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Sample records for acute respiratory failure

  1. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

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    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  2. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). METHODS: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational pr...

  3. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

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    Mas A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Arantxa Mas, Josep MasipCritical Care Department, Consorci Sanitari Integral (CSI, Hospital Sant Joan Despí Moisès Broggi and Hospital General de l’Hospitalet, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. Keywords

  4. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique.

  5. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

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    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  6. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department.

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    Kozak, Hasan Huseyin; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Teke, Turgut; Altas, Mustafa; Karatas, Emine

    2016-06-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO 2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure.

  7. Acute Respiratory Failure in Acute Poisoning by Neutrotropic Substances

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    A. N. Lodyagin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of methods for diagnosing and treating critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF in acute poisoning by neurotropic substances. Subjects and methods. Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute severe intoxication with neurotropic poisons were examined. All the patients were admitted for toxic-hypoxic coma and ARF; in this connection all the patients underwent artificial ventilation (AV. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 1 those in whom the traditional treatments (AV, detoxifying therapy, and infusional and cardiotropic support could restore the basic parameters of vital functions, as judged from the recovered oxygenation index; these patients had no metabolic shifts; 2 those who had signs of pulmonary hyperhydration, low cardiac output and moderate metabolic disorders, as suggested by elevated lactate levels; 3 seriously ill patients in whom the interval between the time of poisoning to care delivery was more than 20 hours; the patients of this group had the most significant metabolic disorders. Results. Correction of ARF in critically ill patients with acute poisoning should include, in addition to the rational parameters of AV and detoxifying therapy, agents for targeted therapy for sequels of hypoxia and energy deficiency states. For maximally rapid and effective oxygen transport recovery, the addition of perfluorane to the complex therapy cardinally improves the results of treatment and reduces mortality rates. Conclusion. The complexity of the pathogenesis of ARF and its sequels is a ground for diagnosing and correcting not only ventilation disturbances, but also pulmonary microcirculatory disorders and metabolic disturbances. Key words: acute intoxication with neu-rotropic poisons, acute respiratory failure, pulmonary hyperhydration, hypoxia, metabolic disturbances.

  8. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department

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    Hasan Huseyin Kozak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure (ARF is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure. Keywords: Acute respiratory failure, Myasthenia graves, Emergency medicine

  9. Toluene inducing acute respiratory failure in a spray paint sniffer.

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    Peralta, Diego P; Chang, Aymara Y

    2012-01-01

    Toluene, formerly known as toluol, is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is widely used as an industrial feedstock and as a solvent. Like other solvents, toluene is sometimes also used as an inhalant drug for its intoxicating properties. It has potential to cause multiple effects in the body including death. I report a case of a 27-year-old male, chronic spray paint sniffer, who presented with severe generalized muscle weakness and developed acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. Toluene toxicity was confirmed with measurement of hippuric acid of 8.0 g/L (normal <5.0 g/L). Acute respiratory failure is a rare complication of chronic toluene exposure that may be lethal if it is not recognized immediately. To our knowledge, this is the second case of acute respiratory failure due to toluene exposure.

  10. Insufficiency of Medical Care for Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

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    A. V. Dats

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research: to analyze insufficiency of medical care for patients with acute respiratory failure in the ICU.Materials and methods. It was a retrospective study of 160 patients' medical records (age from 15 to 84 years with acute respiratory failure (ARF hospitalized in the ICUs of 24 regional and municipal hospitals of the Irkutsk Oblast. Medical records were provided by the Territorial Fund of Compulsory Medical Insurance of citizens of Irkutsk region.The results. The basic defects in conducting mechanical ventilation were associated with improper lung function evaluation, microbiological tests of sputum and radiology. ARF was not diagnosed in 32 of 160 ICU patients (20%. In 23% of cases the causes of ARF were not diagnosed. The greatest part of the defects in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure was found during the treatment of hypoxemia: no recovery of the respiratory tract patency, no prescription of oxygen for hypoxemia, no mechanical ventilation for persistent hypoxemia on the background of maximum oxygen supply and late switching to mechanical ventilation at the stage of hypoxic cardiac arrest.Conclusions. The use of pulse oximetry alone in the absence of arterial blood gas analysis in 98% of patients with acute respiratory failure and failure to perform the lung X-ray and/or MSCT imaging in 21% of patients were accompanied by a high level of undiagnosed acute respiratory distress syndrome (78%, lung contusion (60%, pulmonary embolism (40%, cardiogenic pulmonary edema (33%, and nosocomial pneumonia (28%. Defects of treatment of patients with ARF in 46% of cases were caused by inadequate management of hypoxemia associated with the recovery of the respiratory tract patency, prescription of oxygen, and mechanical ventilation. 

  11. Effectiveness and predictors of failure of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory failure.

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    Martín-González, F; González-Robledo, J; Sánchez-Hernández, F; Moreno-García, M N; Barreda-Mellado, I

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and identify predictors of failure of noninvasive ventilation. A retrospective, longitudinal descriptive study was made. Adult patients with acute respiratory failure. A total of 410 consecutive patients with noninvasive ventilation treated in an Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary university hospital from 2006 to 2011. Noninvasive ventilation. Demographic variables and clinical and laboratory test parameters at the start and two hours after the start of noninvasive ventilation. Evolution during admission to the Unit and until hospital discharge. The failure rate was 50%, with an overall mortality rate of 33%. A total of 156 patients had hypoxemic respiratory failure, 87 postextubation respiratory failure, 78 exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 61 hypercapnic respiratory failure without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and 28 had acute pulmonary edema. The failure rates were 74%, 54%, 27%, 31% and 21%, respectively. The etiology of respiratory failure, serum bilirubin at the start, APACHEII score, radiological findings, the need for sedation to tolerate noninvasive ventilation, changes in level of consciousness, PaO2/FIO2 ratio, respiratory rate and heart rate from the start and two hours after the start of noninvasive ventilation were independently associated to failure. The effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation varies according to the etiology of respiratory failure. Its use in hypoxemic respiratory failure and postextubation respiratory failure should be assessed individually. Predictors of failure could be useful to prevent delayed intubation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Palytoxin-induced acute respiratory failure

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    Lokendra K. Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin is one of the most potent toxins known to mankind and poses a high risk to humans through ingestion, inhalation and dermal routes [1,2]. Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown it is postulated that palytoxin binds to the Na+/K + ATPase pump resulting in K+ efflux, Ca2+ influx and membrane depolarization leading to widespread secondary pharmacological actions [2]. Palytoxin is highly toxic and can affect multiple organs causing severe symptoms including death. Palytoxin poisoning is mainly developed after ingesting seafood. We are reporting a case of suspected inhalational palytoxin poisoning in a healthy healthcare provider from who developed severe respiratory distress within 12 hours of exposure to vapors. We have highlighted diagnostic clues and clinical features in the patients' history that may help intensivists to diagnose a case of ARDS secondary to palytoxin poisoning.

  13. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

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    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  14. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

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    Clara Abadesso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI, to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF. Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156. Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%, and pneumonia in 44 (29% patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR, pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05 in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/ fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2 was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001. In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%. Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05. Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42-71.4 and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33-111.11. There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection.

  15. Acute respiratory failure due to ehrlichiosis - CT findings: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicknell, S.; Mason, A.

    2000-01-01

    Ehrlichiosis is a rare disease, with approximately 400 cases having been documented in the US since its recognition in 1986. Most of the reported cases were in the southeastern US, although 6 cases have been described in Washington state. Although most of these reported patients were admitted to hospital, severe complications developed in only a small proportion. Findings on chest imaging have been described in 3 children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of computed tomographic (CT) findings in a young adult with erhlichiosis in whom acute respiratory failure developed. (author)

  16. Respiratory Failure

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    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such as ... need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  17. Progressive Diaphragm Atrophy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Failure.

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    Glau, Christie L; Conlon, Thomas W; Himebauch, Adam S; Yehya, Nadir; Weiss, Scott L; Berg, Robert A; Nishisaki, Akira

    2018-02-05

    Diaphragm atrophy is associated with delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and increased mortality in critically ill adults. We sought to test for the presence of diaphragm atrophy in children with acute respiratory failure. Prospective, observational study. Single-center tertiary noncardiac PICU in a children's hospital. Invasively ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm thickness at end-expiration and end-inspiration were serially measured by ultrasound in 56 patients (median age, 17 mo; interquartile range, 5.5-52), first within 36 hours of intubation and last preceding extubation. The median duration of mechanical ventilation was 140 hours (interquartile range, 83-201). At initial measurement, thickness at end-expiration was 2.0 mm (interquartile range, 1.8-2.5) and thickness at end-inspiration was 2.5 mm (interquartile range, 2-2.8). The change in thickness at end-expiration during mechanical ventilation between first and last measurement was -13.8% (interquartile range, -27.4% to 0%), with a -3.4% daily atrophy rate (interquartile range, -5.6 to 0%). Thickening fraction = ([thickness at end-inspiration - thickness at end-expiration]/thickness at end-inspiration) throughout the course of mechanical ventilation was linearly correlated with spontaneous breathing fraction (beta coefficient, 9.4; 95% CI, 4.2-14.7; p = 0.001). For children with a period of spontaneous breathing fraction less than 0.5 during mechanical ventilation, those with exposure to a continuous neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 15) had a significantly larger decrease in thickness at end-expiration compared with children with low spontaneous breathing fraction who were not exposed to a neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 18) (-16.4%, [interquartile range, -28.4% to -7.0%] vs -7.3%; [interquartile range, -10.9% to -0%]; p = 0.036). Diaphragm atrophy is present in children on mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm contractility, measured as

  18. Failure of Noninvasive Ventilation for De Novo Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure: Role of Tidal Volume.

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    Carteaux, Guillaume; Millán-Guilarte, Teresa; De Prost, Nicolas; Razazi, Keyvan; Abid, Shariq; Thille, Arnaud W; Schortgen, Frédérique; Brochard, Laurent; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Mekontso Dessap, Armand

    2016-02-01

    A low or moderate expired tidal volume can be difficult to achieve during noninvasive ventilation for de novo acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (i.e., not due to exacerbation of chronic lung disease or cardiac failure). We assessed expired tidal volume and its association with noninvasive ventilation outcome. Prospective observational study. Twenty-four bed university medical ICU. Consecutive patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure between August 2010 and February 2013. Noninvasive ventilation was uniformly delivered using a simple algorithm targeting the expired tidal volume between 6 and 8 mL/kg of predicted body weight. Expired tidal volume was averaged and respiratory and hemodynamic variables were systematically recorded at each noninvasive ventilation session. Sixty-two patients were enrolled, including 47 meeting criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 32 failed noninvasive ventilation (51%). Pneumonia (n = 51, 82%) was the main etiology of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. The median (interquartile range) expired tidal volume averaged over all noninvasive ventilation sessions (mean expired tidal volume) was 9.8 mL/kg predicted body weight (8.1-11.1 mL/kg predicted body weight). The mean expired tidal volume was significantly higher in patients who failed noninvasive ventilation as compared with those who succeeded (10.6 mL/kg predicted body weight [9.6-12.0] vs 8.5 mL/kg predicted body weight [7.6-10.2]; p = 0.001), and expired tidal volume was independently associated with noninvasive ventilation failure in multivariate analysis. This effect was mainly driven by patients with PaO2/FIO2 up to 200 mm Hg. In these patients, the expired tidal volume above 9.5 mL/kg predicted body weight predicted noninvasive ventilation failure with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 87%. A low expired tidal volume is almost impossible to achieve in the majority of patients receiving noninvasive ventilation

  19. A comparison of volume control and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guldager, Henrik; Nielsen, Soeren L; Carl, Peder; Soerensen, Mogens B

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a new mode of ventilation (pressure-regulated volume control; PRVC) is associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics and outcome when compared with conventional volume control (VC) ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a randomised, prospective, open, cross over trial on 44 patients with acute respiratory failure in the general intensive care unit of a university hospital. After a stabiliz...

  20. Acute Respiratory Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients: A Single Intensive Care Unit Experience.

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    Ulas, Aydin; Kaplan, Serife; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Torgay, Adnan; Pirat, Arash; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Frequency of pulmonary complications after renal transplant has been reported to range from 3% to 17%. The objective of this study was to evaluate renal transplant recipients admitted to an intensive care unit to identify incidence and cause of acute respiratory failure in the postoperative period and compare clinical features and outcomes between those with and without acute respiratory failure. We retrospectively screened the data of 540 consecutive adult renal transplant recipients who received their grafts at a single transplant center and included those patients admitted to an intensive care unit during this period for this study. Acute respiratory failure was defined as severe dyspnea, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypoxemia or hypercapnia on room air, or requirement of noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 540 adult renal transplant recipients, 55 (10.7%) were admitted to an intensive care unit, including 26 (47.3%) admitted for acute respiratory failure. Median time from transplant to intensive care unit admission was 10 months (range, 0-67 mo). The leading causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia (56%) and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (44%). Mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen ratio was 174 ± 59, invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 13 patients (50%), and noninvasive mechanical ventilation was used in 8 patients (31%). The overall mortality was 16.4%. Acute respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission in almost half of our renal transplant recipients. Main causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Mortality of patients admitted for acute respiratory failure was similar to those without acute respiratory failure.

  1. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

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    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  2. Non.Invasive Ventilation for Adult Acute Respiratory Failure. Part II.

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    Duke, G J; Bersten, A D

    1999-06-01

    To discuss the clinical indications and complications of non-invasive ventilation. A review of articles published in peer-reviewed journals from 1966 to 1998 and identified through a MEDLINE search on non-invasive ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used in patients with respiratory failure caused by cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, in patients with acute respiratory failure, it appears that acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and acute respiratory failure associated with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia are the only disorders in which significant benefits have been associated with the use of the NIV mode of CPAP. The potential clinical benefit of CPAP in acute asthma and blunt chest trauma remains unclear. Pressure support ventilation is beneficial in patients with hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) secondary to respiratory muscle insufficiency, high inspiratory work loads, or reduced alveolar ventilation. It appears also to be associated with an improved outcome in COPD patients with hypercapnic ARF. Non-invasive ventilation using the modes of CPAP, PSV, BiPAP and NIPPV should be considered in patients with respiratory disorders who remain in acute respiratory failure despite conventional therapy, before considering invasive mechanical ventilation.

  3. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

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    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prone position for acute respiratory failure in adults.

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    Bloomfield, Roxanna; Noble, David W; Sudlow, Alexis

    2015-11-13

    Acute hypoxaemia de novo or on a background of chronic hypoxaemia is a common reason for admission to intensive care and for provision of mechanical ventilation. Various refinements of mechanical ventilation or adjuncts are employed to improve patient outcomes. Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome, one of the main contributors to the need for mechanical ventilation for hypoxaemia, remains approximately 40%. Ventilation in the prone position may improve lung mechanics and gas exchange and could improve outcomes. The objectives of this review are (1) to ascertain whether prone ventilation offers a mortality advantage when compared with traditional supine or semi recumbent ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory failure requiring conventional invasive artificial ventilation, and (2) to supplement previous systematic reviews on prone ventilation for hypoxaemic respiratory failure in an adult population. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to 31 January 2014), EMBASE (1980 to 31 January 2014), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to 31 January 2014) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1992 to 31 January 2014) in Ovid MEDLINE for eligible randomized controlled trials. We also searched for studies by handsearching reference lists of relevant articles, by contacting colleagues and by handsearching published proceedings of relevant journals. We applied no language constraints, and we reran the searches in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS in June 2015. We added five new studies of potential interest to the list of "Studies awaiting classification" and will incorporate them into formal review findings during the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effects of prone position versus supine/semi recumbent position during conventional mechanical ventilation in

  5. Determinants of noninvasive ventilation success or failure in morbidly obese patients in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemyze, Malcolm; Taufour, Pauline; Duhamel, Alain; Temime, Johanna; Nigeon, Olivier; Vangrunderbeeck, Nicolas; Barrailler, Stéphanie; Gasan, Gaëlle; Pepy, Florent; Thevenin, Didier; Mallat, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a common life-threatening complication in morbidly obese patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). We aimed to identify the determinants of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) success or failure for this indication. We prospectively included 76 consecutive patients with BMI>40 kg/m2 diagnosed with OHS and treated by NIV for ARF in a 15-bed ICU of a tertiary hospital. NIV failed to reverse ARF in only 13 patients. Factors associated with NIV failure included pneumonia (n = 12/13, 92% vs n = 9/63, 14%; psuccessful response to NIV was idiopathic decompensation of OHS (n = 30, 48% vs n = 0, 0%; p = 0.001). In the NIV success group (n = 63), 33 patients (53%) experienced a delayed response to NIV (with persistent hypercapnic acidosis during the first 6 hours). Multiple organ failure and pneumonia were the main factors associated with NIV failure and death in morbidly obese patients in hypoxemic ARF. On the opposite, NIV was constantly successful and could be safely pushed further in case of severe hypercapnic acute respiratory decompensation of OHS.

  6. Determinants of noninvasive ventilation success or failure in morbidly obese patients in acute respiratory failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Lemyze

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Acute respiratory failure (ARF is a common life-threatening complication in morbidly obese patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS. We aimed to identify the determinants of noninvasive ventilation (NIV success or failure for this indication. METHODS: We prospectively included 76 consecutive patients with BMI>40 kg/m2 diagnosed with OHS and treated by NIV for ARF in a 15-bed ICU of a tertiary hospital. RESULTS: NIV failed to reverse ARF in only 13 patients. Factors associated with NIV failure included pneumonia (n = 12/13, 92% vs n = 9/63, 14%; p<0.0001, high SOFA (10 vs 5; p<0.0001 and SAPS2 score (63 vs 39; p<0.0001 at admission. These patients often experienced poor outcome despite early resort to endotracheal intubation (in-hospital mortality, 92.3% vs 17.5%; p<0.001. The only factor significantly associated with successful response to NIV was idiopathic decompensation of OHS (n = 30, 48% vs n = 0, 0%; p = 0.001. In the NIV success group (n = 63, 33 patients (53% experienced a delayed response to NIV (with persistent hypercapnic acidosis during the first 6 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple organ failure and pneumonia were the main factors associated with NIV failure and death in morbidly obese patients in hypoxemic ARF. On the opposite, NIV was constantly successful and could be safely pushed further in case of severe hypercapnic acute respiratory decompensation of OHS.

  7. Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure, is associated with a mortality of 30–50% and is precipitated by both direct and indirect pulmonary insults. Treatment is largely supportive, consisting of lung protective ventilation and thereby necessitating Intensive Care Unit (ICU admission. The most common precipitant is community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, but other putative pathogens include viruses and fungi. On rare occasions, ARDS can be secondary to tropical disease. Accordingly, a history should include travel to endemic regions. Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease most common in the tropics and typically associated with mild pulmonary complications. We describe a case of a 25-year-old male with undiagnosed leptospirosis, presenting with fever and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, returning from a Costa Rican holiday. There was no other organ failure. He was intubated and received lung protective ventilation. His condition improved after ampicillin and penicillin G were added empirically. This case illustrates the rare complication of ARDS from leptospirosis, the importance of taking a travel history, and the need for empiric therapy because of diagnostic delay.

  8. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients : The Efraim multinational prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio; Perner, Anders; Rello, Jordi; Bauer, Philippe R.; van de Louw, Andry; Hemelaar, Pleun; Lemiale, Virginie; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Loeches, Ignacio Martin; Meyhoff, Tine Sylvest; Salluh, Jorge; Schellongowski, Peter; Rusinova, Katerina; Terzi, Nicolas; Mehta, Sangeeta; Antonelli, Massimo; Kouatchet, Achille; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Valkonen, Miia; Landburg, Precious Pearl; Bruneel, Fabrice; Bukan, Ramin Brandt; Pene, Frederic; Metaxa, Victoria; Moreau, Anne Sophie; Souppart, Virginie; Burghi, Gaston; Girault, Christophe; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Montini, Luca; Barbier, Francois; Nielsen, Lene B.; Gaborit, Benjamin; Mokart, Djamel; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Background: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Methods: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational

  9. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients: the Efraim multinational prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azoulay, E.; Pickkers, P.; Soares, M.; Perner, A.; Rello, J.; Bauer, P.R.; Louw, A. van de; Hemelaar, P.; Lemiale, V.; Taccone, F.S.; Loeches, I.M.; Meyhoff, T.S.; Salluh, J.; Schellongowski, P.; Rusinova, K.; Terzi, N.; Mehta, S.; Antonelli, M.; Kouatchet, A.; Barratt-Due, A.; Valkonen, M.; Landburg, P.P.; Bruneel, F.; Bukan, R.B.; Pene, F.; Metaxa, V.; Moreau, A.S.; Souppart, V.; Burghi, G.; Girault, C.; Silva, U.V.A.; Montini, L.; Barbier, F.; Nielsen, L.B.; Gaborit, B.; Mokart, D.; Chevret, S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). METHODS: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational

  10. Risk factors for and impact of respiratory failure on mortality in the early phase of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Kristensen, Marlene Østermark; Rysgaard, Sisse

    2016-01-01

    : Retrospective cohort study including 359 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. Information was gathered from electronic patient records. We defined respiratory failure based on the modified Marshall scoring system in the revised Atlanta criteria. Predictors of respiratory failure were evaluated...

  11. Acute or chronic respiratory failure. Assessment and management of patients with COPD in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G A; Hall, J B

    1989-06-16

    Patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure exhibit severe pulmonary impairment as a baseline characteristic. Additional minor insults can precipitate cardiopulmonary failure that requires hospital admission and possibly mechanical ventilation. Our approach to these patients emphasizes evaluation of the imbalance between neuromuscular competence and mechanical load on the respiratory system. In this way, reversible factors can be identified and corrected before they progress to inspiratory muscle fatigue and respiratory failure. For cases in which deterioration is inexorable, guidelines for mechanical ventilation are given and approaches to eventual liberation from the ventilator are reviewed.

  12. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goad, M.E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O 2 exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms

  13. Variables predictive of outcome in patients with acute hypercapneic respiratory failure treated with noninvasive ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahuddin, N.; Irfan, M.; Khan, S.; Naeem, M.; Haque, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    To assess results with NIV in acute hypercapneic respiratory failure and to identify outcome predictors. This was a retrospective observational study on consecutive patients presenting with acute type II respiratory failure and meeting criteria for NIV use over a 5 year period. Patients presenting with haemodynamic instability, inability to protect their airway, malignant arrhythmias and recent oesophageal surgery were excluded. Univariate and Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the impact on survival. A p value of 35 Meq/L (adjusted Odds ratio 0.9; 95% CI 0.83, 0.98, p < 0.015) identified those less at risk for intubation. NIV was found to be both safe and effective in the management of acute hypercapneic respiratory failure. Sepsis and serum HCO/sub 3/ at admission identified patients having poor outcomes (JPMA 60:13; 2010). (author)

  14. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijazi Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas.

  15. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Alveolar Hemorrhage after Exposure to Organic Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is associated with severe outcomes. We report a case of acute respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation and was clinically and pathologically diagnosed as DAH related to exposure to organic dust. A 39-year-old man, who had visited a warehouse to grade beans for purchase, was referred to our hospital for impending respiratory failure. His initial radiographic examinations revealed diffuse bilateral ground-glass opacities in his lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage resulted in progressively bloodier returns, which is characteristic of DAH. He underwent bedside open lung biopsy of his right lower lobe in the intensive care unit. Biopsy results revealed DAH and organization with accumulation of hemosiderin-laden macrophages and a few fibroblastic foci. The patient was treated with empirical antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids and successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation. DAH might be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute respiratory failure after exposure to organic particles.

  16. [Acute respiratory failure as the sol inaugural sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouch, N; Meraï, S; Cheikh Rouhou, S; Ben Romdhane, K; Ben Mrad, S; Besbes, M; Tritar, F

    2007-10-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation is an occipitocervical malformation where the cerebellar amygdales descend below the occipital foramen. Acute respiratory failure is an exceptional inaugural sign. We report two cases disclosed by alveolar hypoventilation associated with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The two patients age 51 and 52 years had an uneventful past history and presented with hypercapnic encephalopathy with acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Respiratory function tests, helicoidal thoracic computed tomographic angiography, electromyogram, cardiac echography, and thyroid and immunological tests were normal. Blood gases and polysomnography were in favor of central hypoventilation without sleep apnea. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The course was complicated by recurrent respiratory failure in both patients. Surgical decompression performed for the first patient provided no improvement. This patient died two months after surgery subsequent to aspiration pneumonia. The second patient was treated with continuous positive pressure noninvasive ventilatory assistance and had a good outcome at 25 months. These two cases illustrate the absence of any neurological sign, acute respiratory failure being the only sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation.

  17. Long-term survival for COPD patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titlestad, Ingrid L; Lassen, Annmarie T; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an add-on treatment has been routinely used in a non-intensive care setting since 2004 for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute hypercapnic respiratory failure at a university hospital in Denmark. Although randomized...

  18. Electrical impedance tomography in the assessment of extravascular lung water in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Raaijmakers, E.; Bakker, J.; Groeneveld, A. B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To establish the value of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in assessing pulmonary edema in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure (ARF), as compared to the thermal dye double indicator dilution technique (TDD). DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: ICU of a general

  19. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacilli, Angela Maria Grazia; Valentini, Ilaria; Carbonara, Paolo; Marchetti, Antonio; Nava, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status. PMID:24563868

  20. Core Domains for Clinical Research in Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: An International Modified Delphi Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Alison E; Sepulveda, Kristin A; Dinglas, Victor D; Chessare, Caroline M; Bingham, Clifton O; Needham, Dale M

    2017-06-01

    To identify the "core domains" (i.e., patient outcomes, health-related conditions, or aspects of health) that relevant stakeholders agree are essential to assess in all clinical research studies evaluating the outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. A two-round consensus process, using a modified Delphi methodology, with participants from 16 countries, including patient and caregiver representatives. Prior to voting, participants were asked to review 1) results from surveys of clinical researchers, acute respiratory failure survivors, and caregivers that rated the importance of 19 preliminary outcome domains and 2) results from a qualitative study of acute respiratory failure survivors' outcomes after hospital discharge, as related to the 19 preliminary outcome domains. Participants also were asked to suggest any additional potential domains for evaluation in the first Delphi survey. Web-based surveys of participants representing four stakeholder groups relevant to clinical research evaluating postdischarge outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors: clinical researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers, and U.S. federal research funding organizations. None. None. Survey response rates were 97% and 99% in round 1 and round 2, respectively. There were seven domains that met the a priori consensus criteria to be designated as core domains: physical function, cognition, mental health, survival, pulmonary function, pain, and muscle and/or nerve function. This study generated a consensus-based list of core domains that should be assessed in all clinical research studies evaluating acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. Identifying appropriate measurement instruments to assess these core domains is an important next step toward developing a set of core outcome measures for this field of research.

  1. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The volume of air left in the lungs when airway closure occurs ... LUNG. 4. VOLUME. (LI r). 3. 2. YEARS. 20. 30. 40. 50. 60. NORMAL ADULT. (AI. 70. ADULT. WITH. ARF. (8). Fig. 1. Increasing closing volume shown in relation to age. is known as the .... with emphysema, by depressing the respiratory centre, will result in the ...

  2. January 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has expanded its role in the treatment of both chronic and acute respiratory failure. Its initial use in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, neuromuscular disease and tracheobronchomalacia, have been shown to improve quality of life and reduce mortality. Over the past 20 years studies have looked at using noninvasive ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure from pulmonary edema, asthma and COPD exacerbations. During this month's journal club we reviewed 3 articles evaluating the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure. Gupta D, Nath A, Agarwal R, Behera D. A prospective randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation in severe acute asthma. Respir Care. 2010;55(5:536-43. [PubMed] This was a small unblinded randomized controlled trial (RCT looking at the efficacy using noninvasive ventilation (NIV in acute asthma. A total of 53 patients were included and divided into 2 groups of 28 patients ...

  3. Efficiency of Oxygen Therapy by Simple Face Mask and Nasal Cannula for Acute Respiratory Failure in Infants and Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ioana D. BADIU TIŞA; Sorana BOLBOACĂ; Nicolae MIU; Daniela IACOB

    2013-01-01

    Premises: Acute respiratory failure caused by respiratory diseases, which is a frequent pathology in infants and young children, requires oxygen therapy, which can be administered by different devices. Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of two devices for oxygen administration by determining a clinical appraisal score for acute respiratory failure in infants and young children by oxygen therapy using simple face masks and nasal cannulas. Material and methods: 74 children, aged between one...

  4. Challenges on non-invasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Raffaele

    2016-11-15

    Acute respiratory failure is a frequent complication in elderly patients especially if suffering from chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation constitutes a successful therapeutic tool in the elderly as, like in younger patients, it is able to prevent endotracheal intubation in a wide range of acute conditions; moreover, this ventilator technique is largely applied in the elderly in whom invasive mechanical ventilation is considered not appropriated. Furthermore, the integration of new technological devices, ethical issues and environment of treatment are still largely debated in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the elderly.This review aims at reporting and critically analyzing the peculiarities in the management of acute respiratory failure in elderly people, the role of noninvasive mechanical ventilation, the potential advantages of applying alternative or integrated therapeutic tools (i.e. high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy, non-invasive and invasive cough assist devices and low-flow carbon-dioxide extracorporeal systems), drawbacks in physician's communication and "end of life" decisions. As several areas of this topic are not supported by evidence-based data, this report takes in account also "real-life" data as well as author's experience.The choice of the setting and of the timing of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in elderly people with advanced cardiopulmonary disease should be carefully evaluated together with the chance of using integrated or alternative supportive devices. Last but not least, economic and ethical issues may often challenges the behavior of the physicians towards elderly people who are hospitalized for acute respiratory failure at the end stage of their cardiopulmonary and neoplastic diseases.

  5. Changes of Respiratory Mechanics in COPD Patients from Stable State to Acute Exacerbations with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriana, Piero; Vitacca, Michele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Paneroni, Mara; Pisani, Lara; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Symptoms, clinical course, functional and biological data during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EXCOPD) have been investigated, but data on physiological changes of respiratory mechanics during a severe exacerbation with respiratory acidosis requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of respiratory mechanics in COPD patients comparing data observed during EXCOPD with those observed during stable state in the recovery phase. In 18 COPD patients having severe EXCOPD requiring NIMV for global respiratory failure, we measured respiratory mechanics during both EXCOPD (T0) and once the patients achieved a stable state (T1). The diaphragm and inspiratory muscles effort was significantly increased under relapse, as well as the pressure-time product of the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscle (PTPdi and PTPes). The resistive loads to breathe (i.e., PEEPi,dyn, compliance and inspiratory resistances) were also markedly increased, while the maximal pressures generated by the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles, together with forced expired volumes were decreased. All these indices statistically improved but with a great intrasubject variability in stable condition. Moreover, tension-time index (TTdi) significantly improved from the EXCOPD state to the condition of clinical stability (0.156 ± 0.04 at T0 vs. 0.082 ± 0.02 at T1 p < 0.001). During an EXCOPD, the load/capacity of the respiratory pump is impaired, and although the patients exhibit a rapid shallow breathing pattern, this does not necessarily correlate with a TTdi ≥ 0.15. These changes are reverted once they recover from the EXCOPD, despite a large variability between patients.

  6. A case of acute respiratory failure in a young man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A 40 years old man presents with a few hours history of progressive dyspnea. He was suffering from almost a week of low grade fever. The night before the onset of dyspnea he had high fever (39,5°C, polyuria and dysuria. His blood pressure is 115/65 mmHg and his oxygen saturation while breathing ambient air is 81%. Chest auscultation reveals rales bilaterally. A chest radiography shows bilateral pulmonary infiltrates consistent with pulmonary edema. How should this patient be evaluated to establish the cause of the acute pulmonary edema and to determine appropriate therapy?

  7. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ruggeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  8. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  9. Acute respiratory failure associated with cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS: analysis of predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnegarwala, F; Graviss, E A; Lacke, C E; Dural, A T; Johnson, P C; Atmar, R L; Hamill, R J

    1998-11-01

    The incidence of acute respiratory failure (ARF) associated with cryptococcal disease in patients with AIDS is underestimated in the literature. We performed a retrospective, case-control (referent) study to determine the prevalence of ARF associated with cryptococcal disease and analyzed associated factors. Potential cases of ARF were identified at four university-affiliated teaching hospitals from a cohort of 210 patients with AIDS who had positive cryptococcal antigen tests and/or Cryptococcus neoformans isolated from any body site. Twenty-nine of the 210 (13.8%) had ARF associated with cryptococcal disease. Nineteen were thought to have respiratory failure due solely to C. neoformans. The demographic, clinical, laboratory, treatment, and outcome data of 19 cases of respiratory failure were compared with data for 20 patients without respiratory failure. In-hospital mortality was 100% and median survival was 2 days for cases, vs. 25% and > 365 days, respectively, for referents. The clinical presentation was identical to that of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. In multivariate analysis, variables independently predictive of ARF in patients with cryptococcal disease were black race, a lactate dehydrogenase level of > or = 500 IU/L, the presence of interstitial infiltrates, and the presence of cutaneous lesions. ARF with cryptococcosis in patients with AIDS is associated with disseminated disease and high mortality. The diagnosis frequently is not considered before death. Serum cryptococcal antigen testing is a sensitive and rapid screening method.

  10. Risk factors for and impact of respiratory failure on mortality in the early phase of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Kristensen, Marlene Østermark; Rysgaard, Sisse; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Novovic, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of respiratory failure and other respiratory complications in the early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) is not well investigated. To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of respiratory failure, and its impact on mortality in the early phase AP. Retrospective cohort study including 359 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. Information was gathered from electronic patient records. We defined respiratory failure based on the modified Marshall scoring system in the revised Atlanta criteria. Predictors of respiratory failure were evaluated in univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. The cohort included 188 women and 171 men with a mean age of 56.1 years. Respiratory complications including pleural effusion, pneumonia and atelectasis were registered in 80 patients (22%), 100 (29%) needed oxygen therapy, 27 (8%) continuous positive airway pressure, and six (2%) mechanical ventilation. Thirty-two patients (9%) were treated with bronchodilators and 12 (3%) with steroids. Thirty-one patients (9%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for respiratory failure. Five of these patients (16%) did not have effusion, atelectasis or pneumonia. Predictors of respiratory failure in multivariable analysis were age (OR 1.04; CI 95% (1.03-1.07)) and smoking (OR 2.67; CI 95% (1.21-5.86)). Thirteen patients died in hospital. The Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests showed that patients with respiratory failure had increased in-hospital mortality as did patients with cardiovascular and renal failure (P Respiratory complications are frequent in the early phase of AP. Respiratory, cardiovascular and renal failure is associated with a poor outcome. The fact that patients without effusion, atelectasis, or pneumonia may develop respiratory failure, suggests that acute lung injury, possibly associated with systemic inflammation, may be important. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. What Can We Apply to Manage Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Acute Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jungsil; Park, Ju Hee; Yoo, Kwang Ha

    2018-04-01

    Acute exacerbation(s) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) tend to be critical and debilitating events leading to poorer outcomes in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment modalities, and contribute to a higher and earlier mortality rate in COPD patients. Besides pro-active preventative measures intended to obviate acquisition of AECOPD, early recovery from severe AECOPD is an important issue in determining the long-term prognosis of patients diagnosed with COPD. Updated GOLD guidelines and recently published American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society clinical recommendations emphasize the importance of use of pharmacologic treatment including bronchodilators, systemic steroids and/or antibiotics. As a non-pharmacologic strategy to combat the effects of AECOPD, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is recommended as the treatment of choice as this therapy is thought to be most effective in reducing intubation risk in patients diagnosed with AECOPD with acute respiratory failure. Recently, a few adjunctive modalities, including NIV with helmet and helium-oxygen mixture, have been tried in cases of AECOPD with respiratory failure. As yet, insufficient documentation exists to permit recommendation of this therapy without qualification. Although there are too few findings, as yet, to allow for regular andr routine application of those modalities in AECOPD, there is anecdotal evidence to indicate both mechanical and physiological benefits connected with this therapy. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy is another supportive strategy which serves to improve the symptoms of hypoxic respiratory failure. The therapy also produced improvement in ventilatory variables, and it may be successfully applied in cases of hypercapnic respiratory failure. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal has been successfully attempted in cases of adult respiratory distress syndrome, with protective hypercapnic ventilatory strategy. Nowadays, it is

  12. A comparison of volume control and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldager, Henrik; Nielsen, Soeren L; Carl, Peder; Soerensen, Mogens B

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a new mode of ventilation (pressure-regulated volume control; PRVC) is associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics and outcome when compared with conventional volume control (VC) ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a randomised, prospective, open, cross over trial on 44 patients with acute respiratory failure in the general intensive care unit of a university hospital. After a stabilization period of 8 h, a cross over trial of 2 × 2 h was conducted. Apart from the PRVC/VC mode, ventilator settings were comparable. The following parameters were recorded for each patient: days on ventilator, failure in the assigned mode of ventilation (peak inspiratory pressure > 50 cmH2O) and survival. Results: In the crossover trial, peak inspiratory pressure was significantly lower using PRVC than with VC (20 cmH2O vs 24 cmH2O, P < 0.0001). No other statistically significant differences were found. Conclusions: Peak inspiratory pressure was significantly lower during PRVC ventilation than during VC ventilation, and thus PRVC may be superior to VC in certain patients. However, in this small group of patients, we could not demonstrate that PRVC improved outcome. PMID:11056699

  13. Acute respiratory failure revealing a multilocular thymic cyst in an infant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Bouziri; Ammar, Khaldi; Khaled, Menif; Najoua, Guandoura; Nejla, Ben Jaballah

    2009-11-30

    Multilocular thymic cysts are rare benign lesions of the neck and mediastinum that can occur at any age. In children, multilocular thymic cysts are usually symptomatic after the age of 2 years and produce few symptoms. We present an unusual case of a multilocular thymic cyst diagnosed in a 3-month-old girl and causing severe respiratory failure. A 3 month-old-girl, with a medical history of dyspnea and wheezing since the age of 20 days, presented in our pediatric intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The chest radiograph showed thoracic distension without any other abnormalities. The diagnosis of severe asthma was initially suspected and the patient was treated by intravenous corticosteroids and continuous perfusion of salbutamol without any improvement. A chest tomography scan was performed and demonstrated an anterior mediastinal multiseptated cystic mass extending from the inferior face of the thyroid gland to the left cardiophrenic angle. Sternotomy and excision biopsy were planned urgently. The cystic mass was excised completely. The histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a multilocular thymic cyst. The particularities of our observation are the occurrence of a multilocular thymic cyst in a young infant and its presentation by a severe acute respiratory failure mimicking asthma.

  14. Acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with cranial nerve involvement, dysautonomia, respiratory failure, and autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, Philippe; Kevers, Luc; Fabien, Nicole; Van Den Bergh, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We examined a 27-year-old woman who developed rapidly progressive quadriplegia and acute respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit. It was unclear whether this was a presentation of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) or acute-onset chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (A-CIDP). Remarkable features included multiple cranial nerve involvement, respiratory failure, dysautonomia, and skin manifestations. Several autoantibodies were elevated, including antinuclear (ANA), anticardiolipin (aCL), thyroid, and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) autoantibodies. The patient was initially diagnosed with GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). After almost complete recovery, relapse with quadriplegia and respiratory failure was observed 12 weeks after motor symptom onset. She then received IVIg and steroid pulse therapy followed by maintenance oral methylprednisolone and plasma exchange. She recovered completely 4 months after the relapse. The further clinical and serological course was consistent with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-associated CIDP. Herein we evaluate the association between A-CIDP and some biological markers of autoimmunity.

  15. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO2R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case–control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO2R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO2R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO2R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCO2R. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO2R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment to enable

  16. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  17. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Praveen; Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Khilnani, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants.

  18. Noninvasive radiographic assessment of cardiovascular function in acute and chronic respiratory failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Matthay, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Noninvasive radiographic techniques have provided a means of studying the natural history and pathogenesis of cardiovascular performance in acute and chronic respiratory failure. Chest radiography, radionuclide angiocardiography and thallium-201 imaging, and M mode and cross-sectional echocardiography have been employed. Each of these techniques has specific uses, attributes and limitations. For example, measurement of descending pulmonary arterial diameters on the plain chest radiograph allows determination of the presence or absence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Right and left ventricular performance can be evaluated at rest and during exercise using radionuclide angiocardiography. The biventricular response to exercise and to therapeutic interventions also can be assessed with this approach. Evaluation of the pulmonary valve echogram and echocardiographic right ventricular dimensions have been shown to reflect right ventricular hemodynamics and size. Each of these noninvasive techniques has been applied to the study of patients with respiratory failure and has provided important physiologic data

  19. Non-invasive ventilation in immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Jerath, Angela; Dres, Martin; Parotto, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The survival rate of immunocompromised patients has improved over the past decades in light of remarkable progress in diagnostic and therapeutic options. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of immunocompromised patients with life threatening complications requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. ICU admission is necessary in up to 15% of patients with acute leukemia and 20% of bone marrow transplantation recipients, and the main reason for ICU referral in this patient population is acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, which is associated with a high mortality rate, particularly in patients requiring endotracheal intubation. The application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and thus the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation with its side effects, appears therefore of great importance in this patient population. Early trials supported the benefits of NIV in these settings, and the 2011 Canadian guidelines for the use of NIV in critical care settings suggest the use of NIV in immune-compromised patients with a grade 2B recommendation. However, the very encouraging results from initial seminal trials were not confirmed in subsequent observational and randomized clinical studies, questioning the beneficial effect of NIV in immune-compromised patients. Based on these observations, a French group led by Azoulay decided to assess whether early intermittent respiratory support with NIV had a role in reducing the mortality rate of immune-compromised patients with non-hypercapnic hypoxemic respiratory failure developed in less than 72 h, and hence conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in experienced ICUs in France. This perspective reviews the findings from their RCT in the context of the current critical care landscape, and in light of recent results from other trials focused on the early management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  20. Early experience of a new extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Buscher, Hergen; Winearls, James; Breeding, Jeff; Ghosh, Debasish; Chaterjee, Shimonti; Braun, Gary; Paul, Eldho; Fraser, John F; Botha, John

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in the technology of extracorporeal respiratory assist systems have led to a renewed interest in extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCOR). The Hemolung is a new, low-flow, venovenous, minimally invasive, partial ECCOR device that has recently been introduced to clinical practice to aid in avoiding invasive ventilation or to facilitate lung-protective ventilation. We report our early experience on use, efficacy and safety of the Hemolung in three Australian intensive care units. Retrospective review of all patients with acute or acute-on-chronic respiratory failure (due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] with severe hypercapnic respiratory failure when non-invasive ventilation failed; acute respiratory distress syndrome; COPD; or asthma when lung-protective ventilation was not feasible due to hypercapnia) for whom the Hemolung was used. Fifteen patients were treated with ECCOR. In four out of five patients, the aim of avoiding intubation was achieved. In the remaining 10 patients, the strategy of instituting lung-protective ventilation was successful. The median duration for ECCOR was 5 days (interquartile range, 3-7 days). The pH and PCO 2 improved significantly within 6 hours of instituting ECCOR, in conjunction with a significant reduction in minute ventilation. The CO 2 clearance was 90-100 mL/min. A total of 93% of patients survived to weaning from ECCOR, 73% survived to ICU discharge and 67% survived to hospital discharge. Our data shows that ECCOR was safe and effective in this cohort. Further experience is vital to identify the patients who may benefit most from this promising therapy.

  1. [Role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in the treatment of acute respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Sergio; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is the most common invasive treatment for acute respiratory failure in intensive care units. According to non-intensivist clinicians, ventilation could be considered as a therapy for blood gas exchange, even though positive pressure ventilation can be extremely dangerous for injured lung tissue. Despite constant advances in ventilation software and modalities, aimed at optimizing patient/ventilator adjustment, the scientific community has addressed major attention in new protective strategies to ventilate the lung, trying to prevent and reduce life-threatening iatrogenic injuries that may derive from inappropriate use of mechanical ventilation. In this review we describe the main ventilation techniques as well as new emerging methodologies. The physiological bases on which the acute respiratory distress syndrome network has significantly changed the strategy for ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome are also discussed. Non-invasive ventilation, including both continuous positive airway pressure and pressure support ventilation, is considered the gold standard for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. There is an increasing interest in the clinical use of non-invasive ventilation outside intensive care units. Although many studies have analyzed risks and benefits of non-invasive ventilation in the intensive care setting, feasibility and organization processes to perform this technique in the non-intensive wards, by preserving efficacy and safety, need to be debated.

  2. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (I part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. A lot of trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases. Methods: In particular clinical conditions, such as Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema (ACPE and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, systematic reviews and meta-analysis show a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. In other clinical conditions, such as acute asthma, Acute Lung Injury (ALI/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and severe pneumonia, NIV does not show significant improvements in term of avoided intubations or mortality rate. Although the first important data on NIV comes from studies performed in Intensive Care Units (ICUs, subsequently these methodologies of ventilation have been used with increasing frequency in Emergency Departments (ED and medical wards. Results: Studies developed in ICU sometimes report slightly worse outcomes compared to studies performed in general wards due to the need to treat more severe patients in ICU. Aetiology remains one of the most important factor determining prognosis: different pathological mechanisms substain different clinical conditions and not in all cases the application of positive pressures to the airways is useful. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective also in a general medical ward if selection of patients, staff training and monitoring are appropriate: its early application improves clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevents endotracheal intubation, decreases mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  3. Noninvasive and invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure associated with bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Jason; Ang, Yvonne L E; See, Kay Choong; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Santiago, Erlinda A; Dela Pena, Eleanor G; Lim, Tow Keang

    2010-04-01

    To describe the outcomes of patients with bronchiectasis and acute respiratory failure (ARF) treated with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) after a failure of conservative measures, and to identify the predictors of hospital mortality and NIV failure. Retrospective review of bronchiectatic patients on NIV (n = 31) or IMV (n = 26) for ARF over 8 years in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) experienced in NIV. At baseline, the NIV group had more patients with acute exacerbations without identified precipitating factors (87.1 vs. 34.6%, p 0.05). The NIV failure rate (need for intubation or death in the ICU) was 32.3%. Using logistic regression, the APACHE II score was the only predictor of hospital mortality (OR 1.19 per point), and the PaO(2)/FiO(2) ratio was the only predictor of NIV failure (OR 1.02 per mmHg decrease). The hospital mortality of patients with bronchiectasis and ARF approximates 25% and is predicted by the APACHE II score. When selectively applied, NIV fails in one-third of the patients, and this is predicted by hypoxemia. Our findings call for randomised controlled trials to compare NIV versus IMV in such patients.

  4. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. Prospective randomised controlled trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases and in particular clinical conditions (Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema, ACPE, and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, COPD systematic reviews and metha-analysis confirm a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. Methods: The most important techniques of ventilation in spontaneous breathing are: Continuous Positive Airway Pression (CPAP, usually performed with Venturi-like flow generators, and bi-level positive pressure ventilation (an high inspiratory pressure and a low expiratory pressure, performed with ventilators. Facial mask rather than nasal mask is used in ARF: the helmet is useful for prolonged treatments. Results: NIV’s success seems to be determined by early application, correct selection of patients and staff training. Controindications to NIV are: cardiac or respiratory arrest, a respiratory rate < 12 per minute, upper airway obstruction, hemodynamic instability or unstable cardiac arrhythmia, encephalopathy (Kelly score > 3, facial surgery trauma or deformity, inability to cooperate or protect the airway, high risk of aspiration and an inability to clear respiratory secretions. Conclusions: Bi-level ventilation for ARF due to COPD and CPAP or bi-level bentilation for ARF due to ACPE are feasible, safe and effective also in a General Medical ward if the selection of patients, the staff’s training and the monitoring are appropriate: they improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevent ETI, decrease mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  5. Acute respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation in pregnant patient: A narrative review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological changes of pregnancy imposes higher risk of acute respiratory failure (ARF with even a slight insult and remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although pregnant women have different respiratory physiology and different causes of ARF, guidelines specific to ventilatory settings, goals of oxygenation and weaning process could not be framed due to lack of large-scale randomized controlled trials. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, pregnant women had higher morbidity and mortality compared to nonpregnant women. During this period, alternative strategies of ventilation such as high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, inhalational of nitric oxide, prone positioning, and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation were increasingly used as a desperate measure to rescue pregnant patients with severe hypoxemia who were not improving with conventional mechanical ventilation. This article highlights the causes of ARF and recent advances in invasive, noninvasive and alternative strategies of ventilation used during pregnancy.

  6. [Predictive factors for failure of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in immunosuppressed patients with acute respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiangli; Yan, Ci; Xu, Sicheng; Gu, Xingli; Wan, Qiufeng; Hu, Xinying; Li, Jingwen; Liu, Guangming; Caikai, Shareli; Guo, Zhijin

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the predictive factors for failure of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) in immunosuppressed patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). The clinical data of 118 immuno-deficient patients treated with NIPPV in the respiratory and intensive care unit (RICU) of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from January 2012 to August 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into a non-endotracheal intubation (ETI) group (n = 62) and ETI group (n = 56) according to whether ETI was performed during the hospitalization period or not. Each observed indicator was analyzed by univariate analysis, and factors leading to failure of NIPPV were further analyzed by Logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to evaluate the predictive value of risk factors for failure of NIPPV in immunosuppressed patients with ARF. The non-intubation rate for NIPPV in immunosuppressed patients was 50.8% (60/118). Compared with the non-ETI group, the body temperature, pH value in the ETI group were significantly increased, the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO 2 ) was significantly decreased, the ratio of oxygenation index (PaO 2 /FiO 2 ) failure of NIPPV. ROC curve analysis showed that the APACHE II score ≥ 20 and PaO 2 /FiO 2 failure of NIPPV, the area under ROC curve (AUC) of the APACHE II score ≥ 20 was 0.787, the sensitivity was 83.93%, the specificity was 69.35%, the positive predict value (PPV) was 71.21%, the negative predict value (NPV) was 82.69%, the positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 2.74, the negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.23, and Youden index was 0.53; the AUC of PaO 2 /FiO 2 failure of NIPPV in immunocompromised patients.

  7. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, BR

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  8. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Noninvasive versus invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure in patients with hematologic malignancies: a 5-year multicenter observational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristina, Giuseppe R; Antonelli, Massimo; Conti, Giorgio; Ciarlone, Alessia; Rogante, Silvia; Rossi, Carlotta; Bertolini, Guido

    2011-10-01

    Mortality is high among patients with hematologic malignancies admitted to intensive care units for acute respiratory failure. Early noninvasive mechanical ventilation seems to improve outcomes. To characterize noninvasive mechanical ventilation use in Italian intensive care units for acute respiratory failure patients with hematologic malignancies and its impact on outcomes vs. invasive mechanical ventilation. Retrospective analysis of observational data prospectively collected in 2002-2006 on 1,302 patients with hematologic malignancies admitted with acute respiratory failure to 158 Italian intensive care units. Mortality (intensive care unit and hospital) was assessed in patients treated initially with noninvasive mechanical ventilation vs. invasive mechanical ventilation and in those treated with invasive mechanical ventilation ab initio vs. after noninvasive mechanical ventilation failure. Findings were adjusted for propensity scores reflecting the probability of initial treatment with noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Few patients (21%) initially received noninvasive mechanical ventilation; 46% of these later required invasive mechanical ventilation. Better outcomes were associated with successful noninvasive mechanical ventilation (vs. invasive mechanical ventilation ab initio and vs. invasive mechanical ventilation after noninvasive mechanical ventilation failure), particularly in patients with acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome (mortality: 42% vs. 69% and 77%, respectively). Delayed vs. immediate invasive mechanical ventilation was associated with slightly but not significantly higher hospital mortality (65% vs. 58%, p=.12). After propensity-score adjustment, noninvasive mechanical ventilation was associated with significantly lower mortality than invasive mechanical ventilation. The population could not be stratified according to specific hematologic diagnoses. Furthermore, the study was observational, and treatment groups may have

  10. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  11. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  12. Acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Zafrani

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce.Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF. Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression.Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI (1.20-17.33; OR, 7.68; (1.78-33.22 and OR 10.60; (2.25-49.97 respectively. Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005-0.21. In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality.Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival.

  13. [LUNG ULTRASOUND IN PATIENTS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE DUE TO PNEUMONIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V A; Galstyan, G M; Gemdzh, I An E G; Kostina, I E; Gitis, M K

    2017-09-01

    To compare the accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (LUS) and chest computed tomography (CT) for the de- tection of lung lesions in patients with hematological malignancies and acute respiratory failure (ARF). 39 patients with hematological malignancies and ARF were enrolled in prospective study. The investigation of the patients included LUS, chest C, extravascular lung water index (EVLW) by transpulmonary ther- modilution, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). There was correlation between the total number of B-lines and E VLW index (r = 0,40; p pneu- mocystis pneumonia. B-lines were detected often in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia. Sensitivity ofLUS pleural effusion assessment was 95%, specificity was 90%. LUS is high sensitivity and specificity method to detect lung lesions in patients with ARF.

  14. Intravascular lymphoma presenting as a specific pulmonary embolism and acute respiratory failure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgin-Lavialle Sophie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The occurrence of an intravascular lymphoma with severe pulmonary involvement mimicking pulmonary embolism is described. Case presentation A 38-year-old man was referred to our intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure and long lasting fever. Appropriate investigations failed to demonstrate any bacterial, viral, parasitic or mycobacterial infection. A chest computed tomography scan ruled out any proximal or sub-segmental pulmonary embolism but the ventilation/perfusion lung scan concluded that there was a high probability of pulmonary embolism. The cutaneous biopsy pathology diagnosed intravascular lymphoma. Conclusion Intravascular lymphoma is a rare disease characterized by exclusive or predominant growth of neoplastic cells within the lumina of small blood vessels. Lung involvement seems to be common, but predominant lung presentation of this disease is rare. In our patient, urgent chemotherapy, along with adequate supportive care allowed complete recovery.

  15. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) in patients with acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Andrea; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Pesenti, Antonio; Ranieri, V Marco; Fan, Eddy

    2017-04-01

    To review the available knowledge related to the use of ECCO 2 R as adjuvant strategy to mechanical ventilation (MV) in various clinical settings of acute respiratory failure (ARF). Expert opinion and review of the literature. ECCO 2 R may be a promising adjuvant therapeutic strategy for the management of patients with severe exacerbations of COPD and for the achievement of protective or ultra-protective ventilation in patients with ARDS without life-threatening hypoxemia. Given the observational nature of most of the available clinical data and differences in technical features and performances of current devices, the balance of risks and benefits for or against ECCO 2 R in such patient populations remains unclear CONCLUSIONS: ECCO 2 R is currently an experimental technique rather than an accepted therapeutic strategy in ARF-its safety and efficacy require confirmation in clinical trials.

  16. Plasma Endothelin-1 Levels in Preterm Neonatal Infants with Acute Respiratory Failure

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    D. V. Dmitriyev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased pulmonary vascular resistance in preterm infants is associated with acute respiratory failure (ARF and at the same time endothelin-1 (E-1 plays an important role in neonatal pulmonary vascular responsiveness. Methods. Endothelin-1 levels were measured in two blood samples in 12 preterm infants with ARF and in 12 controls (at 32.2±1.3 and 29.8±1.2 weeks of gestation, respectively by enzyme immunoassay. For this, the first and second blood samples were taken at 18 to 40 hours after birth. Results. The plasma level of E-1 in the first sample did not differ between the neonates of both groups. In the second sample, significantly higher E-1 concentrations were observed in the newborns with ARF than in the controls. In the first sample, E-1 concentration were higher than in the second one in both groups (p<0.001. There was a significant positive correlation between the second E-1 sample and the SNAPPE 2 scale rating (r=0.38; p=0.02. The plasma level of E-1 in the first sample did not differ in both groups (11.9 and 12.2 pg/ml, respectively. Conclusion. Neonates with and without ARF had the similar plasma E-1 levels in the first sample, by taking into account the fact that the E-1 levels were higher in ARF than in the controls at 18 to 40 hour after birth. Increased vascular resistance in ARF may be associated with the high level of E-1. Key words: endothe-lin-1, acute respiratory failure.

  17. Efficiency of Oxygen Therapy by Simple Face Mask and Nasal Cannula for Acute Respiratory Failure in Infants and Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana D. BADIU TIŞA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Premises: Acute respiratory failure caused by respiratory diseases, which is a frequent pathology in infants and young children, requires oxygen therapy, which can be administered by different devices. Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of two devices for oxygen administration by determining a clinical appraisal score for acute respiratory failure in infants and young children by oxygen therapy using simple face masks and nasal cannulas. Material and methods: 74 children, aged between one month and 3 years were included in our study. Oxygen therapy was administered by face mask to 38 patients, and by nasal cannula to 36 patients. A clinical appraisal score of respiratory failure was calculated both before and after oxygen therapy. Oxygen saturation was measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 and arterial or capillary blood gas (SaO2 before, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes after the initiation of oxygen therapy. Results: We found an improvement in the clinical score regardless of the method of administration; this improvement was more obvious at 60 minutes than at the 30 min evaluation (p<0.001. The differences were statistically significant (p<0.0001 for all the measurements (baseline vs. 30 minutes, baseline vs. 60 minutes, 30 minutes vs. 60 minutes. An increase in both SaO2 and SpO2 values was found (p<0.001. Conclusions: The clinical score for acute respiratory failure and the SaO2 and SpO2 values significantly improved after oxygen therapy.

  18. Relevance of chest sonography in the diagnosis of acute respiratory failure: Comparison with current diagnostic tools in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Daabis

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: Lung ultrasound provided an immediate diagnosis of the underlying etiology of acute respiratory failure in most cases; it can therefore be added to the armamentarium of ICU where urgent decisions are needed for rapid diagnosis and management of patients with ARF.

  19. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist increases respiratory variability and complexity in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Demoule, Alexandre; Cracco, Christophe; Gharbi, Alexandre; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Duguet, Alexandre; Gottfried, Stewart B; Similowski, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a partial ventilatory support mode where positive pressure is provided in relation to diaphragmatic electrical activity (EAdi). Central inspiratory activity is normally not monotonous, but it demonstrates short-term variability and complexity. The authors reasoned that NAVA should produce a more "natural" or variable breathing pattern than other modes. This study compared respiratory variability and complexity during pressure support ventilation (PSV) and NAVA. Flow and EAdi were recorded during routine PSV (tidal volume approximately 6-8 ml/kg) and four NAVA levels (1-4 cm H2O/microVEAdi) in 12 intubated patients. Breath-by-breath variability of flow and EAdi-related variables was quantified by the coefficient of variation (CV) and autocorrelation analysis. Complexity of flow and EAdi was described using noise titration, largest Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, and three-dimensional phase portraits. Switching from PSV to NAVA increased the CV and decreased the autocorrelation for most flow-related variables in a dose-dependent manner (P Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for flow were greater during NAVA than PSV and increased with NAVA level (P Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for EAdi were not influenced by ventilator mode. Compared with PSV, NAVA increases the breathing pattern variability and complexity of flow, whereas the complexity of EAdi is unchanged. Whether this improves clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  20. Noninvasive ventilation in the event of acute respiratory failure in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Battistella, Laura; Pipitone, Emanuela; Vio, Stefania; Concas, Alessandra; Paladini, Luciana; Gallan, Federico; Marchi, Maria Rita; Tona, Francesco; Iliceto, Sabino

    2014-08-01

    Some patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) develop severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) requiring admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and ventilatory support. A limited number of observational studies have reported that noninvasive ventilation (NIV) can be an effective treatment to support breathing and to prevent use of invasive mechanical ventilation in these patients. This study aimed to retrospectively investigate the clinical status and outcomes in IPF patients receiving NIV for ARF and to identify those clinical and laboratory characteristics, which could be considered risk factors for its failure. This is a retrospective analysis of short-term outcomes in 18 IPF patients being administered NIV for ARF. This study was conducted in a 4-bed respiratory ICU (RICU) in a university hospital. Eighteen IPF patients who were administered NIV between January 1, 2005, and April 30, 2013, were included. The outcome measures are the need for endotracheal intubation despite NIV treatment and mortality rate during their RICU stay. The length of the patients' stay in the RICU and their survival rate following RICU admission were also evaluated. Noninvasive ventilation was successful in 8 patients and unsuccessful in 10 who required endotracheal intubation. All the patients in the NIV failure group died within 20.2±15.3 days of intubation. The patients in the NIV success group spent fewer days in the RICU (11.6±4.5 vs 24.6±13.7; P=.0146). The median survival time was significantly shorter for the patients in the NIV failure with respect to the success group (18.0 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 9.0-25.0] vs 90.0 [95% CI, 65.0-305.0] days; Pventilation failure was correlated to the plasma NT-proBNP levels at RICU admission (P=.0326) with an odds ratio of 12.2 (95% CI, 1.2 to infinity) in the patients with abnormally high values (>900 pg/mL). The outcome of IPF patients who were administered NIV was quite poor. The use of NIV was, nevertheless, found to

  1. Use and Outcomes of Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Different Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsancak Ugurlu, Aylin; Sidhom, Samy S; Khodabandeh, Ali; Ieong, Michael; Mohr, Chester; Lin, Denis Y; Buchwald, Irwin; Bahhady, Imad; Wengryn, John; Maheshwari, Vinay; Hill, Nicholas S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic disease and do-not-intubate status increases with age. Thus, we aimed to determine characteristics and outcomes associated with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) use for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in different age groups. A database comprising prospective data collected on site on all adult patients with ARF requiring ventilatory support from 8 acute care hospitals in Massachusetts was used. From a total of 1,225 ventilator starts, overall NIV utilization, success, and in-hospital mortality rates were 22, 54, and 18% in younger (18-44 y); 34, 65, and 13% in middle-aged (45-64 y); 49, 68, and 17% in elderly (65-79 y); and 47, 76, and 24% in aged (≥ 80 y) groups, respectively (P age (25, 57, 57, and 74% and 7, 12, 18, and 31%, respectively, in the 4 age groups [P age groups (P = .27 and P = .98, respectively). NIV use and a do-not-intubate status are more frequent in subjects with ARF ≥ 65 y than in those age groups. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00458926.). Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Invasive versus non-invasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure in neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Annane, Djillali; Orlikowski, David; He, Li; Yang, Mi; Zhou, Muke; Liu, Guan J

    2017-12-04

    Acute respiratory failure is a common life-threatening complication of acute onset neuromuscular diseases, and may exacerbate chronic hypoventilation in patients with neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders. Standard management includes oxygen supplementation, physiotherapy, cough assistance, and, whenever needed, antibiotics and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) via nasal, buccal or full-face devices has become routine practice in many centres. The primary objective of this review was to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation with invasive ventilation in improving short-term survival in acute respiratory failure in people with neuromuscular disease and chest wall disorders. The secondary objectives were to compare the effects of NIV with those of invasive mechanical ventilation on improvement in arterial blood gas after 24 hours and lung function measurements after one month, incidence of barotrauma and ventilator-associated pneumonia, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit and length of hospital stay. We searched the following databases on 11 September 2017: the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase. We also searched conference proceedings and clinical trials registries. We planned to include randomised or quasi-randomised trials with or without blinding. We planned to include trials performed in children or adults with acute onset neuromuscular diseases or chronic neuromuscular disease or chest wall disorders presenting with acute respiratory failure that compared the benefits and risks of invasive ventilation versus NIV. Two review authors reviewed searches and independently selected studies for assessment. We planned to follow standard Cochrane methodology for data collection and analysis. We did not identify any trials eligible for inclusion in the review. Acute respiratory failure is a life-threatening complication of

  3. Failure of Invasive Airway Placement on the First Attempt Is Associated With Progression to Cardiac Arrest in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Hannah R; Srinivasan, Vijay; Topjian, Alexis A; Sutton, Robert M; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Raymond, Tia T

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the proportion of acute respiratory compromise events in hospitalized pediatric patients progressing to cardiopulmonary arrest, and the clinical factors associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest. We hypothesized that failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt (defined as multiple attempts at tracheal intubation, and/or laryngeal mask airway placement, and/or the creation of a new tracheostomy or cricothyrotomy) is independently associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest. Multicenter, international registry of pediatric in-hospital acute respiratory compromise. American Heart Association's Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry (2000-2014). Children younger than 18 years with an index (first) acute respiratory compromise event. None. Of the 2,210 index acute respiratory compromise events, 64% required controlled ventilation, 26% had return of spontaneous ventilation, and 10% progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. There were 762 acute respiratory compromise events (34%) that did not require an invasive airway, 1,185 acute respiratory compromise events (54%) with successful invasive airway placement on the first attempt, and 263 acute respiratory compromise events (12%) with failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt. After adjusting for confounding variables, failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt was independently associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest (adjusted odds ratio 1.8 [95% CIs, 1.2-2.6]). More than 1 in 10 hospitalized pediatric patients who experienced an acute respiratory compromise event progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. Failure of invasive airway placement on the first attempt is independently associated with progression of acute respiratory compromise to cardiopulmonary arrest.

  4. Current application of high flow oxygen nasal cannula in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Bottani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High flow oxygen with nasal cannula (HFONC is a relatively new mode of oxygen delivery. Advantages of HFONC versus conventional oxygen therapy (COT encompass carbon dioxide washout, generation of a slight positive end-expiratory pressure and maintenance of humidified gas flow through airways. These features are mostly shared with non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV, although with lack of a clearly comparable efficacy. In the last few years, HFONC has gained interest as a third alternative to COT and NIMV in the management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the critically ill patient, both in intensive care units and emergency departments. The aim of this article is to review indications, effects and existing evidence on HFONC, COT and NIMV in the setting of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  5. Acute respiratory failure caused by aspiration of high density barium: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Soon; Jung, Eun A; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    Accidental aspiration of barium contrast medium during the upper gastrointestinal study can occur in patients with swallowing disorder, especially in the elderly patients. We experienced a case of respiratory failure followed by death within a few hours in 85 year-old patient after barium aspiration

  6. Efficiency of Oxygen Therapy by Simple Face Mask and Nasal Cannula for Acute Respiratory Failure in Infants and Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana D. BADIU TIŞA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Premises: Acute respiratory failure caused by respiratory diseases, which is a frequent pathology in infants and young children, requires oxygen therapy, which can be administered by different devices. Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of two devices for oxygen administration by determining a clinical appraisal score for acute respiratory failure in infants and young children by oxygen therapy using simple face masks and nasal cannulas. Material and methods: 74 children, aged between one month and 3 years were included in our study. Oxygen therapy was administered by face mask to 38 patients, and by nasal cannula to 36 patients. A clinical appraisal score of respiratory failure was calculated both before and after oxygen therapy. Oxygen saturation was measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 and arterial or capillary blood gas (SaO2 before, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes after the initiation of oxygen therapy. Results: We found an improvement in the clinical score regardless of the method of administration; this improvement was more obvious at 60 minutes than at the 30 min evaluation (p

  7. High Resource Utilization Does Not Affect Mortality in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients Managed With Tracheostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Bradley D; Stwalley, Dustin; Lambert, Dennis; Edler, Joshua; Morris, Peter E; Medvedev, Sofia; Hohmann, Samuel F; Kymes, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tracheostomy practice in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) varies greatly among institutions. This variability has the potential to be reflected in the resources expended providing care. In various healthcare environments, increased resource expenditure has been associated with a favorable effect on outcome. OBJECTIVE To examine the association between institutional resource expenditure and mortality in ARF patients managed with tracheostomy. METHODS We developed analytic models employing the University Health Systems Consortium (Oakbrook, Illinois) database. Administrative coding data were used to identify patients with the principal diagnosis of ARF, procedures, complications, post-discharge destination, and survival. Mean resource intensity of participating academic medical centers was determined using risk-adjusted estimates of costs. Mortality risk was determined using a multivariable approach that incorporated patient-level demographic and clinical variables and institution-level resource intensity. RESULTS We analyzed data from 44,124 ARF subjects, 4,776 (10.8%) of whom underwent tracheostomy. Compared to low-resource-intensity settings, treatment in high-resource-intensity academic medical centers was associated with increased risk of mortality (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.05–1.76), including those managed with tracheostomy (odds ratio high-resource-intensity academic medical center with tracheostomy 1.10, 95% CI 1.04 –1.17). We examined the relationship between complication development and outcome. While neither the profile nor number of complications accumulated differed comparing treatment environments (P > .05 for both), mortality for tracheostomy patients experiencing complications was greater in high-resource-intensity (95/313, 30.3%) versus low-resource-intensity (552/2,587, 21.3%) academic medical centers (P tracheostomy. PMID:23650434

  8. The value of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy after extubation in patients with acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Zhuan Song

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the value of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy after extubation in patients with acute respiratory failure. METHODS: A single-center, prospective, randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted between January 2013 and December 2014. Sixty enrolled patients were randomized immediately after extubation into either a high-flow nasal cannula group (n=30 or an air entrainment mask group (n=30 at a fixed inspired oxygen fraction (40%. The success rate of oxygen therapy, respiratory and hemodynamic parameters and subjective discomfort (using a visual analogue scale were assessed at 24h after extubation. RESULTS: The two groups were comparable at extubation. A total of 46 patients were successfully treated including 27 patients in the high-flow nasal cannula group and 19 patients in the air entrainment mask group. Compared to the air entrainment mask group, the success rate of oxygen therapy and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen were significantly higher and the respiratory rate was lower in the high-flow nasal cannula group. In addition, less discomfort related to interface displacement and airway dryness was observed in the high-flow nasal cannula group than in the air entrainment mask group. CONCLUSIONS: At a fixed inspired oxygen fraction, the application of a high-flow nasal cannula after extubation achieves a higher success rate of oxygen therapy and less discomfort at 24h than an air entrainment mask in patients with acute respiratory failure.

  9. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Kishore; Pradeep Kumar Sharma; Bhaskar Saikia; Praveen Khilnani

    2015-01-01

    Guillain-Barr? syndrome (GBS) is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggesti...

  10. Effects of High-Flow Nasal Cannula on the Work of Breathing in Patients Recovering From Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Mathieu; Bouchard, Pierre-Alexandre; Simon, Mathieu; Simard, Serge; Lellouche, François

    2017-12-01

    High-flow nasal cannula is increasingly used in the management of respiratory failure. However, little is known about its impact on respiratory effort, which could explain part of the benefits in terms of comfort and efficiency. This study was designed to assess the effects of high-flow nasal cannula on indexes of respiratory effort (i.e., esophageal pressure variations, esophageal pressure-time product/min, and work of breathing/min) in adults. A randomized controlled crossover study was conducted in 12 patients with moderate respiratory distress (i.e., after partial recovery from an acute episode, allowing physiologic measurements). Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, QC, Canada. Twelve adult patients with respiratory distress symptoms were enrolled in this study. Four experimental conditions were evaluated: baseline with conventional oxygen therapy and high-flow nasal cannula at 20, 40, and 60 L/min. The primary outcomes were the indexes of respiratory effort (i.e., esophageal pressure variations, esophageal pressure-time product/min, and work of breathing/min). Secondary outcomes included tidal volume, respiratory rate, minute volume, dynamic lung compliance, inspiratory resistance, and blood gases. Esophageal pressure variations decreased from 9.8 (5.8-14.6) cm H2O at baseline to 4.9 (2.1-9.1) cm H2O at 60 L/min (p = 0.035). Esophageal pressure-time product/min decreased from 165 (126-179) to 72 (54-137) cm H2O • s/min, respectively (p = 0.033). Work of breathing/min decreased from 4.3 (3.5-6.3) to 2.1 (1.5-5.0) J/min, respectively (p = 0.031). Respiratory pattern variables and capillary blood gases were not significantly modified between experimental conditions. Dynamic lung compliance increased from 38 (24-64) mL/cm H2O at baseline to 59 (43-175) mL/cm H2O at 60 L/min (p = 0.007), and inspiratory resistance decreased from 9.6 (5.5-13.4) to 5.0 (1.0-9.1) cm H2O/L/s, respectively (p = 0.07). High-flow nasal cannula, when

  11. Acute respiratory failure after aspiration of activated charcoal with recurrent deposition and release from an intrapulmonary cavern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Roland C E; Schefold, Joerg C; Bercker, Sven; Temmesfeld-Wollbrück, Bettina; Weichert, Wilko; Spies, Claudia D; Weber-Carstens, Steffen

    2009-02-01

    To report on the recurrent release of charcoal from an intrapulmonary cavern in a case of acute respiratory failure after charcoal aspiration. Case report. Anaesthesiological ICU, university hospital. An 18-year-old ethanol intoxicated comatose patient regurgitated and aspirated activated charcoal during orotracheal intubation. After 2 days of mechanical ventilation, the patient was transferred to a tertiary care university hospital. On admission, acute respiratory distress syndrome with bilateral pulmonary infiltrations was diagnosed. The patient's recovery was hampered by recurrent release of charcoal from an intrapulmonary cavern. Sophisticated ventilatory support, prone positioning, secretolytics, repetitive bronchoscopy, and antibiotic therapy may have facilitated bronchoalveolar clearance and weaning after 18 days. Aspiration may be a dramatic complication if charcoal is administered in comatose patients without airway protection. In this case report, advanced intensive care measures were necessary to tackle the special feature of charcoal release from an intrapulmonary cavern.

  12. pRotective vEntilation with veno-venouS lung assisT in respiratory failure: A protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, J J; Gillies, M A; Barrett, N A; Agus, A M; Beale, R; Bentley, A; Bodenham, A; Brett, S J; Brodie, D; Finney, S J; Gordon, A J; Griffiths, M; Harrison, D; Jackson, C; McDowell, C; McNally, C; Perkins, G D; Tunnicliffe, W; Vuylsteke, A; Walsh, T S; Wise, M P; Young, D; McAuley, D F

    2017-05-01

    One of the few interventions to demonstrate improved outcomes for acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure is reducing tidal volumes when using mechanical ventilation, often termed lung protective ventilation. Veno-venous extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (vv-ECCO 2 R) can facilitate reducing tidal volumes. pRotective vEntilation with veno-venouS lung assisT (REST) is a randomised, allocation concealed, controlled, open, multicentre pragmatic trial to determine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of lower tidal volume mechanical ventilation facilitated by vv-ECCO 2 R in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure. Patients requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation for acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure will be randomly allocated to receive either vv-ECCO 2 R and lower tidal volume mechanical ventilation or standard care with stratification by recruitment centre. There is a need for a large randomised controlled trial to establish whether vv-ECCO 2 R in acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure can allow the use of a more protective lung ventilation strategy and is associated with improved patient outcomes.

  13. Dexmedetomidine facilitates induction of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure in patients with severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Yasushi; Kido, Takanori; Semba, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) has been reported to be effective for acute respiratory failure in patients with severe asthma. Although NPPV requires less sedative than invasive mechanical ventilation, agitated patients with severe asthma should be given the minimum sedation necessary to facilitate the induction of NPPV. Two asthmatic patients (a 65-year-old man and a 32-year-old woman) separately presented to the intensive care unit with exacerbating respiratory failure. We initiated NPPV using bilevel positive airway pressure (PAP) ventilation. The ventilation was initially set as an inspiratory PAP of 15 cmH(2)O and an expiratory PAP of 4 cmH2O. Because they seemed too agitated to tolerate the mask ventilation, dexmedetomidine was administered intravenously, at 3 microg x kg(-1) x h(-1) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED] for 10 min, followed by a continuous infusion at 0.2-0.6 mircog x kg(-1) x h(-1) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]. One hour after the institution of NPPV, the patients were well cooperative with the mask ventilation and the respiratory symptoms had markedly improved. While the Ramsay sedation scale was maintained at 2 or 3 during the continuous dexmedetomidine infusion, we successfully weaned the patients from NPPV by reducing the inspiratory PAP. Dexmedetomidine helped the agitated patients cooperate with mask ventilation without inducing respiratory depression. We conclude that dexmedetomidine may be a valuable sedative to facilitate the induction of NPPV.

  14. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... Symptoms of acute kidney failure may include any of the following: Bloody stools Breath odor and metallic taste in the mouth Bruising easily Changes in ...

  15. Iron lung vs mask ventilation in the treatment of acute on chronic respiratory failure in COPD patients: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Antonio; Confalonieri, Marco; Marchese, Santino; Mollica, Corrado; Villella, Giuseppe; Gorini, Massimo; Della Porta, Rossana

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of negative-pressure ventilation (NPV) with the use of the iron lung vs noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NIPPV) in the treatment of COPD patients with acute on chronic respiratory failure. A retrospective case-control study. Four Italian respiratory intermediate ICUs. Of a total of 393 COPD patients admitted to the ICU in 1996, 53 pairs were treated with the iron lung (NPV group). Patients treated with NIPPV (NIPPV group) were matched according to mean (+/- SD) age (70.3 +/- 7.1 vs 70.3 +/- 6.9 years, respectively), sex, causes of acute respiratory failure (ARF), APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) II score (22.4 +/- 5.3 vs 22.1 +/- 4.6, respectively), pH (7.26 +/- 0.05 vs 7.27 +/- 0.04, respectively), and PaCO(2) (88.1 +/- 11.5 vs 85.1 +/- 13.5 mm Hg, respectively) on admission to the ICU. The effectiveness of matching was 98.4%. Five patients from the NPV group (9.4%) and seven patients from the NIPPV group (13.2%) needed endotracheal intubation (EI). The treatment failure rate (ie, death and/or need of EI) was 20.7% in the NPV group and 24.5% in the NIPPV group (difference was not significant). The mean duration of mechanical ventilation (29.6 +/- 28.6 vs 62.3 +/- 35.7 h, respectively) and length of hospital stay (10.4 +/- 4.3 vs 15 +/- 5.2 d, respectively) among the 35 concordant surviving pairs were significantly lower in the NPV group than in the NIPPV group (p = 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). These data suggest that both ventilatory techniques are equally effective in avoiding EI and death in COPD patients with ARF. Prospective trials are needed to confirm these preliminary results.

  16. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children.We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b, between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111 and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296. The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths.SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; p<0.001 and fatal outcome (21% vs. 4%; p<0.001 compared to those without danger signs. Only 6/111 (5.4% SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia and 12/296 (4.0% without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (p<0.01.The result suggests that SAM children with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiologic pneumonia who

  17. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Georgopoulos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+ after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure, respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy “Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?” [1].

  18. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  19. FLT-3 ITD Positive Acute Basophilic Leukemia with Rare Complex Karyotype Presenting with Acute Respiratory Failure: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antohe Ion

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute basophilic leukemia is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, as categorized by the 2008 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms. Acute basophilic leukemia diagnosis requires thorough morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, molecular, and cytogenetic studies and exclusion of other hematological neoplasms associating basophilia. The disease course is defined by histamine driven, occasionally life-threatening respiratory, cardiovascular, cutaneous or digestive complications, as well as primary refractoriness to standard therapy. Clinical presentation: We herein report a case of a 63-year-old asthmatic female patient diagnosed with acute basophilic leukemia, associated with previously unpublished cytogenetic features and FLT-3 ITD mutation, pulmonary leukostasis and spontaneous pulmonary capillary leak syndrome, which worsened immediately following chemotherapy initiation. Respiratory complications were successfully managed, but recrudesced upon emergence of refractory disease and were ultimately fatal. We highlight the likelihood of pulmonary complications induced by basophil degranulation and tumor lysis in hypercellular acute basophilic leukemia and the potential benefit of histamine receptor blockade in this setting.

  20. Treatment Failure and Mortality amongst Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition Presenting with Cough or Respiratory Difficulty and Radiological Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S G; Shahid, Abu S M S B; Shahunja, K M; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate intervention is critical in reducing deaths among under-five, severe acutely malnourished (SAM) children with danger signs of severe pneumonia; however, there is paucity of data on outcome of World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended interventions of SAM children with severe pneumonia. We sought to evaluate outcome of the interventions in such children. We prospectively enrolled SAM children aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) ward of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), between April 2011 and June 2012 with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia. All the enrolled children were treated with ampicillin and gentamicin, and micronutrients as recommended by the WHO. Comparison was made among pneumonic children with (n = 111) and without WHO defined danger signs of severe pneumonia (n = 296). The outcomes of interest were treatment failure (if a child required changing of antibiotics) and deaths during hospitalization. Further comparison was also made among those who developed treatment failure and who did not and among the survivors and deaths. SAM children with danger signs of severe pneumonia more often experienced treatment failure (58% vs. 20%; ppneumonia and 12/296 (4.0%) without danger signs had bacterial isolates from blood. In log-linear binomial regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, danger signs of severe pneumonia, dehydration, hypocalcaemia, and bacteraemia were independently associated both with treatment failure and deaths in SAM children presenting with cough or respiratory difficulty and radiological pneumonia (ppneumonia who had WHO-defined danger signs of severe pneumonia more often had treatment failure and fatal outcome compared to those without the danger signs. In addition to danger signs of severe pneumonia, other common causes of both treatment failure and deaths

  1. Effects of Sigh on Regional Lung Strain and Ventilation Heterogeneity in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients Undergoing Assisted Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Tommaso; Eronia, Nilde; Abbruzzese, Chiara; Marcolin, Roberto; Coppadoro, Andrea; Spadaro, Savino; Patroniti, Nicolo'; Bellani, Giacomo; Pesenti, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    In acute respiratory failure patients undergoing pressure support ventilation, a short cyclic recruitment maneuver (Sigh) might induce reaeration of collapsed lung regions, possibly decreasing regional lung strain and improving the homogeneity of ventilation distribution. We aimed to describe the regional effects of different Sigh rates on reaeration, strain, and ventilation heterogeneity, as measured by thoracic electrical impedance tomography. Prospective, randomized, cross-over study. General ICU of a single university-affiliated hospital. We enrolled 20 critically ill patients intubated and mechanically ventilated with PaO2/FIO2 up to 300 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure at least 5 cm H2O (15 with acute respiratory distress syndrome), undergoing pressure support ventilation as per clinical decision. Sigh was added to pressure support ventilation as a 35 cm H2O continuous positive airway pressure period lasting 3-4 seconds at different rates (no-Sigh vs 0.5, 1, and 2 Sigh(s)/min). All study phases were randomly performed and lasted 20 minutes. In the last minutes of each phase, we measured arterial blood gases, changes in end-expiratory lung volume of nondependent and dependent regions, tidal volume reaching nondependent and dependent lung (Vtnondep and Vtdep), dynamic intratidal ventilation heterogeneity, defined as the average ratio of Vt reaching nondependent/Vt reaching dependent lung regions along inspiration (VtHit). With Sigh, oxygenation improved (p ventilation heterogeneity. Our study generates the hypothesis that in ventilated acute respiratory failure patients, Sigh may enhance regional lung protection.

  2. Efficacy of high-flow oxygen by nasal cannula with active humidification in a patient with acute respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Lobato, Salvador; Folgado, Miguel Angel; Chapa, Angel; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of choice for patients with respiratory failure of neuromuscular origin, especially in patients with hypercapnic respiratory acidosis, is noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Endotracheal intubation and invasive ventilation are indicated for patients with severe respiratory compromise or failure of NIV. In recent years, high-flow oxygen therapy and active humidification devices have been introduced, and emerging evidence suggests that high-flow oxygen may be effective in various clinical settings, such as acute respiratory failure, after cardiac surgery, during sedation and analgesia, in acute heart failure, in hypoxemic respiratory distress, in do-not-intubate patients, in patients with chronic cough and copious secretions, pulmonary fibrosis, or cancer, in critical areas and the emergency department. We report on a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who arrived at the emergency department with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. She did not tolerate NIV and refused intubation, but was treated successfully with heated, humidified oxygen via high-flow nasal cannula. Arterial blood analysis after an hour on high-flow nasal cannula showed improved pH, P(aCO2), and awareness. The respiratory acidosis was corrected, and she was discharged after 5 days of hospitalization. Her response to high-flow nasal cannula was similar to that expected with NIV. We discuss the mechanisms of action of heated, humidified high-flow oxygen therapy.

  3. Successful management of acute respiratory failure in an Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis patient using an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Andrea; Arcaro, Giovanna; Paladini, Luciana; Iovino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) requiring Invasive Mechanical Ventilation (IMV) following unsuccessful treatment with Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV) have a high mortality rate. IMV is, moreover, an independent predictor of poor outcome during the post-transplantation period in patients on waiting lists for Lung Transplantation (LT). Here we describe the successful management of an IPF patient with acute respiratory failure (ARF) using a pump-assisted veno-venous system for extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) (ProLUNG® system) as an alternative to endotracheal intubation (ETI) following NIV failure. Given this positive experience, further studies are warranted focusing on the ECCO2R system's tolerability, safety, and efficacy in patients with IPF and severe ARF in whom NIV alone is ineffective.

  4. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

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    Gurveen Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisynthetase (AS syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis.

  5. Use of Lung Opening Maneuver in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure After Cardiosurgical Operations

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    A. A. Yeremenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative respiratory failure is a most common complication and a main cause of postoperative death. The lung opening maneuver is a most effective method of respiratory therapy for this syndrome.Objective. To evaluate the impact of recruiting maneuver on gas exchange parameters, the biomechanical properties of the lung, and hemodynamic parameters. To determine whether the lung opening maneuver can be fully performed in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.Materials and methods. The study covered 19 patients aged 53 to 70 years who had postoperative failure. The indication for the recruiting maneuver was a decrease in the oxygenation index below 250 mm Hg during assisted ventilation (AV with FiO2>0.5, an inspiratory-expira-tory phase ratio of 1:1 to 3:1, and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 5—10 cm H2O.Results. A decrease in the oxygenation index to 139±36 mm Hg was observed before the recruiting maneuver was applied. Cd;n. averaged 41.1±8.4 ml/cm H2O. After use of the recruiting maneuver, there were increases in the oxygenation index up to 371±121 mm Hg and in Cd;n. up to 64.3±10 ml/cm H2O in all the patients. When the recruiting maneuver was employed, 14 patients were observed to have elevated blood pressures corrected with a vasopressor. One patient developed pneumothorax that was drained in proper time.Conclusion. The application of the lung opening maneuver leads to a considerable improvement of gas exchange parameters and lung mechanical properties.

  6. [A comparison of the effects of PAV, PSV and IPPV on cardiopulmonary function in patients with acute respiratory failure].

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    Fang, Z; Niu, S; Zhu, L

    2001-05-01

    Comparing the effects of proportional assist ventilation (PAV), pressure support ventilation (PSV), and intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) on cardiopulmonary function in patients with acute respiratory failure, in particular, evaluating the clinical significance of PAV. Ten patients with acute respiratory failure were firstly ventilated with IPPV. Elaslance (Ers) and Resistance (Rrs) were measured and calculated. Then PSV mode was adapted. Based on the parameters of IPPV, inspiratory positive airway pressure was adjusted to maintain the same tidal volume (V(T)) as that in IPPV. Finally PAV mode was used. According to the parameters of PSV, the assist ratio was adjusted to maintain the same V(T) and peak pressure peak, as those in PSV. Respiratory mechanics, arterial blood gas and hemodynamics were recorded during above three modes of ventilation. Comparing with PSV and IPPV mode, PAV created a significantly lower peak, less work of breathing of patients (WoBp) and work of breathing of ventilation (WoBv) under the similar V(T); Central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) were significantly lower in PAV mode as compared with those in IPPV; While comparing with PSV, V(T), mean blood pressure (mBP) and cardiac output (CO) were higher and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), WoBp were lower in patients with PAV under similar peak. Among them the fall of WoBp was statistically significant. In patients receiving three modes of ventilation, PAV presents with lower airway pressure, less WoBp and less effect on hemodynamics as compared with those with PSV or IPPV.

  7. Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure: Ten-Year’s Clinical Experience of a Respiratory Semi-Intensive Care Unit

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    Raffaele Scala, M.D., esp.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough several prospective controlled randomizedtrials demonstrated the success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV in selected cases of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (ARF in setting with different care levels, clinical practice data about the use of VNI in the “real world” are limited.AimTo report the results of our clinical experiencein NIPPV applied for ARF in the Respiratory Semi-Intensive Care Unit (UTSIR allocated within the Respiratory Division of Arezzo betweenthe years 1996-2006 in terms of: patient tolerance, effects upon arterial blood gases, successrate and predictors of failure. Methods: Three hundred and filthy out of the 1484 patients (23.6% consecutively admittedfor ARF to our Respiratory Division during the study period received NIPPV in addition to standard therapy, according to the predeterminedroutinely used criteria. Results: Eight patients (2.3% did not tolerateNIPPV because of mask discomfort, while the remaining 342 (M: 240, F: 102; median (interquartilesage: 74.0 (68.0-79.3 yrs; COPD: 69.3% were ventilated for >1 hour. Arterial blood gases significantly improved after two hours of NIPPV (mean (standard deviation pH: 7.33 (0.07 versus 7.28 (7.25-7.31, p 48 hrs of ventilation after an initial positive response. Conclusions: As results of ten years of clinicalexperience at our UTSIR, NIPPV was shown to be well tolerated, effective in improving arterialblood gases and useful in avoiding intubationin most ARF episodes non-responsive to standard therapy.

  8. Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure: ten-year’s clinical experience of a Respiratory Semi-Intensive Care Unit (VERSIONE IN ITALIANO

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    Mario Naldi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough several prospective controlled randomizedtrials demonstrated the success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV in selected cases of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (IRA in setting with different care levels, clinical practice data about the use of NIV in the “real world” are limited.AimTo report the results of our clinical experience in NIV applied for IRA in the Respiratory Semi-Intensive Care Unit (UTSIR allocated within the Respiratory Division of Arezzo in the years 1996-2006 in terms of: tolerance, effects upon arterial blood gases, success rate and predictors of failure.MethodsThree hundred filthy of the 1484 patients (23.6% consecutively admitted for IRA to our RespiratoryDivision during the study period received NIV in addition to standard therapy, according to the pre-defined routinely used criteria.ResultsEight patients (2.3% did not tolerated NIV becauseof mask discomfort, while the remaining 342 (M: 240, F: 102; median (interquartiles age: 74.0 (68.0-79.3 yrs; COPD: 69.3% were ventilatedfor >1 hour. Arterial blood gases significantlyimproved after two hours of NIV (mean (standard deviation pH: 7.33 (0.07 versus 7.28 (7.25-7.31, p 48 hrs of ventilation after an initial positive response.ConclusionsAs results of our ten-year’s clinical experience performed in a UTSIR, NIV is confirmed to be well tolerated, effective in improving arterial blood gases and useful in avoiding intubation in most IRA episodes non-responder to standard therapy.

  9. Respiratory failure in diabetic ketoacidosis

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    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Rohrscheib, Mark; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Dorin, Richard I; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory failure complicating the course of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a source of increased morbidity and mortality. Detection of respiratory failure in DKA requires focused clinical monitoring, careful interpretation of arterial blood gases, and investigation for conditions that can affect adversely the respiration. Conditions that compromise respiratory function caused by DKA can be detected at presentation but are usually more prevalent during treatment. These conditions include deficits of potassium, magnesium and phosphate and hydrostatic or non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema. Conditions not caused by DKA that can worsen respiratory function under the added stress of DKA include infections of the respiratory system, pre-existing respiratory or neuromuscular disease and miscellaneous other conditions. Prompt recognition and management of the conditions that can lead to respiratory failure in DKA may prevent respiratory failure and improve mortality from DKA. PMID:26240698

  10. Rituximab treatment in a case of antisynthetase syndrome with severe interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure

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    Zappa Maria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of severe interstitial pneumonitis, mild polyarthritis and polymyositis, and Raynaud's syndrome with the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies, which had been diagnosed as anti-synthetase syndrome. The presence, however, of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies led us to understand that we were dealing here with a more severe form of interstitial lung disease. The patient was treated for acute respiratory failure but he showed resistance to glucocorticoids and cyclosporine. Thus, he was treated with infusions of anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab: his clinical conditions improved very rapidly and a significant decrease in the activity of pulmonary disease was detected using high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT of the thorax and pulmonary function tests.

  11. Noninvasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lixi; Luo, Kai; He, Jianqiang; Ma, Yong; Li, Zongru; Zhao, Na; Xu, Qun; Li, Yi; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-08-27

    To determine the effects of noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) compared with invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) as the initial mechanical ventilation on clinical outcomes when used for treatment of acute respiratory failure (ARF) in immunocompromised patients. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and other databases. Subgroup analyses by disease severity and causes of immunodeficiency were also conducted. Thirteen observational studies with a total of 2552 patients were included. Compared to IMV, NIV was shown to significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (OR 0.43, 95 % CI 0.23 to 0.80, P value = 0.007) and 30-day mortality (OR 0.34, 95 % CI 0.20 to 0.61, P value benefits or at least no harm to ARF patients with certain causes of immunodeficiency or who are less severe.

  12. [Acute respiratory dyspnea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimir, G; Hanssens, L; Mulier, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute respiratory dyspnea is very frequent in children and must be quickly treated to obtain the best prognosis. The diagnosis depends from the natural history of the disease and from the quality of clinical assessment. The use of an algorithm according to the presence of stridor or bronchospasm is very contributive to the diagnosis. The paper reviews the pathophysiology of dyspnea in children and the more common diseases that are causing respiratory distress. Finally, treatment of respiratory failure and management of specific diseases are defined.

  13. Continuous flow biphasic positive airway pressure by helmet in patients with acute hypoxic respiratory failure: effect on oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgrò, Stefano; Zanella, Alberto; Sala, Chiara; Grasselli, Giacomo; Foti, Giuseppe; Pesenti, Antonio; Patroniti, Nicolò

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the effects of periodical high pressure breaths (SIGH) or biphasic positive pressure ventilation (BIPAP) during helmet continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with acute hypoxic respiratory failure. We used a recently developed electromechanical expiratory valve (TwinPAP, StarMed, Mirandola, Italy), which is time-cycled between two customizable positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels. We studied 21 patients (67 ± 17 years old) undergoing helmet CPAP. Continuous flow CPAP system was set at 60 l/min flow rate while maintaining clinical FiO(2) (51 ± 15%). Five steps, lasting 1 h each, were applied: (1) spontaneous breathing with PEEP 0 cmH(2)O (SB), (2) CPAP with PEEP 8 cmH(2)O (CPAP(basal)), (3) low PEEP, 8 cmH(2)O, for 25 s and high PEEP, 25 cmH(2)O, for 5 s (SIGH), (4) low PEEP, 8 cmH(2)O, for 3 s and high PEEP, 20 cmH(2)O, for 3 s (BIPAP), (5) CPAP with PEEP 8 cmH(2)O (CPAP(final)). We randomized the sequence of SIGH and BIPAP. PaO(2) was significantly higher during all steps compared to SB. When compared to CPAP(basal), both SIGH and BIPAP induced a further increase in PaO(2). PaO(2) during SIGH and BIPAP were not different. The oxygenation improvement was maintained during CPAP(final). Superimposed, nonsynchronized positive pressure breaths delivered during helmet CPAP by means of the TwinPAP system may improve oxygenation in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, even at a rate as low as two breaths per minute.

  14. Severe hypoalbuminemia is a strong independent risk factor for acute respiratory failure in COPD: a nationwide cohort study

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    Chen CW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Char-Wen Chen,1,* Yih-Yuan Chen,2,* Chin-Li Lu,3 Solomon Chih-Cheng Chen,3 Yi-Jen Chen,1,4 Ming-Shian Lin,1,4 Wei Chen1,5,6 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, 3Department of Medical Research, Ditmanson Medical Foundation, Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi, 4Department of Respiratory Care, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Chiayi Campus; Changhua, 5College of Nursing, Dayeh University, Changhua 6Department of Respiratory Therapy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Acute respiratory failure (ARF is a life-threatening event, which is frequently associated with the severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Hypoalbuminemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with COPD. However, to date, little is known regarding whether or not hypoalbuminemia is a risk factor for developing ARF in COPD.Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance system of Taiwan. A total of 42,732 newly diagnosed COPD patients (age ≥40 years from 1997 to 2011 were enrolled. Among them, 1,861 (4.36% patients who had received albumin supplementation were defined as hypoalbuminemia, and 40,871 (95.6% patients who had not received albumin supplementation were defined as no hypoalbuminemia.Results: Of 42,732 newly diagnosed COPD patients, 5,248 patients (12.3% developed ARF during the 6 years follow-up period. Patients with hypoalbuminemia were older, predominantly male, had more comorbidities, and required more steroid treatment and blood transfusions than patients without hypoalbuminemia. In a multivariable Cox regression analysis model, being elderly was the strongest independent risk factor for ARF (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 4.63, P<0.001, followed by hypoalbuminemia (adjusted HR: 2

  15. Sequential Oxygenation Index and Organ Dysfunction Assessment within the First 3 Days of Mechanical Ventilation Predict the Outcome of Adult Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Failure

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    Hsu-Ching Kao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine early predictors of outcomes of adult patients with severe acute respiratory failure. Method. 100 consecutive adult patients with severe acute respiratory failure were evaluated in this retrospective study. Data including comorbidities, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score, Acute Physiological Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, PaO2, FiO2, PaO2/FiO2, PEEP, mean airway pressure (mPaw, and oxygenation index (OI on the 1st and the 3rd day of mechanical ventilation, and change in OI within 3 days were recorded. Primary outcome was hospital mortality; secondary outcome measure was ventilator weaning failure. Results. 38 out of 100 (38% patients died within the study period. 48 patients (48% failed to wean from ventilator. Multivariate analysis showed day 3 OI ( and SOFA ( score were independent predictors of hospital mortality. Preexisting cerebrovascular accident (CVA ( was the predictor of weaning failure. Results from Kaplan-Meier method demonstrated that higher day 3 OI was associated with shorter survival time (log-Rank test, . Conclusion. Early OI (within 3 days and SOFA score were predictors of mortality in severe acute respiratory failure. In the future, prospective studies measuring serial OIs in a larger scale of study cohort is required to further consolidate our findings.

  16. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  17. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygenation in Immunocompromised Patients With Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure: A Groupe de Recherche Respiratoire en Réanimation Onco-Hématologique Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiale, Virginie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Mokart, Djamel; Pène, Frédéric; Argaud, Laurent; Mayaux, Julien; Guitton, Christophe; Rabbat, Antoine; Girault, Christophe; Kouatchet, Achille; Vincent, François; Bruneel, Fabrice; Nyunga, Martine; Seguin, Amélie; Klouche, Kada; Colin, Gwenahel; Kontar, Loay; Perez, Pierre; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique D; Papazian, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Chevret, Sylvie; Azoulay, Elie

    2017-03-01

    In immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory failure, invasive mechanical ventilation remains associated with high mortality. Choosing the adequate oxygenation strategy is of the utmost importance in that setting. High-flow nasal oxygen has recently shown survival benefits in unselected patients with acute respiratory failure. The objective was to assess outcomes of immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure treated with high-flow nasal oxygen. We performed a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial of noninvasive ventilation in critically ill immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure. Twenty-nine ICUs in France and Belgium. Critically ill immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure. A propensity score-based approach was used to assess the impact of high-flow nasal oxygen compared with standard oxygen on day 28 mortality. Among 374 patients included in the study, 353 met inclusion criteria. Underlying disease included mostly malignancies (n = 296; 84%). Acute respiratory failure etiologies were mostly pneumonia (n = 157; 44.4%) or opportunistic infection (n = 76; 21.5%). Noninvasive ventilation was administered to 180 patients (51%). Invasive mechanical ventilation was ultimately needed in 142 patients (40.2%). Day 28 mortality was 22.6% (80 deaths). Throughout the ICU stay, 127 patients (36%) received high-flow nasal oxygen whereas 226 patients received standard oxygen. Ninety patients in each group (high-flow nasal oxygen or standard oxygen) were matched according to the propensity score, including 91 of 180 (51%) who received noninvasive ventilation. High-flow nasal oxygen was neither associated with a lower intubation rate (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.11-1.61; p = 0.2) nor day 28 mortality (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.45-1.42; p = 0.45). In immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure, high-flow nasal oxygen when compared with standard oxygen

  18. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

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    Stephan Budweiser

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephan Budweiser1, Rudolf A Jörres2, Michael Pfeifer1,31Center for Pneumology, Hospital Donaustauf, Donaustauf, Germany; 2Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Respirology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyAbstract: Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients with chronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure became a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients’ adherence to therapy.Keywords: respiratory failure, COPD, mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation long-term oxygen therapy, chronic

  19. TWO CASES OF TYPE II RESPIRATORY FAILURE IN COPD TREATED IN KATURI MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL, GUNTUR AND AN OVERVIEW OF TREATMENT OF ACUTE EXACERBATION AND RESPIRATORY FAILURE

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    Ramakrishna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Type II Respiratory Failure in a COPD patient is a difficult task for the ICU and Pulmonary physician. Multi factorial and multi - disciplinary approach is required . Our experience of two cases treated recently in Katuri medical College Hospita l have common features. One is a male of 54 years age and the other is a female of similar age. Both of them were obese and were nonsmokers. Both were poor and could not afford any ICU treatment on their own. Both were rescued by State sponsored Arogyasree programme. Both of them had the advantage of support from their families. Aided by Arogyasree programme, dedicated staff of ICU, Pulmonology, ENT departments , timely interventions with electrolyte balance, balanced antibiotic therapy, Noninvasive and inva sive ventilator strategies, Nutritional support, Blood transfusions, Timely Tracheostomy and excellent nursing care and drug administration in ICU both patients recovered back to normalcy . Initially both required home oxygen therapy and both were subsequen tly seen maintaining normal oxygenation status even without oxygen causing happiness to family members and the treating physicians

  20. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budweiser, Stephan; Jörres, Rudolf A; Pfeifer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacological treatment, supplemental oxygen and mechanical ventilation are major treatment options. This review describes the physiological concepts underlying respiratory failure and its therapy, as well as important treatment outcomes. The rationale for the controlled supply of oxygen in acute hypoxic respiratory failure is undisputed. There is also a clear survival benefit from long-term oxygen therapy in patients withchronic hypoxia, while in mild, nocturnal, or exercise-induced hypoxemia such long-term benefits appear questionable. Furthermore, much evidence supports the use of non-invasive positivepressure ventilation in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. It application reduces intubation and mortality rates, and the duration of intensive care unit or hospital stays, particularly in the presence of mild to moderate respiratory acidosis. COPD with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failurebecame a major indication for domiciliary mechanical ventilation, based on pathophysiological reasoning and on data regarding symptoms and quality of life. Still, however, its relevance for long-term survival has to be substantiated in prospective controlled studies. Such studies might preferentially recruit patients with repeated hypercapnic decompensation or a high risk for death, while ensuring effective ventilation and the patients' adherence to therapy.

  1. Quantitative multichannel EEG measure predicting the optimal weaning from ventilator in ICU patients with acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Christos; Maglaveras, Nikos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Albani, Maria; Chatzinikolaou, Kyriazis; Pappas, Konstantinos

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel quantitative multichannel EEG (qEEG) based analysis method, called Global Field Damping Time (GFDT), in order to detect potential EEG changes of patients admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure, and correlate them to the patients' recovery outcome predicting the optimal time-point to disconnect the patient from mechanical ventilation. Twenty-nine adult patients with acute respiratory failure out of 98 admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Saint Paul General Hospital were enrolled, and among them only 15 completed the study. The patients were classified in 3 groups according to their outcome after 3 months follow-up. The patients were intubated with fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 100%. Neurological Deficit Scores (NDS) were measured 24 h after intubation to assess patients' neurological condition. Twenty-four hours after patient's intubation, FiO2 was decreased to 40% (weaning session), followed by a 5 min early recovery session, a 5 min recovery 1 session and a 5 min recovery 2 session. EEG recordings were performed during this experimental procedure. Multichannel EEG segments were processed and fitted into a multivariate autoregressive (mAR) model, and single channel EEG segments into a scalar autoregressive (sAR) model. The mAR and the sAR models of arbitrary order p were decomposed into mp and p oscillators and relaxators, respectively. Damping time of each oscillator and each relaxator, and the Global Field Damping Time (GFDT) as a weighted damping time were estimated for both mAR and sAR models. A statistically significant increase of mAR model's GFDT during the weaning session was observed in the subjects of all groups. Comparing the 3 patients' groups, statistically significant differences for mAR model's GFDT were observed for the weaning and early recovery session. Linear regression analysis between NDS and mean mAR model's GFDT showed statistical significance during weaning session

  2. Evaluation of acute respiratory failure after cervical spinal cord injury in Mashhad Shahid Kamyab Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadReza Ahsaei

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Acuterespiratory  complications are common in patients with cervical spinal cord injury. These complications can increase mortality and morbidity rates. The aim of this study is to specify the complications after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury, management of these patients and to select the appropriate remedial and preventive measures. Materials and Methods: This study has been performed retrospectively in Shahid Kamyab ICU wards for 2.5 years in patient group with cervical cord injury. The severity of injury had been scored based on Frankel scoring. We completed the charts for clinical and neurological findings, the remedial ways and the results. Finally, statistical analysis has been accomplished. Results: From 592 patients being admitted with spinal trauma, 61 cases had cervical spine injury. 27 patients (44.3% had been hospitalized in ICU for respiratory problems. Methyl prednisolon succinate has been used only for 4 patients. There was not any difference in this group versus control group. 23 patients (85.18% had been scored in Frankel A. Mortality rate was 11 cases (40.7%. Tracheostomy had been used for patients with prolonged intubation and respiratory infection. Conclusion: Respiratory complications after cervical spinal cord injury are common and are accompanied by numerous complications and even mortality. We can reduce the mortality and morbidity rates in these patients by paying attention to these complications and using the immediate and appropriate ways of treating.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Confalonieri, Marco; Salton, Francesco; Fabiano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foste...

  4. Enteral Nutrition Is a Risk Factor for Airway Complications in Subjects Undergoing Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogo, Mariko; Nagata, Kazuma; Morimoto, Takeshi; Ito, Jiro; Sato, Yuki; Teraoka, Shunsuke; Fujimoto, Daichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Otsuka, Kojiro; Tomii, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    Early enteral nutrition is recommended for mechanically ventilated patients in several studies and guidelines. In contrast, the effects of early enteral nutrition on noninvasive ventilation (NIV) have not been investigated extensively. The lack of an established method of airway protection suggests that enteral nutrition administration to these patients could increase airway complications and worsen outcomes. Between January 2007 and January 2015, 150 patients were admitted to our respiratory department for acute respiratory failure and received NIV for >48 h. Of these, 107 subjects incapable of oral intake were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical background and complications were compared in subjects who did and did not receive enteral nutrition. Sixty of the 107 subjects (56%) incapable of oral intake who received NIV also received enteral nutrition. Serum albumin concentration was significantly lower in subjects who received enteral nutrition than in those who did not (mean 2.7 ± 0.68 mg/dL vs 3.0 ± 0.75 mg/dL, P = .048). The rate of airway complications was significantly higher (53% [32/60] vs 32% [15/47], P = .03), and median NIV duration was significantly longer (16 [interquartile range 7-43] d vs 8 [5-20] d, P = .02) in subjects who received enteral nutrition than in those who did not. Multivariate analysis showed that enteral nutrition was unrelated to in-hospital mortality. Among subjects receiving NIV, enteral nutrition was associated with increased risk of airway complications but did not affect mortality. Enteral nutrition should be carefully considered in these patients. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in pediatric acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: disease-specific morbidity survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Christopher J; Cooper, Michael C; Nussbaum, Eliezer; Liao, Eileen; Levine, Glenn K; Randhawa, Inderpal S

    2012-12-01

    Multiple ventilatory strategies for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) in children have been advocated, including high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Despite the frequent deployment of HFOV, randomized controlled trials remain elusive and currently there are no pediatric trials looking at its use. Our longitudinal study analyzed the predictive clinical outcome of HFOV in pediatric AHRF given disease-specific morbidity. A retrospective 8-year review on pediatric intensive care unit admissions with AHRF ventilated by HFOV was performed. Primary outcomes included survival, morbidity, length of stay (LOS), and factors associated with survival or mortality. A total of 102 patients underwent HFOV with a 66 % overall survival rate. Survivors had a greater LOS than nonsurvivors (p = 0.001). Mortality odds ratio (OR) for patients without bronchiolitis was 8.19 (CI = 1.02, 65.43), and without pneumonia it was 3.07 (CI = 1.12, 8.39). A lower oxygenation index (OI) after HFOV commencement and at subsequent time points analyzed predicted survival. After 24 h, mortality was associated with an OI > 35 [OR = 31.11 (CI = 3.25, 297.98)]. Sepsis-related mortality was associated with a higher baseline FiO(2) (0.88 vs. 0.65), higher OI (42 vs. 22), and augmented metabolic acidosis (pH of 7.25 vs. 7.32) evaluated 4 h on HFOV (p pediatric AHRF of various etiologies. Patients with morbidity limited to the respiratory system and optimized oxygenation indices are most likely to survive on HFOV.

  6. Adenovirus serotype 3 and 7 infection with acute respiratory failure in children in Taiwan, 2010-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yin Lai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Increased incidence of adenovirus infection in children was noticed since September 2010 in Taiwan and severe cases requiring intensive care were noted later. We did this study to find the clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with severe adenovirus infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We collected cases of severe adenovirus infection between November 2010 and June 2011 to analyze their clinical characteristics in two medical centers in northern Taiwan. Severe adenovirus infection was defined as laboratory-confirmed adenovirus cases with required intensive care. Hexon gene sequencing was performed for molecular genotyping. RESULTS: 45 patients were included, 22 cases (49% were infected with serotype 7, 19 (42% with serotype 3, and 4 with serotype 2. The median age (range was 2.75 years (0.08-15.43 years; 87% were below 5 years. Male to female ratio was 1.65 (28 to 17. Of these patients, 56% had underlying neurological diseases, 50% experienced fever higher than 40°C and 69% suffered fever longer than one week. The clinical diagnosis included pneumonia in 40 (89% patients, bronchopneumonia in 5 (11%, and encephalitis in 7 (16%. At least 22 patients had pleural effusion. They had complications of respiratory failure (53%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (24%, hypotension (40%, and 6 (13% patients needed extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Ten (22% patients died, all with underlying major systemic diseases and 7 (70% infected with serotype 7. CONCLUSIONS: Adenovirus serotype 7 and 3 can cause severe disease-even death-in children, especially those with underlying neurological diseases. Patients infected with adenovirus serotype 7 tended to have a higher case-fatality rate.

  7. Rigid bronchoscopic management of acute respiratory failure in a 30-year-old woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Madan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old woman presented with a history of progressive shortness of breath, cough, and hoarseness. Stridor was audible on examination. Chest X-ray showed normal lung fields and contrast-enhanced computed tomography thorax showed lower tracheal occlusion with endoluminal growth. Diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated multiple whitish glistening nodules over both vocal cords and lower tracheal occlusion by whitish nodular growth. In view of critical central airway obstruction, rigid bronchoscopy and excision of the lower tracheal growth were performed. Histopathological examination of the excised specimen demonstrated features of squamous papillomas. A diagnosis of respiratory papillomatosis was established. On follow-up surveillance bronchoscopy, there was a gradual spontaneous regression of the residual lesions, and the patient remains currently asymptomatic 1 year since the procedure.

  8. Rigid bronchoscopic management of acute respiratory failure in a 30-year-old woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Dhungana, Ashesh; Madan, Neha Kawatra; Mohan, Anant; Hadda, Vijay; Garg, Rakesh; Jain, Deepali; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with a history of progressive shortness of breath, cough, and hoarseness. Stridor was audible on examination. Chest X-ray showed normal lung fields and contrast-enhanced computed tomography thorax showed lower tracheal occlusion with endoluminal growth. Diagnostic flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated multiple whitish glistening nodules over both vocal cords and lower tracheal occlusion by whitish nodular growth. In view of critical central airway obstruction, rigid bronchoscopy and excision of the lower tracheal growth were performed. Histopathological examination of the excised specimen demonstrated features of squamous papillomas. A diagnosis of respiratory papillomatosis was established. On follow-up surveillance bronchoscopy, there was a gradual spontaneous regression of the residual lesions, and the patient remains currently asymptomatic 1 year since the procedure. PMID:27891001

  9. Long-term non-invasive ventilation reduces readmissions in COPD patients with two or more episodes of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Kasper Linde; Maibom, Sophia Liff; Wilcke, Jon Torgny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who have had an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF) have a large 1-year risk of death or readmission. Acute non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been shown to be an effective treatment of AHRF; and long-term NIV...... (LTNIV) has been shown to be an effective treatment of chronic respiratory failure in stable hypercapnic COPD. We investigated the effects of LTNIV in a group of patients with severe, unstable COPD: frequent admissions and multiple previous episodes of AHRF treated with NIV. METHODS: We conducted...... a retrospective analysis of 20 COPD patients treated with LTNIV after two or more episodes of AHRF during 1 year. RESULTS: The mean number of AHRF episodes decreased from 2.44 in the year prior to LTNIV initiation to 0.44 in the year following (p

  10. An Unusual Suspect Causing Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masooma Aqeel MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antisynthetase syndrome (ASS is characterized by the presence of anti-Jo-1 antibodies in conjunction with clinical findings of fever, polymyositis-dermatomyositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD. Inflammatory myopathies carry a high risk of malignancy, but this association is less well outlined in ASS. We present the case of a patient with ASS who developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old female with ASS presented with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. She was empirically treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for a health care–associated pneumonia; however, she failed to improve. Chest computed tomography revealed extensive bilateral ground glass opacities as well as extensive mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy. Infectious workup was negative. A surgical lung biopsy revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL. The patient was started on chemotherapy with complete resolution of hypoxemic respiratory failure. Conclusions: Malignancy is very rare in the setting of ASS; and our case illustrates the unique presentation of PTCL in ASS. In addition, lung involvement in PTCL is variable (incidence ranging from 8% to 20%; and in this case, bilateral multifocal consolidation was biopsied and proven to be PTCL involving the lungs. This case highlights the rare noninfectious conditions that can present as acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the setting of ASS.

  11. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannulae in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeies, Murdoch; Flynn, Eric; Turgeon, Alexis F; Paunovic, Bojan; Loewen, Hal; Rabbani, Rasheda; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M; Ferguson, Niall D; Zarychanski, Ryan

    2017-10-16

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannulae (HFNC) compared to non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and/or standard oxygen in patients with acute, hypoxemic respiratory failure. We reviewed randomized controlled trials from CENTRAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to February 2016), conference proceedings, and relevant article reference lists. Two reviewers independently screened and extracted trial-level data from trials investigating HFNC in patients with acute, hypoxemic respiratory failure. Internal validity was assessed in duplicate using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. The strength of evidence was assessed in duplicate using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework. Our primary outcome was mortality. Secondary outcomes included dyspnea, PaO 2 :FiO 2 ratio, PaCO 2 , and pH. Safety outcomes included respiratory arrest, intubation, delirium, and skin breakdown. From 2023 screened citations, we identified seven trials (1771 patients) meeting inclusion criteria. All trials were at high risk of bias due to lack of blinding. There was no evidence for a mortality difference in patients receiving HFNC vs. NIV and/or standard oxygen (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.48, I 2  = 63%, five trials, 1629 patients). In subgroup analyses of HFNC compared to NIV or standard oxygen individually, mortality differences were not observed. Measures of patient tolerability were heterogeneous. The PaO 2 :FiO 2 ratio at 6-12 h was significantly lower in patients receiving oxygen via HFNC compared to NIV or standard oxygen for hypoxemic respiratory failure (MD - 53.34, 95% CI - 71.95 to - 34.72, I 2  = 61%, 1143 patients). There were no differences in pH, PaCO 2 , or rates of intubation or cardio-respiratory arrest. Delirium and skin breakdown were infrequently reported in included trials. In patients with

  12. [Herpes simplex virus bronchopneumonitis in patient with acute respiratory failure after surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montesinos-De la Peña, M; Oteiza-López, L; Aldunate-Calvo, S; Gómez-Sánchez, M J; Sáenz-Bañuelos, J J; Tihista-Jiménez, J A

    2010-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus bronchopneumonitis is a clinical entity described in critically ill patients and classically associated to immunosuppression. Recent reports have shown a higher frequency of virus detection from samples obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of immunocompetent critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. This fact suggests its role as an independent pathogenic substrate. We report the case of a female patient who was admitted after an elective surgery of rectal tumor with suspected bronchoaspiration during anesthetic induction. The patient presented persistent fever despite broad spectrum antibiotic treatment. All cultures were negative for bacterial growth. The chest X-ray did not show opacifities. Prolonged mechanical ventilation with repeated failures to wean made it mandatory to perform percutaneous tracheostomy. A fibrobronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, performed previously, showed positive result for herpes simplex virus (PCR and specific nuclear inclusions in cells). Thus, treatment was initiated with acyclovir, with clinical improvement and weaning from mechanical ventilation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Adverse effects of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) for acute respiratory failure: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zulian; Duarte, Rui V; Bayliss, Sue; Bramley, George; Cummins, Carole

    2016-06-07

    The extracorporeal membrane carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) system is primarily designed for the purpose of removing CO2 from the body for patients with potentially reversible severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure or being considered for lung transplantation. Systematic reviews have focused on the effectiveness of ECCO2R. To the author's best knowledge, this is the first systematic review to focus on the adverse effects of this procedure. We will conduct a systematic review of procedure-related adverse effects of ECCO2R systems. A high sensitivity search strategy will be employed in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and product regulatory databases and ongoing trial registers to identify citations. Reference lists of relevant studies and grey literature will also be searched. Screening of the results will be performed by two reviewers independently using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Clinical trials and observational studies will be included. Data will be extracted using a purposefully developed extraction form. Appropriateness for statistical pooling of the results will be determined and carried out if heterogeneity is low to moderate. The GRADE framework will be employed to grade the overall quality of the evidence. In the UK, the current access to the use of ECCO2R is possible only with special arrangements for clinical governance, consent and for audit or research. Current evidence on ECCO2R suggests that there are a number of well-recognised complications which vary greatly across studies. This systematic review will consolidate the existing knowledge on adverse effects resulting from the use of ECCO2R. PROSPERO CRD42015023503 .

  14. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  15. [A multi-centre randomized controlled trial of domiciliary non-invasive ventilation vs long-term oxygen therapy in survivors of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure due to COPD. Non-invasive ventilation in obstructive lung disease (NIVOLD) study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, B; Cuvelier, A; Benichou, J; Muir, J-F

    2012-11-01

    Patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are very likely to develop acute exacerbations. Non-invasive ventilation is often used to treat acute respiratory failure but little information is available about the benefits of domiciliary non-invasive ventilation in COPD patients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure who survive an acute episode. The purpose of this study is to determine whether domiciliary non-invasive ventilation can reduce the incidence of recurrent acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in COPD patients who survived an episode of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF). A multi-center randomized controlled trial including patients with COPD who survived an episode of AHRF. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) (no intervention) or domiciliary non-invasive ventilation (active comparator) in addition to LTOT. In France, three university hospitals: Rouen, Caen and Amiens and three general hospitals: Dieppe, Le Havre and Elbeuf are recruiting. Age above 18 years; patients with COPD who have survived an episode of AHRF; patients weaned from non-invasive or mechanical ventilation for at least seven days following an acute episode; with stable arterial blood gases for at least two days: PaCO(2) greater than 55mmHg and pH greater than 7.35. Exclusion criteria are: age above 85 years, other causes of respiratory failure, obstructive sleep apnoea, adverse psychosocial status, serious co-morbidity. Primary outcome is the frequency of episodes of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (time frame: up to 102 weeks), secondary outcome is mortality (time frame: 1 month and every 6 months for 2 years). A decreased rate of episodes of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the group of patients receiving non-invasive ventilation in addition to long term oxygen therapy. Copyright © 2012 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative rescue closure of patent foramen ovale in the clinical setting of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and stroke following coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L Díaz-Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of intraoperative diagnosis and successful deferred percutaneous closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO in the clinical setting of acute refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure and new-onset ischemic stroke in an elderly patient after coronary artery bypass graft. Perioperative morbidity (i.e. severe hypoxemia, worsening right ventricular dysfunction, and embolic stroke that is potentially related to intraoperatively diagnosed PFO during cardiac surgery can complicate management in the Intensive Care Unit and perhaps affect the patient′s outcome. Although the PFO closure can be challenging in the clinical setting of hypoxemic respiratory failure and stroke following cardiac surgery, it can be a reasonable perioperative option.

  17. Two Cases of Arnold-Chiari Malformation with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Iliaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arnold–Chiari malformation is defined as downward displacement of the brainstem and cerebellum through the foramen magnum. It has different clinical presentations and four subtypes. It is known that downward migration of posterior fossa components through the foramen magnum and associated lower cranial nerve palsy and brainstem compression can cause respiratory failure. Acute respiratory failure could mark the onset of the disease. Posterior fossa decompression performed to treat primary disease can improve the central sleep abnormalities. As respiratory failure is rarely seen, this paper presents two cases of Arnold–Chiari malformation with respiratory failure.

  18. Treatment of respiratory failure in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Budweiser, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Stephan Budweiser1, Rudolf A Jörres2, Michael Pfeifer1,31Center for Pneumology, Hospital Donaustauf, Donaustauf, Germany; 2Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of Respirology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, GermanyAbstract: Patients with advanced COPD and acute or chronic respiratory failure are at high risk for death. Beyond pharmacolog...

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their fever and other symptoms are gone. Hand hygiene is the most important part of SARS prevention. ... Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In: Bennett JE, Dolin ...

  20. Acute Liver Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begins in or spreads to your liver can cause your liver to fail. Shock. Overwhelming infection (sepsis) and shock can severely impair blood flow to the liver, causing liver failure. Many cases of acute liver failure have no apparent ... liver failure often causes complications, including: ...

  1. A comparison of synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in elderly patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Suchi; Shi, Jindong; Fu, Cuiping; Wu, Xu; Li, Shanqun

    2016-01-01

    COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Acute exacerbations of COPD may cause respiratory failure, requiring intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Intensive care unit patients with acute exacerbations of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation have higher mortality rates than other hospitalized patients. Although mechanical ventilation is the most effective intervention for these conditions, invasive ventilation techniques have yielded variable effects. We evaluated pressure-regulated volume control (PRVC) ventilation treatment efficacy and preventive effects on pulmonary barotrauma in elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure. Thirty-nine intubated patients were divided into experimental and control groups and treated with the PRVC and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation - volume control methods, respectively. Vital signs, respiratory mechanics, and arterial blood gas analyses were monitored for 2-4 hours and 48 hours. Both groups showed rapidly improved pH, partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), and PaO2 per fraction of inspired O2 levels and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels. The pH and PaCO2 levels at 2-4 hours were lower and higher, respectively, in the test group than those in the control group (P0.05). Vital signs during 2-4 hours and 48 hours of treatment showed no statistical difference in either group (P>0.05). The level of peak inspiratory pressure in the experimental group after mechanical ventilation for 2-4 hours and 48 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (Pvariables were not significantly different between groups (P>0.05). Among elderly COPD patients with respiratory failure, application of PRVC resulted in rapid improvement in arterial blood gas analyses while maintaining a low peak inspiratory pressure. PRVC can reduce pulmonary barotrauma risk, making it a safer protective ventilation mode than synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation - volume control.

  2. A step-by-step diagnosis of exclusion in a twin pregnancy with acute respiratory failure due to non-fatal amniotic fluid embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Vasilios E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Respiratory failure may develop during the later stages of pregnancy and is usually associated with tocolysis or other co-existing conditions such as pneumonia, sepsis, pre-eclampsia or amniotic fluid embolism syndrome. Case presentation We present the case of a 34-year-old healthy woman with a twin pregnancy at 31 weeks and 6 days who experienced acute respiratory failure, a few hours after administration of tocolysis (ritodrine, due to preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Her chest discomfort was significantly ameliorated after the ritodrine infusion was stopped and a Cesarean section was performed 48 hours later under spinal anesthesia; however, 2 hours after surgery she developed severe hypoxemia, hypotension, fever and mild coagulopathy. The patient was intubated and transferred to the intensive care unit where she made a quick and uneventful recovery within 3 days. As there was no evidence for drug- or infection-related thromboembolic or myocardial causes of respiratory failure, we conclude that our patient experienced a rare type of non-fatal amniotic fluid embolism. Conclusion In spite of the lack of solid scientific support for our diagnosis, we conclude that our patient suffered an uncommon type of amniotic fluid embolism syndrome and we believe that this report highlights the need for extreme vigilance and a high index of suspicion for such a diagnosis in any pregnant individual.

  3. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  4. Association of Broad- vs Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotics With Treatment Failure, Adverse Events, and Quality of Life in Children With Acute Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jeffrey S; Ross, Rachael K; Bryan, Matthew; Localio, A Russell; Szymczak, Julia E; Wasserman, Richard; Barkman, Darlene; Odeniyi, Folasade; Conaboy, Kathryn; Bell, Louis; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Fiks, Alexander G

    2017-12-19

    Acute respiratory tract infections account for the majority of antibiotic exposure in children, and broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections is increasing. It is not clear whether broad-spectrum treatment is associated with improved outcomes compared with narrow-spectrum treatment. To compare the effectiveness of broad-spectrum and narrow-spectrum antibiotic treatment for acute respiratory tract infections in children. A retrospective cohort study assessing clinical outcomes and a prospective cohort study assessing patient-centered outcomes of children between the ages of 6 months and 12 years diagnosed with an acute respiratory tract infection and prescribed an oral antibiotic between January 2015 and April 2016 in a network of 31 pediatric primary care practices in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Stratified and propensity score-matched analyses to account for confounding by clinician and by patient-level characteristics, respectively, were implemented for both cohorts. Broad-spectrum antibiotics vs narrow-spectrum antibiotics. In the retrospective cohort, the primary outcomes were treatment failure and adverse events 14 days after diagnosis. In the prospective cohort, the primary outcomes were quality of life, other patient-centered outcomes, and patient-reported adverse events. Of 30 159 children in the retrospective cohort (19 179 with acute otitis media; 6746, group A streptococcal pharyngitis; and 4234, acute sinusitis), 4307 (14%) were prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics including amoxicillin-clavulanate, cephalosporins, and macrolides. Broad-spectrum treatment was not associated with a lower rate of treatment failure (3.4% for broad-spectrum antibiotics vs 3.1% for narrow-spectrum antibiotics; risk difference for full matched analysis, 0.3% [95% CI, -0.4% to 0.9%]). Of 2472 children enrolled in the prospective cohort (1100 with acute otitis media; 705, group A streptococcal pharyngitis; and 667, acute sinusitis), 868

  5. Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Acute kidney failure Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  6. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.A.C.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish

  7. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on acute respiratory illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Lacey; Khan, Arfa; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien; Batra, Poonam V; Gurney, Jud W; Haramati, Linda B; Jeudy, Jean; Macmahon, Heber; Rozenshtein, Anna; Vydareny, Kay H; Kaiser, Larry; Raoof, Suhail

    2009-10-01

    In a patient with acute respiratory illness (cough, sputum production, chest pain, and/or dyspnea), the need for chest imaging depends on the severity of illness, age of the patient, clinical history, physical and laboratory findings, and other risk factors. Chest radiographs seem warranted when one or more of the following are present: age > or = 40; dementia; a positive physical examination; hemoptysis; associated abnormalities (leukocytosis, hypoxemia); or other risk factors, including coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, or drug-induced acute respiratory failure. Chest CT may be warranted in complicated cases of severe pneumonia and in febrile neutropenic patients with normal or nonspecific chest radiographic findings. Literature on the indications and usefulness of radiologic studies for acute respiratory illness in different clinical settings is reviewed.

  8. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure can be defined as a clinical syndrome in which a structural or functional cardiac abnormality impairs the capacity of the ventricle to fill or eject enough blood for the requirements of the body. Acute heart failure syndrome represents a complex, heterogeneous set of clinical conditions, all with the common.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  10. THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF A PERIPHERAL VENO-VENOUS EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION FOR SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE IN THE EARLY PERIOD AFTER ADULT LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: of our clinical study was to present own experience of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO for the treatment of an adult patient (female, 28 yrs, 150 cm, 35 kg with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in the early period after liver transplantation against satisfactory liver graft function. Materials and methods. Double-lumen cannula 22 F was placed percutaneously in the right internal jugular vein. The ext- racorporeal contour reduced in length and the polymethylpeptene oxygenator (priming volume 175 ml were also. Results. In 1 hour after the beginning of VV ECMO, we registered the noted improvement of arterial blood gas and acid-base balance (regress of respiratory acidosis, improvement of arterial oxygenation which allowed us to use the «protective» mode of mechanical ventilation. Improvement of gas exchange and regress of clinical and radiological manifestations of ARDS allowed for VV ECMO weaning and decannulation on day 7. The patient was discharged from ICU and then from our Centre to a homestay respectively on the 9th and 16th day after VV ECMO weaning with the satisfactory liver graft and lungs function. Conclusion. VV ECMO can be successfully applied to correct the life-threatening acute respiratory failure in the early period after liver transplantation. 

  11. Comparison of Comfort and Effectiveness of Total Face Mask and Oronasal Mask in Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Sadeghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a growing controversy about the use of oronasal masks (ONM or total facemask (TFM in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV, so we designed a trial to compare the uses of these two masks in terms of effectiveness and comfort. Methods. Between February and November 2014, a total of 48 patients with respiratory failure were studied. Patients were randomized to receive NPPV via ONM or TFM. Data were recorded at 60 minutes and six and 24 hours after intervention. Patient comfort was assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using t-test and chi-square test. Repeated measures ANOVA and Mann–Whitney U test were used to compare clinical and laboratory data. Results. There were no differences in venous blood gas (VBG values between the two groups (P>0.05. However, at six hours, TFM was much more effective in reducing the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2 (P=0.04. Patient comfort and acceptance were statistically similar in both groups (P>0.05. Total time of NPPV was also similar in the two groups (P>0.05. Conclusions. TFM was superior to ONM in acute phase of respiratory failure but not once the patients were out of acute phase.

  12. Acute Respiratory Failure Induced by Magnesium Replacement in a 62-Year-Old Woman with Myasthenia Gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paramveer; Idowu, Olakunle; Malik, Imrana; Nates, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium is known to act at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the presynaptic release of acetylcholine and desensitizing the postsynaptic membrane. Because of these effects, magnesium has been postulated to potentiate neuromuscular weakness. We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman with myasthenia gravis and a metastatic thymoma who was admitted to our intensive care unit for management of a myasthenic crisis. The patient's neuromuscular weakness worsened in association with standard intravenous magnesium replacement, and the exacerbated respiratory failure necessitated intubation, mechanical ventilation, and an extended stay in the intensive care unit. The effect of magnesium replacement on myasthenia gravis patients has not been well documented, and we present this case to increase awareness and stimulate research. In addition, we discuss the relevant medical literature.

  13. Transient hypoxic respiratory failure in a patient with severe hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Lavi

    2009-03-01

    Respiratory failure in severely hypophosphatemic patients has been attributed to respiratory muscle weakness, leading to ventilatory failure. While frequently documenting hypercarbic respiratory failure, previous reports of hypophosphatemia-related respiratory failure in patients otherwise free of pulmonary or airway disease often did not provide sufficient information on gas exchange and pulmonary function, precluding inference on alternative or additional sources of respiratory dysfunction in this population. We report a case of acute hypoxic respiratory failure in a 26 year-old bulimic woman with severe hypophosphatemia. The patient presented with acute onset of dyspnea, paresthesias, limb shaking, and severe hyperventilation. SpO2 was 74%, requiring administration of 100% O2, with normal chest radiograph. Serum phosphate was <0.3 mmol/liter (1.0 mg/dL). Further evaluation did not support pulmonary, vascular, neurogenic or external exposure-related causes of hypoxic respiratory failure, which rapidly resolved with parenteral correction of hypophosphatemia. To date, hypoxic respiratory failure has not been reported in association with hypophosphatemia. Increased awareness and further investigations can help elucidate the mechanisms of hypophosphatemia-associated hypoxemia.

  14. [Effects of critical ultrasonic management of Peking Union Medical College Hospital on the etiological diagnosis of patients with acute respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Zhang, Hongmin; He, Huaiwu; Long, Yun

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value and potential therapeutic impact of Peking Union Medical College Hospital critical ultrasonic management (PCUM) in the early management of critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Patients admitted into the ICU of Peking Union Medical College Hospital for ARF were consecutively recruited over a 18-month period. Patients were randomly divided into conventional group and PCUM group (critical care ultrasonic examination was added in addition to conventional examinations). The two groups were compared with respect to time to preliminary diagnosis, time to final diagnosis, diagnostic accuracy, time to treatment response, time to other examination. A total of 187 patients were included in this study. The two groups showed no significant differences in general clinical information or final diagnosis (P > 0.05). The PCUM group had a shorter time to preliminary diagnosis, time to final diagnosis, time to treatment response, time to X-ray/CT examination, and a higher diagnostic accuracy than the conventional group (P acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (sensitivity 92.0%, specificity 98.5%), acute pulmonary edema (sensitivity 94.7%, specificity 96.1%), pulmonary consolidation (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 98.6%), COPD/asthma (sensitivity 84.2%, specificity 98.7%). The PCUM is seem to be an attractive complementary diagnostic tool and able to contribute to an early therapeutic decision for the patients with ARF.

  15. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    Elderly individuals comprise an increasing proportion of the population and represent a progressively expanding number of patients admitted to the ICU. Because of underlying pulmonary disease, loss of muscle mass, and other comorbid conditions, older persons are at increased risk of developing respiratory failure. Recognition of this vulnerability and the adoption of proactive measures to prevent decompensation requiring intrusive support are major priorities together with clear delineation of patients' wishes regarding the extent of support desired should clinical deterioration occur. Further, the development of coordinated approaches to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure and strategies to prevent the need for intubation, such as the use of NIV in appropriate patients, are crucial. As soon as endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are implemented strategies that facilitate the liberation of elderly patients from the ventilator are especially important. The emphasis on a team approach, which characterizes geriatric medicine, is essential in coordinating the skills of multiple health care professionals in this setting. Respiratory failure can neither be effectively diagnosed nor managed in isolation. Integration with all other aspects of care is essential. Patient vulnerability to nosocomial complications and the "cascade effect" of these problems such as the effects of medications and invasive supportive procedures all impact on respiratory care of elderly patients. For example, prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required long after resolution of the underlying cause of respiratory failure because of unrecognized and untreated delirium or residual effects of small doses of sedative and/or analgesic agents or other medications in elderly patients with altered drug metabolism. The deleterious impact of the foreign and sometimes threatening ICU environment and/or sleep deprivation on the patient's course are too often overlooked because

  16. Otalgia and eschar in the external auditory canal in scrub typhus complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sung-Yuan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scrub typhus, a mite-transmitted zoonosis caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, is an endemic disease in Taiwan and may be potentially fatal if diagnosis is delayed. Case presentations We encountered a 23-year-old previously healthy Taiwanese male soldier presenting with the right ear pain after training in the jungle and an eleven-day history of intermittent high fever up to 39°C. Amoxicillin/clavulanate was prescribed for otitis media at a local clinic. Skin rash over whole body and abdominal cramping pain with watery diarrhea appeared on the sixth day of fever. He was referred due to progressive dyspnea and cough for 4 days prior to admission in our institution. On physical examination, there were cardiopulmonary distress, icteric sclera, an eschar in the right external auditory canal and bilateral basal rales. Laboratory evaluation revealed thrombocytopenia, elevation of liver function and acute renal failure. Chest x-ray revealed bilateral diffuse infiltration. Doxycycline was prescribed for scrub typhus with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure. Fever subsided dramatically the next day and he was discharged on day 7 with oral tetracycline for 7 days. Conclusion Scrub typhus should be considered in acutely febrile patients with multiple organ involvement, particularly if there is an eschar or a history of environmental exposure in endemic areas. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, timely administration of antibiotics and intensive supportive care are necessary to decrease mortality of serious complications of scrub typhus.

  17. [Efficacy of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure device in patients with acute respiratory failure attended by an emergency medical service: a randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Regueiro, Irene; Mosteiro Díaz, María Pilar; Herrero Puente, Pablo; Argüelles Luis, Juan; Campa García, Ana María; García Fernández, José Antonio

    2016-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of the Boussignac continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device for treating patients with acute respiratory failure transported by an emergency medical service. Retrospective, descriptive study of a series of patients treated with the Boussignac CPAP system by emergency medical service responders in Asturias between February 1, 2006, and March 19, 2012. We recorded demographic data, diagnosis, techniques and drugs used, technique failure and reasons, vital constants, (heart rate [HR], respiratory frequency [RF], systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry [SpO2]) at 5 times during the event (on contact without oxygen therapy in place, with conventional oxygen therapy, 5 and 15 minutes after starting CPAP, and on hospital transfer), and the duration of prehospital care. A total of 203 patients with a mean (SD) age of 74.5 (10.6) years were enrolled; 133 (65.5%) were men. One hundred five (81.3%) had acute heart failure. The device failed in 28 patients (13.8%), 13 (6.4%) of whom required intubation. One (0.5%) died while still in prehospital care. All vital constants improved with CPAP. SpO2 values increased at all 5 recording times (P<.001); HR and RF improved significantly at 5 and 15 minutes of CPAP and on transfer (P<.001). Systolic and diastolic pressures were significantly lower than baseline after 15 minutes of CPAP and on transfer. Duration of care was significantly longer in patients who did not tolerate CPAP and in patients who were intubated (P<.001). Most patients tolerated treatment with the Boussignac CPAP device and improved clinically. Few required intubation and mortality was very low.

  18. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Lee, William M; Wendon, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades acute liver failure (ALF) has been transformed from a rare and poorly understood condition with a near universally fatal outcome, to one with a well characterized phenotype and disease course. Complex critical care protocols are now applied and emergency liver...

  19. [Hypercapnic respiratory failure. Pathophysiology, indications for mechanical ventilation and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreppein, U; Litterst, P; Westhoff, M

    2016-04-01

    Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure is mostly seen in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). Depending on the underlying cause it may be associated with hypoxemic respiratory failure and places high demands on mechanical ventilation. Presentation of the current knowledge on indications and management of mechanical ventilation in patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure. Review of the literature. Important by the selection of mechanical ventilation procedures is recognition of the predominant pathophysiological component. In hypercapnic respiratory failure with a pH ventilation (NIV) is primarily indicated unless there are contraindications. In patients with severe respiratory acidosis NIV requires a skilled and experienced team and close monitoring in order to perceive a failure of NIV. In acute exacerbation of COPD ventilator settings need a long expiration and short inspiration time to avoid further hyperinflation and an increase in intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Ventilation must be adapted to the pathophysiological situation in patients with OHS or overlap syndrome. If severe respiratory acidosis and hypercapnia cannot be managed by mechanical ventilation therapy alone extracorporeal venous CO2 removal may be necessary. Reports on this approach in awake patients are available. The use of NIV is the predominant treatment in patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure but close monitoring is necessary in order not to miss the indications for intubation and invasive ventilation. Methods of extracorporeal CO2 removal especially in awake patients need further evaluation.

  20. Nondiabetic ketoacidosis in a pregnant woman due to acute starvation with concomitant influenza A (H1N1) and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalley, G; Rodríguez-Villar, S

    2018-02-27

    Threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to short-term starvation nondiabetic ketoacidosis is rarely reported. Severe ketoacidosis due to starvation itself is a rare occurrence, and more so in pregnancy with a concomitant stressful clinical situation. This case report presents a nondiabetic woman admitted in intensive care for respiratory failure type 1 during the third trimester of pregnancy with a severe metabolic acidosis refractory to medical treatment. We diagnosed the patient with acute starvation ketoacidosis based on her history and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis after doing a rigorous analysis of her acid-base disorder. Crown Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of mortality of patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to an intensive care unit: A one year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banga Amit

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD commonly require hospitalization and admission to intensive care unit (ICU. It is useful to identify patients at the time of admission who are likely to have poor outcome. This study was carried out to define the predictors of mortality in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD and to device a scoring system using the baseline physiological variables for prognosticating these patients. Methods Eighty-two patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to COPD admitted to medical ICU over a one-year period were included. Clinical and demographic profile at the time of admission to ICU including APACHE II score and Glasgow coma scale were recorded at the time of admission to ICU. In addition, acid base disorders, renal functions, liver functions and serum albumin, were recorded at the time of presentation. Primary outcome measure was hospital mortality. Results Invasive ventilation was required in 69 patients (84.1%. Fifty-two patients survived to hospital discharge (63.4%. APACHE II score at the time of admission to ICU {odds ratio (95 % CI: 1.32 (1.138–1.532; p Conclusion APACHE II score at admission and SA levels with in 24 hrs after admission are independent predictors of mortality for patients with COPD admitted to ICU. The equation derived from these two parameters is useful for predicting outcome of these patients.

  2. Perioperative acute renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, Padraig

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent biochemical evidence increasingly implicates inflammatory mechanisms as precipitants of acute renal failure. In this review, we detail some of these pathways together with potential new therapeutic targets. RECENT FINDINGS: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin appears to be a sensitive, specific and reliable biomarker of renal injury, which may be predictive of renal outcome in the perioperative setting. For estimation of glomerular filtration rate, cystatin C is superior to creatinine. No drug is definitively effective at preventing postoperative renal failure. Clinical trials of fenoldopam and atrial natriuretic peptide are, at best, equivocal. As with pharmacological preconditioning of the heart, volatile anaesthetic agents appear to offer a protective effect to the subsequently ischaemic kidney. SUMMARY: Although a greatly improved understanding of the pathophysiology of acute renal failure has offered even more therapeutic targets, the maintenance of intravascular euvolaemia and perfusion pressure is most effective at preventing new postoperative acute renal failure. In the future, strategies targeting renal regeneration after injury will use bone marrow-derived stem cells and growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1.

  3. Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Catherine D

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (ALF) is a complex and rapidly progressive syndrome that results from a variety of age-dependent etiologies. It is defined by the acute onset of liver disease with no evidence of chronic liver disease. There must be biochemical or clinical evidence of severe liver dysfunction as defined by an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥2. If hepatic encephalopathy is present, INR should be ≥1.5. Unfortunately, due to the rarity of ALF in pediatric patients, there is a paucity of diagnostic and management algorithms and each patient must have an individualized approach. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(12):e433-e438.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. [Predictive values of different critical scoring systems for mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory failure supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Sun, B; Li, X Y; He, H Y; Tang, X; Zhan, Q Y; Tong, Z H

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the predictive values of different critical scoring systems for mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) supported by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). Forty-two patients with severe ARF supported by VV-ECMO were enrolled from November 2009 to July 2015.There were 25 males and 17 females. The mean age was (44±18) years (rang 18-69 years). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) Ⅱ, Ⅲ, Ⅳ, Simplified Acute Physiology Score Ⅱ (SAPS) Ⅱ, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), ECMO net, PRedicting dEath for SEvere ARDS on VVECMO (PRESERVE), and Respiratory ECMO Survival Prediction (RESP) scores were collected within 6 hours before VV-ECMO support. The patients were divided into the survivors group (n=17) and the nonsurvivors group (n=25) by survival at 180 d after receiving VV-ECMO. The patient clinical characteristics and aforementioned scoring systems were compared between groups. Scoring systems for predicting prognosis were assessed using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to draw the surviving curve, and the survival of the patients was analyzed by the Log-rank test. The risk factors were assessed for prognosis by multiple logistic regression analysis. (1) Positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) 6 hours prior to VV-ECMO support in the survivors group [(9.7±5.0)cmH2O, (1 cmH2O=0.098 kPa)] was lower than that in the nonsurvivors group [(13.2±5.4)cmH2O, t=-2.134, P=0.039]. VV-ECMO combination with continuous renal replacement therapy(CRRT) in the nonsurvivors group (32%) was used more than in the survivors group (6%, χ(2)=4.100, P=0.043). Duration of VV-ECMO support in the nonsurvivors group [(15±13) d] was longer than that in the survivors group [(12±11)d, t=-2.123, P=0.041]. APACHE Ⅱ, APACHE Ⅲ, APACHE Ⅳ, ECMO net, PRESERVE, and RESP scores in the survivors group were superior to the nonsurvivors

  5. An evaluation of the role of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ige Abraham; John, George; John, Preeta; Peter, John Victor; Christopher, Solomon

    2007-09-01

    Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has been shown to decrease the need for invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) in patients presenting with acute respiratory failure (ARF). We conducted a prospective study to assess if NIPPV use, in a developing country, was associated with clinical and physiological improvements. Prospective observational study. Forty patients admitted to a medical intensive care unit during a 2-year period who fulfilled criteria for inclusion formed the study cohort to receive NIPPV. Baseline (mean +/- SD) pH, PaCO 2 and PaO 2 were 7.25 +/- 0.08, 76.6 +/- 20.9 and 79.18 +/- 40.56 mmHg respectively. The primary indication for NIPPV was hypercapnic respiratory failure (n = 36, 90%). The success rate with NIPPV was 85%, with 34 of 40 patients weaned successfully. Significant improvements were observed at 1 hour following institution of NIPPV in pH (7.31 +/- 0.09, P 2 (65 +/- 17.9, P 2 54.7 +/- 20) and maintained (within 12 h) postweaning from the ventilator (pH 7.39 +/- 0.08, PaCO 2 51.9 +/- 12.4). No significant change in the PaO 2 was observed during NIPPV; PaO 2 after 1 h, prior to weaning and after weaning was 90.53 +/- 42.85, 84.80 +/- 33.76, 78.71 +/- 43.81 respectively. This study has demonstrated benefits of NIPPV in avoiding the need for invasive MV in patients presenting with ARF of diverse etiology, with results comparable to developed nations. Increased use of NIPPV in ARF is likely to impact favorably in nations with limited resources.

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... edema; Increased-permeability pulmonary edema; ARDS; Acute lung injury ... RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  7. Acquired respiratory failure in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, R

    1995-01-01

    With increasing survival rates from acute medical or surgical emergencies a new form of peripheral neuropathy, CIP, has been recognized. CIP can be seen only in patients who are considered to be critically ill; therefore, it invariably occurs in the ICU. Typically, initial symptoms begin with transient (hours to a few days) septic encephalopathy followed by generalized weakness, manifested in weaning failure, limb weakness and hyporeflexia. Diagnosis is confirmed by an EMG. CIP should be considered in any elderly patient with sepsis and prolonged respiratory muscle weakness. Prognosis is poor in severe cases, in which the EMG also shows severe axonal degeneration. In milder forms, fair to good recovery is expected within weeks. Management includes treatment of sepsis, normalization of failing organ function, physical therapy and proper nutrition.

  8. Zonography in acute respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinina, V.S.; Fetisova, V.M.; Kozorez, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radiography was performed in 94 patients whose initial condition was assessed as acute respiratory disease. Radioscopy with x-ray image amplifier, roentgenography and zonography were used. Pulmonary changes were found in 61 persons. In 45 of them acute pneumonia was revealed, in 16 changes in the pulmonary pattern assessed as residual manifestations of pneumonia. Changes in 30 patients with pneumonia and 16 patients with residual manifestations were detected by zonography only

  9. Acute respiratory distress after transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jožef Gradišek

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO are clinical syndromes with predominant pulmonary injury and respiratory distress. Anaphylactic reaction, hemolytic transfusion reaction and transfusion of contaminated blood products also impair lung function but are less frequent. Transfusion in critically ill and injured patient is an independent risk factor for acute lung injury. It remains to be determined whether transfusion is the cause of increased mortality or only an indicator of disease severity

  10. Prediction of non-recovery from ventilator-demanding acute respiratory failure, ARDS and death using lung damage biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr; Itenov, Theis Skovsgaard; Thormar, Katrin M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether biomarkers of alveolar damage (surfactant protein D, SPD) or conductive airway damage (club cell secretory protein 16, CC16) measured early after intensive care admittance are associated with one-month clinical respiratory prognosis. If patients who do not recove...

  11. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features · Radiological features of lungs-showing progression of disease · cT Scan of SARS lungs · Imaging type,cost,therapy · SARS – Lung Pathology.

  12. The Recent Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Epidemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe Acute Respiratory syndrome (SARS) took the world by storm in the later part of February 2003.It is a syndrome characterized by fever, cough, sore throat , shortness of breath and malaise which may deteriorate very rapidly to respiratory failure and death. The symptoms of SARS are quite similar to those of common ...

  13. Distribution-based estimates of minimal important difference for hospital anxiety and depression scale and impact of event scale-revised in survivors of acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kitty S; Aronson Friedman, Lisa; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Dinglas, Victor D; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Porter, Richard; Jones, Christina; Hopkins, Ramona O; Needham, Dale M

    2016-01-01

    This study will estimate distribution-based minimal important difference (MID) for the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-D) subscales, and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) in survivors of acute respiratory failure (ARF). Secondary analyses of data from two US and three UK studies of ARF survivors (total N=1223). HADS-D and HADS-A were used to assess depression and anxiety symptoms. IES-R assessed post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. Standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change90, 0.5 standard deviation (S.D.), and 0.2 S.D. were used to estimate MID for the combined sample, by studies, 6- and 12-month follow-ups, country and mental health condition. Overall, MID estimates converged to 2.0-2.5 for the HADS-A, 1.9-2.3 for the HADS-D and 0.17-0.18 for the IES-R. MID estimates were comparable across studies, follow-up, country and mental health condition. Among ARF survivors, 2.0-2.5 is a reasonable range for the MID for both HADS subscales, and 0.2 is reasonable for IES-R. Until anchor-based MIDs for these instruments are available, these distribution-based estimates can help researchers plan future studies and interpret the clinical importance of findings in ARF patient populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathological and ultrastructural analysis of surgical lung biopsies in patients with swine-origin influenza type A/H1N1 and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Luiza Capelozzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cases of H1N1 and other pulmonary infections evolve to acute respiratory failure and death when co-infections or lung injury predominate over the immune response, thus requiring early diagnosis to improve treatment. OBJECTIVE: To perform a detailed histopathological analysis of the open lung biopsy specimens from five patients with ARDS with confirmed H1N1. METHODS: Lung specimens underwent microbiologic analysis, and examination by optical and electron microscopy. Immunophenotyping was used to characterize macrophages, natural killer, T and B cells, and expression of cytokines and iNOS. RESULTS: The pathological features observed were necrotizing bronchiolitis, diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar hemorrhage and abnormal immune response. Ultrastructural analysis showed viral-like particles in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Viral-like particles can be successfully demonstrated in lung tissue by ultrastructural examination, without confirmation of the virus by RT-PCR on nasopharyngeal aspirates. Bronchioles and epithelium, rather than endothelium, are probably the primary target of infection, and diffuse alveolar damage the consequence of the effect of airways obliteration and dysfunction on innate immunity, suggesting that treatment should be focused on epithelial repair.

  15. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yiu Hung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstetric patients comprise a limited portion of intensive care unit patients, but they often present with unfamiliar conditions and exhibit the potential for catastrophic deterioration. This study evaluated the maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy. Methods: Information on 71 patients at >25 weeks gestation in the ICU with respiratory failure was recorded between 2009 and 2013. The characteristics and outcomes of mothers and fetuses were determined through a retrospective chart review and evaluated using Student's t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test. Results: The leading causes of respiratory failure were postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia in the obstetric causes group and pneumonia in the nonobstetric causes group during pregnancy and the peripartum period. The non-obstetric causes group exhibited a higher incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and renal replacement therapy as well as requiring more ventilator days. The patients in the obstetric causes group showed significant improvement after delivery in the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen and peak inspiratory pressure decrease. Both groups exhibited high incidences of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Neonatal complications resulting from meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS and sepsis were more common in the non-obstetric causes group; however, neurological development impairment was more common in the obstetric causes group. Conclusion: Obstetric cause was associated with longer ventilator free days and fewer episodes of ARDS after delivery. Neonatal complications resulting from different etiologies of respiratory failure were found to differ. Keywords: Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Neonatal, Obstetric, Outcome, Respiratory failure

  16. Elevated Extravascular Lung Water Index (ELWI) as a Predictor of Failure of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Via Helmet (Helmet-CPAP) in Patients With Acute Respiratory Failure After Major Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Calvo, Francisco Javier; Bejarano Ramirez, Natalia; Uña Orejon, Rafael; Villazala Garcia, Ruben; Yuste Peña, Ana Sofia; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2015-11-01

    NIV is increasingly used for prevention and treatment of respiratory complications and failure. Some of them are admitted to the PACU with advanced hemodynamic monitors which allow quantification of Extravascular Lung Water (EVLW) by transpulmonary thermodilution technique (TPTD) and Pulmonary Vascular Permeability (PVP) providing information on lung edema. The objective of this study was to ascertain if EVLW Index and PVP Index may predict failure (intubation) or success (non-intubation) in patients developing acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the postoperative period following major abdominal surgery, where the first line of treatment was non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure via a helmet. Hemodynamic variables, EVLWI and PVPI were monitored with a transpulmonary thermodilution hemodynamic monitor device (PiCCO™) before and after the application of CPAP. Avoidance of intubation was observed in 66% of patients with Helmet-CPAP. In these patients after the first hour of application of CPAP, PaO2/FiO2 ratio significantly increased (303.33±65.2 vs. 141.6±14.6, P<.01). Before starting Helmet-CPAP values of EVLWI and PVPI were significantly lower in non-intubated patients (EVLWI 8.6±1.08 vs. 11.8±0.99ml/kg IBW, P<.01 and PVPI 1.7±0.56 vs. 3.0±0.88, P<.01). An optimal cut-off value for EVLWI was established at 9.5, and at 2.45 for PVPI (sensitivity of 0.7; specificity of 0.9, P<.01). In this type of patient the physiological parameters that predict the failure of Helmet-CPAP with the greatest accuracy were the value of the EVLWI and PVPI before Helmet-CPAP institution and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio and the respiratory rate after one hour of CPAP. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbon dioxide therapy in hypocapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julu, P O O; Shah, M; Monro, J A; Puri, B K

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen therapy, usually administered by a facemask or nasal cannulae, is the current default treatment of respiratory failure. Since respiration entails intake of oxygen and release of carbon dioxide from tissues as waste product, the notion of administering carbon dioxide in respiratory failure appears counter-intuitive. However, carbon dioxide stimulates the chemosensitive area of the medulla, known as the central respiratory chemoreceptor, which activates the respiratory groups of neurones in the brainstem and stimulates inspiration thereby initiating oxygen intake during normal breathing. This vital initiation of normal breathing is via a reduction in the pH of the cerebrospinal fluid and the medullary interstitial fluid. We hypothesise that in cases of type I respiratory failure in which the P a CO 2 is low, administration of carbon dioxide by inhalation would stimulate the respiratory groups of brainstem neurones and facilitate breathing, which would be of therapeutic value. Preliminary clinical evidence in favour of this hypothesis is presented and we recommend that a formal randomised study be carried out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroleptic-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Garcia Soriano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome is presented and discussed with emphasis on the role of muscle relaxation, creatine kinase, and respiratory function tests. CASE REPORT: A 41-year-old man presented right otalgia and peripheral facial paralysis. A computed tomography scan of the skull showed a hyperdense area, 2 cm in diameter, in the pathway of the anterior intercommunicating cerebral artery. Preoperative examination revealed: pH 7.4, PaCO2 40 torr, PaO2 80 torr (room air, Hb 13.8 g/dl, blood urea nitrogen 3.2 mmol/l, and creatinine 90 mmol/l. The chest x-ray was normal. The patient had not eaten during the 12-hour period prior to anesthesia induction. Intravenous halothane, fentanyl 0.5 mg and droperidol 25 mg were used for anesthesia. After the first six hours, the PaO2 was 65 torr (normal PaCO2 with FiO2 50% (PaO2/FiO2 130, and remained at this level until the end of the operation 4 hours later, maintaining PaCO2 at 35 torr. A thrombosed aneurysm was detected and resected, and the ends of the artery were closed with clips. No vasospasm was present. This case illustrates that neuroleptic drugs can cause neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a disease that is difficult to diagnose. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is another manifestation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome that has not been recognized in previous reports: it may be produced by neuroleptic drugs independent of the manifestation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Some considerations regarding the cause and effect relationship between acute respiratory distress syndrome and neuroleptic drugs are discussed. Intensive care unit physicians should consider the possibility that patients receiving neuroleptic drugs could develop respiratory failure in the absence of other factors that might explain the syndrome.

  20. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  1. Polyhydramnios and acute renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, D. V.; Kelly, Moira B.; Pryor, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Acute renal failure secondary to ureteric obstruction is described in a primigravida with twin gestation and polyhydramnios. Relief of the obstruction occurred on drainage of the liquor and return to normal renal function following delivery.

  2. Acute heart failure syndrome | Ker | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: acute heart failure syndrome, acute coronary syndrome, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  3. The feasibility and safety of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal to avoid intubation in patients with COPD unresponsive to noninvasive ventilation for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (ECLAIR study): multicentre case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braune, Stephan; Sieweke, Annekatrin; Brettner, Franz; Staudinger, Thomas; Joannidis, Michael; Verbrugge, Serge; Frings, Daniel; Nierhaus, Axel; Wegscheider, Karl; Kluge, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of avoiding invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) by using extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute hypercapnic respiratory failure refractory to noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Case-control study. Patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure refractory to NIV being treated with a pump-driven veno-venous ECCO2R system (iLA-Activve(®); Novalung, Heilbronn, Germany) were prospectively observed in five European intensive care units (ICU). Inclusion criteria were respiratory acidosis (pH ≤ 7.35, PaCO2 > 45 mmHg) with predefined criteria for endotracheal intubation (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01784367). The historical controls were patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure refractory to NIV who were treated with IMV. The matching criteria were main diagnosis, age, SAPS-II score and pH. Twenty-five cases (48.0 % male, mean age 67.3 years) were matched with 25 controls. Intubation was avoided in 14 patients (56.0 %) in the ECCO2R group with a mean extracorporeal blood flow of 1.3 L/min. Seven patients were intubated because of progressive hypoxaemia and four owing to ventilatory failure despite ECCO2R and NIV. Relevant ECCO2R-associated adverse events were observed in 11 patients (44.0 %), of whom 9 (36.0 %) suffered major bleeding complications. The mean time on IMV, ICU stay and hospital stay in the case and control groups were 8.3 vs. 13.7, 28.9 vs. 24.0 and 36.9 vs. 37.0 days, respectively, and the 90-day mortality rates were 28.0 vs. 28.0 %. The use of veno-venous ECCO2R to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation was successful in just over half of the cases. However, relevant ECCO2R-associated complications occurred in over one-third of cases. Despite the shorter period of IMV in the ECCO2R group there were no significant differences in length of stay or in 28- and 90-day mortality rates

  4. Effectiveness and safety of mouthpiece ventilation and nocturnal non-invasive ventilation in patients with kyphoscoliosis: Short and long-term outcomes after an episode of acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nicolini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kyphoscoliosis is a skeletal condition involving the hyperflexion of the thoracic spine. It is characterized by reduced chest wall compliance and impaired respiratory mechanisms leading to progressive hypo-ventilation. We evaluated the effectiveness and the safety of non-invasive ventilation (NIV in patients after an episode of acute respiratory failure (ARF. Methods: Eighteen patients with severe kyphoscoliosis who had been hospitalized for an episode of ARF were followed for 4 years. NIV was applied via mouthpiece (MPV during the daytime and via mask during the night. The primary outcomes were changes in physiological and functional parameters as well as quality of life. Secondary outcomes were considered re-hospitalization and mortality rate after discharge. A set of control subjects was used for comparison. Results: All patients showed a significant improvement in several clinical, physiological, functional and quality of life parameters. Four of them (22.2% died during the four year follow-up period. In the uni-variate analysis patients who died had higher cardiac co-morbidity, lower MIP and SNIP, higher paCO2, and oxygen desaturation index at initial admission. Conclusions: Diurnal MPV associated with nocturnal NIV had significantly improved lung function, clinical outcomes and quality of life. It should be considered as a safe alternative to traditional administering of NIV. Keywords: Kyphoscoliosis, Respiratory failure, Non-invasive ventilation, Mouthpiece ventilation

  5. [Acute cardiac failure in pheochromocytoma.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønler, Morten; Munk, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (P) is an endocrine catecholamine-secreting tumor. Classical symptoms like hypertension, attacks of sweating, palpitations, headache and palor are related to catecholamine discharge. We provide a case of P in a 71 year-old man presenting with acute cardiac failure, severe reduction...

  6. Polyhydramnios and acute renal failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D. V.; Kelly, Moira B.; Pryor, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Acute renal failure secondary to ureteric obstruction is described in a primigravida with twin gestation and polyhydramnios. Relief of the obstruction occurred on drainage of the liquor and return to normal renal function following delivery. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7022419

  7. Benefit of Selective Inspiratory Muscles Training on Respiratory Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelmoniem Ibrahim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to detect the effect of training of inspiratory muscle on respiratory failure patients. Method: Thirty patients with respiratory failure were selected from Cairo university hospital (critical care department. These patients were divided equally into two groups, study Group A and control Group B. Each patient of Group A received inspiratory muscles training using threshold inspiratory muscle trainer (IMT, while patients of Group B received only chest physiotherapy. Oxygen level and respiratory muscles strength for each group were measured. Result revealed significant improvement in both groups, improvement was higher in Group A more than Group B regarding oxygen level and respiratory muscles strength. Conclusion: Training of respiratory muscles using threshold inspiratory muscle trainer could be a useful in improving oxygen level and respiratory muscles power in patients with respiratory failure, this study revealed that, respiratory muscles training could be a helpful tool to improve oxygen level and inspiratory muscle strength for respiratory failure patients.

  8. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    and particularly air-blood barrier structures, pulmonary oxygenizing dysfunction, the development of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema; the absence of left ventricular failure signs. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, pathogenesis.

  9. Acute renal failure in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergesslich, K.A.; Balzar, E.; Weninger, M.; Ponhold, W.; Sommer, G.; Wittich, G.R.; Vienna Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) may be due to obstructive uropathy or renal parenchymal disease. Twenty-five children with acute renal failure secondary to renal parenchymal disease underwent ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys. Changes of renal size and cortical echogenicity were correlated with renal function. All patients presented with bilaterally enlarged kidneys with the exception in renal function resulted in normalization of renal size. With regard to cortical echogenicity two groups were formed. Group A comprised 11 patients whose kidneys had the same echogenicity as the liver, while in group B the kidneys were more echogenic (14 patients). Cortical echogenicity was always increased. Determination of creatinine levels showed a statistically significant difference between group A (3.32 mg% ± 1.40 S.D.) and group B (5.95 mg% ± 1.96 S.D.), p < 0.001. Changes in renal function were paralleled by rapid changes in renal size and cortical echogenicity. (orig.)

  10. The successful treatment of hypercapnic respiratory failure with oral modafinil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parnell H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helen Parnell,1 Ginny Quirke,1 Sally Farmer,1 Sumbo Adeyemo,2 Veronica Varney11Respiratory Department, 2Pharmacy Department, St Helier Hospital, Carshalton, Surrey, UKAbstract: Hypercapnic respiratory failure is common in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is usually treated by nasal ventilation. Not all patients requiring such ventilation can tolerate it, with anxiety and phobia influencing their reaction, along with treatment failure. We report the case histories of six patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were at risk of death due to refusal of nasal ventilation or its failure despite ongoing treatment. We report their improvement with oral modafinil 200 mg tablets used as a respiratory stimulant, which led to discharge, improved arterial blood gases, and offset further admissions with hypercapnic respiratory failure. This drug is licensed for narcolepsy and is said to stimulate the respiratory system via the central nervous system. Its use in respiratory failure is an unlicensed indication, and there are no case reports or studies of such use in the literature. Its respiratory stimulant effects appear better than those with protriptyline, which was a drug previously used until its production was discontinued. Our findings suggest that a study of modafinil in hypercapnic respiratory failure would be warranted, especially for patients with treatment failure or intolerance to nasal ventilation. This may offer a way of shortening hospital stay, improving outcome and quality of life, and reducing death and readmissions.Keywords: COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nasal ventilation, acidosis, modafinil, hypercapnic respiratory failure

  11. Cytokines and Organ Failure in Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    renal, respiratory, and circulatory failure, as was the case for patients with multiorgan failure. Interleukin 18 levels were significantly elevated in renal and respiratory failure only. Tumor necrosis factor > was significantly elevated in all types of organ failures, except for intestinal failure....... Conclusions: Synchronous measurements of 4 cytokines demonstrated IL-6 and IL-8 to be predictive as early surrogate markers with regard to organ failures in AP. The fact that all of the cytokines were particularly elevated in patients with organ failures calls for evaluation of agents modifying the severe...

  12. Predictive Factors of Respiratory Failure in Children with Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat Bilan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Guillain-Barre Syndrome(GBS is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis. Respiratory failure is the most serious short-term complication of GBS and invasive mechanical ventilation is required in 30% of patients.moreover,60% of those who are intubated develop major complications including pnemonia,sepsis,GI bleeding and pulmonary embolism. Thus respiratory failure prediction is crucial. the aim of this study was to determine clinical predictors of respiratory failure to avoid respiratory distress and aspiration.Methods and materials: in a cross sectional and analytical study 140 patients with clinically diagnosis of Guillain-Barre Syndrome were enrolled in study,from october 2008 to october 2014. .demographic data,nerologic examination,cranial nerve and autonomic nervous system involvement, and respiratory failure were recorded prospectively.Results:15 out of 140 patients(10,7% developed respiratory failure and underwent mechanical ventilation.the male/female ratio in patients with respiratory failure and patients without respiratory involvement were (53%/(47% and (54%/(46% respectively(p-value:0.4.the mean age in these two groups were 2,7±1,9 and 5,5±3,2(p-value:0,003.cranial nerve involvement (7,9,10 was recorded in patients with respiratory failure and without respiratory failure54% and25% respectively (p-value:0,03.absent upper limb deep tendon reflexes in these two groups were 70% and 44% respectively.(p-value:0,03 and autonomic nervous system involvement 24% vs. 14%(p-value:0,3.conclusion : our study suggests that younger age , cranial nerve involvement and absent upper limb deep tendon reflexes are predictive factors of respiratory failure in patients with Guillain-Barre Syndrome(GBS.

  13. Nonacetaminophen Drug-Induced Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Arul M; Lewis, James H

    2018-05-01

    Acute liver failure of all causes is diagnosed in between 2000 and 2500 patients annually in the United States. Drug-induced acute liver failure is the leading cause of acute liver failure, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Nonacetaminophen drug injury represents 11% of all cases in the latest registry from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Although rare, acute liver failure is clinically dramatic when it occurs, and requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. In contrast with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure, non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure has a more ominous prognosis with a lower liver transplant-free survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Change of serum prealbumin levels and serum protein markers between egg white powder and casein protein additives in standard enteral feeding formulas in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhurayanontachai, Rungsun; Sa-Nguansai, Sunatee

    2016-01-01

    Protein deficiency is a major problem in critically ill patients. Egg white powder recently became a standard additive for protein supplementation in our unit. However, clinical data are not available to support egg white powder supplementation compared to standard protein casein supplementation. This study aimed to determine the change of serum prealbumin (PAB) levels of egg white powder compared to casein additive in standard enteral feeding in critically ill patients with respiratory failure. A prospective double-blind, randomized, non-inferiority study was conducted in patients with acute respiratory failure in the medical intensive care unit and respiratory care unit. These patients randomly received 1500 kcal/day of enteral nutrition support with 40 g/day of protein additives by either egg white protein powder or casein protein for 7 days. The serum PAB and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Repeated-measures ANOVA determined the group effects displayed by serum PAB and CRP levels. p values egg white powder group. The clinical characteristics, baseline nutritional status, and biochemistries were not significantly different between the groups. No statistically significant differences were seen in the serum PAB and serum CRP levels between the two groups. The average mean ± SEM difference of serum PAB level between the groups was 2.3 ± 2.5 mg% (p = 0.58). The levels of PAB between the egg white protein additive and casein protein additive were not significantly different and less than the non-inferior margin. Thai Clinical Trials Registry TCTR20160126002.

  15. Early predictors of success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, D; Prasad, Bnbm; Tampi, P S; Ramprasad, R

    2011-10-01

    Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) has emerged as a significant advancement in the management of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure requiring ventilation therapy (respiratory rate [RR] of > 30 breaths per minutes, PaCO2 > 55 mmHg and arterial pH success group and these parameters continued to improve even after four and 24 hours of NIPPV treatment. Out of 24 (24%) patients who failed to respond, 13 (54%) needed endotracheal intubation within one hour. The failure group had higher baseline HR than the success group. Improvement in HR, RR, pH, and PCO2 one hour after putting the patient on NIPPV predicts success of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in hypercapnic respiratory failure.

  16. Environmental determinants of acute respiratory symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... The impact of environmental risk factors associated with housing was examined in relation to diarrhoeal disease and acute respiratory symptoms in South African coloured child- ren. A multistage cluster sample representative of all coloured people living in the major urban and peri-urban areas of.

  17. Imaging in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, G.E.; Wong, K.T.; Chu, W.C.W.; Hui, D.S.C.; Cheng, F.W.T.; Yuen, E.H.Y.; Chung, S.S.C.; Fok, T.F.; Sung, J.J.Y.; Ahuja, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, and has become pandemic within a short period of time. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of patients with SARS. The current status of imaging in SARS is presented in this review

  18. Nutrition in acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Mussi Guimarães

    Full Text Available Nutritional status has been considered to be one of the possible determinants of mortality rates in cases of acute renal failure (ARF. However, most studies evaluating possible mortality indicators in ARF cases have not focused on the nutritional status, possibly because of the difficulties involved in assessing the nutritional status of critically ill patients. Although the traditional methods for assessing nutritional status are used for ARF patients, they are not the best choice in this population. The use of nutritional support for these patients has produced conflicting results regarding morbidity and mortality. This review covers the mechanisms and indicators of malnutrition in ARF cases and the types of nutritional support that may be used.

  19. Acute liver failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) in children differs from that observed in adults in both the etiologic spectrum and the clinical picture. Children, particularly very young ones, do not demonstrate classical features of encephalopathy and the definition of ALF has been revised to include patients with advanced coagulopathy, regardless of mental status. A significant number of these children will go on to require transplant or die. Etiologies vary by age with metabolic and infectious diseases prominent in the first year of life and acetaminophen overdose and Wilson's disease occurring in adolescents. In almost 50% of cases, however, the child has an indeterminate cause for ALF. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach and is directed at establishing the etiology where possible and monitoring, anticipating, and managing the multisystem complications that occur in children with ALF. Overall, short-term outcomes are better in children than adults but are dependent upon the degree of encephalopathy and diagnosis.

  20. Bidirectional Cardio-Respiratory Interactions in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Nikola N; Pavlović, Siniša U; Milašinović, Goran; Kirćanski, Bratislav; Platiša, Mirjana M

    2018-01-01

    We investigated cardio-respiratory coupling in patients with heart failure by quantification of bidirectional interactions between cardiac (RR intervals) and respiratory signals with complementary measures of time series analysis. Heart failure patients were divided into three groups of twenty, age and gender matched, subjects: with sinus rhythm (HF-Sin), with sinus rhythm and ventricular extrasystoles (HF-VES), and with permanent atrial fibrillation (HF-AF). We included patients with indication for implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator or cardiac resynchronization therapy device. ECG and respiratory signals were simultaneously acquired during 20 min in supine position at spontaneous breathing frequency in 20 healthy control subjects and in patients before device implantation. We used coherence, Granger causality and cross-sample entropy analysis as complementary measures of bidirectional interactions between RR intervals and respiratory rhythm. In heart failure patients with arrhythmias (HF-VES and HF-AF) there is no coherence between signals ( p failure groups causality between signals is diminished, but with significantly stronger causality of RR signal in respiratory signal in HF-VES. Cross-sample entropy analysis revealed the strongest synchrony between respiratory and RR signal in HF-VES group. Beside respiratory sinus arrhythmia there is another type of cardio-respiratory interaction based on the synchrony between cardiac and respiratory rhythm. Both of them are altered in heart failure patients. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is reduced in HF-Sin patients and vanished in heart failure patients with arrhythmias. Contrary, in HF-Sin and HF-VES groups, synchrony increased, probably as consequence of some dominant neural compensatory mechanisms. The coupling of cardiac and respiratory rhythm in heart failure patients varies depending on the presence of atrial/ventricular arrhythmias and it could be revealed by complementary methods of time series

  1. Acute renal failure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederholm, C.; Almen, T.; Bergqvist, D.; Golman, K.; Takolander, R.

    1986-01-01

    Acute renal failure is a serious complication oif reconstructive aortoiliac surgery. The question was raised whether its etiology includes interaction between preoperative angiographic contrast medium and intra-operative clamping of the renal arteries. Renal arteries of 180 rats were bilaterally clamped 10 to 120 min and serum urea was determined from 3 h to 7 days later. In 35 rats 40 min clamping alone produced an increase in urea reaching a maximum 1 day later (median increase 70%). In 3 groups of 12 rats intravenous injection of the contrast medium metrizoate alone in doses 1, 2 and 3 g I/kg body-weight produced no significant increase in urea. Intravenous injection of the same doses to 3 groups of 10 rats each followed 1 h later by renal arterial occlusion for 40 min produced median urea increases one day later of 110, 130 and 170%, respectively, in the 3 groups. The increase was higher than that produced by contrast medium alone (p<0.01) or by renal artery clamping alone (p<0.05) indicating a potentiation of transient renal failure by the combination of contrast medium and renal arterial clamping. (orig.)

  2. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Farrell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS attributed to Neosartorya udagawae infection. This mold grew rapidly in cultures of multiple respiratory specimens from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman. Neosartorya spp. are a recently recognized cause of invasive disease in immunocompromised patients that can be mistaken for their sexual teleomorph, Aspergillus fumigatus. Because the cultures were sterile, phenotypic identification was not possible. DNA sequencing of ITS, calmodulin and β-tubulin genes supported identification of Neosartorya udagawae. Our case is the first report of ARDS associated with Neosartorya sp. infection and defines a new clinical entity.

  3. Adult-onset nemaline myopathy presenting as respiratory failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2008-11-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a rare congenital myopathy that generally presents in childhood. We report a case of a 44-year-old man who presented with severe hypoxic hypercapnic respiratory failure as the initial manifestation of nemaline myopathy. After starting noninvasive ventilation, his pulmonary function test results improved substantially, and over the 4 years since diagnosis his respiratory function remained stable. There are few reported cases of respiratory failure in patients with adult-onset nemaline myopathy, and the insidious onset in this case is even more unusual. This case highlights the varied presenting features of adult-onset nemaline myopathy and that noninvasive ventilation improves respiratory function.

  4. Reduction in adverse effects of mechanical ventilation in rabbits with acute respiratory failure by treatment with extracorporeal CO2 removal and a large fluid volume of diluted surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotz, FB; Mook, PH; Jansen, NJG; Oetomo, SB; Wildevuur, CRH

    1997-01-01

    The long-term outcome of infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome can be improved by optimizing surfactant therapy and minimizing the risk for pulmonary barovolutrauma and oxygen toxicity. The authors hypothesized that this may be achieved with low frequency ventilation and extracorporeal

  5. Cytokines and organ failure in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).......We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP)....

  6. Diuretics and mortality in acute renal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uchino, Shigehiko; Doig, Gordon S.; Bellomo, Renaldo; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morgera, Stanislao; Schetz, Miet; Tan, Ian; Bouman, Catherine; Nacedo, Ettiene; Gibney, Noel; Tolwani, Ashita; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A.

    2004-01-01

    According to recent research, diuretics may increase mortality in acute renal failure patients. The administration of diuretics in such patients has been discouraged. Our objective was to determine the impact of diuretics on the mortality rate of critically ill patients with acute renal failure.

  7. Acute liver failure : Spontaneous recovery or transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerman, L; Zijlstra, JG; Schweizer, JJ; Verwer, R; Slooff, MJH; Haagsma, EB

    1997-01-01

    Background: Decision-making in acute liver failure. Acute liver failure is a disease with multiple organ involvement and a high mortality rate. Conservative management alone will only partly influence the outcome. The option of emergency liver transplantation has greatly improved survival rates, but

  8. Risk Factors for Mortality and Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Flávia F; Troster, Eduardo J; Oliveira, Cindy S; Faria, Aline; Lucena, Michelle; João, Paulo R D; Saad, Everardo D; Foronda, Flávia A K; Delgado, Artur F; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow

    2015-09-01

    Children admitted to PICUs often present with or develop respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. We prospectively identified children admitted to three general PICUs, with the goal of identifying risk factors for mortality. Prospective multicenter observational study. Three general PICUs, two in São Paulo and one in Curitiba, Brazil. Children aged between 1 month and 15 years, consecutively admitted between August 2008 and July 2010, with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome that developed at least 12 hours after invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation. None. We used logistic regression models to explore the relationship between death and independent variables. Of 3,046 patients admitted to the three PICUs, 1,658 patients underwent mechanical ventilation, and 84 fulfilled the acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Nearly 60% were boys, and the median age was 31 months. Pressure control/assist control was the initial mode of mechanical ventilation in 86% of cases, and the median durations of mechanical ventilation and PICU stay were 12 and 15 days, respectively. None of the eight patients with acute lung injury died, whereas 33 of 76 of the remaining patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome died, for an overall mortality rate of 39.3% (95% CI, 28.8-50.6%). In different multivariate logistic regression model, the number of organ dysfunctions at admission, peak inspiratory pressure, airway pressure gradient on day 1, and the mean airway pressure gradient over the first 7 days of mechanical ventilation were significantly associated with mortality. Mortality is high in pediatric acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation-associated risk factors for death among such patients are potential targets for intervention.

  9. Severe acute renal failure in malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta K

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have noticed a recent rise in the incidence and severity of acute renal failure (ARF in malaria. AIM: To study the incidence, severity and outcome of ARF in malaria. SETTING and DESIGN: It is a retrospective analysis of data of one year from a tertiary medical centre in a metropolitan city. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with ARF and smear positive malaria were evaluated. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Results were expressed as mean, range and standard deviation. RESULTS: Out of 402 detected smear positive malaria, 24 had ARF. Eighteen were of the age group 21-40 years. Plasmodium falciparum (PF was detected in 16, Plasmodium vivax in three, and mixed infection in five. Non-oliguric ARF was seen in 14. Eighteen showed severe ARF (Serum creatinine >5 mg%. Twenty-two patients needed dialysis. Prolonged ARF lasting for 2-6 weeks was seen in eight. Seventeen patients recovered completely, while seven showed fatal combination of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, severe ARF and PF malaria. No response was seen to chloroquine and artesunate given alone and twenty patients required quinine. CONCLUSION: ARF necessitating dialysis was seen in 92% of patients with ARF in malaria. PF infection, severe ARF, DIC and ARDS were poor prognostic factors. Resistance was noted to both chloroquine and artesunate.

  10. Is Overall Mortality the Right Composite Endpoint in Clinical Trials of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Jesús; Martínez, Domingo; Mosteiro, Fernando; Ambrós, Alfonso; Añón, José M; Ferrando, Carlos; Soler, Juan A; Montiel, Raquel; Vidal, Anxela; Conesa-Cayuela, Luís A; Blanco, Jesús; Arrojo, Regina; Solano, Rosario; Capilla, Lucía; Del Campo, Rafael; Civantos, Belén; Fernández, María Mar; Aldecoa, César; Parra, Laura; Gutiérrez, Andrea; Martínez-Jiménez, Chanel; González-Martín, Jesús M; Fernández, Rosa L; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2018-02-07

    Overall mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome is a composite endpoint because it includes death from multiple causes. In most acute respiratory distress syndrome trials, it is unknown whether reported deaths are due to acute respiratory distress syndrome or the underlying disease, unrelated to the specific intervention tested. We investigated the causes of death after contracting acute respiratory distress syndrome in a large cohort. A secondary analysis from three prospective, multicenter, observational studies. A network of multidisciplinary ICUs. We studied 778 patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with lung-protective ventilation. None. We examined death in the ICU from individual causes. Overall ICU mortality was 38.8% (95% CI, 35.4-42.3). Causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome modified the risk of death. Twenty-three percent of deaths occurred from refractory hypoxemia due to nonresolving acute respiratory distress syndrome. Most patients died from causes unrelated to acute respiratory distress syndrome: 48.7% of nonsurvivors died from multisystem organ failure, and cancer or brain injury was involved in 37.1% of deaths. When quantifying the true burden of acute respiratory distress syndrome outcome, we identified 506 patients (65.0%) with one or more exclusion criteria for enrollment into current interventional trials. Overall ICU mortality of the "trial cohort" (21.3%) was markedly lower than the parent cohort (relative risk, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.43-0.70; p respiratory distress syndrome patients are not directly related to lung damage but to extrapulmonary multisystem organ failure. It would be challenging to prove that specific lung-directed therapies have an effect on overall survival.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Canada Muscular Dystrophy UK Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center: Muscular Dystrophy / Atrophy GeneReviews (1 link) Hereditary Myopathy with Early Respiratory Failure (HMERF) Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed ...

  12. The Therapeutic Outcomes of Mechanical Ventilation in Hematological Malignancy Patients with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Marumo, Atsushi; Omori, Ikuko; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Yui, Shunsuke; Fukunaga, Keiko; Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Okabe, Masahiro; Wakita, Satoshi; Tamai, Hayato; Okamoto, Muneo; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Takeda, Shinhiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    Objective In hematological malignancy patients, the complication of acute respiratory failure often reaches a degree of severity that necessitates mechanical ventilation. The objective of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic outcomes of mechanical ventilation in hematological malignancy patients with respiratory failure and to analyze the factors that are associated with successful treatment in order to identify the issues that should be addressed in the future. Methods The present study was a retrospective analysis of 71 hematological malignancy patients with non-cardiogenic acute respiratory failure who were treated with mechanical ventilation at Nippon Medical School Hospital between 2003 and 2014. Results Twenty-six patients (36.6%) were treated with mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU). Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) was applied in 29 cases (40.8%). The rate of successful mechanical ventilation treatment with NPPV alone was 13.8%. The rate of endotracheal extubation was 17.7%. A univariate analysis revealed that the following factors were associated with the successful extubation of patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation: respiratory management in an ICU (p=0.012); remission of the hematological disease (p=0.011); female gender (p=0.048); low levels of accompanying non-respiratory organ failure (p=0.041); and the non-use of extracorporeal circulation (p=0.005). A subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that respiratory management in an ICU was the only variable associated with successful extubation (p=0.030). Conclusion The outcomes of hematological malignancy patients who receive mechanical ventilation treatment for respiratory failure are very poor. Respiratory management in an ICU environment may be useful in improving the therapeutic outcomes of such patients.

  13. Three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    We report three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy. All cases involved relapsed cervical lesions, and two showed edema of the larynx. Emergency tracheostomy was performed to treat the respiratory failure in one case while the others were treated conservatively. All patients showed improvements without after-effects. Patients who undergo I-131 radioiodine therapy, especially those with cervical lesions, should be carefully monitored for this rare complication after treatment. (author)

  14. Pathophysiology and Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Sabrina M; Nair, Alison; Bulut, Yonca; Sapru, Anil

    2017-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and hypoxia that accompanies up to 30% of deaths in pediatric intensive care units. Pediatric ARDS (PARDS) is diagnosed by the presence of hypoxia, defined by oxygenation index or Pao 2 /Fio 2 ratio cutoffs, and new chest infiltrate occurring within 7 days of a known insult. Hallmarks of ARDS include hypoxemia and decreased lung compliance, increased work of breathing, and impaired gas exchange. Mortality is often accompanied by multiple organ failure. Although many modalities to treat PARDS have been investigated, supportive therapies and lung protective ventilator support remain the mainstay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute airway failure secondary to thyroid metastasis from renal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lastilla Gaetano

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary involvement of the thyroid gland by malignant metastases is uncommon. Acute respiratory crisis due to infiltration of the upper airways is a recognised complication of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma or thyroid lymphoma. Renal cell carcinoma is a tumour that metastasizes diffusely and in an unpredictable manner. Case presentation We report a case of a 73-year-old man with a painful neck mass, dyspnoea, stridor and dysphonia that was evaluated in emergency. A right radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma was performed 8 years previously. An emergency endotracheal intubation was followed by total thyroidectomy. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of thyroid metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. Conclusion A literature review regarding emergency treatment for acute respiratory compromise resulting from secondary thyroid tumours was undertaken. Only two cases of metastatic colon cancer and one case of metastatic meningioma requiring emergency thyroidectomy for acute respiratory failure are reported in the literature. This appears to be the first case of emergency surgery performed for acute respiratory compromise due to thyroid metastasis from renal cell carcinoma.

  16. [Acute cor pulmonale in acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Cao, Quan; Zuo, Xiangrong

    2017-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe respiratory condition that is characterized by rapidly progressive hypoxemia with noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Despite the improvement of therapeutic methods, the mortality of ARDS is in the range of 40%-50% all over the world. Some studies have shown that a significant number of patients with ARDS had acute cor pulmonale (ACP), and ACP is independently associated with the mortality of patients with ARDS, which has attracted wide attention in recent years. This paper reviewed recent related studies, summarized the prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnostic approaches of ACP in ARDS, especially echocardiography which was considered as a cornerstone for ACP diagnosis, and elucidated the beneficial effects of right ventricular protective ventilatory strategy and prone-positioning on the pulmonary vasculature and right heart, in order to provide a novel idea for the therapy of ACP in ARDS.

  17. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Consensus Recommendations From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouvet, Philippe; Thomas, Neal J.; Willson, Douglas F.; Erickson, Simon; Khemani, Robinder; Smith, Lincoln; Zimmerman, Jerry; Dahmer, Mary; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael; Sapru, Anil; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Rimensberger, Peter C.; Kneyber, Martin; Tamburro, Robert F.; Curley, Martha A. Q.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Valentine, Stacey; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Newth, Christopher; Carroll, Christopher L.; Essouri, Sandrine; Dalton, Heidi; Macrae, Duncan; Lopez-Cruces, Yolanda; Quasney, Michael; Santschi, Miriam; Watson, R. Scott; Bembea, Melania

    Objective: To describe the final recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference. Design: Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. Setting: Not applicable. Subjects: PICU patients with evidence of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress

  18. Drug Therapy for Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Acute heart failure is globally one of most frequent reasons for hospitalization and still represents a challenge for the choice of the best treatment to improve patient outcome. According to current international guidelines, as soon as patients with acute heart failure arrive at the emergency department, the common therapeutic approach aims to improve their signs and symptoms, correct volume overload, and ameliorate cardiac hemodynamics by increasing vital organ perfusion. Recommended treatment for the early management of acute heart failure is characterized by the use of intravenous diuretics, oxygen, and vasodilators. Although these measures ameliorate the patient's symptoms, they do not favorably impact on short- and long-term mortality. Consequently, there is a pressing need for novel agents in acute heart failure treatment with the result that research in this field is increasing worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Je Ko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When all conventional treatments for respiratory failure in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS have failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO can provide a chance of survival in these desperately ill patients. A 49-year-old male patient developed septic shock and progressive ARDS after liver abscess drainage. Venovenous ECMO was given due to refractory respiratory failure on postoperative day 6. Initially, two heparin-binding hollow-fiber microporous membrane oxygenators in parallel were used in the ECMO circuit. Twenty-two oxygenators were changed in the first 22 days of ECMO support because of plasma leak in the oxygenators. Each oxygenator had an average life of 48 hours. Thereafter, a single silicone membrane oxygenator was used in the ECMO circuit, which did not require change during the remaining 596 hours of ECMO. The patient's tidal volume was only 90 mL in the nadir and less than 300 mL for 26 days during the ECMO course. The patient required ECMO support for 48 days and survived despite complications, including septic shock, ARDS, acute renal failure, drug-induced leukopenia, and multiple internal bleeding. This patient received an unusually long duration of ECMO support. However, he survived, recovered well, and was in New York Heart Association functional class I-II, with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 81% of the predicted level 18 months later. In conclusion, ECMO can provide a chance of survival for patients with refractory ARDS. The reversibility of lung function is possible in ARDS patients regardless of the severity of lung dysfunction at the time of treatment.

  20. Acute liver failure and self-medication

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, André Vitorio Câmara de; ROCHA, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; ABREU, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. AIM: To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. METHOD: Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute l...

  1. State of the art. Neonatal respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L A

    1999-12-01

    Advances in ventilatory management of respiratory distress in the newborn have made dramatic strides during the last decade. Innovative treatments such as PTV, HFV, liquid ventilation, and NO therapy are just beginning to have an impact on the care of neonates in the NICU. These treatment modalities should continue to have an effect on the care of the newborn infant well into the future.

  2. A 53-year-old man with dyspnoea, respiratory failure, consistent with infliximab-induced acute interstitial pneumonitis after an accelerated induction dosing schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofaiel, Rymon; Kohli, Sonny; Mura, Marco; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2017-05-12

    A 53-year-old man with ulcerative colitis (UC) suffered fatal acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP) post completing an accelerated infliximab induction course. This is the first case reported in this setting. A literature review found four similar cases of infliximab-induced interstitial lung disease in the setting of treating patients with UC using standard infliximab regimens had successful treatment of the subjects post infliximab discontinuation. Unfortunately, the patient we are presenting, who had an accelerated infliximab induction course, did not survive. Although a prior small trial along more recent new small studies continue to show a benefit in reducing the need for early colectomy with the accelerated infliximab induction regimen as salvage therapy, it should be used cautiously until more safety data are available. Further larger trials are required to investigate rare side effects that may be associated with this regimen such as rapidly progressive lung toxicity as seen in this patient. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Clinical outcomes of isolated renal failure compared to other forms of organ failure in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougol, Amir; Dugum, Mohannad; Dudekula, Anwar; Greer, Phil; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2017-08-07

    To assess differences in clinical outcomes of isolated renal failure (RF) compared to other forms of organ failure (OF) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Using a prospectively maintained database of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to a tertiary medical center between 2003 and 2016, those with evidence of persistent OF were classified to renal, respiratory, cardiovascular, or multi-organ (2 or more organs). Data regarding demographics, comorbidities, etiology of acute pancreatitis, and clinical outcomes were prospectively recorded. Differences in clinical outcomes after development of isolated RF in comparison to other forms of OF were determined using independent t and Mann-Whitney U tests for continues variables, and χ 2 test for discrete variables. Among 500 patients with acute pancreatitis, 111 patients developed persistent OF: mean age was 54 years, and 75 (67.6%) were male. Forty-three patients had isolated OF: 17 (15.3%) renal, 25 (21.6%) respiratory, and 1 (0.9%) patient with cardiovascular failure. No differences in demographics, etiology of acute pancreatitis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome scores, or development of pancreatic necrosis were seen between patients with isolated RF vs isolated respiratory failure. Patients with isolated RF were less likely to require nutritional support (76.5% vs 96%, P = 0.001), ICU admission (58.8% vs 100%, P = 0.001), and had shorter mean ICU stay (2.4 d vs 15.7 d, P failure. None of the patients with isolated RF or isolated respiratory failure died. Among patients with SAP per the Revised Atlanta Classification, approximately 15% develop isolated RF. This subgroup seems to have a less protracted clinical course compared to other forms of OF. Isolated RF might be weighed less than isolated respiratory failure in risk predictive modeling of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Coccidioidomycosis: an unusual cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelson Nobre Veras

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A male farmer, 20 years old, from the countryside of the State of Piauí, developed acute respiratory infection. Despite adequate antimicrobial therapy, his conditions worsened, requiring mechanical ventilation. His X-rays showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. His PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 58. Direct microscopy and culture of tracheal aspirates showed the presence of Coccidioides immitis. Autochthonous cases of coccidioidomycosis have only recently been described in Brazil, most of them from the State of Piauí. C. immitis has been isolated from humans, dogs and armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, and also from soil samples of armadillo's burrows. Failure to respond to antimicrobial therapy and a patient's origin from recognized endemic areas should alert to the possibility of acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

  5. Adult venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe respiratory failure: Current status and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO for severe acute respiratory failure was proposed more than 40 years ago. Despite the publication of the ARDSNet study and adoption of lung protective ventilation, the mortality for acute respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome has continued to remain high. This technology has evolved over the past couple of decades and has been noted to be safe and successful, especially during the worldwide H1N1 influenza pandemic with good survival rates. The primary indications for ECMO in acute respiratory failure include severe refractory hypoxemic and hypercarbic respiratory failure in spite of maximum lung protective ventilatory support. Various triage criteria have been described and published. Contraindications exist when application of ECMO may be futile or technically impossible. Knowledge and appreciation of the circuit, cannulae, and the physiology of gas exchange with ECMO are necessary to ensure lung rest, efficiency of oxygenation, and ventilation as well as troubleshooting problems. Anticoagulation is a major concern with ECMO, and the evidence is evolving with respect to diagnostic testing and use of anticoagulants. Clinical management of the patient includes comprehensive critical care addressing sedation and neurologic issues, ensuring lung recruitment, diuresis, early enteral nutrition, treatment and surveillance of infections, and multisystem organ support. Newer technology that delinks oxygenation and ventilation by extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal may lead to ultra-lung protective ventilation, avoidance of endotracheal intubation in some situations, and ambulatory therapies as a bridge to lung transplantation. Risks, complications, and long-term outcomes and resources need to be considered and weighed in before widespread application. Ethical challenges are a reality and a multidisciplinary approach that should be adopted for every case in consideration.

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: implications for perinatal and neonatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an emerging infection that causes a potentially fatal respiratory disease. Although the SARS outbreak lasted less than 1 year, it resulted in significant morbidity and mortality and impacted nursing practices. A literature review was conducted. Only English language research articles in peer-reviewed journals, national organization publications, and book chapters were utilized. Data from 37 relevant articles were extracted, analyzed, and summarized. SARS' clinical description is presented, including its common signs/symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Recommended isolation practices for labor and delivery and proper procedures for donning, using, and doffing personal protective equipment are provided. Potential maternal outcomes include spontaneous miscarriage during the first trimester, preterm birth, emergency cesarean section, renal failure, secondary bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, adult respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, surgical site infection, and maternal death. There have been no documented cases of vertical transmission; passive immunity is suspected on the basis of the presence of antibodies in some maternal body fluids. Potential neonatal outcomes include complications related to premature birth, intrauterine growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome, and severe gastrointestinal manifestations. It is not known if or when SARS will reemerge, but perinatal and neonatal nurses should become familiar with its clinical description and proper infection control procedures to halt potential outbreaks.

  7. Emerging indications for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults with respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Darryl; Brodie, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in technology have spurred the increasing use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, this accounts for only a small percentage of patients with respiratory failure. We envision the application of ECMO in many other forms of respiratory failure in the coming years. Patients with less severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome, for instance, may benefit from enhanced lung-protective ventilation with the very low tidal volumes made possible by direct carbon dioxide removal from the blood. For those in whom hypercapnia predominates, extracorporeal support will allow for the elimination of invasive mechanical ventilation in some cases. The potential benefits of ECMO may be further enhanced by improved techniques, which facilitate active mobilization. Although ECMO for these and other expanded applications is under active investigation, it has yet to be proven beneficial in these settings in rigorous controlled trials. Ultimately, with upcoming and future technological advances, there is the promise of true destination therapy, which could lead to a major paradigm shift in the management of respiratory failure.

  8. Phytotherapy of Acute Respiratory Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays phytotherapy is increasingly being implemented into medical practice, especially for the prevention and treatment of many diseases. Acute respiratory viral infections are most common in childhood and in adults. Acute rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, nasopharyngitis and acute laryngitis refer to diseases of the upper respiratory tract. The main reason for respiratory diseases in recurrent respiratory infection child is disorders of mucociliary and immune protection. The therapeutic value of medicinal plants is determined by their biologically active substances. The method of application of phytotherpy is an integral part of traditional medicine. Herbal medicine can be used at home and does not require special equipment. The main indications for the herbal medicine use in pediatrics are the initial stage of the disease as a primary method of treatment due to mild and low toxicity; as a supporting treatment for enhancing the protective forces of the child’s body during the disease deterioration. During the recovery period herbal medicine again occupies a leading position, especially in case of chronic diseases because it can be used for a long time and is well combined with synthetic drugs. The terms of appointment of herbs for children: prescription of medicinal plants for children must be individual according to indications, taking into account the child’s age; it is recommended to take into account the form and nature of the course of the main disease and comorbidities as well; at the initial stage of the treatment it is better to use some medicinal plants or species consisting of 2–3 plants and in the future a more complex composition; therapy with medicinal plants requires a long period to be used use, especially in chronic diseases; in the treatment of chronic diseases a good effect preventive courses of herbal medicine was revealed, which are appointed during seasonal exacerbations; in case of intolerance

  9. Acute kidney injury in children with heart failure: any relationship to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Method : Prospective study of cohort of children with heart failure were studied. Heart failure was defined using heart rate for age, respiratory rate for age and tender hepatomegaly. Acute kidney injury was based on absolute serum creatinine level > 0.5 mg/dl on admission. Age, gender, and out come we r e ...

  10. Alterações histopatológicas pulmonares em pacientes com insuficiência respiratória aguda: um estudo em autopsias Pulmonary histopathological alterations in patients with acute respiratory failure: an autopsy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Matos Soeiro

    2008-02-01

    patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF and determine whether underlying diseases and certain associated risk factors increase the incidence of these histopathological patterns. METHODS: Final autopsy reports were reviewed, and 3030 autopsies of patients > 1 year of age with an underlying disease and associated risk factors were selected. All had developed diffuse infiltrates and died of ARF-related pulmonary alterations. RESULTS: The principal pulmonary histopathological alterations resulting in immediate death were diffuse alveolar damage (DAD, pulmonary edema, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP and alveolar hemorrhage. The principal underlying diseases were AIDS, bronchopneumonia, sepsis, liver cirrhosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, acute myocardial infarction (AMI, cerebrovascular accident, tuberculosis, cancer, chronic kidney failure and leukemia. The principal associated risk factors were as follows: age > 50 years; arterial hypertension; congestive heart failure; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and diabetes mellitus. These risk factors and AIDS correlated with a high risk of developing LIP; these same risk factors, if concomitant with sepsis or liver cirrhosis, correlated with a risk of developing DAD; thromboembolism and these risk factors correlated with a risk of developing alveolar hemorrhage; these risk factors and AMI correlated with a risk of developing pulmonary edema. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary findings in patients who died of ARF presented four histopathological patterns: DAD, pulmonary edema, LIP and alveolar hemorrhage. Underlying diseases and certain associated risk factors correlated positively with specific histopathological findings on autopsy.

  11. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure following multiple hornet stings

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    N. Sharma

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera is a class of insects that sting in order to subdue their prey. Humans coming into accidental contact with these insects results in stings that may cause from mild local reaction like weal formation around the sting site to severe systemic reactions such as intravascular hemolysis, acute renal failure, pulmonary edema, cerebral edema, and rarely pancreatitis. We report here the clinical course of a patient who developed concurrent acute pancreatitis and pigment-induced acute renal failure after multiple hornet stings.

  12. Acute-on-chronic Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Choudhury, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct entity that differs from acute liver failure and decompensated cirrhosis in timing, presence of treatable acute precipitant, and course of disease, with a potential for self-recovery. The core concept is acute deterioration of existing liver function in a patient of chronic liver disease with or without cirrhosis in response to an acute insult. The insult should be a hepatic one and presentation in the form of liver failure (jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy, ascites) with or without extrahepatic organ failure in a defined time frame. ACLF is characterized by a state of deregulated inflammation. Initial cytokine burst presenting as SIRS, progression to CARS and associated immunoparalysis leads to sepsis and multi-organ failure. Early identification of the acute insult and mitigation of the same, use of nucleoside analogue in HBV-ACLF, steroid in severe alcoholic hepatitis, steroid in severe autoimmune hepatitis and/or bridging therapy lead to recovery, with a 90-day transplant-free survival rate of up to 50 %. First-week presentation is crucial concerning SIRS/sepsis, development, multiorgan failure and consideration of transplant. A protocol-based multi-disciplinary approach including critical care hepatology, early liver transplant before multi-organ involvement, or priority for organ allocation may improve the outcome. Presentation with extrahepatic organ involvement or inclusion of sepsis as an acute insult in definition restricts the therapy, i.e., liver transplant or bridging therapy, and needs serious consideration. Augmentation of regeneration, cell-based therapy, immunotherapy, and gut microbiota modulation are the emerging areas and need further research.

  13. Determinants of acute respiratory infections in Soweto - a population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are an important cause of infant morbidity in both developing and developed countries, and they are the leading cause of death in poorer parts of the world. Respiratory viruses appear to be the most frequent microbiological pathogens, especially respiratory syncytial virus.

  14. Chinese herbal medicine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Shi, Yi

    2004-01-01

    To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically.......To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically....

  15. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  16. Respiratory failure caused by intrathoracic amoebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Yokoyama

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Toshinobu Yokoyama1, Masashi Hirokawa1, Yutaka Imamura2, Hisamichi Aizawa11Division of Respirology, Neurology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University, Japan; 2Department of Hematology, St. Mary’s Hospital, Kurume, JapanAbstract: A 41-year-old male was admitted to the hospital with symptoms of diarrhea, fever and rapidly progressive respiratory distress. A chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT of the chest and the abdomen showed a large amount of right pleural effusion and a large liver abscess. The patient was thus diagnosed to have amoebic colitis, amoebic liver abscess and amoebic empyema complicated with an HIV infection. The patient demonstrated agranulocytosis caused by the administration of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. However, the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor made it possible for the patient to successfully recover from agranulocytosis, and he thereafter demonstrated a good clinical course.Keywords: amebiasis, amoebic empyema, HIV, agranulocytosis, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole

  17. Acute respiratory infections in young Ethiopian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris RA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Arden HarrisDepartment of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAThe identification of risk factors for acute respiratory infections (ARI is crucial for designing interventions to both minimize transmission and augment the immune response, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where poverty-related ARI is still a major cause of preventable death in young children.1 I therefore read with interest Geberetsadik et al’s recent study of the factors associated with ARI in Ethiopian children.2 Their study uses nationally representative data on households and individuals to build a model of the social, demographic, and anthropometric determinants of ARI. A precise understanding of their model, however, requires clarification of several items in their paper.View original paper by Geberetsadik et al.

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, I; Peñuelas, O; Esteban, A

    2012-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition that affects patients admitted in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) under mechanical ventilation. ARDS is a process of non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema and hypoxemia associated with a variety of conditions, resulting in a direct (e.g., pneumonia) or indirect (e.g., sepsis) lung injury and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. A large body of clinical and basic research has focused in ventilatory strategies and novel pharmacological therapies but, nowadays, treatment is mainly supportive. Mechanical ventilation is the hallmark of the management of these patients. In the last decades, the recognition that mechanical ventilation can contribute to harming the lung has changed the goals of this therapy and has driven research to focus in ventilatory strategies that mitigate lung injury. This review emphasizes clinical aspects in the evaluation and management of ARDS in the ICUs and updates the latest advances in these therapies.

  19. Quantitation of respiratory viruses in relation to clinical course in children with acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rogier R.; Schinkel, Janke; dek, Irene; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Visser, Caroline E.; de Jong, Menno D.; Molenkamp, Richard; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2010-01-01

    Quantitation of respiratory viruses by PCR could potentially aid in clinical interpretation of PCR results. We conducted a study in children admitted with acute respiratory tract infections to study correlations between the clinical course of illness and semiquantitative detection of 14 respiratory

  20. Acute ventilatory failure complicating obesity hypoventilation: update on a 'critical care syndrome'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BaHammam, Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Obesity can result in serious complications, including obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). OHS patients may present with acute-on-chronic ventilatory failure, necessitating acute care management. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent literature on acute ventilatory failure in OHS patients. Obese persons can develop acute hypercapnic respiratory failure and sleep hypoventilation due to disorders in lung mechanics, ventilatory drive, and neurohormonal and neuromodulators of breathing. Although there are no clearly defined predictors for OHS patients who are likely to develop acute hypercapnic respiratory failure, most such patients are middle-aged (mid-50s), morbidly obese, and have daytime hypercapnia, hypoxemia, and low serum pH values. Immediate ventilatory support, without sleep study confirmation, is necessary in most such patients. Patients with respiratory acidemia (pH care unit monitoring. Noninvasive application of bilevel positive airway pressure therapy is the recommended initial ventilatory support under close monitoring. Prompt initiation of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation reduces the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and rapidly improves the levels of blood gases. Obese patients with sleep hypoventilation have an increased risk of acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Early diagnosis and implementation of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation is recommended for these patients.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and respiratory failure; what about the diaphragm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A.; Alfen, N. van; Voet, N.B.M.; Kerstjens, H.A.; Wijkstra, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present a case of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) with a diaphragm paralysis as the primary cause of ventilatory failure. FSHD is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with a restricted pattern of weakness. Although respiratory weakness is a relatively unknown in

  2. Plasma osteopontin in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srungaram, Praveen; Rule, Jody A; Yuan, He Jun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteopontin (OPN) is a novel phosphoglycoprotein expressed in Kupffer cells that plays a pivotal role in activating natural killer cells, neutrophils and macrophages. Measuring plasma OPN levels in patients with acute liver failure (ALF) might provide insights into OPN function...... in the setting of massive hepatocyte injury. METHODS: OPN levels were measured using a Quantikine® ELISA assay on plasma from 105 consecutive ALF patients enrolled by the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group, as well as controls including 40 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 35 healthy subjects both before, and 1...

  3. Fever, jaundice and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Sam M; Pathak, Neha; Toms, Graham C; Gelding, Susan V; Sivaprakasam, Venkat

    2015-02-01

    Leptospirosis is an uncommon infectious disease that has protean clinical manifestations ranging from an innocuous 'flu-like' illness to potentially life-threatening multi-organ failure. Here we describe a case of Weil's disease that presented on the acute medical take with fever, jaundice and acute renal failure. We highlight the importance of careful history taking at the time of admission and how understanding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of leptospirosis enables a definitive diagnosis to be reached. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  4. Acute liver failure and self-medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, André Vitorio Câmara; Rocha, Frederico Theobaldo Ramos; Abreu, Sílvio Romero de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Not responsible self-medication refers to drug use in high doses without rational indication and often associated with alcohol abuse. It can lead to liver damage and drug interactions, and may cause liver failure. To warn about how the practice of self-medication can be responsible for acute liver failure. Were used the Medline via PubMed, Cochrane Library, SciELO and Lilacs, and additional information on institutional sites of interest crossing the headings acute liver failure [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND acetaminophen [tiab]; acute liver failure [tiab] AND dietary supplements [tiab]; self-medication [tiab] AND liver failure [tiab] and self-medication [tiab] AND green tea [tiab]. In Lilacs and SciELO used the descriptor self medication in Portuguese and Spanish. From total surveyed were selected 27 articles and five sites specifically related to the purpose of this review. Legislation and supervision disabled and information inaccessible to people, favors the emergence of cases of liver failure drug in many countries. In the list of released drugs that deserve more attention and care, are some herbal medicines used for the purpose of weight loss, and acetaminophen. It is recommended that institutes of health intensify supervision and better orient their populations on drug seemingly harmless, limiting the sale of products or requiring a prescription for release them.

  5. Respiratory failure following anti-lung serum: study on mechanisms associated with surfactant system damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachmann, B.; Hallman, M.; Bergmann, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Within 2 minutes intravenous anti-lung serum (ALS) into guinea pig induces a respiratory failure that is fatal within 30 min. The relationship between surfactant, alveolar-capillary permeability and respiratory failure was studied. Within two minutes ALS induced a leak in the alveolar-capillary barrier. Within 30 minutes 28.3% (controls, given normal rabbit serum: 0.7%) of iv 131 I-albumin, and 0.5% (controls 0.02%) of iv surfactant phospholipid tracer were recovered in bronchoalveolar lavage. Furthermore, 57% (controls 32%) of the endotracheally administered surfactant phospholipid became associated with lung tissue and only less than 0.5% left the lung. The distribution of proteins and phospholipids between the in vivo small volume bronchoalveolar lavages and the ex vivo bronchoalveolar lavages were dissimilar: 84% (controls 20%) of intravenously injected, lavageable 131 I-albumin and 23% (controls 18%) of total lavageable phospholipid were recovered in the in vivo small volume bronchoalveolar lavages. ALS also decreased lavageable surfactant phospholipid by 41%. After ALS the minimum surface tension increased. The supernatant of the lavage increased the minimum surface tension of normal surfactant. In addition, the sediment fraction of the lavage had slow surface adsorption, and a marked reduction in 35,000 and 10,000 MW peptides. Exogenous surfactant ameliorated the ALS-induced respiratory failure. We propose that inhibition, altered intrapulmonary distribution, and dissociation of protein and phospholipid components of surfactant are important in early pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure

  6. Importance of Respiratory Viruses in Acute Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Terho; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2003-01-01

    Acute otitis media is usually considered a simple bacterial infection that is treated with antibiotics. However, ample evidence derived from studies ranging from animal experiments to extensive clinical trials supports a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the etiology and pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Viral infection of the upper respiratory mucosa initiates the whole cascade of events that finally leads to the development of acute otitis media as a complication. The pathogenesis o...

  7. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  8. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  9. The influence of a fentanyl and dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G. Vengerovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl is widely used for prophylaxis and therapy of traumatic shock associated with massive bleeding. Its side effects – skeletal muscle rigidity and respiratory center depression – are especially pronounced with repeated administration. It is rational to apply fentanyl in diminished doses in combination with non-opioid analgesics in order to reduce respiratory disturbances risk.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the influence of opioid analgesic fentanyl and α2 -adrenomimetic dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model.Materials and methods. Acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume was modeled in experiments on 75 white mongrel male rats. The external respiratory functions (respiratory rate, respiratory volume, breath volume per minute were estimated in animals of 5 groups: 1 – rats without analgesic help (controls; 2–3 – rats receiving a single fentanyl intramuscular injection (ED99 98,96 mcg/kg or fentanyl together with dexme detomidine (ED99 of combination 67,94 mcg/kg 15 min after acute blood loss; 4–5 – rats receiving the same drugs 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min later.Results. In experimental acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume, 15 min later a secondary acute respiratory failure developed with a drop of respiratory rate, respiratory volume and volume of breath per minute by 30%, 21 and 47% (p < 0,05. The external respiratory functions recoverеd after 4 h mainly due to the increase of respiratory volume. A single intramuscular injection of fentanyl caused respiratory depression 15 min after experimental blood loss which resulted in the decrease of breath volume per minute to 30–61% (p < 0,05 for 90 min. Four intramuscular injections of fentanyl 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min after hemorrhage caused a severe respiratory dysfunction, accompanied by apnea periods and Biot’s respiration. Respiratory rate was reduced

  10. Update: Acute Heart Failure (VII): Nonpharmacological Management of Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plácido, Rui; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2015-09-01

    Acute heart failure is a major and growing public health problem worldwide with high morbidity, mortality, and cost. Despite recent advances in pharmacological management, the prognosis of patients with acute decompensated heart failure remains poor. Consequently, nonpharmacological approaches are being developed and increasingly used. Such techniques may include several modalities of ventilation, ultrafiltration, mechanical circulatory support, myocardial revascularization, and surgical treatment, among others. This document reviews the nonpharmacological approach in acute heart failure, indications, and prognostic implications. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute Renal Failure following Accidental Potassium Bromate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accidental poisoning is common in children. Potassium bromate is a commonly used additive and raising agent in many edibles particularly bread, a staple food worldwide, yet its accidental poisoning has hitherto, not been documented in Nigeria. We report an unusual case of acute renal failure following accidental ...

  12. The management of acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milo-Cotter, O.; Bettari, L.; Kleijn, L.; Bugatti, S.; Lombardi, C.; Rund, M.; Metra, M.; Voors, A. A.; Cotter, G.; Kaluski, E.; Weatherley, B. D.

    Hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the burdensome aspects of 21(st) century medicine, leading to significant debilitating symptoms, high morbidity and mortality and consuming significant portion of the health care budget. Management of AHF is thought-provoking given the

  13. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  14. Hemolysis and Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qi; Nath, Karl A.; Wu, Yiming; Daoud, Tarek M.; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    Deposits of iron and hemosiderosis in the kidney have been observed in diseases with intravascular hemolysis, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and valvular heart diseases and prosthetic heart valve implants. However, the decrease in kidney function associated with hemolysis caused by cardiac valvular disease or prostheses is less well recognized. We present a case of intravascular hemolysis after repair and banding of the mitral valve that resulted in massive renal tubular deposition of hemosiderin with decreased kidney function. We discuss the pathophysiologic process of both acute and chronic tubular injury from heme and heme proteins, including injury to organelles resulting in autophagic vacuoles containing damaged organelles, such as mitochondria. We conclude that tubular injury resulting from heme proteins should be considered as a cause of decreased kidney function in all patients with a cardiac valvular disease or prosthesis. PMID:20605299

  15. De novo acute heart failure and acutely decompensated chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Astrid; Empe, Klausn; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B

    2015-04-24

    Heart failure is one of the most common diseases of adults in Europe, with an overall prevalence of 1-2%. Among persons aged 60 and above, its prevalence is above 10% in men and 8% in women. Acute heart failure has a poor prognosis; it is associated with a high rate of rehospitalization and a 1-year mortality of 20-30%. This review is based on pertinent literature, including guidelines, retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. There are different types of acute heart failure; the basic diagnostic assessment is performed at once and consists of ECG, echocardiography, and the measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) and troponin levels. The most common causes of decompensation are arrhythmia, valvular dysfunction, and acute cardiac ischemia, each of which accounts for 30% of cases. The potential indication for immediate revascularization should be carefully considered in cases where acute heart failure is due to coronary heart disease. The basic treatment of acute heart failure is symptomatic, with the administration of oxygen, diuretics, and vasodilators. Ino-tropic agents, vasopressors, and temporary mechanical support for the circulatory system are only used to treat cardiogenic shock. The treatment of acute heart failure is markedly less evidence-based than that of chronic heart failure. Newer treatment approaches that are intended to improve outcomes still need to be tested in multicenter trials.

  16. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stravitz, R.T.; Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a potentially life-threatening complication of acute liver failure, the syndrome of abrupt loss of liver function in a patient with a previously healthy liver. Although the prevalence of cerebral edema appears to be decreasing, patients with rapidly progressive (hyperacute) liver...... failure, such as after acetaminophen overdose, remain at highest risk. In severe cases of cerebral edema, intracranial hypertension develops and leads to brain death after brainstem herniation or to anoxic brain injury and permanent neurologic impairment. Intracranial hypertension in patients with acute...... liver failure often can be temporarily controlled by manipulating body position, increasing the degree of sedation, and increasing blood osmolarity through pharmacologic means. However, these maneuvers often postpone, but do not eliminate, the risk of brainstem herniation unless orthotopic liver...

  17. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, R.L.; Campbell, F.; Brenbridge, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis

  18. Prognostic factors in neonatal acute renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, R.L.; Campbell, F.; Brenbridge, A.N.

    1984-08-01

    Sixteen infants, 2 to 35 days of age, had acute renal failure, a diagnosis based on serum creatinine concentrations greater than 1.5 mg/dL for at least 24 hours. Eight infants were oliguric (urine flow less than 1.0 mL/kg/h) whereas the remainder were nonoliguric. To determine clinical parameters useful in prognosis, urine flow rate, duration of anuria, peak serum creatinine, urea (BUN) concentration, and nuclide uptake by scintigraphy were correlated with recovery. Nine infants had acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia, three had acute renal failure as a result of congenital cardiovascular disease, and four had major renal anomalies. Four oliguric patients died: three of renal failure and one of heart failure. All nonoliguric infants survived with mean follow-up serum creatinine concentration of 0.8 +/- 0.5 (SD) mg/dL whereas that of oliguric survivors was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. Peak serum creatinine concentration did not differ between those patients who were dying and those recovering. All infants who were dying remained anuric at least four days and revealed no renal uptake of nuclide. Eleven survivors were anuric three days or less, and renal perfusion was detectable by scintigraphy in each case. However, the remaining survivor (with bilateral renal vein thrombosis) recovered after 15 days of anuria despite nonvisualization of kidneys by scintigraphy. In neonates with ischemic acute renal failure, lack of oliguria and the presence of identifiable renal uptake of nuclide suggest a favorable prognosis.

  19. Mechanism and Clinical Importance of Respiratory Failure Induced by Anticholinesterases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivosevic Anita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory failure is the predominant cause of death in humans and animals poisoned with anticholinesterases. Organophosphorus and carbamate anticholinesterases inhibit acetylcholinesterase irreversibly and reversibly, respectively. Some of them contain a quaternary atom that makes them lipophobic, limiting their action at the periphery, i.e. outside the central nervous system. They impair respiratory function primarily by inducing a desensitization block of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular synapse. Lipophilic anticholinesterases inhibit the acetylcholinesterase both in the brain and in other tissues, including respiratory muscles. Their doses needed for cessation of central respiratory drive are significantly less than doses needed for paralysis of the neuromuscular transmission. Antagonist of muscarinic receptors atropine blocks both the central and peripheral muscarinic receptors and effectively antagonizes the central respiratory depression produced by anticholinesterases. To manage the peripheral nicotinic receptor hyperstimulation phenomena, oximes as acetylcholinesterase reactivators are used. Addition of diazepam is useful for treatment of seizures, since they are cholinergic only in their initial phase and can contribute to the occurrence of central respiratory depression. Possible involvement of central nicotinic receptors as well as the other neurotransmitter systems – glutamatergic, opioidergic – necessitates further research of additional antidotes.

  20. Acute renal failure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederholm, C.; Almen, T.; Bergquist, D.; Golman, K.; Takolander, R.; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1989-01-01

    It was demonstrated in rats that renal injury which follows transient renal hypoxia is potentiated by the contrast media metrizoate, ioxaglate, iopamidol and iohexol. Intravenous injection of 1 g I/kg of all four media alone to 82 rats caused no significant increase in serum urea 1, 3 and 7 days later. The percentage increase of serum urea is given in median values and interquartile range (in parentheses). Bilateral renal arterial occlusion alone for 40 minutes in 42 rats increased serum urea one day later by 40% (20-130). Intravenous injection of the media followed in one hour by bilateral renal arterial occlusion for 40 minutes in 104 rats caused serum urea to increase one day later by 130% (70-350) after metrizoate, by 220% (50-380) after ioxaglate, by 290 % (60-420) after iopamidol and by 160% (50-330) after iohexol. There were no significant differences between the potentiating effects of the various media on ischemic renal failure. (orig.)

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  2. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cutaneous exposure to Lysol: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y Y; Lu, C C; Perng, R P

    1999-12-01

    Lysol (mixed cresols) is a brand of popular detergent commonly used to disinfect toilets and floors in Taiwan. We report a patient with acute respiratory failure immediately following chemical burns caused by skin contact with Lysol solution. On admission, chest radiography showed bilateral diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and an arterial blood gas analysis disclosed hypoxemia refractory to a high concentration of oxygen by inhalation. Under the impression of acute respiratory distress syndrome, our patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for respiratory care. Poor clinical improvement was noted, despite aggressive respiratory therapy. High-dose steroid therapy (hydrocortisone 30 mg/kg/day) was administered from the seventh day after mechanical ventilation began and the ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fractional concentration of oxygen in inspired gas improved thereafter. The amount of steroid was gradually tapered to the maintenance dose and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventilator after a 93-day course of mechanical ventilation.

  4. Acute Liver Failure Secondary to Niacin Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Ellsworth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old male was transferred to the pediatric intensive care unit for evaluation of acute liver failure. He was recently released from an alcohol treatment center with acute onset of chest pain. Cardiac workup was negative but he was found to have abnormal coagulation studies and elevated liver transaminases. Other evaluations included a normal toxicology screen and negative acetaminophen level. Autoimmune and infectious workups were normal providing no identifiable cause of his acute liver failure. He initially denied any ingestions or illicit drug use but on further query he admitted taking niacin in an attempt to obscure the results of an upcoming drug test. Niacin has been touted on the Internet as an aid to help pass urine drug tests though there is no evidence to support this practice. Niacin toxicity has been associated with serious multisystem organ failure and fulminant hepatic failure requiring liver transplantation. Pediatric providers should be aware of the risks associated with niacin toxicity and other experimental medical therapies that may be described on the Internet or other nonreputable sources.

  5. Recurrent reproductive failure associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in a swine herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, S A; Joo, H S

    1994-10-01

    An investigation of a case of recurrent reproductive failure in a swine herd was conducted. The subject farm (A) and a neighboring farm (B) had experienced an acute outbreak of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in 1990. During 1992, farm A experienced recurrent episodes of conception failure, stillbirths, preweaning mortality, and sow mortality. Similar clinical findings were not evident on farm B. Evaluation of production records indicated that the problem was occurring in first-parity litters. It was learned that replacement gilts for farm A were being purchased from an outside source, whereas farm B raised its own replacement gilts. Indirect fluorescent antibody testing of gilts from both farms indicated a high prevalence of seronegative gilts on farm A vs a high prevalence of seropositive gilts on farm B. Although there is no correlation between indirect fluorescent antibody titers and immunity, it would appear that exposure to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus prior to breeding is essential to prevent reproductive disease.

  6. Severe Plasmodium ovale malaria complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in a young Caucasian man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abramo, Alessandra; Gebremeskel Tekle, Saba; Iannetta, Marco; Scorzolini, Laura; Oliva, Alessandra; Paglia, Maria Grazia; Corpolongo, Angela; Nicastri, Emanuele

    2018-04-02

    Although Plasmodium ovale is considered the cause of only mild malaria, a case of severe malaria due to P. ovale with acute respiratory distress syndrome is reported. A 37-year old Caucasian man returning home from Angola was admitted for ovale malaria to the National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani in Rome, Italy. Two days after initiation of oral chloroquine treatment, an acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed through chest X-ray and chest CT scan with intravenous contrast. Intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline were started and he made a full recovery. Ovale malaria is usually considered a tropical infectious disease associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, severe disease and death have occasionally been reported. In this case clinical failure of oral chloroquine treatment with clinical progression towards acute respiratory distress syndrome is described.

  7. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  8. Activation and Regulation of Hemostasis in Acute Liver Failure and Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    Acute liver failure and acute pancreatitis are accompanied by substantial changes in the hemostatic system. In acute liver failure, defective synthesis of coagulation factors and intravascular activation of coagulation results in thrombocytopenia and reduced levels of proteins involved in

  9. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  10. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during

  11. Acute respiratory acidosis and alkalosis – A modern quantitative interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three different approaches for assessing the acid-base status of a patient exist, i.e. the Boston, Copenhagen, and Stewart´s approach, and they employ different parameters to assess a given acid-base disturbance. Students, researchers, and clinicians are getting confused by heated debates about which of these performs best and by the fact that during their curricula, they typically get acquainted with one of the approaches only, which prevents them to understand sources employing other approaches and to critically evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In this paper, the authors introduce and define the basic parameters characterizing each of the approaches and point out differences and similarities between them. Special attention is devoted to how the different approaches assess the degree of change in the concentration of plasma bicarbonate that occurs during primary respiratory changes; proper understanding of these is necessary to correctly interpret chronic respiratory and metabolic acid-base changes.Conclusion: During acute respiratory acidosis the concentration of bicarbonate rises and during acute respiratory alkalosis it falls, depending on the buffering strength of non-bicarbonate buffers. During acute respiratory acid-base disturbances, buffer base (employed by the Copenhagen approach, apparent and effective strong ion difference, as well as strong ion gap (employed by the Stewart approach remain unchanged; the anion gap (employed by the Boston and Copenhagen approach falls during acute respiratory acidosis and rises during acute respiratory alkalosis.

  12. Steroid use in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karkhanis, Jamuna; Verna, Elizabeth C; Chang, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Drug-induced and indeterminate acute liver failure (ALF) might be due to an autoimmune-like hepatitis that is responsive to corticosteroid therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether corticosteroids improve survival in fulminant autoimmune hepatitis, drug......-induced, or indeterminate ALF, and whether this benefit varies according to the severity of illness. We conducted a retrospective analysis of autoimmune, indeterminate, and drug-induced ALF patients in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group from 1998-2007. The primary endpoints were overall and spontaneous survival (SS......% versus 66%, P = 0.41), nor with improved survival in any diagnosis category. Steroid use was associated with diminished survival in certain subgroups of patients, including those with the highest quartile of the Model for Endstage Liver Disease (MELD) (>40, survival 30% versus 57%, P = 0...

  13. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  14. Etiology of pediatric acute liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Jing; SUN Mei

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (PALF) is a complex syndrome with rapid progression, and the cause of PALF is age-dependent. This article analyzes the common causes of PALF in clinical practice, including infection factors, inherited metabolic factors, poisoning and drugs, abnormal perfusion, and autoimmune diseases, among which infection factors are the most common cause. With the improvement in diagnosis and treatment techniques, the diagnostic rate of PALF caused by inherited metabolic disea...

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in victims with isolated severe brain injury (SBI. Subject and methods. 171 studies were performed in 16 victims with SBI. Their general condition was rated as very critical. The patients were divided into three groups: 1 non-ARDS; 2 Stage 1 ARDS; and 3 Stage 2 ARDS. The indicators of Stages 1 and 2 were assessed in accordance with the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev. Intracranial pressure (ICP, extravascular lung water index, pulmonary vascular permeability, central hemodynamics, oxygenation index, lung anastomosis, the X-ray pattern of the lung and brain (computed tomography, and its function were monitored. Results. The hemispheric cortical level of injury of the brain with function compensation of its stem was predominantly determined in the controls; subcompensation and decompensation were ascertained in the ARDS groups. According to the proposed classification, these patients developed Stages 1 and 2 ARDS. When ARDS developed, there were rises in the level of extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary vascular permeability, a reduction in the oxygenation index (it was 6—12 hours later as compared with them, increases in a lung shunt and ICP; X-ray study revealed bilateral infiltrates in the absence of heart failure in Stage 2 ARDS. The correlation was positive between ICP and extravascular lung water index, and lung vascular permeability index (r>0.4;p<0.05. Conclusion. The studies have indicated that the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev enables an early diagnosis of ARDS. One of its causes is severe brainstem injury that results in increased extravascular fluid in the lung due to its enhanced vascular permeability. The ICP value is a determinant in the diagnosis of secondary brain injuries. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, extravascu-lar lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, brain injury

  16. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W R; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468).

  17. Organ protection possibilities in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Pérez-Barquero, M; Morales-Rull, J L

    2016-04-01

    Unlike chronic heart failure (HF), the treatment for acute HF has not changed over the last decade. The drugs employed have shown their ability to control symptoms but have not achieved organ protection or managed to reduce medium to long-term morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute HF suggest that treatment should be directed not only towards correcting the haemodynamic disorders and achieving symptomatic relief but also towards preventing organ damage, thereby counteracting myocardial remodelling and cardiac and extracardiac disorders. Compounds that exert vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory action in the acute phase of HF and can stop cell death, thereby boosting repair mechanisms, could have an essential role in organ protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  18. Respiratory failure in tetanus: case report and review of a 25-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, T Jared; Thalji, Muna K; Pellikka, Patricia A; Aksamit, Timothy R

    2002-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to describe a novel presentation of tetanus and to review the course of the respiratory component and the treatment and management of the disease. A case report is presented with a review of a 25-year experience at Mayo Clinic. We describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with persistent hiccups, dyspnea, and pleurisy of 3 days duration that was caused by tetanus from inadequate secondary immunity. She required intubation for progressive trismus and laryngospasm-associated respiratory failure. Infusion of lorazepam did not control her spasms. Refractory spasms and hiccups resolved with fentanyl and cisatracurium therapy. After 3 weeks, the patient was weaned from the ventilator with complete recovery. In the past 25 years, nine additional patients have presented to Mayo Clinic with acute tetanus. Respiratory failure requiring intubation developed in seven patients, and six of the seven intubated patients survived with minimal deficits. The prognosis of tetanus is favorable if it is diagnosed promptly and if treatment and supportive measures are begun. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with acute tetanus presenting with hiccups. This report also confirms the results of previous studies that suggested a need for improved immunity in the elderly population.

  19. Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute respiratory infections are the commonest cause of acute morbidity in children especially those under five in the developing countries. Clinical diagnosis is of utmost importance considering the unavailability of radiological and microbiological services in most primary care settings in most developing ...

  20. Risk factors for acute renal failure: inherent and modifiable risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Martine; Kellum, John A; Gibney, R T Noel; Lieberthal, Wilfred; Tumlin, James; Mehta, Ravindra

    2005-12-01

    Our purpose is to discuss established risk factors in the development of acute renal failure and briefly overview clinical markers and preventive measures. Findings from the literature support the role of older age, diabetes, underlying renal insufficiency, and heart failure as predisposing factors for acute renal failure. Diabetics with baseline renal insufficiency represent the highest risk subgroup. An association between sepsis, hypovolemia, and acute renal failure is clear. Liver failure, rhabdomyolysis, and open-heart surgery (especially valve replacement) are clinical conditions potentially leading to acute renal failure. Increasing evidence shows that intraabdominal hypertension may contribute to the development of acute renal failure. Radiocontrast and antimicrobial agents are the most common causes of nephrotoxic acute renal failure. In terms of prevention, avoiding nephrotoxins when possible is certainly desirable; fluid therapy is an effective prevention measure in certain clinical circumstances. Supporting cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, and renal perfusion pressure are indicated to reduce the risk for acute renal failure. Nonionic, isoosmolar intravenous contrast should be used in high-risk patients. Although urine output and serum creatinine lack sensitivity and specificity in acute renal failure, they remain the most used parameters in clinical practice. There are identified risk factors of acute renal failure. Because acute renal failure is associated with a worsening outcome, particularly if occurring in critical illness and if severe enough to require renal replacement therapy, preventive measures should be part of appropriate management.

  1. A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis with respiratory failure in an African American woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Denise L

    2015-05-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is an acute endocrine emergency characterized by hyperthyroidism, profound muscle weakness and/or paralysis, and hypokalemia that is not due to potassium deficiency. Typically described in young males of Asian descent, it is becoming increasingly recognized outside of this demographic group and is believed to be an underrecognized cause of symptomatic hypokalemia. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis usually manifests as acute onset of symmetrical distal extremity weakness and is treated with careful potassium replacement and nonselective β-blockers. In this case, a 43-year-old African American woman with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis had recurrent lower extremity myopathy and acute respiratory failure precipitated by noncompliance with treatment for Graves disease. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  2. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes.

  3. Acute renal failure in Yemeni patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamed Al Rohani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is defined as a rapid decrease in the glomerular filtration rate, occurring over a period of hours to days. The Science and Technology University Hospital, Sana′a, is a referral hospital that caters to patients from all parts of Yemen. The aim of this study is to have a deeper overview about the epidemiological status of ARF in Yemeni patients and to identify the major causes of ARF in this country. We studied 203 patients with ARF over a period of 24 months. We found that tropical infectious diseases constituted the major causes of ARF, seen in 45.3% of the patients. Malaria was the most important and dominant infectious disease causing ARF. Hypotension secondary to infection or cardiac failure was seen in 28.6% of the patients. Obstructive nephropathy due to urolithiasis or prostate enlargement was the cause of ARF in a small number of patients. ARF was a part of multi-organ failure in 19.7% of the patients, and was accompanied by a high mortality rate. Majority of the patients were managed conservatively, and only 39.9% required dialysis. Our study suggests that early detection of renal failure helps improve the outcome and return of renal function to normal. Mortality was high in patients with malaria and in those with associated hepatocellular failure.

  4. [Relation between ultrasound-measured diaphragm movement and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in blood from patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure after the start of noninvasive ventilation in an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Nicolás, José Andrés; Cinesi-Gómez, César; Villén-Villegas, Tomás; Piñera-Salmerón, Pascual; García-Pérez, Bartolo

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the correlation between variations in ultrasound-measured diaphragm movement and changes in the arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) after the start of noninvasive ventilation (NIV). RDescriptive study of a prospective case series comprised of nonconsecutive patients aged 18 years or older with hypercapnic respiratory failure who were placed on NIV in an emergency department. We recorded clinical data, blood gas measurements, and ultrasound measurements of diaphragm movement. Twenty-one patients with a mean (SD) age of 83 (13) years were studied; 11 (52.4%) were women. The mean (SD) range of diaphragm movement and PCO2 values at 4 moments were as follows: 1) at baseline: diaphragm movement, 13.90 (7.7) mm and PCO2, 71.75 (11.4) mm Hg; 2) after 15 minutes on NIV: diaphragm movement, 17.10 (9.1) mm; 3) at 1 hour: diaphragm movement, 22.40 (10.4) mm and PCO2, 63.45 (16.0) mm Hg; and 4) at 3 hours: diaphragm movement, 26.60 (19.5) mm and PCO2, 61.85 (13.0) mm Hg. We detected a statistically significant correlation between the difference in range of diaphragm movement at baseline and at 15 minutes and the decrease in PCO2 after 1 hour of NIV (r=-0.489, P=.035). In patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure, the increase in range of diaphragm movement 15 minutes after starting NIV is associated with a decrease in PCO2 after 1 hour.

  5. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (acute myocardial infarction. Treatment consists of general measures to reverse acidosis and hypoxemia, as well as the use of vasopressors and inotropic drugs. Early coronary revascularization has been demonstrated to improve survival in shock associated with ischaemic heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  7. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwofie, Theophilus B; Anane, Yaw A; Nkrumah, Bernard; Annan, Augustina; Nguah, Samuel B; Owusu, Michael

    2012-04-10

    Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  8. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  9. Herbal vaginal pessary induced acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyemekeihia, U R; Esume, C O; Oladele, C O; Oviasu, E

    2009-10-01

    In Africa, the use of traditional herbal remedy is widespread. Acute renal failure (ARF) is one of the most serious complications. The use of herbal remedies (mostly orally) accounts for nearly 35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Development of renal failure following herbal vaginal pessary is rarely reported. In November 2003, a 35-year-old Nigerian female who is a petty trader and a primary school leaver with three children (all males) presented to us in the renal unit with oliguric ARF induced by herbal vaginal pessary. She had sought this alternative medicine in an attempt to have a female child as all her three children are males. Her condition was managed accordingly and required three sessions of hemodialysis. She started diuresing on the eighth day of admission. This case presentation highlights the potential tragedies of herbal preparation, of note, that herbal vaginal pessaries are as deleterious as the oral preparations, and that the dilemma of ignorance is still prevalent in our society.

  10. Preterm birth, respiratory failure and BPD: which neonatal management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoldi, Francesca; Lista, Gianluca; Scopesi, Fabio; Somaschini, Marco; Cuttano, Armando; Grappone, Lidia; Maffei, Gianfranco

    2013-10-01

    Preterm birth is a significant problem in the world regarding perinatal mortality and morbidity in the long term, especially bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Premature delivery is often associated to failure in transition to create an early functional residual capacity (FRC), since many preterm babies need frequently respiratory support. The first and most effective preventive measure to reduce the incidence of BPD is represented by the attempt to avoid preterm birth. Whenever this fails, the prevention of every known risk factors for BPD should start in the delivery room and should be maintained in the NICU through the use of tailored management of high-risk infants. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Health-related quality of life in COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M. L.; Wempe, J. B.; Bladder, G.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Wijkstra, P. J.

    The Maugeri Respiratory Failure (MRF-28) and Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI) questionnaires were recently developed to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with chronic respiratory failure, although not exclusively in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

  12. Morgagni hernia with respiratory failure aggravated by noninvasive positive pressure ventilation: a case report and overview of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tone, Kazuya; Kiryu, Ikumi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Takagi, Masamichi; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    An elderly woman diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM) in 2007 had improved with chemotherapy. She had severe kyphosis and a diaphragmatic hernia (DH), but no respiratory symptoms. In 2011, because of thoracic deformity and emaciation, we advised her to continue the previously prescribed domiciliary noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) therapy for chronic type II respiratory failure. However, she refused to continue NPPV. She was later admitted for deterioration in respiratory status and carbon dioxide (CO2) narcosis. We believed her low adherence to domiciliary NPPV caused CO2 narcosis; hence, we advised her to continue domiciliary NPPV and she complied. In May 2012, the now 79-year-old patient was admitted for acute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure and CO2 narcosis. Chest imaging suggested that DH had caused a deterioration of her status. She underwent laparoscopic diaphragmatic hernia repair. Operative findings revealed a retrosternal hernia sac, and she was diagnosed as having a Morgagni hernia (MH). Her respiratory status subsequently improved. We hypothesize that NPPV increased intra-abdominal pressure, thereby worsening the MH and exacerbating respiratory failure. We believe that clinicians should be cautious when prescribing NPPV for MH patients. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure after Gardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljko Vucicevic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute nontraumatic exertional rhabdomyolysis may arise when the energy supply to muscle is insufficient to meet demands, particularly in physically untrained individuals. We report on a psychiatric patient who developed large bruises and hemorrhagic blisters on both hands and arms, rhabdomyolysis of both forearm muscles with a moderate compartment syndrome, and consecutive acute renal failure following excessive work in the garden. Although specifically asked, the patient denied any hard physical work or gardening, and heteroanamnestic data were not available. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis was easy to establish, but until reliable anamnestic data were obtained, the etiology remained uncertain. Four days after arrival, the patient recalled working hard in the garden. The etiology of rhabdomyolysis was finally reached, and the importance of anamnestic data was once more confirmed.

  14. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an ‘aged’ population. As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department, intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  15. Etiology of pediatric acute liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Jing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric acute liver failure (PALF is a complex syndrome with rapid progression, and the cause of PALF is age-dependent. This article analyzes the common causes of PALF in clinical practice, including infection factors, inherited metabolic factors, poisoning and drugs, abnormal perfusion, and autoimmune diseases, among which infection factors are the most common cause. With the improvement in diagnosis and treatment techniques, the diagnostic rate of PALF caused by inherited metabolic diseases and autoimmune diseases keeps increasing. Due to the small number of PALF patients, there lacks experience in etiological diagnosis. This article summarizes related reports, in order to provide a reference for screening the causes of PALF.

  16. Acute liver failure complicating viral hepatitis A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rui Diniz-Santos

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A is one of the most frequent infectious liver diseases affecting children worldwide. The disease is usually mild and self-limited, and complications are very rare. Nevertheless, hepatitis A can sometimes cause acute liver failure (ALF, a severe, life-threatening condition. Herein is reported a case of a child who presented ALF during a course of hepatitis A. The need for early identification of possible ALF cases among hepatitis A patients, and for effective ways of evaluating such a possibility, are discussed. We also emphasize the importance of prevention measures, especially vaccination.

  17. Babesiosis Presenting as Acute Liver Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Nassar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Babesiosis is a zoonotic, tick-borne infection caused by the protozoan Babesia. It is transmitted by the Ixodes ticks which transmit the infection to humans. Babesia microti, Babesia duncani, Babesia divergens, and Babesia venatorum are species that have been identified as being infectious to humans worldwide. The most common species causing infection to humans is B. microti which is endemic to the Northeast and Midwestern United States with most infections occurring between the months of May and October. We report a case of an elderly man with acute liver failure due to an infection with B. microti.

  18. Management of hypoxaemic respiratory failure in a Respiratory High-dependency Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hukins, Craig; Wong, Mimi; Murphy, Michelle; Upham, John

    2017-07-01

    There are limited data on outcomes of hypoxaemic respiratory failure (HRF), especially in non-intensive care unit (ICU) settings. To assess outcomes in HRF (without multi-system disease and not requiring early intubation) of patients directly admitted to a Respiratory High-dependency Unit (R-HDU). This is a retrospective cohort study of HRF compared to hypercapnic respiratory failure (HCRF) in a R-HDU (2007-2011). Patient characteristics (age, gender, pre-morbid status, diagnoses) and outcomes (non-invasive ventilation (NIV) use, survival, ICU admission) were assessed. There were 1207 R-HDU admissions in 2007-2011, 205 (17%) with HRF and 495 (41%) with HCRF. The proportion with HRF increased from 12.2% in 2007 to 20.1% in 2011 (P patients were younger, more often male and had better pre-morbid performance. Compared to HCRF, HRF was more frequently associated with lung consolidation (61% vs 15%, P patients with HRF were treated with NIV (28% vs 87%, P patients with HRF died (19.5% vs 12.3%, P = 0.02). Interstitial lung disease, consolidation, shock, malignancy and poorer pre-morbid function were associated with increased mortality. Initial R-HDU management is an effective option in selected HRF to reduce ICU demand, although mortality and clinical deterioration despite NIV are more common than in HCRF. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Fluid in the management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is the hallmark of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The amount of fluid and which fluid should be used in these patients is controversial. Methods 43 patients with ARDS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU of the Second Hospital, Jilin University between November 1, 2011-November 1, 2012 were prospectively analyzed and was observational. Volume and the type of fluid administered were compared to 90 day mortality and the 24 and 72 hour sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, lactate level, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2, duration of ICU stay, total ventilator days, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Results Mortality was increased when hydroxylethyl starch (HES was used in the first day or plasma substitutes were used during the first 3 days (P3000 ml during the first 24 hours or >8000 ml during the first 72 hours were associated with higher SOFA scores at 24 and 72 hours (P<0.05, both comparisons. Colloid, especially higher volume colloid use was also associated with increased SOFA scores at either 24 or 72 hours. Conclusions Limiting the use of colloids and the total amount of fluid administered to patients with ARDS is associated with improved mortality and SOFA scores.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension due to acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    S.A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to describe the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, to characterize their hemodynamic cardiopulmonary profiles, and to correlate these parameters with outcome. All consecutive patients over 16 years of age who were in the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of ARDS and an in situ pulmonary artery catheter for hemodynamic monitoring were studied. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was >25 mmHg at rest with a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure or left atrial pressure <15 mmHg. During the study period, 30 of 402 critically ill patients (7.46% who were admitted to the ICU fulfilled the criteria for ARDS. Of the 30 patients with ARDS, 14 met the criteria for pulmonary hypertension, a prevalence of 46.6% (95% CI; 28-66%. The most common cause of ARDS was pneumonia (56.3%. The overall mortality was 36.6% and was similar in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Differences in patients' hemodynamic profiles were influenced by the presence of pulmonary hypertension. The levels of positive end-expiratory pressure and peak pressure were higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and the PaCO2 was higher in those who died. The level of airway pressure seemed to influence the onset of pulmonary hypertension. Survival was determined by the severity of organ failure at admission to the intensive care unit.

  1. Prognostic modeling in pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vandana; Dhawan, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the only proven treatment for pediatric acute liver failure (PALF). However, over a period of time, spontaneous native liver survival is increasingly reported, making us wonder if we are overtransplanting children with acute liver failure (ALF). An effective prognostic model for PALF would help direct appropriate organ allocation. Only patients who would die would undergo LT, and those who would spontaneously recover would avoid unnecessary LT. Deriving and validating such a model for PALF, however, encompasses numerous challenges. In particular, the heterogeneity of age and etiology in PALF, as well as a lack of understanding of the natural history of the disease, contributed by the availability of LT has led to difficulties in prognostic model development. Several prognostic laboratory variables have been identified, and the incorporation of these variables into scoring systems has been attempted. A reliable targeted prognostic model for ALF in Wilson's disease has been established and externally validated. The roles of physiological, immunological, and metabolomic parameters in prognosis are being investigated. This review discusses the challenges with prognostic modeling in PALF and describes predictive methods that are currently available and in development for the future. Liver Transplantation 22 1418-1430 2016 AASLD. © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Nutritional management of acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, Wilfred

    2005-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with fundamental alterations of metabolism and immunocompetence with the induction of a pro-oxidative and proinflammatory state. Thus, the objectives of nutritional therapy include not only conventional goals such as maintaining lean body mass and stimulating immunocompetence and repair functions, but also mitigating the inflammatory state and improving the oxygen radical scavenging system and endothelial functions. Moreover, pre-existing and/or hospital-acquired malnutrition has been identified as an important factor contributing to the persistent high mortality in acutely ill patients with ARF. A nutritional program for a patient with ARF must consider not only the specific metabolic consequences associated with renal failure and with the underlying disease process, but also the profound alterations in nutrient balances induced by replacement therapy. Nutrient requirements thus may differ widely between individual patients and during the course of disease, and nutrition therapy must be coordinated with renal replacement therapy. Whenever possible, enteral nutrition should be provided in patients with ARF because even small amounts of luminal nutrients will help to maintain intestinal function. Nevertheless, in many patients parenteral nutrition, at least supplementary and/or temporarily, will become necessary. Because of the complex alterations in the use of various nutrients and the impaired tolerance to electrolytes and volume load, metabolic complications of nutritional support frequently occur in patients with ARF. Therefore, nutrition therapy must be more closely monitored in patients with ARF than with other diseases.

  3. Clinical and high-resolution computed tomographic findings in five patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who developed respiratory failure following chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, Masanori; Sakatani, Mitsunori

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who developed respiratory failure after starting chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clinical records, chest radiographs, and HRCT findings in five patients with non-miliary pulmonary tuberculosis who developed respiratory failure after starting chemotherapy were reviewed. RESULTS: Chest radiographs taken early in the course of acute respiratory failure showed progression of the original lesions with (n = 4) or without (n = 1) new areas of opacity away from the site of the original lesions. HRCT demonstrated widespread ground-glass attenuation with a reticular pattern as well as segmental or lobar consolidation with cavitation and nodules, consistent with active tuberculous foci in all five cases. Prominent interlobular septal thickening was seen in two cases. Four of the five patients had received corticosteroids. Of these five, two died and three recovered with continued corticosteroid therapy. Transbronchial biopsy in three cases showed evidence of acute alveolar damage. CONCLUSION: In selected patients with tuberculosis who develop respiratory failure following the initiation of antituberculous therapy, HRCT may be a helpful adjunct to clinical evaluation in differentiating hypersensitivity reactions (presumed to be due to the release of mycobacterial antigens) from other pulmonary complications. Akira, M. and Sakatani, M. (2001)

  4. Acute intermittent hypoxia induced neural plasticity in respiratory motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Tao; Fong, Angelina Y; Bautista, Tara G; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2013-09-01

    Respiratory neural networks can adapt to rapid environmental change or be altered over the long term by various inputs. The mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing remain unclear. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)-induced respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF) is one of the most extensively studied types of respiratory plasticity. Acute intermittent hypoxia-induced LTF is present in several respiratory motor outputs, innervating both pump muscles (i.e. diaphragm) and valve muscles (i.e. tongue, pharynx and larynx). Long-term facilitation is present in various species, including humans, and the expression of LTF is influenced by gender, age and genetics. Serotonin plays a key role in initiating and modulating plasticity at the level of respiratory motor neurons. Recently, multiple intracellular pathways have been elucidated that are capable of giving rise to respiratory LTF. These mainly activate the metabolic receptors coupled to Gq ('Q' pathway) and Gs ('S' pathway) proteins. Herein, we discuss AIH-induced respiratory LTF in animals and humans, as well as recent advances in our understanding of the synaptic and intracellular pathways underlying this form of plasticity. We also discuss the potential to use intermittent hypoxia to induce functional recovery following cervical spinal injury. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Failure due to Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Maggi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome caused by skeletal muscle cells destruction which can occur for many reasons, including prolonged immobilization. The main complication of the syndrome is the development of acute renal failure. Rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria are responsible for approximately 5% of all causes of acute renal failure in the USA. The cause of rhabdomyolysis is often multifactorial, and approximately 8–20% of such patients develop myoglobinuric acute renal failure.

  6. Intercostal and forearm muscle deoxygenation during respiratory fatigue in patients with heart failure: potential role of a respiratory muscle metaboreflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A M; Castro, R R T; Silva, B M; Villacorta, H; Sant'Anna Junior, M; Nóbrega, A C L

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle fatigue on intercostal and forearm muscle perfusion and oxygenation in patients with heart failure. Five clinically stable heart failure patients with respiratory muscle weakness (age, 66 ± 12 years; left ventricle ejection fraction, 34 ± 3%) and nine matched healthy controls underwent a respiratory muscle fatigue protocol, breathing against a fixed resistance at 60% of their maximal inspiratory pressure for as long as they could sustain the predetermined inspiratory pressure. Intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume and oxygenation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy with transducers placed on the seventh left intercostal space and the left forearm. Data were compared by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Respiratory fatigue occurred at 5.1 ± 1.3 min in heart failure patients and at 9.3 ± 1.4 min in controls (P0.05). Respiratory fatigue in heart failure reduced intercostal and forearm muscle blood volume (Pmuscles (heart failure, -4.5 ± 0.5%; controls, +0.5 ± 0.8%; Pfatigue in patients with heart failure causes an oxygen demand/delivery mismatch in respiratory muscles, probably leading to a reflex reduction in peripheral limb muscle perfusion, featuring a respiratory metaboreflex.

  7. O papel da ventilação líquida no tratamento da insuficiência respiratória aguda em crianças - uma revisão sistemática The role of liquid ventilation in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in children - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Freitas Góes

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A ventilação líquida consiste no preenchimento total ou parcial dos pulmões por líquido (perfluorocarbono, eliminando a interface ar-líquido da membrana alveolar e reduzindo a tensão superficial em pulmões com deficiência de surfactante. Este trabalho tem como objetivo avaliar o papel da ventilação líquida no tratamento da insuficiência respiratória aguda em crianças. MÉTODOS: A técnica empregada foi uma revisão sistemática da literatura sobre ventilação líquida. O levantamento bibliográfico utilizou os bancos de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, COCHRANE LIBRARY e referências de artigos. Os termos utilizados para pesquisa foram: liquid ventilation, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia e acute respiratory distress syndrome. Foram procurados ensaios clínicos randômicos, estudos de coorte, caso-controle e série de casos. Os desfechos avaliados foram resposta sobre a oxigenação sangüínea, mecânica respiratória e a sobrevida dos pacientes. RESULTADOS: Foram selecionadas 284 publicações relacionadas à ventilação líquida durante o período de estudo. Destas, 22 (7,7% eram ensaios clínicos, e apenas seis referiam-se à utilização da ventilação líquida em crianças. Todas as seis publicações foram caracterizadas como série de casos e analisadas separadamente. CONCLUSÃO: A partir da análise dos estudos clínicos, pôde-se concluir que, pela falta de estudos clínicos randômicos e controlados, a ventilação líquida não pode ser recomendada como terapia para insuficiência respiratória aguda em pediatria.BACKGROUND: Liquid Ventilation consists of partially or completely filling the lungs with a fluid (perfluorcarbon. This brings about elimination of the air-liquid interface and reduction of the surface tension in lungs with surfactant deficiency. This article focuses on the role of liquid ventilation in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in

  8. "ACUTE LIVER FAILURE" : THE HEART MAY BE THE MATTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, K.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; van der Berg, A. P.; Ligtenberg, J. J. M.; Tulleken, J. E.; Zijlstra, J. G.; Meertens, John H. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis secondary to heart failure is a known and treatable cause of liver failure. The diagnosis may be difficult, especially when symptoms of heart failure are absent. We present two patients who were transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of acute liver failure to be screened

  9. Respiratory sound energy and its distribution patterns following clinical improvement of congestive heart failure: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Baumann, Brigitte M; Slutsky, Karen; Gruber, Karen N; Jean, Smith

    2010-01-15

    Although congestive heart failure (CHF) patients typically present with abnormal auscultatory findings on lung examination, respiratory sounds are not normally subjected to additional analysis. The aim of this pilot study was to examine respiratory sound patterns of CHF patients using acoustic-based imaging technology. Lung vibration energy was examined during acute exacerbation and after clinical improvement. Respiratory sounds throughout the respiratory cycle were captured using an acoustic-based imaging technique. Twenty-three consecutive CHF patients were imaged at the time of presentation to the emergency department and after clinical improvement. Digital images were created (a larger image represents more homogeneously distributed vibration energy of respiratory sound). Geographical area of the images and respiratory sound patterns were quantitatively analyzed. Data from the CHF patients were also compared to healthy volunteers. The median (interquartile range) geographical areas of the vibration energy image of acute CHF patients without and with radiographically evident pulmonary edema were 66.9 (9.0) and 64.1(9.0) kilo-pixels, respectively (p < 0.05). After clinical improvement, the geographical area of the vibration energy image of CHF patients without and with radiographically evident pulmonary edema were increased by 18 +/- 15% (p < 0.05) and 25 +/- 16% (p < 0.05), respectively. With clinical improvement of acute CHF exacerbations, there was more homogenous distribution of lung vibration energy, as demonstrated by the increased geographical area of the vibration energy image.

  10. Respiratory sound energy and its distribution patterns following clinical improvement of congestive heart failure: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Karen N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although congestive heart failure (CHF patients typically present with abnormal auscultatory findings on lung examination, respiratory sounds are not normally subjected to additional analysis. The aim of this pilot study was to examine respiratory sound patterns of CHF patients using acoustic-based imaging technology. Lung vibration energy was examined during acute exacerbation and after clinical improvement. Methods Respiratory sounds throughout the respiratory cycle were captured using an acoustic-based imaging technique. Twenty-three consecutive CHF patients were imaged at the time of presentation to the emergency department and after clinical improvement. Digital images were created (a larger image represents more homogeneously distributed vibration energy of respiratory sound. Geographical area of the images and respiratory sound patterns were quantitatively analyzed. Data from the CHF patients were also compared to healthy volunteers. Results The median (interquartile range geographical areas of the vibration energy image of acute CHF patients without and with radiographically evident pulmonary edema were 66.9 (9.0 and 64.1(9.0 kilo-pixels, respectively (p p p Conclusions With clinical improvement of acute CHF exacerbations, there was more homogenous distribution of lung vibration energy, as demonstrated by the increased geographical area of the vibration energy image.

  11. Intensive Care Management of Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfi, Riad; Abulebda, Kamal; Nitu, Mara E; Molleston, Jean P; Bozic, Molly A; Subbarao, Girish

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure is rare but life-threatening illness that occurs in children without preexisting liver disease. The rarity of the disease, along with its severity and heterogeneity, presents unique clinical challenges to the physicians providing care for pediatric patients with acute liver failure. In this review, practical clinical approaches to the care of critically ill children with acute liver failure are discussed with an organ system-specific approach. The underlying pathophysiological processes, major areas of uncertainty, and approaches to the critical care management of pediatric acute liver failure are also reviewed.

  12. DiapHRaGM: A mnemonic to describe the work of breathing in patients with respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulaimat, Aiman; Trick, William E

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of the work of breathing in the definitions of respiratory failure is vague and variable. Identify a parsimonious set of signs to describe the work of breathing in hypoxemic, acutely ill patients. We examined consecutive medical ICU patients receiving oxygen with a mask, non-invasive ventilation, or T-piece. A physician inspected each patient for 10 seconds, rated the level of respiratory distress, and then examined the patient for vital signs and 17 other physical signs. We used the rating of distress as a surrogate for measuring the work of breathing, constructed three multivariate models to identify the one with the smallest number of signs and largest explained variance, and validated it with bootstrap analysis. We performed 402 observations on 240 patients. Respiratory distress was absent in 78, mild in 157, moderate in 107, and severe in 60. Respiratory rate, hypoxia, heart rate, and frequency of most signs increased as distress increased. Respiratory rate and hypoxia explained 43% of the variance in respiratory distress. Diaphoresis, gasping, and contraction of the sternomastoid explained an additional 28%. Heart rate, blood pressure, alertness, agitation, body posture, nasal flaring, audible breathing, cyanosis, tracheal tug, retractions, paradox, scalene or abdominal muscles contraction did not increase the explained variance in respiratory distress. Most of the variance is respiratory distress can be explained by five signs summarized by the mnemonic DiapHRaGM (diaphoresis, hypoxia, respiratory rate, gasping, accessory muscle). This set of signs may allow for efficient, standardized assessments of the work of breathing of hypoxic patients.

  13. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  14. Acute respiratory infections among returning Hajj pilgrims-Jordan, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa; Rha, Brian; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Payne, Daniel C; Iblan, Ibrahim; Binder, Alison M; Haddadin, Aktham; Nsour, Mohannad Al; Alsanouri, Tarek; Mofleh, Jawad; Whitaker, Brett; Lindstrom, Stephen L; Tong, Suxiang; Ali, Sami Sheikh; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Berman, LaShondra; Zhang, Jing; Erdman, Dean D; Gerber, Susan I

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has prompted enhanced surveillance for respiratory infections among pilgrims returning from the Hajj, one of the largest annual mass gatherings in the world. To describe the epidemiology and etiologies of respiratory illnesses among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj. Surveillance for respiratory illness among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj was conducted at sentinel health care facilities using epidemiologic surveys and molecular diagnostic testing of upper respiratory specimens for multiple respiratory pathogens, including MERS-CoV. Among the 125 subjects, 58% tested positive for at least one virus; 47% tested positive for rhino/enterovirus. No cases of MERS-CoV were detected. The majority of pilgrims returning to Jordan from the 2014 Hajj with respiratory illness were determined to have a viral etiology, but none were due to MERS-CoV. A greater understanding of the epidemiology of acute respiratory infections among returning travelers to other countries after Hajj should help optimize surveillance systems and inform public health response practices. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. New Combined Scoring System for Predicting Respiratory Failure in Iraqi Patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome

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    Zaki Noah Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is an acute post-infective autoimmune polyradiculoneuropathy, it is the commonest peripheral neuropathy causing respiratory failure. The aim of the study is to use the New Combined Scoring System in anticipating respiratory failure in order to perform elective measures without waiting for emergency situations to occur.
    Patients and methods: Fifty patients with GBS were studied. Eight clinical parameters (including progression of patients to maximum weakness, respiratory rate/minute, breath holding
    count (the number of digits the patient can count in holding his breath, presence of facial muscle weakness (unilateral or bilateral, presence of weakness of the bulbar muscle, weakness of the neck flexor muscle, and limbs weakness were assessed for each patient and a certain score was given to
    each parameter, a designed combined score being constructed by taking into consideration all the above mentioned clinical parameters. Results and discussion: Fifteen patients (30% that were enrolled in our study developed respiratory failure. There was a highly significant statistical association between the development of respiratory failure and the lower grades of (bulbar muscle weakness score, breath holding count scores, neck muscle weakness score, lower limbs and upper limbs weakness score , respiratory rate score and the total sum score above 16 out of 30 (p-value=0.000 . No significant statistical difference was found regarding the progression to maximum weakness (p-value=0.675 and facial muscle weakness (p-value=0.482.
    Conclusion: The patients who obtained a combined score (above 16’30 are at great risk of having respiratory failure.

  16. Acute Renal Failure in Dengue Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakrani, Girish Pamappa; Subramanyam, Nambakam Tanuja

    2017-01-01

    Acute Renal Failure (RF) is a rare but well recognized complication of Dengue Infection (DI). There has been paucity of published data regarding renal involvement in DI. The aim of the present study was to elucidate different clinical presentations, disease outcomes of DI. To study the frequency, severity and predictors of RF in DI. Patients diagnosed either as Dengue Fever (DF) or Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) respectively were enrolled for this study. The diagnostic criteria for DI were febrile illness associated with one of the following: 1) detection of dengue-specific IgM capture antibody or Non-Structural Protein1 (NS1) antigen; or 2) a four-fold or greater increase of dengue-specific IgG capture antibody by ELISA and haemoagglutination inhibition assay. Patients were diagnosed as having Acute RF, if serum creatinine was >1.2 mg/dl or who showed improvement by 50% in serum creatinine from the initial value. It is an observational study of medical charts, data of age, gender, and medical history of any underlying diseases in association with the severity of DI of each patient recorded. All of the laboratory results were collected. Parameters that influenced the clinical presentations and outcomes for development of classical DF or DHF/DSS in patients with or without RF were analysed and compared. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was carried. The Statistical software namely SAS 9.2, SPSS 15.0, Stata 10.1, Med Calc 9.0.1, Systat 12.0 and R environment ver.2.11.1 were used. Most common symptoms were fever followed by headache and pain in abdomen. Among the patients with RF, all patients had recovery. The patients with DHF/DSS were more susceptible to develop renal failure compared to DF group. There were statistically significant higher frequencies of renal failure, haemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, low serum cholesterol. Patients in the RF group also had significantly higher percentages of shock, haemoconcentration

  17. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making. PMID:27925054

  18. Respiratory Complications from Acute Corrosive Poisonings in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibishev, Andon A.; Simonovska, Natasa; Bozinovska, Cvetanka; Pereska, Zanina; Smokovski, Ivica; Glasnovic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute corrosive poisonings are caused by ingestion of corrosive chemicals which are most commonly used as household agents. Intoxications with these kind of agents produce numerous and severe post-corrosive complications of the upper gastrointestinal tract. On the other hand, our experience showed that corrosive agents may also cause injuries of the respiratory system, which makes the treatment very hard and additionally complicates the severe clinical condition of the patient. Objective: The aim of the study is to show the incidence of respiratory complications in acute corrosive poisonings, the need of various clinical investigations and also the treatment and final outcome of these kind of poisoning. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical records of 415 patients hospitalized and treated at the University clinic for toxicology and urgent internal medicine, in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, in the period between 2007 and 2011. The protocol consisted of methods for analyzing the systemic complications, with an accent on the post-corrosive respiratory complications. Results: From the total number of patients even 98 (23.61%) exhibited systemic complications, from which 51 (52.04%) are respiratory complications. The majority of patients are female (n=40, 78.43%) and the most common complication is pneumonia (n=47). The youngest patient in this study was 14 and the oldest was 87 years old. Conclusion: Besides the gastrointestinal complications in the acute corrosive poisonings respiratory complications are also very often. They complicate the clinical state of patient and very often lead to fatal endings. PMID:24944527

  19. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making.

  20. Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation in the management of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) refractory respiratory failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Das, J P

    2011-03-01

    Rapidly progressive acute respiratory failure attributed to 2009 H1N1 influenza A infection has been reported worldwide-3. Refractory hypoxaemia despite conventional mechanical ventilation and lung protective strategies has resulted in the use a combination of rescue therapies, such as conservative fluid management, prone positioning, inhaled nitric oxide, high frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)4. ECMO allows for pulmonary or cardiopulmonary support as an adjunct to respiratory and cardiac failure, minimising ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). This permits treatment of the underlying disease process, while concurrently allowing for recovery of the acute lung injury. This case documents a previously healthy twenty-two year old Asian male patient with confirmed pandemic (H 1N1) 2009 influenza A who was successfully managed with ECMO in the setting of severe refractory hypoxaemia and progressive hypercapnia.

  1. Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation in the management of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) refractory respiratory failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Das, J P

    2012-02-01

    Rapidly progressive acute respiratory failure attributed to 2009 H1N1 influenza A infection has been reported worldwide-3. Refractory hypoxaemia despite conventional mechanical ventilation and lung protective strategies has resulted in the use a combination of rescue therapies, such as conservative fluid management, prone positioning, inhaled nitric oxide, high frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)4. ECMO allows for pulmonary or cardiopulmonary support as an adjunct to respiratory and cardiac failure, minimising ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). This permits treatment of the underlying disease process, while concurrently allowing for recovery of the acute lung injury. This case documents a previously healthy twenty-two year old Asian male patient with confirmed pandemic (H 1N1) 2009 influenza A who was successfully managed with ECMO in the setting of severe refractory hypoxaemia and progressive hypercapnia.

  2. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Fernandes-Matano

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections.This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR.The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%. The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8% and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%. A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9% caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age.In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  3. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  4. Ceftriaxone and acute renal failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhou, Xuefeng; Yuan, Jiyan; Chen, Guiying; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical profile, treatment, and outcome of ceftriaxone-associated postrenal acute renal failure (PARF) in children. We retrospectively studied 31 consecutive cases from 2003 to 2012 for PARF after ceftriaxone treatment. There was no past history of urolithiasis or nephropathy in these children. The average time of ceftriaxone administration before PARF was 5.2 days. The major symptoms apart from anuria included flank pain (>3 years old, 25/25), excessive crying (Ceftriaxone was verified to be the main component of the calculi in 4 children by tandem mass spectrometric analysis. The recovery was complete in all cases. Ceftriaxone therapy in children may cause PARF. Early diagnosis and prompt pharmacological therapy are important in relieving the condition. Retrograde ureteral catheterization is an effective treatment of those who fail to respond to pharmacotherapy.

  5. Acute renal failure secondary to rhabdomyolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Han, M.C.; Kim, S.; Lee, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    MR imaging of the kidney was performed in 6 patients with acute renal failure (ARF) secondary to rhabdomyolysis caused by snake bite (n = 4), crush injury (n = 1), and carbon monoxide poisoning (n = 1). A test for urine myoglobin was positive in all 6 patients and MR imaging was done 6 to 18 days after the causative event of the rhabdomyolysis. MR images in all 6 patients showed globular swelling of the kidneys, preserved corticomedullary contrast on T1-weighted images, and obliteration of corticomedullary contrast on T2-weighted images. Unlike other medical renal diseases in which corticomedullary contrast is lost on T1-weighted images, preservation of the corticomedullary contrast on T1-weighted MR images with globular renal swelling was a constant finding in patients with ARF secondary to rhabdomyolysis. (orig.)

  6. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated

  7. Vitamin A status, other risk factors and acute respiratory infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-01-01

    Jan 1, 1997 ... Objective. This study evaluated the association between vitamin A status and the severity of acute respiratory infections (AAIs) in children, controlling for the influence of other known AAI risk factors. Design. Case control study_. Setting. Ambulatory and hospital-based stUdy. Patients. Severe cases (N = 35) ...

  8. Acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Upper respiratory tract infections (UTRIs), which may be complicated by acute otitis media (AOM), account for a large number of visits to the primary physician especially in the developed world. Materials and Methods: This study aims to determine the knowledge and treatment outcomes of UTRIs complicated ...

  9. Cleaved caspase-3 in lung epithelium of children who died with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; van der Loos, Chris M.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Bos, Albert P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining in lung epithelial cells in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. DESIGN: Observational study in sixteen children who died with acute respiratory distress syndrome and diffuse alveolar damage. SETTING: Pediatric

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, metabolic acidosis, and respiratory acidosis associated with citalopram overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa Edriss

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a 53-year-old man who ingested 2400 mg of citalopram and presented to the emergency department three hours post-ingestion with altered mental status, somnolence, and a blood pressure of 67/45 mmHg. He failed to respond to three boluses of normal saline (1000 ml each and required vasopressors. The patient developed serotonin syndrome with hyper-reflexia, rigidity, and ankle myoclonus. He had a tonic-clonic seizure in the ER requiring intravenous lorazepam and phenytoin. An ECG showed QT prolongation. Chest x-ray on presentation was normal. Within 32 hours the patient developed acute respiratory distress, hypoxemia, a wide A-a gradient, PaO2/FiO2< 200, and chest x-ray changes compatible with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. He had normal central venous pressures, normal cardiac biomarkers, normal systolic and diastolic functions on echocardiography, and no acute ST/T wave changes. His ABG showed a metabolic acidosis and a respiratory acidosis. The patient required intubation and ventilation. Citalopram has been associated with seizures and ECG abnormalities after overdoses. The respiratory complications and metabolic acidosis have been reported only a few times in the literature.  We are reporting the second case of ARDS and the fifth case of metabolic acidosis due to citalopram overdose and suggest that the metabolic acidemia is explained by propionic acid. The respiratory acidosis seen in this patient has not been reported previously.

  11. Respiratory Failure in Premature Babies Born from Multiple Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the factors that are responsible for the development of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS and the specific features of its course in preterm twin neonates. Subjects and methods. Twenty-three patients who had had twin pregnancy, including 9 (39.1% and 14 (60% with monochorial and bichorial biamniotic twin pregnancies, respectively, were examined. Their mean age was 28.5±5.4 years. Obstetric and gynecologic histories, conditions at conception, the course of pregnancy, the type of pla-centation, and fetal presentation were considered. The placentas were morphologically examined. In all the patients, pregnancy ended in birth of 46 premature neonates, of them there were 19 (41.3% boys and 27 (58.7% girls. The gestational age of the neonates averaged 31.7±2.3 weeks. The evaluation of the efficiency of performed therapy used clinical assessment of the status of the premature neonates; measurement of partial oxygen tension (pO2 and calculation of alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (A-a DO2, respiratory index (RI, and oxygenation index (OI; death rates were analyzed. Results. The main cause of respiratory failure (RF was RDS in premature twins. Neonatal blood aspiration-caused pneumonia occurred in one case. The course of RDS was variable. Most neonatal infants needed exogenous surfactant replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation (MV. No signs of RF were present in 7 (15.2% premature neonates. Conclusion. Premature twins are a high RDS risk group. The unfavorable factors that contribute to the development of the disease are multiple pregnancy, a past maternal obstetric history, in-vitro fertilization-induced pregnancy, severe gestosis in the second half of pregnancy, and preterm delivery. The type of placentation affects the fetal status after birth. Fatal outcome occurred in infants from the monochorial bioamniotic twins. In multiple pregnancies, there are pathological changes in the placenta, its membranes, and umbilical

  12. ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION IN CHILDREN IN THE AGE ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Rovny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of laboratory-confirmed acute respiratory syncytial virus infection (ARSVI are described in 221 children of the age from 1 month to 5 years. Febrile fever has been recorded in 76% of patients with ARSVI, and significantly more often in children in the second year of life (92%, but the difference in the temerature or duration has not been found. 98% of children have had symptoms of the lower respiratory tract lesions. The most common ARSVI manifestations in the patients of the first year of life were obstructive diseases of the lower respiratory tract (obstructive bronchitis in 53% and bronchiolitis in 11% of children, in the patients of the second year of life — pneumonia (28%, p < 0,05 and catarrhal otitis (26%; p < 0,05. Bronchial obstruction syndrome in children of the first year of life was characterized by the significantly higher frequency (73% and the maximal duration (9,7 ± 1,08 days. The largest number of cases of the severe respiratory failure has been recorded among patients of the second year of life (3 degree of respiratory failure in 22% of patients, p < 0,05.

  13. Worsening renal function definition is insufficient for evaluating acute renal failure in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakabe, Akihiro; Hata, Noritake; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Okazaki, Hirotake; Matsushita, Masato; Shibata, Yusaku; Nishigoori, Suguru; Uchiyama, Saori; Asai, Kuniya; Shimizu, Wataru

    2018-02-01

    Whether or not the definition of a worsening renal function (WRF) is adequate for the evaluation of acute renal failure in patients with acute heart failure is unclear. One thousand and eighty-three patients with acute heart failure were analysed. A WRF, indicated by a change in serum creatinine ≥0.3 mg/mL during the first 5 days, occurred in 360 patients while no-WRF, indicated by a change failure; n = 98). The patients were assigned to another set of four groups: no-WRF/no-AKI (n = 512), no-WRF/AKI (n = 211), WRF/no-AKI (n = 239), and WRF/AKI (n = 121). A multivariate logistic regression model found that no-WRF/AKI and WRF/AKI were independently associated with 365 day mortality (hazard ratio: 1.916; 95% confidence interval: 1.234-2.974 and hazard ratio: 3.622; 95% confidence interval: 2.332-5.624). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the rate of any-cause death during 1 year was significantly poorer in the no-WRF/AKI and WRF/AKI groups than in the WRF/no-AKI and no-WRF/no-AKI groups and in Class I and Class F than in Class R and the no-AKI group. The presence of AKI on admission, especially Class I and Class F status, is associated with a poor prognosis despite the lack of a WRF within the first 5 days. The prognostic ability of AKI on admission may be superior to WRF within the first 5 days. © 2018 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  14. Systemic sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure: about 12 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis affecting most frequently the lungs and the mediastinum. An acute renal failure reveals exceptionally this disease. It's a retrospective study implicating 12 cases of sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to determine epidemiological, clinical, ...

  15. Acute renal failure in high dose carboplatin chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Kool, G.; de Kraker, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboplatin has been reported to cause acute renal failure when administered in high doses to adult patients. We report a 4 1/2-year-old girl who was treated with high-dose carboplatin for metastatic parameningeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Acute renal failure developed followed by a slow partial

  16. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebistorf, Fabienne; Karam, Oliver; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF) and mostly acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions. AHRF results from several systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in individuals of all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has been...... used to improve oxygenation, but its role remains controversial. This Cochrane review was originally published in 2003, and has been updated in 2010 and 2016. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to examine the effects of administration of inhaled nitric oxide on mortality in adults and children...... data and resolved disagreements by discussion. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. We performed several subgroup and sensitivity analyses to assess the effects of INO in adults and children and on various clinical and physiological outcomes. We presented pooled estimates of the effects...

  17. Predictors of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients with Paraquat Intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hu, Ching-Chih; Lin, Ja-Liang; Lin-Tan, Dan-Tzu; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Paraquat poisoning is characterized by acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory failure, and multi-organ failure, resulting in a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to identify predictors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cases of paraquat poisoning and determine the association between these parameters. Materials and Methods In total, 187 patients were referred for management of intentional paraquat ingestion between 2000 and 2010. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) scores were collected, and predictors of ARDS were analyzed. Results The overall mortality rate for the entire population was 54% (101/187). Furthermore, the mortality rate was higher in the ARDS patients than in the non-ARDS patients (80% vs. 43.80%, Pparaquat concentrations (Pparaquat concentrations (P=0.01) for predicting ARDS. Conclusions The analytical results indicate that SOFA48-h scores, blood paraquat concentrations, and steroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapies are significantly associated with ARDS complications after paraquat intoxication. PMID:24349340

  18. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

  19. Obstructive acute renal failure by severe gastric distension after binge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Julie; Lvovschi, Virginie; Joly, Luc-Marie

    2017-08-01

    Binge eating occurs in patients with eating disorders and can result in metabolic complications, leading to gastric rupture or necrosis. However, organ failure as acute renal failure is rarely observed. We report the case of an overeating episode resulting in massive gastric dilatation and acute renal failure with abdominal pressure and bilateral ureteral obstruction. The outcome was favorable with gastric aspiration and fasting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Host gene expression classifiers diagnose acute respiratory illness etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Henao, Ricardo; Nichols, Marshall; Burke, Thomas; Ko, Emily R; McClain, Micah T; Hudson, Lori L; Mazur, Anna; Freeman, Debra H; Veldman, Tim; Langley, Raymond J; Quackenbush, Eugenia B; Glickman, Seth W; Cairns, Charles B; Jaehne, Anja K; Rivers, Emanuel P; Otero, Ronny M; Zaas, Aimee K; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Lucas, Joseph; Fowler, Vance G; Carin, Lawrence; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Woods, Christopher W

    2016-01-20

    Acute respiratory infections caused by bacterial or viral pathogens are among the most common reasons for seeking medical care. Despite improvements in pathogen-based diagnostics, most patients receive inappropriate antibiotics. Host response biomarkers offer an alternative diagnostic approach to direct antimicrobial use. This observational cohort study determined whether host gene expression patterns discriminate noninfectious from infectious illness and bacterial from viral causes of acute respiratory infection in the acute care setting. Peripheral whole blood gene expression from 273 subjects with community-onset acute respiratory infection (ARI) or noninfectious illness, as well as 44 healthy controls, was measured using microarrays. Sparse logistic regression was used to develop classifiers for bacterial ARI (71 probes), viral ARI (33 probes), or a noninfectious cause of illness (26 probes). Overall accuracy was 87% (238 of 273 concordant with clinical adjudication), which was more accurate than procalcitonin (78%, P diagnostic platforms to combat inappropriate antibiotic use and emerging antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Measles and respiratory failure: Case report and review of the last European outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonel Lagunes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Measles is an preventable acute viral illness, with the potential for severe and fatal complications. According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control in the last surveillance report, a total of 10 271 cases of measles were reported from January to December 2013. And 127 of those were reported in Spain with a 2.7/1 million habitants rate. In 2010, the World Health Organization European Region made a new commitment to eradicate measles by 2015 in the zone, however, measles cases and outbreaks are still occurring in many countries. We present the last 2 cases with severe measles-associated respiratory failure and a review of the literature of the last European outbreaks. Two young adults were admitted in the intensive care unit due to respiratory failure with a confirmed measles infection. Both treated with high flow nasal cannula during 3 to 5 days; one had a pneumococcal pneumonia coinfection. An incomplete vaccination schedule was documented in one of them while the other did not remember his. Within 10 days of admission, both were discharged from intensive care unit and the hospital with no complications. Measles can present with a variety of symptoms in adults and is responsible for a high morbidity especially during outbreaks. Pneumonia is a severe complication of measles infection, commonly reported. Surveillance and vaccination programs should be strengthened in order to achieve measles elimination.

  2. Acute renal failure in premature neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doronjski Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Hemodynamic stress is the leading cause of acute renal failure (ARF in premature neonates. Incidence of ARF in this population is between 8 and 24%. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of presence of ARF in premature neonates, as well as its impact on their survival. Methods. A retrospective study of 114 premature neonates [(gestational age, GA less than 37 gestation weeks (gw] admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU at the Pediatric Clinic, Institute of Child and Youth Healthcare of Vojvodina in 2007 was conducted. Serum creatinine, urea and bilirubine were determined on the 3rd day of life in 65 newborns who met inclusion criteria. ARF was diagnosed in 16 newborns (n=16/65; 25%. Results. The premature neonates with ARF had significantly lower GA [<28 gw - 8/16 (50% vs. 5/49 (10%; p < 0.05], birth weight (BW (1 265 g vs. 1615 g; p < 0.05 and systolic blood pressure (43.37 mm Hg vs. 52.7 mmHg; p < 0.05 than ones without ARF. Non-olyguric ARF was diagnosed in 62% of newborns with ARF (n=10/16, while the rest had the olyguric type (n = 6/16; 38%. Twenty-five percent of premature neonates with ARF (n = 4/16 died in contrast to 10% of premature neonates without ARF (n = 5/49. ARF was treated conservatively in all but 3 cases when peritoneal dialysis was performed. Renal function has recovered completely in all of the survivors. In order to determine their predictivity in relation to ARF, following parameters were analyzed: GA, BW < 1 500 g, presence of concomitant sepsis and intracranial hemorrhage grade III/IV. BW < 1 500 g demonstrated the highest sensitivity (se 0.75, while GA < 28 gw, sepsis and intracranial hemorrhage grade III/IV showed high specificity (sp = 0.90, 0.89 0.88, respectively. Conclusion. Acute renal failure frequently occurs in population of premature neonates and requires meticulous fluid and electrolyte balance, especially in the case of low birth weight and extreme immaturity.

  3. [Acute renal failure in paediatric oncological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Joanna; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Rückemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna; Drozyńska-Duklas, Magdalena; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Balcerska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in children with malignancies is a rare clinical situation, but nonetheless it is a serious life threatening condition. It may arise from different clinical situations and may be caused by various factors. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency, aetiology and the course of ARF in children treated for malignancies in the Department of Pediatrics, Hematology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Gdansk. A group of 586 pediatric oncology patients treated between 1992 and 2004 were enrolled in a retrospective study. ARF was diagnosed in 29 cases including: 12 patients with prerenal course of ARF (11 due to septic shock and 1 due to dehydration), 16 patients with intrinsic renal aetiology of ARF (as a complication after cisplatinum and carboplatinum therapy in 2 children, in 2 cases after methotrexate, as a consequence of bilateral nephrectomy due to nephroblastoma in 1 patient and in 11 children with tumour lysis syndrome, including 5 patients with neoplasmatic infiltration of kidneys) and postrenal ARF in 1 patient as a first symptom of a tumour located in the small pelvis (Rhabdomyosarcoma). Renal replacement therapy (dialysis) was necessary in 11 children. Among 29 analysed children, in 20 cases renal failure was reversible. Due to appropriate treatment, ARF in course of tumour lysis syndrome is nowadays reversible. ARF due to septic shock or cytostatics nephrotoxicity is a significant therapeutic problem. In most of the cases it is irreversible. 1. ARF in these studies occurred in 29 out of 586 children with malignancies (4.9%). 2. Prerenal and renal ARF were the most frequent forms. 3. Implementation of tumour lysis prophylaxis in the treatment of children with blood system proliferative diseases reduces the incidence of ARF. 4. In cases of ARF in children's malignancies close cooperation between paediatric oncologist and nephrologist is necessary.

  4. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  5. Functional and histopathological identification of the respiratory failure in a DMSXL transgenic mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrica-Adrian Panaite

    2013-05-01

    Acute and chronic respiratory failure is one of the major and potentially life-threatening features in individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. Despite several clinical demonstrations showing respiratory problems in DM1 patients, the mechanisms are still not completely understood. This study was designed to investigate whether the DMSXL transgenic mouse model for DM1 exhibits respiratory disorders and, if so, to identify the pathological changes underlying these respiratory problems. Using pressure plethysmography, we assessed the breathing function in control mice and DMSXL mice generated after large expansions of the CTG repeat in successive generations of DM1 transgenic mice. Statistical analysis of breathing function measurements revealed a significant decrease in the most relevant respiratory parameters in DMSXL mice, indicating impaired respiratory function. Histological and morphometric analysis showed pathological changes in diaphragmatic muscle of DMSXL mice, characterized by an increase in the percentage of type I muscle fibers, the presence of central nuclei, partial denervation of end-plates (EPs and a significant reduction in their size, shape complexity and density of acetylcholine receptors, all of which reflect a possible breakdown in communication between the diaphragmatic muscles fibers and the nerve terminals. Diaphragm muscle abnormalities were accompanied by an accumulation of mutant DMPK RNA foci in muscle fiber nuclei. Moreover, in DMSXL mice, the unmyelinated phrenic afferents are significantly lower. Also in these mice, significant neuronopathy was not detected in either cervical phrenic motor neurons or brainstem respiratory neurons. Because EPs are involved in the transmission of action potentials and the unmyelinated phrenic afferents exert a modulating influence on the respiratory drive, the pathological alterations affecting these structures might underlie the respiratory impairment detected in DMSXL mice. Understanding

  6. Acute effects of urban air pollution on respiratory health of children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, S; Hoek, G; Boezen, H M; Schouten, Jan; van Wijnen, J H; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent different components of air pollution are associated with acute respiratory health effects in children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: During three consecutive winters starting in 1992-3, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and respiratory

  7. Interferon therapy of acute respiratory viral infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of nasal spray Laferobionum® (100,000 IU/ml in children with acute respiratory viral infections. Materials and methods. The study included 84 children aged 12 to 18 years. Children of the main group (42 persons received Laferobionum® spray in addition to the standard treatment for acute respiratory viral infections. The drug was administered to children of 12–14 years for 2 spray doses in each nasal passage 4–5 times a day at regular intervals (with the exception of sleep time, children aged 14–18 years received 3 spray-doses per each nasal passage 5–6 times a day at regular intervals (excluding sleep time. The course of treatment for all subjects was 5 days. Children of the control group received standard treatment for acute respiratory viral infections without Laferobionum®. Objective research included: auscultation of the heart and lungs, examination of the skin and mucous membranes, measurement of heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature. All patients underwent a general blood test, a general urinalysis, identification of the pathogen using the method of direct immunofluorescence (in smears taken from the nasal passages in the laboratory “Medical Diagnostic Center of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy”. Results. In the non-epidemic period, the respiratory syncytial virus and adenoviruses were the leading viral pathogens of acute respiratory viral infections. The main clinical manifestations of acute respiratory viral infection in the observed patients were signs of general inflammatory and catarrhal syndromes. All patients had not severe course of the disease. The data of the physical examination performed before the beginning of treatment indicated the absence of clinically significant deviations from the cardiovascular system in the children of the main and control groups. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate in the subjects of both groups were

  8. Repeated bedside echocardiography in children with respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehlicka Petr

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to verify the benefits and limitations of repeated bedside echocardiographic examinations in children during mechanical ventilation. For the purposes of this study, we selected the data of over a time period from 2006 to 2010. Methods A total of 235 children, average age 3.21 (SD 1.32 years were included into the study and divided into etiopathogenic groups. High-risk groups comprised: Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS, return of spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ROSC, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, cardiomyopathy (CMP and cardiopulmonary disease (CPD. Transthoracic echocardiography was carried out during mechanical ventilation. The following data were collated for statistical evaluation: right and left ventricle myocardial performance indices (RV MPI; LV MPI, left ventricle shortening fraction (SF, cardiac output (CO, and the mitral valve ratio of peak velocity of early wave (E to the peak velocity of active wave (A as E/A ratio. The data was processed after a period of recovery, i.e. one hour after the introduction of invasive lines (time-1 and after 72 hours of comprehensive treatment (time-2. The overall development of parameters over time was compared within groups and between groups using the distribution-free Wilcoxons and two-way ANOVA tests. Results A total of 870 echocardiographic examinations were performed. At time-1 higher average values of RV MPI (0.34, SD 0.01 vs. 0.21, SD 0.01; p Conclusion Echocardiography complements standard monitoring of valuable information regarding cardiac load in real time. Chest excursion during mechanical ventilation does not reduce the quality of the acquired data.

  9. Repeated bedside echocardiography in children with respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobr, Jiri; Fremuth, Jiri; Pizingerova, Katerina; Sasek, Lumir; Jehlicka, Petr; Fikrlova, Sarka; Slavik, Zdenek

    2011-04-26

    The aim of this study was to verify the benefits and limitations of repeated bedside echocardiographic examinations in children during mechanical ventilation. For the purposes of this study, we selected the data of over a time period from 2006 to 2010. A total of 235 children, average age 3.21 (SD 1.32) years were included into the study and divided into etiopathogenic groups. High-risk groups comprised: Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), return of spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ROSC), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), cardiomyopathy (CMP) and cardiopulmonary disease (CPD). Transthoracic echocardiography was carried out during mechanical ventilation. The following data were collated for statistical evaluation: right and left ventricle myocardial performance indices (RV MPI; LV MPI), left ventricle shortening fraction (SF), cardiac output (CO), and the mitral valve ratio of peak velocity of early wave (E) to the peak velocity of active wave (A) as E/A ratio. The data was processed after a period of recovery, i.e. one hour after the introduction of invasive lines (time-1) and after 72 hours of comprehensive treatment (time-2). The overall development of parameters over time was compared within groups and between groups using the distribution-free Wilcoxons and two-way ANOVA tests. A total of 870 echocardiographic examinations were performed. At time-1 higher average values of RV MPI (0.34, SD 0.01 vs. 0.21, SD 0.01; p mechanical ventilation does not reduce the quality of the acquired data.

  10. The management of acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo-Cotter, O; Bettari, L; Kleijn, L; Bugatti, S; Lombardi, C; Rund, M; Metra, M; Voors, A A; Cotter, G; Kaluski, E; Weatherley, B D

    2010-03-01

    Hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the burdensome aspects of 21st century medicine, leading to significant debilitating symptoms, high morbidity and mortality and consuming significant portion of the health care budget. Management of AHF is thought-provoking given the heterogeneity of the patient population, absence of a universally accepted definition, incomplete understanding of the pathophysiology and the beneficial and adverse effects of currently used therapies and lack of robust evidence-based guidelines. The article will discuss the clinical approach to the patients admitted with AHF, reviewing types of intervention (both approved and investigational) and will delineate their role and timing in specific AHF presentations. One of the challenges of AHF management is to effectively treat the subsets of patients with slow improvement or those with refractory AHF or early recurrence (worsening HF) during their initial admission. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are at increased risk for subsequent complications and adverse outcomes. Therefore, considerable efforts in AHF management should be directed towards this population. Regretfully, to date no specific targeted therapy was proven beneficial for these patients, being one of the leading reasons for the lack of improvement in AHF outcomes over the last 30 years.

  11. Early extracorporeal life support as rescue for Wegener granulomatosis with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Mark; Charles, Anthony G

    2011-12-01

    The study's objective was to report a case and review the literature on the use of extracorporeal life support in the face of severe pulmonary hemorrhage for acute respiratory distress syndrome. This study is a single case report of a pediatric patient who was successfully managed on venovenous extracorporeal life support for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with acute pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to Wegener disease. Extracorporeal life support can be used successfully in selected patients with respiratory failure with pulmonary hemorrhage. The cautious use of anticoagulation should be balanced with the risk of bleeding, mindful of the need for other measures to mitigate severe bleeding if this should occur.

  12. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complicating Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

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    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is endemic in tropic and subtropic areas, but is currently seldom encountered in developed area like Taiwan. We present an elder man with acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. There was no significant clue initially for diagnosing this patient as having S. stercoralis hyperinfection. Neither peripheral eosinophilia nor significant hemoptysis was noted. Bronchoscopy played a critical role to define the unexpected cause of his progressive pulmonary infiltrates. The correct diagnosis was soon made by recognition of the worm in bronchioloalveolar lavage cytology, and specific treatment was initiated promptly. For a septic patient with progressive pulmonary infiltrates, bronchoscopic studies including cytology may be necessary for defining the cause. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis should be considered as a cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompromised patient, especially with the presence of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms.

  13. Coccidioidomycosis: an unusual cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Veras, Kelson Nobre; Figueirêdo, Bruno C. de Souza; Martins, Liline Maria Soares; Vasconcelos, Jayro T. Paiva; Wanke, Bodo

    2003-01-01

    A male farmer, 20 years old, from the countryside of the State of Piauí, developed acute respiratory infection. Despite adequate antimicrobial therapy, his conditions worsened, requiring mechanical ventilation. His X-rays showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. His PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 58. Direct microscopy and culture of tracheal aspirates showed the presence of Coccidioides immitis. Autochthonous cases of coccidioidomycosis have only recently been described in Brazil, most of them from the Sta...

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Ge, Xupeng; Sun, Kai; Agopian, Vatche G; Wang, Yuelan; Yan, Min; Busuttil, Ronald W; Steadman, Randolph H; Xia, Victor W

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication with substantial mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the incidence, preoperative and intraoperative risk factors, and impact of ARDS on outcomes in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Adult OLT patients between January 2004 and October 2013 at our center were included. Postoperative ARDS was determined using the criteria proposed by the Berlin Definition. Multivariate logistic models were used to identify preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for ARDS. Of 1726 patients during the study period, 71 (4.1%) developed ARDS. In the preoperative model, encephalopathy (odds ratio [OR], 2.22; P = .022), preoperative requirement of intubation (OR, 2.06; P = .020), and total bilirubin (OR, 1.02; P = .003) were independent risk factors. In the intraoperative model, large pressor bolus was the sole risk factor for ARDS (OR, 2.69; P = .001). Postoperatively, patients with ARDS had a 2-fold increase in 1-year mortality, mechanical ventilation time, and length of hospital stay. Acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred at a rate of 4.1% following OLT in adult patients and was associated with preoperative encephalopathy, requirement of intubation, and total bilirubin and intraoperative large boluses of pressors. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was associated with increased mortality, longer ventilation time, and hospital stay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute renal failure in asphyxiated term neonates

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    Pejović Biljana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute renal failure (ARF is a frequent clinical condition in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. The leading cause of neonatal ARF is perinatal asphyxia (PS. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the degree of PS and the severity of ARF in term neonates. METHODS A prospective survey of 31 term neonates with Ps and but without congenital malformations or sepsis was performed in NICU of the regional Hospital of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Belgrade (average number of deliveries about 6000 per year. ARF was diagnosed in the first 7 days of life when plasma creatinine was above 133 μmοΙ/L for at least 48 hours while maternal renal function was normal. The degree of PS was determined according to Apgar score (AS at 1 min. The severe PS was defined as AS < 3 and moderate PS as AS 4-6. RESULTS Twenty neonates (64% had oliguric ARF with urine output of 0.37 ±0.16 ml/kg/h while the others had nonoliguric ARF with urine output of 2.4 ± 0.7 ml/kg/h. Most of neonates with oliguric ARF (65% had severe perinatal asphuxia while in those with nonoliguric ARF moderate perinatal asphyxia predominated (73%. DISCUSSION During hypoxic-ischaemic events many organs are injured, and the most vulnerable ones are kidneys and central nervous system. Our results showed a strong connection between perinatal asphyxia and A, which was in accordance with the results of other studies. Neonates with severe perinatal asphyxia had serious impairment of renal function, which was confirmed with strong correlation between Apgar score and plasma creatinine. In neonates with oliguric ARF, but not in those with nonoliguric ARF, the highly positive linear correlations were found between AS and urinary output (r = 0.77; p < 0.01, plasma creatinine (r = 0.78; p < 0.01, fractional excretion of sodium (r = 0.76; p < 0.01, and index of renal failure (r = 0.80; p < 0.01. Only in oliguric neonates with severe perinatal asphyxia (31 % the outcome was

  16. Correlations between respiratory and functional variables in heart failure

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    Fábio Cangeri Di Naso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory alterations can impact on the functional performance of patients with heart failure. Aim: To correlate maximum inspiratory muscular force and lung function variables with functional capacity in heart failure patients. Methods: A transversal study January-July 2007 with 42 chronic heart disease patients (28 males with no prior pulmonary illness. The patients were in New York Heart Association Functional Class I, II and III. The variables used were maximum inspiratory pressure, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second. Respiratory variables measured were distance covered in the six-minute walk test, NYHA functional class and the physical functioning domain of the Short Form-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire. Results: Maximum inspiratory pressure correlated with the six-minute walk test (r = 0.543 and p < 0.001, functional capacity (r = −0.566 and p < 0.001 and the physical functioning domain score of the Short Form-36 (r = 0.459 and p = 0.002. The same was true of forced vital capacity and the six-minute walk test (r = 0.501 and p = 0.001, functional capacity (r = −0.477 and p = 0.001 and Short Form-36 (r = 0.314 and p = 0.043 variables. Forced expiratory volume correlated with the distance covered in the six-minute walk test (r = 0.514 and p < 0.001 and functional capacity (r = −0.383 and p = 0.012. Conclusion: Lung function and inspiratory muscular force respiratory variables correlated with functional variables in patients with heart failure. Resumo: Fundamento: Alterações respiratórias podem influenciar o desempenho funcional em doentes com insuficiência cardíaca (IC. Objectivo: Correlacionar a força muscular inspiratória máxima (PImax e as variáveis da função pulmonar com a capacidade funcional em doentes com IC. Métodos: Estudo transversal

  17. Malaria induced acute renal failure: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KV Kanodia; AV Vanikar

    2010-01-01

    Malaria has protean clinical manifestations and renal complications, particularly acute renal failure that could be life threatening. To evaluate the incidence, clinical profile, ou come and predictors of mortality in patients with malarial acute renal failure, we retrospectively studied the last two years records of malaria induced acute renal failure in patients with peripheral smear positive for malarial parasites. One hundred (10.4%) (63 males, 37 females) malaria induced acute renal failure amongst 958 cases of acute renal failure were evaluated. Plasmodium (P). falciparum was reported in 85%, P. vivax in 2%, and both in 13% patients. The mean serum creatinine was 9.2 ± 4.2 mg%, and oligo/anuria was present in 82%; 78% of the patients required hemodialysis. Sixty four percent of the patients recovered completely, 10% incompletely, and 5% developed chronic kidney failure; mortality occurred in 21% of the patients. Low hemoglobin, oligo/anuria on admission, hyperbilirubinemia, cerebral malaria, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and high serum creatinine were the main predictors of mortality. We conclude that malaria is associated with acute renal failure, which occurs most commonly in plasmodium falciparum infected patients. Early diagnosis and prompt dialysis with supportive management can reduce morality and enhance recovery of renal function (Author).

  18. Intravenous fluids in acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikdeli, Behnood; Strait, Kelly M; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Li, Shu-Xia; Mody, Purav; Partovian, Chohreh; Coca, Steven G; Kim, Nancy; Horwitz, Leora I; Testani, Jeffrey M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to determine the use of intravenous fluids in the early care of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (HF) who are treated with loop diuretics. Intravenous fluids are routinely provided to many hospitalized patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with HF to 346 hospitals from 2009 to 2010. We assessed the use of intravenous fluids during the first 2 days of hospitalization. We determined the frequency of adverse in-hospital outcomes. We assessed variation in the use of intravenous fluids across hospitals and patient groups. Among 131,430 hospitalizations for HF, 13,806 (11%) were in patients treated with intravenous fluids during the first 2 days. The median volume of administered fluid was 1,000 ml (interquartile range: 1,000 to 2,000 ml), and the most commonly used fluids were normal saline (80%) and half-normal saline (12%). Demographic characteristics and comorbidities were similar in hospitalizations in which patients did and did not receive fluids. Patients who were treated with intravenous fluids had higher rates of subsequent critical care admission (5.7% vs. 3.8%; p fluid treatment varied widely across hospitals (range: 0% to 71%; median: 12.5%). Many patients who are hospitalized with HF and receive diuretics also receive intravenous fluids during their early inpatient care, and the proportion varies among hospitals. Such practice is associated with worse outcomes and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

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    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  20. Is public transport a risk factor for acute respiratory infection?

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    Packham Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between public transport use and acquisition of acute respiratory infection (ARI is not well understood but potentially important during epidemics and pandemics. Methods A case-control study performed during the 2008/09 influenza season. Cases (n = 72 consulted a General Practitioner with ARI, and controls with another non-respiratory acute condition (n = 66. Data were obtained on bus or tram usage in the five days preceding illness onset (cases or the five days before consultation (controls alongside demographic details. Multiple logistic regression modelling was used to investigate the association between bus or tram use and ARI, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Recent bus or tram use within five days of symptom onset was associated with an almost six-fold increased risk of consulting for ARI (adjusted OR = 5.94 95% CI 1.33-26.5. The risk of ARI appeared to be modified according to the degree of habitual bus and tram use, but this was not statistically significant (1-3 times/week: adjusted OR = 0.54 (95% CI 0.15-1.95; >3 times/week: 0.37 (95% CI 0.13-1.06. Conclusions We found a statistically significant association between ARI and bus or tram use in the five days before symptom onset. The risk appeared greatest among occasional bus or tram users, but this trend was not statistically significant. However, these data are plausible in relation to the greater likelihood of developing protective antibodies to common respiratory viruses if repeatedly exposed. The findings have differing implications for the control of seasonal acute respiratory infections and for pandemic influenza.

  1. Oxygen saturation index and severity of hypoxic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Munmun; Chandrasekharan, Praveen K; Williams, Ashley; Gugino, Sylvia; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Swartz, Daniel; Ma, Chang Xing; Mathew, Bobby; Nair, Jayasree; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2015-01-01

    The oxygenation index (OI = mean airway pressure, MAP × FiO2 × 100 : PaO2) is used to assess the severity of hypoxic respiratory failure (HRF) and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). An indwelling arterial line or arterial punctures are necessary to obtain PaO2 for the calculation of OI. Oxygenation can be continuously and noninvasively assessed using pulse oximetry. The use of the oxygen saturation index (OSI = MAP × FiO2 × 100 : SpO2) can be an alternate method of assessing the severity of HRF. To evaluate the correlation between OSI and OI in the following: (1) neonates with HRF and (2) a lamb model of meconium aspiration syndrome. Human neonates: a retrospective chart review of 74 ventilated late preterm/term neonates with indwelling arterial access and SpO2 values in the first 24 h of life was conducted. OSI and OI were calculated and correlated. Lamb model: arterial blood gases were drawn and preductal SpO2 was documented in 40 term newborn lambs with asphyxia and meconium aspiration. OI and OSI were calculated and correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Mean values of OSI and OI showed a correlation coefficient of 0.952 in neonates (mean value of 308 observations in 74 neonates) and 0.948 in lambs (mean value of 743 observations in 40 lambs). In lambs, with increasing PVR, there was a decrease in OI and OSI. OSI correlates significantly with OI in infants with HRF. This noninvasive measure may be used to assess the severity of HRF and PPHN in neonates without arterial access. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  3. Mortality in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith Ju-Ming; Jit, Mark; Sultana, Rehena; Mok, Yee Hui; Yeo, Joo Guan; Koh, Jia Wen Janine Cynthia; Loh, Tsee Foong; Lee, Jan Hau

    2017-01-01

    Sparse and conflicting evidence exists regarding mortality risk from pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to determine the pooled mortality in pediatric ARDS and to describe its trend over time. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched from 1960 to August 2015. Keywords or medical subject headings (MESH) terms used included "respiratory distress syndrome, adult," "acute lung injury," "acute respiratory insufficiency," "acute hypoxemic respiratory failure," "pediatrics," and "child." Study inclusion criteria were (1) pediatric patients aged 0 days to 18 years, (2) sufficient baseline data described in the pediatric ARDS group, and (3) mortality data. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective observational studies were eligible. Data on study characteristics, patient demographics, measures of oxygenation, and mortality were extracted using a standard data extraction form. Independent authors conducted the search, applied the selection criteria, and extracted the data. Methodological quality of studies was assessed. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed to obtain pooled estimates of mortality. Meta-regression was performed to analyze variables contributing to change in mortality over time. Eight RCTs and 21 observational studies (n = 2274 patients) were included. Pooled mortality rate was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19-31). There was a decrease in mortality rates over 3 epochs (≤2000, 2001-2009, and ≥2010: 40% [95% CI: 24-59], 35% [95% CI: 21-51], and 18% [95% CI: 12-26], respectively, P < .001). Observational studies reported a higher mortality rate than RCTs (27% [95% CI: 24-29] versus 16% [95% CI: 12-20], P < .001). Earlier year of publication was an independent factor associated with mortality. Overall mortality rate in pediatric ARDS is approximately 24%. Studies conducted and published later were associated with better survival.

  4. Renal dysfunction in African patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sani, Mahmoud U.; Davison, Beth A.; Cotter, Gad; Sliwa, Karen; Edwards, Christopher; Liu, Licette; Damasceno, Albertino; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Mondo, Charles; Dzudie, Anastase; Ojji, Dike B.; Voors, Adrian A.

    Aims In Western countries with typically elderly ischaemic acute heart failure patients, predictors and clinical outcome of renal dysfunction and worsening renal function are well described. However, the prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of renal dysfunction in younger, mainly hypertensive

  5. [Review of the knowledge on acute kidney failure in the critical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero García, M; Delgado Hito, P; de la Cueva Ariza, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure affects from 1% to 25% of patients admitted to intensive care units. These figures vary depending on the population studied and criteria. The complications of acute renal failure (fluid overload, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, bleeding) are treated. However, mortality remains high despite the technological advances of recent years because acute renal failure is usually associated with sepsis, respiratory failure, serious injury, surgical complications or consumption coagulopathy. Mortality ranges from 30% to 90%. Although there is no universally accepted definition, the RIFLE classification gives us an operational tool to define the degree of acute renal failure and to standardize the initiation of renal replacement techniques as well as to evaluate the results. Therefore, nurses working within the intensive care unit must be familiar with this disease, with its treatment (drug or alternative) and with the prevention of possible complications. Equally, they must be capable of detecting the manifestations of dependency each one of the basic needs and to be able to identify the collaboration problems in order to achieve an individualized care plan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  6. A Rare Case of Propofol-Induced Acute Liver Failure and Literature Review

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    G. Kneiseler

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of drug-induced acute liver failure is increasing. A number of drugs can inhibit mitochondrial functions, alter β-oxidation and cause accumulation of free fatty acids within the hepatocytes. This may result in hepatic steatosis, cell death and liver injury. In our case, propofol, an anesthetic drug commonly used in adults and children, is suspected to have induced disturbance of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which in consequence led to insufficient energy supply and finally liver failure. We report the case of a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with acute liver failure after anesthesia for stripping of varicose veins. Liver histology, imaging and laboratory data indicate drug-induced acute liver failure, presumably due to propofol. Hepatocyte death and microvesicular fatty degeneration of 90% of the liver parenchyma were observed before treatment with steroids. Six months later, a second biopsy was performed, which revealed only minimal steatosis and minimal periportal hepatitis. We suggest that propofol led to impaired fatty acid oxidation possibly due to a genetic susceptibility. This caused free fatty acid accumulation within hepatocytes, which presented as hepatocellular fatty degeneration and cell death. Large scale hepatocyte death was followed by impaired liver function and, consecutively, progressed to acute liver failure.

  7. Energy expenditure in the acute renal failure patient mechanically ventilated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Y; Viale, J P; Annat, G; Delafosse, B; Guillaume, C; Motin, J

    1987-01-01

    Twenty mechanically ventilated patients with acute renal failure were studied on 31 occasions to determine their energy expenditure (EE) during a 2 h period before a hemodialysis. Oxygen consumption and CO2 elimination were measured continuously with a mass spectrometer system. EE (1660 +/- 48 kcal day-1) was close to the total caloric intake (1682 +/- 83 kcal day-1) and represented 1.19 +/- 0.03 times the predicted resting energy expenditure (PREE) with large inter-individual variations (0.7-1.7 PREE). EE/PREE was higher when sepsis was present (1.31 +/- 0.03 versus 1.14 +/- 0.02; p less than 0.05). Glucose oxidation rate (4.35 mg kg-1 min-1) exceeded glucose intake (2.6 mg kg-1 min-1). Respiratory quotient was 1.02 +/- 0.01. Nitrogen loss was 17.3 +/- 1.7 g day-1 and nitrogen balance -11.9 +/- 1.9 g day-1. In conclusion, EE values were scattered but never exceeded 1.7 times the PREE. Sepsis increased EE. With a nutritional support covering EE, nitrogen balance remained markedly negative and a preferential utilisation of glucose and lipogenesis occurred.

  8. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-07-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. /sup 131/I OIH, /sup 67/gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease.

  9. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, R.A.; Byun, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. 131 I OIH, 67 gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease

  10. HEPATIC DIALYSIS IN NEONATES WITH ACUTE LIVER FAILURE

    OpenAIRE

    Stancu, Samantha Mc Kenzie; Cirstoveanu, Catalin Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic dialysis is an artificial extracorporeal liver support device designed to filter out toxins accumulated in patients with acute liver failure. Although it is a rare entity encountered in neonates, acute liver failure is a highly fatal condition, with seventy percent resulting in mortality without liver transplantation. Scientific data on extracorporeal liver support concerning the pediatric population is scarce in literature. Artificial extracorporeal liver support devices in the form ...

  11. A case of acute liver failure in dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Biswas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an arboviral disease endemic in many parts of the world. The clinical presentation of dengue viral infection ranges from asymptomatic illness to fatal dengue shock syndrome. Although, it is known to cause hepatic involvement, it occasionally results in acute hepatic failure. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever presenting with acute liver failure. The case recovered completely after treatment. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(2: 41-42

  12. Fluid removal in acute heart failure: diuretics versus devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Felker, G Michael

    2014-10-01

    Fluid removal and relief of congestion are central to treatment of acute heart failure. Diuretics have been the decongestive mainstay but their known limitations have led to the exploration of alternative strategies. This review compares diuretics with ultrafiltration and examines the recent evidence evaluating their use. Relevant recent studies are the Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation trial (of diuretics) and the Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure (of ultrafiltration). The Diuretic Optimization Strategies Evaluation study evaluated strategies of loop diuretic use during acute heart failure (continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus and high dose versus low dose). After 72  h, there was no significant difference with either comparison for the coprimary end points. Patients treated with a high-dose strategy tended to have greater diuresis and more decongestion compared with low-dose therapy, at the cost of transient changes in renal function. The Cardiorenal Rescue Study in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure study showed that in acute heart failure patients with persistent congestion and worsening renal function, ultrafiltration, as compared with a medical therapy, was associated with similar weight loss but greater increase in serum creatinine and more adverse events. Decongestion remains a major challenge in acute heart failure. Although recent studies provide useful data to guide practice, the relatively poor outcomes point to the continued need to identify better strategies for safe and effective decongestion.

  13. Current treatments for acute heart failure: focus on serelaxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett RG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert G BennettVA Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System and Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USAAbstract: Acute heart failure remains an enormous health concern worldwide, and is a major cause of death and hospitalization. In spite of this, the treatment strategies for acute heart failure have remained largely unchanged for the past 2 decades. Several large randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have recently been conducted to attempt to improve the treatment and outcomes of acute decompensated heart failure. Some studies, including the EVEREST (tolvaptan and ASCEND (nesiritide showed efficacy at relieving early symptoms, but failed to improve long-term outcomes. Others, including PROTECT (rolofylline and ASTRONAUT (aliskiren showed little benefit in the relief of early symptoms or long-term outcomes. The recent RELAX-AHF studies using serelaxin, a recombinant form of relaxin, have shown considerable promise. Importantly, serelaxin improved congestion (dyspnea and other early targets of acute decompensated heart failure treatment, but also improved mortality at 180 days. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current treatment strategies for acute decompensated heart failure, and a discussion of the recent clinical trials, with an emphasis on the serelaxin studies.Keywords: acute heart failure, dyspnea, relaxin, serelaxin

  14. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Burke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR. With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  15. DiapHRaGM: A mnemonic to describe the work of breathing in patients with respiratory failure.

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    Aiman Tulaimat

    Full Text Available The assessment of the work of breathing in the definitions of respiratory failure is vague and variable.Identify a parsimonious set of signs to describe the work of breathing in hypoxemic, acutely ill patients.We examined consecutive medical ICU patients receiving oxygen with a mask, non-invasive ventilation, or T-piece. A physician inspected each patient for 10 seconds, rated the level of respiratory distress, and then examined the patient for vital signs and 17 other physical signs. We used the rating of distress as a surrogate for measuring the work of breathing, constructed three multivariate models to identify the one with the smallest number of signs and largest explained variance, and validated it with bootstrap analysis.We performed 402 observations on 240 patients. Respiratory distress was absent in 78, mild in 157, moderate in 107, and severe in 60. Respiratory rate, hypoxia, heart rate, and frequency of most signs increased as distress increased. Respiratory rate and hypoxia explained 43% of the variance in respiratory distress. Diaphoresis, gasping, and contraction of the sternomastoid explained an additional 28%. Heart rate, blood pressure, alertness, agitation, body posture, nasal flaring, audible breathing, cyanosis, tracheal tug, retractions, paradox, scalene or abdominal muscles contraction did not increase the explained variance in respiratory distress.Most of the variance is respiratory distress can be explained by five signs summarized by the mnemonic DiapHRaGM (diaphoresis, hypoxia, respiratory rate, gasping, accessory muscle. This set of signs may allow for efficient, standardized assessments of the work of breathing of hypoxic patients.

  16. Insuficiência respiratória aguda causada por pneumonia em organização secundária à terapia antineoplásica para linfoma não Hodgkin Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriell Ramalho Santana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Doenças difusas do parênquima pulmonar pertencem a um grupo de doenças de evolução geralmente subaguda ou crônica, mas que podem determinar insuficiência respiratória aguda. Paciente masculino, 37 anos, em terapia para linfoma não Hodgkin, admitido com tosse seca, febre, dispneia e insuficiência respiratória aguda hipoxêmica. Iniciadas ventilação mecânica e antibioticoterapia, porém houve evolução desfavorável. Tomografia computadorizada de tórax mostrava opacidades pulmonares em "vidro fosco" bilaterais. Devido ao paciente ter feito uso de três drogas relacionadas à pneumonia em organização (ciclofosfamida, doxorrubicina e rituximabe e quadros clínico e radiológico serem sugestivos, iniciou-se pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona com boa resposta. Pneumonia em organização pode ser idiopática ou associada a colagenoses, drogas e neoplasias, e geralmente responde bem a corticoterapia. O diagnóstico é anatomopatológico, mas condições clínicas do paciente não permitiam a realização de biópsia pulmonar. Pneumonia em organização deve ser diagnóstico diferencial em pacientes com aparente pneumonia de evolução desfavorável ao tratamento antimicrobiano.Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab, and the clinical and radiological symptoms were

  17. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as ...

  18. Cochrane Commentary: Probiotics For Prevention of Acute Upper Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, who are at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyze 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI [at least one episode: odds ratio (OR): 0.53; 95% CI = 0.37-0.76, P school absence (OR: 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.47, very low quality evidence). Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio: 0

  19. Acute renal failure in pregnancy: Our experience

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    Rohina S Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a serious medical complication during pregnancy, and, in the post-partum period, is associated with significant maternal morbidity and mortality as well as fetal loss. The objective of our study is to find the etiology and maternal outcome of ARF during preg-nancy. The study was conducted at the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Institute of Kidney Disease and Research Center, Ahmedabad, India from January 2009 to January 2011. Fifty previously healthy patients who developed ARF, diagnosed on oliguria and serum creatinine >2 mg%, were included in the study. Patients with a known history of renal disease, diabetes and hypertension were excluded from the study. All patients were followed-up for a period of six months. Patient re-cords, demographic data, urine output on admission and preceding history of antepartum hemorrhage (APH, post-partum hemorrhage (PPH, septicemia, operative interventions and retained product of conception were noted and need for dialysis was considered. Patients were thoroughly examined and baseline biochemical investigations and renal and obstetrical ultrasound were performed on each patient and bacterial culture sensitivity on blood, urine or vaginal swabs were performed in selected patients. The age range was 19-38 years (mean 26 ± 3.8. The first trimester, second trimester and puerperal groups comprised of four (8%, 25 (50% and 21 patients (42%, respectively. Hemorrhage was the etiology for ARF in 15 (30%, APH in ten (20% and PPH in five (10% patients. Eleven (22% patients had lower segment cesarian section (LSCS while 36 (78% patients had normal vaginal delivery. In 20 (40% patients, puerperal sepsis was the etiological factor, while pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome accounted for 18 (36% patients. Two (4% patients had dissemi-nated intravascular coagulation on presentation while one (2% patient was diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Maternal mortality was 12% (n

  20. Acute renal failure caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae pyelonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, W. M.; Lobatto, S.; Weening, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 34-year-old male patient without prior medical history who presented with acute renal failure due to acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Both blood and urine cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although a kidney biopsy revealed extensive necrosis and no viable glomeruli, renal function

  1. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Presenting Respiratory Failure as the Sole Initial Manifestation

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    Fuyuki Tateno

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is rare that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS presents with respiratory failure as the sole initial manifestation. A 72-year-old man with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease developed exertional dyspnea for 13 months. He then progressed to limb weakness that led to the diagnosis of ALS. Although rare, ALS can present with respiratory failure as the sole initial manifestation more than 1 year prior to limb weakness.

  2. Successful Use of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Respiratory Failure Caused by Mediastinal Precursor T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Masafumi Oto; Kyoko Inadomi; Toshiyuki Chosa; Shima Uneda; Soichi Uekihara; Minoru Yoshida

    2014-01-01

    Precursor T lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) often manifests as a mediastinal mass sometimes compressing vital structures like vessels or large airways. This case was a 40-year-old male who developed T-LBL presenting as respiratory failure caused by mediastinal T-LBL. He presented with persistent life threatening hypoxia despite tracheal intubation. We successfully managed this respiratory failure using venovenous (VV) ECMO. Induction chemotherapy was started after stabilizing oxygenation and t...

  3. Generalized pustular psoriasis complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Samra, T; Constantin, J-M; Amarger, S; Mansard, S; Souteyrand, P; Bazin, J-E; D'Incan, M

    2004-02-01

    Psoriasis has a chronic and relatively benign course. However, severe complications are possible. One rare complication is acute interstitial pneumonitis. This entity should be suspected when a patient presents with dyspnoea and high fever. Knowledge of this pathology is crucial, for although it is essential to rule out aetiologies requiring specific management such as microbial infection or drug-related syndromes, diagnosis should not be delayed as its severe clinical course is improved by corticosteroids. We report two patients with an acute respiratory distress syndrome arising during the course of pustular psoriasis. Repeated bacteriological testing in lungs and blood remained negative. In both cases lung involvement was severe, requiring artificial ventilation. Dramatic clinical resolution was obtained by using corticosteroids. Besides infectious causes and drug hypersensitivity to methotrexate or acitretin, acute respiratory distress syndrome, sometimes due to a pulmonary capillary leak syndrome, is a rare cause of pneumonitis in the course of psoriasis, and may be fatal. Its pathogenesis is unknown. However, animal models suggest a role for T-helper (Th) 1 lymphocytes, known to be activated in psoriasis, and a role for tumour necrosis factor-alpha, a major Th1 cytokine, in alveolar damage.

  4. Risk Factors of Respiratory Failure in Children with Guillain-Barré Syndrome

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    Mei-Hua Hu

    2012-10-01

    Conclusions: Respiratory failure in childhood GBS was related to the Hughes score at nadir, respiratory distress, and hypotension. Atypical presentations of symptoms were more predominant in patients younger than 6 years. The prognosis in our series was good and not related to previous events. Understanding the risk factors of severe GBS will provide better treatment strategies and improve the outcomes.

  5. Implementing a bedside assessment of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Chen, Guang-Qiang; Shore, Kevin; Shklar, Orest; Martins, Concetta; Devenyi, Brian; Lindsay, Paul; McPhail, Heather; Lanys, Ashley; Soliman, Ibrahim; Tuma, Mazin; Kim, Michael; Porretta, Kerri; Greco, Pamela; Every, Hilary; Hayes, Chris; Baker, Andrew; Friedrich, Jan O; Brochard, Laurent

    2017-04-04

    Despite their potential interest for clinical management, measurements of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are seldom performed in routine practice. We introduced a systematic assessment of respiratory mechanics in our clinical practice. After the first year of clinical use, we retrospectively assessed whether these measurements had any influence on clinical management and physiological parameters associated with clinical outcomes by comparing their value before and after performing the test. The respiratory mechanics assessment constituted a set of bedside measurements to determine passive lung and chest wall mechanics, response to positive end-expiratory pressure, and alveolar derecruitment. It was obtained early after ARDS diagnosis. The results were provided to the clinical team to be used at their own discretion. We compared ventilator settings and physiological variables before and after the test. The physiological endpoints were oxygenation index, dead space, and plateau and driving pressures. Sixty-one consecutive patients with ARDS were enrolled. Esophageal pressure was measured in 53 patients (86.9%). In 41 patients (67.2%), ventilator settings were changed after the measurements, often by reducing positive end-expiratory pressure or by switching pressure-targeted mode to volume-targeted mode. Following changes, the oxygenation index, airway plateau, and driving pressures were significantly improved, whereas the dead-space fraction remained unchanged. The oxygenation index continued to improve in the next 48 h. Implementing a systematic respiratory mechanics test leads to frequent individual adaptations of ventilator settings and allows improvement in oxygenation indexes and reduction of the risk of overdistention at the same time. The present study involves data from our ongoing registry for respiratory mechanics (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02623192 . Registered 30 July 2015).

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS After Nitric Acid Inhalation

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    Gülay Kır

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung injury resulting from inhalation of chemical products continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Concentrated nitric acids are also extremely corrosive fuming chemical liquids. Fumes of nitric acid (HNO3 and various oxides of nitrogen such as nitric oxide (NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 may cause fatal illnesses such as severe pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS when inhaled. Intensive respiratory management including mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP, inverse ratio ventilation, replacement of surfactant and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, steroids and n-acetylcysteine (NAC may improve survival. In this case report we present the diagnosis and successful treatment of a 57 years old male patient who developed ARDS following pulmonary edema due to nitric acid fumes inhalation.

  7. Acute decompensated heart failure: new strategies for improving outcomes [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer Fisher, Emily; Burns, Boyd; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-05-22

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common emergency department presentation with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Heart failure accounts for more than 1 million hospitalizations annually, with a steadily increasing incidence as our population ages. This issue reviews recent literature regarding appropriate management of emergency department presentations of acute decompensated heart failure, with special attention to newer medication options. Emergency department management and appropriate interventions are discussed, along with critical decision-making points in resuscitation for both hypertensive and hypotensive patients. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  8. Acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis leading to acute renal failure following multiple hornet stings

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    Bambery Pradeep

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hornet stings are generally associated with local and occasionally anaphylactic reactions. Rarely systemic complications like acute renal failure can occur following multiple stings. Renal failure is usually due to development of acute tubular necrosis as a result of intravascular haemolysis, rhabdomyolysis or shock. Rarely it can be following development of acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis. Case presentation We describe a young male, who was stung on face, head, shoulders and upper limbs by multiple hornets (Vespa orientalis. He developed acute renal failure as a result of acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis and responded to steroids. Conclusion Rare causes of acute renal failure like tubulo-interstitial nephritis should be considered in a patient with persistent oliguria and azotemia following multiple hornet stings. Renal biopsy should be undertaken early, as institution of steroid therapy may help in recovery of renal function

  9. A Prospective One-Year Microbiologic Survey of Combined Pneumonia and Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kristen; Trupka, Tracy; Micek, Scott T; Juang, Paul; Kollef, Marin H

    2017-10-01

    Pneumonia and respiratory failure are common problems in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting, often occurring together. The relative prevalence of pneumonia types (community acquired, hospital acquired, ventilator associated) and causative pathogens is not well described in patients with respiratory failure. This was a prospective observational cohort study conducted in the medical ICU (34 beds) of Barnes-Jewish Hospital, an academic referral center of 1,300 beds from January 2016-December 2016. All patients who were prospectively adjudicated to have respiratory failure and pneumonia (RFP) regardless of pneumonia type were classified into one of four microbiologic categories: pathogen negative, antibiotic-susceptible pathogen (according to ceftriaxone susceptibility), antibiotic-resistant pathogen, and viruses. The primary outcomes assessed were the hospital mortality rate and inappropriate initial antibiotic therapy (IIAT) for non-viral pathogens. Among 364 consecutive patients with RFP, 63 (17.3%) had organisms that were antibiotic susceptible, 104 (28.6%) had antibiotic-resistant organisms, 118 (32.4%) were pathogen negative, and 79 (21.7%) had viral infections. For these categories, IIAT occurred in 3.2%, 21.2%, 0.8%, and 0, respectively (p < 0.001). Vasopressor-requiring shock was present in 61.9%, 72.1%, 68.6%, and 67.1%, respectively (p = 0.585), and the hospital mortality rates were 27.0%, 48.1%, 31.4%, and 36.7%, respectively (p = 0.020). Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified IIAT as an independent predictor of in-hospital death (adjusted odds ratio 5.28; 95% confidence interval 2.72-10.22; p = 0.012). Male gender, increasing Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores, greater age, and the presence of shock also predicted death. Microbiologic categorization of patients with RFP suggests that antibiotic-resistant pathogens and viruses are associated with the highest mortality rates. Vasopressor

  10. Anemia and thrombocytopenia in acute and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgalaleh, Akbar; Mahmudi, Mohammad; Tabibian, Shadi; Khatib, Zahra Kashani; Tamaddon, Gholam Hossein; Moghaddam, Esmaeil Sanei; Bamedi, Taregh; Alizadeh, Shaban; Moradi, Eshagh

    2013-01-01

    Acute renal failure describes as a syndrome by rapid decline in the ability of the kidney to eliminate waste products, regulate acid-base balance, and manage water homeostasis. When this impairment is prolonged and entered chronic phase, erythropoietin secretion by this organ is decreasing and toxic metabolic accumulates and causes hematological changes include decrease of HCT, MCV and RBC and platelet counts. This study evaluates present of anemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with acute and chronic renal failure. This study conducted on 132 patients with renal impairment and also 179 healthy individuals as two separated control groups. Initially patients with renal problem were tested and after confirmation of impairment, patients were divided in two groups, acute with less than 3 months and chronic with more than 3 months renal failure, based on duration of the disease. Then complete blood count performed for each patient and finally obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software. Comparison between 96 patients with acute and 36 patients with chronic renal failure revealed that severity of anemia (HCT, Hb and MCV) between these two groups were statistically high in comparison with control groups (P > 0.05) but thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic renal failure was statistically different from control and the acute ones (P renal failure, to prevent the risk of bleeding, platelet count should be checked periodically.

  11. Obesity and nutrition in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Renee D; Suratt, Benjamin T

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses obesity, its contribution to clinical outcomes, and the current literature on nutrition. More than one third of Americans are obese. Literature suggests that, among critically ill patients, the relationship between obesity and outcomes is complex. Obese patients may be at greater risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) than normal weight patients. Although obesity may confer greater morbidity in intensive care, it seems to decrease mortality. ARDS is a catabolic state; patients demonstrate a profound inflammatory response, multiple organ dysfunction, and hypermetabolism, often with malnutrition. The concept of pharmaconutrition has emerged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanical ventilation in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Oleg; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-08-01

    The management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patient is fundamental to the field of intensive care medicine, and it presents unique challenges owing to the specialized mechanical ventilation techniques that such patients require. ARDS is a highly lethal disease, and there is compelling evidence that mechanical ventilation itself, if applied in an injurious fashion, can be a contributor to ARDS mortality. Therefore, it is imperative for any clinician central to the care of ARDS patients to understand the fundamental framework that underpins the approach to mechanical ventilation in this special scenario. The current review summarizes the major components of the mechanical ventilation strategy as it applies to ARDS.

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a pregnant woman with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-J A; Tseng, J-J; Yang, M-J; Tsao, Y-P; Lin, H-Y

    2014-12-01

    When the disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is controlled appropriately, a pregnant woman who has lupus is able to carry safely to term and deliver a healthy infant. While the physiology of a healthy pregnancy itself influences ventilatory function, acute pulmonary distress may decrease oxygenation and influence both mother and fetus. Though respiratory failure in pregnancy is relatively rare, it remains one of the leading conditions requiring intensive care unit admission in pregnancy and carries a high risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, not to mention the complexity caused by lupus flare. We report a case of SLE complicated with lupus pneumonitis and followed by acute respiratory distress during pregnancy. Though there is a high risk of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, maternal respiratory function improved after cesarean section and treatment of the underlying causes. The newborn had an extremely low birth weight but was well at discharge. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Surfactant for acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by near drowning in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettah, Nurdan; Dilli, Dilek; Beken, Serdar; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Okumuş, Nurullah

    2014-03-01

    Near drowning is the term for survival after suffocation caused by submersion in water or another fluid. Pulmonary insufficiency may develop insidiously or suddenly because of near drowning. We want to present a newborn case of acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by near drowning. A 26-day-old boy was brought to the emergency department because of severe respiratory distress. Two hours before admission, the baby suddenly slipped out his mother's hands and fell in the bathtub full of water while bathing. After initial resuscitation, he was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for mechanical ventilation. PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 97, with SaO2 of 84%. Bilateral heterogeneous densities were seen on his chest x-ray film. The baby was considered to have acute respiratory distress syndrome. Antibiotics were given to prevent infection. Because conventional therapy failed to improve oxygenation, a single dose of surfactant was tested via an intubation cannula. Four hours later, poractant alfa (Curosurf) administered repeatedly at the same dosage because of hypoxemia (PaO2/FIO2 ratio, 124; SaO2, 88%). Oxygen saturation was increased to more than 90% in 24 hours, which was maintained for 3 days when we were able to wean him from mechanical ventilation. After 7 days, the x-ray film showed considerable clearing of shadows. He was discharged home on the 15th day after full recovery. This case report describes a rapid and persistent improvement after 2 doses of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome with severe oxygenation failure caused by near drowning in a newborn.

  15. Non-invasive ventilation improves respiratory distress in children with acute viral bronchiolitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combret, Yann; Prieur, Guillaume; LE Roux, Pascal; Médrinal, Clément

    2017-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a common treatment for bronchiolitis. However, consensus concerning its efficacy is lacking. The aim of this systematic review was to assess NIV effectiveness to reduce respiratory distress. Secondary objectives were to summarize the effects of NIV, identify predictive factors for failure and describe settings and applications. Literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, PEDro, Cochrane, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, UpToDate, and SuDoc from 1990 to April 2015. Randomized controlled trials, controlled non-randomized trials and prospective studies of NIV (continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP], bi-level CPAP, or neurally-adjusted ventilator assist) for bronchiolitis in infants younger than 2 years were included. Fourteen studies were included, for a total of 379 children. Of these, 357 were treated with NIV as first intention. Respiratory distress, heart rate, respiratory rate and respiratory effort improved (P<0.05). Results were inconclusive regarding prevention of endotracheal intubation. Few adverse events were reported. NIV reduced carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in 10 studies. Two randomized controlled studies reported a decrease of 7 mmHg in pCO2 (P<0.05). Predictive factors of NIV failure were apneas, high pCO2, young age, low weight, elevated heart rate and high pediatric risk of mortality score. NIV is mostly administered through a nasal mask, nasal cannula or helmet, with an initial expiratory positive airway pressure of 7 cmH2O. NIV shows promising results for the reduction of respiratory distress in acute viral bronchiolitis, as shown in several recent studies. However, there is a lack of robust studies to confirm this.

  16. [Spinal muscular atrophy and respiratory failure. How do primary care pediatricians act in a simulated scenario?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Tuñas, M C; Sánchez Santos, L; Busto Cuiñas, M; Rodríguez Núñez, A

    2015-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1) tends to be fatal in the first year of life if there is no ventilatory support. The decision whether to start such support is an ethical conflict for healthcare professionals. A scenario of acute respiratory failure in an infant with SMA-1 has been included in a training program using advanced simulation for Primary Care pediatricians (PCP). The performances of 34 groups of 4 pediatricians, who participated in 17 courses, were systematically analyzed. Clinical, ethical and communication aspects with parents were evaluated. The initial technical assistance (Administration of oxygen and immediate ventilatory support) was correctly performed by 94% of the teams. However, the PCP had problems in dealing with the ethical aspects of the case. Of the 85% of the teams that raised the ethical conflict with parents, 29% did so on their own initiative, 23% actively excluded them, and only 6% involved them and took their opinion into account in making decisions. Only 11.7% asked about the quality of life of children and 12% for their knowledge of the prognosis of the disease. None explained treatment alternatives, nor tried to contact the pediatrician responsible for the child. When faced with a simulated SMA-1 infant with respiratory failure, PCP have difficulties in interacting with the family, and to involve it in the decision making process. Practical training of all pediatricians should include case scenarios with an ethical clinical problem. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a neonate due to possible transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a potentially life-threatening complication of blood component transfusion. It is relatively underdiagnosed entity in neonates with scant literature. We report a case of TRALI in a preterm neonate developing acute respiratory distress within 6 h of blood product transfusion in the absence of preexisting lung disease. Prompt ventilator and supportive management were instituted. The baby showed clinical and radiological improvement within 12 h; however, he succumbed to death due to acute massive pulmonary hemorrhage 36 h later. Possibility of TRALI should be kept if there is sudden deterioration of lung function after blood transfusion.

  18. Acute heart failure: Epidemiology, risk factors, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Parissis, John; Lekakis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-03-01

    Acute heart failure represents the first cause of hospitalization in elderly persons and is the main determinant of the huge healthcare expenditure related to heart failure. Despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis of acute heart failure is poor, with in-hospital mortality ranging from 4% to 7%, 60- to 90-day mortality ranging from 7% to 11%, and 60- to 90-day rehospitalization from 25% to 30%. Several factors including cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions as well as patient-related and iatrogenic factors may precipitate the rapid development or deterioration of signs and symptoms of heart failure, thus leading to an acute heart failure episode that usually requires patient hospitalization. The primary prevention of acute heart failure mainly concerns the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and heart disease, including coronary artery disease, while the secondary prevention of a new episode of decompensation requires the optimization of heart failure therapy, patient education, and the development of an effective transition and follow-up plan. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Vaughn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease.

  20. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Septic Shock due to Cytomegalovirus Infection in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbarth; Meyer; Grau; Loutan; Ricou

    1997-09-01

    Incidence of falciparum malaria in developed countries has increased in recent years due to tourism to tropical countries and immigration from Asia and Africa. In Switzerland, about 250 cases of malaria were reported in 1994 to the Federal Office of Health, including three cases with fatal outcome.1 The most commonly described complications of plasmodia infection are cerebral malaria, acute renal failure, and severe anemia with disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, pulmonary involvement occurs in 3 to 10% of cases and represents the most serious complication of this infection, with a lethality of 70%.2,3 Furthermore, a pronounced general immunosuppression has been reported in malaria patients, which may predispose them to opportunistic infections.4 We report a case of Plasmodium falciparum infection complicated by severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with development of systemic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection leading to death. This evolution implies a severe immune deficiency associated with malaria, as previously suggested in the literature.

  2. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of kyphoscoliosis patients with respiratory failure in the intensive care unit and during long term follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adıgüzel Nalan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to evaluate the ICU management and long-term outcomes of kyphoscoliosis patients with respiratory failure. Methods A retrospective observational cohort study was performed in a respiratory ICU and outpatient clinic from 2002–2011. We enrolled all kyphoscoliosis patients admitted to the ICU and followed-up at regular intervals after discharge. Reasons for acute respiratory failure (ARF, ICU data, mortality, length of ICU stay and outpatient clinic data, non-invasive ventilation (NIV device settings, and compliance were recorded. NIV failure in the ICU and the long term effect of NIV on pulmonary performance were analyzed. Results Sixty-two consecutive ICU kyphoscoliosis patients with ARF were enrolled in the study. NIV was initially applied to 55 patients, 11 (20% patients were intubated, and the majority had sepsis and septic shock (p  Conclusions We strongly discourage the use of NIV in the case of septic shock in ICU kyphoscoliosis patients with ARF. Pulmonary performance improved with NIV during long term follow up.

  4. Acute Renal Failure Following Intravenous Cholangiography | Gold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iodinated compound is reported. The clinical findings and course are presented, with particular emphasis on the fact that there appeared to be no underlying or associated disorder which may have cause the renal failure, other than possible mild ...

  5. Levosimendan beyond inotropy and acute heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Alvarez, Julian; Gal, Tuvia Ben

    2016-01-01

    Levosimendan is a positive inotrope with vasodilating properties (inodilator) indicated for decompensated heart failure (HF) patients with low cardiac output. Accumulated evidence supports several pleiotropic effects of levosimendan beyond inotropy, the heart and decompensated HF. Those effects a...

  6. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME DAN ACUTE PNEUMONIA PADA NEAR DROWNING:SEBUAH LAPORAN KASUS

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    Michelle Prinka Adyana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Near drowning is a condition in which the victim survived the first 24 hours. The WorldHealth Organization (WHO , recorded worldwide in 2000 there were 400,000 incidentdrowned accidentally . That is, this figure ranks second only to traffic accidents.Aspiration pneumonia is a complication of near drwoning which occurred in 80 % ofcases of near drowning, while 50 % of patients sink into acute respiratory distresssyndrome ( ARDS . This case report discusses the acute respiratory distress syndromeand acute pneumonia in near drowning 24 years old , who had drowned at the beach for± 15 minutes , the chest x - ray obtained pulmonary edema dd / lung pnuemonia therepneuomothorax . Examination of multislice spiral computed tomography ( MSCT bilateral pneumothorax Thorax obtained major and minor fisuura right and left majorfissure , pneumomediastinum , pulmonary pneumonia contusio / suspected aspirationpneumonia , emphysema subcutis . In intensive care patients conducted for 9 days andreturn to akitivitas everyday

  7. Thrombocytopenia Is Associated With Multi-organ System Failure in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stravitz, R. Todd; Ellerbe, Caitlyn; Durkalski, Valerie; Reuben, Adrian; Lisman, Ton; Lee, William M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Acute liver failure (ALF) is a syndrome characterized by an intense systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) and multi-organ system failure (MOSF). Platelet-derived microparticles increase in proportion to the severity of the SIRS and MOSF, and are associated with poor outcome. We

  8. Respiratory viruses in young South African children with acute lower respiratory infections and interactions with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalay, Alicia A; Abbott, Salome; Sikazwe, Chisha; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Bizzintino, Joelene; Zhang, Guicheng; Laing, Ingrid; Chidlow, Glenys R; Smith, David W; Gern, James; Goldblatt, Jack; Lehmann, Deborah; Green, Robin J; Le Souëf, Peter N

    2016-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the most common respiratory virus and has been associated with frequent and severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI). The prevalence of RV species among HIV-infected children in South Africa is unknown. To describe the prevalence of respiratory viruses, including RV species, associated with HIV status and other clinical symptoms in children less than two years of age with and without ALRI in Pretoria, South Africa. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 105 hospitalized ALRI cases and 53 non-ALRI controls less than two years of age. HIV status was determined. Common respiratory viruses were identified by PCR, and RV species and genotypes were identified by semi-nested PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic tree analyses. Respiratory viruses were more common among ALRI cases than controls (83.8% vs. 69.2%; p=0.041). RV was the most commonly identified virus in cases with pneumonia (45.6%) or bronchiolitis (52.1%), regardless of HIV status, as well as in controls (39.6%). RV-A was identified in 26.7% of cases and 15.1% of controls while RV-C was identified in 21.0% of cases and 18.9% of controls. HIV-infected children were more likely to be diagnosed with pneumonia than bronchiolitis (pHIV-infected cases (n=15) compared with 30.6% of HIV-uninfected cases (n=85, p=0.013), and was identified more frequently in bronchiolitis than in pneumonia cases (43.8% vs. 12.3%; pHIV infection may be protective against RSV and bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel swine model of ricin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaf Katalan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to the plant toxin ricin leads to respiratory insufficiency and death. To date, in-depth study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS following pulmonary exposure to toxins is hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model. To this end, we established the pig as a large animal model for the comprehensive study of the multifarious clinical manifestations of pulmonary ricinosis. Here, we report for the first time, the monitoring of barometric whole body plethysmography for pulmonary function tests in non-anesthetized ricin-treated pigs. Up to 30 h post-exposure, as a result of progressing hypoxemia and to prevent carbon dioxide retention, animals exhibited a compensatory response of elevation in minute volume, attributed mainly to a large elevation in respiratory rate with minimal response in tidal volume. This response was followed by decompensation, manifested by a decrease in minute volume and severe hypoxemia, refractory to oxygen treatment. Radiological evaluation revealed evidence of early diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates while hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged, excluding cardiac failure as an explanation for respiratory insufficiency. Ricin-intoxicated pigs suffered from increased lung permeability accompanied by cytokine storming. Histological studies revealed lung tissue insults that accumulated over time and led to diffuse alveolar damage. Charting the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio in a mechanically ventilated pig confirmed that ricin-induced respiratory damage complies with the accepted diagnostic criteria for ARDS. The establishment of this animal model of pulmonary ricinosis should help in the pursuit of efficient medical countermeasures specifically tailored to deal with the respiratory deficiencies stemming from ricin-induced ARDS.

  10. EXPERIENCE WITH NON - INVASIVE VENTILATION IN TYPE II RESPIRATORY FAILURE AT DEPARTMENT OF PULMONARY MEDICINE, KURNOOL MEDICAL COLLEGE, KURNOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Non - invasive ventilation (NIV is the delivery of positive pressure ventilation through an interface to upper airways without using the invasive airway. Use of NIV is becoming common with the increasing recognition of its benefits. OBJECTIVES: This study was done to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of NIV (BiPAP in Type II Respiratory Failu re in Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kurnool Medical College. Materials and Methods: An observational study conducted over a period of 18 months in Department of pulmonary medicine, Kurnool Medical C ollege in 40 patients who were treated by NIV (BiPaP. Patients were stratified on basis of set of exclusion and inclusion criteria. NIV was given in accordance with the arterial blood gas (ABG parameters defining Type II respiratory failure. RESULTS: In the present study NIPPV was successful in 34(85% and failed in 6(15% patients . The most common indication of NIV in our hospital was acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE - COPD 90% and 88% of AE - COPD patients were improved by NIV. Application of NIV resulted in significant improvem ent of pH and blood gases in COPD patients. Kyphoscoliosis, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA patients with Type II Respirato r y failure also showed significant improvement in partial pressure of oxygen and carbon dioxide. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates and encourages the use of NIV as the first - line ventilator treatment in AE - COPD patients with Type II respiratory failure. It also supports NIV usage in other causes of type II Respiratory failure as a promising step toward prevention of mechanical ventila tion.

  11. A case report of zinc phosphide poisoning: complicated by acute renal failure and tubulo interstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogendranathan, Nilukshana; Herath, H M M T B; Sivasundaram, Thenuka; Constantine, R; Kulatunga, Aruna

    2017-05-25

    Run Rat® is a rodenticide widely used against small mammals. It comprises of a minimum of 32% zinc phosphide which is highly toxic in acute exposures to humans. It may be consumed accidentally or intentionally. It enters the body via skin, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Zinc phosphide is hydrolyzed by the gastric acid and is transformed into phosphine gas. Phosphine is a respiratory toxin that inhibits cytochrome C oxidase system resulting in renal failure and liver failure. A 35 year old Sri Lankan female presented following ingestion of 2.5 g of Run Rat®, which is a branded preparation of zinc phosphide, resulting in 61 mg/kg poison load. She developed severe acute kidney injury with acute tubular necrosis, subnephrotic ranged proteinuria and tubulointerstitial nephritis for which she underwent haemodialysis three times along with other measures of resuscitation. She also developed elevated liver enzymes with hyperblirubinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, acute pancreatitis and mild myocarditis. She improved with supportive therapy over a period of 3 weeks. Run Rat® is a commonly used rodenticide and the toxic effects are mediated through conversion of phosphide to phosphine gas. The majority of the deaths had occurred in the first 12 to 24 h and the main causes identified are refractory hypotension and arrhythmias. The late deaths (beyond 24 h) had been commonly due to adult respiratory distress syndrome, liver and renal failure. The outcome is poorer with delayed presentation, development of coagulopathy, hyperglycaemia and multiorgan failure with elevated liver enzymes. In our patient, Zinc phosphide poisoning caused severe acute kidney injury, abnormal liver profile, pancreatitis and possible myocarditis. The patient improved with repeated haemodialysis. The renal biopsy revealed acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with acute tubular necrosis. In tropical countries, the rural population engaged in agriculture has easier access to the compound, as it

  12. Allopurinol-induced Severe Hypersensitivity with Acute Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hung Chen

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old male was sent to the emergency room due to a high fever and generalized skin rash after taking allopurinol for 9 days. Physical examination was normal except for the generalized skin rash presenting with erythematous macules. Complete blood count showed leukocytosis with eosinophilia. Blood biochemistry showed impaired renal and hepatic function. Pathologic examination concluded that the skin rash was erythema multiforme. These findings met the diagnostic criteria for allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS. Our patient not only had the most common skin lesion but soon developed acute renal failure that required intermittent hemodialysis, despite rapid discontinuation of allopurinol and adequate hydration and steroid therapy. No other causes of acute renal failure were found. Renal impairment was the worst part of the patient's condition and he never completely recovered. AHS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute renal and hepatic failure in patients with evidence of allergy and recent use of allopurinol.

  13. Increased Plasma Levels of Heparin-Binding Protein on Admission to Intensive Care Are Associated with Respiratory and Circulatory Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Tydén

    Full Text Available Heparin-binding protein (HBP is released by granulocytes and has been shown to increase vascular permeability in experimental investigations. Increased vascular permeability in the lungs can lead to fluid accumulation in alveoli and respiratory failure. A generalized increase in vascular permeability leads to loss of circulating blood volume and circulatory failure. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of HBP on admission to the intensive care unit (ICU would be associated with decreased oxygenation or circulatory failure.This is a prospective, observational study in a mixed 8-bed ICU. We investigated concentrations of HBP in plasma at admission to the ICU from 278 patients. Simplified acute physiology score (SAPS 3 was recorded on admission. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were recorded daily for three days.Median SAPS 3 was 58.8 (48-70 and 30-day mortality 64/278 (23%. There was an association between high plasma concentrations of HBP on admission with decreased oxygenation (p<0.001 as well as with circulatory failure (p<0.001, after 48-72 hours in the ICU. There was an association between concentrations of HBP on admission and 30-day mortality (p = 0.002. ROC curves showed areas under the curve of 0,62 for decreased oxygenation, 0,65 for circulatory failure and 0,64 for mortality.A high concentration of HBP in plasma on admission to the ICU is associated with respiratory and circulatory failure later during the ICU care period. It is also associated with increased 30-day mortality. Despite being an interesting biomarker for the composite ICU population it's predictive value at the individual patient level is low.

  14. Predisposing Factors in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebicka, J.

    2016-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a syndrome with high short-term mortality in patients with chronic liver disease. The definition of ACLF has been addressed recently in many publications, and despite regional differences the number and severity of organ failures are decisive for the prese......Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a syndrome with high short-term mortality in patients with chronic liver disease. The definition of ACLF has been addressed recently in many publications, and despite regional differences the number and severity of organ failures are decisive...... hypertension might predispose for the development of ACLF after proper injury and response. © 2016 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc....

  15. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute Renal Failure due to Non-Traumatic Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a musculoskeletal clinical and biochemical syndrome which is seen associated with traumatic and non-traumatic causes and is known as muscular dystrophy. Rhabdomyolysis which develops following crush-type trauma (Crush syndrome is rarely seen but is a well-known clinical event in the etiology of acute renal failure. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare. The case is here presented of a patient who was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis on presentation with acute renal failure and to whom repeated dialysis was applied.

  17. CESAR: conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugford Miranda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 350 adults develop severe, but potentially reversible respiratory failure in the UK annually. Current management uses intermittent positive pressure ventilation, but barotrauma, volutrauma and oxygen toxicity can prevent lung recovery. An alternative treatment, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, uses cardio-pulmonary bypass technology to temporarily provide gas exchange, allowing ventilator settings to be reduced. While extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is proven to result in improved outcome when compared to conventional ventilation in neonates with severe respiratory failure, there is currently no good evidence from randomised controlled trials to compare these managements for important clinical outcomes in adults, although evidence from case series is promising. Methods/Design The aim of the randomised controlled trial of Conventional ventilatory support vs extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure (CESAR is to assess whether, for patients with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation will increase the rate of survival without severe disability ('confined to bed' and 'unable to wash or dress' by six months post-randomisation, and be cost effective from the viewpoints of the NHS and society, compared to conventional ventilatory support. Following assent from a relative, adults (18–65 years with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure (Murray score ≥ 3.0 or hypercapnea with pH Discussion Analysis will be based on intention to treat. A concurrent economic evaluation will also be performed to compare the costs and outcomes of both treatments.

  18. Probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Bi Rong; Wu, Taixiang

    2015-02-03

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyse 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI (at least one episode: odds ratio (OR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.76, P value school absence (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.47, very low quality evidence). Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute

  19. Acute renal failure related to oxaliplatin-induced intravascular hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Misra, Srimanta; Haydar, Mazen; Habert, Hélène; Castagne, Vincent; Gumus, Yusuf; Delmas-Marsalet, Béatrice; Machover, David

    2010-12-01

    Oxaliplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent frequently used in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Rare cases of renal failure and hemolytic reactions have been reported as separate side effects of oxaliplatin. Here we present a clinical picture of immune-related intravascular hemolysis and acute tubular necrosis in a patient receiving this drug. This case suggests a mechanistic explanation of renal failure in patients treated with oxaliplatin.

  20. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  1. Acute Liver Failure During Deferasirox Chelation: A Toxicity Worth Considering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaker, Nathan; Halligan, Katharine; Shur, Natasha; Paige, John; Hickling, Matthew; Nepo, Anne; Weintraub, Lauren

    2017-04-01

    This case report details a unique case of acute, reversible liver failure in a 12-year-old male with sickle cell anemia on chronic transfusion protocol and deferasirox chelation. There is substantial literature documenting deferasirox-induced renal injury, including Fanconi syndrome, but less documentation of hepatic toxicity and few reports of hepatic failure. The case highlights the importance of close monitoring of ferritin, bilirubin, and transaminases for patients on deferasirox.

  2. Celiac artery trunk thrombosis presenting as acute liver failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarian, M.A.; Kahrom, M.; Kahrom, H.

    2011-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is a life-threatening vascular emergency that requires early diagnosis and intervention to adequately restore mesenteric blood flow and to prevent bowel necrosis and patient death. While, almost always superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are involved, we report a 57-year-old male with an unusual celiac artery trunk thrombosis leading to gastero-duodenal and hepato-splenic infarction, and presenting an acute liver failure. (author)

  3. High mortality from respiratory failure secondary to swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegelenberg, C F N; Irusen, E M; Cooper, R; Diacon, A H; Taljaard, J J; Mowlana, A; von Groote-Bidlingmaier, F; Bolliger, C T

    2010-05-01

    The novel influenza A (H1N1) pandemic affected South Africa late during the 2009 Southern hemisphere winter and placed an extra burden on a health care system already dealing with a high prevalence of chronic lung diseases and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological characteristics, clinical features, management and outcomes of patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1) infection complicated by respiratory failure. We included all adult patients with confirmed influenza A (H1N1) infection that were referred to the medical intensive care unit of a large academic hospital in Cape Town for ventilatory support in this prospective observational study. A total of 19 patients (39.5 +/- 14.8 years) needed ventilatory support over a 6-week period. Of these, 15 were female and 16 had identifiable risk factors for severe disease, including pregnancy (n = 6), type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 6), obesity (n = 4), HIV infection (n = 3), immunosuppressive therapy (n = 3) and active pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 2). The most frequent complications were acute renal failure (n = 13), acute respiratory distress syndrome (n = 12) and ventilator associated pneumonia (n = 10). Thirteen patients died (mortality: 68.4%). Fatal cases were significantly associated with an APACHE II score >or=20 (P = 0.034), but not with a P(a)O(2)/F(I)O(2) or=12 (P = 0.134). The majority of patients with respiratory failure secondary to influenza A (H1N1) infection were young females and had an underlying risk factor for severe disease. The condition had a high mortality, particularly amongst patients with an APACHE II score >or=20.

  4. Evaluation of physiological parameters before and after respiratory physiotherapy in newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    S Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Feitosa, Sérgio; de Castro Selestrin, Cláudia; Valenti, Vitor E; de Sousa, Fernando H; F Siqueira, Arnaldo A; Petenusso, Márcio; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute viral bronchiolitis is a respiratory disease with high morbidity that affects newborn in the first two years of life. Its treatment with physiotherapy has been highlighted as an important tool, however, there is no consensus regarding its effects on patients improvement. We aimed to evaluate the physiological parameters before and after the procedure respiratory therapy in newborn with acute viral bronchiolitis....

  5. Nonpulmonary treatments for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Stacey L; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Curley, Martha A Q

    2015-06-01

    To describe the recommendations from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference on nonpulmonary treatments in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. A panel of 27 experts met over the course of 2 years to develop a taxonomy to define pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and to make recommendations regarding treatment and research priorities. The nonpulmonary subgroup comprised three experts. When published data were lacking, a modified Delphi approach emphasizing strong professional agreement was utilized. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference experts developed and voted on a total of 151 recommendations addressing the topics related to pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, 30 of which related to nonpulmonary treatment. All 30 recommendations had strong agreement. Patients with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome should receive 1) minimal yet effective targeted sedation to facilitate mechanical ventilation; 2) neuromuscular blockade, if sedation alone is inadequate to achieve effective mechanical ventilation; 3) a nutrition plan to facilitate their recovery, maintain their growth, and meet their metabolic needs; 4) goal-directed fluid management to maintain adequate intravascular volume, end-organ perfusion, and optimal delivery of oxygen; and 5) goal-directed RBC transfusion to maintain adequate oxygen delivery. Future clinical trials in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome should report sedation, neuromuscular blockade, nutrition, fluid management, and transfusion exposures to allow comparison across studies. The Consensus Conference developed pediatric-specific definitions for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and recommendations regarding treatment and future research priorities. These recommendations for nonpulmonary treatment in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome are intended to promote optimization and

  6. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, M.; Cohen-Solal, A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been...... defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure...... adrenergic inotropes as a first line therapy for all ACS-AHF patients who are under beta-blockade and or when urinary output is insufficient after diuretics. Levosimendan can be used alone or in combination with other inotropic or vasopressor agents, but requires monitoring due to the risk of hypotension. (C...

  7. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min GAO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, atypical pathogens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, HAI is mainly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. The drug-resistant bacterial infection not only makes treatment difficult, but also leads to an increase in mechanical ventilation time, length of ICU stay, mortality rate, and medical costs. The present paper has reviewed the relationship between ARDS and infection, therapeutic principles and measures of ARDS related infection, and introduced the optimal strategy of anti-infectious treatment of ARDS.

  8. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren-Gash, C; Fragaszy, E; Hayward, AC

    2012-01-01

    : Please cite this paper as: Warren-Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary an...

  9. [International cooperation on problems in acute respiratory viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůmová, B

    1996-03-01

    The annual occurrence of acute respiratory infections (ARI) of viral origin incl. influenza, the serious character of influenza epidemics and pandemics were the reason why a network of 110 national influenza centres and four international collaborating centres were created. This worldwide surveillance programme is coordinated by WHO. With advancing integration of Europe scientific groups were created which implement this programme in Europe. EUROSENTINEL analyzes the notified morbidity from influenza and ARI in eight participating countries, EUROGEIG concentrates on the programme of influenza prevention and the preparation of anti-pandemic provisions, EUROGROG associates 27 National influenza centres which in the course of the season exchange information on the incidence of influenza and other respiratory viruses. ESWI (European Scientific Working Group on Influenza) organizes clinical and epidemiological investigations on the influence of influenza infection and the impact of anti-flu vaccination; it tries to harmonize the surveillance programme and raise its standard and strives for joint research projects. The National reference laboratory in Prague participates in all these programmes and takes also active part in some projects.

  10. Acute respiratory infections in Pakistan: Have we made any progress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Madni, S.A.; Zaidi, A.K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the leading cause of death in young children in Pakistan, responsible for 20-30% of child deaths under age 5 years. This paper summarizes the research and technical development efforts over the last 15 years which have contributed to improving the effectiveness of the case management strategy to reduce mortality from 5' pneumonia in children in Pakistan. Community intervention is viable, effective and practical. Rising antimicrobial resistance among commonly used and A low-cost oral agent is of significant concern. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation of the impact of the ARI control programme is lacking. Lack of funding for programmatic activities, lack of coordination with other child survival programs, inadequate training for community health workers and general practitioners in the private sector, lack of public awareness about seeking timely and appropriate care and insufficient planning and support for ARI in the programmatic activities at provincial and district levels are major hindrances in decreasing the burden of ARI in the country. The recent introduction of the community-based Lady Health Worker (LHW) Programme and WHO and UNICEF-sponsored integrated management of childhood illness initiative present ideal opportunities for re-emphasizing early case detection and appropriate case management of ARI. Ultimately, focusing on preventive strategies such as improving nutrition, reducing indoor pollution, improving mass vaccination, as well as introduction of new vaccines effective against important respiratory pathogens will likely have the most impact on reducing severe ARI and deaths from severe disease. (author)

  11. Driving pressure and survival in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Marcelo B P; Meade, Maureen O; Slutsky, Arthur S; Brochard, Laurent; Costa, Eduardo L V; Schoenfeld, David A; Stewart, Thomas E; Briel, Matthias; Talmor, Daniel; Mercat, Alain; Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Carvalho, Carlos R R; Brower, Roy G

    2015-02-19

    Mechanical-ventilation strategies that use lower end-inspiratory (plateau) airway pressures, lower tidal volumes (VT), and higher positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEPs) can improve survival in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relative importance of each of these components is uncertain. Because respiratory-system compliance (CRS) is strongly related to the volume of aerated remaining functional lung during disease (termed functional lung size), we hypothesized that driving pressure (ΔP=VT/CRS), in which VT is intrinsically normalized to functional lung size (instead of predicted lung size in healthy persons), would be an index more strongly associated with survival than VT or PEEP in patients who are not actively breathing. Using a statistical tool known as multilevel mediation analysis to analyze individual data from 3562 patients with ARDS enrolled in nine previously reported randomized trials, we examined ΔP as an independent variable associated with survival. In the mediation analysis, we estimated the isolated effects of changes in ΔP resulting from randomized ventilator settings while minimizing confounding due to the baseline severity of lung disease. Among ventilation variables, ΔP was most strongly associated with survival. A 1-SD increment in ΔP (approximately 7 cm of water) was associated with increased mortality (relative risk, 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.51; PAmparo e Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo and others.).

  12. Molecular mechanisms of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabel Peter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a new infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus that leads to deleterious pulmonary pathological features. Due to its high morbidity and mortality and widespread occurrence, SARS has evolved as an important respiratory disease which may be encountered everywhere in the world. The virus was identified as the causative agent of SARS due to the efforts of a WHO-led laboratory network. The potential mutability of the SARS-CoV genome may lead to new SARS outbreaks and several regions of the viral genomes open reading frames have been identified which may contribute to the severe virulence of the virus. With regard to the pathogenesis of SARS, several mechanisms involving both direct effects on target cells and indirect effects via the immune system may exist. Vaccination would offer the most attractive approach to prevent new epidemics of SARS, but the development of vaccines is difficult due to missing data on the role of immune system-virus interactions and the potential mutability of the virus. Even in a situation of no new infections, SARS remains a major health hazard, as new epidemics may arise. Therefore, further experimental and clinical research is required to control the disease.

  13. Correntropy-based spectral characterization of respiratory Patterns in patients with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Garde Martínez, Ainara; Sörnmo, Leif; Jané Campos, Raimon; Giraldo Giraldo, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    A correntropy-based technique is proposed for the characterization and classification of respiratory flow signals in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients with periodic or nonperiodic breathing (PB or nPB, respectively) and healthy subjects. The correntropy is a recently introduced, generalized correlation measure whose properties lend themselves to the definition of a correntropybased spectral density (CSD). Using this technique, both respiratory and modulation frequencies can be reliably ...

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome mimickers lacking common risk factors of the Berlin definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibelin, Aude; Parrot, Antoine; Maitre, Bernard; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Fartoukh, Muriel; de Prost, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Some patients presenting with acute respiratory failure and meeting the Berlin criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) lack exposure to common risk factors (CRF). These so-called ARDS mimickers often lack histological diffuse alveolar damage. We aimed to describe such ARDS mimickers lacking CRF (ARDS CRF-) in comparison with others (ARDS CRF+). Retrospective study including all patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation for ARDS admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) of two tertiary care centers from January 2003 to December 2012. The prevalence of ARDS CRF- was 7.5 % (95 % CI [5.5-9.5]; n = 50/665). On the basis of medical history, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology, and chest CT scan patterns, four etiological categories were identified: immune (n = 18; 36 %), drug-induced (n = 13; 26 %), malignant (n = 7; 14 %), and idiopathic (n = 12; 24 %). Although the ARDS CRF- patients had a lower logistic organ dysfunction score (4 [3-8] vs. 10 [6-13]; p risk of mortality. For such atypical ARDS, a complete diagnostic workup, including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytology and chest CT scan patterns, should be performed to identify those patients who might benefit from specific therapies, including corticosteroids.

  15. End-of-life decision making in respiratory failure. The therapeutic choices in chronic respiratory failure in a 7-item questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Elfriede Rinnenburger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The transition from paternalistic medicine to a healthcare culture centred on the patient's decision making autonomy presents problems of communication and understanding. Chronic respiratory failure challenges patients, their families and caregivers with important choices, such as invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy, which, especially in the case of neuromuscular diseases, can significantly postpone the end of life. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 7-item questionnaire was administered to 100 patients with advanced COPD, neuromuscular diseases and pulmonary fibrosis, all of them on oxygen therapy and receiving day-hospital treatment for respiratory failure. The objective was to find out whether or not patients, if faced with a deterioration of their health condition, would want to take part in the decision making process and, if so, how and with whom. RESULTS. Results showed that: 90% of patients wanted to be interviewed, 10% preferred not to be interviewed, 82% wanted to be regularly updated on their clinical situation, 75% wanted to be intubated, if necessary, and 56% would also agree to have a tracheostomy. These choices have been confirmed one year later, with 93% of respondents accepting the questionnaire and considering it useful. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to conclude that a simple questionnaire can be a useful tool contributing to therapeutic decision making in respiratory failure.

  16. Influenza and other respiratory viruses involved in severe acute respiratory disease in northern Italy during the pandemic and postpandemic period (2009-2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pariani, Elena; Martinelli, Marianna; Canuti, Marta; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Oude Munnink, Bas B.; Deijs, Martin; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Zanetti, Alessandro; van der Hoek, Lia; Amendola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009 pandemic, international health authorities recommended monitoring severe and complicated cases of respiratory disease, that is, severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the proportion of SARI/ARDS cases and deaths due to

  17. Acute Renal Failure Due to Massive Envenomation Byafricanized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of a 50 years old gardener who had multiple beestings. He had no significant feature of anaphylaxis and initially appeared to be improving with fluids, steroids and antihistamines until few days into hospital admission, when he developed features of uraemia. A diagnosis of acute renal failure secondary to ...

  18. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Effiong Ekong; Ekrikpo, Udeme E.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30–35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes “holy water” green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango), shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew), Carica papaya (paw-paw) leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree), and Azadirachta indica (Neem) trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for “body cleansing” and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission. PMID:26199625

  19. Haemodialysis for post-traumatic acute renal failure – factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Post-traumatic acute renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy in an intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with high mortality. Objective. To assess indicators of improved survival. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of 64 consecutive trauma patients (penetrating and blunt trauma and burns) ...

  20. Acute Renal Failure Following the Saharan Horned Viper (Cerastes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Saharan horned viper (Cerastes cerastes) is a common snake in the sandy and rocky regions in the south of Morocco. Although nearly all snakes with medical relevance can induce acute renal failure (ARF), it's unusual except with bites by some viper species. ARF has very rarely been reported following ...

  1. Acute renal failure in four Comrades Marathon runners ingesting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To evaluate common factors associated with the development of acute renal failure (ARF) in Comrades Marathon runners. Methods. This was a retrospective case series of 4 runners hospitalised post-race with ARF in the 89 km 2010 Comrades Marathon. The outcome measures were incidence of analgesic use, ...

  2. Treatment of the complex abdomen and acute intestinal failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, F.E.E.

    2018-01-01

    Management of the complex abdomen and acute intestinal failure (IF) is challenging and requires specialized multidisciplinary treatment. Due to the small numbers and heterogeneity of the patient group high-quality evidence for some of the research questions is probably unachievable. Nevertheless,

  3. Imperforate hymen complicated by obstructive acute renal failure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imperforate hymen is a rare malformation (1/ 1000 female births). It is diagnosed most often during puberty. Early diagnosis of hematocolpos and evacuation is necessary to avoid any consequences. We report a rare case of an imperforate hymen complicated with acute urinary retention, hydronephrosis and renal failure in ...

  4. Effect of Ularitide on Cardiovascular Mortality in Acute Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Packer, M.; O'Connor, C.; McMurray, J. J. V.; Wittes, J.; Abraham, W. T.; Anker, S. D.; Dickstein, K.; Filippatos, G.; Holcomb, R.; Krum, H.; Maggioni, A. P.; Mebazaa, A.; Peacock, W. F.; Petrie, M. C.; Ponikowski, P.; Ruschitzka, F.; van Veldhuisen, D. J.; Kowarski, L. S.; Schactman, M.; Holzmeister, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In patients with acute heart failure, early intervention with an intravenous vasodilator has been proposed as a therapeutic goal to reduce cardiac-wall stress and, potentially, myocardial injury, thereby favorably affecting patients' long-term prognosis. METHODS In this double-blind

  5. Acute Renal Failure Induced by Chinese Herbal Medication in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effiong Ekong Akpan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional herbal medicine is a global phenomenon especially in the resource poor economy where only the very rich can access orthodox care. These herbal products are associated with complications such as acute renal failure and liver damage with a high incidence of mortalities and morbidities. Acute renal failure from the use of herbal remedies is said to account for about 30–35% of all cases of acute renal failure in Africa. Most of the herbal medications are not usually identified, but some common preparation often used in Nigeria includes “holy water” green water leaves, bark of Mangifera indica (mango, shoot of Anacardium occidentale (cashew, Carica papaya (paw-paw leaves, lime water, Solanum erianthum (Potato tree, and Azadirachta indica (Neem trees. We report a rare case of a young man who developed acute renal failure two days after ingestion of Chinese herb for “body cleansing” and general wellbeing. He had 4 sessions of haemodialysis and recovered kidney function fully after 18 days of admission.

  6. Acute liver failure and transplantation in children | Horslen | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute liver failure (ALF) was relatively easy to recognise in the days before liver transplantation became available as rescue therapy, because the diagnosis was based on end-stage disease manifestations such as profound coagulopathy, jaundice, encephalopathy and cerebral oedema (in a patient with no history of ...

  7. A course of acute respiratory infections in children with hyperplasia of lymphopharyngeal ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachenko V.Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the peculiarities of acute respiratory disease in children, depending on the presence of hyperplasia of lymphopharyngeal ring (HLR. Materials and methods. A total of 100 children 3–6 years old (the average age of 4 years and 10 months with clinical manifestations of acute respiratory infections. Formed two groups of observations: Group 1 — the children who suffering acute respiratory infections in the background HLR (n=50; Group 2 — the children who suffering acute respiratory infections without HLR (n=50. Results. Have HLR is accompanied by an increase in the duration and severity of acute respiratory infections in children of preschool age. In children HLR doubles the risk of complications from acute respiratory infections, and the possibility of various degrees of conductive hearing loss is three times higher than their peers without HLR. In nasal mucous in children with HLR show a more pronounced inflammatory process in the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract with the direct participation of bacteria in the pathological process. Conclusions. For children of preschool age the presence of HLR is accompanied by an increase in the duration and severity of acute respiratory disease with the development of bacterial complications.

  8. Systemic sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure: about 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Mamlouk, Habiba; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatosis affecting most frequently the lungs and the mediastinum. An acute renal failure reveals exceptionally this disease. It's a retrospective study implicating 12 cases of sarcoidosis complicated of acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to determine epidemiological, clinical, biological and histological profile in these cases and then to indicate the interest to consider the diagnosis of sarcoidosis in cases of unexplained renal failure. Extra-renal complications, therapeutic modalities and the outcome were determined in all patients. Our series involved 12 women with an average age of 40 years. Biological investigations showed an abnormal normocalcemia in 7 cases, a hypercalcemia in 5 cases, a hypercalciuria in 10 cases and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia in 7 cases. An acute renal failure was found in all patients with a median creatinin of 520 umol/L. For all patients, the renal echography was normal however, the kidney biopsy showed tubulo-interstitial nephritis. The extra-renal signs highlighting pulmonary interstitial syndrome in 5 cases, a sicca syndrome in 4 cases, mediastinal lymph nodes in 2 cases, a lymphocytic alveolitis in 3 cases, an anterior granulomatous uveitis in 2 cases and a polyarthritis in 5 cases. Five patients benefited of hemodialysis. The treatment consisted of corticosteroid in all cases. The follow up was marked by complete resolution of clinical and biological signs. The diagnosis of renal sarcoidosis must be done quickly to prevent renal failure.

  9. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is uncle......-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted.......Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...

  10. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  11. Acute renal failure in falciparum malaria: Clinical characteristics, demonstration of oxidative stress, and prognostication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Venkata Rama Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this prospective study, we aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of acute renal failure (ARF, determine oxidative stress, as well as to predict the outcome in patients with severe falciparum malaria (FM. The study included a total of 75 subjects; there were 25 adult patients with acute severe FM and ARF, 25 adult patients with uncomplicated FM without ARF, and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who served as controls. In patients with severe FM and ARF (n = 25, renal failure was non-oliguric in 28% and oliguric in 72%. The average duration of renal failure was 10.53 ± 4.0 days. Sixty percent recovered and 40% died. All patients with non-oliguric presentation recovered. The mean serum malondialdehyde (MDA levels were 0.82 ± 0.43 μmol/L, 2.97 ± 1.11 μmol/L, and 6.86 ± 2.62 μmol/L, respectively, in healthy con-trols, in patients with uncomplicated FM, and in those with severe FM with ARF. The Acute Physiology Age and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score, and the Acute Tubular Necrosis-Individual Severity Index (ATN-ISI score were all significantly higher in the expired group (19 ± 5.49 when compared to the survivor group (14.4 ± 3.15 (P = 0.014. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that survival was low in patients with delayed hospitalization and longer duration of symptoms. Also, we observed a high occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and central nervous system involvement among the patients who expired.

  12. Watershed Cerebral Infarction in a Patient with Acute Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Ozelsancak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure can cause neurologic manifestations such as mood swings, impaired concentration, tremor, stupor, coma, asterixis, dysarthria. Those findings can also be a sign of cerebral infarct. Here, we report a case of watershed cerebral infarction in a 70-year-old female patient with acute renal failure secondary to contrast administration and use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Patient was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging because of dysarthria. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed milimmetric acute ischemic lesion in the frontal and parietal deep white matter region of both cerebral hemisphere which clearly demonstrated watershed cerebral infarction affecting internal border zone. Her renal function returned to normal levels on fifth day of admission (BUN 32 mg/dl, creatinine 1.36 mg/dl and she was discharged. Dysarthria continued for 20 days.

  13. Clinical observation on the treatment of acute liver failure by combined non-biological artificial liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoqin; Sun, Jingxi; Li, Jiaqiong; Shi, Zaixiang; Xu, Jiyuan; Lu, Bo; Cheng, Shuli; Xu, Yanjun; Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Xianjiang

    2016-12-01

    The clinical efficacy and safety of different combinations of non-bio artificial liver in the treatment of acute liver failure was examined. A total of 61 cases were selected under blood purification treatment from the patients with severe acute liver failure admitted to the severe disease department of the hospital from December, 2010 to December, 2015. Three types of artificial liver combinations were observed, i.e., plasma exchange plus hemoperfusion plus continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (PE+HP+CVVHDF), PE+CVVHDF and HP+CVVHDF. The heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), respiratory index (PaO 2 /FiO 2 ), liver and kidney function indicator, as well as platelet and coagulation function were compared. A comparison before and after the treatment using the three methods, showed improvement in the HRs, MAPs, PaO 2 /FiO 2 , total bilirubins (TBIL) and alanine aminotransferases (ALT) (Prate of 62.3% (38/61), and a viral survival rate of 35.0% (7/20); with the non-viral survival rate being 75.6% (31/41). In conclusion, following the treatment of three types of artificial livers, the function was improved to varying degrees, with the PE+HP+CVVHDF and the PE+CVVHDF method being better. By contrast, after the treatment of non-viral liver failure, the survival rate was significantly higher than the patients with viral liver failure.

  14. Acute liver failure after recommended doses of acetaminophen in patients with myopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceelie, Ilse; James, Laura P.; Gijsen, Violette; Mathot, Ron A. A.; Ito, Shinya; Tesselaar, Coranne D.; Tibboel, Dick; Koren, Gideon; de Wildt, Saskia N.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the likelihood that recommended doses of acetaminophen are associated with acute liver failure in patients with myopathies. Retrospective analysis. Level III pediatric intensive care unit. Two pediatric patients with myopathies and acute liver failure. CLINICAL INVESTIGATIONS: We

  15. Long-term prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, P; Schmidt, L E; Larsen, F S

    2010-01-01

    The prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure remains unknown.......The prognosis for transplant-free survivors of paracetamol-induced acute liver failure remains unknown....

  16. Predicting success of high-flow nasal cannula in pneumonia patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure: The utility of the ROX index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Oriol; Messika, Jonathan; Caralt, Berta; García-de-Acilu, Marina; Sztrymf, Benjamin; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Masclans, Joan R

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe early predictors and to develop a prediction tool that accurately identifies the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) in pneumonia patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF) treated with high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC). This is a 4-year prospective observational 2-center cohort study including patients with severe pneumonia treated with HFNC. High-flow nasal cannula failure was defined as need for MV. ROX index was defined as the ratio of pulse oximetry/fraction of inspired oxygen to respiratory rate. One hundred fifty-seven patients were included, of whom 44 (28.0%) eventually required MV (HFNC failure). After 12 hours of HFNC treatment, the ROX index demonstrated the best prediction accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.74 [95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.84]; Pfailure in whom therapy can be continued after 12 hours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis complicated by decompensated respiratory failure in two children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurégan, C; Thierry, B; Blanchard, M; Chéron, G

    2015-11-01

    Laryngeal papillomatosis is a rare, potentially severe cause of recurrent laryngeal dyspnea. It should be known as a cause of laryngeal dyspnea resistant to the usual treatments. We report on two pediatric cases of severe laryngeal papillomatosis with respiratory distress and failure. These observations illustrate the importance of early adequate treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: clinical recognition and preventive management in chiropractic acute care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtz, T A

    2001-09-01

    To present clinical information relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its appearance in chiropractic acute care practice. The National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database was used, along with the bibliographies of selected articles and textbooks commonly found in chiropractic college libraries and bookstores. Clinical studies from the English literature were selected if they pertained to incidence, clinical relevancy, or the association of ARDS with commonly-seen diagnoses in chiropractic neuromusculoskeletal or orthopedic practice. All relevant studies identified by the search were evaluated based on information pertinent to chiropractic management of acute care patients. ARDS is a pulmonary distress syndrome with a high mortality rate. Recognizable indications for the possible development of ARDS include chest pain, head injury, and thoracic spine pain with or without trauma. Clinical evaluation, radiographic findings, and laboratory findings are presented to assist practitioners in identifying this disease process of multiple etiology. A study of the basic pathophysiologic processes that occur in the formation of ARDS is presented to help practitioners gain clinical appreciation. Strategies for preventing respiratory distress in chiropractic patients are also presented and include use of the postural position and the clinical maxim of "slow, deep breathing despite pain" to lessen incident rates of subjects at risk. Although ARDS may not be prevalent in chiropractic practice, it is important for physicians to be aware of the clinical basics (including its pathophysiology), its medical significance, and the preventive strategies that may be used to minimize its occurrence. This basic understanding will further advance knowledge of this disease complex.

  19. [Analogies between heart and respiratory muscle failure. Importance to clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, D

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is an established diagnosis. Respiratory muscle or ventilatory pump failure, however, is less well known. The latter becomes obvious through hypercapnia, caused by hypoventilation. The respiratory centre tunes into hypercapnea in order to prevent the danger of respiratory muscle overload (hypercapnic ventilatory failure). Hypoventilation will consecutively cause hypoxemia but this will not be responsible for performance limitation. One therefore has to distinguish primary hypoxemia evolving from diseases in the lung parenchyma. Here hypoxemia is the key feature and compensatory hyperventilation usually decreases PaCO2 levels. The cardiac as well as the respiratory pump adapt to an inevitable burden caused by chronic disease. In either case organ muscle mass will increase. If the burden exceeds the range of possible physiological adaptation, compensatory mechanisms will set in that are similar in both instances. During periods of overload either muscle system is mainly fueled by muscular glycogen. In the recovery phase (e. g. during sleep) stores are replenished, which can be recognized by down-regulation of the blood pressure in case of the cardiac pumb or by augmentation of hypercapnia through hypoventilation in case of the respiratory pump. The main function of cardiac and respiratory pump is maintenance of oxygen transport. The human body has developed certain compensatory mechanisms to adapt to insufficient oxygen supply especially during periods of overload. These mechanisms include shift of the oxygen binding curve, expression of respiratory chain isoenzymes capable of producing ATP at lower partial pressures of oxygen and the development of polyglobulia. Medically or pharmacologically the cardiac pump can be unloaded with beta blockers, the respiratory pump by application of inspired oxygen. Newer forms of therapy augment the process of recovery. The heart can be supported through bypass surgery or intravascular pump systems, while respiratory

  20. Acute respiratory failure in 3 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may result...

  1. Acute Respiratory Failure in 3 Children With Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may result...

  2. HIV-exposed infants with acute respiratory failure secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The decision to provide mechanical ventilation (intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV)) to HIV-exposed infants in resource-poor settings has remained difficult owing to problems in confirming HIV infection and the lack of data on outcome. We evaluated the predictive value of the HIV antibody test in ...

  3. Metabolic acidosis as an underlying mechanism of respiratory distress in children with severe acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L; Clark, Jeff; Sarnaik, Ashok P

    2007-11-01

    1) To alert the clinician that increasing rate and depth of breathing during treatment of acute asthma may be a manifestation of metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation rather than worsening airway obstruction; and 2) to describe the frequency of metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation in children with severe acute asthma admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit. Retrospective medical record review. University-affiliated children's hospital. All patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with a diagnosis of asthma between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005. None. Fifty-three patients with asthma (median age 7.8 yrs, range 0.7-17.9 yrs; 35 [66%] male; 46 [87%] black and 7 [13%] white) were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit during the study period. Fifteen (28%) patients developed metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation (pH 120 mg/dL [6.7 mmol/L]). Patients who developed metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation received asthma therapy similar to that received by patients who did not develop the disorder. Metabolic acidosis resolved contemporaneously with tapering of beta2-adrenergic agonists and administration of supportive care. All patients survived. Metabolic acidosis with hyperventilation manifesting as respiratory distress can occur in children with severe acute asthma. A pathophysiologic rationale exists for the contribution of beta2-adrenergic agents to the development of this acid-base disorder. Failure to recognize metabolic acidosis as the underlying mechanism of respiratory distress may lead to inappropriate intensification of bronchodilator therapy. Supportive care and tapering of beta2-adrenergic agents are recommended to resolve this condition.

  4. Risk factors for respiratory failure of motor neuron disease in a multiracial Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao; Hao, Ying; Xiao, Bin; Tan, Eng-King; Lo, Yew-Long

    2017-05-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND) is a devastating degenerative disorder. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common and severe form of MND. Respiratory failure arising from ventilator musculature atrophy is the most common cause of death for ALS patients. Exploring the factors correlated with respiratory failure can contribute to disease management. To characterize the clinical features of MND and determine the factors that may affect respiratory failure of MND patients. The case records of all MND patients seen in Singapore General Hospital (SGH) between January 2004 and December 2014 were examined. Demographic, clinical information were collected by reviewing case records. Mortality data, if not available from records, were obtained via phone call interview of family members. Demographic data and clinical treatments were compared between Respiratory support group and Non-respiratory support group. There were 73 patients included in our study. 49 (67.1%) patients died during follow-up. The mean age of onset was 58±11.1years. With regard to treatment, 63% needed feeding support, and 42.5% required ventilation aid. The median overall survival was 36months from symptom onset. Chi-square tests showed there was significantly higher percentage of respiratory support needed in Chinese than in other races (P=0.016). Compared with non-feeding support patients, patients with feeding support were more likely to require assisted ventilation (P=0.001). We report for the first time that the need of feeding support is significantly associated with assisted ventilation. Chinese MND patients may be more inclined to require respiratory support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre-operative risk factors predict post-operative respiratory failure after liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Tzu Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Post-operative pulmonary complications significantly affect patient survival rates, but there is still no conclusive evidence regarding the effect of post-operative respiratory failure after liver transplantation on patient prognosis. This study aimed to predict the risk factors for post-operative respiratory failure (PRF after liver transplantation and the impact on short-term survival rates. DESIGN: The retrospective observational cohort study was conducted in a twelve-bed adult surgical intensive care unit in northern Taiwan. The medical records of 147 liver transplant patients were reviewed from September 2002 to July 2007. Sixty-two experienced post-operative respiratory failure while the remaining 85 patients did not. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Gender, age, etiology, disease history, pre-operative ventilator use, molecular adsorbent re-circulating system (MARS use, source of organ transplantation, model for end-stage liver disease score (MELD and Child-Turcotte-Pugh score calculated immediately before surgery were assessed for the two groups. The length of the intensive care unit stay, admission duration, and mortality within 30 days, 3 months, and 1 year were also evaluated. Using a logistic regression model, post-operative respiratory failure correlated with diabetes mellitus prior to liver transplantation, pre-operative impaired renal function, pre-operative ventilator use, pre-operative MARS use and deceased donor source of organ transplantation (p<0.05. Once liver transplant patients developed PRF, their length of ICU stay and admission duration were prolonged, significantly increasing their mortality and morbidity (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The predictive pre-operative risk factors significantly influenced the occurrence of post-operative respiratory failure after liver transplantation.

  6. Antithrombin III is associated with acute liver failure in patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing mechanical circulatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Judith; Ulmer, Hanno; Kilo, Juliane; Margreiter, Raimund; Grimm, Michael; Mair, Peter; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2017-06-01

    There are few data on the role of liver dysfunction in patients with end-stage heart failure supported by mechanical circulatory support. The aim of our study was to investigate predictors for acute liver failure in patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing mechanical circulatory support. A consecutive 164 patients with heart failure with New York Heart Association class IV undergoing mechanical circulatory support were investigated for acute liver failure using the King's College criteria. Clinical characteristics of heart failure together with hemodynamic and laboratory values were analyzed by logistic regression. A total of 45 patients (27.4%) with heart failure developed subsequent acute liver failure with a hospital mortality of 88.9%. Duration of heart failure, cause, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of vasopressors, central venous pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary pulsatility index, cardiac index, and transaminases were not significantly associated with acute liver failure. Repeated decompensation, atrial fibrillation (P failure in univariate analysis only. In multivariable analysis, decreased antithrombin III was the strongest single measurement indicating acute liver failure (relative risk per %, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-0.93; P = .001) and remained an independent predictor when adjustment for the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was performed (relative risk per %, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.99; P = .031). Antithrombin III less than 59.5% was identified as a cutoff value to predict acute liver failure with a corresponding sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 87%. In addition to the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, decreased antithrombin III activity tends to be superior in predicting acute liver failure compared with traditionally thought predictors. Antithrombin III measurement may help to identify patients more precisely who are developing acute liver failure during mechanical

  7. Are de novo acute heart failure and acutely worsened chronic heart failure two subgroups of the same syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banović Marko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute heart failure (AHF is one of the most common diseases in emergency medicine, associated with poor prognosis and high in-hospital and long-term mortality. Objective. To investigate clinical presentation of patients with de novo AHF and acute worsening of chronic heart failure (CHF and to identify differences in blood levels of biomarkers and echocardiography findings. Methods. This prospective study comprised 64 consecutive patients being grouped according to the onset of the disease into patients with the de novo AHF (45.3%, and patients with acute worsening of CHF (54.7%. Results. Acute congestion (60% was the most common manifestation of de novo AHF, whereas pulmonary oedema (43.1% was the most common manifestation of acutely decompensated CHF. Patients with acutely decompensated CHF had significantly higher blood values of creatinine (147.10 vs 113.16 μmol/l; p<0.05, urea (12.63 vs 7.82 mmol/l; p<0.05, BNP (1440.11 vs 712.24 pg/ml; p<001 and NTproBNP (9097.00 vs 2827.70 pg/ml; p<0.01 on admission, and lower values of M-mode left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF during hospitalization (49.44% vs 42.94%; p<0.05. The follow-up after one year revealed still significantly higher BNP (365.49 vs 164.02 pg/ ml; p<0.05 and lower average values of both LVEF in patients with acutely worsened CHF (46.62% vs 54.41% and 39.52% vs 47.88%; p<0.05. Conclusion. Considering differences in clinical severity on admission, echocardiography and natriuretic peptide values during hospitalization and after one year follow-up, de novo AHF and acutely worsened CHF are two different subgroups of the same syndrome.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced acute renal failure in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Thomas E N; Graebe, Martin; Promeneur, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In conscious, chronically instrumented rats we examined 1) renal tubular functional changes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute renal failure; 2) the effects of LPS on the expression of selected renal tubular water and sodium transporters; and 3) effects of milrinone......-alpha and lactate, inhibited the LPS-induced tachycardia, and exacerbated the acute LPS-induced fall in GFR. Furthermore, Ro-20-1724-treated rats were unable to maintain MAP. We conclude 1) PDE3 or PDE4 inhibition exacerbates LPS-induced renal failure in conscious rats; and 2) LPS treated rats develop an escape......, a phosphodiesterase type 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, and Ro-20-1724, a PDE4 inhibitor, on LPS-induced changes in renal function. Intravenous infusion of LPS (4 mg/kg b.wt. over 1 h) caused an immediate decrease in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and proximal tubular outflow without changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP...

  9. Acute Renal Failure Secondary to Tuberculosis: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed I. Khilji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a multiorgan disease with varied clinical presentations and is reemerging due to increasing immigration and globalization. We present the case of an immigrant female patient who developed acute renal failure with clinical and biochemical features suggestive of lupus nephritis but with a timely renal biopsy showing caseating granulomata in the renal parenchyma consistent with renal tuberculosis. Despite treatment with antituberculosis treatment and resolution of TB on repeat renal biopsy, she remained haemodialysis dependent. We discuss the diagnostic challenges faced in this presentation and also explore possible differential diagnoses. This rare presentation highlights the importance of renal biopsy in the diagnosis and treatment of acute renal failure and the atypical presentation of tuberculosis.

  10. Update on acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Cristina; Solà, Elsa

    2018-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a recently defined syndrome characterised by acute decompensation of chronic liver disease, associated with organ failures and high mortality. ACLF is a common condition and may affect up to 30% of patients admitted to hospital for cirrhosis complications. Bacterial infections, alcoholism and reactivation of viral hepatitis are the most common precipitating factors in ACLF, although in up to 40% of patients no precipitating factor can be identified. Although the pathophysiology of ACLF is not completely understood, the presence of an excessive inflammatory response appears to play a key role. There is no specific treatment for patients with ACLF and management is based on organ support and liver transplantation. New treatment strategies based on liver support systems and immunomodulatory treatments are being evaluated but existing data are still limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcome of acute liver failure in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiødt, Frank V; Chung, Raymond T; Schilsky, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    Older age is considered a poor prognostic factor in acute liver failure (ALF) and may still be considered a relative contraindication for liver transplantation for ALF. We aimed to evaluate the impact of older age, defined as age > or = 60 years, on outcomes in patients with ALF. One thousand one...... hundred twenty-six consecutive prospective patients from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group registry were studied. The median age was 38 years (range, 15-81 years). One thousand sixteen patients (90.2%) were younger than 60 years (group 1), and 499 (49.1%) of these had acetaminophen-induced ALF...... and 48.2% in group 2 for non-acetaminophen patients (P liver transplantation) was 64.9% in group 1 and 60.0% in group 2 (not significant) for acetaminophen patients and 30.8% in group 1 and 24.7% in group 2 for non-acetaminophen patients (P...

  12. Profiling acute respiratory tract infections in children from Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARI are leading global cause of under-five mortality and morbidity. Objective: To elicit the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among under-five children. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in 21 registered urban slums of Guwahati in Assam to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among 370 under-five children from 184 households and 370 families. Results: The prevalence of ARI was found to be 26.22%; infants and female children were more affected. Majority of the ARI cases were from nuclear families (84.54%, living in kutcha houses (90.72% with inadequate ventilation (84.54%, overcrowded living condition (81.44%, with kitchen attached to the living room (65.98% and using biomass fuel for cooking (89.69%. ARI was significantly associated with ventilation, location of kitchen in household; presence of overcrowding, nutritional status, and primary immunization status also had impacts on ARI. Conclusion: The present study had identified a high prevalence of the disease among under-fives. It also pointed out various socio-demographic, nutritional, and environmental modifiable risk factors which can be tackled by effective education of the community.

  13. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G; Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes.

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis

  15. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: fluid management in the PICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Ingelse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS. Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes.

  16. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We generate strong (1 and weak (2 grade of recommendations based on high (A, moderate (B and low (C grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B and inhaled nitric oxide (1A as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C, and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B. The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B, however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B. In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B. Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A. In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  17. Avascular necrosis of bone in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, N. E-mail: hongnan@bjmu.edu.cn; Du, X.K

    2004-07-01

    AIM: To report the incidence of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven SARS patients who had large joint pain between March 2003 and May 2003 underwent both plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination on the same day. All patients received steroids and ribavirin treatment. All plain radiographs and MR images were analysed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Any abnormalities, location, extent, morphology, the number, size and signal intensity of lesions were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were identified with AVN, The mean time to diagnosis of AVN was 119 days after the onset of SARS, or 116 days after steroid use. Three patients had early bilateral AVN of the femoral head, four patients of one femoral head, five patients of the bilateral hips and knees, four patients of the ipsilateral hip and knees, 10 patients of the knee(s), one patient of the right proximal fibula, and one patient of the knees and talus. Results of hip, knee and ankle plain radiographs were negative. CONCLUSION: AVN can occur in the patients with SARS. AVN had a strong association with steroid use. More studies are required to confirm whether the virus itself can also lead to AVN.

  18. Avascular necrosis of bone in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, N.; Du, X.K.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To report the incidence of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven SARS patients who had large joint pain between March 2003 and May 2003 underwent both plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination on the same day. All patients received steroids and ribavirin treatment. All plain radiographs and MR images were analysed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Any abnormalities, location, extent, morphology, the number, size and signal intensity of lesions were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were identified with AVN, The mean time to diagnosis of AVN was 119 days after the onset of SARS, or 116 days after steroid use. Three patients had early bilateral AVN of the femoral head, four patients of one femoral head, five patients of the bilateral hips and knees, four patients of the ipsilateral hip and knees, 10 patients of the knee(s), one patient of the right proximal fibula, and one patient of the knees and talus. Results of hip, knee and ankle plain radiographs were negative. CONCLUSION: AVN can occur in the patients with SARS. AVN had a strong association with steroid use. More studies are required to confirm whether the virus itself can also lead to AVN

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis.

  20. Definition and epidemiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezoagli, Emanuele; Fumagalli, Roberto; Bellani, Giacomo

    2017-07-01

    Fifty years ago, Ashbaugh and colleagues defined for the first time the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), one among the most challenging clinical condition of the critical care medicine. The scientific community worked over the years to generate a unified definition of ARDS, which saw its revisited version in the Berlin definition, in 2014. Epidemiologic information about ARDS is limited in the era of the new Berlin definition, and wide differences are reported among countries all over the world. Despite decades of study in the field of lung injury, ARDS is still so far under-recognized, with 2 out of 5 cases missed by clinicians. Furthermore, although advances of ventilator strategies in the management of ARDS associated with outcome improvements-such as protective mechanical ventilation, lower driving pressure, higher PEEP levels and prone positioning-ARDS appears to be undertreated and mortality remains elevated up to 40%. In this review, we cover the history that led to the current worldwide accepted Berlin definition of ARDS and we summarize the recent data regarding ARDS epidemiology.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated With Rabies: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsiang Hsu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is the first potentially lethal complication in rabies virus infection, although its occurrence is rare. We report on a fatal case of rabies virus infection in a 45-year-old woman from Hu-Nan Province, China. The neurologic signs of limb numbness and water phobia occurred from 61 days after the dog bite; the clinical course was progressive, with the most severe clinical manifestations being fever, encephalitis, and ARDS. The woman expired 12 days after admission to the hospital. An autopsy proved rabies encephalitis, mainly involving the medulla oblongata, the thalamus, part of the pons, the cerebellum, and the hippocampus. The lung pathologic examination revealed the organizing phase of ARDS with diffuse alveolar damage, hyaline membrane formation, type II alveolar cell hyperplasia accompanied by proliferation of fibroblasts and infiltration of mononuclear cells into the interstitial space. Immunohistochemistry stain and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for rabies virus failed to demonstrate the organism in the lung tissue. Strong expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was detected in the alveolar macrophages. An immunologic mechanism with iNOS expression in the absence of direct invasion of the organism may participate in the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with rabies.

  2. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  3. Disseminated lymphoma presenting as acute thigh pain and renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A 66-year-old diabetic man presented with severe right thigh swelling and pain together with acute renal failure. At autopsy, this was found to be due to disseminated high grade B cell lymphoma invading the psoas muscle and multiple organs, including the kidneys. The unique presentation of this case emphasizes the need for increased awareness of the variety of ways in which lymphoma can manifest itself.

  4. Renal function trajectories and clinical outcomes in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givertz, Michael M; Postmus, Douwe; Hillege, Hans L; Mansoor, George A; Massie, Barry M; Davison, Beth A; Ponikowski, Piotr; Metra, Marco; Teerlink, John R; Cleland, John G F; Dittrich, Howard C; O'Connor, Christopher M; Cotter, Gad; Voors, Adriaan A

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated adverse risk associated with baseline and worsening renal function in acute heart failure, but none has modeled the trajectories of change in renal function and their impact on outcomes. We used linear mixed models of serial measurements of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine to describe trajectories of renal function in 1962 patients with acute heart failure and renal dysfunction enrolled in the Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study of the Selective A1 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Rolofylline for Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Volume Overload to Assess Treatment Effect on Congestion and Renal Function study. We assessed risk of 180-day mortality and 60-day cardiovascular or renal readmission and used Cox regression to determine association between renal trajectories and outcomes. Compared with patients alive at 180 days, patients who died were older, had lower blood pressure and ejection fraction, and higher creatinine levels at baseline. On average for the entire cohort, creatinine rose from days 1 to 3 and increased further after discharge, with the trajectory dependent on the day of discharge. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the rate of change in creatinine from baseline were the strongest independent predictors of 180-day mortality and 60-day readmission, whereas the rate of change of blood urea nitrogen from baseline was not predictive of outcomes. Baseline blood urea nitrogen>35 mg/dL and increase in creatinine>0.1 mg/dL per day increased the risk of mortality, whereas stable or decreasing creatinine was associated with reduced risk. Patients with acute heart failure and renal dysfunction demonstrate variable rise and fall in renal indices during and immediately after hospitalization. Risk of morbidity and mortality can be predicted based on baseline renal function and creatinine trajectory during the first 7 days. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00328692 and NCT

  5. Contrast media induced acute renal failure in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambausek, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dehydration, preexisting renal insufficiency, multiple myeloma and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are known risk factors for a radiocontrast medium induced acute renal failure. In 90% of patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency and proteinuria, a further detoriation of renal function can be expected after i.v. administration of radiocontrast medium. Recent concepts on the genesis of acute renal failure after radiocontrast medium in multiple myeloma emphasize the role of tubular blocade (tubular precipitation of myeloma protein with contrast medium). In insulin-dependent diabetic patients we found altered carbohydrate composition of urinary Tamm Horsfall Protein (THP), with increased glucose and diminished N-acetyl-neuraminicacid content. This was paralleled by a difference in an in-vitro system of coprecipitation where THP of diabetes triggered more pronounced calcium dependent coprecipitation of contrast medium and albumin. These in-vitro findings might be important for the explanation of the genesis of radiocontrast medium-induced acute renal failure in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. (orig.) [de

  6. Acute renal failure--which treatment modality is the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, M; Papagianni, A; Diamantopoulou, D; Mitsopoulos, E; Belechri, A M; Koukoudis, P; Memmos, D

    1998-09-01

    Despite the progress in animal research concerning the pathophysiology and the progress in clinical practice regarding the methods of therapy, the incidence and mortality of acute renal failure remain high, especially when other organs are involved. New pharmacological interventions have led to the perspective that in the near future it may be possible to prevent and/or ameliorate this devastating syndrome. Continuous dialysis therapy and the selection of a biocompatible membrane may possibly help the critically ill patient especially when parenteral nutrition and correction of electrolyte and acid-base disturbances are important. Nevertheless, more solid data are needed and one should take into consideration that acute renal failure is a multifactorial syndrome. The type of dialysis itself is not the only matter which has to be evaluated since the mortality rate can be correlated with the number of involved organs before or after the initiation of acute renal failure and with the severity of the original disease. In clinical practice, a large number of prospective studies and more sophisticated statistical methodology are needed in order to evaluate the proper treatment modality.

  7. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-09-06

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Permissive hypercapnia for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompromised children: A single center experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Fuchs

    Full Text Available Controlled hypoventilation while accepting hypercapnia has been advocated to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury. The aim of the study was to analyze outcomes of a cohort of immunocompromised children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS ventilated with a strategy of stepwise increasing PCO2 targets up to 140 mm Hg.Retrospective analysis of outcomes of a cohort of children with oncologic disease or after stem cell transplantation and severe respiratory failure in comparison with a historical control cohort.Out of 150 episodes of admission to the PICU 88 children underwent invasive mechanical ventilation for >24h (overall survival 75%. In a subgroup of 38 children with high ventilator requirements the PCO2 target ranges were increased stepwise. Fifteen children survived and were discharged from the PICU. Severe pulmonary hypertension was seen in two patients and no case of cerebral edema was observed. Long term outcome was available in 15 patients and 10 of these patients survived without adverse neurological sequelae. With introduction of this strategy survival of immunocompromised children undergoing mechanical ventilation for >24h increased to 48% compared to 32% prior to introduction (historical cohort.A ventilation strategy incorporating very high carbon dioxide levels to allow for low tidal volumes and limited inspiratory pressures is feasible in children. Even severe hypercapnia may be well tolerated. No severe side effects associated with hypercapnia were observed. This strategy could potentially increase survival in immunocompromised children with severe ARDS.

  9. A case of lung cancer associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome after thoracic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enoki, Masafumi; Tojima, Hirokazu

    1996-01-01

    A 73-year-old man presented with dyspnea, cough, fever, appetite loss and stridor due to bronchial stenosis. Fiber-optic bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial lesion in the right main bronchus and biopsy specimens showed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical stage of lung cancer was IIIB (T4N2M0). The patient received 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 43 days to a field including the right hilum and mediastinum. The tumor decreased in size and stenosis of the bronchus disappeared. A week after completion of radiation the patient began to have high grade fever and dyspnea, and progressive hypoxia developed. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates. Despite mechanical ventilation with PEEP and the administration of steroids, he died of respiratory failure three weeks after completion of radiation. Necropsy specimens obtained from the left lung revealed massive deposition of fibrin in the alveolar airspaces associated with hyaline membranes and hyperplasia of type II cells indicating diffuse alveolar damage. The patient had mild pulmonary fibrosis on a CT scan taken before the start of radiotherapy. We conclude that care should be taken if the case has pulmonary fibrosis because radiation therapy can precipitate severe radiation pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in such cases. (author)

  10. Stridor and respiratory failure due to tracheobronchomalacia: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Andrade de Mello

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM results from structural and functional abnormalities of the respiratory system. It is characterized by excessive collapse: at least 50% of the cross-sectional area of the trachea and main bronchi. In this paper, we present a rare case of a patient with TBM who first presented with stridor and respiratory failure due to exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. CASE REPORT: An 81-year-old Caucasian man was admitted presenting coughing, purulent sputum, stridor and respiratory failure. He had a medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and silicosis and was a former smoker. Axial computed tomography on the chest revealed marked collapse of the trachea in its middle third. Bronchoscopy showed characteristics compatible with TBM. He was treated with noninvasive ventilation, without any good response. Subsequently, a Dumon Y stent was placed by means of rigid bronchoscopy. After the procedure, he was discharged with a clinical improvement. CONCLUSION: TBM is fatal and often underdiagnosed. In COPD patients, stridor and respiratory failure may be helpful signs that should alert physicians to consider TBM as an early diagnosis. Thus, these signs may be important for optimizing the treatment and evolution of such patients.

  11. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced