of hypovolemic shock normally present late. As management of idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma is usually conservative, early diagnosis can save the patient an unnecessary exploration. This will improve.

  8. MRI of subdural fluid collections in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Tsuneyuki; Takagi, Takuji; Nagai, Hajime; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    Twenty cases of subdural fluid collectioin in infants were examined by MRI (0.5 Tesla). The findings of MRI were classified into 3 groups as follows: Group I: Blood component is observed in the entire subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group II: Blood component is observed in a part of the subdural fluid (4 cases, 20 %). Group III: Subdural fluid consists of pure CSF (12 cases, 60 %). In general, operative treatment should be considered for cases which have blood components in the subdural space and/or symptoms and signs of increased ICP. In group I, operation was performed on 2 cases (50 %). In group II, subdural fluid collections were associated with dilated subarachnoid spaces and 2 cases were operated on in this group (50 %). In group III, only one case was operated on (8.3 %) and subdural fluid collections disappeared spontaneously in 4 cases of this group. The precise anatomical location of subdural fluid collections could not be decided in several cases even by MRI. The cases which had blood components, tended to demonstrate membranes frequently on MRI. However, the existence of blood components did not affect the DQ S significantly. The prognosis of subdural fluid collection is supposedly related to the degree of preexistent brain damage. (author)

  9. The False Falx and Tentorium Sign: Case Report of Subdural Haematoma and Sickle Cells Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvis-Miranda Hernando Raphael

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increased density in the basal cisterns and the subarachnoid space on CT scans is a well-known characteristic of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Have been described diverse conditions that can emulate subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as purulent leptomeningitis, intrathecal contrast material and leak of high doses of intravenous contrast material to the subarachnoid space. We present the case of a male patient who presented a subdural hematoma in the setting of non-diagnosed sickle cell disease. To this patient was performed a panangiography which discard any aneurismal hemorrhage origin

  10. Expanding refractory rectus sheath hematoma: a therapeutic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Guo-Shiang; Liau, Guo-Shiou; Shyu, Hann-Yeh; Chu, Shi-Jye; Ko, Fu-Chang; Wu, Kuo-An

    2012-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon but well-described complication of a tussive paroxysm. It is an accumulation of blood within the sheath of the rectus abdominis secondary to disruption of the epigastric vessels or the rectus muscle and is often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen. Increases in the number of elderly patients and the use of therapeutic anticoagulation may increase the prevalence and severity of rectus sheath hematomas encountered in clinical practice. Expanding rectus sheath hematomas are occasionally refractory to conservative treatment and may require hemostatic intervention. Here, we describe the case of an 87-year-old woman who presented with two separate rectus sheath hematomas that were precipitated by a paroxysm of coughing. Repeated computed tomography showed two separate expanding rectus sheath hematomas, which were not accompanied by obvious contrast extravasation on angiography. Empiric left inferior epigastric artery embolization resulted in rapid hemodynamic stabilization, and the hematomas shrank gradually. Early empiric transcatheter arterial embolization may be appropriate for patients who are poor surgical candidates and have enlarging hematomas that are refractory to conservative treatment.

  11. Delayed intracranial hematoma following stereoelectroencephalography for intractable epilepsy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrey, Stéphane; Lebas, Axel; Parain, Dominique; Baray, Marie Gilles; Marguet, Christophe; Freger, Pierre; Proust, François

    2012-12-01

    Intracranial bleeding following stereoelectroencephalography (sEEG) is rare and commonly occurs early after electrode implantation. The authors report the case of a delayed intracranial hematoma following sEEG. This 10-year-old boy was referred to the authors' department to undergo an sEEG study for intractable epilepsy, with the hypothesis of a single localized epileptic zone in the left precentral region. To perform the exploration, 14 depth electrodes were implanted under stereotactic conditions. The results of a postoperative CT scan performed routinely at the end of the surgical procedure were normal. Eight days later, following an epileptic seizure, the child's condition worsened. The neurological examination revealed a left hemiparesis, agitation, and coma due to a right subdural hematoma with intraparenchymal bleeding. Despite a surgical evacuation followed by a decompressive craniectomy, the curative treatments were stopped 1 week later due to severe diffuse ischemic lesions found on MRI studies. This is the first observation of a delayed hematoma following an sEEG procedure. The mechanism underlying this complication remains unclear, but the rupture of a growing pseudoaneurysm caused by the electrode's implantation or the tearing of a neighboring vessel by an electrode were suspected. In consequence, physicians must remain vigilant during the entire sEEG recording period and probably also several days after electrode removal.

  12. Chronic subdural haematoma complicating spinal anaesthesia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural haematoma is a rare but serious complication of dural puncture. We report a case of chronic subdural haematoma, which occurred following spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section. A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with a post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anaesthesia.

  13. [Neonatal adrenal hematoma: various modes of presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadil, F-Z; Lehlimi, M; Chemsi, M; Habzi, A; Benomar, S

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal adrenal hematoma is a rare condition, most frequently caused by trauma. We report three cases of adrenal hematoma admitted to the Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the A. Harouchi Children's Hospital, the Ibn Rushd University Hospital in Casablanca, Morocco, over a 2-year period from January 2011 to December 2012. The average age of these patients was 5 days. The clinical presentations were diverse; the most common manifestations were intense jaundice in one case, acute adrenal insufficiency in one case, and severe anemia in the other case. Abdominal ultrasonography was used to confirm the diagnosis and monitor adrenal hemorrhage in all the patients. Analysis of clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonography data showed a favorable prognosis in all the patients. Based on these observations, we discuss the risk factors, clinical presentations, progression and management of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Hematoma Locations Predicting Delirium Symptoms After Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidech, Andrew M; Polnaszek, Kelly L; Berman, Michael D; Voss, Joel L

    2016-06-01

    Delirium symptoms are associated with later worse functional outcomes and long-term cognitive impairments, but the neuroanatomical basis for delirium symptoms in patients with acute brain injury is currently uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that hematoma location is predictive of delirium symptoms in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, a model disease where patients are typically not sedated or bacteremic. We prospectively identified 90 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage who underwent routine twice-daily screening for delirium symptoms with a validated examination. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping with acute computed tomography was used to identify hematoma locations associated with delirium symptoms (N = 89). Acute delirium symptoms were predicted by hematoma of right-hemisphere subcortical white matter (superior longitudinal fasciculus) and parahippocampal gyrus. Hematoma including these locations had an odds ratio for delirium of 13 (95 % CI 3.9-43.3, P delirium symptoms. Higher odds ratio for delirium was increased due to hematoma location. The location of neurological injury could be of high prognostic value for predicting delirium symptoms.

  15. [Incidence and clinical impact of seizures after surgery for chronic subdural haematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, F; Lubrano, V; Ribeiro-Filho, T; Pradel, V; Roche, P-H

    2012-08-01

    Seizures can occur in patients who have surgery for a chronic subdural hematoma. However, the incidence of seizures and their impact on the clinical course of patients in the perioperative period is not well known. In this retrospective study, we reviewed 161 cases of patients treated for chronic subdural hematoma in our institution. The surgical procedures consisted in trephine craniotomy in 156 cases, burr-hole craniotomy in three cases, and bone flap craniotomy in two cases. All the patients had systematic antiepileptic drug prophylaxis. In our patients' population, the incidence of seizures was 10.6% before surgery and 14.9% after surgery. Low initial score on the Glasgow Coma Scale (Pcognitive impairment (P=0.005) were associated with a higher rate of postoperative seizures. In our study, the mortality rate was 14.9%. Low initial score on the Glasgow Coma Scale (P=0.068) and postoperative seizures (P=0.002) were associated with a higher mortality rate. We have shown that patients suffering from seizures may have worse outcome. The benefit of a systematic perioperative prophylaxis using antiepileptic drugs has to be evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Subdural injection: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid-Puentes, Adriana

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two cases are reported of accidental subdural injection during epidural procedures for pain control. The first one was a man with chronic lumbar pain who suffered such complication during an epidural injection of steroids using the interlaminar approach. The second one was a woman with intracranial hypotension syndrome who required the application of an epidural blood patch in order to control multiple CSF fistulae. The procedure had to be aborted twice due to the subdural pattern observed after injection of the contrast medium. Accidental subdural block is a rare complication of epidural injection for analgesic or anesthetic procedures.

  17. Decompressive Craniectomy for Acute Subdual Haematoma with Expansile Duraplasty Versus Dura-Slits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, B.; Afridi, E. A. K.; Khan, S. A.; Aurangzeb, A.; Khan, A. A.; Khan, W.; Bhatti, S. N.; Khan, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic subdural hematoma is one of the lethal injuries to brain. Various surgical techniques are used to evacuate the acute subdural hematoma. The hematoma evacuation can either be done by opening of dura by multiple slits or by opening of dura in single large c shape and then doing the expansile duraplasty. Present study aimed to compare both these techniques. Methods: This randomized control study was conducted in department of neurosurgery, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from July 2011 to July 2013. A total of 59 patients were included in this study, which were randomly allocated in two groups (i.e., group A and group B) for decompressive craniectomy. Thirty-one patients were operated by craniectomy with full dural flap opening (Group A), and 28 patients were operated by craniectomy with multidural-slits (Group B). Glasgow Outcome score (GOS) at 6 weeks after the surgery was used to determine the outcome. Results: Mean age of the patients was 33.4±12.8 years. Majority were males. In group A 51.6 percent (16) of the patients survived out of which a favourable outcome (GOC 3-5) was observed in 41.9 percent of the patients, and 9.1 percent of patients ended up in vegetative state. While in group B 46.4 percent (13) of the patients survived among which favourable outcome was seen in 39.3 percent of patients and 7.1 percent of patients ended up in vegetative state. The difference in outcome measure is insignificant. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference among the two groups as regards the mortality, GOS, frequency of complications and hospital. While the duration of surgery was significantly shorter in patients operated with dural slits. (author)

  18. MR imaging of hyperacute intracranial hematomas; Utility of gradient-recalled-echo on 0. 5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Takahiko; Nishino, Shigeki; Tsuchida, Shouhei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira (Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Akioka, Tatsurou; Sano, Masao

    1990-10-01

    A modification of the gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) pulse sequence, which we called hematoma sensitive GRE, was compared with CT and spin-echo (SE) MR images for patients suffering from parenchymal hemorrhage in the hyperacute stage (within 6 hours). In the hyperacute stage, CT was most sensitive to hematoma, and hematomas were visualized more clearly on GRE than SE. Hematomas and the surrounding tissues were almost isointense relative to white matter on T{sub 1}-weighted images (WI), and hyperintense on T{sub 2}-WI of SE. But they were visualized at different intensity from each other on GRE. Hematomas were hyperintense including hypointensity, and plasma was more hyperintense (similar to cerebrospinal fluid), and edematous tissue was slightly hyperintense relative to white matter. The changes of tissue surrounding hematoma were not detected on CT. Hematomas were iso- or hyperintense on SE in the acue stage, and were slightly hyperintense including hypointense areas with a surrounding hypointense rim on GRE. The change of intensity of hematoma was delayed on GRE compared to SE. This phenomenon was caused by lack of sensitivity to the intracellular methemoglobin. Thus it is possible to visualize the contents of hematoma on GRE in the acute stage. (author).

  19. Contralateral delayed epidural hematoma following intracerebral hematoma surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomiichuk, Volodymyr O.; Drizhdov, Konstantin I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Delayed epidural hematoma (EDH) is an uncommon finding in patients after intracranial hematomas evacuation. It occurs in 6.7-7.4% of cases. A total of 29 reports were found in literature. Between them were no cases of delayed contralateral EDH after intracerebral hematoma evacuation. Case Description: This paper represents a clinical case of a 28-year-old male patient with opened penetrating head injury, who underwent left frontal lobe intracerebral hematoma evacuation and one day later a contralateral EDH was found and successfully surgically treated. Conclusion: Contralateral EDH is a life-threatening neurosurgical emergency case, which can occur during first 24 hours after decompressive craniectomy. Control CT scans must be performed next day after the operation to verify and treat contralateral EDH timely. PMID:24233058

  20. Clinical analysis of surgical treatment of traumatic hematomas of the posterior cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenhua; Zhou Youxin; Zhu Fengqing; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical features and surgical outcome of the traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa. Methods: Fifteen patients with traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa in authors' hospital during the period from 1995 to 1998 were reviewed. Results: Thirteen patients had an occipital skull fracture, 11 pure epidural hematomas among whom 4 had cerebellar contusion and hematomas 4 posterior cranial fossa hematoma with associated cerebral hematoma or contusion, and 5 acute hydrocephalus. Fifteen patients were treated by emergency surgery, 9 had good recovery and 1 had severe disability in GCS between 9 and 15 marking, 1 had good recovery, 1 had severe disability and 3 died in GCS between 3 and 8. Nine patients had good recovery in 11 patient having pure epidural hematoma of posterior cranial fossa. Conclusions: The clinical course of the traumatic hematomas posterior cranial fossa was acute and severe. The GCS value below 9 predicts the poor out-come for patients. Early diagnosis and appropriately and promptly treatment are crucial for achieving good results

  1. Spontaneous retropharynegeal hematoma: A case report and literature overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ji Hwa

    2014-01-01

    A spontaneous retropharyngeal hematoma is a rare condition with a difficult diagnostic. This disease may rapidly progress to an airway obstruction. The author reports about a case of a 56-year-old man with an acute onset of sore throat, dysphonia and dyspnea. A retropharyngeal high attenuated soft tissue density could be seen on the neck CT. A rapid improvement of the retropharyngeal abnormality was seen on the 3 days follow-up MR imaging. Signal changes caused by blood products which were visible on the MRI images suggested the diagnosis of retropharyngeal hematoma. The patient was conservatively managed.

  2. Spontaneous retropharynegeal hematoma: A case report and literature overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ji Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A spontaneous retropharyngeal hematoma is a rare condition with a difficult diagnostic. This disease may rapidly progress to an airway obstruction. The author reports about a case of a 56-year-old man with an acute onset of sore throat, dysphonia and dyspnea. A retropharyngeal high attenuated soft tissue density could be seen on the neck CT. A rapid improvement of the retropharyngeal abnormality was seen on the 3 days follow-up MR imaging. Signal changes caused by blood products which were visible on the MRI images suggested the diagnosis of retropharyngeal hematoma. The patient was conservatively managed.

  3. Rectus sheath hematoma of the abdomen. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena-Tovar, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma in the vast number of cases is due to an inferior epigastric artery tear occasionally due to trauma (not considered serious) or alterations in coagulation or use of anticoagulant therapy. It is an unlikely and difficult to diagnose pathology. We present the case of a 61-year-old female patient. The patient presented in emergency service with sudden abdominal pain caused by coughing as a result of an upper respiratory tract infection. The culmination was a spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. Rectus sheath hematoma is a diagnosis to consider in a previously asymptomatic patient who presents with clinical features of acute pain and appearance of increase of volume in the abdominal wall involving the rectus muscles.

  4. Role of antithrombotic therapy in the risk of hematoma recurrence and thromboembolism after chronic subdural hematoma evacuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornebo, Ida; Sjåvik, Kristin; Alibeck, Mark

    2017-01-01

    January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2010, at the Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Early AT resumption was ≤30 days and late >30 days after the procedure. RESULTS: A total of 308/763 (40.4%) cSDH patients were on AT treatment at the time of diagnosis. There was no difference in c...

  5. Surgical management of intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsementzis, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional and recent developments in the management of spontaneous intracranial hematomas are reviewed. A comprehensive account of the epidemiological characteristics worldwide with an etiological analysis including prevention and prophylaxis introduce the size and clinical significance of this neurological problem. The usefulness and limitations of the available diagnostic methods are described. Most of the emphasis, however, is placed on the management and medicosurgical treatment of intracranial hematomas in correlation with their clinical presentation and localization. 80 references

  6. Subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction and upper cervical spine after traumatic cerebral contusion: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Moriconi, Elisa; Gladi, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolò; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hematoma (SSH) is a rare condition, more commonly occurring after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or anesthesiological procedures. It has also been observed after traumatic events, in patients under anticoagulation therapy or in case of arteriovenous malformation rupture. In a very small number of cases no causative agent can be identified and a diagnosis of spontaneous SSH is established. The lumbar and thoracic spine are the most frequently involved segments and only seven cases of cervical spine SSH have been described until now. Differential diagnosis between subdural and subarachnoid hematoma is complex because the common neuroradiological investigations, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not enough sensitive to exactly define clot location. Actually, confirmation of the subarachnoid location of bleeding is obtained at surgery, which is necessary to resolve the fast and sometimes dramatic evolution of clinical symptoms. Nonetheless, there are occasional reports on successful conservative treatment of these lesions. We present a peculiar case of subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction, developing after the rupture of a right temporal lobe contusion within the adjacent arachnoidal spaces and the following clot migration along the right lateral aspect of the foramen magnum and the upper cervical spine, causing severe neurological impairment. After surgical removal of the hematoma, significant symptom improvement was observed.

  7. Spontaneous Esophageal Injury: Esophageal Intramural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hui Chiu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute chest pain can indicate a life-threatening condition and it is important for physicians to diagnose and treat it as a matter of urgency. We report 1 rare case of esophageal intramural hematoma (IMH that presented with chest pain at the emergency department and which was initially clinically suspected to be due to aortic dissection. The case was diagnosed preoperatively by multidetector computed tomography. Esophageal IMH may represent an intermediate stage between Mallory-Weiss tear (mucosal and Boerhaave's syndrome (transmural. Multidetector computed tomography is a useful noninvasive imaging modality for accurate diagnosis of these spontaneous intramural and transmural ruptures of the esophagus, and aids in the differential diagnosis of aortic and other mediastinal diseases with acute chest pain.

  8. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  9. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Abe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe abdominal pain in a flank distribution. A large mass was palpable in the right upper quadrant on physical examination. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a well-defined, right-sided, retroperitoneal cystic lesion located between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava (IVC. The tumor size was 55 × 58 mm, and it compressed the gallbladder and the duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal radiography revealed a stricture of the second portion of the duodenum by the tumor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that the whole part was hyperintense with hypointense rims, but the inner was partially hypointense. Based on the radiological findings, the preoperative differential diagnosis included retroperitoneal teratoma, Schwannoma, abscess, and primary retroperitoneal tumor. On laparotomy, the tumor was located in the right retroperitoneal cavity. Kocher maneuver and medial visceral rotation, which consists of medial reflection of the upper part of right colon and duodenum by incising their lateral peritoneal attachments, were performed. Although a slight adhesion to the IVC was detected, the tumor was removed safely. Thin-section histopathology examination detected neither tumor tissues nor any tissues such as adrenal gland, ovarian tissue, or endometrial implants. The final pathological diagnosis was idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma; the origin of the bleeding was unclear. The patient was discharged without any complication 5 days after the operation.

  10. Hemiparesis Caused by Cervical Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma: A Report of 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinya Nakanishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH with hemiparesis. The first patient was a 73-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis, neck pain, and left shoulder pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C3–C6 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The second patient was a 62-year-old man who presented with right hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a right posterolateral dominant epidural hematoma at the C6-T1 level. The condition of the patient improved after laminectomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. The third patient was a 60-year-old woman who presented with left hemiparesis and neck pain. A cervical MRI scan revealed a left posterolateral epidural hematoma at the C2–C4 level. The condition of the patient improved with conservative treatment. The classical clinical presentation of SSEH is acute onset of severe irradiating back pain followed by progression to paralysis, whereas SSEH with hemiparesis is less common. Our cases suggest that acute cervical spinal epidural hematoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with clinical symptoms of sudden neck pain and radicular pain with progression to hemiparesis.

  11. Epidural hematomas of posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Danilo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior fossa epidural hematomas represent 7-14% of all traumatic intracranial epidural hematomas. They are most frequently encountered posttraumatic mass lesions in the posterior fossa. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features that could lead to the early diagnosis of posterior fossa epidural hematoma. Methods. Between 1980 and 2002, 28 patients with epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa were operated on at the Institute for Neurosurgery, Belgrade. Clinical course neuroradiological investigations, and the results of surgical treatment of the patients with posterior fossa epidural hematomas were analyzed retrospectively. Results. Almost two thirds of patients were younger than 16 years of age. In 20 cases injury was caused by a fall, in 6 cases by a traffic accident, and in 2 by the assault. Clinical course was subacute or chronic in two thirds of the patients. On the admission Glasgow Coma Scale was 7 or less in 9 injured, 8-14 in 14 injured, and 15 in 5 injured patients. Linear fracture of the occipital bone was radiographically evident in 19 patients, but was intraoperatively encountered in all the patients except for a 4-year old child. In 25 patients the diagnosis was established by computer assisted tomography (CAT and in 3 by vertebral angiography. All the patients were operated on via suboccipital craniotomy. Four injured patients who were preoperatively comatose were with lethal outcome. Postoperatively, 24 patients were with sufficient neurologic recovery. Conclusion. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma should be suspected in cases of occipital injury, consciousness disturbances, and occipital bone fracture. In such cases urgent CAT-scan is recommended. Early recognition early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are crucial for good neurological recovery after surgery.

  12. MRI of subacute intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Hideo

    1990-01-01

    Subacute hematomas consisting of intracellular methemoglobin (MetHb) become hypointense on T 2 weighted spin-echo (SE) images using high-field magnetic resonance. This effect results from diffusion of proton through local field gradients created by MetHb and is called preferential T 2 proton relaxation enhancement (PT2PRE). Gradient-echo acquisition (GEA) can depict hematomas to be more hypointense, because the acquisition is sensitive to field inhomogeneity. In this paper, the difference between SE and GEA images of subacute hematomas was studied experimentally using intracellular MetHb suspension. Although T 2 * decay curves were expected to decline faster than T 2 decay curves, no significant differences were observed between them. This result suggests that PT2PRE cannot be increased significantly by GEA. T 2 obtained with multiple-echo technique is generally inaccurate and smaller than T 2 obtained with single-echo techqnie, but the results showed in a case of intracellular MetHb they were almost similar. This is because mutiple 180deg pulses partly correct the dephasing of proton resulting from its diffusion. As contrast of hematomas is dependent on differences of signal intensities between hematomas and surrounding tissues, it means that multiple-echo technique depicts the lesion less conspicuously than single-echo technique and GEA. GEA images (TR=200 msec/TE=15 msec) showed hypointense rim (boundary effect) at the margin of intracellular MetHb suspension with a hematocrit of larger than 30%, and with TE of 40 msec boundary effect could be seen even at a hematocrit of 15%. On the contrary, SE images (TR=2500 msec/TE=80 msec) hardly showed boundary effect. In conclusion, GEA can depict subacute hematomas to be more hypointense than SE using multiple-echo, because multiple 180deg pulses are not used and boundary effect is present. (author)

  13. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  14. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  15. MR imaging of experimental subdural bleeding. Correlates of brain deformation and tissue water content, and changes in vital physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlin, J.R.; Thuomas, K.Aa.; Ponten, U.; Bergstroem, K.; Zwetnow, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate morphological and physiological changes during acute lethal subdural bleeding in 2 models of anaesthetized dogs. Material and Methods: In model I, blood from the aorta was led into a collapsed subdural rubber balloon while in model II, the blood was directed into the subdural compartment over the left cerebral frontoparietal lobe. Eight vital physiological parameters were continuously registered. MR imaging visualized the compression and displacement of cerebral tissue, and assessed the dynamic changes in cerebral tissue water. Results: In model I, tissue herniation and compression of cerebral ventricles led to death at a haematoma volume corresponding to 8% of the intracranial volume. In model II, the extravasated blood progressed infratentorially and into the spinal sac with a volume that was 3 times larger than that of the lethal haematoma. Tissue water increased almost linearly during bleeding in both models. (orig.)

  16. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  17. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  18. Subdural Empyema: Clinical Presentations and Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural Empyema: Clinical Presentations and Management Options for an Uncommon Neurosurgical Emergency in a Developing Country. MC Chikani, W Mezue, E Okorie, C Mbachu1, C Ndubisi2, UN Chikani3. Address for correspondence: Dr. MC Chikani,. Neurosurgery Unit, Surgery Department, College of Medicine,.

  19. [Subdural hygroma after falling down a staircase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, M.C. van der; Lammers, G.J.; Buchem, M.A. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2007-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted because of head trauma following a fall down a staircase. Initial CT-imaging of the brain showed only global atrophy, but repeated CT-imaging 4 days later revealed a subdural hygroma. Because of the discrepancy between the radiological deterioration and the unchanged

  20. Conservative vs. Surgical Management of Post-Traumatic Epidural Hematoma: A Case and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Anderson, David Greg; Graziano, Francesca; Meccio, Flavia; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 30 Final Diagnosis: Acute epidural hematoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Observation Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Trauma is the leading cause of death in people younger than 45 years and head injury is the main cause of trauma mortality. Although epidural hematomas are relatively uncommon (less than 1% of all patients with head injuries and fewer than 10% of those who are comatose), they should always be considered in evaluation of a serious head injury. Patients with epidural hematomas who meet surgical criteria and receive prompt surgical intervention can have an excellent prognosis, presumably owing to limited underlying primary brain damage from the traumatic event. The decision to perform a surgery in a patient with a traumatic extraaxial hematoma is dependent on several factors (neurological status, size of hematoma, age of patients, CT findings) but also may depend on the judgement of the treating neurosurgeon. Case Report: A 30-year old man arrived at our Emergency Department after a traumatic brain injury. General examination revealed severe headache, no motor or sensory disturbances, and no clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. A CT scan documented a significant left fronto-parietal epidural hematoma, which was considered suitable for surgical evacuation. The patient refused surgery. Following CT scan revealed a minimal increase in the size of the hematoma and of midline shift. The neurologic examination maintained stable and the patient continued to refuse the surgical treatment. Next follow up CT scans demonstrated a progressive resorption of hematoma. Conclusions: We report an unusual case of a remarkable epidural hematoma managed conservatively with a favorable clinical outcome. This case report is intended to rather add to the growing knowledge regarding the best management for this serious and acute pathology. PMID:26567227

  1. Auricular hematoma cases caused by mobile phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil E. Özel, MD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report auricular hematoma cases caused by mobile phones. A 32-year-old male and a 23-year-old female presented with auricular hematoma, having no significant histories of trauma. The patients underwent simple hematoma aspiration. Hematoma re-accumulated in the first case. Incision and drainage were performed, and then auricular skin was stabilized by suturing a gauze pad over the area. Both patients recovered without sequelae after treatment. Judging from these cases, we want to postulate that prolonged mobile phone use may cause auricular hematoma.

  2. Spontaneous Cervical Epidural Hematoma with Hemiparesis Mimicking Cerebral Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Tiryaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH is defined as an epidural hematoma that does not have an etiological explanation. The most common site for SCEH is cervicothoracic area. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for prognosis and good results. In this paper, we aimed to present a case who complains of sudden weakness on right extremities imitating cerebral stroke and that neuroimaging reveals spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. Case. A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with acute neck pain and loss of strength on right extremities. On neurological examination, the patient had right hemiparesis. PT, aPTT, and INR results were 50.5, 42.8, and 4.8, respectively. Cranial MRI was in normal limits. Spinal MRI revealed a lesion that extends from C4 to C7 located on the right side and compatible with epidural hematoma. The patient was operated after normalization of INR values. Conclusion. Even though SCEH is a rare condition, it can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment are quiet important for prognosis. SCEH can easily be mistaken for stroke as with other pathologies and this diagnosis should come to mind especially in patients who have diathesis of bleeding.

  3. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  4. Assessment of InfraScanner 2000™ in Detecting Subdural and Epidural Hematomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-03

    Head Trauma; Craniocerebral Injuries; Crushing Skull Injury; Head Injuries; Head Injuries, Multiple; Head Injuries, Closed; Head Trauma,Closed; Head Trauma Injury; Head Trauma, Penetrating; Head Injury, Minor; Head Injury Major; Head Injury, Open; Injuries, Craniocerebral; Injuries, Head; Multiple Head Injury; Trauma, Head

  5. Large coronary intramural hematomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2015-01-01

    coronary vessel wall pathology, with poorly understood underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Affected individuals may present with a broad spectrum of symptoms ranging from acute coronary syndromes (ACS) to cardiogenic shock or even sudden cardiac death. The disease entity causes challenges in terms of both......, no randomized, controlled trials exist to guide treatment, and no consensus regarding management is available. Currently, treatment strategies are based on a case-by-case clinical assessment, and experiences described in previous, limited retrospective studies and case reports....

  6. CT findings of falical and tentorial subdural hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Keun; Jung, Nam Keun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography has been established as an indispensable tool in the detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Extra axial fluid collections are usually easily distinguished from intracerebral hemorrhages. However, hemorrhages in atypical locations, such as in falx and tentorial regions, can be difficult to diagnose with CT. The tentorial and falcial collection of subdural blood are rather unusual. Authors report here 84 cases of falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhages with reference data that we have encountered in the last two years. The results were as follows; 1. In 589 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, the incidence of subdural hemorrhage was 372 cases (63.2%). 2. Among 372 cases with subdural hemorrhage, 84 cases (22.6%) had falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage. In 84 cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there were 50 cases (13.4%) of falcial subdural hemorrhages, 21 cases (5.7%) of tentorial subdural hemorrhage and 13 cases (3.5%) of combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage. 3. The location of falcial subdural hemorrhage was anterior in 30 cases (60%), posterior in 15 cases (30%) and middle in 5 cases (10%). 4. The location of tentorial subdural hemorrhage was petrous edge in 7 cases (33.3%), occipital attachment in 6 cases (28.6%), tentorial hiatus in 5 cases (23.8%), and diffuse in 3 cases (14.3%). 5. In 13 cases showing combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there was 3 cases (23.1%) of posterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases (15.4%) of anterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of anterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases of posterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of posterior falx and occipital attachment, 1 case (7.7%) of posterior falx and diffuse, and 1 case of posterior, middle falx and diffuse. 6. In the cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, the incidence of associated intracranial hemorrhage were intracrania subdural hemorrhage in 40 cases (47.6%), hemorrhagic brain

  7. Intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of therapy with Warfarin: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Juliano; Pessoa, Roberta; Hudson, Marcelo; Vitoi, Silvio; Villela, Ovidio; Torres, Jose; Paula, Mara Delgado; Bemvindo, Aloisio

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a patient receiving chronic oral anticoagulant therapy with Warfarin who presented with acute intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography showed intramural duodenal hematoma. Treatment was conservative with correction of the coagulation parameters and observation. This case exemplifies the usefulness of conservative therapy and computed tomography in patients with acute small bowel obstruction receiving anticoagulant therapy. (author)

  8. Mirror image extradural hematoma in elderly population: management strategy with surgical bilateral or unilateral evacuation or conservative treatment modality with literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta; Yada Rajpur; Moscote-Salazar Luis Rafael; Agrawal Amit

    2017-01-01

    Extradural hematomas (EDH) represent one of common imaging findings in cases sustaining traumatic brain injury. Bilateral extradural haematoma is considered rare and even rarer in elder people male. Bilateral extradural hematoma is usually acute, and generally associated with severe traumatic head injury. Mirror-image extradural hematomas (MEDH) constitute a special type of bilateral extradural hamatomas, which is placed anatomically symmetrically on both the sides of the intracranial compart...

  9. Is human fracture hematoma inherently angiogenic?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Street, J

    2012-02-03

    This study attempts to explain the cellular events characterizing the changes seen in the medullary callus adjacent to the interfragmentary hematoma during the early stages of fracture healing. It also shows that human fracture hematoma contains the angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor and has the inherent capability to induce angiogenesis and thus promote revascularization during bone repair. Patients undergoing emergency surgery for isolated bony injury were studied. Raised circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor were seen in all injured patients, whereas the fracture hematoma contained significantly higher levels of vascular endothelial growth factor than did plasma from these injured patients. However, incubation of endothelial cells in fracture hematoma supernatant significantly inhibited the in vitro angiogenic parameters of endothelial cell proliferation and microtubule formation. These phenomena are dependent on a local biochemical milieu that does not support cytokinesis. The hematoma potassium concentration is cytotoxic to endothelial cells and osteoblasts. Subcutaneous transplantation of the fracture hematoma into a murine wound model resulted in new blood vessel formation after hematoma resorption. This angiogenic effect is mediated by the significant concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor found in the hematoma. This study identifies an angiogenic cytokine involved in human fracture healing and shows that fracture hematoma is inherently angiogenic. The differences between the in vitro and in vivo findings may explain the phenomenon of interfragmentary hematoma organization and resorption that precedes fracture revascularization.

  10. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  11. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  12. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A.; Harrer, J.; Cesak, T.; Herman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  13. Interventricular septum hematoma during cineventriculography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melzer Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraseptal hematoma and subsequent myocardial infarction due to accidental contrast agent deposition complicating diagnostic cineventriculography is a previously undescribed complication of angiography. Case presentation A 61 year old man was admitted at intensive care unit because of unstable angina pectoris 1 hour after coronary angiography. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography showed a non-perfused area in the middle of interventricular septum with an increase of thickening up to 26 mm. Review of cineventriculography revealed contrast enhancement in the interventricular septum after contrast medium injection and a dislocation of the pigtail catheter tip. Follow up by echocardiography and MRI showed, that intramural hematoma has resolved after 6 weeks. After 8 weeks successful stent implantation in LAD was performed and after 6 month the patient had a normal LV-function without ischemic signs or septal thickening demonstrated by stressechocardiography. Conclusion A safe and mobile position of the pigtail catheter during ventriculography in the middle of the LV cavity should be ensured to avoid this potentially life-threatening complication. For assessment and absolute measurement of intramural hematoma contrast-enhanced echocardiography is more feasible than MRI and makes interchangeable results.

  14. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma: Report of a case managed conservatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Tariq

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a rare cause of acute spinal cord compression. A 25-year-old male presented with a history of sudden onset of complete quadriplegia with sensory loss below the neck along with loss of bowel and bladder control. He had no history of any constitutional symptoms. He reported 10 days later. He was managed conservatively and after two weeks of intensive rehabilitation he had complete neural recovery. The spontaneous recovery of neurological impairment is attributed to the spreading of the hematoma throughout the epidural space, thus decreasing the pressure with partial neural recovery. Conservative treatment is a fair option in young patients who present late and show neurological improvement. The neurological status on presentation will guide the further approach to management.

  15. Spontaneous renal hematoma - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrzut, M.; Obrzut, M.; Homa, J.; Obrzut, B.

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous pararenal hematoma is a rare pathology most frequently coexisting with renal tumours, vascular anomalies and inflammatory processes. In some cases one cannot establish its etiology. The paper describes a case of a 58-year-old man with a spontaneous pararenal hematoma and presents a diagnostic algorithm. Ultrasonography and CT play an important role in diagnostics of spontaneous pararenal haemorrhages. These methods enable a precise evaluation of size and location of hematoma and its evolution. (author)

  16. Optimal management of hemophilic arthropathy and hematomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobet S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sébastien Lobet,1,2 Cedric Hermans,1 Catherine Lambert1 1Hemostasis-Thrombosis Unit, Division of Hematology, 2Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium Abstract: Hemophilia is a hematological disorder characterized by a partial or complete deficiency of clotting factor VIII or IX. Its bleeding complications primarily affect the musculoskeletal system. Hemarthrosis is a major hemophilia-related complication, responsible for a particularly debilitating chronic arthropathy, in the long term. In addition to clotting factor concentrates, usually prescribed by the hematologist, managing acute hemarthrosis and chronic arthropathy requires a close collaboration between the orthopedic surgeon and physiotherapist. This collaboration, comprising a coagulation and musculoskeletal specialist, is key to effectively preventing hemarthrosis, managing acute joint bleeding episodes, assessing joint function, and actively treating chronic arthropathy. This paper reviews, from a practical point of view, the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilia-induced arthropathy for hematologists, orthopedic surgeons, and physiotherapists. Keywords: hemophilia, arthropathy, hemarthrosis, hematoma, physiotherapy, target joint

  17. Lumbar Puncture in Brain Abscessor Subdural Empyema: Not an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To assess the role of lumbar puncture (LP) in aiding diagnosis and influencing outcome in patients with intracranial brain abscess or subdural empyema. Methods The records of patients admitted with space occupying intracranial infective mass lesions (brain abscess and subdural empyema) to the neurosurgical ...

  18. Idiopathic Interdural Hematoma Looking Like a "Chinese Dumpling" : Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Miyajima, Ken; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Kuwayama, Naoya; Hirashima, Yutaka; Endo, Shunro

    2004-01-01

    A 79-year-old man presented with an interdural hematoma manifesting as headache. Computed tomography revealed a right parietal intracranial hematoma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the hematoma had divided the dura mater into two layers. Craniotomy was performed and a dural pouch containing a solid hematoma was totally removed. Histological examination showed the hematoma had divided the meningeal dura into two layers. This case confirms the location of interdural hematoma.

  19. Intramural Hematoma of the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dahlia Thao; Reny, Jean-Luc; Lanthier, Nicolas; Frossard, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with an intramural hematoma of the esophagus. This rare condition is more common in elderly women and can be misdiagnosed as cardiovascular or other digestive emergent disease. The classical clinical triad includes chest pain, sudden dysphagia or odynophagia and minor hematemesis. Known precipitating factors are Valsalva maneuver, blunt, direct or iatrogenic injuries, but spontaneous cases have also been described. Chest imaging including computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging as well as upper gastrointestinal endoscopy are useful tools for diagnosis. The treatment is conservative and the prognosis usually excellent with complete resolution within a few weeks. PMID:23730267

  20. Intra-uterine hematoma in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S; Nielsen, P H

    1991-01-01

    In 60 patients with a live fetus and an intra-uterine hematoma (IUH) proven by ultrasonic scanning the outcome of pregnancy was spontaneous abortion in 12% and premature delivery in 10%. No correlation between the outcome of the pregnancy and the maximum size of the hematoma or the week...

  1. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, John C.; Jones, Blaise V.; Crone, Kerry R.

    2008-01-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  2. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, John C. [Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV (United States); Jones, Blaise V. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Crone, Kerry R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  3. Unusual plain film appearance of extrapleural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranner, G.; Kullnig, P.; Dirnhofer, R.; Sigrist, T.

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of extrapleural hematoma, proven during autopsy, are presented. Plain chest films did not demonstrate the typical signs of an extrapleural mass lesion. The roentgenologic differential diagnosis of a free or partially encapsulated pleural effusion, as well as the pathogenesis of extrapleural hematoma is discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. A Case of Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Mimicking Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Rabia Koç

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute non-traumatic myelopathy and may present with various clinical phenotypes. Focal neurological symptoms can result in overlooking this differential diagnosis in patients presenting with neurological deficits and assuming the diagnosis of a stroke. Therefore, a thorough documentation of patient history is of great importance, since this can reveal symptoms suggestive of a different etiology. Here, we present a case of an 80-year-old female who was admitted with a hemiparesis without cortical or cranial neurological abnormalities. She mentioned of preceding shoulder and neck pain. Diagnosis of epidural hematoma was made by cervical magnetic resonance imaging. Symptoms resolved partially after surgical intervention. Our case illustrates the variation in the clinical presentation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma which can be misdiagnosed as stroke. Therefore, in patients with preceding neck, shoulder or interscapular pain and focal neurological deficits, this diagnosis should be included in the differential, particularly when cortical and cranial signs are lacking

  5. Dengue Fever with rectus sheath hematoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anurag; Bhatia, Sonia; Singh, Rajendra Pratap; Malik, Gaurav

    2014-04-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  6. Subdural haematoma in pregnancy-induced idiopathic thrombocytopenia: Conservative management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitree Pandey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conservative management of subdural haematoma with antioedema measures in second gravida with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP resulted in resolution of haematoma. We present a case of second gravida with ITP who developed subdural haematoma following normal vaginal delivery. She was put on mechanical ventilation and managed conservatively with platelet transfusion, Mannitol 1g/kg, Dexamethasone 1mg/kg and Glycerol 10ml TDS. She regained consciousness and was extubated after 48 hrs. Repeat CT after 10 days showed no mass effect with resolving haematoma which resolved completely after 15 days. Trial of conservative management is safe in pregnant patient with ITP who develops subdural haematoma.

  7. Intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of therapy with Warfarin: a case report and literature review; Hematoma intramural duodenal como complicacao de terapia anticoagulante com Warfarin: relato de caso e revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Juliano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: drjuliano@uol.com.br; Pessoa, Roberta; Hudson, Marcelo; Vitoi, Silvio; Villela, Ovidio; Torres, Jose; Paula, Mara Delgado [Hospital Marcio Cunha, Ipatinga, MG (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem; Bemvindo, Aloisio [Hospital Marcio Cunha, Ipatinga, MG (Brazil). Servico de Terapia Intensiva

    2004-12-01

    We report a case of a patient receiving chronic oral anticoagulant therapy with Warfarin who presented with acute intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography showed intramural duodenal hematoma. Treatment was conservative with correction of the coagulation parameters and observation. This case exemplifies the usefulness of conservative therapy and computed tomography in patients with acute small bowel obstruction receiving anticoagulant therapy. (author)

  8. Epidural Hematoma Following Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hilibrand, Alan S; Arnold, Paul M; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Isaacs, Robert E; Kanter, Adam S; Mroz, Thomas E; Nassr, Ahmad; Sasso, Rick C; Fehlings, Michael G; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Lord, Elizabeth L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Nguyen, Emily C; Roe, Allison K; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Yanez, Marisa Y; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicentered retrospective case series. To determine the incidence and circumstances surrounding the development of a symptomatic postoperative epidural hematoma in the cervical spine. Patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, at 23 institutions were reviewed, and all patients who developed an epidural hematoma were identified. A total of 16 582 cervical spine surgeries were identified, and 15 patients developed a postoperative epidural hematoma, for a total incidence of 0.090%. Substantial variation between institutions was noted, with 11 sites reporting no epidural hematomas, and 1 site reporting an incidence of 0.76%. All patients initially presented with a neurologic deficit. Nine patients had complete resolution of the neurologic deficit after hematoma evacuation; however 2 of the 3 patients (66%) who had a delay in the diagnosis of the epidural hematoma had residual neurologic deficits compared to only 4 of the 12 patients (33%) who had no delay in the diagnosis or treatment ( P = .53). Additionally, the patients who experienced a postoperative epidural hematoma did not experience any significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life metrics as a result of the index procedure at final follow-up evaluation. This is the largest series to date to analyze the incidence of an epidural hematoma following cervical spine surgery, and this study suggest that an epidural hematoma occurs in approximately 1 out of 1000 cervical spine surgeries. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may improve the chance of making a complete neurologic recovery, but patients who develop this complication do not show improvements in the health-related quality-of-life measurements.

  9. A male infant had subdural effusion and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia during the febrile episode of Kawasaki disease: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Pei; Lin, I-Chun; Kuo, Kuang-Che

    2016-05-28

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, febrile, self-limiting, inflammatory systemic vasculitis seen in early childhood, most commonly in those below 5 years of age. In Kawasaki disease, the coronary arteries are most commonly affected, which may lead to asymptomatic coronary artery ectasia or formation of an aneurysm. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia(PSVT) is a severe and rare cardiovascular complication of Kawasaki disease. A case of Kawasaki disease presenting with unusual findings, including subdural effusion and PSVT is reported. This is a 4-month-10-day-old boy presents with anterior fontanelle bulging and moderate bilateral subdural effusion at the acute stage of Kawasaki disease and PSVT at the subacute stage of Kawasaki disease. The subdural effusion was resolution after intravenous immunoglobulin(IVIG) administration. And the PSVT was subsided after administered 3 doses of adenosine, 1 dose of amiodarone loading and Propranolol twice per day use. At 1-year follow-up has made a complete recovery with no arrhythmia episodes, developmental effects or abnormal neurologic findings. Subdural effusion in the acute stage of Kawasaki disease may be an inflammatory response. It may resolves spontaneously after anti-inflammatory treatment such as IVIG infusion. PSVT is a severe cardiovascular complication of Kawasaki disease. In those who taking aspirin, we need to carefully observe the heart rhythm and PSVT side effects, especially in the first month.

  10. Retroocular and Subdural Hemorrhage or Hemosiderin Deposits in Pediatric Autopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bigio, Marc R; Phillips, Susan M

    2017-04-01

    The presence of hemosiderin in the optic nerve sheath and/or retina is sometimes used to estimate the timing of injury in infants or children with suspected non-accidental head trauma. To determine the prevalence of hemosiderin in deaths not associated with trauma, we performed a prospective study of retroocular orbital tissue, cranial convexity, and cervical spinal cord dura mater in infants and children hemosiderin within the orbital fat, ocular muscles, and parasagittal cranial and/or cervical spinal subdural compartment. This bleeding is likely a consequence of the birth process. None had evidence of hemorrhage within the optic nerve sheath. Premature birth was less likely associated with orbital tissue hemorrhage. Caesarean section birth (mainly nonelective) was not associated with lower prevalence. Residual hemosiderin was identifiable up to 36 weeks postnatal age, suggesting gradual disappearance after birth. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (performed in the majority of cases) was not associated with acute hemorrhage. In 9 traumatic deaths, 6 had blood and/or hemosiderin within the optic nerve sheath. Knowledge of the potential presence and resolution of hemosiderin in these locations is important for medicolegal interpretation of childhood deaths associated with head or brain injury. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hematoma subperiosteal de órbita: relato de caso Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit: case report

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    Jacinto Barbosa Lay Chaves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos um paciente de 16 anos que após traumatismo crânio-encefálico leve evoluiu com dor ocular, hematoma palpebral unilateral e proptose do olho esquerdo. Tomografia computadorizada de órbitas evidenciou hematoma subperiosteal em órbita esquerda. Foi realizada drenagem cirúrgica da coleção. O hematoma subperiosteal de órbita, apesar de raro, deve ser incluído como etiologia de proptose ocular e seu diagnóstico deve ser precoce a fim de evitar a morbidade associada.We describe a sixteen years old male patient that suffered a craniocerebral trauma and presented at the emergency room, with ocular pain, palpebral hematoma and left eye proptosis. Orbital computed tomography showed left subperiosteal orbital hematoma. A surgical drainage was performed. Subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit is a rare cause of proptosis; its early diagnosis must be made in order to avoid possible complications.

  12. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

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    Hideki Katagiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation.

  13. Aortic dissection presenting with secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by compression of the pulmonary artery by dissecting hematoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Ryu, Sang Wan; Choi, Yong Sun; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2004-01-01

    The rupture of an acute dissection of the ascending aorta into the space surrounding the pulmonary artery is an uncommon occurrence. No previous cases of transient pulmonary hypertension caused by a hematoma surrounding the pulmonary artery have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of acute aortic dissection presenting as secondary pulmonary hypertension

  14. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

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    Mirko Velickovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention.

  15. The relationship between neuron-specific enolase and prognosis of patients with acute traumatic brain injury

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    Yun-yang LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between neuron-specific enolase (NSE levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI and the prognosis of TBI patients.  Methods A total of 89 patients with acute TBI were divided into light, medium, heavy and severe TBI groups based on admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score. Serum NSE expression levels were detected in all cases and NSE levels in CSF were detected in 18 cases within 12 h after TBI. The expression levels of serum NSE in 20 normal people, except cases of lung disease and nervous system damage, were detected as a control group. Results Compared with the control group, serum NSE expression levels of patients in each TBI group were elevated (P < 0.05, for all, and the NSE levels in severe and heavy TBI groups were higher than that in medium and light groups (P < 0.05, for all. The serum NSE expression levels of patients with cerebral contusion were higher than that of patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI, P = 0.025, subdural hematoma (P = 0.031 and epidural hematoma (P = 0.021. Serum NSE expression levels were negatively correlated with GCS score (rs = - 0.327, P = 0.024 and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score (rs = - 0.252, P = 0.049. The NSE expression levels of CSF in severe and heavy TBI patients were higher than that of serum (P = 0.039, 0.031.  Conclusions NSE expression changes can be evaluated as an auxiliary indicator in reflecting the degree of acute TBI, typing diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, and NSE levels of CSF is more sensitive than that of serum. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.013

  16. Sport-Related Structural Brain Injury: 3 Cases of Subdural Hemorrhage in American High School Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Gardner, Ryan M; Kuhn, Andrew W; Solomon, Gary S; Bonfield, Christopher M; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2017-10-01

    The risk of sport-related concussion (SRC) has emerged as a major public health concern. In rare instances, sport-related head injuries can be even more severe, such as subdural hemorrhage, epidural hemorrhage, or malignant cerebral edema. Unlike SRCs, sport-related structural brain injury (SRSBI) is rare, may require neurosurgical intervention, and can lead to permanent neurologic deficit or death. Data characterizing SRSBI are limited, and many have recognized the need to better understand these catastrophic brain injuries. The goal of the current series is to describe, in detail, the presentation, management, and outcomes of examples of these rare injuries. During the fall of 2015, three high school football players presented with acute subdural hemorrhages following in-game collisions and were treated at our institution within a span of 2 months. For the 2 athletes who required surgical intervention, a previous SRC was sustained within 4 weeks before the catastrophic event. One year after injury, 2 players have returned to school, though with persistent deficits. One patient remains nonverbal and wheelchair bound. None of the athletes has returned to sports. Acute subdural hemorrhage resultant from an in-game football collision is rare. The temporal proximity of the reported SRSBIs to recent SRCs emphasizes the importance of return-to-play protocols and raises questions regarding the possibility of second impact syndrome. Although epidemiologic conclusions cannot be drawn from this small sample, these cases provide a unique opportunity to demonstrate the presentation, management, and long-term outcomes of SRSBI in American high school football. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 4 cases of iliopsoas hematoma associated with hemophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Yukiyoshi; Iwata, Hisashi; Inoda, Kunio

    1984-01-01

    Four patients were diagnosed as having iliopsoas hematoma associated with hemophilia by CT scanning. The site and disappearance of hematoma were observed on CT. It was suggested that hematoma occurs inside the iliacus or posoas muscle in cases of iliopsoas hematoma complicated by hemophilia or coagulation and that it occurs in the pelvic wall of the iliacus muscle in cases of iliopsoas hematoma uncomplicated by coagulation abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  19. Streptococcal Subdural Empyema as a Complication of Varicella

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old male infant who presented with a group A streptococcal subdural empyema on day 5 of a varicella skin rash is reported from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  20. Solid Right Ventricular Compression by Intraventricular Septum-Hematoma Induced after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

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    Ibrahim El-Battrawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraventricular septum-hematoma is a rare complication following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. This complication may represent a challenge for accurate diagnosis and treatment. This case report is about a 60-year-old male patient being admitted with an acute coronary syndrome. Despite successful PCI with drug eluting stent implantation into the right coronary artery (RCA the patient complained about recurrent angina pectoris according to Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS class IV. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and transthoracic echocardiography revealed a massive 4.9×9.2 cm sized end-diastolic septum-hematoma, which compromised right ventricular cavity. Emergent recoronary angiography ruled out further contrast extravasation from the RCA. Conservative treatment was intended after discussion in the “heart-team.” The patient completely recovered with nearly complete resolution of the hematoma after 6 months.

  1. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

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    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  2. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jerônimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xareltor. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban.

  3. Endovascular Treatment of Incoercible Epistaxis and Epidural Cerebral Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, M.; Pavia, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary A young patient with a facial trauma after a road accident was admitted to our department with incoercible epistaxis. A CT scan showed a right pterional acute epidural hematoma (EDH). Angiography demonstrated multiple sources of bleeding of the right sphenopalatine arteries, cause of the epistaxis, and an intracranial leakage of the right middle meningeal artery, responsible for the EDH. The patient immediately underwent embolization of the right internal maxillary artery and right middle meningeal artery. The procedure stopped the epistaxis and no further enlargement of the EDH was observed, avoiding its surgical treatment. Endovascular surgery may be an effective procedure to stop the arterial meningeal bleeding sustaining acute EDH and may be a useful tool in the management of special cases of post traumatic EDH. PMID:20569576

  4. Retrospective analysis of 14 cases of remote epidural hematoma as a postoperative complication after intracranial tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlu; Yang, Hongfa; Cui, Dayong; Li, Yunqian

    2016-01-06

    epidural hematoma evacuation, 13 patients were discharged with good recovery, and one patient died. The reduced intracranial pressure due to the intracranial tumor resection may be the cause of this hematoma. This type of epidural hematoma is acute and often occurs before hernia. Thus, the risk of remote epidural hematoma after intracranial tumor resection needs to be made known. Aggressive hematoma evacuation can often result in satisfactory outcomes for patients.

  5. Technique of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters improve the prognosis of acute post-traumatic hemispheric brain swelling patients

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    Lei eShi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute post-traumatic cerebral hemispheric brain swelling (ACHS is a serious disorder that occurs after traumatic brain injury (TBI, and it often requires immediate treatment. The aim of our clinical study was to assess the effects of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters on the prognosis of ACHS patients.Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 172 cases of severe craniocerebral trauma patients with acute cerebral hemispheric swelling. The patients were divided into two groups: unilateral stepwise standard large trauma craniectomy (S-SLTC combined with external ventricular drainage (EVD catheter implants (n = 86 and unilateral routine frontal temporal parietal SLTC (control group, n = 86.Result: No significant differences in age, sex, or preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale score were observed between groups (P < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the ipsilateral subdural effusion incidence rates between the S-SLTC+EVD treatment group and the routine SLTC group. However, the incidence rates of intraoperative acute encephalocele and contralateral epidural and subdural hematoma in the S-SLTC+EVD group were significantly lower than those in the SLTC group (17.4% and 3.5% vs. 37.2% and 23.3%, respectively. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP values of patients in the S-SLTC+EVD group were also lower than those in the SLTC group at days 1 through7 (P<0.05. A positive neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 50.0% and decreased mortality (15.1% was observed in the S-SLTC+EVD group compared to the neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 33.8%; 36.0% in the SLTC group (P<0.05.Conclusions: Our data suggest that S-SLTC+EVD is more effective for controlling ICP, improving neurological outcome, and decreasing mortality rate compared with routine SLTC.

  6. Prognostic models for predicting posttraumatic seizures during acute hospitalization, and at 1 and 2 years following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Anne C; Wagner, Amy K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Brooks, Maria M; Zafonte, Ross D; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Fabio, Anthony; Hammond, Flora M; Dreer, Laura E; Bushnik, Tamara; Walker, William C; Brown, Allen W; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Shea, Timothy; Krellman, Jason W; Rosenthal, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures (PTS) are well-recognized acute and chronic complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk factors have been identified, but considerable variability in who develops PTS remains. Existing PTS prognostic models are not widely adopted for clinical use and do not reflect current trends in injury, diagnosis, or care. We aimed to develop and internally validate preliminary prognostic regression models to predict PTS during acute care hospitalization, and at year 1 and year 2 postinjury. Prognostic models predicting PTS during acute care hospitalization and year 1 and year 2 post-injury were developed using a recent (2011-2014) cohort from the TBI Model Systems National Database. Potential PTS predictors were selected based on previous literature and biologic plausibility. Bivariable logistic regression identified variables with a p-value load, and pre-injury limitation in learning/remembering/concentrating as significant PTS predictors during acute hospitalization. Significant predictors of PTS at year 1 were subdural hematoma (SDH), contusion load, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, preinjury mental health treatment/psychiatric hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Year 2 significant predictors were similar to those of year 1: SDH, intraparenchymal fragment, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Corrected concordance (C) statistics were 0.599, 0.747, and 0.716 for acute hospitalization, year 1, and year 2 models, respectively. The prognostic model for PTS during acute hospitalization did not discriminate well. Year 1 and year 2 models showed fair to good predictive validity for PTS. Cranial surgery, although medically necessary, requires ongoing research regarding potential benefits of increased monitoring for signs of epileptogenesis, PTS prophylaxis, and/or rehabilitation/social support. Future studies should

  7. Caesarean delivery complicated by unintentional subdural block and conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharkawy, Hesham; Khanna, Ashish K; Barsoum, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Combined spinal epidural (CSE) can provide excellent labor analgesia. Subdural block is also a potential but rare complication of attempted epidural placement during a CSE procedure, which may present as a block that is usually patchy in nature, with a component of sensory and/or motor deficit and a variable duration of action. In addition, a conversion disorder or a functional neurological disorder has been described with epidural and spinal anesthesia in obstetric patients. In this clinical report, we describe a 33-year-old G4P3 at 40 weeks gestation that received an unintentional subdural block as part of her labor analgesia and after an uneventful caesarean delivery presented with a conversion disorder. The rarity of the association between a subdural block and a conversion disorder complicated by the fact that the neurological deficit produced by the subdural block and that produced by a conversion disorder are similar in distribution made the clinical presentation and diagnosis a challenge for the obstetric anesthesia team. A functional neurological disorder of this nature complicating a subdural block in an obstetric anesthesia clinical practice has not been described so far.

  8. Serial MR Imaging of Intramuscular Hematoma: Experimental Study in a Rat Model with the Pathologic Correlation

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    Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam National University, School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to demonstrate the temporal changes of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas in rats and to correlate these data with the concurrent pathologic observations. Intramuscular hematoma was induced in 30 rats. The MR images were obtained at 1, 4, 7 and 10 days and at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after muscle injury. The characteristic serial MRI findings were evaluated and the relative signal intensities were calculated. Pathologic specimens were obtained at each time point. On the T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), the intramuscular hematomas exhibited isointensity compared to that of muscle or the development of a high signal intensity (SI) rim on day one after injury. The high SI persisted until eight weeks after injury. On the T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), the hematomas showed high SI or centrally low SI on day one after injury, and mainly high SI after four days. A dark signal rim was apparent after seven days, which was indicative of hemosiderin on the pathology. The gradient echo (GRE) imaging yielded dark signal intensities at all stages. Unlike brain hematomas, experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas show increased SI on both the T1WI and T2WI from the acute stage onward, and this is pathologically correlated with a rich blood supply and rapid healing response to injury in the muscle. On the T2WI and GRE imaging, high SI with a peripheral dark signal rim is apparent from seven days to the chronic stage

  9. Serial MR Imaging of Intramuscular Hematoma: Experimental Study in a Rat Model with the Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kwon, Soon Tae

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to demonstrate the temporal changes of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas in rats and to correlate these data with the concurrent pathologic observations. Intramuscular hematoma was induced in 30 rats. The MR images were obtained at 1, 4, 7 and 10 days and at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after muscle injury. The characteristic serial MRI findings were evaluated and the relative signal intensities were calculated. Pathologic specimens were obtained at each time point. On the T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), the intramuscular hematomas exhibited isointensity compared to that of muscle or the development of a high signal intensity (SI) rim on day one after injury. The high SI persisted until eight weeks after injury. On the T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), the hematomas showed high SI or centrally low SI on day one after injury, and mainly high SI after four days. A dark signal rim was apparent after seven days, which was indicative of hemosiderin on the pathology. The gradient echo (GRE) imaging yielded dark signal intensities at all stages. Unlike brain hematomas, experimentally-induced intramuscular hematomas show increased SI on both the T1WI and T2WI from the acute stage onward, and this is pathologically correlated with a rich blood supply and rapid healing response to injury in the muscle. On the T2WI and GRE imaging, high SI with a peripheral dark signal rim is apparent from seven days to the chronic stage

  10. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Thanvir Mohamed Niazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture.

  11. Recurrent massive subperiosteal hematoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis

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    Steenbrugge, F.; Poffyn, B.; Uyttendaele, D.; Verdonk, R. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Verstraete, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium)

    2001-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 13-year-old neurofibromatosis (NF-I) patient who suffered a blunt trauma in 1993. The diagnosis of subperiosteal hematoma was made. The pathogenesis of subperiosteal hematoma is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Recurrent massive subperiosteal hematoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbrugge, F.; Poffyn, B.; Uyttendaele, D.; Verdonk, R.; Verstraete, K.

    2001-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 13-year-old neurofibromatosis (NF-I) patient who suffered a blunt trauma in 1993. The diagnosis of subperiosteal hematoma was made. The pathogenesis of subperiosteal hematoma is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Delayed epidural hematoma after mild head injury

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    Radulović Danilo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traumatic delayed epidural hematoma (DEH can be defined as insignificant or not seen on the initial CT scan performed after a trauma but seen on the subsequent CT scan as a “massive” epidural bleeding. Case report. We presented two cases of traumatic DEH after mild head injury. Both patients were conscious and without neurological deficit on the admission. Initial CT scan did not reveal intracranial hematoma. Repeated CT scan, that was performed after neurological deterioration, revealed epidural hematoma in both cases. The patients were operated with a favorable surgical outcome. Conclusion. Traumatic DEH could occur in the patients with head injuries who were conscious on the admission with a normal initial CT scan finding. Early detection of DEH and an urgent surgical evacuation were essential for a good outcome.

  14. Traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in an infant

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    Vithal Rangarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-month-old male infant had presented with a history of a fall from the crib a fortnight ago. He had developed progressive weakness of both lower limbs. On examination, the infant had spastic paraplegia. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging of the cervical spine showed an epidural hematoma extending from the fourth cervical (C4 to the first dorsal (D1 vertebral level with cord compression. The patient had no bleeding disorder on investigation. He underwent cervical laminoplasty at C6 and C7 levels. The epidural hematoma was evacuated. The cervical cord started pulsating immediately. Postoperatively, the patient′s paraplegia improved dramatically in 48 hours. According to the author′s literature search, only seven cases of post-traumatic epidural hematoma have been reported in pediatric patients, and our patient is the youngest. The present case report discusses the etiopathology, presentation, and management of this rare case.

  15. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  16. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  17. CT-guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hideki

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is now effective not only for definite diagnosis and location of intracerebral hematomas but also for coordination of the center of a hematoma. CT-guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma was performed in 51 cases: 34 of basal ganglionic hematoma with or without ventricular perforation, 11 of subcortical hematoma, 3 of thalamic hematoma and 3 of cerebellar hematoma. Three dimensional CT images or biplane CT images were taken to determine the coordinates of the target point, which was the center of the hematoma. Then, a silicon tube (O.D. 3.5 phi, I.D. 2.1 phi) was inserted into the center of the hematoma through a burr-hole under local anesthesia, and the liquid or solid hematoma was aspirated as completely as possible with a syringe. Urokinase (6,000 I.U./5 ml saline) was administered through this silicon tube every 6 or 12 hours for several days until the hematoma had drained out competely. The silicon tube was taken out when repeated CT scanning revealed no hematoma. The results of clinical follow-ups indicated that this procedure is as good as, or rather better than conventional microsurgery with evacuation of hematoma under direct vision. Moreover this CT-guided stereotactic approach for evacuation of the hematoma has the following advantages: 1) the procedure is simple and safe, 2) operation can be performed under local anesthesia, and 3) the hematoma is drained out completely with the aid of urokinase. This surgery seems indicated as an emergency treatment for high-age or high risk patients and also as a routine surgery for intracerebral hematomas in patients showing no herination signs. (author)

  18. A blackhole over brain: Interdural hematoma - A challenging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayev, Rasim; Ekşi, Murat Şakir

    2015-01-01

    Hematoma in between two dura leaves, named as 'interdural hematoma', is a very rare entity in adulthood. Interdural hematoma may emerge spontaneously or secondary to coagulopathies. A 61-year-old male patient, who had a medical history of alcoholic cirrhosis, presented with interdural hematoma. The case has been discussed with a literature review about diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in this pathology. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulsative hematoma: A penile fracture complication

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    Nale Đorđe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fracture of the penis is a direct blunt trauma of the erect or semi-erect penis. It can be treated by conservative or surgical means. Retrospective analyses of conservative penile fracture treatment reveal frequent immediate and later complications. Case report. We presented a 41- year-old patient with pulsative hematoma caused by an unusual fracture of the penis. Fracture had appeared 40 days before the admittance during a sexual intercourse. The patient was treated surgically. Conclusion. Pulsative hematoma (pulsative diverticulum is a very rare, early complication of a conservatively treated penile fracture. Surgical treatment has an advantage over surgical one, which was confirmed by our case report.

  20. The dynamics and pathogenesis of traumatic subdural hygromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, W.

    1988-01-01

    Of 2005 patients, who had suffered blunt skull trauma, 108 developed post-traumatic subdural hygromas (TSH). CT was used to observe the course of subdural hygromas not treated surgically, with particular reference to the time of their appearance and regression. The relative incidence of TSH, and of the severity of head trauma quanitified on a 5-grade scale was determined in different age groups. From the traumatic changes demonstrated on CT, some conclusions could be drawn regarding the pathogenesis. A hypothetical model has been developed which explains TSH as a result of shearing forces. (orig.) [de

  1. Scalp Hematoma Characteristics Associated With Intracranial Injury in Pediatric Minor Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Emma C M; Grool, Anne M; Klassen, Terry P; Correll, Rhonda; Jarvis, Anna; Joubert, Gary; Bailey, Benoit; Chauvin-Kimoff, Laurel; Pusic, Martin; McConnell, Don; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Silver, Norm; Taylor, Brett; Osmond, Martin H

    2016-05-01

    Minor head trauma accounts for a significant proportion of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits. In children younger than 24 months, scalp hematomas are thought to be associated with the presence of intracranial injury (ICI). We investigated which scalp hematoma characteristics were associated with increased odds of ICI in children less than 17 years who presented to the ED following minor head injury and whether an underlying linear skull fracture may explain this relationship. This was a secondary analysis of 3,866 patients enrolled in the Canadian Assessment of Tomography of Childhood Head Injury (CATCH) study. Information about scalp hematoma presence (yes/no), location (frontal, temporal/parietal, occipital), and size (small and localized, large and boggy) was collected by emergency physicians using a structured data collection form. ICI was defined as the presence of an acute brain lesion on computed tomography. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, dangerous injury mechanism, irritability on examination, suspected open or depressed skull fracture, and clinical signs of basal skull fracture. ICI was present in 159 (4.1%) patients. The presence of a scalp hematoma (n = 1,189) in any location was associated with significantly greater odds of ICI (odds ratio [OR] = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.06 to 6.02), particularly for those located in temporal/parietal (OR = 6.0, 95% CI = 3.9 to 9.3) and occipital regions (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 3.5 to 8.9). Both small and localized and large and boggy hematomas were significantly associated with ICI, although larger hematomas conferred larger odds (OR = 9.9, 95% CI = 6.3 to 15.5). Although the presence of a scalp hematoma was associated with greater odds of ICI in all age groups, odds were greatest in children aged 0 to 6 months (OR = 13.5, 95% CI = 1.5 to 119.3). Linear skull fractures were present in 156 (4.0%) patients. Of the 111 patients with scalp hematoma and ICI, 57 (51%) patients had

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Incoercible Epistaxis and Epidural Cerebral Hematoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bortoluzzi, M.; Pavia, M.

    2006-01-01

    A young patient with a facial trauma after a road accident was admitted to our department with incoercible epistaxis. A CT scan showed a right pterional acute epidural hematoma (EDH). Angiography demonstrated multiple sources of bleeding of the right sphenopalatine arteries, cause of the epistaxis, and an intracranial leakage of the right middle meningeal artery, responsible for the EDH. The patient immediately underwent embolization of the right internal maxillary artery and right middle men...

  3. MR imaging of epidural hematoma in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsay, Theodore A.; Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erwin Road, Room 1504, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    To bring attention to the MR imaging appearance of epidural hematoma (EDH) in the lumbar spine as a small mass often associated with disk herniation or an acute event. This paper will show our experience with this entity and describe criteria for its MR imaging appearance. Design and patients. Thirteen cases of prospectively diagnosed EDH of the lumbar spine were compared with 12 cases of prospectively diagnosed prominent epidural extrusion. Our criteria were retrospectively evaluated by the two authors for their presence or absence in each case. The chi-square test for nominal data was applied. MR imaging criteria utilized to distinguish EDH from disk herniation at our institution include: (1) signal different from disk, (2) high signal on T1-weighted images, either centrally or peripherally, (3) teardrop- or egg-shaped mass, in the sagittal plane, (4) size greater than half the vertebral body height in a craniocaudal dimension, (5) primarily retrosomatic epidural location, (6) plasticity - the mass is seen to conform closely to the contours of bone (e.g., in the lateral recess), (7) little or no disk space narrowing unless associated with disc herniation. Chi-square analysis demonstrated each criterion to significantly differentiate between EDH and extrusion. Only six of 13 EDH cases went to surgery in spite of their relatively large size. Two of six patients were diagnosed as having epidural clot consistent with hematoma at the time of surgery. The four patients who were not diagnosed at surgery revealed only small disk herniations or fragments of disk. The occurrence of EDH is more frequent than previously suspected. Spontaneous EDH is frequently associated with disk herniation and acute events such as sneezing or coughing. Most cases of spontaneous EDH will resolve prior to surgery with only the minority becoming chronic in order to be seen at surgery as an encapsulated mass. MR imaging can reliably identify EDH and distinguish between EDH and large disk

  4. Cervical spine intradural-extramedullary hematoma presenting as ipsilateral hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Ming Lin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old Taiwanese man suffered from acute onset of right-sided extremity weakness while talking to his neighbors. He was transferred to the hospital within three-hour time after symptom onset. Initial acute ischemic cerebral infarct was diagnosed based on his symptom and cerebral computed tomography. Thrombolytic therapy was held after his symptom improved promptly and could not excluded other etiology. Thorough history taking unraveled previous Chinese medicine clinic visit because of neck sore. However, he received limited improvement after several times of massage treatment. Magnetic resnance imaging (MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated hematoma compressing right side intradural-extramedullary space at the C2/C3 level. Through his clinical course, muscle weakness was the sole neurological finding with sparing of sensory defects. Given the close anatomy relationship between sensory and motor lamina distribution in the cervical spinal cord, our patient presented a rare manifestation. Cases of cervical spine intradural-extramedullary hematoma are not often seen and only sporadic in the documented literature. We wish, through the report of this article, to inform the first- line physicians with the following information. Among the elderly, neck sore is a common symptom. Over- stretching or overt local massage is not suggested due to relatively fragile musculature. In the clinical diagnosis and localization of lesion, cerebral or cervical spine lesion could mimic with each other and manifest hemiparesis as their first symptom. Meticulous history taking, neurological/ physical examination and pertinent laboratory work-up should be done before initiation of intravenous thrombolytic therapy as it could cause catastrophic consequences if not used properly.

  5. Study of near infrared technology for intracranial hematoma detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Ma, Hong Y.; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton

    2000-04-01

    Although intracranial hematoma detection only requires the continuous wave technique of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), previous studies have shown that there are still some problems in obtaining very accurate, reliable hematoma detection. Several of the most important limitations of NIR technology for hematoma detection such as the dynamic range of detection, hair absorption, optical contact, layered structure of the head, and depth of detection are reported in this article. A pulsed light source of variable intensity was designed and studied in order to overcome hair absorption and to increase the dynamic range and depth of detection. An adaptive elastic optical probe was made to improve the optical contact and decrease contact noise. A new microcontroller operated portable hematoma detector was developed. Due to the layered structure of the human head, simulation on a layered medium was analyzed experimentally. Model inhomogeneity tests and animal hematoma tests showed the effectiveness of the improved hematoma detector for intracranial hematoma detection.

  6. Management of Chronic Subdural Haematoma in a Case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    region suggestive of chronic subdural haematoma with significant mass affect with effacement of ipsilateral ventricles [Figure 1]. She was given two units of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and three units of single donor platelet (SDP) with which the platelet count rose to. 48,000/mm3 over a period of 15 days. This was done so.

  7. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-16

    Jan 16, 2013 ... local anaesthetic occurs rarely and few anaesthesiologists are familiar with its clinical presentation.2-4 We report on a case of suspected subdural deposition of local anaesthetic in an infant who was administered caudal anaesthesia for postoperative pain relief. The case report and a review of literature are ...

  8. Rhinogenic subdural empyema in-older children and teenagers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-12-13

    Dec 13, 1993 ... antivenom, given sooner, may have prevented some deaths. Children must receive the same dose of antivenom as adults. The SAIMR recommends 4 ..... tragedy of permanent neurological sequelae or death from an eminently treatable disease. REFERENCES. 1. Bok APL, Peter JC. Subdural empyema ...

  9. Infantile lumbosacral spinal subdural abscess with sacral dermal sinus tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung Woo; Yoon, Soo Han; Cho, Ki Hong; Shin, Yong Sam; Ahn, Young Hwan

    2007-01-01

    Clinical case report of a spinal subdural abscess in an infant presenting with sacral dermal sinus tract (DST). To suggest that sacral DST with caudal direction may require surgical resection as early as possible. DST may induce the formation of a spinal abscess. However, it is sometimes difficult to decide on early surgical resection for DST, especially in cases that are located at a lower level than the lumbar spine and directed caudally that is not accompanied by cerebrospinal fluid leakage. A 9-month-old girl was transferred due to intermittent fever and vomiting, with the midline sinus of the lower back at the second sacral spinal level. She showed mild tenderness of the lower back and slight weakness of both lower extremities with increased residual urine volume of the bladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the low-lying sacral DST traced into the subdural space with caudal orientation, and the presence of extensive subdural spinal abscess from the first lumbar spine to the fourth sacrum. Emergency resection of the sacral DST was performed after laminotomy from the first lumbar spine to the second sacrum, and the subdural spinal abscess was also surgically removed. After 8 weeks of intravenous antibiotic treatment, she showed no neurologic deficit and no evidence of residual abscess on MRI. We suggest that even low-lying sacral DST may require surgical resection as early as possible because it may result in indolent and extensive spinal abscesses.

  10. Accidental deposition of local anaesthetic in the subdural space ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of accidental injection of local anaesthetic into the subdural space during neuraxial blockade is rare. The presentation of unexplainable clinical signs that do not match the clinical picture of subarachnoid or intravascular injection of the local anaesthetic agent should invoke high suspicion of unintentional ...

  11. Uncommon pathogen Bacillus cereus causing subdural empyema in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Subdural empyema (SDE) in children is a severe intracranial infection. Many pathogens can cause SDE. Case Details: In this articlewe present a 15-month old Indonesian boy diagnosed as SDE based on the clinical symptoms and neuroimaging. A complete blood count showed white blood cell count of ...

  12. A comparative study of irrigation versus no irrigation during burr hole craniostomy to treat chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang-Ping; Yuan, Ye; Guan, Jun-Wen; Jiang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-09-11

    Burr hole craniostomy is a widely used method for the evacuation of CSDH. However it is not clear whether the irrigation during operation improves the prognosis or gives rise to additional complications instead. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to determine this issue. Patients attending two medical centers in China who underwent burr hole drainage with irrigation (BHDI) or burr hole drainage without irrigation (BHD) for unilateral CSDH during January 2013 to December 2016 were included in this study. The patients' clinical information and follow-up data were retrospectively reviewed, and the radiologic findings were processed using the 3D Slicer software. The differences in outcomes were identified using t-test, chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test. A total of 151 patients comprising 63 patients in the BHD group and 88 patients in the BHDI group were included. Patients in the BHDI group had a higher volume of pneumocrania on the first postoperative day than that of patients in the BHD group (p  0.05). Irrigation had no improvement in the long-term curative effect on CSDH, but it increased the risk of short-term complication in terms of pneumocrania. Therefore, this study suggests that irrigation is not an obligatory procedure during burr hole drainage.

  13. Delayed life-threatening subdural hematoma after minor head injury in a patient with severe coagulopathy: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, Marc; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Smits, Marion; van de Beek, Diederik

    2009-01-01

    Minor head injury is a frequent cause for neurologic consultation and imaging. Most patients with minor head injury will make an uneventful recovery, but in a very small proportion of these patients life threatening intracranial complications occur. We describe a patient on oral anticoagulation

  14. Delayed life-threatening subdural hematoma after minor head injury in a patient with severe coagulopathy: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Engelen (Marc); P.J. Nederkoorn (Paul); M. Smits (Marion); D. van de Beek (Diederik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractMinor head injury is a frequent cause for neurologic consultation and imaging. Most patients with minor head injury will make an uneventful recovery, but in a very small proportion of these patients life threatening intracranial complications occur. We describe a patient on oral

  15. Spinal subdural hemorrhage in abusive head trauma: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Arabinda Kumar; Bradford, Ray K; Dias, Mark S; Moore, Gregory J; Boal, Danielle K B

    2012-01-01

    To compare the relative incidence, distribution, and radiologic characteristics of spinal subdural hemorrhage after abusive head trauma versus that after accidental trauma in children. This study received prior approval from the Human Subjects Protection Office. Informed consent was waived. This study was HIPAA compliant. Two hundred fifty-two children aged 0-2 years treated for abusive head trauma at our institute between 1997 and 2009 were identified through retrospective chart review. A second group of 70 children aged 0-2 years treated at our institute for well-documented accidental trauma between 2003 and 2010 were also identified through retrospective chart review. All clinical data and cross-sectional imaging results, including computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, spine, chest, abdomen, and pelvis, were reviewed for both of these groups. A Fisher exact test was performed to assess the statistical significance of the proportion of the spinal canal subdural hemorrhage in abusive head trauma versus that in accidental trauma. In the abusive head trauma cohort, 67 (26.5%) of 252 children had evaluable spinal imaging results. Of these, 38 (56%) of 67 children had undergone thoracolumbar imaging, and 24 (63%) of 38 had thoracolumbar subdural hemorrhage. Spinal imaging was performed in this cohort 0.3-141 hours after injury (mean, 23 hours ± 27 [standard deviation]), with 65 (97%) of 67 cases having undergone imaging within 52 hours of injury. In the second cohort with accidental injury, only one (1%) of 70 children had spinal subdural hemorrhage at presentation; this patient had displaced occipital fracture. The comparison of incidences of spinal subdural hemorrhage in abusive head trauma versus those in accidental trauma was statistically significant (P head trauma who underwent thoracolumbar imaging in this series but was rare in those with accidental trauma. © RSNA, 2011.

  16. Intracranial hematoma as the cause of headache after subarachnoid anesthesia for cesarean section--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skret-Magierło, Joanna; Barnaś, Edyta; Sek-Kłebukowska, Barbara; Nicpoń, Jakub; Kloc, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma is an exceptionally rare but life-threating complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. The diagnosis is rather difficult because the initial symptoms mimic post-dural puncture headache. A 33-year-old primipara was admitted to the hospital at 38 weeks gestation for a cesarean section due to premature rupture of membranes and meconium stained amniotic fluid. During the procedure a single puncture between L2 and L3 vertebrae was made with the use of a 26-gauge, pencil-point needle. The amount of 2.8 ml of analgesic solution was administered in order to obtain subarachnoid analgesia at the level of Th4 and Th5 vertebrae. Postpartum recovery was uneventful for the first two days. On the third day the patient developed strong headache in the forehead area and tinnitus. An anesthesiologist diagnosed post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). The patient received 1 g of Paracetamol every 6 hours intravenously together with 3000 ml of crystalloid solution for 24 hours. As a result, the patient recovered and was discharged home with her infant. Five days later the patient presented at the neurology clinic because of strong and chronic temporal lobe headache. No other complaints were reported. Upon admission, the patient had a head CT followed by an MRI examination, which revealed cranial hematomas localized bilaterally in the area of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, spreading from the cranial vault to the skull base. The width of the hematomas was: 3-4 mm on the left and 5-6 mm on the right side. Hematomas infiltrated the anterior part of the medial longitudinal fissure. Magnetic resonance angiography showed normal images of the arteries, veins, and the dural venous sinuses. No vascular malformations, which may be a source of intracranial hemorrhage, were found. Other tests showed normal results. Patient condition during hospitalization was stable. Conservative treatment was implemented, i.e. fluids administered intravenously anti

  17. A prospective randomised study to compare the utility and outcomes of subdural and subperiosteal drains for the treatment of chronic subdural haematoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2012-11-01

    The usage of a drain following evacuation of a chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is known to reduce recurrence. In this study we aim to compare the clinical outcomes and recurrence rate of utilising two different types of drains (subperiosteal and subdural drain) following drainage of a CSDH.

  18. "ACUTE FATTY LIVER OF PREGNANCY AND PREECLAMPSIA IN A TRIPLET GESTATION "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaffarnejad

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP is a rare entity and a potentially fatal disorder. It is reported to be more common in multiple than singleton pregnancies. Sometimes it coincides with preeclampsia but the exact etiology is not yet understood. A 31-year-old G2 P1 patient admitted at 33 weeks of pregnancy with signs and symptoms of jaundice, gastroenteritis, hypertension, malaise, urinary incontinence and preterm contractions. She had history of idiopathic hypothalamic amenorrhea and by a recent trial with gonadotropins, she had got triplet gestation. After admission her general condition deteriorated. She underwent Cesarean section at once and all fetuses survived. She had severe postpartum hemorrhage. The results of laboratory tests indicated coagulopathy and liver function abnormalities. The AFLP was diagnosed on the third day of hospital stay. She was discharged one week later. Again she returned with complaint of severe sustained headache. Computed tomography showed subdural hemorrhage and drainage of hematoma was performed immediately. Finally the patient recovered from all of these critical conditions. This is the first report of AFLP in a patient with history of idiopathic hypothalamic amenorrhea. AFLP should be suspected in every pregnant patient with preeclampsia and gastroenteritis symptoms in the third trimester of pregnancy.

  19. Ultrasonographic findings of psoas abscess and hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Yong Dae; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Soon Yong

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic findings of 9 cases tuberculous abscess, 5 cases of pyogenic abscess and 2 cases of hematoma of psoas and adjacent muscles was made. Fluid collection with or without internal echoes was seen in 12 cases out of total 16 cases. Other findings were 2 cases of only muscle swelling, 1 cases of highly echogenic mass-like appearance and 1 case of fluid collection with septae. Ultrasonography is considered an accurate method in identifying early pathologic changes of the psoas muscle and determining its extent, and in differentiating tumor from fluid collection of the psoas muscle. Authors dare to say that ultrasound examination is a procedure of choice in the diagnosis of psoas abscess and hematoma

  20. A new treatment for hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiwaku, Tetsushi; Tanikawa, Tatsuya; Amano, Keiichi

    1986-01-01

    Durining the last 2 years, 46 cases of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage in the basal ganglia were treated by CT guided stereotactic aspiration and their outcome was evaluated in terms of the rate of hematoma removal, the change of consciousness level and the recovery of motor and sensory functions. They are aged from 45 to 79 years old, the average 56, and aspirated 1 to 24 days after the onset, two third of them being within 1 week. The whole procedure was done in the CT room under direct CT guidance and by one trial. In putaminal type hemorrhage, the removed hematoma volumes ranged from 9 to 48 ml, average being 23.7 ml, in thalamic type from 5 to 29 ml, average being 15.5 ml. The average rate of removal was 81.1 % in 30 cases within 1 week. In most cases, preoperative consciousness was not severely disturbed, in putaminal type, 19 were alert or confused, 4 somnolent, 5 stuperous and in thalamic type, 6, 6, 3 respectively and 2 were semicomatous, one of them had herniation sign. In putaminal type all but 2 cases recovered to alert or confused state, the first one had postoperative bleeding and the other was already apallic preoperatively. In thalamic type, we lost 3 cases, 2 by gastrointestinal bleeding and 1 DIC, by rehemorrhage 2 months after the operation. All but one who was semicomatous preoperatively recovered to alertness. In motor function, some cases of the putaminal bleeding with intact internal capsule remained hemiplegic. On the other hand, most of the cases with partial destruction of the internal capsule on CT recovered well in both types of hematoma. Especially in thalamic type, only 2 had inability to walk durinig the follow-up period. In sensory function, two thirds of the cases recovered to almost normal level. CT guided stereotactic aspiration, therefore, can be evaluated as less invasive and more definitive treatment for intracerebral hematoma in the basal ganglia. (author)

  1. An Obscure Case of Hepatic Subcapsular Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Ndzengue

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous liver bleeding is often reported in preeclampsia. It is otherwise rare and has been linked to gross anatomical lesions and coagulopathy. We report a case of subcapsular hematoma of the liver without any apparent lesion and in the absence of coagulopathy. A 41-year-old male, paraplegic for 16 years, presented to the emergency department 3 days after sudden onset of right upper quadrant and shoulder pain. He had been on vitamins and 5,000 units subcutaneous heparin 12-hourly at the nursing home for the last month. He was in no distress, afebrile, with stable vitals. Physical examination showed a diverting colostomy, tender hepatomegaly and sacral decubiti. A fecal occult blood test was negative. There was spastic paraplegia below the level of T12. Two days after admission, the patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. PTT, PT, liver profile, BUN and creatinine were all normal, however his hemoglobin had dropped from 11.3 to 7.6 g/dl. An abdominal CT scan revealed an isolated 9.0 × 1.8 cm subcapsular hematoma. The patient received blood transfusion in the intensive care unit and was discharged 7 days later. In conclusion, spontaneous liver hemorrhage occurs in the nonobstetrical population in the setting of gross anatomical lesions or coagulopathy. This is the first report of an isolated subcapsular liver hematoma.

  2. Intracerebral hematoma complicating herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sainz, Aida; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Guio-Carrión, Laura; Matute-Nieves, Alexandra; Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carbayo-Lozano, Guillermo; Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    To describe two patients who developed an intracranial hematoma as a complication of temporal lobe encephalitis due to herpes simplex type 1 virus, and to review the literature. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman developed a brain hematoma in the location of the encephalitic lesion on day 9 after the onset of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) that required surgical evacuation. The second patient, a 53-year-old woman was being treated for HSE; on day 8 after admission a temporal lobe hematoma with midline shift was disclosed due to persistent headache. Both patients survived but were left with sequelae. We conducted a PubMed/MEDLINE search from 1986 to April 2013 on this topic. We have found 20 additional cases reported in the literature and review their characteristics. Hemorrhage was present on admission in 35% of pooled patients, and consistently involved the area of encephalitis. Clinical presentation of intracranial hemorrhage overlapped the encephalitic symptoms in two-thirds of the patients. Half of patients underwent surgery. Overall, mortality rate was low (5.2%), and half of patients fully recovered. Intracranial bleeding, although infrequent, can complicate the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis and should be borne in mind since its presence may require neurosurgery. Although its presentation may overlap the encephalitic features, the lack of improvement or the worsening of initial symptoms, particularly during the second week of admission, should lead to this suspicion and to perform a neuroimaging study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Secondary encephalocele in infant following subdural empyema repaired endoscopically-A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roshan K; Kaur, Navjot

    2017-09-01

    Subdural empyema (SDE) is an uncommon entity, mostly associated with meningitis and can be life threatening in infants. Rarely, a subdural empyema can lead to nasal encephalocele which can be challenging situation to manage especially in infant. We present a case of 7 month old infant who presented with subdural empyema that led to formation of nasal encaphalocele after 4 months which was managed endoscopic route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale score and ICH score: which predicts the 30-day mortality better for intracerebral hematoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality.This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018, 0.715 (P = 0.0008 (by ABC/2 to 0.738 (P = 0.0002 (by CAVA, 0.877 (P<0.0001 (by ABC/2 to 0.882 (P<0.0001 (by CAVA, and 0.912 (P<0.0001, respectively.Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score.

  5. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis presenting with an intracranial epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.-W.; McLeary, M.S.; Zuppan, C.W.; Won, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy developed vomiting and severe headache following minor head trauma. A CT scan of the head demonstrated a lytic lesion of the skull and adjacent epidural hematoma. Surgical evacuation and removal of the skull lesion and hematoma were carried out, and pathologic evaluation resulted in a diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH). Epidural involvement of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is very rare, and we report the first case of LCH presenting as an intracranial epidural hematoma. (orig.)

  6. Prognostic Significance of Ultraearly Hematoma Growth in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients Receiving Hematoma Evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Jun; Guo, Rui; Ma, Lu; Li, Mou; Wang, Xiaoze; Lin, Sen; You, Chao; Li, Hao

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the association between ultraearly hematoma growth (uHG) and clinical outcome in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) receiving hematoma evacuation. Supratentorial sICH patients receiving hematoma evacuation within 24 hours after ictus were enrolled in this study. uHG was defined as baseline hematoma volume/onset-to-computed tomography (CT) time (mL/h). The outcome was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months. Unfavorable outcome was defined as mRS >2. A total of 93 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean uHG was 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/h. In 69 (74.2%) of patients, the outcome was unfavorable at 3 months. The uHG in patients with unfavorable outcome were significantly higher than in those with favorable outcome (11.0 ± 6.1 mL/h vs. 8.3 ± 2.5 mL/h, P = 0.003). The optimal cutoff of uHG for predicting unfavorable outcome was 8.7 mL/h. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of uHG >8.7 mL/h for predicting unfavorable outcome were 56.5%, 75.0%, 86.7%, and 37.5%, respectively. uHG is a helpful predictor of unfavorable outcome in sICH patients treated with hematoma evacuation. The optimal cutoff of uHG to assist in predicting unfavorable outcome in sICH patients receiving hematoma evacuation is 8.7mL/h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Dhawan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramural hematoma of the gastrointestinal tract is an uncommon occurrence, with the majority being localized to the esophagus or duodenum. Hematoma of the gastric wall is very rare, and has been described most commonly in association with coagulopathy, peptic ulcer disease, trauma, and amyloid-associated microaneurysms. A case of massive gastric intramural hematoma, secondary to anticoagulation therapy, and a gastric ulcer that was successfully managed with conservative therapy, is presented. A literature review of previously reported cases of gastric hematoma is also provided.

  8. Gastric intramural hematoma: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Vivek; Mohamed, Ahmed; Fedorak, Richard N

    2009-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of the gastrointestinal tract is an uncommon occurrence, with the majority being localized to the esophagus or duodenum. Hematoma of the gastric wall is very rare, and has been described most commonly in association with coagulopathy, peptic ulcer disease, trauma, and amyloid-associated microaneurysms. A case of massive gastric intramural hematoma, secondary to anticoagulation therapy, and a gastric ulcer that was successfully managed with conservative therapy, is presented. A literature review of previously reported cases of gastric hematoma is also provided.

  9. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma using the improved cubature formula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Lu, Wen

    2010-06-01

    The more accurate calculate method was investigated according to the improved formula of intracranial hematoma using segment deducing. The improved formula was deduced to calculate the intracranial hematoma using the volume formula of the solid geometry. The volume of intracranial hematoma was measured as a related accurate standards using software. The volumes of intracranial hematoma calculated by the improved formula, Tada's formula and the software were compared. The measure accuracy of the improved formula was higher than that of Tada's formula, and showed a similarity with that by using software method. The improved formula method shows a more accurate result than Tada's formula, and can be used in forensic practice.

  10. Intramural intestinal hematoma causing obstruction in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Carpenter, J

    1984-01-15

    Intramural hematoma of the intestine caused intestinal obstruction in three dogs. Two dogs were examined because of vomiting and anorexia of several weeks' duration. In one of these, an intramural hematoma of the duodenum was associated with chronic pancreatitis. A cause was not found in the second dog. The third dog, which had clinical and radiographic evidence of gastric dilatation, was found at surgery to have hemoperitoneum associated with a ruptured intramural intestinal hematoma. In 1 dog, the hematoma was evacuated through a serosal incision. In the other 2 dogs, the problem was resolved by resection of the involved segment of intestine, followed by anastomosis. All 3 dogs recovered without complications.

  11. Chronic subdural haematoma in patients with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlivanis, I; Andrich, J; Scholz, M; Harders, A; Saft, C; Schmieder, K

    2006-10-01

    We studied the frequency of patients who had chronic subdural haematomas (CSDH) and Huntington's disease (HD) in a 1-year study period. In our department a total of 58 patients with CSDH were treated. Four patients (6.9% of them) had HD. Surgical evacuation of the haematoma was performed in all four cases with the use of a twist drill trepanation without a drainage system.

  12. Hematoma extradural do vértex: relato de caso Epidural hematoma at the vertex: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Haikel Jr.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos caso incomum de um paciente de 37 anos com hematoma extradural traumático do vértex com sintomas de hipertensão intracraniana. O diagnóstico foi feito através da tomografia do crânio em cortes coronais e o paciente foi submetido a craniotomia com drenagem do hematoma.We report the unusual case of a 37 years old man with an epidural traumatic hematoma at the vertex with intracranial hypertension symptoms. The diagnostic was achieved with coronal cranial tomographic scans and a craniotomy was performed for hematoma removal.

  13. Hematoma Asfixiante Tardío.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Hernández, Marta; Bouzas Pérez, Daniel; Fernández Crespo, Ana Belén; Barredo Cañibano, Francisco Javier; Casanueva, Jesús A; Carceller Malo, José M

    2014-01-01

    En la práctica anestésica diaria, con el objetivo de monitorizar la presión venosa central para control hemodinámico (precarga, introducir un swan ganz para vigilar la presión arterial pulmonar...) o infundir drogas vasopresoras, se canaliza una vía venosa central, yugular o subclavia. Aunque la tasa complicaciones es baja, esta técnica no está exenta de riesgos: hemotórax, pseudoaneurisma, fístula arterio-venosa, lesión vascular venosa, hematoma, punción arterial, entre otras. La tasa de ...

  14. Spontaneous Rectus Sheath Hematoma in the Elderly: An Unusual Case and Update on Proper Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Galyfos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma (SRSH is an uncommon medical emergency in the elderly. We present a case of SRSH with an atypical clinical presentation and discuss literature regarding diagnosis and proper management. A 75-year-old female patient was transferred to the emergency department due to acute dyspnoea and confusion. Her medical history revealed a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and no coughing or use of anticoagulants. The clinical examination showed tenderness of the left lower abdomen, although palpation was misleading due to patient’s obesity. Laboratory investigations showed light anaemia. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a large rectus sheath hematoma of the left abdominal wall. Despite further deterioration of the patient, conservative management including bed rest, fluid replacement, blood products transfusion, and proper analgesia was successful. No surgical intervention was needed. Prompt diagnosis and management of SRSH plays significant role in the prognosis, especially in elder patients. Independently of size and severity, conservative management remains the first therapeutic choice. Only by failure of supportive management, progressive and large hematoma or uncontrollable hemodynamic patients, interventional management including surgery or less invasive newer techniques is indicated.

  15. Hematoma intramural duodenal como complicação de terapia anticoagulante com Warfarin: relato de caso e revisão da literatura Intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of therapy with Warfarin: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Faria

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos o caso de uma paciente em terapia anticoagulante oral com Warfarin, apresentando obstrução intestinal aguda. A tomografia computadorizada revelou hematoma intramural duodenal. O tratamento baseou-se na correção das provas de coagulação e medidas expectantes. Este caso ilustra o valor da tomografia computadorizada e da abordagem conservadora nos pacientes em terapia anticoagulante com obstrução aguda do intestino delgado.We report a case of a patient receiving chronic oral anticoagulant therapy with Warfarin who presented with acute intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography showed intramural duodenal hematoma. Treatment was conservative with correction of the coagulation parameters and observation. This case exemplifies the usefulness of conservative therapy and computed tomography in patients with acute small bowel obstruction receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  16. Longterm surgery of posttraumatic intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babochkin D.S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Research objective — studying of consequences of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas in the remote period. Material. The nearest and remote results of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas at 105 patients in terms from 6 months till 3 years are analyzed. During research the anamnesis was studied, neurologic investigation, and also research cognitive functions by means of scale MMSE, the test of drawing of hours, a scale of studying of alarm/depression HADS, learning of 5 words, scale quality of life SF-36. Results. It is established, that in the remote period the condition of the majority of patients gradually improves, at the same time, frequent enough and expressed consequences which are necessary for analyzing with the purpose of optimization of outcomes and the forecast at the given disease are observed. The special attention should be given again developing complications to which it is possible to carry epileptic seizures and behavioral-memorable infringements. Conclusion. Studying of the remote consequences of this heavy kind of craniocereberal trauma allows to optimize results of treatment and to provide complex medical, labor, social and family adaptation

  17. Complete paralysis of the quadriceps secondary to post-traumatic iliopsoas hematoma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, N; Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Chemla, N; Herman, S

    2015-01-01

    Paralysis of the femoral nerve secondary to compression by a hematoma of the iliopsoas is rarely post-traumatic. The acute surgical removal of hematoma seems the treatment of choice. The main objective of this systematic review was to determine the optimal delay between the trauma and surgery, to obtain a total functional recovery. A search was performed via PubMed. The inclusion criteria were the studies in English language, reporting the results of the treatment of femoral nerve palsy secondary to compression by a post-traumatic hematoma of the iliopsoas. The primary evaluation criterion was the clinical recovery of femoral nerve function. The secondary criteria were the delay of recovery and the delay between the trauma and surgery. Thirteen studies were identified, only case reports. Sixteen patients were included, mean age 16.6 ± 3.4 years, 11 men and 5 women. The injury was associated with the sports practice in 12/16 (75 %) cases. Neurological symptoms developed about 5 days after injury. Femoral palsy was complete in 8 patients and partial in 8 patients. The mean delay between the injury and the diagnosis was 7.3 (2-25) days in conservative group and 17.8 (4-45) days in surgical group. Seven patients were managed conservatively, 6 partial paralysis and 1 total paralysis, and 9 surgically, 7 total paralysis and 2 partial paralysis. The recovery was total in 13/14 patients (seven surgical treatment and six conservative management) and partial in one patient who was managed conservatively despite a total paralysis. The delay of total recovery varied from 1 month to 6 weeks in conservative group and 3 months to 2 years in surgical group. This systematic review seems to indicate that whatever the delay, surgery is necessary in case of complete paralysis of the femoral nerve secondary to compression from a post-traumatic hematoma of the iliopsoas muscle.

  18. Mirror image extradural hematoma in elderly population: management strategy with surgical bilateral or unilateral evacuation or conservative treatment modality with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyarthee Guru Dutta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extradural hematomas (EDH represent one of common imaging findings in cases sustaining traumatic brain injury. Bilateral extradural haematoma is considered rare and even rarer in elder people male. Bilateral extradural hematoma is usually acute, and generally associated with severe traumatic head injury. Mirror-image extradural hematomas (MEDH constitute a special type of bilateral extradural hamatomas, which is placed anatomically symmetrically on both the sides of the intracranial compartment, requires prompt diagnosis and emergent surgical intervention as it carry high mortality if evacuation of hematoma is not carried out expeditely. The mortality rate still remains higher in comparison to unilateral single extradural hematomas. The postoperative outcome depends on preoperative neurological status, total volume of blood, accurate diagnosis and prompt shifting to neurosurgical facility, expatiation of surgical procedure, pre- hospital care. Authors report a case of a - 65-year-old man who presented with acute simultaneous bilateral extradural haematomas following road traffic accident, underwent bilateral trephine craniotomy and simultaneous evacuation on both side led to good recovery.

  19. Subdural haematoma complicating shunting for normal pressure hydrocephalus in the setting of concomitant antiplatelet medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the occurrence and management of subdural haematoma after shunt implantation for normal pressure hydrocephalus and to determine the risk of recurrence in the setting of antiplatelet medication. METHODS: From a consecutive series of 80 patients implanted with a cerebrospinal...... fluid shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus, records from 11 patients taking antiplatelet drugs, who subsequently had surgery for subdural haematoma were extracted and retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Patients were followed up for a mean of 1819 days after shunt implantation. Subdural haematomas...... reoperations done before the subdural collection disappeared. Only one patient had a late recurrence almost 11 years after shunt implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Subdural haematoma in the setting of a ventriculoperitoneal implantation for normal pressure hydrocephalus and concomitant antiplatelet medication can...

  20. Evaluation of three imaging instruments in dogs with liver hematomas: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.P.; Knight, L.C.; Ponto, R.A.; Loken, M.K.

    1979-01-01

    Single-gamma emission computerized tomography (ECT) was compared with transmission computerized tomography (TCT) and scintillation-camera imaging (SC) in eight dogs with acute, solitary hematomas in the left liver lobe. The superior performance of TCT was attributed to its inherently better spatial resolution than those of ECT or SC, and to the fact that studies with TCT could be performed during apnea. ECT was more sensitive than SC to small changes in the spatial distribution of radionuclides. In addition, the ECT, by virtue of its sectioning capability, was more sensitive than is SC to differences in radionuclide concentrations at the same depth in an organ

  1. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cernea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity.

  2. Coleção subdural na criança: fisiopatologia e tratamento Subdural effusions in children: pathophysiology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Gusmão

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Nove crianças portadoras de coleção subdural (CSD foram tratadas por meio de derivação subduro-peritoneal. Todas foram submetidas a controle com tomografia computadorizada do encéfalo. O tamanho da coleção subdural foi avaliado por medida de sua área no corte tomográfico por meio de morfologia quantitativa com planímetro. Ocorreu regressão completa ou quase completa da CSD em oito pacientes. Os resultados funcionais foram excelentes em quatro pacientes, bons em três e maus em dois. Foi feita uma revisão da fisiopatologia e do tratamento da CSD na criança.Nine children harboring subdural effusions were treated by subduro peritoneal shunt. These patients were followed-up by CT scans. The area of the subdural effusions was measured by quantitative morphology with a planimeter. With the surgical treatment, the subdural effusion disappeared completely or near completely in 8 patients. The patient's functional state were excellent in 4, good in 3 and bad in 2 in the postoperative follow-up. We aldo reviewed the literature as far as the pathophysiology and the treatment of the subdural effusions are concerned.

  3. Added value of delayed computed tomography angiography in primary intracranial hemorrhage and hematoma size for predicting spot sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Te Chang; Chen, Tai Yuan; Shiue, Yow Ling; Chen, Jeon Hor; Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi; Ko, Ching Chung; Lin, Ching Po

    2018-04-01

    Background The computed tomography angiography (CTA) spot sign represents active contrast extravasation within acute primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is an independent predictor of hematoma expansion (HE) and poor clinical outcomes. The spot sign could be detected on first-pass CTA (fpCTA) or delayed CTA (dCTA). Purpose To investigate the additional benefits of dCTA spot sign in primary ICH and hematoma size for predicting spot sign. Material and Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 patients who underwent non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTA within 24 h of onset of primary ICH. The presence of spot sign on fpCTA or dCTA, and hematoma size on NCCT were recorded. The spot sign on fpCTA or dCTA for predicting significant HE, in-hospital mortality, and poor clinical outcomes (mRS ≥ 4) are calculated. The hematoma size for prediction of CTA spot sign was also analyzed. Results Only the spot sign on dCTA could predict high risk of significant HE and poor clinical outcomes as on fpCTA ( P sign on fpCTA or dCTA in the absence of intraventricular and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Conclusion This study clarifies that dCTA imaging could improve predictive performance of CTA in primary ICH. Furthermore, the XY value is the best predictor for CTA spot sign.

  4. Empiema espinhal subdural relato de um caso: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães,Gerson Canedo de; Rocha,José Roberto Coelho da; Souza,Luís Alberto M.; Salomão,José Francisco; Jevoux,Carla; Carneiro,Welmer

    1995-01-01

    A raridade do empiema subdural pode ser verflcada pela escassez de casos descritos na literatura. Os autores apresentam mais um caso, mostrando as dificuldades diagnosticas principalmente quando não há aparente porta de entrada. Enfatizam, nestas circunstâncias, a importância de certos sinais clínicos, o valor da punção lombar e da imagem por ressonância nuclear magnética na elucidação diagnóstica. Este último exame não foi mencionado anteriormente na literatura consultada sobre o assunto. O ...

  5. Bilateral parietal extradural metastatic ewing's sarcoma simulating acute epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, E.; Imran, M.; Faridi, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    Sarcomas usually metastasize to lugs. The following case report describes an unusual metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma to extradural parietal region bilaterally. The primary was found at lower end of ulna. (author)

  6. Sciatica due to pelvic hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocaman Umit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sciatica is defined as pain in the sciatic nerve distribution. The most common reason of sciatica is radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia. Other causes can be congenital, acquired, infectious, neoplastic, or inflammatory. The piriformis syndrome is another cause. The pain starts in an insidious manner when the cause of sciatica is an extraspinal tumor. It is intermittent at first but a constant and progressive pain that does not decrease with position or rest gradually develops in all patients. The possibility of an intraabdominal or pelvic mass should always be considered and the relevant tests requested when the cause of the sciatica cannot be explained. We present an 83-year-old male who presented with non-traumatic and non-vascular lumbosacral plexopathy due to a large hematoma in the left adductor muscle following the use of warfarin sodium.

  7. Computed tomographic investigations on intraventricular hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laber-Szillat, S.

    1982-01-01

    This work investigated in 106 patients with intraventricular hematomas all the known factors which can have an influence on prognosis: age, sex, anamnesis of the patients, size, extent and localization of the intracranial bleeding, underlying angiopathy and differences between arterial and venous and spontaneous and traumatic bleedings. It was shown that the state of mind was the deciding prognostic factor, whereby viligance was the cumulative expression of all other investigated influences. A computed tomography (CT) examination is deciding in the question of operative hydrocephalus care. In 13 patients it was further shown, how clearly CT results and brain dissection allowed themselves to be compared. The computed tomographic examination method is best suited to achieve even physiological and more extensive prognostic possibilities. (orig.) [de

  8. Spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keynan, Ory; Ashkenazi, Ely; Floman, Yizhar [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Smorgick, Yossi [Israel Spine Center at Assuta Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zerifin (Israel); Schwartz, Allan J. [Hadassah University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2006-09-15

    Lumbar or sacral nerve root compression is most commonly caused by intervertebral disc degeneration and/or herniation. Less frequently, other extradural causes may be implicated, such as infection, neoplasm, epidural hematoma, or ligamentum flavum pathology. We present the case of a patient with spontaneous ligamentum flavum hematoma compressing the L4 nerve root, without antecedent trauma. Although exceedingly rare, the diagnosis of ligamentum flavum pathology in general, and that of ligamentum flavum hematoma in particular, should be considered on those rare occasions when the etiology of lumbar or sacral nerve root compressions appears enigmatic on radiological studies. Usually surgical treatment produces excellent clinical outcome. (orig.)

  9. Changes in signal intensity of cerebral hematoma in magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant, J.; Poyatos, C.; Marti-Bonmarti, L.; Martinez, J.; Ferrer, D.; Dualde, D.; Talens, A.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive for the detection of intraparenchymatous hemorrhage. The evolution of hematoma over time translates into changes in signal intensity. This means that we can determine when the hematoma presented and, in addition. follow its course. On the other hand, many intracranial processes developing association with hemorrhage, the recognition of which is, in some cases, of importance. We have studied 60 cerebral hematomas and have described the changes that will take place in their signal and the reasons for them. (author)

  10. Giant Chest Wall Hematoma Mimicking Elastofibroma Dorsi: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Kuhn; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Hematoma on the thoracic wall is very rare. We describe here a 63-year-old man with a huge chest wall hematoma and the man had no history of trauma. The patient was found to have a large mass located subjacent to the inferior angle of the right scapula area and the CT and MRI findings were similar to those of an elastofibroma dorsi. We describe the CT and MRI findings of this hematoma and how to make the differential diagnosis from elastofibroma dorsi

  11. Giant Chest Wall Hematoma Mimicking Elastofibroma Dorsi: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Kuhn; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kang, Si Won

    2011-01-01

    Hematoma on the thoracic wall is very rare. We describe here a 63-year-old man with a huge chest wall hematoma and the man had no history of trauma. The patient was found to have a large mass located subjacent to the inferior angle of the right scapula area and the CT and MRI findings were similar to those of an elastofibroma dorsi. We describe the CT and MRI findings of this hematoma and how to make the differential diagnosis from elastofibroma dorsi

  12. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lädermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described.

  13. [Measurement of intracranial hematoma volume by personal computer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Wanping; Tan, Lihua; Zhai, Ning; Zhou, Shunke; Wang, Rui; Xue, Gongshi; Xiao, An

    2011-01-01

    To explore the method for intracranial hematoma volume measurement by the personal computer. Forty cases of various intracranial hematomas were measured by the computer tomography with quantitative software and personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software, respectively. the data from the 2 methods were analyzed and compared. There was no difference between the data from the computer tomography and the personal computer (P>0.05). The personal computer with Photoshop CS3 software can measure the volume of various intracranial hematomas precisely, rapidly and simply. It should be recommended in the clinical medicolegal identification.

  14. Evidence-based assessment of well-established interventions: the parachute and the epidural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kyle S; Brearley, Ann M; Haines, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    The methods of evidence-based medicine are a relatively recent development in the understanding of clinical practice. They are criticized as not providing support for interventions long held to be highly effective based on experience that predated the availability of evidence-based analysis. To determine if the methods of evidence-based medicine can be successfully applied to interventions established before those methods were developed. Systematic review of English language literature on the natural history and treated prognosis of acute epidural hematoma and analysis of existing data on mortality associated with parachute use. Sources of data included Medline, Old Medline, Science Citation Index, British and US Parachute Associations, and Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board databases (both of the United States). Also included were national databases reporting mortality and total number of parachute uses. The estimated mortality of falling from an airplane with an ineffective parachute is 74% (69-79). Mortality associated with effective parachute deployment is between 0.0011% and 0.0017%. For acute epidural hematoma, estimated mortality is 98.54% (95.1-99.9) without treatment and 12.9% (10.5-15.3) with treatment. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 death for the parachute is estimated to be 1.35 (1.27-1.45) and for epidural hematoma 1.17 (1.13-1.22) (95% binomial confidence intervals in parentheses). The methods of evidence-based medicine are robust and can deal with interventions of great face validity and those considered well established before such methods were well developed. We propose initial criteria for evaluating the quality of evidence supporting long-established interventions.

  15. Changes in signal intensity of cerebral hematoma in magnetic resonance. Claves en la semiologia del hematoma cerebral en resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galant, J.; Poyatos, C.; Marti-Bonmarti, L.; Martinez, J.; Ferrer, D.; Dualde, D.; Talens, A. (Universidad de Valencia (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas)

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive for the detection of intraparenchymatous hemorrhage. The evolution of hematoma over time translates into changes in signal intensity. This means that we can determine when the hematoma presented and, in addition. follow its course. On the other hand, many intracranial processes developing association with hemorrhage, the recognition of which is, in some cases, of importance. We have studied 60 cerebral hematomas and have described the changes that will take place in their signal and the reasons for them. (author)

  16. Acute aortic syndromes: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Carole A; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2015-05-01

    The term acute aortic syndrome comprises aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. The most recent developments in acute aortic syndromes include (1) a change in the mindset that each entity is pathologically distinct, with a shift toward considering the acute aortic syndromes as points along a spectrum of aortic disease, (2) the optimization of aortic imaging quality and radiation dose, and (3) surgical or endovascular management. This review article focuses on how these developments pertain to thoracic radiologists.

  17. Idiopathic intraparenchymal hematoma of the liver in a neonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amodio, John; Fefferman, Nancy; Rivera, Rafael; Pinkney, Lynne; Strubel, Naomi [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, New York University Medical Center, 560 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Hepatic hematomas in newborn infants are not frequently detected clinically, but are often found at perinatal autopsies. These hematomas of the liver are usually subcapsular in location. A variety of etiologies for such hematomas has been implicated, such as trauma, sepsis, and coagulopathies. We present a neonate who presented with jaundice and abdominal distention. Initial imaging studies revealed a large intraparenchymal lesion of the liver, which was at first thought to be suspicious for neoplasm; however, MRI showed the lesion to be hemorrhagic and follow-up sonographic studies showed total resolution of this lesion, compatible with hematoma. The intraparenchymal location and the idiopathic nature of this lesion distinguish this case from others previously reported. (orig.)

  18. Unilateral proptosis and extradural hematoma in a child with scurvy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Sumit; Sivanandan, Sindhu; Seth, Rachna; Kabra, Shushil [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Pediatrics, New Delhi (India); Aneesh, Mangalasseril K.; Gupta, Vaibhav [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2007-09-15

    We report a 3-year-old boy with unilateral proptosis, painful swelling of the right thigh and aphasia. He had radiographic evidence of scurvy in the limbs and bilateral frontal extradural hematomas with a mass lesion in the left orbit on MRI. He was treated with vitamin C and on follow-up 8 weeks later had recovered with no evidence of the orbital mass on clinical or radiological study. Scurvy manifesting as proptosis and extradural hematoma is rare. (orig.)

  19. Cervical epidural hematoma: Following interlaminar cervical epidural steroid injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwarkadas Kanhayalal Baheti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical epidural steroid injection is a common procedure performed for patients with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical epidural hematoma is a rare but known complication of Intervention Pain Treatment Procedure (IPTP in healthy patients without coagulopathy. We report a case of cervical epidural hematoma as a complication of cervical epidural steroid injection in an elderly patient with cervical radiculopathy; resulting in right upper limb motor sensory deficit. Patient responded to conservative management and surgery was not performed since symptoms progressively improved.

  20. Hematoma hepático subcapsular en el puerperio

    OpenAIRE

    Carazo H,Belén; Romero C,Manuel Ángel; Puebla M,Cristina; Sanz M,Amelia; Rojas P,Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    El hematoma hepático subcapsular es una complicación infrecuente y grave durante la gestación o el período puerperal. Esta patología generalmente se relaciona con preeclampsia o síndrome de HELLP. Su diagnóstico debe confirmarse por tomografía axial computarizada. La precocidad del diagnóstico y tratamiento es importante para evitar la ruptura del hematoma.