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Sample records for acute pulmonary embolism

  1. Postoperative Acute Pulmonary Embolism Following Pulmonary Resections

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    Shonyela, Felix Samuel; Liu, Bo; Jiao, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections is highly fatal complication. Many literatures have documented cancer to be the highest risk factor for acute pulmonary embolism after pulmonary resections. Early diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism is highly recommended and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography is the gold standard in diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic therapy have shown a great success in treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical therapies (embolectomy and inferior vena cava filter replacement) proved to be lifesaving but many literatures favored medical therapy as the first choice. Prophylaxis pre and post operation is highly recommended, because there were statistical significant results in different studies which supported the use of prophylaxis in prevention of acute pulmonary embolism. Having reviewed satisfactory number of literatures, it is suggested that thoroughly preoperative assessment of patient conditions, determining their risk factors complicating to pulmonary embolism and the use of appropriate prophylaxis measures are the key options to the successful minimization or eradication of acute pulmonary embolism after lung resections. PMID:26354232

  2. Acute pulmonary embolism in childhood

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    van Ommen, C. Heleen; Peters, Marjolein

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is an uncommon, but potentially fatal disease in children. Most children with pulmonary embolism have underlying clinical conditions, of which the presence of a central venous catheter is the most frequent. The clinical presentation is often subtle, or masked by the underlying

  3. Acute pulmonary embolism in young: Case reports

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    Sandeep Rana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism remains a disease which needs high clinical suspicion to prevent mortality and morbidity. More so in young healthy individuals, suspicion is very low as compared to old age individuals with multiple co-morbid conditions. Pulmonary embolism carries high mortality if not suspected and treatment initiated as early as possible. There are two case reports of young male individuals who presented as acute onset of breathlessness and later diagnosed and treated as a case of pulmonary thromboembolism.

  4. Coagulopathy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnert, Per; Johansson, Pär I; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2017-01-01

    Whole blood coagulation and markers of endothelial damage were studied in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), and evaluated in relation to PE severity. Twenty-five patients were enrolled prospectively each having viscoelastical analysis of whole blood done using thrombelastography (TEG...

  5. [Anticoagulation after an acute pulmonary embolism].

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    Le Mao, Raphael; Tromeur, Cécile; Couturaud, Francis

    In order to determine the optimal duration of anticoagulation after an acute pulmonary embolism, the benefit risk balance needs to be analysed based on the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism in the absence of anticoagulation and the risk of bleeding while on anticoagulant therapy. Such evaluation take in account the frequency and the severity of the risks; clinical variables appear more informative to predict recurrent venous thromboembolism than biochemical or morphological variables. Three major results are now available: (1) the minimal duration of anticoagulation for pulmonary embolism is 3 months; (2) after pulmonary embolism that was provoked by a major transient risk factor, the risk of recurrence is low and does not justify to prolong anticoagulation beyond 6 months; and (3), in patients with an unprovoked pulmonary embolism (high risk of recurrence), the prolongation of anticoagulation up to 1 or 2 years as compared to 3 or 6 months is not associated with a long term reduction in the risk of recurrence and, consequently, these patients should be treated either during 3 to 6 months or indefinitely. This last observation has two major implications: first, to identify, among patients with unprovoked pulmonary embolism, those who have a low risk of recurrence and who do not require indefinite anticoagulation; and second, in those who are eligible for indefinite anticoagulation, to reduce the risk of bleeding. If direct oral anticoagulant therapies are promising, however, additional clinical trials are needed to help physician for the daily practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute Pulmonary Embolism Mimics Acute Coronary Syndrome in Older Patient

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    Chun-Chieh Liu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a fatal disease and an often missed diagnosis. There are no specific symptoms or signs. Accurate diagnosis followed by effective therapy can reduce mortality. We report on a 67-year-old man who underwent lumbar laminectomy and developed an acute anterior compressive-like chest pain and jaw numbness rather than dyspnea on the fifth postoperative day. Owing to refractory chest pain with suspicious posterior myocardial infarction or unstable angina on surface electrocardiogram, the patient received emergency coronary catheterization, which demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Further investigation provided a final diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Acute pulmonary embolism with simultaneous recent neuro-surgery was a therapeutic dilemma because of the risk of postoperative hemorrhage threatening neurologic function. After treatment with enoxaparin and close monitoring of his neurologic condition, his symptoms were eliminated. Clinicians must keep in mind a differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in a postoperative high-risk patient.

  7. Multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography in childhood acute pulmonary embolism

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    Tang, Chun Xiang; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Chowdhury, Shahryar M.; Fox, Mary A.; Lu, Guang Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition affecting people of all ages. Multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography has improved the imaging of pulmonary embolism in both adults and children and is now regarded as the routine modality for detection of pulmonary embolism. Advanced CT pulmonary angiography techniques developed in recent years, such as dual-energy CT, have been applied as a one-stop modality for pulmonary embolism diagnosis in children, as they can simultaneously provide anatomical and functional information. We discuss CT pulmonary angiography techniques, common and uncommon findings of pulmonary embolism in both conventional and dual-energy CT pulmonary angiography, and radiation dose considerations. PMID:25846076

  8. Multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography in childhood acute pulmonary embolism

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    Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Chowdhury, Shahryar M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition affecting people of all ages. Multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography has improved the imaging of pulmonary embolism in both adults and children and is now regarded as the routine modality for detection of pulmonary embolism. Advanced CT pulmonary angiography techniques developed in recent years, such as dual-energy CT, have been applied as a one-stop modality for pulmonary embolism diagnosis in children, as they can simultaneously provide anatomical and functional information. We discuss CT pulmonary angiography techniques, common and uncommon findings of pulmonary embolism in both conventional and dual-energy CT pulmonary angiography, and radiation dose considerations. (orig.)

  9. Management dilemmas in acute pulmonary embolism

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    Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A; Hughes, Rodney J; Hurdman, Judith; Maclean, Rhona M; Sabroe, Ian; van Veen, Joost J; Kiely, David G

    2014-01-01

    Background Physicians treating acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are faced with difficult management decisions while specific guidance from recent guidelines may be absent. Methods Fourteen clinical dilemmas were identified by physicians and haematologists with specific interests in acute and chronic PE. Current evidence was reviewed and a practical approach suggested. Results Management dilemmas discussed include: sub-massive PE, PE following recent stroke or surgery, thrombolysis dosing and use in cardiac arrest, surgical or catheter-based therapy, failure to respond to initial thrombolysis, PE in pregnancy, right atrial thrombus, role of caval filter insertion, incidental and sub-segmental PE, differentiating acute from chronic PE, early discharge and novel oral anticoagulants. Conclusion The suggested approaches are based on a review of the available evidence and guidelines and on our clinical experience. Management in an individual patient requires clinical assessment of risks and benefits and also depends on local availability of therapeutic interventions. PMID:24343784

  10. Acute pulmonary embolism leading to cavitation and large pulmonary abscess: A rare complication of pulmonary infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Koroscil, Matthew T.; Hauser, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary infarction is an infrequent complication of pulmonary embolism due to the dual blood supply of the lung. Autopsy studies have reported cavitation to occur in only 4–5% of all pulmonary infarctions with an even smaller proportion of these cases becoming secondarily infected. Patients with infected cavitating pulmonary infarction classically present with fever, positive sputum culture, and leukocytosis days to weeks following acute pulmonary embolism. We describe a rare case of acute ...

  11. The Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

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    Ebtesam Islam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the most current literature on the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism.  The epidemiology and symptomology of this disorder, including common symptoms such as fever, chest pain, dyspnea, edema, and syncope, are reviewed.  The utility of basic and easily available testing, such as electrocardiography and chest radiography, is evaluated. The literature on determining the pretest probability of venous thromboembolism with scoring systems, such as the Wells Score, the Geneva Scoring System, and the Pulmonary Embolism Rule Out Criteria, is appraised.  As the evaluation of pulmonary embolism has evolved, multiple imaging techniques has been developed and studied.  Ultrasonography, computed tomography with angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, ventilation perfusion lung scanning, and SPECT ventilation-perfusion lung imaging are discussed.  In conclusion, the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism remains complicated.  Clinical suspicion and stratification should guide a diagnostic strategy for the comprehensive evaluation and diagnosis of patients with this disorder.

  12. [Pulmonary embolism].

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    Hecker, M; Sommer, N; Hecker, A; Bandorski, D; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Mayer, E; Walmrath, D

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a potentially fatal disorder and frequently seen in critical care and emergency medicine. Due to a high mortality rate within the first few hours, the accurate initiation of rational diagnostic pathways in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and timely consecutive treatment is essential. In this review, the current European guidelines on the diagnosis and therapy of acute pulmonary embolism are presented. Special focus is put on a structured patient management based on the individual risk of early mortality. In particular risk assessment and new risk-adjusted treatment recommendations are presented and discussed in this article.

  13. Surgical Treatment of Acute Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

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    Beckerman, Ziv; Bolotin, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (MPE) is a life-threatening condition. The management of MPE has changed over the course of the last few years. Since the emergence of thrombolytic therapy, only a few patients remain amenable for surgical treatment. Currently, surgical embolectomy is advised only in very specific indications. This chapter will review the background, history, indications, surgical technique and results of surgical pulmonary embolectomy in patients with MPE.

  14. Thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, D R; Levine, M N

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether thrombolytic therapy reduces the rate of death or complications in patients with acute pulmonary embolism and whether a particular thrombolytic regimen is more effective than others. DATA SOURCES: The key words "fibrinolytic agents," "plasminogen activators," "streptokinase," "urokinase" and "pulmonary embolism" were used to search MEDLINE for relevant articles in English; the bibliographies of these articles were reviewed for additional publications. STUDY SE...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute pulmonary embolism

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    Fink, Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim-University of Heidelberg, Department of Clinical Radiology, Mannheim (Germany); Ley, Sebastian; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [University Hospitals Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a very common and potentially life-threatening disease. In comparison with CT, the clinical relevance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of PE is low. Nevertheless, as there are some potential advantages of MRI over CT (e.g. radiation free method, better safety profile of MR contrast media, capability of functional imaging). In certain patient, groups MRI might therefore be considered as a valuable alternative in the assessment of suspected PE. This article reviews the relevant MRI techniques for the evaluation of PE and gives an overview of the current literature for contrast-enhanced MR angiography of PE. (orig.)

  16. A Case of Tracheobronchomalacia Mimicking Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

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    Schwartz, Stefani M; Greco, Katherine J; Reddy, Venugopal

    2017-09-19

    BACKGROUND Pulmonary embolism is a common acute postoperative complication and is associated with 100,000 deaths per year in the USA. Tracheobronchomalacia is an uncommon condition, which presents with similar symptoms to pulmonary embolism, including hypoxemia, tachycardia, and shortness of breath. We describe a case of a patient who presented with postoperative pulmonary symptoms that were initially thought to be due to pulmonary embolism. However, following imaging investigations these symptoms were found to be due to tracheobronchomalacia. CASE REPORT A 73-year-old woman underwent elective ventral hernia repair and takedown of a Hartmann's pouch. On the ninth postoperative day, she developed symptoms of acute respiratory distress and was admitted to the surgical intensive care unit. Respiratory function tests and blood gas evaluation showed that her alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (A-a gradient) and modified Wells' score were suggestive of a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the lungs was negative for pulmonary embolism but demonstrated findings suggestive of tracheobronchomalacia. CONCLUSIONS Tracheobronchomalacia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoxia when evaluating a patient in the ICU.

  17. Treatment of Right Heart Thrombi Associated with Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

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    Barrios, Deisy; Chavant, Jeremy; Jiménez, David; Bertoletti, Laurent; Rosa-Salazar, Vladimir; Muriel, Alfonso; Viallon, Alain; Fernández-Capitán, Carmen; Yusen, Roger D; Monreal, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Evidence-based recommendations do not adequately address the treatment of right heart thrombi in patients who present with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism. This study included patients who had acute pulmonary embolism associated with right heart thrombi and participated in the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbólica registry. We assessed the effectiveness of anticoagulation versus reperfusion treatment for the outcomes of all-cause mortality, pulmonary embolism-related mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and major bleeding rates through 30 days after initiation of pulmonary embolism treatment. We used propensity score matching to adjust for the likelihood of receiving reperfusion treatment. Of 325 patients with pulmonary embolism and right heart thrombi, 255 (78%; 95% confidence interval, 74-83) received anticoagulation and 70 (22%; 95% confidence interval, 17-26) also received reperfusion treatment. Propensity score-matched pairs analyses did not detect a statistically lower risk of all-cause death (6.2% vs 14%, P = .15) or pulmonary embolism-related mortality (4.7% vs 7.8%; P = .47) for reperfusion compared with anticoagulation. Of the patients who received reperfusion treatment, 6.2% had a recurrence during the study follow-up period, compared with 0% of those who received anticoagulation (P = .049). The incidence of major bleeding events was not statistically different between the 2 treatment groups (3.1% vs 3.1%; P = 1.00). In patients with pulmonary embolism and right heart thrombi, no significant difference was found between reperfusion therapy and anticoagulant therapy for mortality and bleeding. The risk of recurrences was significantly higher for reperfusion therapy compared with anticoagulation. Right heart thrombi may not warrant riskier interventions than standard anticoagulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Risk stratification and management of acute pulmonary embolism.

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    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-12-02

    The clinical management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is rapidly changing over the years. The widening spectrum of clinical management strategies for these patients requires effective tools for risk stratification. Patients at low risk for death could be candidates for home treatment or early discharge. Clinical models with high negative predictive value have been validated that could be used to select patients at low risk for death. In a major study and in several meta-analyses, thrombolysis in hemodynamically stable patients was associated with unacceptably high risk for major bleeding complications or intracranial hemorrhage. Thus, the presence of shock or sustained hypotension continues to be the criterion for the selection of candidates for thrombolytic treatment. Interventional procedures for early revascularization should be reserved to selected patients until further evidence is available. No clinical advantage is expected with the insertion of a vena cava filter in the acute-phase management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Direct oral anticoagulants used in fixed doses without laboratory monitoring showed similar efficacy (odds ratio [OR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70-1.12) and safety (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.77-1.03) in comparison with conventional anticoagulation in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Based on these results and on their practicality, direct oral anticoagulants are the agents of choice for the treatment of the majority of patients with acute pulmonary embolism. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulmonary Embolism

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    A pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot in the ... and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can cause Permanent ...

  20. Computed tomography of acute pulmonary embolism: state-of-the-art

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    Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Meinel, Felix G.; McQuiston, Andrew D.; Ravenel, James G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the detection, risk stratification and prognosis evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism. This review will discuss the technical improvements for imaging peripheral pulmonary arteries, the methods of assessing pulmonary embolism severity based on CT findings, a multidetector CT technique for pulmonary embolism detection, and lastly, how to avoid overutilization of CT pulmonary angiography and overdiagnosis of pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  1. The New Diagnostic Marker For Acute Pulmonary Embolism In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The New Diagnostic Marker For Acute Pulmonary Embolism In Emergency Department; Mean Platelet Volume. Fahrettin Talay, Tarık Ocak, Aytekin Alcelik, Kurşat Erkuran, Akcan Akkaya, Arif Duran, Abdullah Demirhan, Ozlem Kar Kurt, Zehra Asuk ...

  2. Catheter-based therapies in acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jacob; Andersen, Asger; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To provide a systematic review of catheter-based therapies of acute pulmonary embolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: Studies published in peer-reviewed journals before February 2017 were included and categorized according to the mechanism of thrombus removal: fragmentation, rheolytic therapy...

  3. An unusual cause of acute pulmonary embolism: giant hepatic hemangioma

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    Hatice Duygu Hatice Duygu Bas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are the most common benign hepatic tumors and are usually asymptomatic. Lesions measuring more than 4 cm in diameter are known as “giant hemangiomas” and may cause various symptoms or complications depending on the size, the location, and the degree of compression of adjacent structures. Pulmonary embolism is a very rare complication of giant hepatic hemangiomas. In this case report, we describe a patient with acute pulmonary emboli, which presumably originated from laminar thrombi in the inferior vena cava caused by compression by giant hepatic hemangiomas.

  4. National Trends in Home Treatment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

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    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Hughes, Mary J

    2018-01-01

    Management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism has evolved from obligatory hospitalization to home treatment of carefully selected low-risk patients. The purpose of this investigation is to determine national trends in the prevalence of home treatment of pulmonary embolism. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was used to determine the number of patients seen in emergency departments throughout the United States with a primary (first-listed) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and the proportion hospitalized according to age, from 2007 to 2012. The National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample was used to determine in-hospital all-cause mortality and length of stay of hospitalized patients. Patients were adults (≥18 years) of both genders and all races from all regions of the United States. Excluded patients were those in shock or on ventilator support. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify patients and comorbid conditions. Home treatment was selected for 54 494 (6.0%) of 915 702 stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism. The proportion of patients treated at home was age-dependent, highest in those aged 30 years or younger, 12.1%, and lowest in those >80 years, 2.9%. Most patients treated at home, 66.8%, and had no comorbid conditions. In-hospital all-cause deaths were 2.6%. Deaths were ≤0.9% in those ≤40 years and 4.8% in those >80 years. Length of stay was 6 days or longer in 37.6% of patients. In view of the lower death rate among younger patients, they might be a group in whom home treatment would be more advantageous than in elderly patients.

  5. CT pulmonary angiography findings that predict 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

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    Bach, Andreas Gunter, E-mail: mail@andreas-bach.de [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany); Nansalmaa, Baasai; Kranz, Johanna [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany); Taute, Bettina-Maria [Department of Internal Medicine, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany); Wienke, Andreas [Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger-Str. 8, 06112 Halle (Germany); Schramm, Dominik; Surov, Alexey [Department of Radiology, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • In patients with acute pulmonary embolism contrast reflux in inferior vena cava is significantly stronger in non-survivors (odds ratio 3.29; p < 0.001). • This finding is independent from the following comorbidities: heart insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension. • Measurement of contrast reflux is a new and robust radiologic method for predicting 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. • Measurement of contrast reflux is a better predictor of 30-day mortality after acute pulmonary embolism than any other existing radiologic predictor. This includes thrombus distribution, and morphometric measurements of right ventricular dysfunction. - Abstract: Purpose: Standard computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) can be used to diagnose acute pulmonary embolism. In addition, multiple findings at CTPA have been proposed as potential tools for risk stratification. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the prognostic value of (I) thrombus distribution, (II) morphometric parameters of right ventricular dysfunction, and (III) contrast reflux in inferior vena cava on 30-day mortality. Material and methods: In a retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 365 consecutive patients were included. Inclusion criteria were: presence of acute pulmonary embolism, and availability of 30-day follow-up. A review of patient charts and images was performed. Results: There were no significant differences between the group of 326 survivors and 39 non-survivors in (I) thrombus distribution, and (II) morphometric measurements of right ventricular dysfunction. However, (III) contrast reflux in inferior vena cava was significantly stronger in non-survivors (odds ratio 3.29; p < 0.001). Results were independent from comorbidities like heart insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: Measurement of contrast reflux is a new and robust method for predicting 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary

  6. CT Pulmonary Angiography and Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism

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    Enden, T.; Kloew, N.E. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Cardiovascular Radiology

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use and quality of CT pulmonary angiography in our department, and to relate the findings to clinical parameters and diagnoses. Material and Methods: A retrospective study of 324 consecutive patients referred to CT pulmonary angiography with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). From the medical records we registered clinical parameters, blood gases, D-dimer, risk factors and the results of other relevant imaging studies. Results: 55 patients (17%) had PE detected on CT. 39 had bilateral PE, and 8 patients had isolated peripheral PE. 87% of the examinations showing PE had satisfactory filling of contrast material including the segmental pulmonary arteries, and 60% of the subsegmental arteries. D-dimer test was performed in 209 patients, 85% were positive. A negative D-dimer ruled out PE detected at CT. Dyspnea and concurrent symptoms or detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), contraceptive pills and former venous thromboembolism (VTE) were associated with PE. The presence of only one clinical parameter indicated a negative PE diagnosis (p < 0.017), whereas two or more suggested a positive PE diagnosis (p < 0.002). CT also detected various ancillary findings such as consolidation, pleural effusion, nodule or tumor in nearly half of the patients; however, there was no association with the PE diagnosis. Conclusion: The quality of CT pulmonary angiography was satisfactory as a first-line imaging of PE. CT also showed additional pathology of importance in the chest. Our study confirmed that a negative D-dimer ruled out clinically suspected VTE.

  7. The prognostic value of pulmonary embolism severity index in acute pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Prognostic assessment is important for the management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) and simple PESI (sPESI) are new emerged prognostic assessment tools for APE. The aim of this meta-analysis is to assess the accuracy of the PESI and the sPESI to predict prognostic outcomes (all-cause and PE-related mortality, serious adverse events) in APE patients, and compare between these two PESIs. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE database were searched up to June 2012 using the terms “Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index” and “pulmonary embolism”. Summary odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prognostic outcomes in low risk PESI versus high risk PESI were calculated. Summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) used to estimate overall predicting accuracies of prognostic outcomes. Results Twenty-one studies were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed low-risk PESI was significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.15), PE-related mortality (OR 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.17) and serious adverse events (OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.41), with no homogeneity across studies. In sPESI subgroup, the OR of all-cause mortality, PE-related mortality, and serious adverse events was 0.10 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.14), 0.09 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.26) and 0.40 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.51), respectively; while in PESI subgroup, the OR was 0.14 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.16), 0.09 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.21), and 0.30 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.38), respectively. For accuracy analysis, the pooled sensitivity, the pooled specificity, and the overall weighted AUC for PESI predicting all-cause mortality was 0.909 (95% CI: 0.900 to 0.916), 0.411 (95% CI: 0.407 to 0.415), and 0.7853±0.0058, respectively; for PE-related mortality, it was 0.953 (95% CI: 0.913 to 0.978), 0.374 (95% CI: 0.360 to 0.388), and 0.8218±0.0349, respectively; for serious adverse events, it was 0.821 (95% CI: 0.795 to 0.845), 0

  8. Massive pulmonary embolism at the onset of acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Sorà

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in  APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO obtaining complete remission.

  9. Prospective cardiopulmonary screening program to detect chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in patients after acute pulmonary embolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, F.A.; Kralingen, K.W. van; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Heyning, F.H.; Vliegen, H.W.; Huisman, M.V.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary embolism is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Understanding the incidence of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary embolism is important for evaluating the need for screening but is also a

  10. Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, considerable progress in technology and clinical research methods have led to advances in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of acute venous thromboembolism. Despite this, however, the diagnosis is still often missed and preventive methods are often ignored. Published guidelines are useful, but are limited by the existing evidence base so that controversies remain with regard to topics such as duration of anticoagulation, indications for placement and removal of inferior vena caval filters, and when and how to administer thrombolytic therapy. The morbidity and mortality of this disease remain high, particularly when undiagnosed. While preventive approaches remain crucial, the focus of this review is on the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to acute venous thromboembolism, with an emphasis on acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:22619694

  11. Assessment of right ventricular function in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Deisy; Morillo, Raquel; Lobo, José Luis; Nieto, Rosa; Jaureguizar, Ana; Portillo, Ana K; Barbero, Esther; Fernandez-Golfin, Covadonga; Yusen, Roger D; Jiménez, David

    2017-03-01

    The optimal approach to assess right ventricular (RV) function in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) lacks clarity. This study aimed to evaluate the optimal approach to assess RV function in normotensive patients with acute symptomatic PE. Outcomes assessed through 30-days after the diagnosis of PE included all-cause mortality and complicated course. Eight hundred forty-eight patients were enrolled. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and transthoracic echocardiography agreed on the presence or absence of RV overload in 449 (53%) patients. The combination of the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) and MDCT showed a negative predictive value for 30-day all-cause mortality of 100%. Of the 43% that had an sPESI of >0 points and MDCT RV enlargement, 41 (11.3%) experienced a complicated course that included 24 (6.6%) deaths. One hundred twenty-nine patients (15%) had an sPESI of >0 points, MDCT, and echocardiographic RV overload. Of these, 21 (16.3%) experienced a complicated course within the first 30days, and 10 (7.7%) of them died. Incorporation of echocardiographic RV overload to the sPESI and MDCT did not improve identification of low-risk PE patients, whereas it improved identification of those at intermediate-high risk for short-term complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Syncope as a presentation of acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altınsoy B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bülent Altınsoy, Fatma Erboy, Hakan Tanrıverdi, Fırat Uygur, Tacettin Örnek, Figen Atalay, Meltem Tor Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine, Bulent Ecevit University, Kozlu, Zonguldak, Turkey Purpose: Syncope is an atypical presentation for acute pulmonary embolism (APE. There are conflicting data concerning syncope and prognosis of APE. Patients and methods: One hundred and seventy-nine consecutive patients aged 22–96 years (median, 68 years with APE were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Results: Prevalence of syncope was 13% (n=23 at the time of presentation. Compared to patients without syncope, those with syncope had a higher rate of central embolism (83% vs 43%, respectively, P=0.002, right ventricular dysfunction (91% vs 68%, P=0.021, and troponin positivity (80% vs 39%, P=0.001 but not 30-day mortality (13% vs 10%, P=0.716. Multivariate analysis showed that central localization (odds ratio: 9.08 and cardiac troponin positivity (odds ratio: 4.67 were the independent correlates of the presence of syncope in the patients with APE. Frequency of cardiopulmonary disease was lower, and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission was shorter in patients with syncope (P=0.138 and 0.118, respectively, although not significant. Conclusion: Syncope most likely represents an intermediate condition between massive APE and hypotension. In APE patients with syncope, the prognosis seems to depend on the underlying pathology, the patient’s age, comorbidities and duration from symptom onset to hospital admission, and the use of thrombolytic therapy. Keywords: syncope, prognosis, pulmonary embolism, mortality rate, compression sonography, right ventricular dysfunction

  13. Surgical treatment of acute pulmonary embolism--a 12-year retrospective analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnert, Per; Møller, Christian H; Carlsen, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    Surgical embolectomy for acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is considered to be a high risk procedure and therefore a last treatment option. We wanted to evaluate the procedures role in modern treatment of acute PE....

  14. Acute pulmonary embolism: A review | Saleh | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Medline and Embase databases. Key words employed were: pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), venous thromboembolism (VTE) and thrombophilia. Information was also sourced from the British Thoracic Society and The ...

  15. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQueen, A.S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andrewmcqueen7@hotmail.com; Worthy, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Keir, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  16. Follow-up CT pulmonary angiograms in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Hughes, Patrick G; Hourmouzis, Zak N; Hourmouzis, Nina P; Schweiss, Robert E; Bach, Jennifer A; Kazan, Viviane M; Kakish, Edward J; Keyes, Daniel C; Hughes, Mary J

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) angiography is associated with a non-negligible lifetime attributable risk of cancer. The risk is considerably greater for women and younger patients. Recognizing that there are risks from radiation, the purpose of this investigation was to assess the frequency of follow-up CT angiograms in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients aged ≥18 years with acute pulmonary embolism seen in three emergency departments from January 2013 to December 2014. Records of all patients were reviewed for at least 14 months. Pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by CT angiography in 600 patients. At least one follow-up CT angiogram in 1 year was obtained in 141 of 600 (23.5 %). Two follow-ups in 1 year were obtained in 40 patients (6.7 %), 3 follow-ups were obtained in 15 patients (2.5 %), and 4 follow-ups were obtained in 3 patients (0.5 %). Among young women (aged ≤29 years) with pulmonary embolism, 10 of 21 (47.6 %) had at least 1 follow-up and 4 of 21 (19.0 %) had 2 or more follow-ups in 1 year. Among all patients, recurrent pulmonary embolism was diagnosed in 15 of 141 (10.6 %) on the first follow-up CT angiogram and in 6 of 40 (15.0 %) on the second follow-up. Follow-up CT angiograms were obtained in a significant proportion of patients with pulmonary embolism, including young women, the group with the highest risk. Alternative options might be considered to reduce the hazard of radiation-induced cancer, particularly in young women.

  17. Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Elderly Patients with Stable Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Hughes, Mary J

    2017-03-01

    Patients aged >60 years with pulmonary embolism who were stable and did not require thrombolytic therapy were shown to have a somewhat lower in-hospital all-cause mortality with vena cava filters. In this investigation we further assess mortality with filters in stable elderly patients. In-hospital all-cause mortality according to use of inferior vena cava filters was assessed from the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample, 2003-2012, in: 1) All patients with pulmonary embolism; 2) All with pulmonary embolism who had none of the comorbid conditions listed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index; 3) Patients with a primary (first-listed) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and 4) Patients with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and none of the comorbid conditions listed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index. From 2003-2012, 2,621,575 stable patients with pulmonary embolism were hospitalized in the US. Patients aged >80 years showed lower mortality with vena cava filters (all pulmonary embolism, 6.1% vs 10.5%; all pulmonary embolism with no comorbid conditions, 3.3% vs 6.3%; primary pulmonary embolism, 4.1% vs 5.7%; primary pulmonary embolism with no comorbid conditions, 2.1% vs 3.7%; all P pulmonary embolism, irrespective of comorbid conditions, did not show lower mortality with filters. At present, in the absence of a randomized controlled trial, it seems prudent to consider a vena cava filter in very elderly (aged >80 years) stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Severity assessment of acute pulmonary embolism: evaluation using helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collomb, D.; Paramelle, P.J.; Calaque, O. [Department of Radiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Bosson, J.L. [Department of Statistics and Vascular diseases, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Vanzetto, G. [Department of Cardiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Barnoud, D. [Department of Medical Intensive Care, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Pison, C. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Coulomb, M.; Ferretti, G.

    2003-07-01

    The objective was to evaluate the helical CT (HCT) criteria that could indicate severe pulmonary embolism (PE). In a retrospective study, 81 patients (mean age 62 years) with clinical suspicion of PE explored by HCT were studied. The patients were separated into three different groups according to clinical severity and treatment decisions: group SPE included patients with severe PE based on clinical data who were treated by fibrinolysis or embolectomy (n=20); group NSPE included patients with non-severe PE who received heparin (n=30); and group WPE included patients without PE (n=31). For each patient we calculated a vascular obstruction index based on the site of obstruction and the degree of occlusion in the pulmonary artery. We noted the HCT signs, i.e., cardiac and pulmonary artery dimensions, that could indicate acute cor pulmonale. According to multivariate analysis, factors significantly correlated with the severity of PE were: the vascular obstruction index (group SPE: 54%; group NSPE: 24%; p<0.001); the maximum minor axis of the left ventricle (group SPE: 30.2 mm; group NSPE: 40.4 mm; p<0.001); the diameter of the central pulmonary artery (group SPE: 32.4 mm; group NSPE: 28.3 mm; p<0.001); the maximum minor axis of the right ventricle (group SPE: 47.5 mm; group NSPE: 42.7 mm; p=0.029); the right ventricle/left ventricle minor axis ratio (group SPE: 1.63; group NSPE: 1.09; p<0.0001). Our data suggest that hemodynamic severity of PE can be assessed on HCT scans by measuring four main criteria: the vascular obstruction index; the minimum diameter of the left ventricle; the RV:LV ratio; and the diameter of the central pulmonary artery. (orig.)

  19. Physician failure to stratify patients hospitalized with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mitchell D; Greco, Allison; Mukhtar, Umer; Dunn, Jonathan; Scharf, Michael L

    2017-12-01

    In 2011, the AHA recommended risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Failure to risk stratify may cause under recognition of intermediate-risk PE and its attendant short- and long-term consequences. We sought to determine if patients hospitalized with acute PE were appropriately risk stratified according to the 2011 AHA Scientific Statement within our hospital system and whether differences exist in adherence to risk stratification by hospital or treating hospital service. We also wished to know the frequency of in-hospital consultations for acute PE which might assist in the risk stratification process. This is a retrospective chart audit of all patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of acute PE between January 2011 and December 2013 at our 937-bed metropolitan, three hospital system comprised of academic University, neuroscience Specialty, and teaching Community hospitals. We evaluated the presence of imaging, laboratory tests, and specialty consultation within 72 h of PE diagnosis by hospital. 701 patients with acute PE were admitted to our hospital system during the study period. 308 patients (43.9%) met criteria for intermediate-risk PE. 347 patients (49.5%) were considered 'Low-Risk - At Risk', patients defined in a low-risk category not having undergone all recommended risk stratification testing and so truly may have been in a higher risk category. No specialty consultations were utilized for 265 patients (37.8%). Our large metropolitan hospital system inadequately risk stratifies hospitalized patients with acute PE. Because nearly one-half of patients with acute PE did not have all recommended testing, clinicians may be under recognizing patients with intermediate-risk PE and their risk for long-term morbidity. Specialty consultations were underutilized and may help guide medical decision-making.

  20. Clinical Presentation of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Survey of 800 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, Massimo; Cenci, Caterina; Monti, Simonetta; Poli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially fatal disease that is still underdiagnosed. The objective of our study was to reappraise the clinical presentation of PE with emphasis on the identification of the symptoms and signs that prompt the patients to seek medical attention. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 800 patients with PE from two different clinical settings: 440 were recruited in Pisa (Italy) as part of the Prospective Investigative Study of Acute Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PISAPED); 360 were diagnosed with and treated for PE in seven hospitals of central Tuscany, and evaluated at the Atherothrombotic Disorders Unit, Firenze (Italy), shortly after hospital discharge. We interviewed the patients directly using a standardized, self-administered questionnaire originally utilized in the PISAPED. The two samples differed significantly as regards age, proportion of outpatients, prevalence of unprovoked PE, and of active cancer. Sudden onset dyspnea was the most frequent symptom in both samples (81 and 78%), followed by chest pain (56 and 39%), fainting or syncope (26 and 22%), and hemoptysis (7 and 5%). At least one of the above symptoms was reported by 756 (94%) of 800 patients. Isolated symptoms and signs of deep vein thrombosis occurred in 3% of the cases. Only 7 (1%) of 800 patients had no symptoms before PE was diagnosed. Conclusions/Significance Most patients with PE feature at least one of four symptoms which, in decreasing order of frequency, are sudden onset dyspnea, chest pain, fainting (or syncope), and hemoptysis. The occurrence of such symptoms, if not explained otherwise, should alert the clinicians to consider PE in differential diagnosis, and order the appropriate objective test. PMID:22383978

  1. Rescue surgical pulmonary embolectomy for acute massive pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdulrahman Elassal

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is a rescue operation in high-risk PE. It could save patients with preoperative cardiac arrest. Early diagnosis, interdisciplinary team action, appropriate and emergent treatment strategy are necessary for favorable outcome.

  2. CT pulmonary angiogram for assessing the treatment outcome of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hai-Ting; Yan, Wen-Ying; Zhao, De-Li; Liang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Guo-Kun; Ling, Zai-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Ling

    2017-12-11

    To discuss the value of CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) for assessing the treatment outcome of acute pulmonary embolism (APE). CT pulmonary angiogram data and other clinical data were collected for 28 cases diagnosed as APE and analyzed retrospectively. The number and positions of emboli in the pulmonary artery, pulmonary artery obstruction index, right ventricular/left ventricular diameter ratio, main pulmonary artery/ascending aorta diameter ratio and blood oxygen saturation, and pulmonary arterial pressure were compared before and after treatment. Of 28 cases, emboli in the pulmonary artery completely or partially disappeared in 16 and 12 cases, respectively. CPTA indicated that the pulmonary arterial pressure decreased dramatically and the blood oxygen saturation increased after treatment in 26 cases. There were significant differences in the number and positions of pulmonary emboli and in pulmonary artery obstruction index before and after treatment in 28 cases (P  .05). CT pulmonary angiogram proved reliable for assessing the treatment efficacy of APE, providing more clinical information on the patients' status. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Acute pulmonary embolism: A review | Saleh | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common clinical disorder which is associated with high morbidity and mortality if untreated. Due to the high morbidity and mortality associated with undiagnosed and poorly treated PE, there is a need for protocols based on risk factor assessment to facilitate early diagnosis of PE ...

  4. Acute kidney injury in patients with pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fu, Chung-Ming; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Shao-Wei; Chang, Su-Wei; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is overlooked in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk factors for and long-term outcomes of this complication remain unknown. This study evaluated the predictors and prognosis of AKI in patients with PE. This retrospective cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We enrolled a total of 7588 patients who were admitted to a hospital for PE from January1997 to December 2011 and administered anticoagulation or thrombolytic agents. All demographic data, risk factors, and outcomes were analyzed. AKI was diagnosed in 372 (4.9%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed pre-existing chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, massive PE, anemia, and sepsis as independent risk factors for AKI. In the long-term follow-up, the survival rate was similar in the AKI and non-AKI groups. Careful risk factor screening and intensive intervention in patients with AKI might yield outcomes similar to those in patients without AKI. PMID:28248851

  5. Midterm outcomes of catheter-directed interventions for the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nathan L; Chaer, Rabih A; Marone, Luke K; Singh, Michael J; Makaroun, Michel S; Avgerinos, Efthymios D

    2017-04-01

    Objective The hemodynamic benefits of catheter-directed thrombolysis for acute pulmonary embolism have not been clearly defined beyond the periprocedural period. The objective of this study is to report midterm outcomes of catheter-directed thrombolysis for treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. Methods Records of all patients undergoing catheter-directed thrombolysis for high- or intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism were retrospectively reviewed. Endpoints were clinical success, procedure-related complications, mortality, and longitudinal echocardiographic parameter improvement. Results A total of 69 patients underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis (mean age 59 ± 15 y, 56% male). Eleven had high-risk and 58 intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism. Baseline characteristics did not differ by pulmonary embolism subtype. Fifty-two percent of patients underwent ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis, 39% standard catheter-directed thrombolysis, and 9% other interventional therapy; 89.9% had bilateral treatment. Average treatment time was 17.7 ± 11.3 h with average t-Pa dose of 28.5 ± 19.6 mg. The rate of clinical success was 88%. There were two major (3%) and six minor (9%) periprocedural bleeding complications with no strokes. All echocardiographic parameters demonstrated significant improvement at one-year follow-up. Pulmonary embolism-related in-hospital mortality was 3.3%, and estimated survival was 81.2% at one year. Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis is safe and effective for treatment of acute pulmonary embolism, with sustained hemodynamic improvement at one year. Further prospective large-scale studies are needed to determine comparative effectiveness of interventions for acute pulmonary embolism.

  6. Transient right bundle branch block in a patient with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzva, Jonathan; Viard, François-Valéry; Jost, Daniel; Lefort, Hugues; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    We report the case of an 86-year-old man found at home with acute chest pain and dyspnea. He presented some episodes of left chest pain combined with dyspnea. The physical examination revealed crackling sounds on the bases of the lungs without other anomalies. Electrocardiograms revealed a transient and complete right bundle branch block with inverted T waves in leads V1, V2, and V3. He was diagnosed with a proximal bilateral acute pulmonary embolism without acute cor pulmonale. We describe a case of a transient bundle branch block, without tachycardia or acute cor pulmonale, revealing a pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pulmonary artery catheter-directed thrombolysis for intermediate high risk acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of 60-year-old male with acute pulmonary embolism without hypotension but signs of right ventricular dysfunction and elevated cardiac biomarkers is reported in this study. The patient comes under intermediate high-risk category and was successfully thrombolysed with alteplase infused through pulmonary artery catheter. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT can be considered as much safer and effective alternative to systemic thrombolysis in such patients with lower risk of bleeding. This novel bedside method of pulmonary artery CDT with the advantage of no radiation exposure and real time monitoring of pulmonary artery pressures as an end-point of thrombolysis can be utilized in the near future.

  8. Pulmonary thrombo-embolic disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, a number of new and exciting anticoagulant therapies are being developed for this disease. Definition. Pulmonary thrombo-embolic diseases can be either acute or chronic. Pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs with partial or complete obstruction of the central or peripheral pulmonary arteries by emboli. Incidence.

  9. A porcine in-vivo model of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jacob; Andersen, Asger; Gade, Inger Lise; Ringgaard, Steffen; Kjaergaard, Benedict; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2018-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third most common cardiovascular cause of death after acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Patients are, however, often under-treated due to the risks associated with systemic thrombolysis and surgical embolectomy. Novel pharmacological and catheter-based treatment strategies show promise, but the data supporting their use in patients are sparse. We therefore aimed to develop an in vivo model of acute PE enabling controlled evaluations of efficacy and safety of novel therapies. Danish Landrace pigs (n = 8) were anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Two pre-formed autologous PEs (PE1, PE2, 20 × 1 cm) were administered consecutively via the right external jugular vein. The intact nature and central location were visualized in situ by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hemodynamic and biochemical responses were evaluated at baseline (BL) and after each PE by invasive pressure measurements, MRI, plus arterial and venous blood analysis. Pulmonary arterial pressure increased after administration of the PEs (BL: 16.3 ± 1.2, PE1: 27.6 ± 2.9, PE2: 31.6 ± 3.1 mmHg, BL vs. PE1: P = 0.0027, PE1 vs. PE2: P = 0.22). Animals showed signs of right ventricular strain evident by increased end systolic volume (BL: 60.9 ± 5.1, PE1: 83.3 ± 5.0, PE2: 99.4 ± 6.5 mL, BL vs. PE1: P = 0.0005, PE1 vs. PE2: P = 0.0045) and increased plasma levels of Troponin T. Ejection fraction decreased (BL: 58.9 ± 2.4, PE1: 46.4 ± 2.9, PE2: 37.3 ± 3.5%, BL vs. PE1: p = 0.0008, PE1 vs. PE2: P = 0.009) with a compensatory increase in heart rate preserving cardiac output and systemic blood pressure. The hemodynamic and biochemical responses were comparable to that of patients suffering from intermediate-high-risk PE. This porcine model mirrors the anatomical and physiologic changes seen in human patients with intermediate-high-risk PE, and may enable testing of future therapies

  10. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Carolina; Jiménez, David; De Miguel, Javier; Martí, David; Díaz, Gema; Sueiro, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is often complicated by the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some studies have suggested that patients with PE and concomitant COPD have a worse prognosis than patients without COPD. Outpatients diagnosed with acute symptomatic PE at a university tertiary care hospital were prospectively included in the study. Clinical characteristics, time between onset of symptoms and diagnosis, and outcome were analyzed according to presence or absence of COPD. The primary endpoint was all-cause deaths at 3 months. Of 882 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute symptomatic PE, 8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6%-9%) had COPD. Patients with COPD were significantly more likely to have a delay in diagnosis of more than 3 days and to have a low pretest probability of pulmonary embolism according to a standardized clinical score. The total number of deaths during 3 months of follow-up was 128 (14%; 95% CI, 12%-17%). Factors significantly associated with mortality from all causes were a history of cancer or immobilization, systolic blood pressure less than 100mm Hg, and arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation less than 90%. COPD was significantly associated with PE-related death in the logistic regression analysis (relative risk, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-5.1). Patients with COPD and PE more often have a lower pretest probability and a longer delay in diagnosis of PE. COPD is significantly associated with PE-related death in the 3 months following diagnosis.

  11. Multidetector computed tomography to assess clinical outcome in hemodynamically stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becattini, C.; Vedovati, M.C.; Grifoni, S.; Casazza, F.; Douma, R.; Bianchi, M.; Salvi, A.; Konstantinides, S.; Vanni, S.; Ageno, W.; Kamphuisen, P.; Nitti, C.; Poggio, R.; Duranti, M.; Agnelli, G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: In patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) right ventricle dysfunction (RVD) assessed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been suggested to be associated with an adverse in-hospital outcome. The aim of this study in hemodynamically stable patients with acute PE was to

  12. CTPA for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer-Prokop, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokop, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Utrecht Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been suggested by the Fleischner society as the first test following a negative leg ultrasound in pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. This editorial discusses the use of CTPA as a diagnostic tool in pregnant women and comments on the need for specifically adapting CT protocols during pregnancy in the light of new research describing a substantial number of non-diagnostic examinations in pregnant women if routine scanning protocols are used for CTA of the pulmonary arteries. Potential reasons for these high numbers of insufficient examinations are physiological changes occurring during pregnancy that lead to a hyperdynamic circulation, which reduces average enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature. In addition, there are possible breathing-related effects that include an increased risk for Valsalva manoeuvre with devastating effects for pulmonary vascular enhancement. Techniques to overcome these problems are discussed: bolus triggering with short start delays, high flow rates or high contrast medium concentration, preferential use of fast CT systems and the use of low kVp CT techniques. CT data acquisition during deep inspiration should be avoided and shallow respiration may be considered as an alternative to suspended breathing in this patient group. All these factors can contribute to optimization of the quality of pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. It is time now to adapt our protocols and provide optimum care for this sensitive patient group.

  13. Derivation of a clinical prediction score for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, F A; Dzikowska-Diduch, O; Kostrubiec, M; Vliegen, H W; Pruszczyk, P; Hasenfuß, G; Huisman, M V; Konstantinides, S; Lankeit, M

    2016-01-01

    Essentials Predicting chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) after pulmonary embolism is hard. We studied 772 patients with pulmonary embolism who were followed for CTEPH (incidence 2.8%). Logistic regression analysis revealed 7 easily collectable clinical variables that combined predict CTEPH. Our score identifies patients at low (0.38%) or higher (10%) risk of CTEPH. Introduction Validated risk factors for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) after acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are currently lacking. Methods This is a post hoc patient-level analysis of three large prospective cohorts with a total of 772 consecutive patients with acute PE, without major cardiopulmonary or malignant comorbidities. All underwent echocardiography after a median of 1.5 years. In cases with signs of pulmonary hypertension, additional diagnostic tests to confirm CTEPH were performed. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics of the acute PE event were included in a multivariable regression analysis. Independent predictors were combined in a clinical prediction score. Results CTEPH was confirmed in 22 patients (2.8%) by right heart catheterization. Unprovoked PE, known hypothyroidism, symptom onset > 2 weeks before PE diagnosis, right ventricular dysfunction on computed tomography or echocardiography, known diabetes mellitus and thrombolytic therapy or embolectomy were independently associated with a CTEPH diagnosis during follow-up. The area under the receiver operating charateristic curve (AUC) of the prediction score including those six variables was 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.94). Sensitivity analysis and bootstrap internal validation confirmed this AUC. Seventy-three per cent of patients were in the low-risk category (CTEPH incidence of 0.38%, 95% CI 0-1.5%) and 27% were in the high-risk category (CTEPH incidence of 10%, 95% CI 6.5-15%). Conclusion The 'CTEPH prediction score' allows for the identification of

  14. The prognostic impact of chest pain in 1306 patients presenting with confirmed acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher C Y; Ng, Austin C C; Lau, Jerrett K; Chow, Vincent; Sindone, Andrew P; Kritharides, Leonard

    2016-10-15

    The prognostic influence of chest pain in patients presenting with pulmonary embolism has not been well defined. We investigated whether the presence of chest pain at presentation affected the mortality of patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary hospital with confirmed acute pulmonary embolism from 2000 to 2012, with study outcomes tracked using a state-wide death registry. Of the 1306 patients included in the study, 771 (59%) had chest pain at presentation. These patients were younger with fewer comorbidities, and had lower 6-month mortality compared to patients without chest pain (5% vs 15%, PChest pain was consistently found to be an independent predictor of 6-month mortality in three separate multivariable models (range of hazard ratios 0.52-0.60, all with Pchest pain to a multivariable model that included the simplified pulmonary embolism severity index, haemoglobin, and sodium led to a significant net reclassification improvement of 18% (PChest pain is a novel, favourable prognostic marker in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Catheter-Directed Therapy for Acute Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: Summary of Current Evidence and Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselman, Andrew; Kuo, William T

    2017-09-01

    Treatment of acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PE) with thrombolytic therapy remains an area of controversy. For patients who fail or who have contraindications to systemic thrombolysis, catheter-directed therapy (CDT) may be offered depending on the patient's condition and the available institutional resources to perform CDT. Although various CDT techniques and protocols exist, the most studied method is low-dose catheter-directed thrombolytic infusion without mechanical thrombectomy. This article reviews current protocols and data on the use of CDT for acute submassive pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High‑risk pulmonary embolism in a patient with acute dissecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the last decades, an increased incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and acute dissection (AD) of aortic aneurysms has been registered mostly due to increased availability of advanced imaging techniques. They seldom occur concomitantly in the same patient. In this paper, we present the clinical challenges and ...

  17. Predictive value of insufficient contrast medium filling in pulmonary veins in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Ma, Yanhe; Song, Zhenchun; Lv, Jun; Yang, Yapeng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study is to investigate the predictive value of insufficient contrast medium filling (ICMF) in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A total of 108 PE patients were enrolled and divided into group A and group B according to the presence of ICMF. PE index and ventricul araxial lengths were measured. Heart cavity volumes were examined and right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle (LV) diameter ratio (RV/LV(d)) and volume ratio (RV/LV(V)) and right atrium (RA) to left atrium (LA) volume ratio (RA/LA(V)) were calculated and compared. Group A was further divided into A1 and A2 based upon the pulmonary vein filling degree and each index was compared. There were no significant differences between group A and B in general condition. PE index of group A was higher than that of group B. LA and LV in group A were smaller than that of group B, whereas RA in group A was larger than that of group B. RV/LV(d), RV/LV(V), and RA/LA(V) in group A were significantly larger than that of group B. Embolism index of group A2 was higher than that of groupA1, but without statistical significant difference. LA in group A2 was smaller than that of group A1, whereas RA, RV/LV(d), and RV/LV(V) were larger than that of group A1, all with significant differences. PE increased with serious ICMF in pulmonary veins could be used as an indicator for risk stratification in patients with acute PE. PMID:28906373

  18. Ultrasound Assisted Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: A Review of Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Hiba; Bansal, Vikas; Zuberi, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism continues as a very common and also presumably life-threatening disorder. For affected individuals with intermediate- as well as high-risk pulmonary embolism, catheter-based revascularization procedures have developed a possible substitute for systemic thrombolysis or for surgical embolectomy. Ultrasound-assisted catheter-directed thrombolysis is an innovative catheter-based approach; which is the main purpose of the present review article. Ultrasound-assisted catheter-directed thrombolysis is much more efficacious in reversing right ventricular dysfunction as well as dilatation in comparison to anticoagulation alone in individuals at intermediate risk. However, a direct comparison of ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis with systemic thrombolysis or surgical thrombectomy is not available. Ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis with early intrapulmonary thrombolytic bolus could also be successful in high-risk patients, but unfortunately, data from randomized trials is limited. This review article recapitulates existing information on ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis for acute pulmonary embolism. PMID:28944131

  19. The predictive value of echocardiography for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after acute pulmonary embolism in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Sup; Ahn, Jinhee; Choi, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Lee, Han Cheol; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong

    2017-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a life-threatening complication after acute pulmonary embolism (APE) and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of CTEPH after APE in Korea and to determine echocardiographic predictors of CTEPH. Among 381 patients with APE confirmed by chest computed tomography (CT) between January 2007 and July 2013, 246 consecutive patients with available echocardiographic data were enrolled in this study. CTEPH was defined as a persistent right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) greater than 35 mmHg on echocardiography during follow-up and persistent pulmonary embolism on the follow-up CT. Fifteen patients (6.1%) had CTEPH. The rate of right ventricular (RV) dilatation (66.7% vs. 28.1%, p = 0.002) and the RVSP (75.5 mmHg vs. 39.0 mmHg, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the CTEPH group. D-dimers, RV dilatation, RV hypertrophy, RVSP, and intermediate-risk APE were associated with the risk of CTEPH after APE (odds ratio [OR] 0.59, 5.11, 7.82, 1.06, and 4.86, respectively) on univariate analysis. RVSP remained as a significant predictor of CTEPH on multivariate analysis (OR, 1.056; 95% confidence interval, 1.006 to 1.109; p = 0.029). This study showed that the incidence of CTEPH after APE in Korea was 6.1% and that initial RVSP by echocardiography was a strong prognostic factor for CTEPH.

  20. Quantification of right ventricular function in acute pulmonary embolism: relation to extent of pulmonary perfusion defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, J.; Schaadt, B.K.; Lund, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    Aims The relation of the extent of obstruction of the pulmonary vascutature in pulmonary embolism (PE) and impact on right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics is not well established. This study evaluated the relation of size of perfusion defects and changes in echocardiographic measures of global...

  1. Quantitative CT Evaluation of Small Pulmonary Vessels in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Shin; Kotoku, Akiyuki; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Matsushita, Shoichiro; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2018-01-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between the computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional area (CSA) of small pulmonary vessels and the CT obstruction index in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and the correlation between the changes in these measurements after anticoagulant therapy. Fifty-two patients with acute PE were selected for this study. We measured the CSA less than 5 mm2 on coronal reconstructed images to obtain the percentage of the CSA (%CSA < 5). CT angiographic index was obtained based on the Qanadli method for the evaluation of the degree of pulmonary arterial obstruction. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the initial and the follow-up values and changes in the %CSA < 5 and the CT obstruction index. There was no significant correlation between the %CSA < 5 and CT obstruction index on both initial (ρ = -0.03, P = 0.84) and follow-up (ρ = -0.03, P = 0.82) assessments. In contrast, there was a significant negative correlation between the changes in %CSA < 5 and the CT obstruction index (ρ = -0.59, P < 0.0001). Although the absolute %CSA < 5 and CT obstruction index were not significantly correlated, the changes in the values of the two parameters had a significant correlation. Changes in %CSA < 5, which can be obtained easily, can be used as biomarker of therapeutic response in patients with acute PE. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Usefulness of Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Unstable Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism and Patients Who Underwent Pulmonary Embolectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Lawrence, Frank R; Hughes, Mary J

    2018-02-15

    Administrative data were analyzed from the Premier Healthcare Database, 2010 to 2014, to assess whether inferior vena cava (IVC) filters reduce mortality in unstable patients (in shock or on ventilator support) with acute pulmonary embolism and in stable patients who undergo surgical pulmonary embolectomy. Mortality was assumed to be due to pulmonary embolism in patients who had none of the co-morbid conditions listed in the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Data were determined on the basis of International Classification of Disease-9th Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes. All-cause mortality in unstable patients was lower with IVC filters in-hospital, 288 of 1,972 (23%) versus 1339 of 3002 (45%) (p <0.0001), and at 3 months, all-cause mortality was 316 of 1,272 (25%) versus 1,428 of 3,002 (48%) (p <0.0001). Pulmonary embolism mortality was lower with IVC filters in unstable patients in-hospital, 191 of 926 (21%) versus 913 of 2,138 (43%) (p <0.0001) and at 3 months, 215 of 926 (23%) versus 971 of 2,138 (45%) (p <0.0001). A lower in-hospital and 3-month all-cause mortality and pulmonary embolism mortality was also shown with IVC filters in stable patients who underwent pulmonary embolectomy. These data, in concert with previous retrospective data, suggest that unstable patients with pulmonary embolism and stable patients who undergo pulmonary embolectomy may benefit from an IVC filter. Further investigations would be useful. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. ECG-gated pulmonary artery CTA for evaluation of right ventricular function in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-Wei; Zhao, De-Li; Liu, Xin-Ding; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Hai-Ting; Zhao, Cheng-Lei; Wang, Guo-Kun; Xu, Mei-Ling; Zhang, Jin-Ling

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate right ventricular function in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE) using electrocardiogram-gated CTA and to discuss the clinical value of pulmonary artery CTA PATIENTS AND METHODS: Based on death risk evaluation, 86 APE patients were divided into high-risk group (n=46) and non-high-risk group (n=40). The CT pulmonary embolism (PE) index and parameters of right ventricular function were analyzed from the CTPA images and compared between the two groups. Potential correlation between the two was also discussed. CT PE index (median 24.69%) of the high-risk group was obviously higher than that of the non-high-risk group (median 8.58%) (Pright ventricular function were significantly different between the two groups (Pright ventricular function. ECG-gated pulmonary artery CTA is suitable for assessing the severity of APE and right ventricular function. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A new prognostic strategy for adult patients with acute pulmonary embolism eligible for outpatient therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angriman, Federico; Vazquez, Fernando J; Roy, Pierre Marie; Le Gal, Gregoire; Carrier, Marc; Gandara, Esteban

    2017-04-01

    We sought to derive a parsimonious predictive model to identify a subgroup of patients that will experience a low number of adverse events within 14 days of the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Retrospective cohort study of adult patients with acute pulmonary embolism at the Ottawa Hospital between 2007 and 2012. Primary outcome was defined as the composite of all-cause mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism and major bleeding within 14 days. Multivariate logistic regression models were fit to model the occurrence of the primary outcome so as to guide either outpatient therapy or early discharge after initial admission. Calibration and discrimination were assessed in both the derivation and internal validation cohorts. 1143 patients were included, of whom 42% were treated as outpatients. At pulmonary embolism diagnosis, final score to predict the primary outcome included age, malignancy, intravenous drug or oxygen requirement and systolic blood pressure pulmonary embolism at low risk of clinically meaningful outcomes during the first 14 days of follow up.

  5. 30-Day Mortality in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Prognostic Value of Clinical Scores and Anamnestic Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Gunter Bach

    Full Text Available Identification of high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism is vital. The aim of the present study was to examine clinical scores, their single items, and anamnestic features in their ability to predict 30-day mortality.A retrospective, single-center study from 06/2005 to 01/2010 was performed. Inclusion criteria were presence of pulmonary embolism, availability of patient records and 30-day follow-up. The following clinical scores were calculated: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, original and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index, Glasgow Coma Scale, and euroSCORE II.In the study group of 365 patients 39 patients (10.7% died within 30 days due to pulmonary embolism. From all examined scores and parameters the best predictor of 30-day mortality were the Glasgow Coma scale (≤ 10 and parameters of the circulatory system including presence of mechanical ventilation, arterial pH (< 7.335, and systolic blood pressure (< 99 mm Hg.Easy to ascertain circulatory parameters have the same or higher prognostic value than the clinical scores that were applied in this study. From all clinical scores studied the Glasgow Coma Scale was the most time- and cost-efficient one.

  6. Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Retrospective Cohort Study of the Predictive Value of Perfusion Defect Volume Measured With Dual-Energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Dong Jin; Hur, Jin; Han, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Woocheol; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2017-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate dual-energy CT findings predictive of clinical outcome and to determine the incremental risk stratification benefit of dual-energy CT findings compared with CT ventricular diameter ratio in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. A retrospective evaluation was conducted of the cases of 172 patients with acute pulmonary embolism who underwent dual-energy CT. Ventricular diameter ratio and relative perfusion defect volume were measured. The primary endpoints were death within 30 days and pulmonary embolism-related death. A ventricular diameter ratio of 1 or greater was associated with increased risk of death within 30 days (hazard ratio, 3.822; p = 0.002) and pulmonary embolism-related death (hazard ratio, 18.051; p pulmonary embolism-related death (hazard ratio, 1.046; p = 0.017). However, the addition of relative perfusion defect volume to ventricular diameter ratio had no added benefit for prediction of death of any cause within 30 days (concordance statistic, 0.833 vs 0.815; p = 0.187) or pulmonary embolism-related death (concordance statistic, 0.873 vs 0.874; p = 0.866). Compared with ventricular diameter ratio alone, lung perfusion defect volume had no statistically significant added benefit for prediction of death of any cause within 30 days or of pulmonary embolism-related death among patients with acute PE.

  7. D-Dimer and thrombus burden in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Karsten; Beule, Johannes; Balzer, Jörn Oliver; Dippold, Wolfgang

    2018-01-17

    Thrombus burden in pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with higher D-Dimer-levels and poorer prognosis. We aimed to investigate i) the influence of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and high-risk PE-status on D-Dimer-levels and ii) effectiveness of D-Dimer to predict RVD in normotensive PE patients. Overall, 161 PE patients were analyzed retrospectively, classified in 5 subgroups of thrombus burden according to clinical indications and compared regarding D-Dimer-levels. Linear regression models were computed to investigate the association between D-Dimer and the groups. In hemodynamically stable PE patients, a ROC curve was calculated to assess the effectiveness of D-Dimer for predicting RVD. Overall, 161 patients (60.9% females, 54.0% aged >70 years) were included in this analysis. The D-Dimer-level was associated with group-category in a univariate linear regression model (β 0.050 (95%CI 0.002-0.099), P = .043). After adjustment for age, sex, cancer, and pneumonia in a multivariate model we observed an association between D-Dimer and group-category with borderline significance (β 0.047 (95%CI 0.002-0.096), P = .058). The Kruskal-Wallis test demonstrated that D-Dimer increased significantly with higher group-category. In 129 normotensive patients, patients with RVD had significantly higher D-Dimer values compared to those without (1.73 (1.11/3.48) vs 1.17 (0.65/2.90) mg/l, P = .049). A ROC curve showed an AUC of 0.61, gender non-specific, with calculated optimal cut-off of 1.18 mg/l. Multi-variate logistic regression model confirmed an association between D-Dimer >1.18 mg/l and RVD (OR2.721 (95%CI 1.196-6.190), P = .017). Thrombus burden in PE is related to elevated D-Dimer levels, and D-Dimer values >1.18 mg/l were predictive for RVD in normotensive patients. D-Dimer levels were influenced by DVT, but not by cancer, pneumonia, age, or renal impairment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Severe pulmonary embolism and acute lower limb ischemia complicating peripartum cardiomyopathy successfully treated by streptokinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaméogo, N V; Kaboré, E; Seghda, A; Kagambèga, L J; Kaboré, H P; Millogo, G R C; Kologo, K J; Kambiré, Y; Bama, A; Toguyeni, B J Y; Samadoulougou, A K; Zabsonré, P

    2016-02-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a cardiac disease at high thromboembolism potential. The authors report a case of peripartum cardiomyopathy admitted for congestive heart failure. Echocardiography found a dilated cardiomyopathy with severely impaired left ventricular systolic function and biventricular thrombi. During hospitalization his condition was complicated by severe bilateral pulmonary embolism and left lower limb arterial acute thrombosis. The treatment consisted of thrombolysis with streptokinase associated with dobutamine (in addition to the conventional treatment of heart failure and bromocriptine). The outcome was favorable, marked by pulmonary and lower limb arterial unblocking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Outpatient Management of Emergency Department Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Variation, Patient Characteristics, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, David R; Ballard, Dustin W; Huang, Jie; Reed, Mary E; Lin, James S; Kene, Mamata V; Sax, Dana R; Rauchwerger, Adina S; Wang, David H; McLachlan, D Ian; Pleshakov, Tamara S; Silver, Matthew A; Clague, Victoria A; Klonecke, Andrew S; Mark, Dustin G

    2017-12-13

    Outpatient management of emergency department (ED) patients with acute pulmonary embolism is uncommon. We seek to evaluate the facility-level variation of outpatient pulmonary embolism management and to describe patient characteristics and outcomes associated with home discharge. The Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (MAPLE) study is a retrospective cohort study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism undertaken in 21 community EDs from January 2013 to April 2015. We gathered demographic and clinical variables from comprehensive electronic health records and structured manual chart review. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between patient characteristics and home discharge. We report ED length of stay, consultations, 5-day pulmonary embolism-related return visits and 30-day major hemorrhage, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and all-cause mortality. Of 2,387 patients, 179 were discharged home (7.5%). Home discharge varied significantly between EDs, from 0% to 14.3% (median 7.0%; interquartile range 4.2% to 10.9%). Median length of stay for home discharge patients (excluding those who arrived with a new pulmonary embolism diagnosis) was 6.0 hours (interquartile range 4.6 to 7.2 hours) and 81% received consultations. On adjusted analysis, ambulance arrival, abnormal vital signs, syncope or presyncope, deep venous thrombosis, elevated cardiac biomarker levels, and more proximal emboli were inversely associated with home discharge. Thirteen patients (7.2%) who were discharged home had a 5-day pulmonary embolism-related return visit. Thirty-day major hemorrhage and recurrent venous thromboembolism were uncommon and similar between patients hospitalized and those discharged home. All-cause 30-day mortality was lower in the home discharge group (1.1% versus 4.4%). Home discharge of ED patients with acute pulmonary embolism was uncommon and varied significantly between facilities. Patients selected for outpatient management had a

  10. Anuria due to acute bilateral renal vein occlusion after thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakynthinos, Epaminondas; Douka, Evangelia; Daniil, Zoi; Konstantinidis, Kosmas; Markaki, Vassiliki; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2005-05-11

    Severe hemorrhage is the more frequent complication of thrombolysis, with intracranial bleeding the most critical one. We report a 73-year-old woman with major pulmonary embolism (PE), yet haemodynamically stable, in whom thrombolysis resulted in severe complications with acute renal failure (ARF) due to bilateral renal vein occlusion, quite unexpected; this complication has never been reported, as yet. We believe that disrupture of peripheral vein clots by thrombolysis led to migration of thrombi particles upwards to the inferior vena cava (IVC) and bilateral renal vein occlusion. However, the large thrombus straddled to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary trunk and extending to the right pulmonary artery, as visualized by transthoracic (TTE) and transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), was not affected by thrombolysis. Finally, endogenous fibrinolytic activity, under low molecular weight heparin, resulted in a slow dissolution of the pulmonary thrombus and restoration of kidney function.

  11. Acute Pulmonary Embolism and Paradoxical Embolism in Patients with Patent Foramen Ovale: To Close or Not to Close... That is the Question!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Zuin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the treatment of patent foramen ovale (PFO after acute pulmonary embolism (PE remains matter of speculation. Absence of both randomized trials and recommendations in current international guidelines complicate the decisions making in such patients. In the present manuscript we discuss about the reasons for which PFO should be closed after acute PE.

  12. [Massive pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Olivier; Planquette, Benjamin; Wermert, Delphine; Marié, Elisabeth; Meyer, Guy

    2008-10-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is defined by systemic hypotension or cardiogenic shock. Clinically stable patients with right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography, elevated brain natriuretic peptide or troponin are usually considered as having sub-massive pulmonary embolism, but this definition is not universally accepted. The time-lag to confirm massive pulmonary embolism should be kept as short as possible and every effort should be done to rely on bedside tests and to avoid patient transfer to the radiology department. D-dimer tests are useless in this setting and the diagnosis is mainly based on clinical probability and bedside echocardiography. When clinical probability is high, right ventricular dilatation assessed by echocardiography allows confirming the diagnosis without additional testing. On the other hand a normal echocardiography does not allow excluding pulmonary embolism. In this setting, a spiral computed tomography is mandatory after the patient has been stabilized. Anticoagulant treatment should be started as soon as pulmonary embolism has been suspected. Supportive care includes oxygen, fluid loading and inotropes. There is little doubt that thrombolytic treatment is of value in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Conversely, the use of thrombolytic therapy in patients with so-called sub-massive pulmonary embolism remains controversial. Current data do not confirm that thrombolytic therapy decreases mortality in those patients but cannot exclude a clinically significant benefit. A large randomised comparison of heparin and thrombolysis in patients with sub-massive pulmonary embolism is underway to answer this question. Surgical or catheter embolectomy is nowadays only rarely performed in patients with pulmonary embolism. This method can be undertaken in the few patients with persisting shock despite supportive care and who have an absolute contraindication for thrombolytic therapy. Before new data are available there is no special

  13. Acute pulmonary embolism with right ventricular dysfunction and left ventricular collapse. Case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Rivas-Ibargüen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a patient with high risk Pulmonary Embolism (PE due to right ventricular dysfunction and severe hemodynamic dysfunction. The patient required thrombolytic therapy in the context of an initial suspicion of an acute coronary event. PE is a frequent, preventable clinical entity characterized by sudden occlusion of the pulmonary artery. The clinical spectrum is wide, from asymptomatic patients to death by shock and circulatory collapse. The basis of its treatment is anticoagulation. Therapies such as thrombolysis have been shown to have benefits in the mortality of patients in the scenario of shock and hemodynamic instability if there are no contraindications for its use. This entity represents a challenge since the clinical manifestations may be very similar to those of an acute coronary event and other potentially fatal conditions.

  14. Surgical embolectomy for high-risk acute pulmonary embolism is standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Daisuke; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Masatsugu; Yamada, Muneaki; Shimada, Naohiro; Takahashi, Aya; Kaki, Nobuaki

    2017-08-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism (AMPE) is a life-threatening condition that often induces rapid haemodynamic deterioration. The mortality of surgical embolectomy is still poor in patients with preoperative cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). We analysed the outcome of surgical pulmonary embolectomy for haemodynamically unstable patients. Thirty-one patients underwent surgical embolectomy for haemodynamically unstable AMPE. The indications for surgical embolectomy were (i) Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) and simplified PESI scores were 158 ± 51 and 2.4 ± 0.9, respectively. The hospital mortality rate was 12.9% (n = 4). Two patients died of hypoxia. Multiorgan failure occurred by sepsis and by right ventricular failure in 1 patient each. No hospital deaths occurred in patients with preoperative PCPS (n = 9). The mean follow-up period was 47.7 ± 35.9 months (range, 3 - 134 months) and the 5-year survival rate was 83.2 ± 6.9%. Postoperative pulmonary artery pressure significantly decreased from 52.7 to 25.8 mmHg. Surgical embolectomy for high-risk AMPE patients has an excellent operative mortality and long-term outcome. Preoperative PCPS may lead to an immediate stable haemodynamic state and improve surgical embolectomy results, especially in high-risk patients (e.g. those with preoperative CPA). Surgical embolectomy for AMPE is an established operation and considered as the first-line therapy.

  15. Treatment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Update on Newer Pharmacologic and Interventional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Schiariti, Michele; Terzano, Claudio; Keylani, Abdul M.; D'Agostino, Darrin C.; Speziale, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common complication in hospitalized patients, spanning multiple patient populations and crossing various therapeutic disciplines. Current treatment paradigm in patients with massive PE mandates prompt risk stratification with aggressive therapeutic strategies. With the advent of endovascular technologies, various catheter-based thrombectomy and thrombolytic devices are available to treat patients with massive or submassive PE. In this paper, a variety of newer treatment strategies for PE are analyzed, with special emphasis on various interventional treatment strategies. Clinical evidence for utilizing endovascular treatment modalities, based on our institutional experience as well as a literature review, is provided. PMID:25025049

  16. Treatment of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Update on Newer Pharmacologic and Interventional Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pelliccia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism (PE is a common complication in hospitalized patients, spanning multiple patient populations and crossing various therapeutic disciplines. Current treatment paradigm in patients with massive PE mandates prompt risk stratification with aggressive therapeutic strategies. With the advent of endovascular technologies, various catheter-based thrombectomy and thrombolytic devices are available to treat patients with massive or submassive PE. In this paper, a variety of newer treatment strategies for PE are analyzed, with special emphasis on various interventional treatment strategies. Clinical evidence for utilizing endovascular treatment modalities, based on our institutional experience as well as a literature review, is provided.

  17. Predicting in-hospital death during acute presentation with pulmonary embolism to facilitate early discharge and outpatient management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrett K Lau

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism continues to be a significant cause of death. The aim was to derive and validate a risk prediction model for in-hospital death after acute pulmonary embolism to identify low risk patients suitable for outpatient management.A confirmed acute pulmonary embolism database of 1,426 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-center (2000-2012 was analyzed, with odd and even years as derivation and validation cohorts respectively. Risk stratification for in-hospital death was performed using multivariable logistic-regression modelling. Models were compared using receiver-operating characteristic-curve and decision curve analyses.In-hospital mortality was 3.6% in the derivation cohort (n = 693. Adding day-1 sodium and bicarbonate to simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI significantly increased the C-statistic for predicting in-hospital death (0.71 to 0.86, P = 0.001. The validation cohort yielded similar results (n = 733, C-statistic 0.85. The new model was associated with a net reclassification improvement of 0.613, and an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.067. The new model also increased the C-statistic for predicting 30-day mortality compared to sPESI alone (0.74 to 0.83, P = 0.002. Decision curve analysis demonstrated superior clinical benefit with the use of the new model to guide admission for pulmonary embolism, resulting in 43 fewer admissions per 100 presentations based on a risk threshold for admission of 2%.A risk model incorporating sodium, bicarbonate, and the sPESI provides accurate risk prediction of acute in-hospital mortality after pulmonary embolism. Our novel model identifies patients with pulmonary embolism who are at low risk and who may be suitable for outpatient management.

  18. Predicting in-hospital death during acute presentation with pulmonary embolism to facilitate early discharge and outpatient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jerrett K; Chow, Vincent; Brown, Alex; Kritharides, Leonard; Ng, Austin C C

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism continues to be a significant cause of death. The aim was to derive and validate a risk prediction model for in-hospital death after acute pulmonary embolism to identify low risk patients suitable for outpatient management. A confirmed acute pulmonary embolism database of 1,426 consecutive patients admitted to a tertiary-center (2000-2012) was analyzed, with odd and even years as derivation and validation cohorts respectively. Risk stratification for in-hospital death was performed using multivariable logistic-regression modelling. Models were compared using receiver-operating characteristic-curve and decision curve analyses. In-hospital mortality was 3.6% in the derivation cohort (n = 693). Adding day-1 sodium and bicarbonate to simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) significantly increased the C-statistic for predicting in-hospital death (0.71 to 0.86, P = 0.001). The validation cohort yielded similar results (n = 733, C-statistic 0.85). The new model was associated with a net reclassification improvement of 0.613, and an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.067. The new model also increased the C-statistic for predicting 30-day mortality compared to sPESI alone (0.74 to 0.83, P = 0.002). Decision curve analysis demonstrated superior clinical benefit with the use of the new model to guide admission for pulmonary embolism, resulting in 43 fewer admissions per 100 presentations based on a risk threshold for admission of 2%. A risk model incorporating sodium, bicarbonate, and the sPESI provides accurate risk prediction of acute in-hospital mortality after pulmonary embolism. Our novel model identifies patients with pulmonary embolism who are at low risk and who may be suitable for outpatient management.

  19. Comparison of acute and convalescent biomarkers of inflammation in patients with acute pulmonary embolism treated with systemic fibrinolysis vs. placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lauren K; Nordenholz, Kristen E; Courtney, Mark; Kabrhel, Christopher; Jones, Alan E; Rondina, Matthew T; Diercks, Deborah B; Klinger, James R; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2017-12-01

    : Previous studies have associated biomarkers indicative of acute inflammation with pulmonary embolism, which may amplify coagulation, inhibit fibrinolysis and increase risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence. The aim of this study was to measure inflammatory and hemostatic biomarkers in acute submassive pulmonary embolism at diagnosis and 3-month follow-up and to test the impact of treatment with fibrinolysis. Secondary analysis of a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial including patients with submassive pulmonary embolism. Blood samples were obtained within 24 h of diagnosis and prior to bolus-dose tenecteplase (TNK) or placebo; all patients received standard anticoagulation and blood was redrawn 3 months later. Plasma concentrations of inflammatory [Interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloperoxidase (MPO)] and hemostatic [plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), fibrinogen, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and D-dimer] biomarkers were quantified. The median values of the biomarkers of inflammation (IL-6, CRP, MPO) were all significantly decreased at 3-month follow-up, ranging from a 60 to 91% reduction over this time period. Concentrations of PAI-1 and fibrinogen did not change significantly. D-dimer concentration at 3-month follow-up was lower in patients treated with fibrinolysis vs. placebo and appeared to have a trend toward significance (placebo 310 vs. TNK 220 ng/ml, P = 0.051). Acute pulmonary embolism causes marked but transient inflammation, as demonstrated by the significant elevation in the inflammatory biomarkers at diagnosis, followed by their reduction in more than 80% of patients at 3-month follow-up.

  20. A New Diagnostic Marker For Acute Pulmonary Embolism In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    while 99 patients have been placed in the Chest disease department service. The exclusion criteria's were as follows: age>65, coronary artery diseases, acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, significant valvular heart disease, pacemaker implantation, atrial flutter or fibrillation, peripheral vascular diseases ...

  1. Cardiovascular parameters to assess the severity of acute pulmonary embolism with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dian-Jiang Zhao; Da-Qing Ma; Wen He; Jian-Jun Wang; Yan Xu; Chun-Shuang Guan (Dept. of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)), e-mail: madaqing@263.net

    2010-05-15

    Background: Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been established as a first-line test in the acute pulmonary embolism (APE) diagnostic algorithm, but the assessment of the severity of APE by this method remains to be explored. Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and severity in patients with APE without underlying cardiopulmonary disease using helical computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Seventy-three patients (35 men and 38 women) were divided into two groups according to the clinical findings: severe APE (n=22) and non-severe APE (n=51). Pulmonary artery CT obstruction index was calculated according to the location and degree of clots in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular parameters including RV short axis and left ventricular (LV) short axis, RV short axis to LV short axis (RV/LV) ratio, main pulmonary artery, azygous vein, and superior vena cava diameters were measured. Leftward bowing of the interventricular septum, reflux of contrast medium into the inferior vena cava and azygous vein, and bronchial artery dilatation were also recorded. The results were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test, x2 test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az). Results: CT obstruction index in patients with severe APE (median 43%) was higher than that of patients with non-severe APE (median 20%). Comparison of cardiovascular parameters between patients with severe and non-severe pulmonary embolism showed significant differences in RV short axis, LV short axis, RV/LV ratio, RV wall thickness, main pulmonary artery diameter, azygous vein diameter, leftward bowing of the interventricular septum, and bronchial artery dilatation. The correlation between CT obstruction indexes and cardiovascular parameters was significant. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was highest between RV/LV ratio and CT obstruction index. Az values were

  2. The diagnostic value of serum copeptin levels in an acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Ali Kemal; Ozturk, Derya; Erturk, Mehmet; Kalkan, Mehmet Emin; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Oner, Ender; Uzun, Fatih; Tasbulak, Omer; Yakisan, Turab; Celik, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is a common disease which is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Circulating level of copeptin, which was demonstrated to be elevated in heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary arterial hypertension, were reported to be independent predictors of poor outcome in recent studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical utility of copeptin in the diagnosis of APE. A total of 90 consecutive patients, admitted to emergency service due to acute chest pain and/or dyspnea and who underwent pulmonary computerized tomography angiography (CTA) due to suspicion of APE, were included in this prospective study. The patients diagnosed with APE were defined as APE (+) group and the remaining individuals with normal pulmonary CTA result were defined as APE (-) group. Copeptin levels (7.76 ± 4.4 vs. 3.81 ± 1.34 ng/dL; p Copeptin was significantly positively correlated with B-type natriuretic peptide (r = 0.434, p copeptin with right ventricular dysfunction parameters was investigated, it was significantly inversely correlated with the tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r = -0.521, p Copeptin (OR 1.836, 95% CI 1.171-2.878, p = 0.008) was found as a significant independent predictor of APE in a multivariate analysis, after adjusting for other risk parameters. Copeptin is a promising new biomarker, which may be used to support the need for further investigations and to improve the diagnosis of patients with APE.

  3. Modification of Simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index and its Prognostic Value in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostovan, Mohammad Ali; Ghaffari, Samad; Pourafkari, Leili; Dehghani, Pooyan; Hajizadeh, Reza; Nadiri, Mehdi; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-02-01

    Various risk stratification systems have been used to predict the clinical outcome of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). In this study we present a modification of the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (S-PESI) score and evaluate its accuracy in predicting the outcome of these patients. Patients older than 18 years with documented PE were enrolled in this study. S-PESI was calculated in all patients. We added electrocardiographic evidence of right ventricular strain as a new criteria and replaced the O2 saturation of <90% in S-PESI score with PaO2 /PaCO2 ratio obtained from the arterial blood gas analysis as two newly modified criteria to define a modified form of S-PESI system (modified s-PESI). Patients were followed for about one year in outpatient clinics. Any deaths attributable to PE or for unknown reasons were considered as PE related. We defined Major Adverse Cardio-Pulmonary Events (MACPE) as sum of one-year mortality, need for thrombolysis and mechanical ventilation during index hospitalisation. Among 300 enrolled patients, in-hospital mortality occurred in 38 (12.7%) and one-year mortality in 73 (24.3%) patients. Considering a cut-off point of 3, modified s-PESI score had a lower sensitivity (49.3% vs. 89%) and higher specificity (79.4% vs. 37.7%) than S-PESI to predict one-year mortality. Area Under Curve (AUC) to predict MACPE was significantly higher for modified s-PESI (0.692 vs 0.730, P=0.012). The modified s-PESI is superior to S-PESI in predicting one-year outcome in patients with PE and can be used for more accurate risk stratification of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary embolism : diagnostic management and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Frederikus Albertus

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the diagnostic management, short term prognosis and long term complications of pulmonary embolism. We have validated a newly derived clinical decision rule, the revised Geneva score, for predicting the pre-test probability of having acute pulmonary embolism. This rule can be

  5. Prognostic stratification of acute pulmonary embolism: Focus on clinical aspects, imaging, and biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Luca Masotti1, Marc Righini2, Nicolas Vuilleumier3, Fabio Antonelli4, Giancarlo Landini5, Roberto Cappelli6, Patrick Ray71Internal Medicine, 4Clinical Chemistry, Cecina Hospital, Cecina, Italy; 2Division of Angiology and Haemostasis, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland; 3Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Switzerland; 5Internal Medicine, Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Florence, Italy; 6Thrombosis Center, University of Siena, Siena, Italy; 7Department of Emergency Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Pitié-Salpêtrière, UPMC Paris 6, Paris, FranceAbstract: Pulmonary embolism (PE represents a common disease in emergency medicine and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment have had wide diffusion. However, PE morbidity and mortality remain high, especially when associated to hemodynamic instability or right ventricular dysfunction. Prognostic stratification to identify high risk patients needing to receive more aggressive pharmacological and closer monitoring is of utmost importance. Modern guidelines for management of acute PE are based on risk stratification using either clinical, radiological, or laboratory findings. This article reviews the modern treatment of acute PE, which is customized upon patient prognosis. Accordingly the current risk stratification tools described in the literature such as clinical scores, echocardiography, helical computer tomography, and biomarkers will be reviewed.Keywords: pulmonary embolism, prognosis, troponin, BNP, NT-proBNP, echocardiography, computer tomography

  6. The role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Halil; de Roos, Albert; Geleijins, Jacob; Huisman, Menno V.; Kroft, Lucia J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life threatening condition requiring adequate diagnosis and treatment. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is excellent for including and excluding PE, therefore CT is the first-choice diagnostic imaging technique in patients suspected of having acute PE. Due to its wide availability and low invasiveness, CTPA tends to be overused. Correct implementation of clinical decision rules in diagnostic workup for PE improves adequate use of CT. Also, CT adds prognostic value by evaluating right ventricular (RV) function. CT-assessed RV dysfunction and to lesser extent central emboli location predicts PE-related mortality in normotensive and hypotensive patients, while PE embolic obstruction index has limited prognostic value. Simple RV/left ventricular (LV) diameter ratio measures >1.0 already predict risk for adverse outcome, whereas ratios <1.0 can safely exclude adverse outcome. Consequently, assessing the RV/LV diameter ratio may help identify patients who are potential candidates for treatment at home instead of treatment in the hospital. A minority of patients develop chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) following acute PE, which is a life-threatening condition that can be diagnosed by CT. In proximal CTEPH, involving the more central pulmonary arteries, thrombectomy usually results in good outcome in terms of both functional status and long-term survival rate. CT is becoming the imaging method of choice for diagnosing CTEPH as it can identify patients who may benefit from thrombectomy. New CT developments such as distensibility measurements and dual-energy or subtraction techniques may further refine diagnosis and prognosis for improved patient care. PMID:26133321

  7. [From acute pulmonary embolism to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: Pathobiology and pathophysiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) represents a unique subtype of pulmonary hypertension characterized by the presence of mechanical obstruction of the major pulmonary vessels caused by venous thromboembolism. CTEPH is a progressive and devastating disease if not treated, and is the only subset of PH potentially curable by a surgical procedure known as pulmonary endarterectomy. The clot burden and pulmonary embolism recurrence may contribute to the development of CTEPH however only few thrombophilic factors have been found to be associated. A current hypothesis is that CTEPH results from the incomplete resolution and organization of thrombus modified by inflammatory, immunologic and genetic mechanisms, leading to the development of fibrotic stenosis and adaptive vascular remodeling of resistance vessels. The causes of thrombus non-resolution have yet to be fully clarified. CTEPH patients often display severe PH that cannot be fully explained by the degree of pulmonary vascular obstruction apparent on imaging studies. In such cases, the small vessel disease and distal obstructive thrombotic lesions beyond the sub-segmental level may contribute for out of proportion elevated PVR. The processes implicated in the development of arteriopathy and micro-vascular changes might explain the progressive nature of PH and gradual clinical deterioration with poor prognosis, as well as lack of correlation between measurable hemodynamic parameters and vascular obstruction even in the absence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. This review summarizes the most relevant up-to-date aspects on pathobiology and pathophysiology of CTEPH. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulmonary Embolism in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Ahmar Urooj; Hutchins, Kelley K.; Rajpurkar, Madhvi

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) in the pediatric population is relatively rare when compared to adults; however, the incidence is increasing and accurate and timely diagnosis is critical. A high clinical index of suspicion is warranted as PE often goes unrecognized among children leading to misdiagnosis and potentially increased morbidity and mortality. Evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of children with PE are lacking and current practices are extrapolated from adult data. Treatment options include thrombolysis and anticoagulation with heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists, with newer direct oral anticoagulants currently in clinical trials. Long-term sequelae of PE, although studied in adults, are vastly unknown among children and adolescents. Additional research is needed in order to provide pediatric focused care for patients with acute PE. PMID:28848725

  9. Clinician gestalt estimate of pretest probability for acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism in patients with chest pain and dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Stubblefield, William B

    2014-03-01

    Pretest probability helps guide diagnostic testing for patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism. Pretest probability derived from the clinician's unstructured gestalt estimate is easier and more readily available than methods that require computation. We compare the diagnostic accuracy of physician gestalt estimate for the pretest probability of acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism with a validated, computerized method. This was a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected, multicenter study. Patients (N=840) had chest pain, dyspnea, nondiagnostic ECGs, and no obvious diagnosis. Clinician gestalt pretest probability for both acute coronary syndrome and pulmonary embolism was assessed by visual analog scale and from the method of attribute matching using a Web-based computer program. Patients were followed for outcomes at 90 days. Clinicians had significantly higher estimates than attribute matching for both acute coronary syndrome (17% versus 4%; Pprobability but on receiver operating curve analysis were as accurate for pulmonary embolism but not acute coronary syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors associating with the presence of residual thrombosis after 3-month treatment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingluan; Xu, Mingling; Sun, Nina; Cheng, Zhaozhong; Sui, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the factors associating with the presence of residual thrombosis in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE) after at least 3-month anticoagulant therapy. Demographic and clinical data of 180 cases in the affiliated hospital of Qingdao University from January 2005 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. APE in all patients were confirmed by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Patients were then detected for the presence of residual thrombosis according to a second CTPA. After appropriate comparison test, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors for residual thrombosis. Among 180 patients, complete clearance of thrombosis occurred in 115 (63.9%) patients. Residual thrombosis remained in 65 (36.1%) patients. The independent factors associating with residual thrombosis include unprovoked APE (OR 0.231, 95% CI 0.062-0.861) and fibrinogen level in acute phase (OR 1.958, 95% CI 1.282-2.911). Furthermore, these two variables were both associated with the presence of residual thrombosis in patients receiving different parenteral anticoagulants (unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin). Pulmonary thrombosis in some patients with APE are not completely dissolved after at least 3-month treatment. Additionally, unprovoked APE is positive predictor of decreased residual thrombosis and fibrinogen level in acute phase is a risk factor of the presence of residual thrombosis.

  11. Widening of coronary sinus in CT pulmonary angiography indicates right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staskiewicz, Grzegorz [Medical University of Lublin, 1. Department of Radiology, Lublin (Poland); Medical University of Lublin, Department of Human Anatomy, Lublin (Poland); Czekajska-Chehab, Elzbieta; Trojanowska, Agnieszka; Drop, Andrzej [Medical University of Lublin, 1. Department of Radiology, Lublin (Poland); Przegalinski, Jerzy; Tomaszewski, Andrzej [Medical University of Lublin, Chair and Department of Cardiology, Lublin (Poland); Torres, Kamil; Torres, Anna [Medical University of Lublin, Department of Human Anatomy, Lublin (Poland); Maciejewski, Ryszard [Medical University of Lublin, Department of Human Anatomy, Lublin (Poland); UITM Rzeszow, Medical Emergency Department, Rzeszow (Poland)

    2010-07-15

    Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) may occur in the course of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Patients with RVD need more intensive treatment, and the prognosis is more severe. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the measurement of the coronary sinus in the assessment of RVD in patients with acute PE and to compare it with other indicators of RVD. Retrospective assessment of 55 CT pulmonary angiography examinations with signs of acute PE was performed. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was echocardiographically assessed in all patients, and RVD was defined as PASP values greater than 30 mmHg. CT measurements included the size of the heart ventricles, mediastinal vessels and the width of the coronary sinus. Median width of the coronary sinus was 16 mm (range 12-24 mm) in patients with increased PASP and 10 mm (range 7-22 mm) in patients with normal PASP (p = 0.001). Best cut-off value was assessed to be 12.5 mm, with sensitivity 94% and specificity 75%. It was characterised by the largest area under ROC curve (0.82) among analysed parameters. Width of the coronary sinus seems to be a promising parameter for identification of RVD in patients with acute PE. A prospective study should be undertaken to further assess its clinical and prognostic applicability. (orig.)

  12. Family history of venous thromboembolism predicts the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher; Agy, Chad; Carlson, Margaret; Steenblik, Jacob; Bledsoe, Joseph; Hartsell, Stephen; Madsen, Troy

    2018-01-06

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) clinical decision rules do not consider a patient's family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We evaluated whether a family history of VTE predicts acute PE in the emergency department (ED). Over a 5.5-year study period, we enrolled a prospective convenience sample of patients presenting to an academic emergency department with chest pain and/or shortness of breath. We defined a family history of VTE as a first-degree relative with previous PE or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We noted outcomes of testing during the patient's ED stay, including the diagnosis of acute PE by either computed tomography (CT) or ventilation/perfusion (VQ) scan. Of the 3024 study patients, 19.4% reported a family history of VTE and 1.9% were diagnosed with an acute PE during the ED visit. Patients with a family history of VTE were more likely to be diagnosed with a PE: 3.2% vs. 1.6% (p = 0.009). 82.3% of patients were Pulmonary Embolism Rule-out Criteria (PERC) positive, and among PERC-positive patients, those with a family history of VTE were more likely to be diagnosed with a PE: 3.6% vs. 1.9% (p = 0.016). Of patients who underwent testing for PE (33.7%), patients with a family history of VTE were more likely to be diagnosed with a PE: 9.4% vs. 4.9% (p = 0.032). Patients with a self-reported family history of VTE in a first-degree relative are more likely to be diagnosed with an acute PE in the ED, even among those patients considered to have a higher likelihood of PE. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Clinical gestalt versus prognostic scores for prognostication of patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Carlos Andrés; Zamarro, Celia; Gómez, Vicente; Guerassimova, Ina; Nieto, Rosa; Barbero, Esther; Chiluiza, Diana; Barrios, Deisy; Morillo, Raquel; Jiménez, David

    2017-12-21

    To determine the accuracy of clinical gestalt to identify patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) at low-risk for short-term complications. This study included a total of 154 consecutive patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic PE in a tertiary university hospital. We compared the prognostic accuracy of the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), the simplified PESI (sPESI), and clinical gestalt of 1) 2senior physicians (one with and one without experience in the management of patients with PE), 2) a fourth-year resident of Pneumology, 3) a third-year resident of Pneumology, and 4) a second-year resident of Pneumology. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality during the first month after the diagnosis of PE. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 8.4% (13/154; 8.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1-12.8%). The PESI and clinical gestalt classified more patients as low-risk, compared to the sPESI (36.4%, 31.3% y 28.6%, respectively). There were no deaths in the sPESI low-risk category (negative predictive value 100%). Prognostic accuracy increased with increasing experience (84.6 vs. 92.3%; P=.049). The sPESI showed the best accuracy at correctly identifying low-risk patients with acute symptomatic PE. Clinical gestalt is not inferior to standardized clinical prediction rules to prognosticate patients with acute PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The relation between international normalized ratio and mortality in acute pulmonary embolism: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırış, Tuncay; Yazıcı, Selcuk; Durmuş, Gündüz; Çanga, Yiğit; Karaca, Mustafa; Nazlı, Cem; Dogan, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious clinical disease characterized by a high mortality rate. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of international normalized ratio (INR) in acute PE patients not on anticoagulant therapy. The study included 244 hospitalized acute PE patients who were not receiving previous anticoagulant therapy. Based on their 30-day mortality, patients were categorized as survivors or non-survivors. INR was measured during the patients' admission, on the same day as the diagnosis of PE but before anticoagulation started. Thirty-day mortality occurred in 39 patients (16%). INR was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (1.3±0.4 vs 1.1±0.3, P=.003). In multivariate analysis, INR (HR: 3.303, 95% CI: 1.210-9.016, P=.020) was independently associated with 30-day mortality from PE. Inclusion of INR in a model with simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (sPESI) score improved the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve from 0.736 (95% CI: 0.659-0.814) to 0.775 (95% CI: 0.701-0.849) (P=.028). Also, the addition of INR to sPESI score enhanced the net reclassification improvement (NRI=8.8%, P<.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI=0.043, P=.027). Elevated INR may have prognostic value for 30-day mortality in acute PE patients not on anticoagulation. Combining INR with sPESI score improved the predictive value for all-cause mortality. However, further large-scale studies are needed to confirm it's prognostic role. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The value of isovolumic acceleration for the assessment of right ventricular function in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Murat; Sayar, Nurten; Demir, Serafettin; Rodi Tosua, Aydın; Aslan, Vedat

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of tricuspid annulus myocardial isovolumic acceleration (IVA) in the assessment of right ventricular function in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Fifteen patients (mean age 60.6±11.3 years) with acute PE were enrolled and a control group was formed of 15 patients with a similar mean age (60.3±11.5). Patients who were diagnosed with acute PE by thoracic computed tomography angiography underwent transthoracic echocardiography at the time of diagnosis and at one month after diagnosis. In the control group IVA was 2.8±0.2 m/s(2), while in the acute PE group, it was 2.0±0.1 m/s(2) at the time of diagnosis and 2.9±0.1 m/s(2) at the end of the first month. When IVA values of acute PE patients at the end of the first month were compared with their initial values and those of the control group, they had normalized (control and acute PE p<0.0001; control and PE at one-month follow-up p=0.983). In our study, IVA was shown to be a reliable marker of right ventricular systolic function in patients with acute PE. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of intra-operative acute pulmonary embolism during general anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuanyuan; Wen, Shuai; Chen, Gezi; Zhang, Wei; Ai, Yanqiu; Yuan, Jingjing

    2017-05-26

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) can be life-threatening. Early detection is even more difficult for patients under general anesthesia as common symptoms are not available and the pathophysiological course of intra-operative APE is influenced by procedures of surgery and anesthesia, which makes patients under general anesthesia a distinctive group. We report a case of APE during orthopedic surgery under general anesthesia. A 64-year-old female with atrial fibrillation and surgical history of varicosity underwent total right hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia. No arterial or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found prior to the surgery, but APE still occurred intraoperatively. The sudden decrease in PETCO2 and increase in PaCO2 combined other clues raised the suspect of APE, which is further evidenced by transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE). Multidisciplinary consultation was started immediately. After discussion with the consultation team and communication with patient's family members, anticoagulation therapy was started and IVC filter was placed to prevent PE recurrence. The patient went through the operation and discharged uneventfully 30 days later. Pulmonary embolism is a rare and potentially high-risk perioperative situation, with a difficult diagnosis when occurs under anesthesia. The separation phenomenon of decrease in PETCO2 and increase in PaCO2 might be a useful and suggestive sign, enabling prompt management and therefore improving the prognosis.

  17. [A statement the Polish Cardiac Society Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation on screening for CTEPH patients after acute pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurzyński, Michał; Kurzyna, Marcin; Kopeć, Grzegorz; Błaszczak, Piotr; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Kamiński, Karol; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Mularek-Kubzdela, Tatiana; Mroczek, Ewa; Biederman, Andrzej; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Torbicki, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Both pharmacological and invasive treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is now available in Poland and the awareness of the disease among physicians is growing. Thus, the Polish Cardiac Society's Working Group on Pulmonary Circulation in cooperation with independent experts in this field, have launched the statement on algorithm to guide a CTEPH diagnosis in patients with previous acute pulmonary embolism (APE). In Poland, every year this disease affects about 250 patients. CTEPH should be suspected in individuals after APE with dyspnea, despite at least 3 months period of effective anticoagulation, particularly when specified risk factors are present. Echocardiography is a main screening tool. The authors suggest that a diagnostic process of patients with significant clinical suspicion of CTEPH and right ventricle overload in echocardiography should be performed in reference centres. The document contains a list of Polish centres diagnosing patients with suspected CTEPH. Pulmonary scintigraphy is a safe and highly sensitive screening test for CTEPH. Multi-detector computed tomography with precise detection of thromboembolic residues in pulmonary circulation is important for planning of pulmonary endarterectomy. Right heart catheterisation definitely confirms the presence of pulmonary hypertension and direct pulmonary angiography allows for identification of lesions suitable for thromboendarterectomy or pulmonary balloon angioplasty. In this document a diagnostic algorithm in patients with suspected CTEPH is also proposed. With individualised sequential diagnostic strategy each patient can be finally qualified for a particular mode of therapy by dedicated CTEPH Heart Team. Moreover the document contains short information for the primary care physician about the management of patients after APE.

  18. Prevalence of venous thrombo-embolism in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Kamel

    2013-10-01

    Conclusion: VTE appeared to be a common problem in COPD patients with exacerbations. The role of CTPA is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. DVT of lower limbs was not essential in all cases of proven pulmonary embolism. Serum D-dimer, Wells criteria and Geneva score are useful bedside criteria that may help to assess the occurrence of VTE in such patients.

  19. Right ventricular dysfunction as an echocardiographic prognostic factor in hemodynamically stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jae Hyung; Kutti Sridharan, Gurusaravanan; Kim, Seon Ha; Kaw, Roop; Abburi, Triveni; Irfan, Affan; Kocheril, Abraham G

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated whether right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) as assessed by echocardiogram can be used as a prognostic factor in hemodynamically stable patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Short-term mortality has been investigated only in small studies and the results have been controversial. Methods A PubMed search was conducted using two keywords, “pulmonary embolism” and “echocardiogram”, for articles published between January 1st 1998 and December 31st 2011. Out of 991 ...

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound Performed by Pulmonary Critical Care Physicians for Right Ventricle Assessment in Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filopei, Jason; Acquah, Samuel O; Bondarsky, Eric E; Steiger, David J; Ramesh, Navitha; Ehrlich, Madeline; Patrawalla, Paru

    2017-12-01

    Risk stratification for acute pulmonary embolism using imaging presence of right ventricular dysfunction is essential for triage; however, comprehensive transthoracic echocardiography has limited availability. We assessed the accuracy and timeliness of Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine Fellow's performance of goal-directed echocardiograms and intensivists' interpretations for evaluating right ventricular dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism. Prospective observational study and retrospective chart review. Four hundred fifty bed urban teaching hospital. Adult in/outpatients diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary critical care fellows performed and documented their goal-directed echocardiogram as normal or abnormal for right ventricular size and function in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Gold standard transthoracic echocardiography was performed on schedule unless the goal-directed echocardiogram showed critical findings. Attending intensivists blinded to the clinical scenario reviewed these exams at a later date. Two hundred eighty-seven consecutive patients were evaluated for acute PE. Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine Fellows performed 154 goal-directed echocardiograms, 110 with complete cardiology-reviewed transthoracic echocardiography within 48 hours for comparison. Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine Fellow's area under the curve for size and function was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.75-0.90) and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.75-0.90), respectively. Intensivists' 1/2 area under the curve for size and function was (1) 0.87 (95% CI, 0.82-0.94), (1) 0.87 (95% CI, 0.80-0.93) and (2) 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95), (2) 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95). Median time difference between goal-directed echocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiography was 21 hours 18 minutes. This is the first study to evaluate pulmonary critical care fellows' and intensivists' use of goal-directed echocardiography in diagnosing right ventricular dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary Critical Care

  1. Risk management in acute pulmonary embolism: correlation between right heart dysfunction, pulmonary clots distribution, biomarkers and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Right heart dysfunction (RHD is related to adverse outcomes in acute pulmonary embolism (PE. AIM OF THE STUDY To evaluate the relation between RHD, pulmonary clots distribution and biomarkers and prognosis of patients with PE. METHODS We analysed echocardiographic data of 70 patients with diagnosis of PE confirmed by pulmonary computer tomography, hCT. We considered the enddiastolic right/left ventricles ratio > 1 as index of RHD; echocardiographic data were compared with clots distribution in pulmonary vascular tree such as hCT findings and biomarkers. For each patient we calculated the shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure ratio, shock defined as ratio ≥ 1. RESULTS Hospital mortality was 8.5%. Mean age of dead patients was significantly higher compared to alive (85.67 vs 71.57 years, p < 0.05. 41% of patients revealed unilateral PE, 59% had bilateral. In 10% of patients main pulmonary artery was interested by clot, 48% of patients had involved one of the main branches, 90% had involved at least one of the lobar branches, 59% one of segmental branches of pulmonary arteries. 52% of patients had RHD. Mortality in RHD patients was 14.8% vs 8% in no RHD, p < 0.05. Mean values of troponin I and D-dimer were significantly higher in RHD patients. Shock index was ≥ 1 in 37.5% of RHD and 20% in no RHD. RHD patients showed significantly higher involvement of main pulmonary artery and its branches and higher bilateral involvement. CONCLUSIONS RHD is related to proximal and bilateral pulmonary clots distribution and troponin I and D-dimer values and poorer prognosis.

  2. Thrombolysis for acute intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang-yuan; Yang, Ping; Liu, Miao; Ding, Mei; Liu, Guo-hui; Tong, Ya-liang; Yang, Chun-yan; Meng, Fan-bo

    2015-11-01

    The use of thrombolytic therapy in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism is controversial. To compare with anticoagulation alone, no analysis before has determined whether thrombolytic therapy is associated with improved survival or lower incidence of adverse clinical outcomes for intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism. This meta-analysis was performed to assess mortality benefits, bleeding and recurrent pulmonary embolism risks associated with thrombolytic therapy compared with anticoagulation in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism. The Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, EBSCO, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing thrombolytic therapy with anticoagulation in intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism patients (in which the mortality data were reported) from inception to August 5, 2014. Primary outcomes were all-cause mortality and major bleeding. Secondary outcomes were recurrent pulmonary embolism and minor bleeding. The pooled relative risk (RR), Mantel-Haenszel corresponding method and fixed-effect model were used to estimate the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy with 95% confidence intervals. Eight clinical randomized controlled trials involving 1755 patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism were included. Patients treated with thrombolytics presented lower mortality than patients in the anticoagulation cohort (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.28-0.97; 1.39% [12/866] vs. 2.92% [26/889]). Compared with anticoagulation, thrombolytic therapy was associated with a higher risk of major (RR, 3.35; 95% CI, 2.03-5.54; 7.80% [64/820] vs. 2.28% [19/834]) and minor (RR, 3.66; 95% CI, 2.77-4.84; 32.78% [197/601] vs. 8.94% [53/593]) bleeding. Furthermore, thrombolytic therapy was associated with a lower incidence of recurrent pulmonary embolism (RR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.15-0.73; 0.73% [6/826] vs. 2.72% [23/846]). Compared with anticoagulation, thrombolytic therapy in patients with intermediate

  3. Shape-based analysis of right ventricular dysfunction associated with acute pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Nima; Xue, Wenzhe; Wu, Hong; Liang, Jianming; McMahon, Eileen M.; Belohlavek, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is known as one of the major causes of sudden death. However, high level of mortality caused by APE can be reduced, if detected in early stages of development. Hence, biomarkers capable of early detection of APE are of utmost importance. This study investigates how APE affects the biomechanics of the cardiac right ventricle (RV), taking one step towards developing functional biomarkers for early diagnosis and determination of prognosis of APE. To that end, we conducted a pilot study in pigs, which revealed the following major changes due to the severe RV afterload caused by APE: (1) waving paradoxical motion of the RV inner boundary, (2) decrease in local curvature of the septum, (3) lower positive correlation between the movement of inner boundaries of the septal and free walls of the RV, (4) slower blood ejection by the RV, and (5) discontinuous movement observed particularly in the middle of the RV septal wall.

  4. Pulmonary embolism presenting with ST segment elevation in inferior leads

    OpenAIRE

    Muzaffer Kahyaoğlu; Elnur Alizade; Abdurrahman Naser; Akin İzgi

    2017-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is a form of venous thromboembolism that is widespread and sometimes mortal. The clinical presentation of pulmonary embolism is variable and often nonspecific making the diagnosis challenging. In this report, we present a case of pulmonary embolism characterized by ST segment elevation in inferior leads without reciprocal changes in the electrocardiogram.

  5. Pulmonary embolism presenting with ST segment elevation in inferior leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Kahyaoğlu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a form of venous thromboembolism that is widespread and sometimes mortal. The clinical presentation of pulmonary embolism is variable and often nonspecific making the diagnosis challenging. In this report, we present a case of pulmonary embolism characterized by ST segment elevation in inferior leads without reciprocal changes in the electrocardiogram.

  6. Risk stratifying emergency department patients with acute pulmonary embolism: Does the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index perform as well as the original?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, David R; Ballard, Dustin W; Mark, Dustin G; Huang, Jie; Reed, Mary E; Rauchwerger, Adina S; Wang, David H; Lin, James S; Kene, Mamata V; Pleshakov, Tamara S; Sax, Dana K; Sax, Jordan M; McLachlan, D Ian; Yamin, Cyrus K; Swap, Clifford J; Iskin, Hilary R; Vemula, Ridhima; Fleming, Bethany S; Elms, Andrew R; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2016-12-01

    The Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) is a validated prognostic score to estimate the 30-day mortality of emergency department (ED) patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A simplified version (sPESI) was derived but has not been as well studied in the U.S. We sought to validate both indices in a community hospital setting in the U.S. and compare their performance in predicting 30-day all-cause mortality and classification of cases into low-risk and higher-risk categories. This retrospective cohort study included adults with acute objectively confirmed PE from 1/2013 to 4/2015 across 21 community EDs. We evaluated the misclassification rate of the sPESI compared with the PESI. We assessed accuracy of both indices with regard to 30-day mortality. Among 3006 cases of acute PE, the 30-day all-cause mortality rate was 4.4%. The sPESI performed as well as the PESI in identifying low-risk patients: both had similar sensitivities, negative predictive values, and negative likelihood ratios. The sPESI, however, classified a smaller proportion of patients as low risk than the PESI (27.5% vs. 41.0%), but with similar low-risk mortality rates (<1%). Compared with the PESI, the sPESI overclassified 443 low-risk patients (14.7%) as higher risk, yet their 30-day mortality was 0.7%. The sPESI underclassified 100 higher-risk patients (3.3%) as low risk who also had a low mortality rate (1.0%). Both indices identified patients with PE who were at low risk for 30-day mortality. The sPESI, however, misclassified a significant number of low-mortality patients as higher risk, which could lead to unnecessary hospitalizations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Catheter-Based Embolectomy for Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Devices, Technical Considerations, Risks, and Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Wissam A; McDaniel, Michael C

    2018-01-01

    A significant number of patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism have contraindications to thrombolytic therapy. Catheter-based therapy may be helpful and consists of a multitude of catheters and techniques, some old and some new. Although there are few data supporting the use of any of these techniques, there has been a recent rise in interest and use of catheter-based pulmonary embolectomy. This text describes the contemporary devices used in pulmonary embolism treatment, discusses their challenges, and proposes some future directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk-Adapted Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Recent Evidence, New Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käberich, Anja; Wärntges, Simone; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, may cause life-threatening complications and imposes a substantial socio-economic burden. During the past years, several landmark trials paved the way towards novel strategies in acute and long-term management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk stratification is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic management of the highly heterogeneous population of patients with acute PE. Recently published European Guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function) and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury) for identification of normotensive PE patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome. In this patient group, systemic full-dose thrombolysis was associated with a significantly increased risk of intracranial bleeding, a complication which discourages its clinical application unless hemodynamic decompensation occurs. A large-scale clinical trial program evaluating new oral anticoagulants in the initial and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism showed at least comparable efficacy and presumably increased safety of these drugs compared to the current standard treatment. Research is continuing on catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, local, low-dose thrombolysis in the management of intermediate-risk PE. PMID:25386356

  9. Incidence of acute pulmonary embolism, related comorbidities and survival; analysis of a Swedish national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Therese; Söderberg, Stefan

    2017-06-14

    The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in Sweden and any regional differences. To assess short- and long-term survival analysis after an episode of PE, before and after excluding patients with known malignancies, and to determine the most common comorbidities prior to the PE event. All in-hospital patients, including children, diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 were retrieved from the Swedish National Patient Registry (NPR) and incidence rates were calculated. All registered comorbidities from 1998 until the index events were collected and survival up to 4 years after the event were calculated and compared to matched controls. There were 5793 patients of all ages diagnosed with acute PE in 2005 resulting in a national incidence of 0.6/1000/year. The mean age was 70 years and 52% were women. The most frequent comorbidities were cardiac-, vascular-, infectious- and gastrointestinal diseases, injuries and malignancies. The mortality rates were more than doubled in patients with recent PE compared to that in a matched control group (49.1% vs 21.9%), and the excess mortality remained after exclusion of deaths occurring within one year and after exclusion of patients with any malignancy prior to the event. PE is associated with high age as well as with multiple comorbidities, and with an increased short- and long-term mortality. This study highlights the importance of a proper follow-up after an acute PE.

  10. Risk-Adapted Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Recent Evidence, New Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Käberich

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, the third most frequent acute cardiovascular syndrome, may cause life-threatening complications and imposes a substantial socio-economic burden. During the past years, several landmark trials paved the way towards novel strategies in acute and long-term management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE. Risk stratification is increasingly recognized as a cornerstone for an adequate diagnostic and therapeutic management of the highly heterogeneous population of patients with acute PE. Recently published European Guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical prediction rules in combination with imaging procedures (assessment of right ventricular function and laboratory biomarkers (indicative of myocardial stress or injury for identification of normotensive PE patients at intermediate risk for an adverse short-term outcome. In this patient group, systemic full-dose thrombolysis was associated with a significantly increased risk of intracranial bleeding, a complication which discourages its clinical application unless hemodynamic decompensation occurs. A large-scale clinical trial program evaluating new oral anticoagulants in the initial and long-term treatment of venous thromboembolism showed at least comparable efficacy and presumably increased safety of these drugs compared to the current standard treatment. Research is continuing on catheter-directed, ultrasound-assisted, local, low-dose thrombolysis in the management of intermediate-risk PE.

  11. Clinical characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of South-East Asian patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Kwang How; Wong, Shiun Woei; Wong, Yee May; Foo, David; Watson, Timothy James; Ho, Hee Hwa

    2017-12-15

    The clinical features of acute PE have not been well studied in South-East Asia. We therefore sought to evaluate the clinical characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of patients diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) in our region. From January 2008 to March 2013, 343 patients were admitted to our tertiary institution with acute PE. Data were collected retrospectively on baseline clinical characteristics, presenting signs and symptoms, results of electrocardiographic and imaging studies, therapeutic modality and hospital course. 91% of the patients presented with submassive PE. 6.1% of patients had saddle PE. The most common presenting symptom was dyspnea (72.3%) followed by chest pain (12.8%), hemoptysis (2.6%), syncope (2.6%) and cardiovascular collapse (1.2%). Risk factors for PE were idiopathic cause (33.5%), immobilization (21%), malignancy (6.1%) and hypercoagulable state (2.9%). The overall in-hospital mortality was 5%. Factors associated with mortality were massive PE, tachycardia at presentation, right ventricular dysfunction and cardiogenic shock. Bleeding complications occurred in 10.2% of patients (major bleeding in 3.5%). Acute PE in the South-East Asian patients is associated with an overall mortality rate of 5%. The bleeding complications from treatment are also high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Severe Thrombophilia in Acute Unprovoked Idiopathic Fatal Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Matt; Lin, Ying; Sampson, Barbara A; Wang, Dawei; Zhou, Bo; Eng, Lucy S; Um, Sung Yon; Devinsky, Orrin; Goldstein, David B; Tang, Yingying

    2017-03-01

    Acute unprovoked idiopathic fatal pulmonary embolism (IFPE) causes sudden death without an identifiable thrombogenic risk. We aimed to investigate the underlying genomic risks of IFPE through whole exome sequencing (WES). We reviewed 14years of consecutive out-of-hospital fatal pulmonary embolism records (n=1478) from the ethnically diverse population of New York City. We selected 68 qualifying IFPE cases for WES. We compared the WES data of IFPE cases to those of 9332 controls to determine if there is an excess of rare damaging variants in the genome using ethnicity-matched controls in collapsing analyses. We found nine of the 68 decedents (13·2%) who died of IFPE had at least one pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant in one of the three anti-coagulant genes: SERPINC1 (Antithrombin III), PROC, and PROS1. The odds ratio of developing IFPE as a variant carrier for SERPINC1 is 144·2 (95% CI, 26·3-779·4; P=1·7×10-7), for PROC is 85·6 (95% CI, 13·0-448·9; P=2.0×10-5), and for PROS1 is 56·4 (95% CI, 5·3-351·1; P=0·001). The average age-at-death of anti-coagulant gene variant carriers is significantly younger than that of non-carriers (28·56years versus 38·02years; P=0·01). This study showed the important role of severe thrombophilia due to natural anti-coagulant deficiency in IFPE. Evaluating severe thrombophilia in out-of-hospital fatal PE beyond IFPE is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Right ventricular dysfunction in acute pulmonary embolism: NT-proBNP vs. troponin T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugno, Marilena; Orgaz-Molina, Jacinto; Rosa-Salazar, Vladimir; Guirado-Torrecillas, Leticia; García-Pérez, Bartolomé

    2017-04-21

    Dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV) is a parameter of severity in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Echocardiographic assessment is not always possible in accident and emergency, hence the need to predict the presence of RV dysfunction using easily measurable parameters. To analyse the value of NT-proBNP and troponin T as markers of RV dysfunction in patients with acute PE. Secondarily, to assess the relationship between RV failure and clinical parameters related to PE. Analytical, observational, cross-sectional and retrospective study comparing the values NT-proBNP, troponin T and presenting symptoms of PE among patients with and without RV dysfunction. One hundred seventy-two patients (52 with RV failure,120 without) were included. All symptoms occurred with similar frequency between the 2groups except dyspnea and syncope (more common in the group with RV failure). Both NT-proBNP and troponin T had significantly higher values in the group of patients with RV dysfunction. However, in the multivariate analysis, NT-proBNP had a higher explanatory value for RV failure than troponin T. NT-proBNP is a diagnostic parameter of RV dysfunction with higher sensitivity in the context of acute PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ryan W; Stinson, Hannah R; Wolfe, Heather; Lindell, Robert B; Topjian, Alexis A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M; Berg, Robert A; Kilbaugh, Todd J

    2017-12-19

    Pulmonary embolism is a rarely reported and potentially treatable cause of cardiac arrest in children and adolescents. The objective of this case series is to describe the course of five adolescent patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest secondary to pulmonary embolism. Case series. Single, large academic children's hospital. All patients under the age of 18 years (n = 5) who experienced an in-hospital cardiac arrest due to apparent pulmonary embolism from August 1, 2013, to July 31, 2017. All five patients received systemic thrombolytic therapy (IV tissue plasminogen activator) during cardiac arrest or periarrest during ongoing resuscitation efforts. Five adolescent patients, 15-17 years old, were treated for pulmonary embolism-related cardiac arrests during the study period. These accounted for 6.3% of all children and 25% of adolescents (12-17 yr old) receiving at least 5 minutes of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation during the study period. All five had venous thromboembolism risk factors. Two patients had known, extensive venous thrombi at the time of cardiac arrest, and one was undergoing angiography at the time of arrest. The diagnoses of pulmonary embolism were based on clinical suspicion, bedside echocardiography (n = 4), and low end-tidal CO2 levels relative to arterial CO2 values (n = 5). IV tissue plasminogen activator was administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in three patients and after the return of spontaneous circulation, in the setting of severe hemodynamic instability, in the other two patients. Four of five patients were successfully resuscitated and survived to hospital discharge. Pulmonary embolism was recognized as the etiology of multiple adolescent cardiac arrests in this single-center series and may be more common than previously reported. Recognition, high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and treatment with thrombolytic therapy resulted in survival in four of five patients.

  15. Pulseless electrical activity in acute massive pulmonary embolism during thrombolytic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han-Hua; Jeng, Jing-Ren

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of acute pulmonary embolism with hemodynamic instability diagnosed by a computed tomography pulmonary angiogram. The patient developed pulseless electrical activity during systemic thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Successful return of spontaneous circulation was achieved after immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compressions for 6 min. His electrocardiogram (ECG) on arrival in the emergency department displayed sinus tachycardia, an S wave in lead I, a Q wave in lead III, incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB), T-wave inversion (TWI) in leads V1–V3, ST elevation in leads aVR and V1, and ST depression in leads I, II, III, aVF, and V4–V6. These characteristic ECG changes might have prognostic value for clinical deterioration. He recovered after treatment. After discharge, the ECG showed resolution of TWI in leads V1–V3 and incomplete RBBB, suggesting recovery from right ventricular dysfunction, which was confirmed by an echocardiogram on follow in the outpatient department. PMID:28757765

  16. Recovery of right and left ventricular function after acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klok, F.A., E-mail: f.a.klok@lumc.nl [Section of Vascular Medicine, Department of General Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Romeih, S. [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, L.J.M.; Westenberg, J.J.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Huisman, M.V. [Section of Vascular Medicine, Department of General Internal Medicine-Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Roos, A. de [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To evaluate recovery of cardiac function after acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: Routine breath-held computed tomography (CT)-pulmonary angiography was performed in patients with suspected PE to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of PE at initial presentation. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered cardiac CT was performed to assess biventricular function. After 6 months, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. In total, 15 consecutive patients with PE and 10 without were studied. A significant change in ventricular volume was defined as a >15% change in end-diastolic or -systolic volumes (EDV, ESV), and significant ventricular function improvement as a >5% increase in ejection fraction (EF) as based on reported cut-off values. Results: Right and left ventricular (RV and LV) EDV and ESV changed non-significantly (<1.3%) in the patients without PE, indicating good comparability of those values measured by CT and MRI. PE patients with baseline normal RV function (RVEF {>=}47%) revealed a >5% improvement in the RVEF (+5.4 {+-} 3.1%) due to a decrease in the RVESV. Patients with baseline abnormal RV function showed a >5% improvement in the RVEF (+14 {+-} 15%) due to decreases in both the RVESV and RVEDV. Furthermore, the LVEDV increased in this latter patient group. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated an improvement in RV function in the majority of patients with PE, independent of baseline RV function. The degree of RV and LV recovery was dependent on the severity of baseline RV dysfunction.

  17. ANP, BNP and D-dimer predict right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to predict right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) using plasma concentration of D-dimer, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (pro-ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and cardiac troponin I (TNI) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE).......The aim of this study was to predict right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) using plasma concentration of D-dimer, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (pro-ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and cardiac troponin I (TNI) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE)....

  18. Diclofenac for reversal of right ventricular dysfunction in acute normotensive pulmonary embolism: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, David; Nieto, Rosa; Corres, Jesús; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Barrios, Deisy; Morillo, Raquel; Quezada, Carlos Andres; Huisman, Menno; Yusen, Roger D; Kline, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    The inflammatory response associated with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) contributes to the development of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may facilitate the reversal of PE-associated RV dysfunction. We randomly assigned normotensive patients who had acute PE associated with echocardiographic RV dysfunction and normal systemic blood pressure to receive intravenous (IV) diclofenac (two doses of 75mg in the first 24h after diagnosis) or IV placebo. All patients received standard anticoagulation with subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and an oral vitamin K antagonist. RV dysfunction was defined by the presence of, at least, two of the following criteria: i) RV diastolic diameter>30mm in the parasternal window; ii) RV diameter>left ventricle diameter in the apical or subcostal space; iii) RV free wall hypokinesis; and iv) estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure>30mmHg. Persistence of RV dysfunction at 48h and 7days after randomization were the primary and secondary efficacy outcomes, respectively. The primary safety outcome was major bleeding within 7days after randomization. Of the 34 patients randomly assigned to diclofenac or placebo, the intention-to-treat analysis showed persistent RV dysfunction at 48h in 59% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33-82%) of the diclofenac group and in 76% (95% CI, 50-93%) of the placebo group (difference in risk [diclofenac minus standard anticoagulation], -17 percentage points; 95% CI, -47 to 17). Similar proportions (35%) of patients in the diclofenac and placebo groups had persistent RV dysfunction at 7days. Major bleeding occurred in none of patients in the diclofenac group and in 5.9% (95% CI, 0.2-29%) of patient in the placebo group. Due to slow recruitment, our study is inconclusive as to a potential benefit of diclofenac over placebo to reverse RV dysfunction in normotensive patients with acute PE. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  19. Pulmonary Embolism in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaradass, Prasanna Venkatesan; Dey, Sadanand; Singh, Dilip; Hill, Michael D

    2018-01-28

    Silent pulmonary embolism (PE) may be associated with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We identified 10 patients from 3,132 unique patients (3,431 CT scans). We retrospectively examined CT angiogram of patients with AIS to determine the frequency of concurrent PE in AIS. The period prevalence of PE was 0.32. Seven patients had concurrent PE, whereas three had PE diagnosed 2 days after their AIS presentation. We suspected paradoxical embolism via patent foramen ovale as the cause of stroke in three patients and thrombophilia in four patients. Seven patients had poor outcome including four deaths. CT angiogram stroke protocol images from aortic arch to vertex allows visualization of upper pulmonary arteries and PE detection in AIS.

  20. Systemic thrombolytic therapy for acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Christophe; John, Gregor; Konstantinides, Stavros; Combescure, Christophe; Sanchez, Olivier; Lankeit, Mareike; Meyer, Guy; Perrier, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Aim Thrombolytic therapy induces faster clot dissolution than anticoagulation in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) but is associated with an increased risk of haemorrhage. We reviewed the risks and benefits of thrombolytic therapy in the management of patients with acute PE. Methods and results We systematically reviewed randomized controlled studies comparing systemic thrombolytic therapy plus anticoagulation with anticoagulation alone in patients with acute PE. Fifteen trials involving 2057 patients were included in our meta-analysis. Compared with heparin, thrombolytic therapy was associated with a significant reduction of overall mortality (OR; 0.59, 95% CI: 0.36–0.96). This reduction was not statistically significant after exclusion of studies including high-risk PE (OR; 0.64, 95% CI: 0.35–1.17). Thrombolytic therapy was associated with a significant reduction in the combined endpoint of death or treatment escalation (OR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.22–0.53), PE-related mortality (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.14–0.60) and PE recurrence (OR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.27–0.94). Major haemorrhage (OR; 2.91, 95% CI: 1.95–4.36) and fatal or intracranial bleeding (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.25–8.11) were significantly more frequent among patients receiving thrombolysis. Conclusions Thrombolytic therapy reduces total mortality, PE recurrence, and PE-related mortality in patients with acute PE. The decrease in overall mortality is, however, not significant in haemodynamically stable patients with acute PE. Thrombolytic therapy is associated with an increase of major and fatal or intracranial haemorrhage. PMID:24917641

  1. MASSIVE PULMONARY EMBOLISM IN OLDER PATIENT: SURVIVAL DESPITE STATISTIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Makharynska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Massive pulmonary thromboembolism is presented in this article on example of clinical case. Clinical investigation, prognosis evaluation tools, diagnosis and acute phase treatment along with prevention of recurrent episode of pulmonary embolism presented. Observed and described clinical case of pulmonary embolism in older patient, when patient was mistakenly diagnosed in emergency department as acute coronary syndrome patient.

  2. [Clinical efficacy and safety of thrombolytic treatment with reteplase in patients with intermediate-risk acute pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H G; Wang, S X; Lu, Z N; Yan, X X; Lyu, Z C; Peng, F H; Wu, Y; Gao, X; Hua, L; Jing, Z C; Xu, X Q

    2017-04-24

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic treatment with reteplase in patients with intermediate-risk acute pulmonary embolism. Methods: Ten consecutive patients with intermediate-risk acute pulmonary embolism who received thrombolytic treatment with reteplase at Thrombosis and Vascular Medicine Center, Fuwai Hospital from March to November in 2016 were included.Vital signs, right ventricular diameter, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, and biochemical markers were assessed before and after thrombolytic therapy with reteplase, and bleeding complications were also observed during 3 months follow up. Results: (1) For the efficacy outcomes: at 48 hours after thrombolytic treatment with reteplase, echocardiography-derived diameter of right ventricular was significant reduced from (27.9±3.8) mm to (24.8±2.6) mm (P=0.03), systolic pulmonary artery pressure decreased from (63.9±21.6) mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) to (34.4±19.8) mmHg (P=0.02). Heart rate and breathing rate were also decreased significantly (both Ppulmonary embolism or deep-vein thrombosis during the 3 months follow-up. (2) For the safety outcomes: a thrombolytic relevant hemoptysis (about 70 ml) occurred in 1 patient, and was controlled by PCC therapy.No other clinically relevant events were observed during thrombolytic treatment. Eight patients were followed more than 3 months, there was no major bleeding complication or death during the follow up period. Conclusion: Treatment of intermediate-risk acute pulmonary embolism with reteplase is effective and safe and there are no obvious side effects.

  3. Referral Patterns and Diagnostic Yield of Lung Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannier, Erik; Zuckier, Lionel S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study is to assess referral patterns and the yield of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy in patients referred for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients who underwent V/Q studies between April 1, 2008, and March 31, 2010. Patients were subdivided into 4 groups based on their referral source: emergency department (ED), hospital inpatient ward, outpatient thrombosis clinic, and all other outpatient sources. Results. A total of 1008 patients underwent V/Q scintigraphy to exclude acute PE. The number of ED, inpatient, thrombosis clinic, and outpatient studies was 43 (4.3%), 288 (28.6%), 351 (34.8%), and 326 (32.3%). Proportion of patients with contrast contraindication varied significantly among the different groups. Of the 1,008 studies, 331 (32.8%) were interpreted as normal, 408 (40.5%) as low, 158 (15.7%) as intermediate, and 111 (11.0%) as high probability for PE. 68 (6.7%) patients underwent CTPA within 2 weeks following V/Q. Conclusion. The rate of nondiagnostic studies is lower than that reported in previously published data, with a relatively low rate of intermediate probability studies. Only a small fraction of patients undergoing a V/Q scan will require a CTPA. PMID:28491475

  4. D-dimer testing for safe exclusion and risk stratification in patients with acute pulmonary embolism in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Yin; Yiyi Chen; Qiong Xie; Zhexin Shao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Safe exclusion and risk stratification are currently recommended for the initial management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). The aim of this study was to assess the safe exclusion and risk stratification value of D-dimer (DD) for APE when tested at the beginning of admission. Materials and Methods: All consecutive Chinese APE patients and controls were recruited from January 2010 to December 2012. All measurements of serum indexes were made in duplicate and blinded...

  5. Is stand-alone D-dimer testing safe to rule out acute pulmonary embolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, N; van der Hulle, T; Büller, H R; Klok, F A; Huisman, M V; Galipienzo, J; Di Nisio, M

    2017-02-01

    Essentials A stand-alone D-dimer below 750 μg/L has been proposed to rule out acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This was a post-hoc analysis on data from 6 studies comprising 7268 patients with suspected PE. The negative predictive value of a D-dimer pulmonary embolism (PE), without additional imaging, but this approach needs validation. Objectives To evaluate stand-alone D-dimer testing at a positivity threshold of 750 μg L-1 to rule out PE. Methods Individual data from 7268 patients with suspected PE previously enrolled in six prospective management studies were used. Patients were assessed by the Wells rule followed by quantitative D-dimer testing in those with a 'PE unlikely' score. Patients were classified post hoc as having a negative (< 750 μg L-1 ) or positive (≥ 750 μg L-1 ) D-dimer. Using a one-stage meta-analytic approach, the negative predictive value (NPV) of stand-alone D-dimer testing was evaluated overall and in different risk subgroups. Results The pooled incidence of PE was 23% (range, 13-42%). Overall, 44% of patients had a D-dimer < 750 μg L-1 , of whom 2.8% were diagnosed with PE at baseline or during 3-month follow-up (NPV, 97.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 94.9-98.5). The NPV was highest in patients with a low probability of PE according to the Wells rule (99.2%; 95% CI, 98.6-99.5%) and lowest in those with a high probability of PE (79.3%; 95% CI, 53.0-92.8%). The NPVs in patients with active cancer, patients with previous venous thromboembolism and inpatients were 96.2% (95% CI, 85.6-99.1%), 94.7% (95% CI, 88.6-97.6%) and 92.7% (95% CI, 79.3-97.7%), respectively. Conclusions Our findings suggest that stand-alone D-dimer testing at a positivity threshold of 750 μg L-1 is not safe to rule out acute PE. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. Inferior Vena Cava Filters in Stable Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism Who Receive Thrombolytic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Matta, Fadi; Hughes, Mary J

    2018-01-01

    There is a need for further analyses of subgroups of patients with pulmonary embolism who might benefit from vena cava filters. In the present investigation, we analyze mortality with vena cava filters in the subgroup of stable patients with pulmonary embolism who received thrombolytic therapy. We use a different database than used previously, and we analyze data in more recent years. Administrative data were analyzed from the Premier Healthcare Database, 2010-2014, in hospitalized stable patients with pulmonary embolism who received thrombolytic therapy and may or may not have received a vena cava filter. Patients were identified on the basis of International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. In-hospital all-cause mortality in stable patients who received a vena cava filter in addition to thrombolytic therapy was 139 of 2660 (5.2%), compared with 697 of 4332 (16.1%) who did not receive a filter (P pulmonary embolism who receive thrombolytic therapy, irrespective of the reason, the additional use of an inferior vena cava filter results in a lower in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. D-dimer test in cancer patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, M.; Sohne, M.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Büller, H. R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The safety of a D-dimer (DD) measurement in cancer patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) is unclear. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of the DD test in consecutive patients with clinically suspected PE with and without cancer. Methods: The

  8. D-Dimer test in cancer patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nisio, M. Di; Sohne, M.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Buller, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of a D-dimer (DD) measurement in cancer patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) is unclear. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of the DD test in consecutive patients with clinically suspected PE with and without cancer. METHODS: The

  9. Logistic regression model for identification of right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism by means of computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staskiewicz, Grzegorz, E-mail: grzegorz.staskiewicz@gmail.com [1st Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta, E-mail: czekajska@gazeta.pl [1st Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Uhlig, Sebastian, E-mail: uhligs@eranet.pl [1st Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Przegalinski, Jerzy, E-mail: jerzy.przegalinski@umlub.pl [Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Maciejewski, Ryszard, E-mail: maciejewski.r@gmail.com [Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland); Drop, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.drop@umlub.pl [1st Department of Radiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin (Poland)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Diagnosis of right ventricular dysfunction in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is known to be associated with increased risk of mortality. The aim of the study was to calculate a logistic regression model for reliable identification of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients diagnosed with computed tomography pulmonary angiography. Material and methods: Ninety-seven consecutive patients with acute pulmonary embolism were divided into groups with and without RVD basing upon echocardiographic measurement of pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). PE severity was graded with the pulmonary obstruction score. CT measurements of heart chambers and mediastinal vessels were performed; position of interventricular septum and presence of contrast reflux into the inferior vena cava were also recorded. The logistic regression model was prepared by means of stepwise logistic regression. Results: Among the used parameters, the final model consisted of pulmonary obstruction score, short axis diameter of right ventricle and diameter of inferior vena cava. The calculated model is characterized by 79% sensitivity and 81% specificity, and its performance was significantly better than single CT-based measurements. Conclusion: Logistic regression model identifies RVD significantly better, than single CT-based measurements.

  10. Acute, massive pulmonary embolism with right heart strain and hypoxia requiring emergent tissue plasminogen activator (TPA infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Patane

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 63-year-old male presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath. He had a history of prostate cancer and two previous pulmonary embolisms, but was not currently on blood thinners. He had no associated chest pain at the time of presentation, but endorsed hemoptysis. Vital signs were significant for a heart rate of 88, blood pressure 145/89, oxygen saturation in the mid-70’s on room air which increased to mid-80’s on 15L facemask. His exam was significant for clear lung sounds bilaterally. He immediately underwent chest x-ray which showed no acute abnormalities. A bedside ultrasound was performed which showed evidence of right ventricular and atrial dilation, consistent with right heart strain. Given that the patient’s oxygen saturations improved to 88% on 15L facemask, the patient was felt to be stable enough for CT angiography. Significant findings: CT angiogram showed multiple large acute pulmonary emboli, most significantly in the distal right main pulmonary artery (image 1 and 2. Additional pulmonary emboli were noted in the bilateral lobar, segmental, and subsegmental levels of all lobes. There was a peripheral, wedge-shaped consolidation surrounded by groundglass changes in the posterolateral basal right lower lobe that was consistent with a small lung infarction (image 3. Discussion: The patient underwent in the Emergency Department a tissue plasminogen activator (TPA infusion of alteplase 100 mg over 2 hours for his massive acute pulmonary embolisms. Throughout his TPA infusion his oxygen saturations became improved to mid-90’s and his shortness of breath symptoms began improving. His troponin returned at 0.15 ng/mL, suggesting right heart strain. He was admitted to the ICU for continued monitoring and treatment. An acute, massive pulmonary embolism is described as having more than 50% occlusion of pulmonary blood flow.1 The main causes of hypoxia includes ventilation

  11. A retrospective analysis of catheter-based thrombolytic therapy for acute submassive and massive pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Bennet; Wallace, Eric L; Charnigo, Richard; Wingerter, Kelly E; Kapadia, Pavan; Gurley, John C; Smyth, Susan S

    2015-04-01

    Catheter-based thrombolysis (CBT) is emerging as an option for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Although prior studies have demonstrated improvement in right ventricular function, little data is available regarding clinical patient outcomes. Our institution adopted CBT as an option for patients with submassive and massive PE and we evaluated its effect on patient outcomes. Two hundred and twenty-one patients who presented to our institution with submassive and massive PE were analyzed over three years by time period; 102 prior to the use of CBT and 119 during the time CBT was performed. The primary outcome was in-hospital major adverse clinical events (a composite of death, recurrent embolism, major bleeding, or stroke). Secondary outcomes were overall and ICU length of stay and individual components of the composite outcome. Mean age was 56.3±16 years with high rates of central PE (57.9%), RV dysfunction (37%), and myocardial necrosis (26%). Mean RV/LV ratio was 1.2. Thirty-two patients were treated with CBT. The composite endpoint occurred more frequently in the CBT era vs the pre-CBT era (21.0% vs 14.7%, p=0.23). After multivariate adjustment, CBT treatment demonstrated no effect on major adverse clinical events (OR 0.84, CI 0.22-3.22, p=0.80). CBT era patients had an unadjusted 37% increase in ICU days and 54% increase in total length of stay (ptreatment resulted in an adjusted 190% increase in overall length of stay (p<0.001). CBT did not demonstrate improvement in hospital outcomes, despite adjustments of PE severity, and was associated with a significant increase in overall and ICU length of stay. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Comparison of PESI, echocardiogram, CTPA, and NT-proBNP as risk stratification tools in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamsidhar, A; Rajasekhar, D; Vanajakshamma, V; Lakshmi, A Y; Latheef, K; Siva Sankara, C; Obul Reddy, G

    The aim of this study is to prospectively assess the diagnostic accuracy of pulmonary embolism severity index, echocardiogram, computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA), and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) for predicting adverse events in acute pulmonary embolism patients. Thirty consecutive acute pulmonary embolism patients were included in this study. Combined adverse events consisted of in-hospital death or use of escalation of care including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor therapy, or secondary thrombolysis during hospital stay. The outcomes were met in 30% of patients. Qanadli index (a measure of clot burden on CTPA) and NT-proBNP were significantly higher in patients with adverse events than those without (p=0.005 and p=0.009, respectively). PESI had moderate positive correlation with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) (r=0.449, p=0.013) but there was no significant difference in PESI between patients with and without adverse events (p=0.7). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that Qanadli index was the best predictor of adverse events with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.807 (95% CI: 0.651-0.963) with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% and positive predictive value (PPV) of 47.4% at cut-off value of 19. Right ventricle to left ventricle ratio on CTPA was found to predict RVD with AUC of 0.94 (95% CI: 0.842-1.000), NPV (77.8%), and PPV (95.2%) at cut-off value at 1.15. Qanadli index is more accurate predictor of adverse events than pulmonary embolism severity index, NT-proBNP, and RVD on echocardiogram and CTPA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Scintigraphic diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism - current status; Szintigraphische Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie - aktueller Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1998-03-01

    Due to its principle of detection, perfusion scintigraphy can detect small and even the smallest pulmonary embolisms with a maximum degree of sensitivity. There are weaknesses in specificity, in detection of pulmonary infarction and of non-occlusive emboli. To increase specificity, perfusion scintigrams should only be interpreted in conjunction with a current chest X-ray and a ventilation scintigram. Perfusion defects with V/Q mismatch should be interpreted and treated as pulmonary embolism even without angiographic correlates. In emergencies (serious dyspnea), however, perfusion scintigraphy alone provides results which are sufficiently precise, as far as prevalence is sufficiently high. Perfusion scintigraphy is the only imaging procedure which shows directly the functional consequences of pulmonary embolism, the degree of obstruction in the pulmonary arterial circulation can be estimated semiquantitatively. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Die Perfusionsszintigraphie kann aufgrund ihres indirekten Nachweisprinzips auch kleinere und kleinste Lungenembolien mit einem Hoechstmass an Sensitivitaet nachweisen. Schwaechen zeigen sich bei der Spezifitaet, beim Erkennen von Lungeninfarkten sowie von nicht okkludierenden Emboli. Zur Anhebung der Spezifitaet sollen Perfusionsszintigramme nur in Verbindung mit einem aktuellen Roentgenthoraxbild und einem Ventilationsszintigramm befundet werden. Perfusionsdefekte mit V/Q mismatch sind auch ohne angiographisches Korrelat als Lungenembolie zu deuten und zu behandeln. Im Notfall (schwere Dyspnoe) liefert aber auch die Perfusionsszintigraphie allein ein ausreichend genaues Ergebnis, sofern die Praevalenz ausreichend hoch ist. Die Perfusionsszintigraphie kann als einziges bildgebendes Verfahren die funktionellen Folgen der Lungenembolie direkt sichtbar machen, der Obstruktionsgrad der Lungenarterienendstrombahn wird semiquantitativ abschaetzbar. (orig./MG)

  14. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jann; Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte

    2014-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar...

  15. Weight-based contrast administration in the computerized tomography evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Lisa; Zamfirova, Ina; Sulo, Suela; Baral, Pesach

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Compare individualized contrast protocol, or weight-based protocol, to standard methodology in evaluating acute pulmonary embolism. Retrospective chart review was performed on patients undergoing computed tomography angiography with standard contrast protocol (n = 50) or individualized protocol (n = 50). Computerized tomography images were assessed for vascular enhancement and image quality. Demographics were comparable, however, more patients in the individualized group were admitted to intensive care unit (48% vs 16%, P = 0.004). Vascular enhancement and image quality were also comparable, although individualized protocol had significantly fewer contrast and motion artifact limitations (28% vs 48%, P = 0.039). Fifteen percent decrease in intravenous contrast volume was identified in individualized group with no compromise in image quality. Individualized contrast protocol provided comparable vascular enhancement and image quality to the standard, yet with fewer limitations and lower intravenous contrast volume. Catheter-gauge flow rate restrictions resulting in inconsistent technologist exam execution were identified, supporting the need for further investigation of this regimen. PMID:28151887

  16. Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in the Course of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Clinical Significance and Impact on Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska, Agnieszka; Kiluk, Izabela; Kosacka, Urszula; Krajewski, Jacek; Musial, Wlodzimierz Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    The relationship and clinical implications of atrial fibrillation (AF) in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are poorly investigated. We aimed to analyze clinical characteristics and prognosis in PE patients with paroxysmal AF episode. Methods. From the 391 patients with PE 31 subjects with paroxysmal AF were selected. This group was compared with patients with PE and sinus rhythm (SR) and 32 patients with PE and permanent AF. Results. Paroxysmal AF patients were the oldest. Concomitant DVT varies between groups: paroxysmal AF 32.3%, SR 49.5%, and permanent AF 28.1% (p = 0.02). The stroke history frequency was 4.6% SR, 12.9% paroxysmal AF, and 21.9% permanent AF (p < 0.001). Paroxysmal AF comparing to permanent AF and SR individuals had higher estimated SPAP (56 versus 48 versus 47 mmHg, p = 0.01) and shorter ACT (58 versus 65 versus 70 ms, p = 0.04). Patients with AF were more often classified into high-risk group according to revised Geneva score and sPESI than SR patients. In-hospital mortality was lower in SR (5%) and paroxysmal AF (6.5%) compared to permanent AF group (25%) (p < 0.001). Conclusions. Patients with PE-associated paroxysmal AF constitute a separate population. More severe impairment of the parameters reflecting RV afterload may indicate relation between PE severity and paroxysmal AF episode. Paroxysmal AF has no impact on short-term mortality. PMID:28280732

  17. The association of blood urea nitrogen levels with mortality in acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisu, Mustafa A; Kaya, Adnan; Keskin, Muhammed; Avsar, Sahin; Bozbay, Mehmet; Tatlisu, Kiymet; Eren, Mehmet

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of BUN levels with in-hospital and long-term adverse clinical outcomes in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) patients treated with tissue-plasminogen activator (t-PA). This retrospective study included 252 consecutive confirmed APE patients treated with t-PA. An admission BUN of 34.5 mg/dL was identified through an ROC analysis as an optimal cutoff value to predict the in-hospital mortality with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity (AUC: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84-0.96; P<.001). Our study showed that an increase in BUN levels was independently associated with a high risk of in-hospital all-cause mortality, low admission systolic blood pressure, use of inotropic drugs, and cardiogenic shock. In-hospital mortality rates were 51.1% in higher BUN group, and 1.9% in lower BUN group (P<.001). In this study, elevated admission BUN level was found to be a predictor of all-cause in-hospital mortality. BUN testing is commonly part of the basic metabolic panel; and it can be used to detect high-risk patients with APE, and it bears little risk, is inexpensive, and easy to perform. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Depression, anxiety and influencing factors in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-ping; LI Xiao-mei; CHEN Hang-wei; CUI Jun-yu; NIU Li-li; HE Yu-bin; TIAN Xin-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Psychological distress has been widely studied in many cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, but the condition in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of depression and anxiety and their influencing factors in APE patients.Methods Sixty consecutive patients with APE were subjected to investigation of depression and anxiety by the Beck Depression Inventory and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and 60 community-based subjects were enrolled as controls.APE patients were stratified as high-risk, intermediate-risk and low-risk according to the disease severity. Scores of depression and anxiety were compared by statistical analysis using paired t tests between APE patients and controls,and by analysis of variance within the APE patients with the three risk stratification. Factors influencing depression and anxiety were evaluated.Results The mean age of the patients (38 males and 22 females) was (52+12) years. APE patients displayed higher scores of depression (P=0.04) and anxiety (P=0.001) compared with controls. Patients in the high-risk group displayed higher scores of depression (P=0.004) and anxiety (P=0.001) compared with those in the intermediate- and low-risk groups. Depression scores were highly correlated with anxiety scores (r=0.60, P <0.001). Both depression and anxiety inversely related to risk stratification (P <0.01), age (P <0.05), and arterial blood oxygen pressure (PaO2) (P <0.05).Linear regression analysis showed that PaO2 was independently inversely related to both depression (P <0.01) and anxiety (P <0.05); risk stratification and age were independently inversely related to anxiety (P <0.05).Conclusions Patients of APE suffered high levels of depression and anxiety, which were negatively influenced by PaO2,risk stratification and age.

  19. Pulmonary embolism; Lungenarterienembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarski, Sonja; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ., Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2016-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) requires a quick diagnostic algorithm, as the untreated disease has a high mortality and morbidity. Crucial for the diagnostic assessment chosen is the initial clinical likelihood of PE and the individual risk profile of the patient. The overall goal is to diagnose or rule out PE as quickly and safely as possible or to initiate timely treatment if necessary. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries (CTPA) with multi-slice CT scanner systems presents the actual diagnostic reference standard. With CTPA further important diagnoses can be made, like presence of right ventricular dysfunction. There are different scan and contrast application protocols that can be applied in order to gain diagnostic examinations with sufficient contrast material enhancement in the pulmonary arteries while avoiding all kinds of artifacts. This review article is meant to be a practical guide to examine patients with suspected PE according to the actual guidelines.

  20. Hyponatremia and short-term prognosis of patients with acute pulmonary embolism: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Hong-Lin; Ni, Song-Shi

    2017-01-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hyponatremia and the short-term prognosis of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Searches of MEDLINE (1966-) and ISI Databases (1965-) were performed for English language studies. Odds ratio (OR) and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for short-term prognosis were calculated for PE patients with or without hyponatremia. Meta-analysis was carried out following Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Eight studies with 18,616 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The mean in-hospital mortality was 12.9% in hyponatremia group, compared with 2.3% in normonatremia group. Meta-analysis showed the summary OR was 5.586 (95% CI 3.424 to 9.112). The mean 30-day mortality was 15.9% in hyponatremia group, compared with 7.4% in normonatremia group. The summary OR was 3.091 (95% CI 1.650 to 5.788). No significant publication bias was found for the meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses by only pooled the adjusted HRs showed the summary HR was 0.924 (95% CI 0.897 to 0.951), which indicted the mortality risk will be decrease to 0.924 times for per-1mmol/L sodium increase in hyponatremia patients. Our meta-analysis indicates that hyponatremia was related with poor short-term prognosis in patients with acute PE. Hyponatremia is a simple, cheap, powerful marker of mortality, which should be used routinely tested in the PE prognostic assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acute Pulmonary Embolism in Patients with Lung Cancer Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ping; Shen, Lei; Huang, Wei; Hu, Xue-Fei; Xie, Dong; Yang, Jian; Song, Xiao; Zhao, Yan-Feng; Zhou, Chao-Jie; Jiang, Ge-Ning

    2018-01-10

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is one of the serious complications with high mortality after thoracic surgery. The authors aimed to determine the prevalence of PE events and evaluate additional risk factors for PE in patients with lung cancer surgery. Patients underwent lung cancer resections during January 2012 to July 2015 and had 30-day postoperative follow-up were included. Those with incomplete or miscoded data were excluded. The number of postoperative PE events was recorded retrospectively. Analyses were used to evaluate risk factors of PE during the hospitalization. The authors reviewed 11,474 patients who underwent surgery for lung cancer. The overall 30-day incidence of PE after thoracic surgery at their institution was 0.53%. The 30-day PE incidence without chemical prophylaxis was 0.57% (55/9,726) and the mortality rate was 10%. Multivariate analyses revealed that age over 66 (odds ratio [OR]: 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), more extensive surgery than lobectomy (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.28-4.25, p = 0.006) and stage IV of lung cancer (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.50-11.9, p = 0.007) were associated with an increased risk of PE. Using these additional risk factors, based on readily available clinical characteristics, can help to risk-stratify patients and warrant extended chemical prophylaxis for patients to reduce the incidence of acute PE. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Thrombolytic therapy in pulmonary embolism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nagi, D

    2010-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism carries a high mortality. Potential treatment includes anticoagulation, thrombolytic therapy and embolectomy. We report a case of deep vein thrombosis leading to progressive massive pulmonary embolism despite appropriate anticoagulation, where thrombolysis with IVC filter placement resulted in a successful outcome.

  3. Echocardiogram in the Evaluation of Hemodynamically Stable Acute Pulmonary Embolism: National Practices and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David M; Winter, Michael; Lindenauer, Peter K; Walkey, Allan J

    2018-01-03

    Societal guideline recommendations vary with regard to the role of routine trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) to screen for right ventricular strain in patients with hemodynamically-stable, acute pulmonary embolism (PE). To characterize national patterns in use of early TTE for the evaluation of patients with hemodynamically-stable, acute PE, and determine associations between TTE use and patient outcomes. Retrospective cohort study using Premier, Inc. database of approximately 20% of patients hospitalized in the United States with hemodynamically stable, acute PE between 2008-2011. Multivariable, risk-adjusted hierarchical regression models were used to evaluate hospital variation in use of TTE for PE and associations between hospital TTE rates and patient outcomes. Patient-level TTE exposure was used in sensitivity analyses. We identified 64,037 patients (mean age 61.7 years, 54% women, 68% white) hospitalized at 363 US hospitals. TTE rates for hemodynamically-stable, acute PE varied widely among hospitals (median TTE rate 41.4%, range 0-89%, IQR 32.7-51.7%). Hospital rates of TTE were not associated with significant differences in risk-adjusted mortality (TTE rate quartile 4 vs. quartile 1: OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.69-1.13) or use of thrombolytics (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.84-1.96), but rates of ICU admission (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.07), hospital length of stay (RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03-1.15) and costs (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23) were significantly higher at high TTE-rate hospitals. Analyses of patient-level TTE exposure produced similar results, except with higher rates of thrombolysis (OR 5.58, 95% CI 4.40-7.09) and bleeding (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.24-1.51) among patients receiving TTE. TTE use in the evaluation of patients with hemodynamically-stable, acute PE varied widely between hospitals. Hospitals with high rates of PE-associated TTE use did not achieve different patient mortality outcomes, but had higher resource utilization and costs. Our findings support the 2016

  4. Surgical Embolectomy for Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism and Pulmonary Thromboendarterectomy for Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemin, Richard J

    2017-09-01

    Surgical therapy for massive acute pulmonary embolism has improved with the use of rapid response teams and selective bedside extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation. The chronic consequence of unresolved pulmonary embolism is a treatable form of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is a curative operation in selected cases, operated upon in an experienced center with the multidisciplinary team including imaging, pulmonary medicine, and cardiothoracic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Massive pulmonary embolism. When medical treatment is not enough].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, B; Glorion, M; Rodriguez, A; Garcia, C; Stephan, F; Fabre, D; Mercier, O; Brenot, P; Fadel, E

    2017-12-01

    Emergency bedside veno-arterious ECMO implantation can be the only saving gesture in the suspicion of acute massive pulmonary embolism leading to haemodynamic failure, even before CT-scan imaging. Once the massive pulmonary embolism is confirmed it is possible to undergo surgical or percutaneous pulmonary thrombectomy, when thrombolytic therapy is contraindicated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Eosinophilic biomarkers for detection of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with or without pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong-Fang; Lu, Ting-Ting; Shu, Cai-Min; Feng, Lan-Fang; Chang, Hao-Teng; Ji, Qiao-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophilia has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). However, the role of eosinophil activation in the development of AECOPD remains unclear. In the present study, the reliability of plasma levels of eosinophil activation markers, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPX), were measured and used as diagnostic biomarkers of AECOPD with or without pulmonary embolism (PE). A total of 47 patients with AECOPD, 30 patients with AECOPD/PE and 35 healthy adults were enrolled in the present study. Plasma levels of ECP, EDN, EPX and MBP were measured using commercial ELISA kits. The mean concentrations of plasma ECP, EDN, EPX and MBP in the patients with AECOPD was significantly 2.87-, 3.06-, 1.60- and 1.92-fold higher, respectively, compared with the control group (P<0.05). Similar results were obtained in patients with AECOPD/PE, for whom plasma levels of ECP, EDN, EPX and MBP were significantly 2.06-, 2.21-, 1.42- and 2.42-fold higher, respectively, compared with the controls (P<0.05). No significant differences were observed in the levels of these proteins between patients with AECOPD or AECOPD/PE. Among the four potential markers, ECP was determined to be the optimal marker for distinguishing patients with AECOPD or AECOPD/PE from the controls. No significant correlation was observed between marker concentrations and gender, age or disease severity. The results of the present study may have clinical applications in the diagnosis of AECOPD using these novel biomarkers. PMID:28912870

  7. Long-term outcome of patients with persistent vascular obstruction on computed tomography pulmonary angiography 6 months after acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golpe, Rafael; Llano, Luis A. Perez de; Olalla, Castro-Anon [The Respiratory Service, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo (Spain)], e-mail: Rafael.golpe.gomez@sergas.es; Vazquez-Caruncho, Manuel [The Radiology Service, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo (Spain); Gonzalez-Juanatey, Carlos [The Cardiology Service, Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo (Spain); Farinas, Maria Carmen [Internal Medicine Dept., Hospital Univ. Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Background: The incidence and clinical significance of pulmonary residual thrombosis 6 months after an acute pulmonary embolism (PE) are still not well-known. Purpose: To evaluate the association between residual vascular obstruction and the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence or death. Material and Methods: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) was repeated in 97 consecutive patients 6 months after an acute episode of hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism. We assessed the long-term consequences of residual thrombosis on vital status and incidence of recurrent VTE. Results: Six patients were lost for follow-up. The remaining 91 patients were classified according to the presence (Group 1: 18 cases) or absence (Group 2: 73 cases) of residual pulmonary vascular obstruction. After a mean {+-}SD of 2.91 {+-}0.99 years, there were eight (8.8%) deaths and 11 (12.1%) VTE recurrences. Groups 1 and 2 did not differ in the incidence of death or VTE recurrence. Conclusion: Persistent pulmonary vascular obstruction on 6-month CTPA did not predict long-term adverse outcome events.

  8. MicroRNA-134 as a potential plasma biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pulmonary embolism (APE remains a diagnostic challenge due to a variable clinical presentation and the lack of a reliable screening tool. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression in a wide range of pathophysiologic processes. Circulating miRNAs are emerging biomarkers in heart failure, type 2 diabetes and other disease states; however, using plasma miRNAs as biomarkers for the diagnosis of APE is still unknown. Methods Thirty-two APE patients, 32 healthy controls, and 22 non-APE patients (reported dyspnea, chest pain, or cough were enrolled in this study. The TaqMan miRNA microarray was used to identify dysregulated miRNAs in the plasma of APE patients. The TaqMan-based miRNA quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions were used to validate the dysregulated miRNAs. The receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the miRNA identified as the candidate biomarker. Results Plasma miRNA-134 (miR-134 level was significantly higher in the APE patients than in the healthy controls or non-APE patients. The ROC curve showed that plasma miR-134 was a specific diagnostic predictor of APE with an area under the curve of 0.833 (95% confidence interval, 0.737 to 0.929; P Conclusions Our findings indicated that plasma miR-134 could be an important biomarker for the diagnosis of APE. Because of this finding, large-scale investigations are urgently needed to pave the way from basic research to clinical utilization.

  9. Clinical Significance of ST Elevation in Lead aVR in Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourafkari, Leili; Ghaffari, Samad; Tajlil, Arezou; Akbarzadeh, Fariborz; Jamali, Farin; Nader, Nader D

    2017-03-01

    Prognostic stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PTE) is crucial in identifying patients who would benefit from more aggressive treatment. We aimed to examine the value of ST elevation in lead aVR (STEaVR ) in predicting hospital mortality following PTE. Two hundred patients with a diagnosis of PTE were allocated into two groups based on the presence or absence of STEaVR . Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the role of "STEaVR " in relation to the other risk factors in predicting prognosis of PTE. Out of 200 patients, 24 (12.0%) had STEaVR . Patients with STEaVR were more likely to present with hypotension and tachycardia than those who did not have this electrocardiographic finding. A total of 33.3% of patients with STEaVR and 13.1% of those without STEaVR died during hospitalization. STEaVR had a low sensitivity of 25.8% but a high specificity of 90.5% for predicting hospital mortality. Odds ratio for hospital mortality was 3.32 for STEaVR with 95% confidence interval of 1.28-8.64 (P = 0.017) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis shock was the strongest predictor of hospital mortality. The presence of STEaVR is indicative of hemodynamic instability, thereby having the ability to predict poor outcome. However, its impact on hospital mortality disappears when the presence of shock on admission is factored in the prediction model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Antoine; Mallett, Susan; Daoud-Elias, Marie; Poggi, Jean-Noël; Clarke, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence for existing prognostic models in acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and determine how valid and useful they are for predicting patient outcomes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources OVID MEDLINE and EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library from inception to July 2014, and sources of grey literature. Eligibility criteria Studies aiming at constructing, validating, updating or studying the impact of prognostic models to predict all-cause death, PE-related death or venous thromboembolic events up to a 3-month follow-up in patients with an acute symptomatic PE. Data extraction Study characteristics and study quality using prognostic criteria. Studies were selected and data extracted by 2 reviewers. Data analysis Summary estimates (95% CI) for proportion of risk groups and event rates within risk groups, and accuracy. Results We included 71 studies (44 298 patients). Among them, 17 were model construction studies specific to PE prognosis. The most validated models were the PE Severity Index (PESI) and its simplified version (sPESI). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 2.3% (1.7% to 2.9%) in the low-risk group and 11.4% (9.9% to 13.1%) in the high-risk group for PESI (9 studies), and 1.5% (0.9% to 2.5%) in the low-risk group and 10.7% (8.8% to12.9%) in the high-risk group for sPESI (11 studies). PESI has proved clinically useful in an impact study. Shifting the cut-off or using novel and updated models specifically developed for normotensive PE improves the ability for identifying patients at lower risk for early death or adverse outcome (0.5–1%) and those at higher risk (up to 20–29% of event rate). Conclusions We provide evidence-based information about the validity and utility of the existing prognostic models in acute PE that may be helpful for identifying patients at low risk. Novel models seem attractive for the high-risk normotensive PE but need to be externally validated then be assessed in impact studies. PMID

  11. TIMI Risk Index as a Predictor of 30-Day Outcomes in Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuin, Marco; Conte, Luca; Picariello, Claudio; Pastore, Gianni; Vassiliev, Dobrin; Lanza, Daniela; Zonzin, Pietro; Zuliani, Giovanni; Rigatelli, Gianluca; Roncon, Loris

    2018-02-01

    Available studies have already identified age, heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) as strong predictors of early mortality in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). One-hundred-seventy patients, with acute PE confirmed on computed tomography angiography (CTA) were enrolled. Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk index (TRI) was calculated using the formula [heart rate (HR) x (AGE/102)/ systolic blood pressure (SBP)]. Study outcomes were 30-day mortality and/or clinical deterioration. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve revealed that a TRI ≥45 was highly specific for both outcomes (AUC 0.91, 95% CI 0.83-0.98, p<0.0001) with a positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 8.3 and 96% for 30-day mortality while PPV and NPV for 30-day mortality and/or clinical deterioration were 21.1 and 98.2%, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis showed that TRI ≥45 was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (O.R. 22.24, 95% CI 2.54-194.10, p=0.005) independently from positive cTnI and RVD (O.R. 9.57, 95% CI 1.88-48.78, p=0.007; OR 24.99, 95% CI 2.84-219.48, p=0.004). Similarly, 30-day mortality and/or clinical deterioration was predicted by TRI ≥45 (O.R. 11.57, 95% CI 2.36-56.63, p=0.003) and thrombolysis (3.83, 95% CI 1.04-14.09, p=0.043), independently from age, RVD and positive cTnI. Cox regression analysis confirmed the role of TRI as independent predictor for both outcomes. Mantel-Cox analysis showed that after 30-day follow-up there was a statistically significant difference in the distribution of survival between patients with and without TRI ≥45 [log rank (Mantel-Cox) chi-square 17.04, p<0.0001]. Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk index (TRI) predicted both 30-days mortality (all-causes) and/or clinical deterioration in patients with acute PE. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Ambulatory management of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusibah, Houssam; Abdelaziz, Muntasir M; Standen, Peter; Bhatia, Praveen; Hamad, Mahir Ma

    2018-01-02

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism can be very difficult and elusive. It depends greatly on the use of diagnostic tests, which are in turn interpreted according to a pre-test clinical probability. These include non-specific tests such as the chest X-ray and electrocardiograph, which help exclude other conditions such as pneumonia or myocardial infarction. On the other hand, more specific tests such as computed tomography or ventilation/perfusion scanning are used to confirm or exclude the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. The condition is potentially fatal, and in the past patients with suspected pulmonary embolism constituted a significant number of hospital admissions. Despite this, the majority were found not to have pulmonary embolism. More recently, studies have suggested that most patients with suspected pulmonary embolism who are haemodynamically stable can be safely managed on an ambulatory pathway. Therefore, there is a paradigm shift towards investigating and treating pulmonary embolism in the outpatient setting. This article discusses the ambulatory pathway of the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism.

  13. Computed Tomographic Pulmonary Angiography in the Assessment of Severity of Acute Pulmonary Embolism and Right Ventricular Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nural, M.S.; Elmali, M.; Findik, S.; Yapici, O.; Uzun, O.; Sunter, A.T.; Erkan, L. (Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayis Univ., Samsun (Turkey))

    2009-07-15

    Background: The distinction between severe pulmonary embolism (PE) and right heart dysfunction is important for predicting patient mortality. Purpose: To identify the role of computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in the assessment of the severity of acute PE and right ventricular dysfunction. Material and Methods: Eighty-five patients suspected of having PE, as diagnosed by CTPA and scintigraphy, were divided into three groups: hemodynamically unstable PE (HUPE) (n = 20), hemodynamically stable PE (HSPE) (n = 33), and no PE (n = 32). For each patient, obstruction scores, including short-axis diameters of the right ventricle (RV) and left ventricle (LV), main pulmonary artery, and superior vena cava (SVC), were measured. The RV/LV short-axis ratios were calculated. The shapes of the interventricular septum and the reflux of the contrast medium into the inferior vena cava (IVC) were evaluated. The mortality due to PE within a 1-month follow-up period was recorded. Results: The median CTPA obstruction score (HUPE 64%, HSPE 28%, P < 0.001), median RV/LV short-axis ratio (HUPE 1.4, HSPE 1.0, P < 0.01), median RV diameter (HUPE 55 mm, HSPE 42 mm, P < 0.001), median SVC diameter (HUPE 23 mm, HSPE 19 mm, P < 0.01), interventricular septum convex toward the LV (HUPE 70%, HSPE 18%, P < 0.001), and reflux of the contrast medium into the IVC (HUPE 65%, HSPE 33%, p < 0.05) were significantly different between the HUPE and HSPE groups. With ROC analysis, the CTPA obstruction score and RV/LV short-axis ratio threshold values for the HUPE patients were calculated to be 48% (95% sensitivity, 76% specificity) and 1.1 (85% sensitivity, 76% specificity), respectively. Three patients in the HUPE group died within the first 24 hours. Logistic regression methods revealed only the RV diameter as a significant predictor of death (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 1.04-1.48; P 0.01). Conclusion: This study found that the parameters useful for distinguishing HUPE and HSPE included CTPA

  14. A fatal case of acute pulmonary embolism caused by right ventricular masses of acute lymphoblastic lymphoma-leukemia in a 13 year old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mi Ko Ko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 13-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic lymphoma- leukemia, who presented with a cardiac metastasis in the right ventricle, resulting in a pulmonary embolism. At the time of her leukemia diagnosis, a cardiac mass was incidentally found. The differential diagnosis for this unusual cardiac mass included cardiac tumor, metastasis, vegetation, and thrombus. Empirical treatment was initiated, including anticoagulation and antibiotics. She underwent plasmapheresis and was administered oral prednisolone for her leukemia. Five days later, she experienced sudden hemodynamic collapse and required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation insertion and emergency surgery. These interventions proved futile, and the patient died. Pathology revealed that the cardiac mass comprised an aggregation of small, round, necrotic cells consistent with leukemia. This is the first known case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as a right ventricular mass, with consequent fatal acute pulmonary embolism. A cardiac mass in a child with acute leukemia merits investigation to rule out every possible etiology, including vegetation, thrombus, and even a mass of leukemic cells, which could result in the fatal complication of pulmonary embolism.

  15. Simultaneous Acute Pulmonary Embolism and Isolated Septal Myocardial Infarction in a Young Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Burkhardt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report here the case of a young patient with a simultaneous isolated septal myocardial infarction (MI and pulmonary embolism (PE. The aim was to describe a rare clinical entity and to explain why these two pathologies were present at the same time in a young patient.
 A review of literature was established. An interventional cardiologist, an interventional radiologist and a lung specialist were consulted. The diagnostic workup revealed only heterozygous Factor Leiden V mutation. This presentation was probably fortuitous, but worth reporting to our opinion.

  16. Stratification, Imaging, and Management of Acute Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Kuo, William T; Schiebler, Mark; Madoff, David C

    2017-07-01

    While pulmonary embolism (PE) causes approximately 100 000-180 000 deaths per year in the United States, mortality is restricted to patients who have massive or submassive PEs. This state of the art review familiarizes the reader with these categories of PE. The review discusses the following topics: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, rationale for stratification, imaging, massive PE management and outcomes, submassive PE management and outcomes, and future directions. It summarizes the most up-to-date literature on imaging, systemic thrombolysis, surgical embolectomy, and catheter-directed therapy for submassive and massive PE and gives representative examples that reflect modern practice. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  17. Multislice computed tomography perfusion imaging for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: animal experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst; Spuentrup, Elmar; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, Ernst; Ditt, Hendrik [Computed Tomography, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of our animal study was to evaluate a new computed tomography (CT) subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Seven healthy pigs were entered into a prospective trial. Acute PE was artificially induced by fresh clot material prior to the CT scans. Within a single breath-hold, whole thorax CT scans were performed with a 16-slice multidetector-row CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 ml of contrast medium with a flow rate of 4 ml/s, followed by a saline chaser. The scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff}, using a thin collimation of 16 x 0.75 mm and a table speed/rotation of 15-18 mm (pitch, 1.25-1.5; rotation time, 0.5 s). Axial source images were reconstructed with an effective slice thickness of 1 mm (overlap, 30%). A new automatic subtraction technique was used. After 3D segmentation of the lungs in the plain and contrast-enhanced series, threshold-based extraction of major airways and vascular structures in the contrast images was performed. This segmentation was repeated in the plain CT images segmenting the same number of vessels and airways as in the contrast images. Both scans were registered onto each other using nonrigid registration. After registration both image sets were filtered in a nonlinear fashion excluding segmented airways and vessels. After subtracting the plain CT data from the contrast data the resulting enhancement images were color-encoded and overlaid onto the contrast-enhanced CT angiography (CTA) images. This color-encoded combined display of parenchymal enhancement of the lungs was evaluated interactively on a workstation (Leonardo, Siemens) in axial, coronal and sagittal plane orientations. Axial contrast-enhanced CTA images were rated first, followed by an analysis of the combination images. Finally, CTA images were reread focusing on areas with perfusion

  18. Association between computed tomography obstruction index and mortality in elderly patients with acute pulmonary embolism: A prospective validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méan, Marie; Tritschler, Tobias; Limacher, Andreas; Breault, Stéphane; Rodondi, Nicolas; Aujesky, Drahomir; Qanadli, Salah D

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has not only become the method of choice for diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism (PE), it also allows for risk stratification of patients with PE. To date, no study has specifically examined the predictive value of CTPA findings to assess short-term prognosis in elderly patients with acute PE who are particularly vulnerable to adverse outcomes. We studied 291 patients aged ≥65 years with acute symptomatic PE in a prospective multicenter cohort. Outcomes were 90-day overall and PE-related mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE), and length of hospital stay (LOS). We examined associations of the computed tomography obstruction index (CTOI) and the right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) diameter ratio with mortality and VTE recurrence using survival analysis, adjusting for provoked VTE, Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. Overall, 15 patients died within 90 days. There was no association between the CTOI and 90-day overall mortality (adjusted hazard ratio per 10% CTOI increase 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.21; P = 0.54), but between the CTOI and PE-related 90-day mortality (adjusted sub-hazard ratio per 10% CTOI increase 1.36; 95% CI 1.03-1.81; P = 0.03). The RV/LV diameter ratio was neither associated with overall nor PE-related 90-day mortality. The CTOI and the RV/LV diameter ratio were significantly associated with VTE recurrence and LOS. In elderly patients with acute PE, the CTOI was associated with PE-related 90-day mortality but not with overall 90-day mortality. The RV/LV diameter ratio did not predict mortality. Both measures predicted VTE recurrence and LOS. The evaluated CTPA findings do not appear to offer any advantage over the PESI in terms of mortality prediction.

  19. Therapeutic Challenges in the Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism in a Cancer Patient with Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuajela Sreh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This case demonstrates the therapeutic challenges encountered when managing an acute pulmonary embolism in a cancer patient with thrombocytopenia. A 64-year-old man with a history of lung cancer receiving chemotherapy was admitted to Walsall Manor Hospital with haemodynamic instability consistent with a pulmonary embolism, proven on computed tomographic pulmonary angiogram. His platelet count was noted to be 35×109/l (chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. After discussions, he was deemed not suitable for thrombolysis based on risk versus benefits. The patient was initially transfused one adult dose of platelets and treated with half the therapeutic dose of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH. The same management plan was followed until the platelet count exceeded 50×10sup>9/l, after which the patient was established on the full therapeutic dose of LMWH. Clinically, the patient improved and was discharged. Three months after discharge, follow-up revealed sustained clinical improvement while the patient continued to be on the full therapeutic dose of LMWH with a stable platelet count.

  20. The long-term prognostic value of highly sensitive cardiac troponin I in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Chuy, Katherine; Hakemi, Emad Uddin; Alyousef, Tareq; Dang, Geetanjali; Doukky, Rami

    2017-12-01

    In patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), detectable levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) using a highly sensitive assay have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality. We sought to investigate the impact of detectable cTnI on long-term survival following acute PE. Detectable cTnI levels in patients presenting with acute PE predict increased long-term mortality following hospital discharge. In a retrospective cohort study, we analyzed consecutive patients with confirmed acute PE and cTnI assay available from the index hospitalization. The detectable cTnI level was ≥0.012 ng/mL. Patients were classified into low and high clinical risk groups according to the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) at presentation. Subjects were followed for all-cause mortality subsequent to hospital discharge using chart review and Social Security Death Index. A cohort of 289 acute PE patients (mean age 56 years, 51% men), of whom 152 (53%) had a detectable cTnI, was followed for a mean of 3.1 ± 1.8 years after hospital discharge. A total of 71 deaths were observed; 44 (29%) and 27 (20%) in the detectable and undetectable cTnI groups, respectively (P = 0.05). Detectable cTnI was predictive of long-term survival among low-risk (P = 0.009) but not high-risk patients (P = 0.78) who had high mortality rates irrespective of cTnI status. In patients with acute PE, detectable cTnI is predictive of long-term mortality, particularly among patients who were identified as low risk according to PESI score. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Spiral computed tomography of the pulmonary arteries in the diagnosis of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism; Spiralcomputertomographie der Pulmonalarterien: Diagnostik der akuten und chronischen Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, H.U. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Schwickert, H.C.; Cagil, H.; Schweden, F.; Mildenberger, P.

    1995-03-01

    The use of tailored acquisition spiral CT protocols together with standardized contrast medium injections result in a detailed visualization of the pulmonary arteries. Since spiral CT is a quick and noninvasive imaging modality, it is especially suited for severely ill patients suspected to be suffering from acute pulmonary embolism. In contrast to perfusion scintigraphy, spiral CT will directly visualize the emboli, and should be performed if scintigraphy is not conclusive before the patient is referred to angiography. In cases of chronic pulmonary embolism spiral CT will directly visualize thromboemboli, consecutive wall thickening, pulmonary infarctions, and relative hyperperfusion as well as signs of pulmonary arterial hypertension and right heart failure. Acquisition protocols, diagnostic criteria, and clinical value of spiral CT are presented. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Spiral-Computertomographie (Spiral-CT) ermoeglicht durch gezielte Untersuchungsprotokolle und standardisierte Kontrastmittelapplikation eine detaillierte Darstellung der Pulmonalarterien. Aufgrund der kurzen Untersuchungszeiten und der fehlenden Invasivitaet ist die Spiral-CT auch bei schwerkranken Patienten als Untersuchung bei Verdacht auf akute Lungenembolie geeignet. Sie erlaubt im Gegensatz zur Szintigraphie den direkten Thrombusnachweis und sollte bei unklarem szintigraphischen Befund vor der Angiographie eingesetzt werden. Bei der chronisch rezidivierenden Lungenembolie ermoeglicht sie die direkte Darstellung von Thromben und Gefaessveraenderungen, von Lungeninfarkten und relativer Hyperperfusion sowie den Nachweis der Zeichen der pulmonalarteriellen Hypertonie und der Rechtsherzbelastung. Untersuchungstechnik, diagnostische Kriterien und Aussagekraft der Spiral-CT werden praesentiert. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of right ventricular performance in patients with acute pulmonary embolism by helical CT; Beurteilung der Rechtsherzbelastung in der Spiral-CT bei Patienten mit akuter Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintersperger, B.J.; Staebler, A.; Seemann, M.; Holzknecht, N.; Helmberger, T.; Reiser, M.F. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Fink, U. [Klinikum Villingen-Schwenningen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this study was to evaluate whether spiral-CT allows judgment of right ventricular failure in patients with acute pulmonary embolism. Materials and Methods: 61 patients underwent spiral-CT due to suspicion of acute pulmonary embolism. Patients with pulmonary embolism were divided into subpopulations according to the severity of pulmonary embolism in the CT scan. Cardiac measurements were performed on axial spiral-CT images and compared to those of patients without suspicion of pulmonary embolism or cardiac diseases. Results: In 30 patients spiral-CT revealed acute pulmonary embolism. Significant differences in cardiac measurements in patients with severe and less severe pulmonary embolism were found on comparing the following dimensions: left ventricular width (p=0.0003), left (p=0.008) and right (p=0.009) ventricular cross-sectional area, proportion of right to left ventricular width (p=0.0003) and proportion of right to left ventricular cross-sectional area (p=0.0001). The proportion of the cross-sectional areas (r=0.65) and the proportion of the width (r=0.60) of both ventricles correlated well with the severity of central pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Besides reliable assessment of pulmonary embolism spiral-CT allows the evaluation of cardiac dimensions for judgment of right ventricular failure. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Es wurde untersucht, ob bei Patienten mit akuter Lungenembolie durch die Spiral-CT kardiale Messparameter zur Abschaetzung der rechtsventrikulaeren Belastung bestimmt werden koennen. Material und Methoden: 61 Patienten mit Verdacht auf akute Lungenembolie wurden mit Spiral-CT untersucht. Bei Patienten mit Lungenembolie in der Spiral-CT erfolgte die Evaluierung kardialer Messparameter (Laenge, Breite, Flaeche) beider Ventrikel anhand axialer Spiral-CT Bilddaten. Patienten wurden anhand der Spiral-CT in Gruppen verschiedenen Embolieausmasses eingeteilt und mit einem Normalkollektiv verglichen. Ergebnisse: Bei 30 Patienten

  3. Dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment in acute pulmonary embolism - correlation with D-dimer level, right heart strain and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Frellesen, Claudia; Schell, Boris; Lehnert, Thomas; Jacobi, Volkmar; Vogl, Thomas J.; Kerl, J.M. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Renker, Matthias [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashley River Tower, Charleston, SC (United States); Ackermann, Hanns [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashley River Tower, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To investigate the role of perfusion defect (PD) size on dual energy CT pulmonary blood volume assessment as predictor of right heart strain and patient outcome and its correlation with d-dimer levels in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). 53 patients with acute PE who underwent DECT pulmonary angiography were retrospectively analyzed. Pulmonary PD size caused by PE was measured on DE iodine maps and quantified absolutely (VolPD) and relatively to the total lung volume (RelPD). Signs of right heart strain (RHS) on CT were determined. Information on d-dimer levels and readmission for recurrent onset of PE and death was collected. D-dimer level was mildly (r = 0.43-0.47) correlated with PD size. Patients with RHS had significantly higher VolPD (215 vs. 73 ml) and RelPD (9.9 vs. 2.9%) than patients without RHS (p < 0.003). There were 2 deaths and 1 readmission due of PE in 18 patients with >5% RelPD, while no such events were found for patients with <5% RelPD. Pulmonary blood volume on DECT in acute PE correlates with RHS and appears to be a predictor of patient outcome in this pilot study. (orig.)

  4. Systematic review and meta-analysis for thrombolysis treatment in patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Y

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Yaoqian Cao,* Haiyan Zhao,* Wanpeng Gao, Yan Wang, Jie Cao Respiratory Department, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052, People's Republic of China *These two authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic treatment in patients with submassive pulmonary embolism (PE. Methods: An electronic search was carried out based on the databases from MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index (SCI, and the Cochrane Library. We included prospective, randomized, and clinical trials in thrombolysis with heparin alone in adults who had evidence of right ventricular dysfunction and normotension. The main endpoints consist of mortality, recurrent PE, and bleeding risk. The relative risk (RR and the relevant 95% confidence intervals were determined by the dichotomous variable. Results: Only seven studies involving 594 patients met the inclusion criteria for further review. The cumulative effect of thrombolysis, compared with intravenous heparin, demonstrated no statistically significant difference in mortality (2.7% versus 4.3%; RR =0.64 [0.29–1.40]; P=0.27 or recurrent PE (2% versus 5%; RR =0.44 [0.19–1.05]; P=0.06. Thrombolytic therapy did not increase major hemorrhage compared with intravenous heparin (4.5% versus 3.3%; RR =1.16 [0.51–2.60]; P=0.73, but it was associated with an increased minor hemorrhage (41% versus 9%; RR =3.91 [1.46–10.48]; P=0.007. Conclusion: Compared with heparin alone, neither mortality nor recurrent PE is reduced by thrombolysis in patients with submassive PE, and it does not reveal an increasing risk of major bleeding. In addition, thrombolysis also produces the increased risk of minor bleeding; however, no sufficient evidence verifies the thrombolytic benefit in this review, because the number of patients enrolled in the trials is limited. Therefore, a large, double-blind clinical trial is required to prove the

  5. Pathophysiology of dyspnoea in acute pulmonary embolism: A cross-sectional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Olivier; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Riant, Elisabeth; Plantier, Laurent; Dres, Martin; Louis, Bruno; Collignon, Marie-Anne; Diebold, Benoit; Meyer, Guy; Peiffer, Claudine; Delclaux, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    Dyspnoea in pulmonary embolism (PE) remains poorly characterized. Little is known about how to measure intensity or about the underlying mechanisms that may be related to ventilatory abnormalities, alveolar dead space ventilation or modulating factors such as psychological modulate. We hypothesized that dyspnoea would mainly be associated with pulmonary vascular obstruction and its pathophysiological consequences, while the sensory-affective domain of dyspnoea would be influenced by other factors. We undertook a prospective study of 90 consecutive non-obese patients (mean ± SD age: 49 ± 16 years, 41 women) without cardiorespiratory disease. All patients were hospitalized with symptoms for <15 days and a confirmed PE (multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scan, n = 87 and high-probability ventilation/perfusion scan, n = 3). Patients underwent assessment of dyspnoea using the Borg score, modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale, assessment of psychological trait, state of anxiety and depression and chest pain via the Visual Analogical Scale at the time of maximum dyspnoea. Functional evaluations such as the quantitative ventilation-perfusion lung scan, echocardiography, alveolar dead space fraction and tidal ventilation measurements were completed within 48 h of admission. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that dyspnoea was mainly linked to pulmonary vascular obstruction and/or its consequences such as raised pulmonary arterial pressure and chest pain. The sensory-affective domain of dyspnoea showed additional determinants such as age, depression and breathing variability. Dyspnoea is mainly related to vascular consequences of PE such as increased pulmonary arterial pressure or chest pain. The sensory-affective domain of dyspnoea also correlates with age, depression and breathing variability. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. Does computer-assisted detection of pulmonary emboli enhance severity assessment and risk stratification in acute pulmonary embolism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelke, C., E-mail: c.engelke@med.uni-goettingen.d [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Goettingen, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Schmidt, S.; Auer, F.; Rummeny, E.J. [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich (Germany); Marten, K. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Goettingen, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: To prospectively assess the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for the computed tomography (CT) severity assessment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: CT angiographic scans of 58 PE-positive patients (34-89 years, mean 66 years) were analysed by four observers for PE severity using the Mastora index, and by CAD. Patients were stratified to three PE risk groups and results compared to an independent reference standard. Interobserver agreement was tested by Bland and Altman and extended kappa (Ke) statistics. Mastora index changes after CAD data review were tested by Wilcoxon signed ranks. Results: CAD detected 343 out of 1118 emboli within given arterial segments and a total of 155 out of 218 polysegmental emboli (segmental vessel-based sensitivity = 30.7%, embolus-based sensitivity = 71.2% false-positive rate = 4.1/scan). Interobserver agreement on PE severity [95% limits of agreement (LOA) = -19.7-7.5% and-5.5-3% for reader pairs 1 versus 2 and 3 versus 4, respectively was enhanced by consensus with CAD data (LOA = -6.5-5.4% and-3.7-2% for reader pairs 1 versus 2 and 3 versus 4, respectively). Simultaneously, the percentual scoring errors (PSE) were significantly decreased (PSE = 35.4 +- 31.8% and 5.1 +- 8.9% for readers1/2 and 2/3, respectively, and PSE = 27.6 +- 31% and 3.8 +- 6.2%, respectively, after CAD consensus; p <= 0.005). Misclassifications to PE risk groups occurred in 27.6, 24.1, 5.2, and 5.2% of patients for readers 1-4, respectively, (Ke = 0.74) and were corrected by CAD consensus in 56.3, 36, 33.3, and 33.3% of misclassified patients, respectively (Ke = 0.83; p < 0.05). Conclusion: Radiologists may benefit from consensus with CAD data that improve PE severity scores and stratification to PE risk groups.

  7. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio for the assessment of hospital mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedikli, Ömer; Ekşi, Alay; Avcıoğlu, Yonca; Soylu, Ayşegül İdil; Yüksel, Serkan; Aksan, Gökhan; Gülel, Okan; Yılmaz, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), which is an essential marker of inflammation, has been shown to be associated with adverse outcomes in various cardiovascular diseases in the literature. In this study we sought to evaluate the association between NLR and prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Material and methods We retrospectively evaluated blood counts and clinical data of 142 patients with the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) from Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital between January 2006 and December 2012. The patients were divided into two groups according to NLR: NLR 126 mg/dl, heart rate > 110 beats/min, and PCO2 50 mm Hg were predictors of in-hospital mortality. The optimal NLR cutoff value was 5.7 for mortality in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Having an NLR value above 5.7 was found to be associated with a 10.8 times higher mortality rate than an NLR value below 5.7. Conclusions In patients presenting with APE, NLR value is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality and may be used for clinical risk classification. PMID:26925123

  8. Prognostic Value of Right Ventricular Dysfunction Markers for Serious Adverse Events in Acute Normotensive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Anthony J; Johnson, Angela K; Troha, Daniel; Thacker, Gregory; Chanler-Berat, Jordan; Runyon, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in pulmonary embolism (PE) has been associated with increased morbidity. Tools for RVD identification are not well defined. The prognostic value of RVD markers to predict serious adverse events (SAE) during hospitalization is unclear. Prospectively compare the incidence of SAE in normotensive emergency department patients with PE based upon RVD by goal-directed echocardiography (GDE), cardiac biomarkers, and right-to-left ventricle ratio by computed tomography (CT). Simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) was calculated. Deaths and readmissions within 30 days were recorded. Consecutive normotensive PE patients underwent GDE focused on RVD (RV enlargement, hypokinesis, or septal bowing), serum troponin, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and evaluation of the CT ventricle ratio. In-hospital SAE and complications within 30 days were recorded. We enrolled 123 normotensive PE patients (median age 59 years, 49% female). Twenty-six of 123 (26%) patients had one or more SAE. RVD was detected in 26% by GDE, in 39% by biomarkers, and in 38% with CT. In-hospital SAE included one death, six respiratory interventions, six dysrhythmias, three major bleeding episodes, and 21 hypotension episodes. Forty-one percent of patients RVD positive by GDE had SAE, compared to the 18% RVD negative by GDE. Odds ratios for GDE, CT, BNP, troponin, and sPESI for SAE were 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-8.5), 2.0 (95% CI 0.8-5.1), 3.3 (95% CI 1.3-8.6), 4.2 (95% CI 1.4-13.5), and 2.9 (95% CI 1.1-8.3), respectively. Five patients had non-PE-related deaths within 30 days. The incidence of SAE within days of PE was significant in our cohort. Those with RVD had an increased risk of nonmortality SAE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of automated quantification of pulmonary perfused blood volume using dual-energy CTPA for the severity assessment of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Felix G; Graef, Anita; Bamberg, Fabian; Thieme, Sven F; Schwarz, Florian; Sommer, Wieland H; Neurohr, Claus; Kupatt, Christian; Reiser, Maximilian F; Johnson, Thorsten R C

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether automated quantification of pulmonary perfused blood volume (PBV) in dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography is of diagnostic value in assessing the severity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Ethical approval and informed consent were waived by the responsible institutional review board for this retrospective study. Of 224 consecutive patients with dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiographic findings positive for acute PE, we excluded 153 patients because of thoracic comorbidities (n = 130), missing data (n = 11), severe artifacts (n = 11), or inadequate enhancement (n = 1). Automated quantification of PBV was performed in the remaining 71 patients (mean [SD] age, 62 [16] years) with acute PE and no cardiopulmonary comorbidities. Perfused blood volume values adjusted for age and sex were correlated with the Qanadli obstruction score, morphological computed tomographic signs of right heart dysfunction, serum levels of troponin, and the necessity for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Dual-energy computed tomography pulmonary angiography-derived PBV values inversely correlated with the Qanadli score (r = -0.46; P global PBV values lower than 60% were significantly more likely to require admission to an ICU than did the patients with global pulmonary PBV of 60% or higher (47% vs 11%; P = 0.003; positive predictive value, 47%; negative predictive value, 89%). On the univariate analysis, a significant negative correlation was found between the global PBV values and the Qanadli obstruction score (r = -0.46; P reader-independent estimation of global pulmonary PBV in acute PE, which inversely correlates with thrombus load, laboratory parameters of PE severity, and the necessity for ICU admission.

  10. [The diagnostic values of Wells score and modified Geneva score for pretesting acute pulmonary embolism: a prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan-ping; Li, Yan-yan; Chen, Jin; Zheng, Guang; Ma, Xin; Peng, Xiao-xia; Yang, Yuan-hua

    2012-08-01

    To assess the diagnostic predictive value of Wells score and modified Geneva score for acute pulmonary embolism by prospective case series and to explore a more suitable scoring system for Chinese population. All the patients suspected of pulmonary embolism (PE) and received CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) were enrolled consecutively in Fuxing Hospital, Capital Medical University, China, from June 2009 to August 2011. Before CTPA test or on condition that test results were unknown, clinical scoring was assessed prospectively by the Wells score and the modified Geneva score. The probability of PE in each patient was assessed and the patients were divided into low, moderate and high probability groups according to the clinical scores. The result of CTPA was used as the diagnostic gold standard for PE. Diagnostic accuracy in each group was analyzed. The predictive accuracy of both scores was compared by AUC(ROC) curve. A total of 139 patients met our enrollment criteria and 117 eligible patients entered our study at last. PE was diagnosed in 47 patients by CTPA with an overall prevalence of 40.2%.Prevalence of PE in the low, moderate and high pretest probability groups assessed by the Wells score and by the simplified modified Geneva score were 7.1% (3/42), 42.9% (21/49), 88.5% (23/26) and 10.0% (3/30), 48.1% (37/77), 7/10, respectively. AUC(ROC) curves for the Wells score and the simplified modified Geneva score were 0.872 (95%CI 0.810 - 0.933) and 0.734 (95%CI 0.643 - 0.825) respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.005). The Wells score is more accurate for clinical predicting acute PE than the modified Geneva score.

  11. Algorithm for the diagnosis and follow-up of acute pulmonary embolisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo Batllés, P

    The urgent diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism benefits from the use of evidence-based clinical guidelines that improve patients' prognoses and reduce the unnecessary use of imaging tests. This article explains the diagnostic algorithms for pulmonary thromboembolism most recently published by the relevant scientific societies both for the general population and for special situations, trying to clear up common doubts and analyzing persistent controversies. It also discusses the need to follow up the thromboembolism after anticoagulation treatment, which is not currently recommended in the guidelines. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute pulmonary embolism: Comparison of standard axial MDCT with paddlewheel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brader, Peter [Department of Radiology, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 9, A-8036 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: peter.brader@meduni-graz.at; Schoellnast, Helmut; Deutschmann, Hannes A.; Thimary, Felix; Schaffler, Gottfried; Reittner, Pia [Department of Radiology, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 9, A-8036 Graz (Austria)

    2008-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of rotated paddlewheel reformations for the detection of central and peripheral pulmonary embolism (PE) compared to standard axial multi detector CT (MDCT) images. Material and methods: CT scans of 35 patients with PE were reviewed by three independent readers for the detection of pulmonary emboli using standard axial CT scans and reformatted paddlewheel technique. All images were evaluated in random order. MDCT examinations were performed with a collimation of 1.25 mm, a pitch of six and a reconstruction interval of 0.8 mm. For each patient MIP were reformatted by using a paddlewheel arrangement with 5 mm slab thickness and 5 deg. rotation. Standard of reference for PE was a consensus reading of the axial images by all three readers. Results: The overall sensitivity for the axial images for the three readers ranged between 91% and 96%; for paddlewheel reformations from 78% to 83%; the specificity for both methods was 98-99%. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was also higher for axial images than for paddlewheel reformations. Conclusion: Comparing standard axial MDCT scans and reformatted paddlewheel images no significant difference for the detection of central PE was found, whereas for the detection of peripheral emboli standard axial images showed a significant higher percentage of detecting PE than paddlewheel reformations.

  13. Predictive value of biomarkers for the prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism in Japanese patients: Results of the Tokyo CCU Network registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Several studies from Western countries have reported associations between cardiac troponin and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and acute pulmonary embolism prognosis; however, the number of such reports from Asian countries, including Japan, is limited. Thus, we evaluated the relationship between blood biochemical findings and acute-phase pulmonary embolism prognosis in Japanese patients. The subjects included 441 patients with acute pulmonary embolism (191 men, 250 women; average age, 65.8±16.0 years) treated at Tokyo CCU Network Institutions from 2009 to 2011 and registered via survey forms. The association between blood biochemical findings at admission and 30-day mortality was investigated. The median BNP value was 186.5pg/mL (25th to 75th interquartile range: 49.8-500pg/mL) of 210 cases. No deaths were recorded among those with BNP levels pulmonary embolism in Japanese patients. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary Perfusion in Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Agreement of MRI and SPECT for Lobar, Segmental and Subsegmental Perfusion Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluge, A.; Gerriets, T.; Stolz, E.; Dill, T.; Mueller, K.D.; Mueller, C.; Bachmann, G. [Pius-Hospital, Oldenburg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess prospectively the agreement of magnetic resonance (MR) pulmonary perfusion with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion for perfusion defects down to the subsegmental level in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Material and Methods: In 41 patients with suspected PE, contrast-enhanced MR pulmonary perfusion (3D-FLASH, TR/TE 1.6/0.6 ms) was compared to SPECT perfusion on a per-examination basis as well as at the lobar, segmental, and subsegmental level. Results: The MRI protocol was completed in all patients, and mean examination time was 3 min 56 s. MR perfusion showed a very high agreement with SPECT (kappa value per examination 0.98, and 0.98, 0.83, and 0.69 for lobar, segmental, and subsegmental perfusion defects, respectively). Of 15 patients with PE, MR perfusion detected 14 cases. Conclusion: The very high agreement of MR perfusion with SPECT perfusion enables the detection of subtle findings in suspected PE.

  15. Treatment of Massive or Submassive Acute Pulmonary Embolism With Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Ashraf; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Telila, Tesfaye; Belgrave, Kevin; Grines, Cindy

    2016-03-15

    The presentation of acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) can be highly variable resulting in diagnostic challenges and management difficulties. Current guidelines suggest that therapy must be adjusted based on the severity of PE presentation. Systemic thrombolysis is the standard therapy for acute massive PE; however, systemic thrombolysis carries an estimated 20% risk of major hemorrhage, including a 3% to 5% risk of hemorrhagic stroke. There are data supporting the use of catheter-directed therapy (CDT) in massive and submassive PE, but past studies have limited its use to patients in whom systemic thrombolysis has either failed or was contraindicated. There is a paucity of data comparing the efficacy of CDT compared to systemic thrombolysis in different risk groups. This review will summarize the available data on the techniques and indications and outcomes of CDT for acute PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulmonary embolism and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, P.; Planchon, B.; Faucal, P. de; Touze, M.D.; Dupas, B.

    1988-01-01

    Risks related to pulmonary embolism require use of diagnostic procedures with good sensitivity, and the potential complications of effective anticoagulant therapy require procedures with good specificity. Clinical signs are not more accurate for diagnosis of pulmonary than are ECG, blood gas and chest X ray examinations. Perfusion-ventilation scintigraphy has good diagnostic accuracy approaching that of pulmonary angiography which remains the gold standard. Since pulmonary embolism is usually a complication of deep venous thrombosis, distal clot detection should be associated with lung explorations. Plethysmography, ultrasonography, doppler studies and scintigraphy of the lower limbs could provide data supplementing those of contrast venography. The value and role of these examinations are analyzed and discussed in terms of different clinical situations.

  17. Triage for suspected acute Pulmonary Embolism: Think before opening Pandora's Box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, David [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kiely, David G. [Sheffield Pulmonary Vascular Disease Unit, M-15, M-Floor, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, MA (United States); Gefter, Warren [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, University of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Schiebler, Mark L., E-mail: mschiebler@uwhealth.org [Department of Radiology, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792-3252 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This is a review of the current strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities available for the diagnosis of suspected non-massive Pulmonary Embolism (PE). Without careful consideration for the clinical presentation, and the timely application of clinical decision support (CDS) methodology, the current overutilization of imaging resources for this disease will continue. For a patient with a low clinical risk profile and a negative D-dimer there is no reason to consider further workup with imaging; as the negative predictive value in this scenario is the same as imaging. While the current efficacy and effectiveness data support the continued use of Computed Tomographic angiography (CTA) as the imaging golden standard for the diagnosis of PE; this test does have the unintended consequences of radiation exposure, possible overdiagnosis and overuse. There is a persistent lack of appreciation on the part of ordering physicians for the effectiveness of the alternatives to CTA (ventilation–perfusion imaging and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography) in these patients. Careful use of standardized protocols for patient triage and the application of CDS will allow for a better use of imaging resources.

  18. Characteristics and clinical management of acute pulmonary embolism in real world: findings from TUSCAN-PE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism (PE remains one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in cardiovascular setting. Despite much information about clinical aspects and recommendations or clinical guidelines is available from literature, few data exist about the management of PE in real world of internal medicine scenario. Therefore the aim of the present study was to report on characteristics and management of PE patients admitted in this setting. TUSCAN-PE study was a multicenter, observational, retrospective, cohort study aimed to analyze data of PE patients admitted in Internal Medicine wards of Tuscany. Each center was invited to submit anonymously data of at least ten patients consecutively discharged for acute PE in 2012. Data were referred to demographic, clinical, instrumental, prognostic and therapeutic characteristics. A total of 452 patients from 28 Tuscan centers (60.2% F, with mean age 76.01±12.34 years, were enrolled. A total of 87% of patients was admitted from Emergency Department, but only 65.2% of patients with diagnosis of PE. Around one third of diagnoses of PE was performed by internists. In 14.8% of diagnoses was incidental. In 86% of patients, diagnosis was performed by computer tomography pulmonary angiography. Overall mortality was 9.5%, 5.75% being PE-related. Main risk factors enclosed recent respiratory tract infections (55.3%, immobility (42.25%, recent hospital admissions (33.6% and cancer (30.3%. In 65.8% of patients, PE was associated with deep vein thrombosis. 16.6% of patients had a shock index ≥1 and 84.75% simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (PESI score ≥1. A number of 51.5% of patients presented echocardiographic right heart dysfunction, 50.6% and 55.9% of patients presented increased values of troponins and natriuretic peptides, respectively. The following percentage, 6.5%, 71.1% and 22.4%, were defined as high, intermediate and low risk according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC

  19. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic...

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography for acute pulmonary embolism - a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Feng, Lei; Li, Jiangbo; Tang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for acute pulmonary embolism (PE). A systematic literature search was conducted that included studies from January 2000 to August 2015 using the electronic databases PubMed, Embase and Springer link. The summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios (PLR), negative likelihood ratios (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) as well as the 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRA for acute PE. Meta-disc software version 1.4 was used to analyze the data. Five studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity (86 %, 95 % CI: 81 % to 90 %) and specificity (99 %, 95 % CI: 98 % to 100 %) demonstrated that MRA diagnosis had limited sensitivity and high specificity in the detection of acute PE. The pooled estimate of PLR (41.64, 95 % CI: 17.97 to 96.48) and NLR (0.17, 95 % CI: 0.11 to 0.27) provided evidence for the low missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis rates of MRA for acute PE. The high diagnostic accuracy of MRA for acute PE was demonstrated by the overall DOR (456.51, 95 % CI: 178.38 - 1168.31) and SROC curves (AUC = 0.9902 ± 0.0061). MRA can be used for the diagnosis of acute PE. However, due to limited sensitivity, MRA cannot be used as a stand-alone test to exclude acute PE.

  1. Upper extremity acute compartment syndrome during tissue plasminogen activator therapy for pulmonary embolism in a morbidly obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Serkan; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Mutlu, Serhat; Ketenci, Ismail Emre; Ulusoy, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are more frequently observed in morbidly obese patients. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic agent which dissolves the thrombus more rapidly than conventional heparin therapy and reduces the mortality and morbidity rates associated with PE. Compartment syndrome is a well-known and documented complication of thrombolytic treatment. In awake, oriented and cooperative patients, the diagnosis of compartment syndrome is made based on clinical findings including swelling, tautness, irrational and continuous pain, altered sensation, and severe pain due to passive stretching. These clinical findings may not be able to be adequately assessed in unconscious patients. In this case report, we present compartment syndrome observed, for which fasciotomy was performed on the upper right extremity of a 46-year old morbidly obese, conscious female patient who was receiving tPA due to a massive pulmonary embolism. Compartment syndrome had occurred due to the damage caused by the repeated unsuccessful catheterisation attempts to the brachial artery and the accompanying tPA treatment. Thus, the bleeding that occurred in the volar compartment of the forearm and the anterior compartment of the arm led to acute compartment syndrome (ACS). After relaxation was brought about in the volar compartment of the forearm and the anterior compartment of the arm, the circulation in the limb was restored. As soon as the diagnosis of compartment syndrome is made, an emergency fasciotomy should be performed. Close follow-up is required to avoid wound healing problems after the fasciotomy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Successful Management of Intraoperative Acute Bilateral Pulmonary Embolism in a High Grade Astrocytoma Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraise, Wail N; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Hiasat, Mohammad Y; Said, Raed S

    2016-08-31

    BACKGROUND Intraoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) is a rare life-threatening complication in patients undergoing surgical intervention. Generally, cancer patients have a higher risk for developing this complication. Unfortunately, there is no standard procedure for its management. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with high-grade glioma in the right frontal lobe who was admitted to the surgical theater for craniotomy and excision of the tumor. During the general anesthesia procedure and just before inserting the central venous line, her end-tidal CO2 and O2 saturation dropped sharply. The anesthesiologist quickly responded with an aggressive resuscitation procedure that included aspiration through the central venous line, 100% O2, and IV administration of ephedrine 6 mg, colloid 500 mL, normal saline 500 mL, and heparin 5000 IU. The patient was extubated and remained in the supine position until she regained consciousness and her vital signs returned to normal. Subsequent radiological examination revealed a massive bilateral PE. A retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was inserted, and enoxaparin anticoagulant therapy was prescribed to stabilize the patient's condition. After 3 weeks, she underwent an uneventful craniotomy procedure and was discharged a week later under the enoxaparin therapy. CONCLUSIONS The successful management of intraoperative PE requires a quick, accurate diagnosis accompanied with an aggressive, fast response. Anesthesiologists are usually the ones who are held accountable for the diagnosis and early management of this complication. They must be aware of the possibility of such a complication and be ready to react properly and decisively in the operation theater.

  3. Diagnostic value of circulating microRNA-27a/b in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Ma, Junfen; Jiang, Zhiyun; Wu, Fan; Ping, Jiedan; Ming, Liang

    2018-02-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been increasingly suggested as biomarkers for numerous diseases. The aims of this study were to evaluate the expression of plasma miR-27a/b in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE) and determine the possibility of miR-27a/b as diagnostic biomarkers for APE. Seventy-eight APE patients diagnosed by computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and 70 age and gender matched normal volunteers were included in this study. The levels of miR-27a and miR-27b were measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and the concentrations of plasma D-dimer were measured using immunoturbidimetric assay. The levels of plasma miR-27a and miR-27b were significantly higher in APE patients (P<0.001) compared with normal controls. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses showed that plasma miR-27a was superior to miR-27b for the diagnosis of APE (AUC=0.784, AUC=0.707, respectively). Combining miR-27a or miR-27b with D-dimer significantly increased the diagnostic capacity of APE. Our results showed that circulating miR-27a and miR-27b might be potential novel diagnostic biomarkers in APE patients.

  4. D-dimer testing for safe exclusion and risk stratification in patients with acute pulmonary embolism in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Safe exclusion and risk stratification are currently recommended for the initial management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE. The aim of this study was to assess the safe exclusion and risk stratification value of D-dimer (DD for APE when tested at the beginning of admission. Materials and Methods: All consecutive Chinese APE patients and controls were recruited from January 2010 to December 2012. All measurements of serum indexes were made in duplicate and blinded to the patients′ status. All the 40 patients with the first episode of APE were confirmed by multi-detector computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. The plasma prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, and DD levels were measured within 24 h of admission. We used the Mann-Whitney U-test to determine the differences between groups and drew receiver operator characteristic curve to evaluate the indexes′ value in the APE screening. Results: The PT and DD in the APE group were significantly higher than those in the disease control group (P 1820 μg/L as cut-off value, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value was 82.5%, 75.2%, 56.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The patients with APE showed significant higher DD levels compared with disease controls, suggesting a negative qualitative DD test result can safely and efficiently exclude APE in primary care.

  5. Aspiration Thrombectomy for Treatment of Acute Massive and Submassive Pulmonary Embolism: Initial Single-Center Prospective Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampi-Dopazo, Juan José; Romeu-Prieto, Juan María; Sánchez-Casado, Marcelino; Romerosa, Beatriz; Canabal, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Blanco, María Luisa; Lanciego, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of aspiration thrombectomy in patients with acute massive or submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). This prospective study analyzed patient demographic data, procedural details, and outcomes in 18 consecutive patients (8 men and 10 women; mean age, 60.1 y; range, 36-80 y), 10 with acute submassive PE and 8 with massive PE, treated with an Indigo Continuous Aspiration Mechanical Thrombectomy Catheter between January 2016 and February 2017. Three patients underwent concomitant systemic fibrinolytic treatment with 100 mg tissue plasminogen activator. Technical success was defined as successful placement of devices and initiation of aspiration thrombectomy. Clinical success was defined as stabilization of hemodynamic parameters; improvement in pulmonary hypertension, right heart strain, or both; and survival to hospital discharge. Complications were also analyzed. The procedure was considered a technical success in 17 patients (94.4%) and a clinical success in 15 (83.3%). Echocardiography showed significant improvements in right ventricle size (46.36 mm ± 2.2 before treatment vs 41.79 mm ± 7.4 after; P = .041), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (16 ± 3 before treatment vs 18.57 ± 3.9 after; P = .011), and systolic wave (10 ± 2.1 before treatment vs 13.1 ± 3.8 after; P = .020). Two patients died of massive PE, and 1 died of submassive PE. Two patients who received systemic fibrinolytic agents experienced intracranial bleeding, and abdominal bleeding developed in 1. Aspiration thrombectomy is a feasible option for the treatment of acute massive or submassive PE in patients with hemodynamic compromise or right ventricular dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic Significance of Right Heart Thrombi in Patients With Acute Symptomatic Pulmonary Embolism: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Deisy; Rosa-Salazar, Vladimir; Morillo, Raquel; Nieto, Rosa; Fernández, Sara; Zamorano, José Luis; Monreal, Manuel; Torbicki, Adam; Yusen, Roger D; Jiménez, David

    2017-02-01

    For patients diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), the prognostic significance of concomitant right heart thrombi (RHT) lacks clarity. We performed a meta-analysis of studies that enrolled patients with acute PE to assess the prognostic value of echocardiography-detectable RHT for the primary outcome of short-term all-cause mortality and the secondary outcome of short-term PE-related mortality. Unrestricted searches were conducted of PubMed and Embase from 1980 through January 31, 2016, and used the terms "right heart thrombi," "pulmonary embolism," and "prognos.*" A random effects model was used to pool study results; Begg rank correlation method was used to evaluate for publication bias; and I2 testing was used to assess for heterogeneity. Six of 79 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria (15,220 patients). Overall, 99 of 593 patients with echocardiography-detectable RHT died (16.7% [95% CI, 13.8-19.9]) compared with 639 of 14,627 without RHT (4.4% [95% CI, 4.0-4.7]). RHT had a significant association with short-term all-cause mortality in all patients (OR, 3.0 [95% CI, 2.2 to 4.1]; I2 = 20%) and with PE-related death (three cohorts, 12,955 patients; OR: 4.8 [95% CI, 2.0-11.3; I2 = 76%). Results were consistent for the prospective (two cohorts, 514 patients; OR, 4.8 [95% CI, 1.7-13.6]; I2 = 56%) and the retrospective (four cohorts, 14,706 patients; OR, 2.8 [95% CI, 2.1 to 3.8]; I2 = 0%) studies. In patients diagnosed with acute PE, concomitant RHT were significantly associated with an increased risk of death within 30 days of PE diagnosis. PROSPERO registry; No.: CRD42016033960; URL: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute massıve pulmonary embolism assocıated wıth olanzapıne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Emine; Ulasli, Sevinc Sarinc; Basaran, Nursel Calik; Babaoglu, Elif; Koksal, Deniz

    2017-10-01

    Treatment with low-potency anti-psychotic agents is an important risk factor in the development of pulmonary embolism (PE). We report a case of 74years old female patient receiving olanzapine for psychotic depression admitted to the emergency service with the complaints of chest pain and shortness of breath. She had tachypnea, hypotension and tachycardia. Arterial blood gas analysis showed hypoxemia-hypocapnia and D-dimer level was high. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) demonstrated pulmonary embolism in both main pulmonary arteries, through lobar and segmental branches. Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) was administered in intensive care unit. As the only possible risk factor for PE was olanzapine, olanzapine treatment was terminated with pyschiatry consultation. During the 12-month follow-up of the patient; malignancy was not observed. Diagnosis and prevention of PE are the important goals to reduce morbidity and mortality in subjects receiving olanzapine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using a dual energy CT system with rapid kVp switching: Initial results

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    Geyer, Lucas L., E-mail: Lucas.Geyer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael, E-mail: michael.scherr@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Körner, Markus, E-mail: markus.koerner@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Wirth, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.wirth@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Deak, Paul, E-mail: paul.deak@ge.com [GE Healthcare, Oskar-Schlemmer-Straße 11, 80807 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Linsenmaier, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.linsenmaier@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich, Nussbaumstraße 20, 80336 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is considered as clinical gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE). Whereas conventional CTPA only offers anatomic information, dual energy CT (DECT) provides functional information on blood volume as surrogate of perfusion by assessing the pulmonary iodine distribution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung perfusion imaging using a single-tube DECT scanner with rapid kVp switching. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with suspicion of acute PE underwent DECT. Two experienced radiologists assessed the CTPA images and lung perfusion maps regarding the presence of PE. The image quality was rated using a semi-quantitative 5-point scale: 1 (=excellent) to 5 (=non-diagnostic). Iodine concentrations were quantified by a ROI analysis. Results: Seventy perfusion defects were identified in 266 lung segments: 13 (19%) were rated as consistent with PE. Five patients had signs of PE at CTPA. All patients with occlusive clots were correctly identified by DECT perfusion maps. On a per patient basis the sensitivity and specificity were 80.0% and 88.9%, respectively, while on a per segment basis it was 40.0% and 97.6%, respectively. None of the patients with a homogeneous perfusion map had an abnormal CTPA. The overall image quality of the perfusion maps was rated with a mean score of 2.6 ± 0.6. There was a significant ventrodorsal gradient of the median iodine concentrations (1.1 mg/cm{sup 3} vs. 1.7 mg/cm{sup 3}). Conclusion: Lung perfusion imaging on a DE CT-system with fast kVp-switching is feasible. DECT might be a helpful adjunct to assess the clinical severity of PE.

  9. Medical Management of Pulmonary Embolism: Beyond Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Nancy; Wang, Tisha; Friedman, Oren; Barjaktarevic, Igor

    2017-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common medical condition that carries significant morbidity and mortality. Although diagnosis, anticoagulation, and interventional clot-burden reduction strategies represent the focus of clinical research and care in PE, appropriate risk stratification and supportive care are crucial to ensure good outcomes. In this chapter, we will discuss the medical management of PE from the time of presentation to discharge, focusing on the critical care of acute right ventricular failure, anticoagulation of special patient populations, and appropriate follow-up testing after acute PE. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Pulmonary embolism due to exogenous estrogen intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Caner; Carus, Murat; Büyükcam, Fatih

    2017-12-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a relatively common clinical presentation of venous thromboembolism, which develops in relation to acute pulmonary arterial occlusion mostly caused by thrombi of the lower limbs. 29year old female admitted to emergency department with pulmonary thromboembolism due to an ingestion of 17 Diana 35 pills (2 mg cyproterone acetate and 0.035mg ethinyl estradiol) in a suicide attempt without any previously known predisposing factors. After thrombolytic therapy, the patient was discharged with oral warfarin treatment. We know that exogenous estrogen increase the risk of venous thromboembolism in therapeutic use. It should be kept in mind that even single ingestion of a single high-dose exogenous estrogen intake may induce pulmonary thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Sex differences in the characteristics and short-term prognosis of patients presenting with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Deisy; Morillo, Raquel; Guerassimova, Ina; Barbero, Esther; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor; Cohen, Alexander T.; Becattini, Cecilia; Tapson, Victor; Yusen, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background We sought to examine sex-related differences in the characteristics and outcome in patients presenting with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 2,096 patients diagnosed with acute PE. The characteristics were recorded at presentation. Treatment was at the discretion of patients’ physicians. The primary study outcome, all-cause mortality, and the secondary outcomes of PE-specific mortality, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and major bleeding were assessed during the first month of follow-up after PE diagnosis. Results Overall, the women were older than the men and had significantly higher rates of immobilization. They had significantly lower rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer. Women had a higher prevalence of syncope and elevated brain natriuretic peptide levels. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was similar between women and men (7.1% versus 6.2%; P = 0.38). Male gender was not independently significantly associated with PE-related death (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.02; 95% CI, 0.50 to 2.07; P = 0.96). Restricting the analyses to haemodynamically stable patients (n = 2,021), female gender was an independent predictor of all-cause (adjusted OR 1.56; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.28; P = 0.02) and PE-specific mortality (adjusted OR 1.85; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.33; P = 0.04). Compared with men, women were 2.05 times more likely to experience a major bleed. Conclusions Women and men with PE had different clinical characteristics, presentation, and outcomes. Women receiving anticoagulation have a significantly higher risk of major bleeding, suggesting the need for careful monitoring of anticoagulant intensity in women. PMID:29107971

  12. Comparison of V/Q SPECT and planar V/Q lung scintigraphy in diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus Verner

    2010-01-01

    Planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy is currently the standard method for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in most nuclear medicine centers. However, recent studies have shown a superior sensitivity and specificity when applying V/Q single photon emission computed tomography...

  13. [Parietal tuberculosis complicated by pulmonary embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopaka, Regis Gothard; Bemba, Presley Lee Esthel; Janah, Hind; Okombi, Franck Hardain Okemba; Jabri, Hasna; Khattabi, Wiam El; Afif, Hicham

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a frequent infectious disease in developing countries. It can affect the lung or spread to other parts of the body. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis poses a major diagnostic problem. We report the case of a patient with pulmonary embolism revealing parietal tuberculosis. This study emphasizes the importance of etiologic assessment in patients with pulmonary embolism.

  14. A clinical prognostic model for the identification of low-risk patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism and active cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Exter, Paul L; Gómez, Vicente; Jiménez, David; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Muriel, Alfonso; Huisman, Menno V; Monreal, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Physicians need a specific risk-stratification tool to facilitate safe and cost-effective approaches to the management of patients with cancer and acute pulmonary embolism (PE). The objective of this study was to develop a simple risk score for predicting 30-day mortality in patients with PE and cancer by using measures readily obtained at the time of PE diagnosis. Investigators randomly allocated 1,556 consecutive patients with cancer and acute PE from the international multicenter Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbólica to derivation (67%) and internal validation (33%) samples. The external validation cohort for this study consisted of 261 patients with cancer and acute PE. Investigators compared 30-day all-cause mortality and nonfatal adverse medical outcomes across the derivation and two validation samples. In the derivation sample, multivariable analyses produced the risk score, which contained six variables: age > 80 years, heart rate ≥ 110/min, systolic BP < 100 mm Hg, body weight < 60 kg, recent immobility, and presence of metastases. In the internal validation cohort (n = 508), the 22.2% of patients (113 of 508) classified as low risk by the prognostic model had a 30-day mortality of 4.4% (95% CI, 0.6%-8.2%) compared with 29.9% (95% CI, 25.4%-34.4%) in the high-risk group. In the external validation cohort, the 18% of patients (47 of 261) classified as low risk by the prognostic model had a 30-day mortality of 0%, compared with 19.6% (95% CI, 14.3%-25.0%) in the high-risk group. The developed clinical prediction rule accurately identifies low-risk patients with cancer and acute PE.

  15. Patent Foramen Ovale and the Risk of Cerebral Infarcts in Acute Pulmonary Embolism-A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindiš, David; Hutyra, Martin; Šaňák, Daniel; Král, Michal; Čecháková, Eva; Littnerová, Simona; Adam, Tomáš; Přeček, Jan; Hudec, Štěpán; Ječmenová, Markéta; Táborský, Miloš

    2018-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with a risk of consecutive paradoxical embolism with brain infarction through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). The aims of this study were to assess the rate of new ischemic brain lesions (IBLs) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a 12-month follow-up period with anticoagulation and to evaluate the potential relationship with the presence of PFO on transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Seventy-eight patients with acute PE underwent baseline contrast TEE with brain MRI. After the 12-month follow-up, 58 underwent brain MRI. The rates of MRI documenting new IBLs were measured based on the presence of PFO. PFO was detected in 31 patients (39.7%). At baseline MRI, IBL was present in 39 of 78 patients (50%). The presence of IBL was not significantly higher in patients with PFO than in patients without PFO (20 [64.5% patients with PFO] versus 19 [40.4% without PFO] of 39 patients with baseline IBL, P = .063). At the follow-up MRI, in the group with new IBL (9 of 58 patients, 15.5%), the number of patients with PFO was significantly higher than that without PFO (7 [33.3%] versus 2 [5.4%], P = .008). PFO was identified as an independent predictor of new IBL (odds ratio 4.6 [1.6-47.4], P = .008). The presence of PFO was associated with new IBL in patients with PE. These patients are at a higher risk of ischemic stroke despite effective anticoagulation therapy. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient management of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilworth, D.L.; Donovan, B.C.; Morrison, R.; Ryan, K.; Reagan, K.; Goldhaber, S.Z.

    1988-03-01

    This is the first article in a four-part continuing education series addressing patient care and the clinical management of disease. This series is not directed at nuclear medicine procedures themselves, but focuses on topics related to patients referred for nuclear medicine studies. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) discuss the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism; and 2) discuss conventional versus thrombolytic approaches to therapy.

  17. Estimation of right ventricular dysfunction by computed tomography pulmonary angiography: a valuable adjunct for evaluating the severity of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Hou, Gang

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in differentiating acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients with or without right ventricular dysfunction and to evaluate the severity of right ventricular dysfunction in acute PE patients with CPTA. We retrospectively collected and measured the following parameters: right ventricular diameter by short axis in the axial plane (RVDaxial), left ventricular diameter by short axis in the axial plane (LVDaxial), right ventricular diameter by level on the reconstructed four-chamber views (RVD4-CH), left ventricular diameter by level on the reconstructed four-chamber views (LVD4-CH), main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAD), ascending aorta diameter (AOD), coronary sinus diameter (CSD), superior vena cava diameter (SVCD), inferior vena cava (IVC) reflux and interventricular septum deviation by CTPA, and we calculated the RVDaxial/LVDaxial, RVD4-CH/LVD4-CH and MPAD/AOD ratios in acute PE patients. We assessed right ventricular function and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) by echocardiography (ECHO) and then divided the patients into two groups: group A had right ventricular dysfunction, and group B did not have right ventricular dysfunction. We utilized a logistic regression model to analyse the relationship between right ventricular dysfunction and the measurement parameters obtained from CTPA, and we constructed the ROC curve to confirm the optimal cut-off value of the statistically significant parameter in the logistic regression model. After an initial screening, 113 acute PE patients were enrolled in our study. Among them, 42 patients showed right ventricular dysfunction (37.2 %), and 71 patients showed no right ventricular dysfunction (62.8 %). The difference between the patients with right ventricular dysfunction and patients without right ventricular dysfunction was statistical significant in RVD4-CH/LVD4-CH ratio. Logistic regression model analysis revealed

  18. Rarity of isolated pulmonary embolism and acute aortic syndrome occurring outside of the field of view of dedicated coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Chung-Ang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Yoo, Seung Min; Rho, Ji Young (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology CHA Medical Univ. Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)), email: smyoo68@hanmail.net; Moon, Jae Youn; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang Wook; Sung, Jung Hoon; Cha, Dong Hun (Dept. of Cardiology CHA Medical Univ. Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of)); White, Charles S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore (United States))

    2011-05-15

    Background Although triple rule-out CT angiography (TRO) to simultaneously evaluate acute coronary syndrome (ACS), pulmonary embolism (PE), and acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is increasingly used in many institutions, TRO is inevitably associated with increased radiation exposure due to extended z-axis coverage compared with dedicated coronary CT angiography (DCTA). Purpose To determine the frequency of exclusion of findings of AAS, PE, and significant incidental non-cardiac pathology that may be the cause of acute chest pain when using a restricted DCTA field of view (FOV). Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT images and charts of 103 patients with acute PE and 50 patients with AAS. Either non-ECG gated dedicated pulmonary or aortic CT angiography was performed using 16- or 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT). We analyzed the incidence of isolated PE, AAS, or significant non-cardiac pathology outside of DCTA FOV (i.e. from tracheal carina to the base of heart). Results There were two cases of isolated PE (2/103, 1.9%) excluded from the FOV of DCTA. One case of PE was isolated to the subsegmental pulmonary artery in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe. In the second case, pulmonary embolism in the left main pulmonary artery was located out of the FOV of DCTA because the left main pulmonary artery was retracted upwardly by fibrotic scar in the left upper lobe due to prior tuberculosis. There was no case of AAS and significant non-cardiac pathology excluded from the FOV of DCTA. AAS (n = 50) consisted of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (n = 7), intramural hematoma (n = 5) and aortic dissection (n = 38). Conclusion As isolated PE, AAS, and significant non-cardiac pathology outside of the DCTA FOV rarely occur, DCTA may replace TRO in the evaluation of patients with non-specific acute chest pain and a low pre-test probability of PE or aortic dissection

  19. Added value of lung perfused blood volume images using dual-energy CT for assessment of acute pulmonary embolism

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    Okada, Munemasa, E-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Kunihiro, Yoshie [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Nakashima, Yoshiteru [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Oosaki 77, Hofu, Yamaguchi 747-8511 (Japan); Nomura, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Kudomi, Shohei; Yonezawa, Teppei [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Hospital, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Suga, Kazuyoshi [Department of Radiology, St. Hills Hospital, Imamurakita 3-7-18, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-0155 (Japan); Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the added value of lung perfused blood volume (LPBV) using dual-energy CT for the evaluation of intrapulmonary clot (IPC) in patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective study. Eighty-three patients suspected of having PE who underwent CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) using a dual-energy technique were enrolled in this study. Two radiologists who were blinded retrospectively and independently reviewed CTPA images alone and the combined images with color-coded LPBV over a 4-week interval, and two separate sessions were performed with a one-month interval. Inter- and intraobserver variability and diagnostic accuracy were evaluated for each reviewer with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Values for inter- and intraobserver agreement, respectively, were better for CTPA combined with LPBV (ICC = 0.847 and 0.937) than CTPA alone (ICC = 0.748 and 0.861). For both readers, diagnostic accuracy (area under the ROC curve [A{sub z}]) were also superior, when CTPA alone (A{sub z} = 0.888 [reader 1] and 0.912 [reader 2]) was compared with that after the combination with LPBV images (A{sub z} = 0.966 [reader 1] and 0.959 [reader 2]) (p < 0.001). However, A{sub z} values of both images might not have significant difference in statistics, because A{sub z} value of CTPA alone was high and 95% confidence intervals overlapped in both images. Conclusion: Addition of dual-energy perfusion CT to CTPA improves detection of peripheral IPCs with better interobserver agreement.

  20. Correlation of CT angiographic pulmonary artery obstruction scores with right ventricular dysfunction and clinical outcome in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfaltrer, P., E-mail: paul.apfaltrer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Henzler, T.; Meyer, M. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Roeger, S.; Haghi, D.; Gruettner, J.; Süselbeck, T. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Wilson, R.B.; Schoepf, U.J. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, 25 Courtenay Drive, MSC 226, Charleston, SC 29401 (United States); Schoenberg, S.O.; Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To correlate CTA pulmonary artery obstruction scores (OS) with right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) and clinical outcome in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and methods: In a prospective study of 50 patients (66 ± 12.9 years) with PE pulmonary artery OS (Qanadli, Mastora, and Mastora central) were assessed by two radiologists. To assess RVD all patients underwent echocardiography within 24 h. Furthermore, RVD on CT was assessed by calculating the right ventricular/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratios on transverse (RV/LVtrans) and four-chamber views (RV/LV4ch) as well as the RV/LV volume ratio (RV/LVvol). OS were correlated with RVD and the occurrence of adverse clinical outcomes (defined as death, need for intensive care treatment, or cardiac insufficiency ≥NYHA III). Results: Mean Mastora, Qanadli, and Mastora central OS were 26.4 ± 17.7, 12.6 ± 9.9 and 7.5 ± 9, respectively. Echocardiography demonstrated moderate and severe RVD in 10 and 5 patients, respectively. Patients with moderate and severe RVD showed significantly higher Mastora central scores than patients without RVD (14 ± 10.8 vs. 5.9 ± 7.8 [p = 0.05]; 17.6 ± 13.2 vs. 5.9 ± 7.8 [p = 0.038]). A relevant correlation (i.e. r ≥ 0.6) between OS and CT parameters for RVD were only found for the Mastora score and the Mastora central score (RV/LV4ch: r = 0.61 and 0.68, RV/LVvol: r = 0.61 and 0.6). 18 patients experienced an adverse clinical outcome. None of the OS differed significantly between patients with and without adverse clinical outcome. Conclusion: Pulmonary artery obstruction scores can differentiate between patients with and without RVD. However, in this study, obstruction scores were not correlated to adverse clinical outcome.

  1. Acute pulmoner embolism mimicking acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Avcı Demir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and electocardiographic (ECG features in pulmonary embolism (PE lack of specificity and may mimic an acute coronary syndrom (ACS. We here report a case of a 56-year-old woman presenting with chest pain secondary to pulmonary artery embolism which was initially diagnosed as ACS due to electrocardiographic changes and raised troponin. PE presenting with negative T-wave inversion can mimic ACS and misdirect the diagnostic approach. Simultaneous T-wave inversions in anterior and inferior leads are important clues suggesting PE. Most common ECG findings in PE are anteroseptal T-wave inversion/ST-elevation or depression along with complete or incomplete right bundle branch block, sinus tachycardia, low QRS-complex voltage, an S1Q3T3 pattern, and right axis deviation. The reasons for the ECG changes that seem like ischemia are sudden RV strain, hypoxemia and the release of catecholamines. So we have to be aware that PE can present as acute coronary syndrome with ECG changes preoccupy ischemia

  2. Effects of different inspired oxygen fractions on sildenafil-induced pulmonary anti-hypertensive effects in a sheep model of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Diana Rocío Becerra; Teixeira-Neto, Francisco José; Paola Lagos-Carvajal, Angie; Steim-Diniz, Miriely; Rodríguez, Nathalia Celeita; Dias-Junior, Carlos Alan

    2015-04-15

    Sildenafil is a pulmonary anti-hypertensive agent whose action could be modified by different fractions of inspired oxygen (FiO2). We compared the effects of pure oxygen (FiO2 > 90%) or room air (21% FiO2) on the cardiopulmonary actions of sildenafil in sheep with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Thirty-two anesthetized, mechanically ventilated sheep (34.9 ± 5.4 kg), were randomly distributed into four groups (n = 8 per group): FiO2 > 90% without intervention; APE induced by microspheres with FiO2 > 90%, followed 30 min later by placebo (Emb90); or APE followed 30 min later by intravenous sildenafil (0.7 mg/kg over 30 min) with FiO2 > 90% (Emb + Sild90) or 21% FiO2 (Emb + Sild21) [Corrected]. Variables were recorded until 30 min after the end of treatment administration. Microsphere injection increased (P anti-hypertensive effect and causes less interference with the systemic circulation with the concomitant use of pure oxygen than that with room air in the APE setting.

  3. Factors determining altered perfusion after acute pulmonary embolism assessed by quantified single-photon emission computed tomography-perfusion scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meysman, Marc; Everaert, Hendrik; Vincken, Walter

    2017-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of the study was to analyze the evolution of perfusion (Q)-defects in patients treated for acute pulmonary embolism (PE), correlation with baseline parameters and evaluation of recurrence risk. METHODS: This is a single-center prospective observational cohort study in symptomatic normotensive PE. Comparison of the ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q-SPECT) acquired at baseline with a quantified SPECT (Q-SPECT) repeated at 1 week and 6 months. The Q-defect extent (percentage of total lung volume affected) was measured semiquantitatively. Data collected at baseline were age, gender, body mass index (BMI), history of previous venous thromboembolism (HVTE), Charlson's Comorbidity Score (CcS), plasma troponin-T and D-dimer levels, PE Severity Index, and tricuspid regurgitation jet (TRJ) velocity. RESULTS: Forty-six patients (22 men/24 women, mean age 61.7 years (± standard deviation 16.3)) completed the study. At 1 week, 13/46 (28.3 %) and at 6 months 22/46 (47.8%) patients had completely normalized Q-SPECT. Persistence of Q-defects was more frequent in female patients in univariate and multivariate analysis. We found no correlation between the persistence of Q-defects on Q-SPECT and HVTE, BMI, plasma troponin-T, and CcS. However, lower TRJ and younger age were statistically significantly linked to normalization of Q-scans after 6 months of treatment only in univariate analysis. There is no difference in the frequency of recurrent PE in relation to the persistence of Q-defects. CONCLUSION: Acute PE patients of female, older age, and higher TRJ in univariate analysis and patients of female in multivariate analysis seem to have a higher risk of persistent Q-defects after 6 months treatment. The presence of residual Q-abnormalities at 6 months was not associated with an increased risk for recurrent PE. PMID:28197219

  4. Coagulopathy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: a pilot study of whole blood coagulation and markers of endothelial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Per; Johansson, Pär I; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Møller, Christian H; Bang, Lia E; Olsen, Peter Skov; Carlsen, Jørn

    2017-02-01

    Whole blood coagulation and markers of endothelial damage were studied in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), and evaluated in relation to PE severity. Twenty-five patients were enrolled prospectively each having viscoelastical analysis of whole blood done using thrombelastography (TEG) and Multiplate aggregometry. Fourteen of these patients were investigated for endothelial damage by ELISA measurements of Syndecan-1 (endothelial glycocalyx degradation), soluble endothelial Selectin (endothelial cell activation), soluble Thrombomodulin (endothelial cell injury) and Histone Complexed DNA fragments (endothelial cytotoxic histones). The mean values of TEG and Multiplate parameters were all within the reference levels, but a significant difference between patients with high and intermediate risk PE was observed for Ly30 (lytic activity) 1.5% [0-10] vs. 0.2% [0-2.2] p = .04, and ADP (platelet reactivity) 92 U [20-145] vs. 59 U [20-111] p = .03. A similar difference was indicated for functional fibrinogen 21 mm [17-29] vs. 18 mm [3-23] p = .05. Analysis of endothelial markers identified a significant difference in circulating levels between high and intermediate risk PE patients for Syndecan-1 118.6 ng/mL [76-133] vs. 36.3 ng/mL [11.8-102.9] p = .008. In conclusion, patients with acute PE had normal whole blood coagulation, but high risk PE patients had signs of increased activity of the haemostatic system and significantly increased level of endothelial glycocalyx degradation.

  5. Suitability of electron beam tomography in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism; Wertigkeit der EB-CT in der Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie - Vorstellung eines neuen Untersuchungsprotokolls

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    Lehmann, K.J.; Weisser, G.; Naser, M.; Denk, S.; Willingstorfer, W.J.; Georgi, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1999-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate electron beam tomography in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism using a new acquisition protocol. Materials and Methods: 65 patients underwent electron beam tomography (EBT) and v./p. scintigraphy. According to the inclusion criteria 46 patients participated in the study. Contrast enhancement and detectability of pulmonary arteries were scored on a 4 step scale for image quality. The results of prospective detection of pulmonary embolism were compared for both modalities (blinded reading). 'Embolism', 'questionable embolism' and 'no embolism' were used as categories. Results: 22/46 patients (48%) showed acute pulmonary embolism. EBT and scintigraphy were discordant in 24% of patients. In EBT 1 false positive and 1 false negative case occurred, scintigraphy demonstrated 2 false negative and 3 false positive cases. 6/9 patients with questionable findings in scintigraphy were correctly classified by EBT to a category 'embolism' or 'no embolism' as 'suspected embolism', EBT displated a sensitivity of 96.3% and a specificity of 94.7%. Scintigraphy evidenced a sensitivity of 93.7% and a specificity of 84.4%. Conclusions: EBT shows better results than scintigraphy for the detection of acute pulmonary emboli. The evaluated new acquisition protocol for EBT seems to be well suited. High vessel contrast and thin slices allow a reliable detection of segmental and subsegmental pulmonary arteries. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Evaluierung der Elektronenstrahl-CT (EB-CT) in der Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie unter Einsatz eines neu entwickelten Aufnahmeprotokolls. Methoden: 65 Patienten werden mittels EB-CT und Ventilations-/Perfusionsszintigraphie (VPS) untersucht, 46 koennen gemaess der Einschlusskriterien in die Studie aufgenommen werden. Die Kontrastierung und Abgrenzbarkeit zentraler und peripherer Pulmonalarterien wird auf einer 4stufigen Qualitaetsskala bewertet. Die Diagnostik einer

  6. Interventional radiology treatment for pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregorio, Miguel A; Guirola, Jose A; Lahuerta, Celia; Serrano, Carolina; Figueredo, Ana L; Kuo, William T

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an illness that has a potentially life-threatening condition that affects a large percentage of the global population. VTE with pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third leading cause of death after myocardial infarction and stroke. In the first three months after an acute PE, there is an estimated 15% mortality among submassive PE, and 68% mortality in massive PE. Current guidelines suggest fibrinolytic therapy regarding the clinical severity, however some studies suggest a more aggressive treatment approach. This review will summarize the available endovascular treatments and the different techniques with its indications and outcomes. PMID:28794825

  7. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, Marcello; van Es, Nick; Büller, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism, constitute a major global burden of disease. The diagnostic work-up of suspected deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism includes the sequential application of a clinical decision rule and D-dimer

  9. Comparison of V/Q SPECT and planar V/Q lung scintigraphy in diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Mortensen, Jann; Jensen, Claus Verner

    2010-01-01

    Planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy is currently the standard method for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in most nuclear medicine centers. However, recent studies have shown a superior sensitivity and specificity when applying V/Q single photon emission computed tomography...... (SPECT) in diagnosing PE. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional V/Q SPECT in comparison with planar V/Q scintigraphy....

  10. Detection of Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient Presenting in PEA Arrest: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangyul Chung-Esaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal management of the critically ill patient in shock requires rapid identification of its etiology. We describe a successful application of an emergency physician performed bedside ultrasound in a patient presenting with shock and subsequent cardiac arrest. Pulmonary embolus was diagnosed using bedside echocardiogram and confirmed with CTA of the thorax. Further validation and real-time implementation of this low-cost modality could facilitate the decision to implement thrombolytics for unstable patients with massive pulmonary embolism who cannot undergo formal radiographic evaluation.

  11. Gender-related differences in clinical presentation, electrocardiography signs, laboratory markers and outcome in patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradović, Slobodan; Džudović, Boris; Rusović, Siniša; Subota, Vesna; Obradović, Dragana

    2016-09-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life threating event, but there are scarce data about genderrelated differences in this condition. The aim of this study was to identify gender-specific differences in clinical presentation, the diagnosis and outcome between male and female patients with PE. We analysed the data of 144 consecutive patients with PE (50% women) and compared female and male patients regarding clinical presentation, electrocardiography (ECG) signs, basic laboratory markers and six-month outcome. All the patients confirmed PE by visualized thrombus on the multidetector computed tomography with pulmonary angiography (MDCTPA), ECG and echocardiographic examination at admission. Compared to the men, the women were older and a larger proportion of them was in the third tertile of age (66.0% vs 34.0%, p = 0.008). In univariate analysis the men more often had hemoptysis [OR (95% CI) 3.75 (1.16-12.11)], chest pain [OR (95% CI) 3.31 (1.57-7.00)] febrile state [OR (95% CI) 2.41 (1.12-5.22)] and pneumonia at PE presentation [OR (95% CI) 3.40 (1.25-9.22)] and less likely had heart decompensation early in the course of the disease [OR (95%CI) 0.48 (0.24-0.97)]. In the multivariate analysis a significant difference in the rate of pneumonia and acute heart failure between genders disappeared due to strong influence of age. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of typical ECG signs for PE between the genders. Women had higher level of admission glycaemia [7.7 mmol/L (5.5-8.2 mmol/L) vs 6.9 mmol/L (6.3-9.6 mmol/L), p = 0.006] and total number of leukocytes [10.5 x 109/L (8.8-12.7 x 109/L vs 8.7 x 109/L (7.0-11.6 x 109/L)), p = 0.007]. There was a trend toward higher plasma level of brain natriuretic peptide in women compared to men 127.1 pg/mL (55.0-484.0 pg/mL), p = 0.092] vs [90.3 pg/mL (39.2-308.5 pg/mL). The main 6-month outcomes, death and major bleeding, had similar frequencies in both sexes. There are several important differences

  12. Monocyte to large platelet ratio as a diagnostic tool for pulmonary embolism in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, Adam J; Kornicki, Kamil; Ciebiada, Maciej; Antczak, Adam; Sitarek, Przemysław; Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Piotrowski, Wojciech J; Górski, Paweł

    2018-01-31

    INTRODUCTION    A higher prevalence of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been noted among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly in those with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD). Due to a similar clinical presentation and the lack of highly specific laboratory tests, there is a common overuse of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). The introduction of an additional, simple, and inexpensive diagnostic tool to help in the diagnosis of PE in patients with AECOPD would be of special interest for everyday clinical practice. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of the monocyte to large platelet ratio (MLPR) as a diagnostic tool for PE in patients with AECOPD.  PATIENTS AND METHODS    We performed a retrospective evaluation of patients with AECOPD and suspicion of PE who underwent CTPA. The MLPR was investigated as a marker of thrombosis. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyses were preformed to measure the accuracy of the MLPR in comparison with CTPA results and to identify the cutoff value for the MLPR. RESULTS    A total of 101 patients (56 men and 45 women; median age, 72 years; range, 37-94 years) were included in the study. The MLPR showed an excellent accuracy in comparison with CTPA results: the area under the ROC curve was 0.945 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.904-0.986). The MLPR was characterized by a good accuracy of qualitative test parameters, with high sensitivity (100%; 95% CI, 79.6-100) and specificity (85.7%; 95% CI, 75.9-92.6). CONCLUSIONS    The MLPR measurement appears to be a reliable, simple, inexpensive, and widely available test that may help in the differential diagnosis of PE in patients with AECOPD.

  13. Normalization of Negative T-Wave on Electrocardiography and Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Patients with an Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo-Youn

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Echocardiography and computed tomography (CT)-angiography may be difficult to perform in a serial follow up, unlike electrocardiography (ECG). Many ECG findings specific for APE have been reported, and many studies have found that negative T-waves (NTW) in precordial leads are most frequently observed in patients with APE. We analyzed serial changes in precordial NTW to detect RVD and predict the recovery of RVD in patients with APE. Methods We examined 81 consecutive patients diagnosed with APE using CT-angiography or echocardiography. ECG, transthoracic echocardiography, and laboratory tests were performed within 24 hours of admission, and daily ECG follow-up was performed. Precordial NTWs were defined by the new development of pointed and symmetrical inverted T-waves in at least three leads. Recovery of NTW was defined as flattening or upright inverted T-waves in more than two leads. Results Of the 81 patients with APE, 52 (64%) had RVD according to echocardiography. Among the patients with RVD, 33 (63%) showed precordial NTW. The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that NTW was the strongest independent predictor for RVD (odds ratio, 22.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.4 to 221.4; p = 0.007). Time to normalization of NTW was associated with improvement of RVD on echocardiography (r = 0.84, p < 0.01). Conclusions Precordial NTW was a reliable finding to identify RVD in patients with APE. Improvements in RVD can be predicted by normalizing precordial NTW. PMID:22403500

  14. Subsegmental pulmonary embolism: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiman, Soheil; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Allameh, Seyed Farshad; Asadi Gharabaghi, Mehrnaz; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Safavi, Enayat

    2016-02-01

    Through the introduction of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for diagnosis of the pulmonary embolism (PE), the high sensitivity of this diagnostic tool led to detecting peripheral filling defects as small as 2-3mm, termed as subsegmental pulmonary embolism (SSPE). However, despite these substantial increases in diagnosis of small pulmonary embolism, there are minimal changes in mortality. Moreover, SSPE patients generally are hemodynamically stable with mild clinical presentation, lower serum level of biomarkers, lower incidence of associated proximal DVTs and less frequent echocardiographic changes compared to the patients with emboli located in more central pulmonary arteries. However, the pros and cons of anticoagulant therapy versus non-treating, monitoring protocol and exact long term outcome of these patients are still unclear. In this article we review existing evidence and provide an overview of what is known about the diagnosis and management of subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Outpatient management of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, P-M; Moumneh, T; Penaloza, A; Sanchez, O

    2017-07-01

    Despite clear potential benefits of outpatient care, most patients suffering from pulmonary embolism (PE) are currently hospitalized due to the fear of possible adverse events. Nevertheless, some teams have increased or envisage to increase outpatient treatment or early discharge. We performed a narrative systematic review of studies published on this topic. We identified three meta-analyses and 23 studies, which involved 3671 patients managed at home (n=3036) or discharged early (n=535). Two main different approaches were applied to select patients eligible for outpatient in recent prospective studies, one based on a list of pragmatic criteria as the HESTIA rule, the other adding severity criteria (i.e. risk of death) as the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Criteria (PESI) or simplified PESI. In all these studies, a specific follow-up was performed for patients managed at home involving a dedicated team. The overall early (i.e. between 1 to 3 months) complication rate was low, Outpatient management appears to be feasible and safe for many patients with PE. In the coming years, outpatient treatment may be considered as the first line management for hemodynamically stable PE patients, subject to the respect of simple eligibility criteria and on the condition that a specific procedure for outpatient care is developed in advance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interventional Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinski, David M; Giri, Jay; Rosenfield, Kenneth

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious and prevalent cause of vascular disease. Nevertheless, optimal treatment for many phenotypes of PE remains uncertain. Treating PE requires appropriate risk stratification as a first step. For the highest-risk PE, presenting as shock or arrest, emergent systemic thrombolysis or embolectomy is reasonable, while for low-risk PE, anticoagulation alone is often chosen. Normotensive patients with PE but with indicia of right heart dysfunction (by biomarkers or imaging) constitute an intermediate-risk group for whom there is controversy on therapeutic strategy. Some intermediate-risk patients with PE may require urgent stabilization, and ≈10% will decompensate hemodynamically and suffer high mortality, though identifying these specific patients remains challenging. Systemic thrombolysis is a consideration, but its risks of major and intracranial hemorrhages rival overall harms from intermediate PE. Multiple hybrid pharmacomechanical approaches have been devised to capture the benefits of thrombolysis while reducing its risks, but there is limited aggregate clinical experience with such novel interventional strategies. One method to counteract uncertainty and generate a consensus multidisciplinary prognostic and therapeutic plan is through a Pulmonary Embolism Response Team, which combines expertise from interventional cardiology, interventional radiology, cardiac surgery, cardiac imaging, and critical care. Such a team can help determine which intervention-catheter-directed fibrinolysis, ultrasound-assisted thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombus fragmentation, or percutaneous or surgical embolectomy-is best suited to a particular patient. This article reviews these various modalities and the background for each. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Acute pulmonary embolism detection with ventilation/perfusion SPECT combined with full dose CT: What is the best option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milà, M; Bechini, J; Vázquez, A; Vallejos, V; Tenesa, M; Espinal, A; Fraile, M; Monreal, M

    To compare diagnostic accuracy of Ventilation/Perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) combined with simultaneous full-dose CT with a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner versus planar ventilation/perfusion (V/P) SPECT and CT angiography (CTA) in patients suspected with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Between 2009 and 2011, consecutive patients suspected of acute PE were referred for V/P SPECT/CT (reviewed board approved study). A contrast agent was administered to patients who had no contraindications. Non-contrast V/P SPECT/CT was performed on the remaining patients. All patients were followed-up for at least 3 months. A total of 314 patients were available during the study period, with the diagnosis of PE confirmed in 70 (22.29%) of them. The overall population sensitivity and specificity was 90.91% and 92.44%, respectively for V/P SPECT, 80% and 99.15%, respectively, for CTA, and 95.52% and 97.08% for V/P SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT performed better than V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0419, P=0.0043, 95% CI; 0.0131-0.0706) and CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259)). Comparing imaging modalities when contrast agent could be administered, sensitivity and specificity increased and V/P SPECT/CT was significantly better than CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259) and V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0659, P=0.0052, 95% CI; 0.0197-0.1121). In case of non-contrast enhancement, there was non-significant increase of specificity. Secondary findings on CT impacted patient management in 14.65% of cases. Our study shows that combined V/P SPECT/CT scanning has a higher diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute PE than V/P SPECT and CTA alone. When feasible, V/P SPECT/CT with contrast enhancement is the best option. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  18. ST-segment elevation in V1-V4 in acute pulmonary embolism: a case presentation and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R

    2016-12-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are seen in 70%-80% of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Rarely, APE presents with ST-segment elevation (STE) in leads V1-V4, mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Herein, we describe a case of APE presenting with STE in V1-V3, along with a comprehensive review of the literature. We reviewed Pubmed/Medline indexed articles from 1950 to 2014 reporting cases of APE presenting with STE in V1-V3 or V4 (V1-V3/V4). Cases were analyzed with specific reference to patient demographics, clinical, laboratory, and radiological data, treatment, and outcome. A total of 12 cases were identified comprising seven males and five females aged between 31 and 64 years. Five cases met the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association criteria for massive APE due to sustained hemodynamic instability or requirement for inotropic support, and seven met criteria for submassive PE due to right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or elevated troponin in absence of systemic hypotension. Among the notable clinical features in this cohort is the high incidence of syncope, in 66.7% of the cases, high incidence of concomitant deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 90% of cases that reported venous Doppler results (eight proximal and one distal DVT), and the presence of a dilated RV in 90% of the cases that reported echocardiographic results. In all but one case the initial working diagnosis was STEMI and emergent cardiac catheterization was planned. In the 90% of cases who eventually had a coronary angiography, the angiogram was performed prior to diagnosing APE, and the lack of occlusive disease prompted further workup that confirmed the diagnosis of APE. In-hospital mortality rate in the studied population was 16.7%. STE in leads V1-V3/V4 in cases with APE identifies a subset of patients who are an intermediate to high risk category. In cases presenting with right precordial lead STE and clinical features that are more

  19. Clinical risk stratification of acute pulmonary embolism: comparing the usefulness of CTA obstruction score and pulmonary perfusion defect score with dual-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei-Fang; Wang, Yu-Ting; Yin, Long-Lin; Pu, Hong; Tao, Ke-Yan

    2017-12-01

    To compare the ability of CT angiography (CTA) obstruction score and perfusion defect score on dual energy CT perfusion imaging (DEPI) for clinical risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). 55 patients diagnosed as acute PE either by CTA or DEPI were retrospectively enrolled. Patients were grouped into high-, intermediate-, and low-risk groups in accordance to the renewed guidelines of 2014. Consistency between DEPI and CTA in diagnosis of PE were assessed. Correlations between CT parameters and right-to-left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio were evaluated. Difference of CTA obstruction score and perfusion defect score across three groups with different risks were analyzed. The consistent rate of DEPI with CTA was 75.4%, and the Kappa value was 0.412 (p = 0.000). 44.3% of partially obstructive PE showed on CTA did not lead to perfusion defect on DEPI. Perfusion defect score was significantly correlated with CTA obstruction score and with RV/LV (r = 0.622 and 0.599, respectively, p < 0.001), and CTA obstruction score had lower correlation with RV/LV (r = 0.403, p = 0.003). Perfusion defect score could distinguish low- from intermediate-risk groups (p = 0.011). However, CTA obstruction score could not distinguish the two groups (p = 0.149). DEPI had fine consistency with CTA to diagnose acute PE and offered additional information of physiologic changes. Comparing with CTA obstruction score, perfusion defect score could better correlate with right ventricular dysfunction, and could be a more promising biomarker for clinical risk stratification.

  20. Tratamento cirúrgico da embolia pulmonar maciça aguda Surgical treatment of acute pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Abdulmassih Neto

    1993-06-01

    apresentam boa evolução a longo prazo.Between January 1984 and December 1992, 8 patients with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE underwent pulmonary embolectomy under cardiopulmonary bypass. The age ranged from 36 to 70 years (average 56.6 years. There were 6 men and 2 women. A causative factor for pulmonary embolism was found in 6 (95%: myocardium revascularization in 3, abdominal lipoaspiration in 2 and hemorrhoidectomy in 1. All patients where severely hypoxic with mean arterial PO2 of 55%. The diagnosis of PE was established by pulmonary angiogram in 6 (75% and surgery in 2. Hospital mortality was 50% (4 patients, two of them had previous cardiac arrest, 1 patient died of acute respiratory distress syndrome, 1 of neurologic complication, 1 of pulmonary infection and 1 of myocardial failure. Among the survival patients, 3 are without symptoms and 1 complains of discrete exertional dyspnea (NYHA class II. This study demonstrates that: 1 the mortality rate was higher in patients with previous cardiac arrest; 2 the time between diagnosis and surgery was a predictive factor; 3 the high mortality rate reflects the gravity of the situation; 4 the long term results in surviving patients have been favorable.

  1. McConnell Sign in a Patient with Massive Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaiser Shafiq

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old female was admitted after experiencing a brief syncopal episode. Three weeks ago the patient sustained a right arm humerus bone fracture in a motor vehicle accident. Since the accident, her mobility has been limited. CT angiogram of the chest revealed massive bilateral pulmonary emboli. A 2D echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated McConnell sign and severe right ventricle dysfunction. Considering potential of hemodynamic instability, the patient received fibrinolytic therapy with Alteplase. A subsequent 2D echocardiogram showed complete resolution of McConnell sign and right ventricle dysfunction.

  2. Management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Vishal; Mehta, Nimeshkumar; Rawat, Naveen; Lehrman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is characterized by systemic hypotension (defined as a systolic arterial pressure pulmonary embolism has a high mortality rate despite advances in diagnosis and therapy. A subgroup of patients with nonmassive PE who are hemodynamically stable but with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or hypokinesis confirmed by echocardiography is classified as submassive PE. Their prognosis is different from that of others with non-massive PE and normal RV function. This article attempts to review the evidence-based risk stratification, diagnosis, initial stabilization, and management of massive and nonmassive pulmonary embolism. PMID:23319967

  3. High‑risk pulmonary embolism in a patient with acute dissecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-07

    Apr 7, 2016 ... stable angina, metabolic syndrome, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperuricemia ... triglycerides ‑ 195 mg/dL, and uric acid ‑ 9.2 mg/dL. ... 3 mg/day, INR adjusted, until September, when surgery was performed. Unfortunately, the patient died shortly after surgery because of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. Can brain natriuretic peptide predict the outcome in patients with acute pulmonary embolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Nafie

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: An elevated plasma level of BNP is a prognostic factor for short-term mortality and overall short-term complicated clinical outcome, and it is a powerful indicator of RVD in patients with acute PE in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD.

  5. Prevalence of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients Suspected for Pulmonary Embolism or Acute Aortic Syndrome: Rationale for the Triple Rule-Out Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahtani, Saad Al; Kandeel, Ahmed Y; Breault, Stephane; Jouannic, Anne-Marie; Qanadli, Salah D

    2015-08-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the prevalence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) among patients presenting with atypical chest pain who are evaluated for acute aortic syndrome (AAS) or pulmonary embolism (PE) with computed tomoangiography (CTA) and discuss the rationale for the use of triple rule-out (TRO) protocol for triaging these patients. This study is a retrospective analysis of patients presenting with atypical chest pain and evaluated with thoracic (CTA), for suspicion of AAS/PE. Two physicians reviewed patient files for demographic characteristics, initial CT and final clinical diagnosis. Patients were classified according to CTA finding into AAS, PE and other diagnoses and according to final clinical diagnosis into AAS, PE, ACS and other diagnoses. Four hundred and sixty-seven patients were evaluated: 396 (84.8%) patients for clinical suspicion of PE and 71 (15.2%) patients for suspicion of AAS. The prevalence of ACS and AAS was low among the PE patients: 5.5% and 0.5% respectively (P = 0.0001), while the prevalence of ACS and PE was 18.3% and 5.6% among AAS patients (P = 0.14 and P = 0.34 respectively). The prevalence of ACS and AAS among patients suspected clinically of having PE is limited while the prevalence of ACS and PE among patients suspected clinically of having AAS is significant. Accordingly patients suspected for PE could be evaluated with dedicated PE CTA while those suspected for AAS should still be triaged using TRO protocol.

  6. Pulmonary Artery Cement Embolism after a Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Nooh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Context. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure most commonly used for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Although it is relatively safe, complications have been reported over time. Among those complications, massive cement pulmonary embolism is considered a rare complication. Here we report a case of massive diffuse cement pulmonary embolism following percutaneous vertebroplasty for a vertebral compression fracture. Study Design. Case report. Methods. This is a 70-year-old female who underwent vertebroplasty for T11 and T12 vertebral compression fracture. Results. CT-scan revealed an incidental finding of cement embolism in the pulmonary trunk and both pulmonary arteries. Since the patient was asymptomatic, she was monitored closely and she did not need any intervention. Conclusion. Vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive procedure used for treatment of vertebral compression fracture. Despite the low rate of complications, a pulmonary cement embolism can occur. The consequences of cement embolism range widely from being asymptomatic to embolism that can cause paralysis, radiculopathy, or a fatal pulmonary embolism.

  7. Suspected pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis: A comprehensive MDCT diagnosis in the acute clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvolini, Luca [Radiology Department, ' Umberto I' Hospital - Ospedali Riuniti - ' Politecnica delle Marche' University, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona (Italy)], E-mail: lucasalvolini@alice.it; Scaglione, Mariano [Emergency and Trauma CT Section, Department of Radiology, Cardarelli Hospital, Via G. Merliani 31, 80127 Naples (Italy); Giuseppetti, Gian Marco; Giovagnoni, Andrea [Radiology Department, ' Umberto I' Hospital - Ospedali Riuniti - ' Politecnica delle Marche' University, Via Conca, 60020 Ancona (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Both pulmonary arterial and peripheral venous sides of venous thromboembolism (VTE) can now be efficiently and safely investigated by multi-detector CT (MDCT) at the same time by a combined CT angiography/CT venography protocol. In the emergency setting, the use of such a single test for patients suspected of suffering from VTE on a clinical grounds may considerably shorten and simplify diagnostic algorithms. The selection of patients to be submitted to MDCT must follow well-established clinical prediction rules in order to avoid generalized referral to CT on a generic clinical suspicion basis and excessive population exposure to increased ionizing radiation dose, especially in young patients. Clinical and anatomical wide-panoramic capabilities of MDCT allow identification of underlying disease that may explain patients' symptoms in a large number of cases in which VTE is not manifest. The analysis of MDCT additional findings on cardiopulmonary status and total thrombus burden can lead to better prognostic stratification of patients and influence therapeutic options. Some controversial points such as optimal examination parameters, clinical significance of subsegmentary emboli, CT pitfalls and/or possible falsely positive diagnoses, and outcome of untreated patients in which VTE has been excluded by MDCT without additional testing, must of course be taken into careful consideration before the definite role of comprehensive MDCT VTE 'one-stop-shop' diagnosis in everyday clinical practice can be ascertained.

  8. A cardiac hydatid cyst underlying pulmonary embolism: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydatid cysts located in the interatrial septum are especially rare but when they occur, they might cause intracavity rupture. We report on a patient with acute pulmonary embolism caused by an isolated, ruptured hydatid cyst on the right side of the interatrial septum. A 16-year-old-boy with an uneventful history was ...

  9. Effect of Aspirin on Fractalkine in Rats with Pulmonary Embolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cai B, Sun C, Wang LC, and Qian H: Curcumin improves the outcomes of acute pulmonary embolism in rats. Zhejiang Med J 2011; 33: 457-459. 8. Widmer BJ, Bassora R, Warrender WJ, Abboud JA: Thromboembolic events are uncommon after open treatment of proximal humerus fractures using aspirin and compression ...

  10. Retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis in perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köcher, Martin; Krcova, Vera; Cerna, Marie; Prochazka, Martin

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis in the perinatal period and to discuss the technical demands associated with the filter's implantation and retrieval. Between 1996 until 2007, eight women (mean age 27.4 years, range 20-42 years) with acute deep iliofemoral venous thrombosis in the perinatal period of pregnancy and increased risk of pulmonary embolism during delivery were indicated for retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter implantation. All filters were inserted and removed under local anesthesia from the jugular approach. The Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filter was implanted suprarenally in all patients on the day of caesarean delivery. In follow-up cavograms performed just before planned filter removal, no embolus was seen in the filter in any patient. In all patients the filter was retrieved without complications on the 12th day after implantation. Retrievable Günther Tulip Vena Cava Filters can be inserted and removed in patients during the perinatal period without major complications.

  11. Retrievable Guenther Tulip Vena Cava Filter in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis in perinatal period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koecher, Martin [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P. Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)], E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Krcova, Vera [Department of Hematooncology, University Hospital, I.P. Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Cerna, Marie [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P. Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Prochazka, Martin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, I.P. Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2009-04-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the retrievable Guenther Tulip Vena Cava Filter in the prevention of pulmonary embolism in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis in the perinatal period and to discuss the technical demands associated with the filter's implantation and retrieval. Methods: Between 1996 until 2007, eight women (mean age 27.4 years, range 20-42 years) with acute deep iliofemoral venous thrombosis in the perinatal period of pregnancy and increased risk of pulmonary embolism during delivery were indicated for retrievable Guenther Tulip Vena Cava Filter implantation. All filters were inserted and removed under local anesthesia from the jugular approach. Results: The Guenther Tulip Vena Cava Filter was implanted suprarenally in all patients on the day of caesarean delivery. In follow-up cavograms performed just before planned filter removal, no embolus was seen in the filter in any patient. In all patients the filter was retrieved without complications on the 12th day after implantation. Conclusions: Retrievable Guenther Tulip Vena Cava Filters can be inserted and removed in patients during the perinatal period without major complications.

  12. Pulmonary Cement Embolism following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimal invasive procedure that is applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. During vertebroplasty, the leakage of bone cement outside the vertebral body leads to pulmonary cement embolism, which is a serious complication of this procedure. Here we report a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea after percutaneous vertebroplasty and diagnosed as pulmonary cement embolism.

  13. USE OF RHEOLYTIC THROMBECTOMY IN MASSIVE PULMONARY EMBOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Kokov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We report the use of rheolytic thombectomy in two patients with severe pulmonary embolism. In first case RT was performed as the second step in treatment of pulmonary embolism after systemic thrombolytic therapy. In second case systemic thrombolytic therapy was not performed because of extremely high risk of duodenal ulcer bleeding. Hemolysis and acute kidney injure with requirement of plasmapheresis and continuous venovenous hemofiltration was required in patient who received big volume of thrombectomy (500 ml. Rheolytic thrombectomy resulted in good angiographic and clinical effect in both patients.

  14. Use of clinical prediction rules and D-dimer tests in the diagnostic management of pregnant patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Pol, L M; Mairuhu, A T A; Tromeur, C; Couturaud, F; Huisman, M V; Klok, F A

    2017-03-01

    Because pregnant women have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and at the same time normal pregnancy is associated with symptoms, mimicking those present in the setting of acute pulmonary embolism (PE), the latter diagnosis is frequently suspected in this patient category. Since imaging tests expose both mother and foetus to ionizing radiation, the ability to rule out PE based on non-radiological diagnostic tests is of paramount importance. However, clinical decision rules have only been scarcely evaluated in the pregnant population with suspected PE, while D-dimer levels lose diagnostic accuracy due to a physiological increase during normal pregnancy. Consequently, clinical guidelines provide contradicting and weak recommendations on this subject and the optimal diagnostic strategy remains highly debated. With this systematic review, we aimed to summarize current evidence on the safety and efficacy of clinical decision rules and biomarkers used in the diagnostic management of suspected acute PE in pregnant patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging of acute pulmonary embolism using multi-detector CT angiography: An update on imaging technique and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Ieneke J.C. [Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Centre, ' s-Gravendijkwal 230, NL-3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: i.hartmann@erasmusmc.nl; Wittenberg, Rianne [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Meander Medical Centre, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the pulmonary arteries has become the main diagnostic test for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism (PE). Not only due to the good availability, low cost and minimal invasiveness of this technique, but mainly because of the introduction of multi-detector CT techniques resulting in significant improvement in resolution, speed and image quality. This continuous gain in image acquisition speed went along with the introduction of new techniques of image acquisition, such as the dual-source CT scanning and novel concepts of image interpretation beyond morphological findings including the definition of the resulting perfusion defects and assessment of the cardiopulmonary circulation as a functional unit. This article will focus on technical and practical aspects to optimize CTPA examinations with modern multi-detector CT scanners, discusses aspects to be considered in specific patient groups (e.g., during pregnancy, young patients) and outlines new advents such as dual-source lung perfusion and automatic detection of pulmonary emboli.

  16. [Percutaneous rheolytic thrombectomy in the treatment of high-risk acute pulmonary embolism: Initial experience of a single center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Rita; Oliveira, Márcia; Ponte, Marta; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Sousa, Marta; Fernandes, Paula; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, Pedro; Gonçalves, Manuel; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    For years, the treatment of high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) was based on two well-defined strategies: thrombolysis, whose benefits have been documented in randomized trials, and surgical embolectomy. However, mechanical reperfusion by percutaneous techniques is used in an increasing number of patients, and is a valid therapeutic option when there is a formal contraindication to thrombolysis, as rescue therapy when thrombolysis fails to improve hemodynamics, and/or when emergency surgical thrombectomy is unavailable or contraindicated. This article discusses the indications for the use of percutaneous techniques in PE, reports the initial experience of our center with the AngioJet® thrombectomy device (Possis Medical Inc, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and reviews the available evidence, the most recent recommendations and the main complications associated with this procedure. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Enoxaparin followed by once-weekly idrabiotaparinux versus enoxaparin plus warfarin for patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism: a randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, non-inferiority trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büller, Harry R.; Gallus, Alex S.; Pillion, Gerard; Prins, Martin H.; Raskob, Gary E.; Raskob, Gary; Decousus, Hervé; Charbonnier, Bernard; Leizorovicz, Alain; Laporte, Silvy; Quenet, Sara; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Blüguermann, J.; Amuchastegui, L.; Ahuad Guerrero, R.; Oberti, P.; Alvarez, C.; Cassettari, A.; Santos, D.; Macin, S.; Santini, F.; Ward, C.; Coughlin, P.; Salem, H.; Gan, E.; Leyden, M.; Prosser, I.; Crispin, P.; Carroll, P.; Gallus, A.; McRae, S.; Waites, J.; Pilger, E.; Koppensteiner, R.; Kyrle, P.; Schinko, H.; Mrochek, A.; Mitkovskaya, N.; Prystrom, A.; Motte, S.; Ninane, V.; Delcroix, M.; Hainaut, P.; Schneider, E.; Saraiva, J.; Maia, L.; Barreto, S.; Fernandes Manenti, E.; Araujo, G.; Dutra, O.; Fiss, E.; Moreira, R.; Yankov, K.; Nenkova, S.; Ivanov, Y.; Kostov, V.; Bhargava, R.; Chan, Y.; Miron, M. J.; Cusson, J.; Ugarte, S.; Morales, A.; Andresen, M.; Lanas, F.; Arriagada, G.; Mendoza, J. J.; Zuñiga, C.; Sepulveda, P.; Wang, C.; Liu, Z.; Yuan, Y.; Ma, Z.; Fang, B.; Liu, J.; Bai, C.; Wu, H.; Yang, L.; Ying, K.; Kang, J.; Li, Q.; Cheng, Z.; Zhang, J.; Wang, H.; Xie, C.; Xia, G.; Du, Y.; Wu, Q.; Zhou, X.; Chen, L.; Yi, Q.; Wu, C.; Hao, Q.; Liu, S.; Xiong, S.; Jiang, S.; Zhao, L.; Xiao, Q.; Qin, Z.; Zhou, J.; Dennis, R.; Miserque, N.; Igueredo, M.; Londoño, D.; Hildebrando, J.; Granados, M.; Buitrago, R.; Solano, M. H.; Pacheco Alvis, P. M.; Botero, R.; Saenz, O.; Bergovec, M.; Padovan, M.; Vucic, N.; Samarzija, M.; Chlumsky, J.; Spacek, R.; Klimsa, Z.; Gregor, P.; Povolny, J.; Podpera, I.; Holm, F.; Lang, P.; Matoska, P.; Sabl, P.; Spinar, J.; Spac, J.; Husted, S.; Avnstrom, S.; Rasmussen, S.; Christensen, A.; Guindy, R.; Hassanein, M.; Paumets, M.; Meriste, S.; Ferrari, E.; Achkar, A.; Azarian, R.; Meneveau, N.; Lorut, C.; Mouallem, J.; Crestani, B.; Proton, A.; Salmeron, S.; Lerousseau, L.; Mottier, D.; Wahl, D.; Siafakas, N.; Papadimitriou, D.; Katis, K.; Katsaris, G.; Gaga, A.; Damianos, A.; Tipparaju, S.; Kalkunte, S.; Vidhut, J.; Kalashetti, S.; Mehta, P.; Talwar, D.; Ramanathan, R.; Mishra, R.; Zeltzer, D.; Lahav, M.; Brenner, B.; Caraco, Y.; Elias, M.; Piovella, F.; Barone, M.; Poggio, R.; Palla, A.; Ghirarduzzi, A.; Pini, M.; Lodigiani, C.; Prandoni, P.; Agnelli, G.; Imberti, D.; Scannapieco, G.; Salvi, A.; Bautista, E.; Diaz, J.; Mercado, R.; Ranero, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Jerjes, C.; Villeda-Espinoza, E.; van der Meer, J.; Ijfering, W.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.; Boersma, W.; van Leendert, R.; Kroon, C.; Dullemond-Westland, A.; Viergever, P.; Kuipers, A.; Grootenboers, M.; Creemers, J.; Pieters, W.; de Munck, D.; Timmer, H.; Jackson, S.; Sandset, P.; Meyer, P.; Kristiansen, T.; Portugal, J.; Paz, E.; Salazar, D.; Chavez, W.; Castillo, L.; de Guia, T.; Lenora, Fernandez; Tomkowski, W.; Kloczko, J.; Rybak, Z.; Gaciong, Z.; Sobkowicz, B.; Pruszczyk, P.; Nizankowski, R.; Mirek-Bryniarska, E.; Kukla, P.; Reis, A.; França, A.; Cortez, M.; Sa, J.; Santos, F.; Marques, M. A.; Gordeev, I.; Gendlin, G.; Yablonsky, P.; Sokurenko, G.; Soroka, V.; Lusov, V.; Markov, V.; Shvats, Y.; Katerlnitskiy, I.; Lapin, O.; Lyamina, N.; Subbotin, Y.; Kim, I.; Zilber, E.; Kchaisheva, L.; Poliacik, P.; Macek, V.; Pretorius, J. P.; Abdullah, I.; Basson, M.; Bollinger, C.; Breedt, J.; Gani, M.; Jansen, J.; Le Roux, G.; Nortje, H.; van der Linder, M.; van Zyl, L.; Viljoen, J.; Bruning, A.; Pujol Farriols, R.; Raguer, E.; Nuffal, D.; Sanchez Rodriguez, A.; Eriksson, H.; Almgren, T.; Carlsson, A.; Elf, J.; Olsson, C. G.; Aagesen, J.; Savas, I.; Sahin, A.; Erdogan, Y.; Ozhan, M.; Ongen, G.; Celikel, T.; Turker, H.; Arseven, O.; Tuncay, E.; Ozacar, R.; Gudz, I.; Nykonenko, O.; Skupyy, O.; Kovalskyy, I.; Prasol, V.; Cohen, A.; Rodriguez-Cintron, W.; Gurka, D.; Bradley, J.; Oliver, G.; Spyropoulos, A.; Lerner, R.; Fulmer, J.; Lu, N. P.; Wright, P.; Han, D.; Servi, R.; Nadar, V.; Quaranta, A.; Gehring, J.; Ginsberg, R.; Jacobson, A.; Colan, D.; Vanway, C.; Gurza, E.; Braslow, B.; Shorr, A.; Rehm, J.; Martin, J.; Sellers, M.; Concha, M.; Gordon, I.; Pullman, J.; Moran, J.; Welker, J.; Panzarella, P.; Mullins, M.; Willms, D.; McGrew, F.; Turki, M.; Menajovsky, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of pulmonary embolism with low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, is not ideal. We aimed to assess non-inferiority of idrabiotaparinux, a reversible longlasting indirect inhibitor of activated factor X, to warfarin in patients with acute

  18. Advanced Cardiopulmonary Support for Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Oren; Horowitz, James M; Ramzy, Danny

    2017-09-01

    Management of high-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of PE, options for rapid clot reduction, critical care interventions, and advanced cardiopulmonary support. PE can lead to rapid respiratory and hemodynamic collapse via a complex sequence of events leading to acute right ventricular failure. Importantly, reduction in pulmonary vascular resistance must be accomplished either by systemic thrombolytics, catheter directed thrombolytics, endovascular clot extraction, or surgical embolectomy. There are important advances in these techniques all of which have a niche role in the cardiopulmonary stabilization of critically ill patient with PE. Critical care support surrounding the above interventions is necessary. Maintenance of systemic perfusion and cardiac output may require careful titration of vasopressors, inotropes, and preload. Extreme caution should be taken with approach to intubation and positive pressure ventilation. A hemodynamically neutral induction with preparations for circulatory collapse should be the goal. Once intubated, the effect of positive pressure on pulmonary vascular resistance and right ventricular hemodynamics is necessary. Veno-arterial extra corporeal membrane oxygenation plays an increasingly important role in the stabilization of the hemodynamically collapsed patient who either has a contraindication to systemic lytics, failed systemic lytics, or requires a bridge to surgical or catheter embolectomy. Veno-arterial extra corporeal membrane oxygenation has also been used alone to stabilize the circulation until hemodynamics normalize on anticoagulation and has also been used in tenuous patient as a safety net for endovascular procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SPECT/CT and pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Jann [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Faroese National Hospital, Department of Medicine, Torshavn (Faroe Islands); Gutte, Henrik [Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Cluster for Molecular Imaging, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-05-15

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is diagnosed either by ventilation/perfusion (V/P) scintigraphy or pulmonary CT angiography (CTPA). In recent years both techniques have improved. Many nuclear medicine centres have adopted the single photon emission CT (SPECT) technique as opposed to the planar technique for diagnosing PE. SPECT has been shown to have fewer indeterminate results and a higher diagnostic value. The latest improvement is the combination of a low-dose CT scan with a V/P SPECT scan in a hybrid tomograph. In a study comparing CTPA, planar scintigraphy and SPECT alone, SPECT/CT had the best diagnostic accuracy for PE. In addition, recent developments in the CTPA technique have made it possible to image the pulmonary arteries of the lungs in one breath-hold. This development is based on the change from a single-detector to multidetector CT technology with an increase in volume coverage per rotation and faster rotation. Furthermore, the dual energy CT technique is a promising modality that can provide functional imaging in combination with anatomical information. Newer high-end CT scanners and SPECT systems are able to visualize smaller subsegmental emboli. However, consensus is lacking regarding the clinical impact and treatment. In the present review, SPECT and SPECT in combination with low-dose CT, CTPA and dual energy CT are discussed in the context of diagnosing PE. (orig.)

  20. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole H. Goldhaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis.

  1. Can multislice CT alone rule out reliably pulmonary embolism? A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilabert, Jose Pamies [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital Universitario La Fe (Spain)]. E-mail: pamies_jos@gva.es; Manzur, Dolores Nauffal [Department of Pneumology, Hospital Universitario La Fe (Spain); Tarrasa, Maria J. Torres [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitario La Fe (Spain); Llorens, Maximiliano Lloret [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital Universitario La Fe (Spain); Braun, Petra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital La Plana of Vila-real (Spain); Arques, Maria P. Bello [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Universitario La Fe (Spain)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of withholding anticoagulation in patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism after negative multislice computed tomography (MSCT) pulmonary angiography and lower-limb venography. Materials and methods: A total of 383 consecutive patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism were prospectively studied. Patients underwent MSCT pulmonary angiography and lower-limb venography, as well as pulmonary scintigraphy and lower-limb ultrasound examination. Patients with negative MSCT results for both pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis were not administered anticoagulants and were followed up for 6 months to rule out thromboembolism. Results: At MSCT, 156 patients were positive for pulmonary embolism, venous thrombosis, or both; 224 were negative; and findings were inconclusive in three. False-negatives were five patients with high probability scintigram and two with venous thrombosis detected at US. A total of 184 patients with negative MSCT and without anticoagulation were followed up for 6 months. During this period of time just one recurrence of pulmonary embolism was detected. The negative predictive value of MSCT pulmonary angiography plus lower-limb venography was 95.8% (183/191). Conclusion: MSCT is efficacious in diagnosing pulmonary embolism, with negative predictive values reported in the literature ranging from 94% to 100%. This enables omission of anticoagulation in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism after negative MSCT findings without the need for other diagnostic tests.

  2. Pulmonary Embolism with Vertebral Augmentation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Bopparaju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the prevalence of an aging American population on the rise, osteoporotic vertebral fractures are becoming a common occurrence, resulting in an increase in vertebral augmentation procedures and associated complications such as cement leakage, vertebral compressions, and pulmonary embolism. We describe a patient who presented with respiratory distress three years following kyphoplasty of the lumbar vertebra. Computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest confirmed the presence of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA cement in the lung fields and pulmonary vessels. We conducted a systematic review of the published literature identifying effective management strategies for the treatment of vertebroplasty-associated pulmonary embolism.

  3. Dermatomyositis masquerading as pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mroz RM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 61-year-old Caucasian was admitted to Department of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis, Medical University of Bialystok, Poland for progressive muscle weakness and weight loss. Eighteen months prior to admission, the patient had been diagnosed with pulmonary embolism. At that point he was started on Enoxaparin QD. Past medical history was unremarkable. In the interim, the patient developed fever, myalgia and progressive dyspnea. Physical examination on admission revealed a rash on his upper torso and back, and the extensor surfaces of all four extremities. Laboratory values included CPK 8229, MB fraction 219, LDH 981. Chest X-ray and CT scan revealed bilateral patchy consolidations and ground-glass opacities. EMG was consistent with myositis. The patient was started on solumedrol 40 mg i.v., b.i.d., and then switched to prednisone 40 mg b.i.d. His symptoms and muscle strength improved remarkably. The patient was discharged with prednisone with an outpatient follow up.

  4. N-terminal Pro-B type natriuretic peptide as long-term predictor of death after an acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Martínez, José Luis; Annicchérico-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Urbieta-Echezarreta, Miren Aránzazu; Pérez-Ricarte, Sara

    2015-03-15

    After an acute pulmonary embolism few long-term prognostic factors have shown to be of practical use. We hypothesized that, as in heart failure, natriuretic peptides could serve as biomarkers of a late deleterious prognosis. Consecutive patients admitted to an Internal Medicine ward diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism were traced through the computerized system of clinical episodes of Navarra Health System and by telephone calls. On hospitalization, standard evaluation was made, previous history of cancer and cardiac disease was recorded, and N-terminal ProB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), D-dimer and Troponin I were measured. In the analysis all-causes death was considered. Two hundred and thirty-four patients were traced, median age 75 [interquartile range (IQR) 16] years old, women 51%. At a median time of 9.5 (IQR 29) months 52 (22%) patients had died, 38 (73%) dead patients had NT-ProBNP higher than 850 ng/L. NT-ProBNP in dead patients was 2.741 (IQR 7.420)ng/L and 662 (IQR 2.517)ng/L in survivors (p<0.001). Age (OR 4.37 CI 95% 1.04-1.16) and NT-ProBNP (OR 1.49 CI 95% 1-1.002) showed to be independent factors of mortality. Between the 3rd and 20th month after the diagnosis, a level of NT-ProBNP higher than 850 ng/L (sensitivity 0.86, specificity 0.45 and negative predictive value 0.92) was associated with a lower survival (p=0.019), hazard ratio 1.89, OR 7.67 (CI 95% 1.52-39.44) for this period. Besides the unchangeable age, plasma level of NT-ProBNP measured on acute pulmonary embolism could predict longer-term all-cause death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute pulmonary embolism after arthroscopic glenoid labral repair and subacromial decompression: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnatovsky, Michelle; Dai, Amos Z; Zacchilli, Michael; Jazrawi, Laith M

    2018-02-01

    This report describes the case of a 29 year-old female with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and on combined oral contraceptives who presents with an acute, CT confirmed pulmonary embolus of the right lower lobe, one week following arthroscopic labral repair of the right shoulder. This patient's relevant risk factors including obesity, oral contraceptive use, PCOS, and surgical positioning are discussed. Literature surrounding venous thromboembolism (VTE) following shoulder arthroscopy is also reviewed.

  6. [Pulmonary Embolism in Portugal: Epidemiology and In-Hospital Mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Miguel; Pinheiro, Luís; Costa, João; Borges, Margarida

    2016-08-01

    In Portugal, the epidemiology of acute pulmonary embolism is poorly understood. In this study, we sought to characterize the pulmonary embolism from the hospital data and evaluate its in-hospital mortality and respective prognostic factors. The study used diagnostic related groups data from National Health System hospitals from 2003 to 2013 and National Statistics Institute population data to establish the evolution of admissions with the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, their inhospital mortality rates and the population incidence rates. Diagnosis-related group microdata were used in a logit regression modeling in-hospital mortality as a function of individual characteristics and context variables. Between 2003 and 2013 there were 35,200 episodes of hospitalization in patients with 18 or more years in which one of the diagnoses was pulmonary embolism (primary diagnosis in 67% of cases). The estimated incidence rate in 2013 was 35/100,000 population (≥ 18 years). Between 2003 and 2013, the annual number of episodes kept increasing, but the in-hospital mortality rate decreased (from 31.8% to 17% for all cases and from 25% to 11.2% when pulmonary embolism was the main diagnosis). The probability of death decreases when there is a computerized tomography scan registry or when patients are females and increases with age and the presence of co-morbidities. In the last decade there was an increased incidence of pulmonary embolism likely related to an increased number of dependents and bedridden. However, there was a in-hospital mortality reduction of such size that the actual mortality in the general population was reduced. One possible explanation is that there has been an increase in episodes of pulmonary embolism with incrementally lower levels of severity, due to the greater capacity of diagnosis of less severe cases. Another possible explanation is greater effectiveness of hospital care. According to the logistic regression analysis, improvements in hospital care

  7. The clinical course of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, E. J.; Kuijer, P. M.; Büller, H. R.; Brandjes, D. P.; Bossuyt, P. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The outcome of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism is known to a limited extent only. OBJECTIVE: To address this limited knowledge in a cohort in whom pulmonary embolism was proved or ruled out. METHODS: Consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism underwent

  8. Prognostic importance of quantitative echocardiographic evaluation in patients suspected of first non-massive pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Schaadt, Bente Krogsgaard; Lund, Jens Otto

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Patients suspected of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) frequently undergo echocardiography as a part of the initial work-up. Prognostic implication of routine echocardiography in patients suspected of PE remain to be established. METHODS AND RESULTS: Transthoracic echocardiography, including...

  9. Successful Surgical Treatment of Massive Pulmonary Embolism after Coronary Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Akay, Tankut Hakki; Sezgin, Atilla; Ozkan, Suleyman; Gultekin, Bahadir; Aslim, Erdal; Aslamaci, Sait

    2006-01-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism after cardiac surgery is very rare. Although accurate diagnosis and rapid treatment are crucial to a successful outcome, there is no standard treatment option. Thrombolytic therapy and catheter embolectomy are the usual treatment options, but they are associated with risks, especially in patients who experience massive pulmonary embolism after coronary artery bypass surgery. Open pulmonary embolectomy may be the best choice for treating these patients. This re...

  10. Embolized prostatic brachytherapy seeds mimicking acute chest pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Guragai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old male with a history of nonobstructive coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and prostate cancer presented to the hospital with 1-day history of pleuritic chest pain. Initial workup for acute coronary event was unremarkable. Chest X-ray revealed multiple small radial densities which were linear and hyperdense, consistent with embolization of metallic seeds to the pulmonary circulation. The patient was noted to have had radioactive metallic seeds implanted for prostate cancer 6 months ago. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolization of prostatic seeds is challenging as they frequently present with chest pain mimicking acute coronary syndromes.

  11. Early, real-world experience with direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of intermediate-high risk acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sónia Martins; Cunha, Susana; Baptista, Rui; Monteiro, Sílvia; Monteiro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco; Pêgo, Mariano

    2017-11-01

    Intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (IHR-PE) has a poor prognosis, but is under-represented in trials of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). We aimed to assess whether the administration of DOACs was equivalent to the conventional (CONV) treatment of low-molecular weight heparin bridged with warfarin for treating IHR-PE. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including 59 consecutive patients admitted with IHR-PE and followed for up to three months after discharge. Two groups were created based on the anticoagulant strategy: CONV (n=35) and DOAC (n=24). The efficacy endpoints were death, recurrent PE, estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), right ventricular systolic function (RVSF) at discharge, and length of stay; the safety endpoint was major bleeding. The two groups were similar regarding demographics, PE etiology and markers of clinical severity. There were four in-hospital deaths in the CONV group and none in the DOAC group. No recurrent PE or major bleeding event was recorded in either group. At discharge, neither PASP nor RVSF was different between the groups. Patients in the DOAC group were discharged 1.7 days earlier on average than patients in the CONV group (4.7±2.4 vs. 3.0±1.5 days, p=0.002). The adoption of a DOAC treatment strategy in this real-world cohort of IHR-PE patients was associated with similar efficacy and safety to the CONV approach. The fact that monitoring of anticoagulation effect was unnecessary probably led to the significant reduction in length of stay. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Computed tomography for the detection of free-floating thrombi in the right heart in acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansencal, Nicolas [Universite de Versailles-Saint Quentin (UVSQ), Ambroise Pare Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Centre de Reference des Maladies Cardiaques Hereditaires, Department of Cardiology, Boulogne (France); AP-HP, Hopital Universitaire Ambroise Pare, Service de Cardiologie et des Maladies Vasculaires, Centre de Reference des Maladies Cardiaques Hereditaires, Boulogne (France); Attias, David; Guiader, Julie; Abi Nasr, Imad; Dubourg, Olivier [Universite de Versailles-Saint Quentin (UVSQ), Ambroise Pare Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Centre de Reference des Maladies Cardiaques Hereditaires, Department of Cardiology, Boulogne (France); Caille, Vincent; Jardin, Francois; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine [Universite de Versailles-Saint Quentin (UVSQ), Ambroise Pare Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Intensive Care Unit, Boulogne (France); Desperramons, Julien; El Hajjam, Mostafa; Lacombe, Pascal [Universite de Versailles-Saint Quentin (UVSQ), Ambroise Pare Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Department of Radiology, Boulogne (France)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of free-floating thrombi in the right heart (FFT) and the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for their detection in pulmonary embolism (PE). We studied 340 consecutive patients presenting with PE. All patients underwent CT and echocardiography. The prevalence of FFT was 3.5% in the global population of PE and 22% in high-risk PE. Dyspnoea, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest and tachycardia were more frequently found in patients with FFT (p = 0.04, p < 0.0001, p = 0.0003 and p = 0.01, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity of CT for the detection of FFT were 100% (95% confidence interval: 74%-100%) and 97% (95%-99%), whereas positive and negative predictive values were 57% (34%-78%) and 100% (99%-100%). Among patients with FFT, right ventricular dilation was always detected by CT, whereas no right ventricular dilation was found among patients with a false diagnosis of FFT performed by CT (p < 0.0001). Prevalence of FFT is 3.5% and differs according to the clinical presentation. Detection of FFT by CT is feasible and should lead to echocardiography being promptly performed for the confirmation of FFT. (orig.)

  13. Guidelines on the diagnosis and management of acute pulmonary embolism: the Task Force for the Diagnosis and Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torbicki, Adam; Perrier, Arnaud; Konstantinides, Stavros; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Galiè, Nazzareno; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Bengel, Frank; Brady, Adrian J. B.; Ferreira, Daniel; Janssens, Uwe; Klepetko, Walter; Mayer, Eckhard; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Bassand, Jean-Pierre; Vahanian, Alec; Camm, John; de Caterina, Raffaele; Dean, Veronica; Dickstein, Kenneth; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Funck-Brentano, Christian; Hellemans, Irene; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; McGregor, Keith; Sechtem, Udo; Silber, Sigmund; Tendera, Michal; Widimsky, Petr; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Andreotti, Felicita; Ascherman, Michael; Athanassopoulos, George; de Sutter, Johan; Fitzmaurice, David; Forster, Tamas; Heras, Magda; Jondeau, Guillaume; Kjeldsen, Keld; Knuuti, Juhani; Lang, Irene; Lenzen, Mattie; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Perez Isla, Leopoldo; Schwehr, Udo; Torraca, Lucia; Vachiery, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Non-thrombotic PE does not represent a distinct clinical syndrome. It may be due to a variety of embolic materials and result in a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, making the diagnosis difficult. With the exception of severe air and fat embolism, the haemodynamic consequences of

  14. Pediatric Pulmonary Embolism: Diagnostic and Management Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, Christian; Chauhan, Aman; Turner, Jason P; Carson, Thomas H; Velez, Maria C; Arcement, Christopher; Caspi, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    A rare case of massive pulmonary embolism is presented in an oligosymptomatic teenager with predisposing factors. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography supported by three-dimensional reconstruction was diagnostic. The embolus qualified as massive by conventional anatomical guidelines, but as low risk by more recent functional criteria. Functional assessment has complemented morphologic assessment for risk stratification in adult patients. Such evidence is scarce in pediatrics. The patient underwent surgical embolectomy, followed by prophylactic anticoagulation, without further events. Diagnostic and management challenges are discussed.

  15. The contribution of different postprocessing methods for multislice spiral CT in acute pulmonary embolism; Stellenwert unterschiedlicher Nachverarbeitungsverfahren in der Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT der akuten Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K.; Funke, M.; Obenauer, S.; Baum, F.; Grabbe, E. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Georg August Univ., Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of different postprocessing algorithms for multislice spiral CT (MSCT) in diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with suspected pulmonary embolism prospectively underwent MSCT using an 8-slice spiral CT. Using a confidence level on a three-point scale, three radiologists reviewed 2-mm and 5-mm axial slices, 5-mm and 10-mm axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) and 2-mm coronal slices as well as interactively generated multiplanar reformatted images. A subsequent consensus reading of the primary 1.25-mm axial slices served as gold standard. ROC analysis was applied to the various vascular sections. Results: The ROC analysis revealed a higher diagnostic accuracy of the 2-mm axial sections as compared to the 5-mm axial slices (Az = [0.988;0.976] vs. Az = [0.988;0.802]). Coronal and multiplanar reformations also showed excellent diagnostic accuracy (Az = [0.972;0.949] and Az = [0.997;0.951], respectively) and were significantly superior to the 5-mm axial slices through the segmental and subsegmental arteries (p=0.05). MIP showed the weakest diagnostic accuracy (Az = [0.967;0.802] for 5-mm MIP; Az = [0.879;0.781] for 10-mm MIP). Conclusion: Thin axial slices as well as coronal and multiplanar reformations are superior to thick axial slices in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. MIP is not suited for accurate diagnosis of pulmonary embolic disease. (orig.) [German] Einleitung: Es wurde der Wert verschiedener Nachverarbeitungsverfahren fuer die Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT der akuten Lungenembolie untersucht. Methode: 48 Patienten mit Verdacht auf eine akute Lungenembolie erhielten eine CT-Angiographie der Pulmonalarterien mit einem 8-Zeilen-Spiral-CT. Es wurden 2 mm und 5 mm dicke axiale Schichten, 5 mm und 10 mm dicke axiale Maximum-Intensitaets-Projektionen (MIP), 2 mm dicke koronare Schichten sowie multiplanare Reformationen erstellt und von drei Auswertern anhand einer dreistufigen

  16. Benefit of combining quantitative cardiac CT parameters with troponin I for predicting right ventricular dysfunction and adverse clinical events in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Roeger, Susanne, E-mail: susanne.roeger@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Haghi, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.haghi@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Kaminski, Wolfgang E., E-mail: wolfgang.kaminski@umm.de [Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Neumaier, Michael, E-mail: michael.neumaier@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: Stefan.Schoenberg@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of quantitative cardiac CT parameters alone and in combination with troponin I for the assessment of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) and adverse clinical events in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Materials and results: This prospective study had institutional review board approval and was HIPAA compliant. In total 83 patients with confirmed PE underwent echocardiography and troponin I serum level measurements within 24 h. Three established cardiac CT measurements for the assessment of RVD were obtained (RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4-CH}, and RV/LV{sub volume}). CT measurements and troponin I serum levels were correlated with RVD found on echocardiography and adverse clinical events according to Management Strategies and Prognosis in Pulmonary Embolism Trial-3 (MAPPET-3 criteria. 31 of 83 patients with PE had RVD on echocardiography and 39 of 83 patients had adverse clinical events. A RV/LV{sub volume} ratio > 1.43 showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) (0.65) for the prediction of adverse clinical events when compared to RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4Ch} and troponin I. The AUC for the detection of RVD of RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4Ch}, RV/LV{sub volume}, and troponin I were 0.86, 0.86, 0.92, and 0.69, respectively. Combination of RV/LV{sub axial}, RV/LV{sub 4Ch}, RV/LV{sub volume} with troponin I increased the AUC to 0.87, 0.87 and 0.93, respectively. Conclusion: A combination of cardiac CT parameters and troponin I measurements improves the diagnostic accuracy for detecting RVD and predicting adverse clinical events if compared to either test alone.

  17. A strategy combining imaging and laboratory biomarkers in comparison with a simplified clinical score for risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankeit, Mareike; Gómez, Vicente; Wagner, Carolin; Aujesky, Drahomir; Recio, Mónica; Briongos, Sem; Moores, Col Lisa K; Yusen, Roger D; Konstantinides, Stavros; Jiménez, David

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the performance of two prognostic models-the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) model and the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI)-in predicting short-term mortality in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). We compared the test characteristics of the ESC model and the sPESI for predicting 30-day outcomes in a cohort of 526 patients with objectively confirmed PE. The primary end point of the study was all-cause mortality. The secondary end point included all-cause mortality, nonfatal symptomatic recurrent VTE, or nonfatal major bleeding. Overall, 40 of 526 patients died (7.6%; 95% CI, 5.3%-9.9%) during the first month of follow-up. The sPESI classified fewer patients as low risk (31% [165 of 526], 95% CI, 27%-35%) compared with the ESC model (39% [207 of 526], 95% CI, 35% to 44%; P < .01). Importantly however, low-risk patients based on the sPESI had no 30-day mortality compared with 3.4% (95% CI, 0.9-5.8) in low-risk patients by the ESC model. The secondary end point occurred in 1.8% of patients in the sPESI low-risk and 5.8% in the ESC low-risk group (difference, 4.0 percentage points; 95% CI, 0.2-7.8). The prognostic ability of the ESC model remained significant in the subgroup of patients at high-risk according to the sPESI model (OR 1.95, 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.71, P < .001). Both the sPESI and the ESC model successfully predict 30-day mortality after acute symptomatic PE, but exclusion of an adverse early outcome does not appear to require routine imaging procedures or laboratory biomarker testing.

  18. Neural hypernetwork approach for pulmonary embolism diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucco, Matteo; Sousa-Rodrigues, David; Merelli, Emanuela; Johnson, Jeffrey H; Falsetti, Lorenzo; Nitti, Cinzia; Salvi, Aldo

    2015-10-29

    Hypernetworks are based on topological simplicial complexes and generalize the concept of two-body relation to many-body relation. Furthermore, Hypernetworks provide a significant generalization of network theory, enabling the integration of relational structure, logic and analytic dynamics. A pulmonary embolism is a blockage of the main artery of the lung or one of its branches, frequently fatal. Our study uses data on 28 diagnostic features of 1427 people considered to be at risk of pulmonary embolism enrolled in the Department of Internal and Subintensive Medicine of an Italian National Hospital "Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona". Patients arrived in the department after a first screening executed by the emergency room. The resulting neural hypernetwork correctly recognized 94% of those developing pulmonary embolism. This is better than previous results obtained with other methods (statistical selection of features, partial least squares regression, topological data analysis in a metric space). In this work we successfully derived a new integrative approach for the analysis of partial and incomplete datasets that is based on Q-analysis with machine learning. The new approach, called Neural Hypernetwork, has been applied to a case study of pulmonary embolism diagnosis. The novelty of this method is that it does not use clinical parameters extracted by imaging analysis.

  19. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nisio, Marcello; van Es, Nick; Büller, Harry R

    2016-12-17

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism, constitute a major global burden of disease. The diagnostic work-up of suspected deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism includes the sequential application of a clinical decision rule and D-dimer testing. Imaging and anticoagulation can be safely withheld in patients who are unlikely to have venous thromboembolism and have a normal D-dimer. All other patients should undergo ultrasonography in case of suspected deep vein thrombosis and CT in case of suspected pulmonary embolism. Direct oral anticoagulants are first-line treatment options for venous thromboembolism because they are associated with a lower risk of bleeding than vitamin K antagonists and are easier to use. Use of thrombolysis should be limited to pulmonary embolism associated with haemodynamic instability. Anticoagulant treatment should be continued for at least 3 months to prevent early recurrences. When venous thromboembolism is unprovoked or secondary to persistent risk factors, extended treatment beyond this period should be considered when the risk of recurrence outweighs the risk of major bleeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. When a pulmonary embolism is not a pulmonary embolism: a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargiz Muganlinskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arterial leiomyosarcomas account for up to 21% of vascular leiomyosarcomas, with 56% of arterial leiomyosarcomas occurring in the pulmonary artery. While isolated cases of primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma document survival up to 36 months after treatment, these uncommon, aggressive tumors are highly lethal, with 1-year survival estimated at 20% from the onset of symptoms. We discuss a rare case of a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma that was originally diagnosed as a pulmonary embolism (PE. A 72-year-old Caucasian female was initially diagnosed with ‘saddle pulmonary embolism’ based on computerized tomographic angiography of the chest 2 months prior to admission and placed on anticoagulation. Dyspnea escalated, and serial computed tomography scans showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary emboli involving the right and left main pulmonary arteries with extension into the right and left upper and lower lobe branches. An echocardiogram on admission showed severe pulmonary hypertension with a pulmonary artery pressure of 82.9 mm Hg, and a severely enlarged right ventricle. Respiratory distress and multiorgan failure developed and, unfortunately, the patient expired. Autopsy showed a lobulated, yellow mass throughout the main pulmonary arteries measuring 13 cm in diameter. The mass extended into the parenchyma of the right upper lobe. On microscopy, the mass was consistent with a high-grade primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Median survival of patients with primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma without surgery is one and a half months, and mortality is usually due to right-sided heart failure. Pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma is a rare but highly lethal disease commonly mistaken for PE. Thus, we recommend clinicians to suspect this malignancy when anticoagulation fails to relieve initial symptoms. In conclusion, early detection and suspicion of pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma should be considered in patients refractory to anticoagulation

  1. Mortality from pulmonary embolism is decreasing in hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcke, Douglas; Harryman, Ondina; Benbow, Emyr W; Hay, Charles; Chalmers, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary embolism is believed to be a common cause of death of hospital inpatients. The aims of this study were to estimate the number of deaths caused by pulmonary embolism and the potential to reduce this by the use of caval filters according to accepted indications. Design Review of autopsy reports and death notification records from 2007 and 2008. When pulmonary embolism was given as cause of death (in the autopsy report or in section 1 a-c or part 2 of the Medical Certificate of the Cause of Death), hospital records were reviewed for evidence of pre-mortem diagnosis of pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and for evidence of accepted indications for caval filter placement. Setting Large UK teaching hospital. Participants Hospital inpatients whose deaths were attributed to pulmonary embolism. Main outcome measures Proportion of deaths adjudged at autopsy to be due to pulmonary embolism; evidence of pre-mortem diagnosis of DVT or pulmonary embolism; total number of hospital admission and deaths. Results From a total of 186,517 adult inpatient admissions there were 2583 (1.4%) adult inpatient deaths of which 696 (27%) underwent autopsy. Of those undergoing autopsy, 14 (2.0%, 95% CI 1.2–3.3%) deaths were caused by pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolism was recorded as a cause of death in a further 12 (0.7%) of 1773 patients who did not undergo autopsy. Of these, five had a pre-mortem diagnosis of DVT or pulmonary embolism. Conclusions The proportion of deaths caused by pulmonary embolism appears to be considerably lower than the widely published rate, and of this small number, few have a pre-mortem diagnosis of DVT or pulmonary embolism. There is little scope for further reduction of pulmonary embolism mortality through use of caval filters according to guidelines. Current policy on pulmonary embolism risk prevention appears to be based on an over-estimate of the level of risk. PMID:21816931

  2. Spontaneous, resolving S1Q3T3 in pulmonary embolism: A case report and literature review on prognostic value of electrocardiography score for pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, Lukasz D; Weizberg, Moshe; Hahn, Barry

    2016-09-01

    Electrocardiography findings in patients with pulmonary embolism have been investigated since 1935. As medicine has evolved, more effective modalities have surpassed the electrocardiogram in diagnostic utility. Despite the advent of these other modalities, the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism remains elusive and the prognosis is variable amongst each clinical presentation of its pathology. After presenting a case of a resolving S1Q3T3 in subsequent electrocardiogram findings of a patient with pulmonary embolism, this literature review will provide information on a 21-point electrocardiogram scoring system that helps the emergency physician stratify the risk of a patient with an acute presentation of pulmonary embolism. Why should emergency care staff be aware of this? Given the time-sensitive nature of diagnosis and appropriate treatment, Electrocardiogram continues to be a tool in the assessment of patients with a clinical suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Based on the information provided, 21-point electrocardiogram score has been shown to have strong usefulness in assessing prognosis of patients presenting with acute pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A rare cause of pulmonary embolism: panax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Mehmet; Cevik, Erdem

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a patient with pulmonary embolism during a high-dose course of panax. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with sudden complaints of shortness of breath, sweating,weakness, and loss of conscious after panax pills intake. At pulmonary computed tomography angiography, hypodense filling defect compatible with pulmonary emboli was seen at the bifurcation level of right and left distal pulmonary arteries and at each of pulmonary lobary arteries. The patient was treated with pulmonary artery selective thrombolysis. Conclusion: Herbal products, which are used all over the world to support health, should not be taken indiscriminately because their ingredients' amounts and what kind of adverse effects may come up whether used alone or in combination cannot be known.

  4. Cardiac Arrest Caused by Multiple Recurrent Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjartan Eskjaer Hannig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism is a common condition with a high mortality. We describe a previously healthy 68-year-old male who suffered three pulmonary embolisms during a short period of time, including two embolisms while on anticoagulant treatment. This paper illustrates three important points. (1 The importance of optimal anticoagulant treatment in the prevention of pulmonary embolism reoccurrence. (2 The benefit of immediate accessibility to echocardiography in the handling of haemodynamically unstable patients with an unknown underlying cause. (3 Thrombolytic treatment should always be considered and may be life-saving in patients with cardiac arrest suspected to be caused by pulmonary embolism.

  5. Risk-adapted management of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Stefano; Konstantinides, Stavros V

    2017-03-01

    The presence and severity of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a key determinant of prognosis in the acute phase of pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk-adapted treatment strategies continue to evolve, tailoring initial management to the clinical presentation and the functional status of the RV. Beyond pharmacological and, if necessary, mechanical circulatory support, systemic thrombolysis remains the mainstay of treatment for hemodynamically unstable patients; in contrast, it is not routinely recommended for intermediate-risk PE. Catheter-directed pharmacomechanical reperfusion treatment represents a promising option for minimizing bleeding risk; for reduced-dose intravenous thrombolysis, the data are still preliminary. Non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants, directly inhibiting factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) or thrombin (dabigatran), have simplified initial and long-term anticoagulation for PE while reducing major bleeding risk. Use of vena cava filters should be restricted to selected patients with absolute contraindications to anticoagulation, or PE recurrence despite adequately dosed anticoagulants. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Using Topological Data Analysis for diagnosis pulmonary embolism

    CERN Document Server

    Rucco, Matteo; Herman, Damir; Petrossian, Tanya; Merelli, Emanuela; Nitti, Cinzia; Salvi, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary Embolism (PE) is a common and potentially lethal condition. Most patients die within the first few hours from the event. Despite diagnostic advances, delays and underdiagnosis in PE are common.To increase the diagnostic performance in PE, current diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism usually starts with the assessment of clinical pretest probability using plasma d-Dimer measurement and clinical prediction rules. The most validated and widely used clinical decision rules are the Wells and Geneva Revised scores. We aimed to develop a new clinical prediction rule (CPR) for PE based on topological data analysis and artificial neural network. Filter or wrapper methods for features reduction cannot be applied to our dataset: the application of these algorithms can only be performed on datasets without missing data. Instead, we applied Topological data analysis (TDA) to overcome the hurdle of processing datasets with null values missing data. A topological network was devel...

  7. Endovascular treatment of pulmonary embolism: Selective review of available techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosher, John L; Patel, Arjun; Jagpal, Sugeet; Gribbin, Christopher; Gendel, Vyacheslav

    2017-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third most common cause of death in hospitalized patients. The development of sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for PE, including endovascular therapy, affords a certain level of complexity to the treatment of patients with this important clinical entity. Furthermore, the lack of level I evidence for the safety and effectiveness of catheter directed therapy brings controversy to a promising treatment approach. In this review paper, we discuss the pathophysiology and clinical presentation of PE, review the medical and surgical treatment of the condition, and describe in detail the tools that are available for the endovascular therapy of PE, including mechanical thrombectomy, suction thrombectomy, and fibrinolytic therapy. We also review the literature available to date on these methods, and describe the function of the Pulmonary Embolism Response Team. PMID:29354208

  8. Point-of-care echocardiography for aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain: EASY screening focused on the assessment of effusion, aorta, ventricular size and shape and ventricular asynergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigami, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography and focused cardiac ultrasound are point-of-care echo protocols for the evaluation of cardiac disease in the emergency room; however, these protocols may not adequately assess aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome in patients with killer chest pain. Here, I present an echocardiography protocol focused on screening for these critical cardiovascular diseases. This protocol (termed EASY screening) consists of the assessment of effusion in the pericardial space, aortic abnormalities, the size and shape of the ventricles and asynergy of the left ventricle. Aortic dissection is suggested by positive findings for effusion and/or abnormal aortic findings. Pulmonary embolism is suggested by a dilated right ventricle and a D-shaped left ventricle in the short-axis view. Acute coronary syndrome is suggested by asynergy of left ventricular wall motion. EASY screening may facilitate the assessment of aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting to the emergency room with killer chest pain.

  9. Pulmonary MRA: differentiation of pulmonary embolism from truncation artefact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannas, Peter; Schiebler, Mark L; Motosugi, Utaroh; François, Christopher J; Reeder, Scott B; Nagle, Scott K

    2014-08-01

    Truncation artefact (Gibbs ringing) causes central signal drop within vessels in pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) that can be mistaken for emboli, reducing diagnostic accuracy for pulmonary embolism (PE). We propose a quantitative approach to differentiate truncation artefact from PE. Twenty-eight patients who underwent pulmonary computed tomography angiography (CTA) for suspected PE were recruited for pulmonary MRA. Signal intensity drops within pulmonary arteries that persisted on both arterial-phase and delayed-phase MRA were identified. The percent signal loss between the vessel lumen and central drop was measured. CTA served as the reference standard for presence of pulmonary emboli. A total of 65 signal intensity drops were identified on MRA. Of these, 48 (74%) were artefacts and 17 (26%) were PE, as confirmed by CTA. Truncation artefacts had a significantly lower median signal drop than PE on both arterial-phase (26% [range 12-58%] vs. 85% [range 53-91%]) and delayed-phase MRA (26% [range 11-55%] vs. 77% [range 47-89%]), p < 0.0001 for both. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses revealed a threshold value of 51% (arterial phase) and 47% signal drop (delayed phase) to differentiate between truncation artefact and PE with 100% sensitivity and greater than 90% specificity. Quantitative signal drop is an objective tool to help differentiate truncation artefact and pulmonary embolism in pulmonary MRA. • Inexperienced readers may mistake truncation artefacts for emboli on pulmonary MRA • Pulmonary emboli have non-uniform signal drop • 51% (arterial phase) and 47% (delayed phase) cut-off differentiates truncation artefact from PE • Quantitative signal drop measurement enables more accurate pulmonary embolism diagnosis with MRA.

  10. Pulmonary embolism after long duration rail travel: economy class syndrome or rail coach syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, S K; Chopra, S; Calton, R

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism after long duration air travel is well described. However it can also occur following a long duration rail or road transport. We present a case of 43 year old male who developed deep venous thrombosis and acute pulmonary embolism after a long rail journey. We propose to call it as rail coach syndrome and stress the need for taking the same preventive measures as recommended for airline passengers.

  11. Abdominal pain as pulmonary embolism presentation, usefulness of bedside ultrasound: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Cattabiani, Chiara; Mumoli, Nicola; Dentali, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that a number of patients affected by hemodynamic stable pulmonary embolism are admitted to the emergency department presenting chest pain without further symptoms of pulmonary embolism, such as dyspnea, cough, hemoptysis, syncope, and tachycardia, but in a few cases, the presenting symptoms are even more unusual. The gold standard for pulmonary embolism diagnosis is computed tomography pulmonary angiogram resulting in significant exposure to ionizing radiation and contrast, but recently bedside ultrasound has shown to be useful in diagnosing pulmonary embolism in the emergency department. We describe two cases of pulmonary embolism in young men evaluated in the emergency department for acute pain of the upper abdomen, preliminarily diagnosed as abdominal colic, in which bedside ultrasound ruled out abdominal diseases and showed basal pulmonary abnormalities consistent with infarction, suggesting the need of diagnostic completion with computed tomography pulmonary angiogram. Bedside ultrasound was useful as complementary imaging test in diagnosing pulmonary embolism in young patients admitted for abdominal pain of unknown origin.

  12. Central Versus Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism: Analysis of the Impact on the Physiological Parameters and Long-term Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Martinez, José Luis; Anniccherico Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Urbieta Echezarreta, Miren Aranzazu; García, Ione Villar; Álvaro, Jorge Rojo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies aimed at assessing whether the emboli lodged in the central pulmonary arteries carry a worse prognosis than more peripheral emboli have yielded controversial results. Aims: To explore the impact on survival and long-term prognosis of central pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods: Consecutive patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism by means of computed tomography (CT) angiography were evaluated at episode index and traced through the computed system of clinical recording and following-up. Central pulmonary embolism was diagnosed when thrombi were seen in the trunk or in the main pulmonary arteries and peripheral pulmonary embolism when segmental or subsegmental arteries were affected. Results: A total of 530 consecutive patients diagnosed with pulmonary embolism were evaluated; 255 patients had central pulmonary embolism and 275 patients had segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Patients with central pulmonary embolism were older, had higher plasma levels of N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-ProBNP), troponin I, D-dimer, alveolar-arterial gradient, and shock index (P pulmonary embolism had an all-cause mortality of 40% while patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE) had an overall mortality of 27% and odds ratio of 1.81 [confidence interval (CI) 95% 1.16-1.9]. Survival was lower in patients with central PE than in patients with segmental or subsegmental pulmonary embolism, even after avoiding confounders (P = .018). Conclusions: Apart from a greater impact on hemodynamics, gas exchange, and right ventricular dysfunction, central pulmonary embolism associates a shorter survival and an increased long-term mortality. PMID:27114970

  13. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Massive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmatova, Elena V; Moazzami, Kasra; Cocke, Thomas P; Elmann, Elie; Vaidya, Pranay; Ng, Arthur F; Satya, Kumar; Narayan, Rajeev L

    Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) has been suggested for cardiopulmonary support in patients with massive pulmonary embolism (PE) refractory to other treatment or as bridging to embolectomy. The survival benefit from ECMO in patients with massive PE remains unclear. Here, we describe 5 cases in which ECMO was used as cardiopulmonary support following massive near-fatal pulmonary embolism. The overall mortality in patients with massive PE that received ECMO support was 40%. Death occurred secondary to ECMO-related complication in one case and due to inability to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion despite ECMO support in the second case. ECMO can be considered as a treatment modality for patients with massive PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-ECG-gated CT pulmonary angiography and the prediction of right ventricular dysfunction in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Mortensen, Jann; Mørk, Mette Louise

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) is an important prognostic factor of 30-day mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). The aim of our study was to evaluate whether non-electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiovascular parameters attained during computed tomography pulmonary...

  15. PULMONARY EMBOLISM IN BREAST CANCER: ETIOLOGY, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND TREATMENT APPROACHES

    OpenAIRE

    I. D. Rozanov; E. A. Rozanova; E. I. Shirikov; A. S. Balkanov; L. E. Gaganov; E. A. Stepanova

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism in breast cancer is one of the causes of major deterioration of health status of the patients. Pulmonary artery occlusion is most often a  consequence of venous thromboembolism; this condition is referred to as "pulmonary thromboembolism". Significantly less common cause of occlusion of the pulmonary artery branches can be embolism by a  cluster of tumor cells, accompanied by development of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy. This paper reviews data on the etiology ...

  16. Pulmonary MRA: Differentiation of pulmonary embolism from truncation artefact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannas, Peter [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schiebler, Mark L.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Francois, Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); Nagle, Scott K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Truncation artefact (Gibbs ringing) causes central signal drop within vessels in pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) that can be mistaken for emboli, reducing diagnostic accuracy for pulmonary embolism (PE). We propose a quantitative approach to differentiate truncation artefact from PE. Twenty-eight patients who underwent pulmonary computed tomography angiography (CTA) for suspected PE were recruited for pulmonary MRA. Signal intensity drops within pulmonary arteries that persisted on both arterial-phase and delayed-phase MRA were identified. The percent signal loss between the vessel lumen and central drop was measured. CTA served as the reference standard for presence of pulmonary emboli. A total of 65 signal intensity drops were identified on MRA. Of these, 48 (74 %) were artefacts and 17 (26 %) were PE, as confirmed by CTA. Truncation artefacts had a significantly lower median signal drop than PE on both arterial-phase (26 % [range 12-58 %] vs. 85 % [range 53-91 %]) and delayed-phase MRA (26 % [range 11-55 %] vs. 77 % [range 47-89 %]), p < 0.0001 for both. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses revealed a threshold value of 51 % (arterial phase) and 47 % signal drop (delayed phase) to differentiate between truncation artefact and PE with 100 % sensitivity and greater than 90 % specificity. Quantitative signal drop is an objective tool to help differentiate truncation artefact and pulmonary embolism in pulmonary MRA. (orig.)

  17. Pulmonary MRA: Differentiation of pulmonary embolism from truncation artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannas, Peter; Schiebler, Mark L; Motosugi, Utaroh; François, Christopher J; Reeder, Scott B; Nagle, Scott K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Truncation artifact (Gibbs ringing) causes central signal drop within vessels in pulmonary MRA that can be mistaken for emboli, reducing the diagnostic accuracy for pulmonary embolism (PE). We propose a quantitative approach to differentiate truncation artifact from PE. Methods Twenty-eight patients who underwent pulmonary CTA for suspected PE were recruited for pulmonary MRA. Signal intensity drops within pulmonary arteries that persisted on both arterial-phase and delayed-phase MRA were identified. The percent signal loss between the vessel lumen and central drop was measured. CTA served as the reference standard for presence of pulmonary emboli. Results A total of 65 signal intensity drops were identified on MRA. 48 (74%) of these were artifact and 17 (26%) were PE, as confirmed by CTA. Truncation artifacts had a significantly lower median signal drop than PE at both arterial-phase (26% [range 12–58%] vs. 85% [range 53–91%]) and at delayed-phase MRA (26% [range 11–55%] vs. 77% [range 47–89%]), p90% specificity. Conclusion Quantitative signal drop is an objective tool to help differentiate truncation artifact and pulmonary embolism in pulmonary MRA. PMID:24863886

  18. Acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism in a young man with pernicious anemia-induced severe hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Marion A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 27 year-old man who presented to the hospital with progressive lower extremity weakness, developed an acute ST elevation myocardial infarction on his second hospital day. Primary angioplasty to the left anterior descending coronary artery was performed. Due to persistent dyspnea, the patient underwent a diagnostic chest computed tomography which confirmed multiple small pulmonary emboli. Laboratory analysis revealed a megaloblastic anemia with a reduced vitamin B12 level and positive titers for antibodies against intrinsic factor, establishing a diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Screening for hypercoaguable markers documented an isolated severely elevated homocysteine levels (105 μmol/l. No other significant risk factors for coronary artery disease including a family history of premature atherosclerosis were identified. This case illustrates the importance of testing for hyperhomocysteinemia as part of a workup for atherothrombotic disease, especially in patients without other significant risk factors. The severity of hyperhomocysteinemia found in our patient is unusual for patients with vitamin B12 malabsorption and raises the question of whether the widely practiced folic acid fortification in the United States may mask or even worsen vitamin B12 deficiency over time, leading to more severe cases of vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia than seen in the past.

  19. Prognostic value of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio in acute pulmonary embolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Ma, Junfen; Jiang, Zhiyun; Ming, Liang

    2018-02-01

    Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) have been reported to predict prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). However, the prognostic value of NLR and PLR remained inconsistent between studies. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the prognostic role of NLR and PLR in acute PE. We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI for relative literature up to March 2017. The pooled statistics for all outcomes were expressed as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3.5 analysis software and Stata software. Totally 7 eligible studies consisting of 2323 patients were enrolled in our meta-analysis. Elevated NLR was significantly associated with overall (short-term and long-term) mortality (OR 10.13, 95% CI 6.57-15.64, P<0.001) and short-term (in-hospital and 30 days) mortality (OR 8.43, 95% CI 5.23-13.61, P<0.001). And elevated PLR was significantly associated with overall mortality (OR 6.32, 95% CI 4.52-8.84, P<0.001), short-term mortality (OR 6.69, 95% CI 2.86-15.66, P<0.001) and long-term mortality (OR 6.11, 95% CI 3.90-9.55, P<0.001). Our meta-analysis revealed that NLR and PLR are promising biomarkers in predicting prognosis in acute PE patients. We suggest NLR and PLR be used routinely in the PE prognostic assessment.

  20. PULMONARY EMBOLISM IN BREAST CANCER: ETIOLOGY, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND TREATMENT APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Rozanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism in breast cancer is one of the causes of major deterioration of health status of the patients. Pulmonary artery occlusion is most often a  consequence of venous thromboembolism; this condition is referred to as "pulmonary thromboembolism". Significantly less common cause of occlusion of the pulmonary artery branches can be embolism by a  cluster of tumor cells, accompanied by development of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy. This paper reviews data on the etiology and pathogenesis of pulmonary embolism in breast cancer, and approaches to its prevention and treatment.

  1. Utility and prevalence of imaging for underlying cancer in unprovoked pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homewood, R; Medford, A R

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines state that patients over 40 years of age with a first unprovoked pulmonary embolism should be offered limited screening for possible cancer and considered for intensive screening (abdomino-pelvic computed tomography and mammography), despite no evidence for the latter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility and cost of intensive screening in routine clinical practice. Methods All patients diagnosed with a first unprovoked pulmonary embolism between January 2014 and June 2014 in a single large UK teaching hospital were included. The information management department searched for patients with an International Classification of Diseases 10 discharge diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and limited to 'acute pulmonary embolism with/without cor pulmonale'. Only patients with unprovoked pulmonary embolism were included. Patients with chronic medical conditions predisposing to pulmonary embolism were excluded. NHS costs were obtained from the Trust Finance Department. These costs were used to generate the costs of limited versus intensive screening, and then scaled up using adult population census information and assuming the same incidence of idiopathic pulmonary embolism to estimate the annual NHS cost of intensive screening. Results Ninety-two patients were diagnosed with pulmonary embolism, and 25 met the inclusion criteria. Clinical examination was often incomplete (84%). Limited screening was often missed (urinalysis 100%, serum calcium 64%). Intensive screening was performed in the majority of cases (68%, all abdomino-pelvic computed tomography with no cancer detected) with an £88 excess cost per patient. Conclusion Intensive screening in first unprovoked pulmonary embolism has a low yield, is costly and should not replace thorough clinical examination and basic screening.

  2. Computed tomography pulmonary embolism index for the assessment of survival in patients with pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Dul, Przemyslaw; Fischbach, Frank; Dudeck, Oliver; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Ricke, Jens [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    This study was an analysis of the correlation between pulmonary embolism (PE) and patient survival. Among 694 consecutive patients referred to our institution with clinical suspicion of acute PE who underwent CT pulmonary angiography, 188 patients comprised the study group: 87 women (46.3%, median age: 60.7; age range: 19-88 years) and 101 men (53.7%, median age: 66.9; age range: 21-97 years). PE was assessed by two radiologist who were blinded to the results from the follow-up. A PE index was derived for each set of images on the basis of the embolus size and location. Results were analyzed using logistic regression, and correlation with risk factors and patient outcome (survival or death) was calculated. We observed no significant correlation between the CTPE index and patient outcome (p = 0.703). The test of logistic regression with the sum of heart and liver disease or presence of cancer was significantly (p< 0.05) correlated with PE and overall patient outcome. Interobserver agreement showed a significant correlation rate for the assessment of the PE index (0.993; p< 0.001). In our study the CT PE index did not translate into patient outcome. Prospective larger scale studies are needed to confirm the predictive value of the index and refine the index criteria. (orig.)

  3. Lung function, functional capacity, and respiratory symptoms at discharge from hospital in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsbacka, Jenny S; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Hansson, Per-Olof; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2018-03-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a cardiovascular disease with symptoms including respiratory associated chest pain (RACP) and dyspnea. No previous studies exist focusing on lung function, functional capacity, and respiratory symptoms at discharge after PE. The aim was to examine and describe lung function, functional capacity, and respiratory symptoms at discharge in patients with PE and compare to reference values. Fifty consecutive patients with PE admitted to the Acute Medical Unit, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, were included. Size of PE was calculated by Qanadli score (QS) percentage (mean QS 33.4% (17.6)). FVC and FEV1 were registered and 6-minute walk test (6MWT) performed at the day of discharge. RACP was rated before and after spirometry/6MWT with the Visual Analogue Scale. Perceived exertion was rated with Borg CR-10 scale. Spirometry and 6MWT results were compared with reference values. This study shows that patients with PE have significantly reduced lung function (p < 0.05) and functional capacity (p < 0.001) at discharge compared with reference values. Patients with higher QS percentage were more dyspneic after 6MWT, no other significant differences in lung function or functional capacity were found between the groups. The patients still suffer from RACP (30%) and dyspnea (60%) at discharge. This study indicates that patients with PE have a reduced lung function, reduced functional capacity, and experience respiratory symptoms as pain and dyspnea at discharge. Further studies are needed concerning long-term follow-up of lung function, functional capacity, and symptoms after PE.

  4. Incidence of Pleural Effusion in Patients with Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Cui, Ai; Zhai, Zhen-Guo; Guo, Xiao-Juan; Li, Man; Teng, Lei-Lei; Xu, Li-Li; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Zhen; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: No data on the incidence of pleural effusion (PE) in Chinese patients with pulmonary embolism are available to date. The aim of the current study was to investigate the frequency of PE in a Chinese population of patients with pulmonary embolism. Methods: This was a retrospective observational single-center study. All data of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) performed over 6-year period on adult patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism were analyzed. Results: From January 2008 until December 2013, PE was identified in 423 of 3141 patients (13.5%) with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism who underwent CTPA. The incidence of PE in patients with pulmonary embolism (19.9%) was significantly higher than in those without embolism (9.4%) (P pulmonary embolism patients were small to moderate and were unilateral. The locations of emboli and the numbers of arteries involved, CT pulmonary obstruction index, and parenchymal abnormalities at CT were not associated with the development of PE. Conclusions: PEs are present in about one fifth of a Chinese population of patients with pulmonary embolism, which are usually small, unilateral, and unsuitable for diagnostic thoracentesis. PMID:25881595

  5. RVAD Support in the Setting of Submassive Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsano, Antonio; Sportelli, Elena; Olivieri, Guido Maria; Di Lorenzo, Nicola; Borile, Silvia; Santini, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    Patients with submassive pulmonary embolism (PE), although normotensive, are characterized by right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and elevated levels of biomarkers of cardiac damage. The best treatment option in these cases is still a subject of debate and the use of thrombolysis in submassive PE remains controversial. A 57-year-old Caucasian male with unprovoked PE, normal blood pressure, and elevated troponin I values was referred to the cardiovascular department. In view of the presence of a right atrium thrombus, the patient underwent surgical embolectomy under extracorporeal circulation, with the extraction of a huge thrombus together with fragmented thrombi from both pulmonary arteries. The patient developed an acute right heart failure solved with a temporary RV assist device (RVAD) support. The RV recovery was observed after 72 hours following the implantation. RVAD placement should be considered in the management of PE in case of acute right heart failure after reperfusion therapy since it can bring the patient out of a death spiral.

  6. S WAVE IN PULMONARY EMBOLISM, A NEW ECG SIGN TO AID THROMBOLYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas John

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a devastating disease that often leads to mortality . Previous investigators have found that thrombolysis reduces mortality in men but not significantly in women with pulmonary embolism. Many of the previous studies are with tenecteplase and alteplase. Here, we describe intra - venous thrombolysis with streptokinase in seven patients with pulmonary embolism who survived including two women. Further, we have one patient who had a new onset of S wave in lead I which subsequently disappeared after embolectomy. We also comment on the usefulness of shock sign in 2 deciding on thrombolysis .We propose a new sign for noninvasive assessment of need for thrombolysis in pulmonary embolism. New onset S wave in Lead I in pulmonary embolism can be used as a new sign for deciding the need for thrombolysis. When added to the shock sign it can be used in the emergency deparment to decide the need for thrombolysis. Further, there are no clear end points as to when to stop thrombolysis. In all 4 patients we switched to heparin when spontaneous bleeding or oozing started. In all 4 patients subsequent CT scans showed that the patient has mild to moderate resolution of the pulmonary embolism and patients remained stable and have been discharged and are under regular follow up. Hence we propose that bleeding can be used as an end point for thrombolysis in acute pulmonary embolism. We also describe a patient who had new onset S wave that disappeared after successful pulmonary embolectomy. Probably, the S wave is a marker of main pulmonary artery branch occlusions.

  7. A Pulmonary Embolism Response Team: initial experiences and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zern, Emily K; Young, Michael N; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common cardiovascular condition resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Consensus recommendations suggest risk stratification of patients into three main categories: high-risk or 'massive' PE, intermediate-risk or 'submassive' PE, and low-risk PE. Given the relative dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials delineating optimal selection of the diverse medical, interventional, and surgical treatment approaches, clinical care requires a multidisciplinary expert approach to patients with PE. Areas covered: The Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT) was the first of its kind to create a multidisciplinary, rapid response team for acute PE, integrated within a research and educational framework. The MGH PERT has treated more than 700 patients with PE, the majority of which are in the 'massive' or 'submassive' categories. The PERT Consortium™ was founded in 2015 as a collaborative network between the growing number of PERT programs internationally, with greater than 80 institutions participating within one year of establishment. Expert commentary: Since its advent, the PERT model has expanded throughout the United States and internationally through a collaborative institutional and research network. PERT may represent a new standard for the care of patients with acute PE.

  8. Massive Pulmonary Embolism after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Akar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE is a rare complication that may result in death after lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Although pulmonary embolism mortality rates decreased with early diagnosis and treatment, delays in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is commonly seen even with advanced diagnostic methods. Even though it is rare, the risk of pulmonary embolism as well as thrombophlebitis and deep vein thrombosis are encountered in patients undergoing spinal surgery. In this case presentation, we discussed the case of pulmonary embolism determined in a young patient developing unconsciousness and then cardiopulmonary arrest following mobilization at the postoperative 12th hour after a lumbar spinal fusion surgery and determined to have severe right ventricular enlargement, leftward deviation of the interatrial septum, severe tricuspid failure at the bedside echocardiography and who was discharged after thrombolytic therapy.

  9. Transarterial embolization of acute intercostal artery bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Kyimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To report our experiences of transarterial embolization for acute intercostal artery bleeding. A retrospectively analysis of the causes, clinical manifestations, angiographic findings and transarterial embolization technique in 8 patients with acute intercostal artery bleeding, with a review of the anatomical basis. The causes of intercostal artery bleeding were iatrogenic and traumatic in 88 and 12% of cases, respectively. Active bleeding from the collateral intercostal or posterior intercostal arteries was angiographically demonstrated in 75 and 25% of cases, respectively. Transarterial embolization successfully achieved hemostasis in all cases. However, two patient with hypovolemic shock expired due to a massive hemothorax, despite successful transarterial embolization. Intercostal access should be performed through the middle of the intercostal space to avoid injury to the collateral intercostal artery. Transarterial embolization is an effective method for the control of intercostal artery bleeding.

  10. [Severe pulmonary embolism revealed by status epilepticus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allou, N; Coolen-Allou, N; Delmas, B; Cordier, C; Allyn, J

    2016-12-01

    High-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) is associated with high mortality rate (>50%). In some cases, diagnosis of PE remains a challenge with atypical presentations like in this case report with a PE revealed by status epilepticus. We report the case of a 40-year-old man without prior disease, hospitalized in ICU for status epilepticus. All paraclinical examinations at admission did not show any significant abnormalities (laboratory tests, cardiologic and neurological investigations). On day 1, he presented a sudden circulatory collapse and echocardiography showed right intra-auricular thrombus. He was treated by thrombolysis and arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. After stabilization, computed tomography showed severe bilateral PE. He developed multi-organ failure and died 4days after admission. Pulmonary embolism revealed by status epilepticus has rarely been reported and is associated with poor prognosis. Physicians should be aware and think of the possibility of PE in patients with status epilepticus without any history or risk factors of seizure and normal neurological investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Concomitant Deep Venous Thrombosis, Femoral Artery Thrombosis, and Pulmonary Embolism after Air Travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Abunnaja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between air travel and deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism “economy-class syndrome” is well described. However, this syndrome does not describe any association between long duration travel and arterial thrombosis or coexistence of venous and arterial thrombosis. We present a case of concomitant deep venous thrombosis, acute femoral artery thrombosis, and bilateral pulmonary embolisms in a patient following commercial air travel. Echocardiogram did not reveal an intracardiac shunt that may have contributed to the acute arterial occlusion from a paradoxical embolus. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that associates air traveling with both arterial and venous thrombosis.

  12. Nonthrombotic Pulmonary Artery Embolism: Imaging Findings and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Emre; Balci, Sinan; Atceken, Zeynep; Akpinar, Erhan; Ariyurek, Orhan Macit

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to emphasize the imaging findings encountered in the setting of nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism. Nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism refers to a spectrum of clinical and radiologic disorders caused by embolization of the pulmonary artery vasculature by various cell types, microorganism, and foreign bodies. Awareness of the imaging and clinical features of the nonthrombotic pulmonary embolism may facilitate prompt diagnosis.

  13. Pulmonary embolism and pulmonary infarction; Lungenembolie und Lungeninfarkt - pathologische Anatomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K.M.; Mueller, A.M. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie]|[Bochum Univ. (Germany). Universitaetsklinikum

    1998-03-01

    Radiological and nuclear medical evaluation of pulmonary embolisms and their consequences is often problematic, since parenchymal alterations in the form of possible pulmonary infarctions occur in only 10-15% after vessel obliteration. Small embolisms rather frequently cause hemorrhagic pulmonary infarctions, which can clinically be demonstrated by radiological and nuclear medical methods, after obliteration of the pre-capillary arterio-arterial anastomoses type I. In pre-existing chronic lung diseases with often markedly developed bronchial artery systems and additional anastomoses hemorrhagic pulmonary infarctions are extremely rare. Thus, today, radiological and nuclear medical studies, such as spiral computer scanning, have to rely largely on the results of thrombembolic vessel obstruction and transitory perfusion deficits and less on parenchymal infiltration patterns. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Die radiologischen und nuklearmedizinischen Begutachtungen von Lungenembolien und deren Folgen sind oft problematisch, weil Parenchymveraenderungen in Form moeglicher Lungeninfarkte in nur 10-15% nach der Gefaessverlegung entstehen. Kleine Embolien fuehren haeufiger zu haemorrhagischen Lungeninfarkten, die mit radiologischen und nukelarmedizinischen Verfahren fassbar werden. Bei vorbestehenden chronischen Lungenerkrankungen mit meist verstaerkt ausgebautem Bronchialartheriensystem und zusaetzlichen Anatomosen sind haemorrhagische Lungeninfarkte besonders selten. Die radiologische und nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik muss sich daher heute nach vielversprechenden Studien, z.B. unter Einsatz der Spiralcomputertomographie, wesentlich auf die Befunde der thrombembolischen Gefaessobstruktion und transitorische Perfusionsausfaelle und weniger auf parenchymatoese Infiltratmuster stuetzen. (orig./MG)

  14. Diagnostic radialogy of pulmonary embolism. Radiologische Diagnostik der Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Fengels, W. (Koeln Univ., Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik (Germany))

    1991-10-01

    The prognosis of accute pulmonary embolism is largely determined by an early and valid diagnosis. Pulmonary angiography, currently most frequently performed by a DSA, ranks third in the range of available diagnostic method, after X-ray imaging of the thorax, and perfusion scintiscanning. The review article discusses the radiological aspects involved together with aspects of the pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations of pulmonary embolism. (orig.).

  15. Cancer patients and characteristics of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenberg, U.; Paul, T. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Feuersenger, A. [Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany); Goyen, M. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Kroeger, K. [Department of Angiology, University Hospital Essen (Germany)], E-mail: knut.kroeger@uk-essen.de

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To check the hypothesis that cancer patients suffer from extended pulmonary embolism (PE) more frequently than patients without cancer we analysed PEs proved by computed tomography (CT)-imaging. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty consecutive CT scans at the University Hospital of Essen from March 2002 until December 2004 which proved a definite case of pulmonary embolism were retrospectively reviewed (79 men, 71 women; mean age 57 {+-} 15 years). Underlying disease and blood parameters were included (haemoglobin, haematocrit, fibrinogen and total protein, if determined within 48 h before the CT scans). Results: Patients with malignant disease were older (59 {+-} 12 years vs. 54 {+-} 19 years, p = 0.05) and tend to have a higher rate of central PEs (52% vs. 34%, p = 0.08) than patients without malignancies. The odds of a central PE in cancer patients was about twice as high as in patients without a malignant disease (Odds ratio: 2.08, 95%-confidence interval: 1.06-4.10; age-adjusted Odds ratio 1.88, 95%-confidence interval: 0.92-3.84). Additional adjustment for the clinical information dyspnoea, inhospital patient and clinically expected PE did not deteriorate the odds. Thrombus density determined in patients with central PE only shows a trend towards a lower density in patients with malignant disease (52 {+-} 13 HE vs. 45 {+-} 15 HE, p = 0.13). There is no statistical evidence that thrombus density is related to one of the blood parameters or even blood density measured in the pulmonary artery. Conclusion: Although this is a retrospective study including a small number of patients it shows that cancer patients are at a higher risk for central PE than patients without cancer. Characteristics of the intrapulmonal thrombus in cancer and non-cancer patients seem to be different.

  16. Factors determining altered perfusion after acute pulmonary embolism assessed by quantified single-photon emission computed tomography-perfusion scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Meysman

    2017-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Acute PE patients of female, older age, and higher TRJ in univariate analysis and patients of female in multivariate analysis seem to have a higher risk of persistent Q-defects after 6 months treatment. The presence of residual Q-abnormalities at 6 months was not associated with an increased risk for recurrent PE.

  17. Prevalence and Localization of Pulmonary Embolism in Unexplained Acute Exacerbations of COPD: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleva, F.E.; Voets, L.W.; Simons, S.O.; Mast, Q. de; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with COPD experience episodes of increased inflammation, so-called acute exacerbations of COPD (AE-COPD). In 30% of AE-COPD cases, no clear cause is found. Since there is well-known cross talk between inflammation and thrombosis, the objectives of this study were to determine

  18. Clot resolution after 3 weeks of anticoagulant treatment for pulmonary embolism : comparison of computed tomography and perfusion scintigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, J.; Douma, R. A.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Verhamme, P.; Wells, P. S.; Bounameaux, H.; Lensing, A. W. A.; Bueller, H. R.

    Introduction Little is known about the natural history of clot resolution in the initial weeks of anticoagulant therapy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Clot resolution of acute PE was assessed with either computed tomography pulmonary angiography scan (CT-scan) or perfusion

  19. Suspected Pulmonary Embolism during Hickman Catheterization in a Child: What Else Should Be Considered besides Pulmonary Embolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haemi Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A 16-month-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia expired during Hickman catheter insertion. She had undergone chemoport insertion of the left subclavian vein six months earlier and received five cycles of chemotherapy. Due to malfunction of the chemoport and the consideration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, insertion of a Hickmann catheter on the right side and removal of the malfunctioning chemoport were planned under general anesthesia. The surgery was uneventful during catheter insertion, but the patient experienced the sudden onset of pulseless electrical activity just after saline was flushed through the newly inserted catheter. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was commenced aggressively, but the patient was refractory. Migration of a thrombus generated by the previous central catheter to the pulmonary circulation was suspected, resulting in a pulmonary embolism.

  20. Small pulmonary artery defects are not reliable indicators of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wallace T; Marinari, Lawrence A; Barbosa, Eduardo; Litt, Harold I; Schmitt, James E; Mahne, Anton; Lee, Victor; Akers, Scott R

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the rate of agreement of pulmonary embolism diagnosis in computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiogram studies and to evaluate the rate of inaccurate interpretations in the community hospital setting. Using the keywords "pulmonary embolism/embolus/emboli," the radiology information system was searched for CT pulmonary angiograms performed over a 3-year period at three U.S. community hospitals. Studies containing probable or definite pulmonary emboli were independently reviewed by four subspecialty thoracic radiologists. Agreement about the presence of pulmonary embolism progressively decreased with decreasing diameter of pulmonary vascular lesions (P pulmonary embolism of subsegmental lesions (P pulmonary embolism diagnosis of subsegmental and/or small pulmonary arterial defects. The probability of a false-positive diagnosis and indeterminate examinations progressively increased with: (1) more peripheral location of the lesion, (2) decreased size (short-axis diameter) of the lesion, and (3) diminishing quality of the CT examination. Forty-eight of 177 (27%) of subsegmental vascular defects identified by community radiologists were deemed indeterminate, and 27 of 177 (15%) of subsegmental vascular defects were judged to be false positive for pulmonary embolism by the consensus diagnosis. Fifty-four of 274 (20%) vascular defects with short axis less than 6 mm were indeterminate for pulmonary embolism, and 37 of 274 (14%) of vascular defects with short axis less than 6 mm were false positive for pulmonary embolism. Eleven of 13 (85%) of vascular lesions identified as pulmonary emboli on the lowest-quality CT examinations were false positive or indeterminate for pulmonary embolism. False-positive examinations were most often due to respiratory motion artifact (19/38, 50%). There is relatively poor interobserver agreement for subsegmental and/or small pulmonary artery defects, especially in CT pulmonary angiograms degraded by technical artifacts. These

  1. Prognostic value of a previous medical or surgical admission in outpatients with symptomatic pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Artacho, P; Rodríguez-López, I; Pérez Peña, C; González Del Castillo, J; Calvo, E; Martín-Sánchez, F J

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether an earlier medical (MA) or surgical (SA) admission in the previous three months is a factor associated with mortality at 30 days in outpatients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism. Observational, retrospective cohort study on adult patients diagnosed with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism in a tertiary hospital over a period of 6 years. The study included 870 patients with a mean age of 72.7 years: 10.6% (92) had a prior MA, 4.9% (43) had a SA and 12.9% (112) died within the first 30 days. The MA group showed a higher frequency of simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) of high risk (≥1) (MA 90.2% vs SA 65.1% vs no prior admission 67.0%; p<0.001) and mortality at 30 days (MA 20.7% vs SA 7.0% vs no prior admission 12.9%; p=0.038). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated that a simplified PESI≥1 was the only independent risk factor for mortality at 30 days. The severity of the acute episode, as assessed by the simplified PESI scale, is independently associated with mortality at 30 days in outpatients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism. An earlier MA in the previous 3 months usually involves greater severity in the acute episode. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic imaging of pulmonary embolism; Bildgebende Diagnostik der Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, A. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Ulm (Germany). Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1999-07-01

    There is a wide range of underlying causes to be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: Coronary infarction, pneumothorax, pneumonia, acute cardiac insufficiency, symptomatic aortic aneurysma, or acute dissection of the aorta. The modalities available for radiological examination are plain X-ray radiography of the chest, ventilation/perfusion scintiscanning, spiral CT, MRT and primarily MR angiography, and intra-arterial DSA. (orig./MG) [German] Die differentialdiagnostische Palette zur Lungenembolie ist weit: Genannt werden als Differentialdiagnosen der Herzinfarkt, der Pneumothorax, die Pneumonie, das akute Herzversagen, das symptomatische Aortenaneurysma oder die akute Aortendissektion. An radiologischen diagnostischen Verfahren stehen die Roentgen-Thoraxuebersichtsaufnahme, die Ventilations-/Perfusionsszintigraphie, das Spiral-CT, die MRT, insbesondere die MR-Angiographie und die intraarterielle DSA zur Verfuegung. (orig.)

  3. [Secondary pulmonary embolism to right atrial myxoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico Besó, L; Zúñiga Cedó, E

    2013-10-01

    A case of pulmonary thromboembolism secondary to atrial myxoma right. The myxoma is a primary cardiac tumor, namely, has his origin in the cardiac tissue. Primary cardiac tumors are rare, including myxomas, the most common type. Have a predilection for females and the most useful tool for diagnosis is echocardiography. About 75% of myxomas occur in the left atrium of the heart and rest are in the right atrium. Right atrial myxomas in some sometimes associated with tricuspid stenosis and atrial fibrillation. The most common clinical manifestations include symptoms of this neoplasm constitutional, and embolic phenomena resulting from the obstruction to the flow intracavitary. The treatment of this condition is surgical. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. [Bilateral proximal pulmonary embolism without associated hypoxemia. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahloul, M; Chtara, K; Turki, O; Kammoun, M M; Bouaziz, W; Bouaziz, M

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a classic complication in intensive care. It is characterized by hypoxemia secondary to perturbed ventilation/perfusion ratios. We report a case of proximal and bilateral pulmonary embolism that occurred without associated hypoxemia. A spiral computed tomography (CT) scan was performed to explore unexplained fever in a patient with a negative infectious investigation. We discuss the mechanisms underlying the absence of hypoxemia in this patient. A 43-year-old patient with no significant pathological history was admitted to intensive care for the management of multiple injuries following a road accident. During resuscitation, the patient developed a proximal and bilateral pulmonary embolism without signs of hypertension of the pulmonary artery or associated hypoxemia. The patient improved under treatment. This case shows that bilateral proximal pulmonary embolism may be associated with normal gas exchange. The absence of hypoxemia could be explained by the bilateral nature of the pulmonary embolism that led to balanced ventilation/perfusion ratios on both sides. Furthermore, bronchoconstriction was bilateral, explaining the maintenance of a stable ventilation/perfusion ratio on both sides. The presence of unexplained fever in a victim of multiple trauma, despite the absence of hypoxemia, suggests the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Persistent tachypnea in children: keep pulmonary embolism in mind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommen, C. H.; Heyboer, H.; Groothoff, J. W.; Teeuw, R.; Aronson, D. C.; Peters, M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tachypnea in children is associated with respiratory disorders and nonrespiratory disorders such as cardiac disease, metabolic acidosis, fever, pain, and anxiety. Pulmonary embolism is seldom considered by pediatricians as a cause of tachypnea. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Three children of

  6. Radiologic diagnosis of pulmonary embolism; Radiologische Diagostik der Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C.; Ley, S.; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie E010

    2004-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication of venous thromboembolism. Despite numerous modern diagnostic methods, the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism remains problematic, especially in view of the nonspecific clinical presentation. In this educational review, current diagnostic methods and their role in the diagnostic workup of pulmonary embolism will be discussed. In addition, practical guidelines are given for the diagnostic cascade contingent on the clinical probability for pulmonary embolism. (orig.) [German] Die akute Lungenembolie ist eine haeufige und potenziell lebensbedrohliche Komplikation der tiefen Venenthrombose. Die Diagnose der akuten Lungenembolie bleibt trotz moderner diagnostischer Verfahren insbesondere aufgrund der unspezifischen klinischen Symptomatik problematisch. Im folgenden Artikel werden die gaengigen diagnostischen Methoden und deren Stellenwert bei der Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie diskutiert. Weiterhin werden praktische Richtlinien fuer das diagnostische Vorgehen gegeben - je nachdem wie wahrscheinlich eine Lungenembolie klinisch ist. (orig.)

  7. Impact of iterative reconstruction on the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) on reduced-dose chest CT angiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontana, François; Henry, Simon; Duhamel, Alain; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Tacelli, Nunzia; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction on the detectability of clots. Fifty-three patients were enrolled in a study comparing reduced-dose and full-dose images, available from the same dual-source data set. From each acquisition, three series of images were generated: (1) full-dose images (from both tubes), reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (group 1; standard of reference), (2) reduced-dose images (from tube A only; 60 % dose reduction) reconstructed with FBP (group 2) and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) (group 3). In group 1 (mean DLP: 264.6 mGy.cm), (1) PE was diagnosed in 8 patients (15 %) with 82 clots in the central (n = 5), segmental (n = 39) and subsegmental (n = 38) arteries and (2) mean level of noise was 30.56 ± 5.07. In group 2 (mean DLP: 105.8 mGy.cm), a significant increase in noise (44.56 ± 6.24; p Reconstruction of reduced-dose images (60 % dose reduction) with SAFIRE provided image quality and diagnostic value comparable to those of full-dose FBP images. • Iterative reconstruction does not alter the detection of endoluminal clots. • Iterative reconstruction allows dose reduction in the context of acute PE. • Iterative reconstruction allows radiologists to approach the prospects of submilliSievert CT.

  8. Diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism: Comparison between helical CT and DSA in the animal experiment; Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie: Vergleich zwischen Spiral-CT und DSA im Tierexperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz-Rode, T. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Kilbinger, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Adam, G. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1995-10-01

    In 11 dogs, lobar, segmental, and subsegmental occlusions of the pulmonary arteries were produced. Subsequent to selective pulmonary angiography, the animals were examined with contrast-enhanced helical CT. In the main and lobar pulmonary arteries there was a complete correlation between CT and DSA in documentation of total and partial embolic occlusions. Identification of segmental and subsegmental pulmonary emboli by CT required a second run with optimized parameters in 7 of 11 cases. Nevertheless, 18% of the peripheral arteries could not be classified. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] In 11 Hunden wurden embolische Verschluesse lobaerer, segmentaler und subsegmentaler Pulmonalarterien erzeugt. Im Anschluss an die selektive Pulmonalisangiographie wurden die Tiere computertomographisch im Bolus-Spiral-Modus untersucht. Im Bereich der Pulmonalishauptstaemme und der Lobararterien ergab sich eine vollstaendige Uebereinstimmung von CT und DSA in der Darstellung kompletter und partieller embolischer Verschluesse. Der CT-Nachweis von Embolien auf Segment- und Subsegmentebene machte in 7 von 11 Faellen einen zweiten Untersuchungsgang mit optimierten Parametern erforderlich. Dennoch waren 18% der peripheren Arterien nicht sicher beurteilbar. (orig./MG)

  9. Quality of life after pulmonary embolism as assessed with SF-36 and PEmb-QoL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Josien; den Exter, Paul L.; Kaptein, Ad A.; Andela, Cornelie D.; Erkens, Petra M. G.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Douma, Renee A.; Mos, Inge C. M.; Cohn, Danny M.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Huisman, Menno V.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although quality of life (QoL) is recognized as an important indicator of the course of a disease, it has rarely been addressed in studies evaluating the outcome of care for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). This study primarily aimed to evaluate the QoL of patients with acute PE

  10. Greater saphenous vein anomaly and aneurysm with subsequent pulmonary embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Truong; Kornbau, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Venous aneurysms often present as painful masses. They can present either in the deep or superficial venous system. Deep venous system aneurysms have a greater risk of thromboembolism. Though rare, there have been case reports of superficial aneurysms and thrombus causing significant morbidity such as pulmonary embolism. We present a case of an anomalous greater saphenous vein connection with an aneurysm and thrombus resulting in a pulmonary embolism. This is the only reported case o...

  11. Assessment of pulmonary ventilation scans using xenon-127 in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, I.F.; Sleight, P.J.; Gaunt, J.I.; Croft, D.N.

    1984-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation scans using /sup 127/Xe were compared with scans using /sup 133/Xe in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. A perfusion scan using sup(99m)Tc-microspheres and ventilation scans with each of the xenon isotopes were performed on 44 patients referred for lung scanning to confirm or exclude a suspected clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. No significant difference was found in the frequency of diagnosis of pulmonary embolism when comparing each of the ventilation scans with the corresponding perfusion scan. For reasons discussed, /sup 127/Xe may be more useful than /sup 133/Xe for pulmonary ventilation scanning.

  12. Helical CT in the detection of pulmonary embolism; Spiral-CT in der Diagnostik der Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, H.U. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Ries, B.G. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Heussel, C.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Schmidt, H.C. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Within a few years, helical CT has proved its value as a useful, relatively risk-free and non-invasive procedure for the detection of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism. Providing the use of carefully chosen angiographic CT procedures of examination, the presence of acute pulmonary embolism may be confirmed or disproved with a high degree of sensitivity and specifity. Even though helical CT is superior to radionuclide procedures as a method of screening for acute pulmonary embolism, acute subsegmental embolism cannot be excluded in all cases, where the examination failed to reveal any particular findings. In the persistence of clinical symptoms and to resolve questions of therapeutical relevance, pulmonary angiography still has an indication. Helical CT must be regarded as the procedure of choice for the detection of chronic pulmonary embolism, while pulmonary angiography is to be used here as a supplementary method in patients undergoing surgery. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Die Spiral-CT hat sich innerhalb weniger Jahre als ein aussagekraeftiges, wenig belastendes und nichtinvasives Verfahren in der Diagnostik der akuten und chronischen Lungenembolie bewaehrt. Unter Verwendung gezielter CT-angiographischer Untersuchungsstrategien ist die Diagnose oder der Ausschluss einer akuten Lungenembolie bis zur Segmentebene mit hoher Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet moeglich. Obwohl die Spiral-CT der Szintigraphie als Screeningverfahren zum Nachweis einer akuten Lungenembolie ueberlegen ist, schliesst eine unauffaellige Spiral-CT jedoch eine akute subsegmentale Lungenembolie nicht sicher aus. Bei fortbestehendem klinischem Verdacht und therapeutischer Konsequenz ist weiterhin die Pulmonalisanigographie indiziert. Fuer die Diagnostik der chronsichen Lungenembolie ist die Spiral-CT als Methode der Wahl anzusehen, die praeoperativ durch die Pulmonalisangiographie ergaenzt werden sollte. (orig./VHE)

  13. Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Embolism in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Broder

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy is a significant and under-recognized problem. In British Columbia, where there are 46,000 pregnancies per year, it is estimated that there are approximately 160 pulmonary embolisms per year and one maternal death every two years secondary to pulmonary embolism. A complete assessment for suspected pulmonary embolus can be performed without putting the fetus at significant risk from radiation exposure. An algorithm is provided for the workup of pulmonary embolus during pregnancy. Heparin is the drug of choice for anticoagulating pregnant women, initially managing the situation with intravenous heparin and then switching to the subcutaneous route given in a bid or tid regimen, aiming to keep the activated partial thromboplastin time 1.5 to 2 times the control. The risks to both the fetus and the mother from anticoagulation during pregnancy are reviewed.

  14. Diagnostic prediction models for suspected pulmonary embolism: systematic review and independent external validation in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geersing, Geert-Jan; Lucassen, Wim A M; Erkens, Petra M G; Stoffers, Henri E J H; van Weert, Henk C P M; Büller, Harry R; Hoes, Arno W; Moons, Karel G M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate all diagnostic prediction models for ruling out pulmonary embolism that are easily applicable in primary care. Design Systematic review followed by independent external validation study to assess transportability of retrieved models to primary care medicine. Setting 300 general practices in the Netherlands. Participants Individual patient dataset of 598 patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism in primary care. Main outcome measures Discriminative ability of all models retrieved by systematic literature search, assessed by calculation and comparison of C statistics. After stratification into groups with high and low probability of pulmonary embolism according to pre-specified model cut-offs combined with qualitative D-dimer test, sensitivity, specificity, efficiency (overall proportion of patients with low probability of pulmonary embolism), and failure rate (proportion of pulmonary embolism cases in group of patients with low probability) were calculated for all models. Results Ten published prediction models for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were found. Five of these models could be validated in the primary care dataset: the original Wells, modified Wells, simplified Wells, revised Geneva, and simplified revised Geneva models. Discriminative ability was comparable for all models (range of C statistic 0.75-0.80). Sensitivity ranged from 88% (simplified revised Geneva) to 96% (simplified Wells) and specificity from 48% (revised Geneva) to 53% (simplified revised Geneva). Efficiency of all models was between 43% and 48%. Differences were observed between failure rates, especially between the simplified Wells and the simplified revised Geneva models (failure rates 1.2% (95% confidence interval 0.2% to 3.3%) and 3.1% (1.4% to 5.9%), respectively; absolute difference −1.98% (−3.33% to −0.74%)). Irrespective of the diagnostic prediction model used, three patients were incorrectly classified as having low probability of pulmonary

  15. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism following physical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S B; Jensen, T N; Bolwig, T

    2005-01-01

    physical restraint may occur in spite of no pre-existing risk factors. Medical guidelines for the prevention of thrombosis following physical restraint are presented. Despite the absence of controlled trials of treatment effectiveness, the catastrophic outcome of DVT and PE warrants early and vigorous......OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following the use of physical restraint in a patient with a diagnosis of acute delusional psychotic disorder. METHOD: A new case report of DVT and PE associated with prolonged physical restraint is presented....... The literature on physical restraint, DVT, and PE was reviewed using a search of Medline and Psychinfo from 1966 to the present. RESULTS: Four other reported cases of DVT and PE were found in association with physically restrained patients. CONCLUSION: Risk of DVT and PE in association with immobilization during...

  16. Is CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries indicated in patients with high clinical probability of pulmonary embolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Montesinos, L; Plasencia Martínez, J M; García Santos, J M

    2017-06-30

    When a diagnostic test confirms clinical suspicion, the indicated treatment can be administered. A problem arises when the diagnostic test does not confirm the initially suspected diagnosis; when the suspicion is grounded in clinically validated predictive rules and is high, the problem is even worse. This situation arises in up to 40% of patients with high suspicion for acute pulmonary embolism, raising the question of whether CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries should be done systematically. This paper reviews the literature about this issue and lays out the best evidence about the relevant recommendations for patients with high clinical suspicion of acute pulmonary embolism and negative findings on CT angiography. It also explains the probabilistic concepts derived from Bayes' theorem that can be useful for ascertaining the most appropriate approach in these patients. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Pulmonary Embolism in 2017: How We Got Here and Where Are We Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Geno J

    2017-09-01

    In the 1970s, both the Urokinase Pulmonary Embolism and Urokinase-Streptokinase Pulmonary Embolism trials began the quest to develop thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of acute massive and submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). The goals of these studies were the immediate reduction in clot burden, restoration of hemodynamic stability, and improved survival. Major bleeding became the major barrier for clinicians to employ these therapies. From 1980s to the present time, a number of studies using recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator for achieving these same above outcomes were completed but major bleeding continued to remain an adoption barrier. Finally, the concept of bringing the thrombolytic agent into the clot has entered the quest for the Holy Grail in the treatment of PE. This article will review all the major trials using peripheral thrombolysis and provide insight into the need for a team approach to pulmonary care (Pulmonary Embolism Response Team), standardization of pulmonary classification, and the need for trials designed for both short- and long-term outcomes using thrombolysis for selected PE populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS AFTER MASSIVE PULMONARY EMBOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Kovačić

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pulmonary embolism is a disease, which has a 30% mortality if untreated, while an early diagnosis and treatment lowers it to 2–8%. Health related quality of life (HRQL of patients who survived massive pulmonary embolism is unknown in published literature. In our research we tried to apply experience of foreign experts in estimation of quality of life in some other diseases to the field of massive pulmonary embolism.Patients and methods. Eighteen patients with shock or hypotension due to massive pulmonary embolism, treated with thrombolysis, between July 1993 and November 2000, were prospectively included in the study. Control group included 18 gender and age matched persons. There were no significant differences regarding demographic data between the groups. The HRQL and aerobic capacity of patients and control group were tested with short questions and questionnaires (Veterans brief, self administered questionnaire (VSAQ, EuroQuality questionnaire (EQ, Living with heart failure questionnaire (LlhHF. With LlhHF physical (F-LlhHF and emotional (E-LlhHF HRQL was assessed at hospitalization and 12 months later.Results. One year after massive pulmonary embolism aerobic capacity (–9.5%, p < 0.017 and HRQL (EQ (–34.5%, F-LlhHF (–85.4%, E-LlhHF (–48.7% decreased in massive pulmonary embolism group compared to aerobic capacity 6 months before massive pulmonary embolism and HRQL. Heart rate before thrombolysis correlated with aerobic capacity (r = 0.627, p < 0.01, EQ (r = 0.479, p < 0.01 and F-LlhHF (r = 0.479, p = 0.04 1 year after massive pulmonary embolism. Total pulmonary resistance at 12 hours after start of treatment correlated with aerobic capacity at 1 year (r = 0.354, p < 0.01.With short question (»Did you need any help in everyday activities in last 2 weeks?« we successfully separated patients with decreased HRQL in EQ (74.3 ± 20.8 vs. 24.5 ± 20.7, p < 0.001 and F-LlhHF (21.7 ± 6.7 vs. 32.8 ± 4.3, p < 0.01, but we

  19. Surgical Embolectomy for Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Daitoku, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism is a catastrophic event, especially for hospitalized patients. The prognosis of pulmonary thromboembolism depends on the degree of pulmonary arterial occlusion. The mortality of massive pulmonary embolism is reportedly as high as 25% without cardiopulmonary arrest and 65% with cardiopulmonary arrest. In patients with unstable hemodynamics due to pulmonary thromboembolism, surgical pulmonary embolectomy is indicated for patients with a contraindication to thrombolysis, failed catheter therapy, or failed thrombolysis. Thrombolytic therapy adds an additional burden on patients who are at risk of potential hemorrhagic complications. It is also indicated if patients are already on a veno-arterial extra-corporate membrane oxygenator for circulatory collapse or cardiopulmonary arrest. The outcome for patients who require cardiopulmonary resuscitation for longer than 30 minutes is poor. Therefore, early triage for massive and sub-massive pulmonary embolism is crucial. A team approach including a cardiovascular surgeon may be effective to save critically ill patients. Prompt removal of emboli reduces the right ventricular load with quick recovery of cardiopulmonary function in the early postoperative period. A recent series reported excellent results, with in-hospital mortality of less than 10%. Surgical pulmonary embolectomy is an effective, safe, and easy procedure to save critical patients due to pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:29034035

  20. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  1. Acute Thrombo-embolic Renal Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman was admitted for acute onset of right lower abdominal pain. She was taking anticoagulant medication regularly for rheumatic valvular disease and atrial fibrillation. Physical examination revealed no obvious abdominal or flank tenderness. Right thrombo-embolic renal infarction was diagnosed after performing computed tomography angiography (CTA.

  2. The model of pulmonary embolism caused by autologous thrombus in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jiao Ding

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish a model of pulmonary embolism in rabbits by using autologous thrombosis of rabbit ear vein, to study the method of establishing acute pulmonary embolism by using autologous thrombus and to explore the diagnostic value of oxygen partial pressure in acute pulmonary embolism. Methods: Twenty rabbits were randomly divided into normal group (n=5, 7 h group, 24h group, 1 week after model establishment Group. The arterial blood gas analysis was performed on the carotid arteries of rabbits at 7 h, 24 h and 1 W after modeling. Results: Normal group oxygen partial pressure (93.15 ± 2.26 mmHg, 7 h group oxygen partial pressure (81.98 ± 1.94 mmHg, 24 h group oxygen partial pressure (84.55 ± 2.18 mmHg, 1 W group oxygen partial pressure (92.66 ± 1.92 mmHg. Normal group oxygen partial pressure and 7 h group, 24 h group oxygen partial pressure, P value was less than 0.05 and less than 0.01, indicating that the difference was statistically significant. Normal group oxygen partial pressure and 1 week group oxygen partial pressure, P value greater than 0.05, indicating that the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The oxygen partial pressure was reduced at 7 h after the establishment of the acute pulmonary embolism model and failed to return to normal within 24 h. After 1 week, the embolus began to dissolve, the respiratory and circulatory system was reestablished, and the oxygen partial pressure gradually Return to normal level. Indicating that there is a positive correlation between oxygen partial pressure and acute pulmonary embolism.

  3. Diagnosis, management and prognosis of symptomatic and incidental pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exter, den P.L.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes studies that aimed to evaluate and improve the diagnostic work-up and management of pulmonary embolism. Age-adjusted D-dimer testing was found to be an effective and safe strategy to reduce the need for CT-imaging in elderly patients with clinically suspected pulmonary

  4. Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Stratification, and Natural History of Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Nicholas J; Jansson, Paul S; Young, Michael N; Hagan, Kaitlin A; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially fatal form of venous thromboembolism that can be challenging to diagnose and manage. PE occurs when there is obstruction of the pulmonary vasculature and is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. A combination of acquired and inherited factors may contribute to the development of this disease and should be considered, since they have implications for both susceptibility to PE and treatment. Patients with suspected PE should be evaluated efficiently to diagnose and administer therapy as soon as possible, but the presentation of PE is variable and nonspecific so diagnosis is challenging. PE can range from small, asymptomatic blood clots to large emboli that can occlude the pulmonary arteries causing sudden cardiovascular collapse and death. Thus, risk stratification is critical to both the prognosis and management of acute PE. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, and natural history of PE and deep vein thrombosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Symptoms, location and prognosis of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, M T; Pena-Álvarez, C; López-Landeiro, P; Bermo-Domínguez, A; Fontúrbel, T; González-Barcala, F J

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common disease with variable symptoms and high overall mortality. The clinical relevance of the extent of PE is still debatable, and the role of anticoagulation in patients with subsegmental involvement has been contested. Our objective is to describe the clinical details of patients with PE in our hospital and to analyze their prognosis based on the extent of the disease. Retrospective study of 313 patients diagnosed with PE by chest computed tomography (CT) scan at the Hospital Complex of Pontevedra in Spain for six years. Predictors of mortality were determined by multivariate analysis. Women accounted for 56% of patients, and patient median age was 70 years (interquartile range 53-78 years). Subsegmental PE accounted for 7% of all cases; these patients were younger and had lower comorbidity; they reported chest pain more often, performed better in blood gas analysis and none of them had proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Patients with subsegmental PE had a higher survival rate. Factors independently associated with mortality were cancer diagnosis and higher comorbidity. Patients with subsegmental PE clinically differ from those with more proximal PE. Underlying diseases have more influence on the prognosis than the extent of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjonbrataj, Endri; Kim, Ji Na; Gjonbrataj, Juarda; Jung, Hye In; Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Won-Il

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with provoked pulmonary embolism (PE). This retrospective cohort study included 237 patients with PE. Patients that had transient risk factors at diagnosis were classified as having provoked PE, with the remaining patients being classified as having unprovoked PE. The baseline clinical characteristics and factors associated with coagulation were compared. We evaluated the risk factors associated with provoked PE. Of the 237 PE patients, 73 (30.8%) had provoked PE. The rate of respiratory failure and infection, as well as the disseminated intravascular coagulation score and ratio of right ventricular diameter to left ventricular diameter were significantly higher in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. The protein and activity levels associated with coagulation, including protein C antigen, protein S antigen, protein S activity, anti-thrombin III antigen, and factor VIII, were significantly lower in patients with provoked PE than in those with unprovoked PE. Multivariate analysis showed that infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 7.4) and protein S activity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95 to 0.99) were significantly associated with provoked PE. Protein S activity and presence of infection were important factors associated with provoked PE. We should pay attention to the presence of infection in patients with provoked PE.

  7. Right Heart Thrombi Accompained with Pulmonary Embolism

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    Mustafa Çörtük

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Right sided heart thrombus (RSHT is rarely seen. It is generally detected during transthoracic echocardiographic (TTE examination or multislice thoracic computed tomographic scanning for pulmonary embolism (PE. Although RSHT and PE secondary to this situation is rare, mortality during the course of process is very high. We aim to aproach right cardiac trombus and determine the results of treatment. Method: In this study 25 patients hospital records were investigated retrospectively. The data obtained consisted of diagnostic methods, presence of shock state, treatments applied and results were assessed. Results: Th present study revealed that the 32% of patients had been admitted to hospital in shock state, hospital mortality rate was 24%, and this mortality rate was not affected by different treatment choices. Conclusion: The exact incidence of RSHT is unknown. It is reported that the probability of seeing a case suffering from RSHT during echocardiographic examination performed to diagnose the PE is 9%. RSHT may cause PE anytime and requires urgent treatment. In our study, we determined that the hospital mortaliy did not change with the type of given treatment and overall mortality was determined as 24%. There are no sufficient studies searching large series on RSHT in literature. Therefore, there is no agreement on treatment tecniques.

  8. Simplified diagnostic management of suspected pulmonary embolism (the YEARS study): a prospective, multicentre, cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hulle, Tom; Cheung, Whitney Y; Kooij, Stephanie; Beenen, Ludo F M; van Bemmel, Thomas; van Es, Josien; Faber, Laura M; Hazelaar, Germa M; Heringhaus, Christian; Hofstee, Herman; Hovens, Marcel M C; Kaasjager, Karin A H; van Klink, Rick C J; Kruip, Marieke J H A; Loeffen, Rinske F; Mairuhu, Albert T A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Nijkeuter, Mathilde; van der Pol, Liselotte M; Schol-Gelok, Suzanne; Ten Wolde, Marije; Klok, Frederikus A; Huisman, Menno V

    2017-07-15

    Validated diagnostic algorithms in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism are often not used correctly or only benefit subgroups of patients, leading to overuse of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). The YEARS clinical decision rule that incorporates differential D-dimer cutoff values at presentation, has been developed to be fast, to be compatible with clinical practice, and to reduce the number of CTPA investigations in all age groups. We aimed to prospectively evaluate this novel and simplified diagnostic algorithm for suspected acute pulmonary embolism. We did a prospective, multicentre, cohort study in 12 hospitals in the Netherlands, including consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism between Oct 5, 2013, to July 9, 2015. Patients were managed by simultaneous assessment of the YEARS clinical decision rule, consisting of three items (clinical signs of deep vein thrombosis, haemoptysis, and whether pulmonary embolism is the most likely diagnosis), and D-dimer concentrations. In patients without YEARS items and D-dimer less than 1000 ng/mL, or in patients with one or more YEARS items and D-dimer less than 500 ng/mL, pulmonary embolism was considered excluded. All other patients had CTPA. The primary outcome was the number of independently adjudicated events of venous thromboembolism during 3 months of follow-up after pulmonary embolism was excluded, and the secondary outcome was the number of required CTPA compared with the Wells' diagnostic algorithm. For the primary outcome regarding the safety of the diagnostic strategy, we used a per-protocol approach. For the secondary outcome regarding the efficiency of the diagnostic strategy, we used an intention-to-diagnose approach. This trial is registered with the Netherlands Trial Registry, number NTR4193. 3616 consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism were screened, of whom 151 (4%) were excluded. The remaining 3465 patients were assessed of whom 456 (13%) were

  9. Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) / Pulmonary Embolism (PE) - Blood Clot Forming in a Vein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) are often underdiagnosed and serious, but ... bloodstream to the lungs, causing a blockage called pulmonary embolism (PE). If the clot is small, and with ...

  10. Suspected pulmonary embolism in patients with pulmonary fibrosis: Discordance between ventilation/perfusion SPECT and CT pulmonary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, Gabriela; Wenter, Vera; Milger, Katrin; Zimmermann, Gregor S; Matthes, Sandhya; Meinel, Felix G; Lehner, Sebastian; Neurohr, Claus; Behr, Jürgen; Kneidinger, Nikolaus

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common differential diagnosis in patients with pulmonary fibrosis presenting with a clinical deterioration. Both ventilation/perfusion (V/Q)-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) are routinely used to detect PE. However, the value of V/Q-SPECT and CTPA in this scenario has not been studied so far. We aimed to investigate the concordance of V/Q-SPECT and CTPA in patients with pulmonary fibrosis and suspicion of pulmonary embolism. A total of 22 consecutive patients with pulmonary fibrosis and clinical deterioration who underwent both V/Q-SPECT and CTPA were included in the study and analyzed for the presence of pulmonary embolism. Nine of 22 patients (41%) had evidence for pulmonary embolism in V/Q-SPECT, and two of these patients had matching evidence for pulmonary embolism in CTPA. In the other seven patients with positive findings in V/Q-SPECT, no evidence of pulmonary embolism was found in CTPA. None of the 13 patients with a negative V/Q-SPECT had evidence for pulmonary embolism in CTPA. In patients with pulmonary fibrosis and suspected pulmonary embolism, pulmonary embolism is detected more frequently by V/Q-SPECT than by CTPA. Thromboembolic disease is identified on CTPA only in a minority of patients with positive findings on V/Q-SPECT. When making treatment decisions, clinicians should be aware of the high rate of discordant findings in V/Q-SPECT and CTPA in this specific patient population. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Outcome of surgical embolectomy in patients with massive pulmonary embolism with and without cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Samad; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Safaei, Naser; Mohammadi, Kamran; Ranjbar, Abdolmohammad; Ghodratizadeh, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary embolism is a challenging critical cardiovascular disease with high morbidity and mortality. Surgical embolectomy has favorable results in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Aim To study the outcome of embolectomy in patients with massive pulmonary embolism. Material and methods In this single-center, retrospective study, 36 patients including 14 male and 22 female patients with a mean age of 50.80 ±18.89 years with acute pulmonary embolism who underwent surgical pulmonary embolectomy from January 2011 to January 2016 were included. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for demographic and preoperative data and postoperative outcomes. Results Common risk factors for acute PE were major surgery within 3 months and deep vein thrombosis. The most common presenting symptoms of patients were dyspnea, followed by chest pain and syncope. Mean duration of hospitalization was 14.76 ±8.69 days and mean operation duration was 4.47 ±1.54 h. Mean time from admission to embolectomy was 6.58 ±1.13 h. Ten (27.8%) patients died during the operation including 3 cases with cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to surgery and 2 cases with severe cardiogenic shock. Patients who survived were followed for 6 months. The mortality rate during follow-up was 15.4%; all 4 patients died during follow-up period due to metastatic cancer. No pulmonary embolism recurrance were seen. Conclusions Although surgical embolectomy mostly was done for high risk patients, it had good in-hospital and excellent mid-term outcomes. PMID:29354176

  12. Calcium Hydroxylapatite Pulmonary Embolism after Percutaneous Injection Laryngoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Seong Jun; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2017-11-01

    Injection medialization laryngoplasty is a procedure that has many advantages in treating vocal fold paralysis; however, undesired complications can occur. We experienced a case of a pulmonary embolism, suspected in a patient who had undergone an injection laryngoplasty with calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA). The patient suffered dyspnea after undergoing the injection laryngoplasty. Chest embolism computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a new lesion of enhancing materials at the pulmonary vasculature in the right upper lobe. The CaHA embolism was suspected, and the patient was treated with warfarin for 12 months. The patient's symptom of dyspnea nearly disappeared and a follow up chest embolism CT scan revealed no signs of the previous lesion. Thus, we would like to report this rare case along with a review of the literature. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017.

  13. Symptoms, location and prognosis of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. García-Sanz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Pulmonary embolism (PE is a common disease with variable symptoms and high overall mortality. The clinical relevance of the extent of PE is still debatable, and the role of anticoagulation in patients with subsegmental involvement has been contested. Our objective is to describe the clinical details of patients with PE in our hospital and to analyze their prognosis based on the extent of the disease. Materials and methods: Retrospective study of 313 patients diagnosed with PE by chest computed tomography (CT scan at the Hospital Complex of Pontevedra in Spain for six years. Predictors of mortality were determined by multivariate analysis. Results: Women accounted for 56% of patients, and patient median age was 70 years (interquartile range 53–78 years. Subsegmental PE accounted for 7% of all cases; these patients were younger and had lower comorbidity; they reported chest pain more often, performed better in blood gas analysis and none of them had proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Patients with subsegmental PE had a higher survival rate. Factors independently associated with mortality were cancer diagnosis and higher comorbidity. Conclusions: Patients with subsegmental PE clinically differ from those with more proximal PE. Underlying diseases have more influence on the prognosis than the extent of the disease. Resumo: Contexto e objectivo: A embolia pulmonar (PE é uma doença comum com sintomas variáveis e uma elevada taxa de mortalidade global. A relevância clínica da extensão da PE é ainda fonte de debate, e o papel da anticoagulação em pacientes com envolvimento de sub-segmentos foi contestado. O nosso objectivo é descrever os dados clínicos de doentes com PE no nosso hospital e analisar o seu prognóstico, com base na extensão da doença. Materiais e métodos: Estudo retrospectivo de 313 doentes, diagnosticados com PE, através de uma tomografia computadorizada de t

  14. Diagnostic Value of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Combined with Perfusion Imaging for Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xijin; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Xingyue; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism has become the third most common cardiovascular disease, which can seriously harm human health. Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-source computerized tomography (CT) and perfusion imaging for peripheral pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent dual-source CT exams. To compare the ability of pulmonary embolism detection software (PED) with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in determining the presence, numbers, and locations of pulmonary emboli, the subsequent images were reviewed by two radiologists using both imaging modalities. Also, the diagnostic consistency between PED and CTPA images and dual-energy pulmonary perfusion imaging (DEPI) for segmental pulmonary embolism was compared. Results CTPA images revealed 50 (7.81%) segmental and 56 (4.38%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms, while the PED images showed 68 (10.63%) segmental and 94 (7.34%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms. Thus, the detection rate on PED images for peripheral pulmonary embolism was significantly higher than that of the CTPA images (P pulmonary embolism between PED and CTPA and DEPI (kappa = 0.85). The sensitivity and specificity of DEPI images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were 91.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion PED software of dual-source CT combined with perfusion imaging can significantly improve the detection rate of peripheral pulmonary embolism. PMID:27703656

  15. Pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension in the setting of negative computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui PV

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH can display acute elevations in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP in the setting of hypoxemia, pulmonary embolism (PE, and possibly sepsis. Case Description: A 68-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, recent tobacco cessation, and recent 2-vessel coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG presented with one to two weeks of respiratory symptoms and syncope on the day of admission. He was found to have a urinary tract infection and Escherichia coli bacteremia. Transthoracic echocardiography found a systolic PAP of 100-105 mmHg, increased from a mean PAP of 32 mmHg before CABG. PE was not seen on computed tomography angiography (CTA. Ventilation-perfusion scan two days later found evidence of subsegmental PE. PAP prior to discharge was 30-35 mmHg plus right atrial pressure. Conclusion: PAP can rise substantially in the acute or subacute setting, particularly when multiple disease processes are involved, and decrease to (near baseline with proper therapy. Chronic PH may even be protective. In a complex clinical setting with multiple possible etiologies for elevated PAP, clinicians should have a high suspicion for PE despite a negative CTA.

  16. High D-dimer levels increase the likelihood of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tick, L. W.; Nijkeuter, M.; Kramer, M. H. H.; Hovens, M. M. C.; Büller, H. R.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; Huisman, M. V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To determine the utility of high quantitative D-dimer levels in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Methods. D-dimer testing was performed in consecutive patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. We included patients with suspected pulmonary embolism with a high risk for venous

  17. OBESITY AS A RISK FACTOR FOR PULMONARY EMBOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ya. Vasiltseva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study. Based on the data of the Register of new cases of hospital pulmonary embolism (PE in hospitals in Tomsk (2003–2012, to explore the contribution of obesity to the development of venous thromboembolism.Material and Methods. Study were subjected to medical history and records of autopsies of patients treated in hospitals in Tomsk in 2003–2012, who at patologoanatomic and/or instrumental study revealed pulmonary embolism. The degree of obesity was assessed according to WHO criteria (1997. Statistical processing of the results was carried out using the software package for PC Statistica 8.0 for Windows. To test the normality of the distribution of quantitative traits using the Shapiro–Wilk test and the Kolmogorov–Smirnov with the adjusted Lillieforsa. Check the equality of the population variance was performed using Fisher's exact test and Cochran. Was considered statistically significant level of p < 0.05.The results of the study. In Western Siberia, Tomsk, a register of hospital pulmonary embolism (2003–2012. In the register included 720 patients with in vivo and/or post mortem revealed pulmonary embolism (PE. Analyzed data from medical records and autopsy reports. Revealed statistically significant differences in BMI (p = 0.033 and the presence of obesity (p = 0.002 in patients with pulmonary embolism, holding medical and surgical beds. As of medical, surgical and among patients with thromboembolism, obesity is significantly more common in women than men (p = 0.050 and p = 0.041 respectively. According to the study, obesity grade 1 or 2 alone (at the isolated presence of the patient is not significantly increased the odds of a massive thromboembolism. However, grade 3 obesity increased the odds of a massive pulmonary embolism by more than 2.7 times (OR = 2.708, CI: 1,461–5,020.

  18. Reduction of lymph tissue false positives in pulmonary embolism detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Bernard; Liang, Jianming; Bi, Jinbo; Salganicoff, Marcos; Krishnan, Arun

    2008-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a serious medical condition, characterized by the partial/complete blockage of an artery within the lungs. We have previously developed a fast yet effective approach for computer aided detection of PE in computed topographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA),1 which is capable of detecting both acute and chronic PEs, achieving a benchmark performance of 78% sensitivity at 4 false positives (FPs) per volume. By reviewing the FPs generated by this system, we found the most dominant type of FP, roughly one third of all FPs, to be lymph/connective tissue. In this paper, we propose a novel approach that specifically aims at reducing this FP type. Our idea is to explicitly exploit the anatomical context configuration of PE and lymph tissue in the lungs: a lymph FP connects to the airway and is located outside the artery, while a true PE should not connect to the airway and must be inside the artery. To realize this idea, given a detected candidate (i.e. a cluster of suspicious voxels), we compute a set of contextual features, including its distance to the airway based on local distance transform and its relative position to the artery based on fast tensor voting and Hessian "vesselness" scores. Our tests on unseen cases show that these features can reduce the lymph FPs by 59%, while improving the overall sensitivity by 3.4%.

  19. Pulmonary Embolism in the Postanesthesia Care Unit: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Debbie; Murauski, Jackie

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a complication that can occur at any time during the perioperative period. The patient undergoing surgery to repair a hip fracture is at a high risk of developing a PE due to venous thrombosis, tissue, or fat emboli. The signs and symptoms of a PE are often nonspecific and can be obscured in the patient receiving or recovering from general anesthesia. This case study describes the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of a patient experiencing a pulmonary embolism in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) after surgery to repair a hip fracture. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute pulmonary embolism: prediction of cor pulmonale and short-term patient survival from assessment of cardiac dimensions in routine multidetector-row CT; Mehrschicht-Spiral-CT bei vermuteter und inzidenteller akuter Lungenembolie: prognostischer Wert morpholoqischer Herzparameter

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    Engeike, C. [Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Rummeny, E.; Marten, K. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Purpose: evaluation of the prognostic value of morphological cardiac parameters in patients with suspected and incidental acute pulmonary embolism (PE) using multidetector-row chest CT (MSCT). Materials and methods: 2335 consecutive MSCT scans were evaluated for the presence of PE. The arterial enhancement and analysability of pulmonary arteries and the heart were assessed as parameters of the scan quality. The diastolic right and left ventricular short axes (RV{sub D}, LV{sub D}) and the interventricular septal deviation (ISD) were measured in all PE-positive patients and the echocardiography reports were reviewed. The clinical data assessment included cardio-respiratory and other co-morbidities, systemic anticoagulant therapy (ACT), and the 30-day outcome. Predictors of acute cor pulmonale and the short-term outcome were calculated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions including odds ratios (OR) and ROC analyses using positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV). Results: 90 patients with acute PE were included (36 with clinically suspected PE, 54 with incidental PE). 26 patients had cardio-respiratory co-morbidities. Four patients underwent systemic thrombolysis, 43 underwent anticoagulation in therapeutic doses, 19 underwent anticoagulation in prophylactic doses, and 24 patients did not undergo ACT. 15 of 41 patients had echocardiographic evidence of acute cor pulmonale. 8 patients died within 30 days. The RV{sub D} was the best independent predictor of acute cor pulmonale (p = 0,002, OR = 9.16, PPV = 0.68, NPV=1 at 4.49 cm cut off) and short-term outcome (p= 0,0005, OR = 2.82, PPV = 0.23, NPV = 0.98 at 4.75 cm cut off). The RV{sub D}/LV{sub D} ratio had a PPV of 0.85 for cor pulmonale. (orig.)

  1. Life-Threatening Contraceptive-Related Pulmonary Embolism in a 14-Year-Old Girl with Hereditary Thrombophilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2015-01-01

    . Based on a case of life-threatening COC-associated pulmonary embolism in a girl heterozygous for the prothrombin G20210A mutation and with a family history of thrombotic disease, we discuss the importance of assessing not just the genotype but also the phenotype when considering initiation of COCs...... in patients with thrombophilia. CASE REPORT: A 14-year-old girl presented with acute onset of chest pain and dyspnea followed by syncope. She was hypoxic and hemodynamically compromised at admission. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed a large central "saddle" pulmonary embolism causing nearly...

  2. Use of rivaroxaban in an elderly patient with intermediate-low early mortality risk due to pulmonary embolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, Maurizio; Rosso, Sebastiano; Menegatti, Elisa; Pazzaglia, Maria

    2015-11-26

    Pulmonary embolism remains one of the leading causes of cardiovascular mortality. The standard treatment for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulant therapy using low molecular weight heparin, fondaparinux and a vitamin K antagonist, but a recent clinical trial showed that rivaroxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, was as effective as standard therapy for the initial and long-term treatment of pulmonary embolism and had less bleeding complications. The present report describes the case of an 80-year-old white man with an intermediate to low early mortality risk of pulmonary embolism. He was successfully treated with rivaroxaban (administered orally as monotherapy), demonstrating rapid benefit without any adverse events. Rivaroxaban, particularly in the acute phase of pulmonary embolism, may be considered an effective and safe therapeutic choice even in elderly patients, a population less represented in clinical trials.

  3. Role of spiral CT in the diagnostic work-up of acute and chronic pulmonary embolism; Wo steht die Spiral-CT in der Stufendiagnostik der akuten und chronischen Lungenembolie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Ries, B.G.; Heussel, C.P.; Roberts, H.C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie

    1998-03-01

    With the more widespread availability of spiral CT scanners during the last five years spiral CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries has been etablished as an accurate test for acute and chronic pulmonary embolism. It is reliable in the direct visualization of thrombotic material down to the segmental level. In several studies, sensitivity and specificity of 80 to 100% as compared with pulmonary angiography were reported. Compared with scintigraphy and echocardiography, spiral CT more often provides a definite and certain diagnosis. In addition to the direct visualization of the emboli spiral CT shows vessel wall thickening as a sign of older emboli, infarction, pneumonia, pleural effusion. Differential diagnoses are depicted significantly more frequent compared with scintigraphy. In chronic thromboembolic disease spiral CT detects vessel wall alterations even more often than angiography. Additionally, spiral CT demonstrates typical changes due to pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure. Depending on the experience of the investigator and the local conditions, spiral CT is equally well suited for further work-up of indeterminate scintigraphic findings or as a primary screening tool for patients in whom pulmonary embolism is suspected. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Mit zunehmender Verbreitung von Spiral-CT Geraeten hat sich die Spiral-CT-Angiographie der Pulmonalarterien in den letzten fuenf Jahren als eine verlaessliche Methode zur Diagnostik der aktuen und chronischen Lungenembolie etabliert. Sie erlaubt zuverlaessig den direkten Nachweis des thrombotischen Materials bis auf Segmentebene. In verschiedenen Studien werden Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet im Vergleich zur Pulmonalisangiographie mit 80 bis 100% angegeben. Im Vergleich zu Szintigraphie und Echokardiographie ist oefter eine eindeutige und sichere Diagnose moeglich. Zusaetzlich zum direkten Thrombusnachweis zeigt die Spiral-CT Wandverdickungen als Zeichen aelterer Thrombembolien, Infarktpneumonien und

  4. Direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Joanna B; Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this review is to examine the management strategies for pulmonary embolism (PE) with an emphasis of the role of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). PubMed was searched to identify relevant journal articles published through April 2017. Additional references were obtained from articles discovered during the database search. Initial heparinization followed by long-term anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists has been considered the mainstay for the treatment of PE. However, DOACs now offer comparably effective and potentially safer alternatives for both acute and long-term treatment of PE using a monotherapy approach without the need for initial heparinization for rivaroxaban or apixaban. Advantages to using DOACs include oral availability, rapid onset of action, minimal drug and food interactions, predictable pharmacokinetics, and lack of need for routine monitoring. Limitations of using these agents include a limited availability of assays to quickly and efficiently measure their anticoagulant effects and the lack of widely available reversal agents for the direct oral factor Xa inhibitors; although idarucizumab has recently been approved for the reversal of dabigatran's anticoagulant effects. Advantages to using DOACs render them an attractive alternative to conventional therapy in PE treatment that may simplify acute and long-term treatment paradigms, improve patient outcomes, and increase patient compliance. However, questions remain pertaining to the use of DOACs in PE patients with high-risk features and in cancer patients and fragile populations. Clinical studies are under way to address many of these issues.

  5. Low-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm presenting with pulmonary embolism: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papoulidis Pavlos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pulmonary artery aneurysm is an uncommon disorder with severe complications. The diagnosis is often difficult, since the clinical manifestations are non-specific and the treatment is controversial, as the natural history of the disease is not completely understood. Case presentation We describe the cases of two patients with pulmonary artery aneurysms. The first patient was a 68-year-old Caucasian man with an idiopathic low-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm together with a pulmonary embolism. The patient preferred a conservative approach and was stable at the 10-month follow-up visit after being placed on anti-coagulant treatment. The second patient was a 66-year-old Caucasian woman with a low-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm also presented together with a pulmonary embolism. The aneurysm was secondary to pulmonary valve stenosis. She received anti-coagulants and, after stabilization, underwent percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty. Conclusion Pulmonary embolism may be the initial presentation of a low-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm. No underlying cause for pulmonary embolism was found in either of our patients, suggesting a causal association with low-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm.

  6. Successful thrombolysis of major pulmonary embolism 5 days after lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, Jens; Licht, Peter B

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive intravenous thrombolysis of pulmonary emboli after major thoracic surgery has rarely been reported and is controversial because of an assumed risk of fatal bleeding. We report a 62-year old female who underwent left upper lobectomy. Her postoperative course was complicated with symptom...... with symptomatic pulmonary embolism and on postoperative day 5 she was successfully treated with intravenous thrombolysis using alteplase (Actilyse(®)) without signs of bleeding. She was discharged from the hospital 12 days postoperatively....

  7. The relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wu, Xueling; Liu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Background Tumor markers (TMs) and D-Dimer are both hallmarks of severity and prognosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers could be related to pulmonary embolism (PE) in lung cancer. Results The number of abnormal tumor markers of lung cancer patients with pulmonary embolism (3.9 ± 1.1vs1.6 ± 0.6,P 0.005) was more than that in patients without pulmonary embolism. TMs panel (P trend pulmonary embolism. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, for tumor markers, TMs panel (OR5.98, P pulmonary embolism. The AUC (area under curve) of TMs panel and CEA were 0.82 [95%CI (0.71–0.95), P pulmonary embolism and those without pulmonary embolism Then the correlation between each tumor marker as well as panel of combined TMs and D-Dimer as well as pulmonary embolism were analyzed for patients with pulmonary embolism. Conclusions There is a relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in patients with lung cancer. The panel of combined tumor markers is a valuable diagnostic marker for pulmonary embolism in lung cancer. PMID:28575869

  8. Pulmonary embolism and stroke associated with mechanical thrombectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Bastianetto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical thrombectomy offers the advantage of rapid removal of venous thrombi. It allows venous obstructions to be removed and requires shorter duration of infusion of thrombolytic agents. However, aspiration of thrombi can lead to complications, particularly pulmonary embolism and hemolysis. The validity of using vena cava filters during thrombectomy in order to avoid embolism has not yet been established. The authors report a case of massive pulmonary embolism associated with ischemic stroke in a patient with a hitherto undiagnosed patent foramen ovale. The patient developed respiratory failure and neurological deficit after thrombectomy. This case raise questions about the value of the thrombectomy for the treatment of proximal vein thrombosis due to the risks of this procedure. The authors also discuss the need for vena cava filters and ruling out a patent foramen ovale in patients undergoing thrombectomy.

  9. Prognostic role of a new risk index for the prediction of 30-day cardiovascular mortality in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: the Age-Mean Arterial Pressure Index (AMAPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuin, Marco; Rigatelli, Gianluca; Picariello, Claudio; Carraro, Mauro; Zonzin, Pietro; Roncon, Loris

    2017-12-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third cause of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. We evaluated a new risk index, named Age-Mean Arterial Pressure Index (AMAPI), to predict 30-day CV mortality in patients with acute PE. Data of 209 patients (44.0% male and 56.0% female, mean age 70.58 ± 14.14 years) with confirmed acute PE were retrospectively analysed. AMAPI was calculated as the ratio between age and mean arterial pressure (MAP), which was defined as [systolic blood pressure + (2 × diastolic blood pressure)]/3. To test AMAPI accuracy, a comparison with shock index (SI) and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (sPESI) was performed. Patients were divided in two groups according their hemodynamic stability, or not, at admission. 30-day mortality rate, in all cases for CV events, was 10.5% (n = 22). Hemodynamically unstable patients had a higher AMAPI compare to those without hypotension at admission (1.28 ± 0.39 vs 0.78 ± 0.27, p < 0.0001). Receiving operative curve analyses (ROC) found the optimal cut-off for AMAPI in hemodynamically stable and unstable patients ≥0.9 and ≥0.92, respectively. In both groups, patients with an AMAPI over the cut-off were significantly older, hypotensive (both systolic and diastolic blood pressure), with a higher SI and lower MAP. In hemodynamically stable patients, 30-day CV mortality risk prediction was improved adding AMAPI ≥0.9 to both SI and sPESI (net reclassification improvement-NRI-of 14.2%, p = 0.0006 and 11.5%, p = 0.0002, respectively). In hemodynamically unstable patients NRI was 19.2%, p = 0.006. Mantel-Cox analysis revealed a statistical significant difference in the distribution of survival between hemodynamically stable patients with an AMAPI index ≥0.9 compared to those with an AMAPI <0.89 [log rank (Mantel-Cox) p < 0.0001] and in hemodynamically unstable patients with an AMAPI ≥0.92 [log rank (Mantel-Cox) p = 0.001]. AMAPI ≥0.90 and ≥0.92 predict 30-day CV mortality

  10. Value of CT pulmonary angiography to predict short-term outcome in patient with pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Ahmed M; Abdeldayem, Emad H

    2018-01-18

    To evaluate the role of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in the assessment of pulmonary embolism (PE) severity and the related CT cardiac changes, reflecting the clinical status of the patients and predicting the outcome. A prospective study of 184 patients presented with suspicious acute PE. All patients underwent CTPA followed by ECHO. Pulmonary artery obstructive index (PAOI) using Qanadli Score was calculated and cardiac changes recorded. The patients' outcome was followed up for 30 days. Only 150 patients completed the study; 26.7% needed ICU admission while 13.3% died during follow-up. There was a significant relationship between the PAOI and the risk classification, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) diagnosed by ECHO and the patients' short outcome. We found PAOI cut off value 45% for mortality and 35% for ICU admission and 27.5% for RVD with 60, 75 and 90% sensitivity and 80, 73.3 and 68.6% specificity respectively. CT RV/LV ratio was the most sensitive parameter to predict RV dysfunction followed by pulmonary artery diameter. CTPA is not only used for diagnosis but also to assess the severity of PE, the effect on the right ventricular function and subsequently the need for ICU admission and prediction of the outcome.

  11. State-of-the-Art Imaging in Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Frary, Charles; Gerke, Oke

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common, ubiquitous, and potentially lethal disease. As symptoms and clinical findings are notoriously nonspecific, diagnostic imaging is essential to avoid undertreatment as well as overtreatment. Controversies remain regarding first-line imaging in suspected PE. The ...

  12. Automatic Detection of Pulmonary Embolism in CTA Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Sonnemans, J.J.; Vilanova, A.; Gerritsen, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common life-threatening disorder for which an early diagnosis is desirable. We propose a new system for the automatic detection of PE in contrast-enhanced CT images. The system consists of candidate detection, feature computation and classification. Candidate

  13. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) and pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, R.F.; Bijl, A.; Van Puijenbroek, E.P.

    Introduction: PDE5i-related arterial thromboembolism is described in literature. Published venous thrombotic events are limited to one case of pulmonary embolism (tadalafil) and of recurrent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) related to sildenafil. Aim of the study: Presentation of two cases of vardenafil

  14. Systemic Thrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism: Who and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapson, Victor F; Friedman, Oren

    2017-09-01

    Anticoagulation has been shown to improve mortality in acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Initiation of anticoagulation should be considered when PE is strongly suspected and the bleeding risk is perceived to be low, even if acute PE has not yet been proven. Low-risk patients with acute PE are simply continued on anticoagulation. Severely ill patients with high-risk (massive) PE require aggressive therapy, and if the bleeding risk is acceptable, systemic thrombolysis should be considered. However, despite clear evidence that parenteral thrombolytic therapy leads to more rapid clot resolution than anticoagulation alone, the risk of major bleeding including intracranial bleeding is significantly higher when systemic thrombolytic therapy is administered. It has been demonstrated that right ventricular dysfunction, as well as abnormal biomarkers (troponin and brain natriuretic peptide) are associated with increased mortality in acute PE. In spite of this, intermediate-risk (submassive) PE comprises a fairly broad clinical spectrum. For several decades, clinicians and clinical trialists have worked toward a more aggressive, yet safe solution for patients with intermediate-risk PE. Standard-dose thrombolysis, low-dose systemic thrombolysis, and catheter-based therapy which includes a number of devices and techniques, with or without low-dose thrombolytic therapy, have offered potential solutions and this area has continued to evolve. On the basis of heterogeneity within the category of intermediate-risk as well as within the high-risk group of patients, we will focus on the use of systemic thrombolysis in carefully selected high- and intermediate-risk patients. In certain circumstances when the need for aggressive therapy is urgent and the bleeding risk is acceptable, this is an appropriate approach, and often the best one. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. MRI of pulmonary embolism; MRT der akuten Lungenembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C.; Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Mannheim (Germany); Thieme, S.; Clevert, D.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Ley, S. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Paediatrische Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Recent technical developments have substantially improved the potential of MRI for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. On the MR scanner side this includes the development of short magnets and dedicated whole-body MRI systems, which allow a comprehensive evaluation of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in a single exam. The introduction of parallel imaging has substantially improved the spatial and temporal resolution of pulmonary MR angiography. By combining time-resolved pulmonary perfusion MRI with high-resolution pulmonary MRA a sensitivity and specificity of over 90% is achievable, which is comparable to the accuracy of CTA. Thus, for certain patient groups, such as patients with contraindications to iodinated contrast media and young women with a low clinical probability for pulmonary embolism, MRI can be considered as a first-line imaging tool for the assessment of pulmonary embolism. (orig.) [German] Technische Weiterentwicklungen der MRT haben deren Moeglichkeiten fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie erheblich verbessert. Hierzu zaehlen auf Geraeteseite kuerzere Magneten sowie dedizierte Ganzkoerper-MRT-Systeme, die einerseits den Patientenzugang beguenstigen und andererseits eine Abklaerung einer potenziell zugrunde liegenden Venenthrombose in einer Untersuchung ermoeglichen. Auf Seite der Sequenztechnik hat die Einfuehrung der parallelen Bildgebung die raeumliche und zeitliche Aufloesung der MR-Angiographie (MRA) der Lunge deutlich verbessert. Durch eine Kombination zeitaufgeloester Messungen der Lungenperfusion und einer raeumlich hochaufgeloesten MRA kann fuer die Diagnostik der Lungenembolie eine Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet von ueber 90% erzielt werden, was vergleichbar der Genauigkeit der CT-Angiographie (CTA) ist. Daher kann die MRT fuer bestimmte Personen, wie z. B. Patienten mit Kontraindikationen gegen jodhaltige Roentgenkontrastmittel (z. B. Hyperthyreose) oder juengere Frauen mit einer geringen klinischen Wahrscheinlichkeit fuer

  16. Identification of patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism suitable for outpatient treatment using the pulmonary embolism severity index (PESI).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, A

    2013-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that outpatient treatment of patients with low-risk stable pulmonary embolism (PE) is safe, effective and potentially reduces costs. It is not clear how many patients presenting to an Irish Emergency Department (ED) are potentially suitable for outpatient management.

  17. Computed tomography angiography with pulmonary artery thrombus burden and right-to-left ventricular diameter ratio after pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouriel, Kenneth; Ouriel, Richard L; Lim, Yeun J; Piazza, Gregory; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Computed tomography angiography is used for quantifying the significance of pulmonary embolism, but its reliability has not been well defined. Methods The study cohort comprised 10 patients randomly selected from a 150-patient prospective trial of ultrasound-facilitated fibrinolysis for acute pulmonary embolism. Four reviewers independently evaluated the right-to-left ventricular diameter ratios using the standard multiplanar reformatted technique and a simplified (axial) method, and thrombus burden with the standard modified Miller score and a new, refined Miller scoring system. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient for intra-observer variability was .949 and .970 for the multiplanar reformatted and axial methods for estimating right-to-left ventricular ratios, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was high and similar for the two methods, with intraclass correlation coefficient of .969 and .976. The modified Miller score had good intra-observer agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient .820) and was similar to the refined Miller method (intraclass correlation coefficient .883) for estimating thrombus burden. Inter-observer agreement was also comparable between the techniques, with intraclass correlation coefficient of .829 and .914 for the modified Miller and refined Miller methods. Conclusions The reliability of computed tomography angiography for pulmonary embolism was excellent for the axial and multiplanar reformatted methods for quantifying the right-to-left ventricular ratio and for the modified Miller and refined Miller scores for quantifying of pulmonary artery thrombus burden.

  18. Clinical course of pulmonary embolism and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy in patients with thrombophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Karpenko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a comparative analysis of the clinical course of pulmonary embolism and the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy in patients with thrombophilia and in those without identified thrombolytic disorders. The impact of thrombophilia on the incidence of pulmonary embolism and phlebothrombosis was analyzed. The results obtained indicate the presence of thrombophilia in 25.7% of patients with pulmonary embolism. It was found out that thrombosis and embolism in the vena cava filter occurred more frequently in patients with thrombophilia rather than in those with pulmonary embolism of unknown etiology.

  19. Saddle Pulmonary Embolism: Laboratory and Computed Tomographic Pulmonary Angiographic Findings to Predict Short-term Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Miao, Ran; Guo, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Hongxia; Hou, Qing; Guo, Youmin; Yang, Yuanhua

    2017-02-01

    Saddle pulmonary embolism (SPE) is rare type of acute pulmonary embolism and there is debate about its treatment and prognosis. Our aim is to assess laboratory and computed tomographic pulmonary angiographic (CTPA) findings to predict short-term mortality in patients with SPE. This was a five-centre, retrospective study. The clinical information, laboratory and CTPA findings of 88 consecutive patients with SPE were collected. One-month mortality after diagnosis of SPE was the primary end-point. The correlation of laboratory and CTPA findings with one-month mortality was analysed with area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and logistic regression analysis. Eighteen patients with SPE died within one month. Receiver operating characteristic curves revealed that the cutoff values for the right and left atrial diameter ratio, the right ventricular area and left ventricular area ratio (RVa/LVa ratio), Mastora score, septal angle, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) for detecting early mortality were 2.15, 2.13, 69%, 57°, 3036 pg/mL and 0.18ng/mL, respectively. Using logistic regression analysis of laboratory and CTPA findings with regard to one-month mortality of SPE, RVa/LVa ratio and cTnI were shown to be independently associated with early death. A combination of cTnI and RVa/LVa ratio revealed an increase in the AUC value, but the difference did not reach significance compared with RVa/LVa or cTnI, alone (P>0.05). In patients with SPE, both the RVa/LVa ratio on CTPA and cTnI appear valuable for the prediction of short-term mortality. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lung Cancer Complicated With Asymptomatic Pulmonary Embolism: Clinical Analysis of 84 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangsheng; Ma, Shuping

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Pulmonary embolism is potentially life-threatening in patients with lung cancer, but the clinical studies on patients with lung cancer having asymptomatic pulmonary embolism were barely reported. Methods: Clinical data of patients with lung cancer were obtained from the Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine of Tianjin Chest Hospital during July 2012 and June 2015 and were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 28 patients with lung cancer having pulmonary embolism (LP group) were enrolled, and another 56 cases with lung cancer alone (LC group) were enrolled as controls. Results: Seventeen (60.7%) of 28 patients in the LP group developed adenocarcinoma, which was more frequent than that in the LC group (P pulmonary embolism among 17 asymptomatic cases in the LP group was 3.6 months postdiagnosis (95% confidence interval, 3.2-4.0), showing a significant difference with that of other 11 patients with symptomatic pulmonary embolism, which was 10.5 months (95% confidence interval, 8.88-12.12; P pulmonary embolism was 7.2 months (95% confidence interval, 5.86-8.56), while that of symptomatic pulmonary embolism was 2.8 months (95% confidence interval, 2.48-3.12). Log-rank examination showed that survival time of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism group was statistically longer than that of symptomatic pulmonary embolism group. Conclusion: Lung adenocarcinoma, chemotherapy, hyperleukocytosis, and d-dimer increment were the risk factors for lung cancer combined with asymptomatic pulmonary embolism. PMID:29332446

  1. Platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio as a novel marker of in-hospital and long-term adverse outcomes among patients with acute pulmonary embolism: A single center large-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan Cetin, Elif Hande; Cetin, Mehmet Serkan; Canpolat, Ugur; Akdi, Ahmet; Aras, Dursun; Temizhan, Ahmet; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of platelets with leukocytes is a well-known process both in progression and prognosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Recently, platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) is emerged as an indirect inflammatory indicator which was shown to be associated with adverse cardiovascular events in various clinical conditions, including acute PE. However, the long-term prognostic value of PLR in acute PE has not been investigated thoroughly. Therefore, we aimed to assess the impact of PLR on both in-hospital and long-term adverse outcomes in acute PE. A total of 459 patients with definite diagnosis of acute PE between January 2009 and January 2016 were enrolled. On admission, blood sampling to calculate PLR and detailed clinical data were obtained. Patients were divided into tertiles according to the admission PLR levels. Simplified PE severity index (sPESI) score and computerized tomography (CT) based pulmonary artery obstruction index were calculated for each patient. Mean sPESI score of the study population was 1.6. A total of 34 patients (7.4%) died during index hospitalization. At median 28.8months follow-up, all-cause mortality was observed in 81 patients (1.9%). Patients in the highest tertile of PLR revealed a higher rate of in-hospital adverse events including cardiogenic shock, the necessity for thrombolytic therapy and in-hospital mortality as well as long-term all-cause mortality. In multivariate analysis, the PLR was found to be a significant predictor of both in-hospital adverse events (OR: 1.588, 95% CI:1.116-2.154, p=0.004) and long-term all-cause mortality (OR:1.746, 95% CI:1.211-2.865, p=0.001). The PLR, as a simple, inexpensive and available marker of inflammatory and prothrombotic status, seemed to be a novel predictor of in-hospital and long-term adverse outcomes in patients with acute PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Age-adjusted D-dimer cutoff levels to rule out pulmonary embolism: the ADJUST-PE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Righini, Marc; van Es, Josien; den Exter, Paul L.; Roy, Pierre-Marie; Verschuren, Franck; Ghuysen, Alexandre; Rutschmann, Olivier T.; Sanchez, Olivier; Jaffrelot, Morgan; Trinh-Duc, Albert; Le Gall, Catherine; Moustafa, Farès; Principe, Alessandra; van Houten, Anja A.; ten Wolde, Marije; Douma, Renée A.; Hazelaar, Germa; Erkens, Petra M. G.; van Kralingen, Klaas W.; Grootenboers, Marco J. J. H.; Durian, Marc F.; Cheung, Y. Whitney; Meyer, Guy; Bounameaux, Henri; Huisman, Menno V.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Le Gal, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    D-dimer measurement is an important step in the diagnostic strategy of clinically suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE), but its clinical usefulness is limited in elderly patients. To prospectively validate whether an age-adjusted D-dimer cutoff, defined as age × 10 in patients 50 years or older,

  3. Life-saving systemic thrombolysis in a patient with massive pulmonary embolism and a recent hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottinor, Wendy; Turlington, Jeremy; Raza, Syed; Roberts, Charlotte S; Malhotra, Rajiv; Jovin, Ion S; Abbate, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism is associated with mortality rates exceeding 50%. Current practice guidelines include the immediate administration of thrombolytic therapy in the absence of contraindications. However, thrombolysis for pulmonary embolism is said to be absolutely contraindicated in the presence of recent hemorrhagic stroke and other conditions. The current contraindications to thrombolytic therapy have been extrapolated from data on acute coronary syndrome and are not specific for venous thromboembolic disease. Some investigators have proposed that the current contraindications be viewed as relative, rather than absolute, in cases of high-risk pulmonary embolism. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman in whom massive pulmonary embolism led to cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity. Eight weeks earlier, she had sustained a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident-a classic absolute contraindication to thrombolytic therapy. Despite this practice guideline, we administered tissue plasminogen activator systemically in order to save the patient's life. This therapy did not evoke intracranial bleeding, and the patient was eventually discharged from the hospital. Until guidelines specific to venous thromboembolic disease are developed, we think that the current contraindications to thrombolysis should be considered on an individual basis in patients who are at high risk of death from massive pulmonary embolism.

  4. QR in V1--an ECG sign associated with right ventricular strain and adverse clinical outcome in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Nils; Walpoth, Nazan; Wustmann, Kerstin; Noveanu, Markus; Gertsch, Marc

    2003-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that Qr in V(1)is a predictor of pulmonary embolism, right ventricular strain, and adverse clinical outcome. ECG's from 151 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were blindly interpreted by two observers. Echocardiography, troponin I, and pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels were obtained in 75 patients with pulmonary embolism. Qr in V(1)(14 vs 0 in controls; p or =1 mV (15 vs 1 in controls; p=0.0002) were more frequently present in patients with pulmonary embolism. Sensitivity and specificity of Qr in V(1)and T wave inversion in V(2)for predicting right ventricular dysfunction were 31/97% and 45/94%, respectively. Three of five patients who died in-hospital and 11 of 20 patients with a complicated course, presented with Qr in V(1). After adjustment for right ventricular strain including ECG, echocardiography, pro-brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I levels, Qr in V(1)(OR 8.7, 95%CI 1.4-56.7; p=0.02) remained an independent predictor of adverse outcome. Among the ECG signs seen in patients with acute pulmonary embolism, Qr in V(1)is closely related to the presence of right ventricular dysfunction, and is an independent predictor of adverse clinical outcome.

  5. Successful treatment of postoperative massive pulmonary embolism with paradoxal arterial embolism through extracorporeal life support and thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapatsas, Konstantinos; Leivaditis, Vasileios; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsilogianni, Zoi; Kotoulas, Sotirios; Kotoulas, Christophoros; Koletsis, Efstratios; Iliadis, Ilias Stylianos; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Trakada, Georgia; Veletza, Lemonia; Kallianos, Anastasios; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Huang, Haidong; Haussmann, Rainer; Haussmann, Erich; Dahm, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common clinical entity related to high mortality. About 200,000 to 300,000 patients die every year due to pulmonary embolism. The purpose of this article is to describe a case of a patient who on the second postoperative day after undergoing thromboembolectomy of the left femoral artery, manifested a massive pulmonary embolism. Due to cardiorespiratory collapse a combined treatment via extracorporeal life support (ECLS) and parallel catheter thrombolysis was decided and performed. By cardiorespiratory improvement and final stabilization the patient was successfully weaned from ECLS and the system was successfully removed. After a reasonable postoperative time the patient was dismissed in good overall condition.

  6. Myocardial infarction, symptomatic third degree atrioventricular block and pulmonary embolism caused by thalidomide: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengyu; Yang, Jing; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Shuyang

    2015-12-18

    Thalidomide has been reported to cause numerous thromboembolic events. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are more common. It can also cause bradycardia and even total atrioventricular block. Rarely, it causes coronary artery spasm and even myocardial infarction. But almost simultaneous onset of myocardial infarction, third degree atrioventricular block and pulmonary embolism in one patient has not been reported so far. A 53-year old man presented because of chest pain, nausea and then syncope for several minutes. Previous medical history included neurodermitis for which thalidomide was given and hypercholesterolemia with simvastatin taking. The patient didn't exhibit any other established risk factors for coronary artery disease. Electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm with third degree atrioventricular block and complete right bundle branch block, and precordial leads ST segment elevation. The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome was suspected, but further coronary angiography demonstrated no flow-limiting lesions in coronary arteries, and temporary pacemaker was implanted. After admission, low SpO2 and elevated D-dimer level was mentioned. Further computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed pulmonary embolism. Thalidomide was thought to be the cause of hypercoagulability and coronary spasm, so it was ceased immediately. Therapeutic low molecule weight heparin was initiated and then switched to warfarin with appropriate INR, and nifedipine was described for coronary spasm. The patient's symptoms completely relived and SpO2 recovered, and atrioventricular block had disappeared during hospitalization with pacemaker removed. This is the very first case in which myocardial infarction, third degree atrioventricular block and pulmonary embolism almost simultaneously developed. We should be ware that anti-thrombotic prophylaxis, which needs further investigation for optimal drug and dosage, may be beneficial in thalidomide therapy. And it is also

  7. Life-threatening hematoma after recurrent femoral artery puncture on a patient with massive pulmonary embolism

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    Serkan Burc Deser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism (PE is a life threatening condition which represents with a severe manifestation of a venous thromboembolic disease. The incidence of PE ranges from 2% to 7%. When a patient is suspected with acute PE, she/he must be hemodynamically stabilized including a respiratory support, hemodynamic support, and empiric anticoagulation therapy. Although empirical anticoagulant therapy may protect the patient, sometimes it is not innocent. In these patients, care must be taken in terms of complications after blood gas analysis, which is a clue to PE diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Here, we present management of a patient with a huge femoral hematoma who diagnosed with PE.

  8. Catheter-Directed Therapy for Pulmonary Embolism: Patient Selection and Technical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Sista, Akhilesh K

    2018-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third most common cause of death among hospitalized patients. Treatment escalation beyond anticoagulation therapy is necessary in patients with cardiogenic shock and may be of benefit in select normotensive patients with right heart strain. Percutaneous catheter-based techniques (catheter-directed mechanical thrombectomy, clot maceration, and/or pharmacologic thrombolysis) as an alternative or adjunct to systemic thrombolysis can rapidly debulk central clot in patients with shock. Catheter-directed thrombolysis, which uses a low-dose intraclot prolonged thrombolytic infusion, is a promising but insufficiently studied therapy for patients presenting with acute intermediate-risk PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Imaging for the exclusion of pulmonary embolism in pregnancy.

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    van Mens, Thijs E; Scheres, Luuk Jj; de Jong, Paulien G; Leeflang, Mariska Mg; Nijkeuter, Mathilde; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-26

    Pulmonary embolism is a leading cause of pregnancy-related death. An accurate diagnosis in pregnant patients is crucial to prevent untreated pulmonary embolism as well as unnecessary anticoagulant treatment and future preventive measures. Applied imaging techniques might perform differently in these younger patients with less comorbidity and altered physiology, who largely have been excluded from diagnostic studies. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), lung scintigraphy and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism during pregnancy. We searched MEDLINE and Embase until July 2015. We used included studies as seeds in citations searches and in 'find similar' functions and searched reference lists. We approached experts in the field to help us identify non-indexed studies. We included consecutive series of pregnant patients suspected of pulmonary embolism who had undergone one of the index tests (computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography, lung scintigraphy or MRA) and clinical follow-up or pulmonary angiography as a reference test. Two review authors performed data extraction and quality assessment. We contacted investigators of potentially eligible studies to obtain missing information. In the primary analysis, we regarded inconclusive index test results as a negative reference test, and treatment for pulmonary embolism after an inconclusive index test as a positive reference test. We included 11 studies (four CTPA, five lung scintigraphy, two both) with a total of 695 CTPA and 665 lung scintigraphy results. Lung scintigraphy was applied by different techniques. No MRA studies matched our inclusion criteria.Overall, risk of bias and concerns regarding applicability were high in all studies as judged in light of the review research question, as was heterogeneity in study methods. We did not undertake meta-analysis. All studies used clinical follow-up as a reference standard

  10. Adjustments in the diagnostic work-up, treatment and prognosis of pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a potentially fatal condition, in which an embolus, usually a thrombus originating from one of the deep veins of the legs, blocks one or more pulmonary arteries. This leads to impaired blood flow through the lungs. Pulmonary embolism is the third most common cardiovascular

  11. Partial pulmonary embolization disrupts alveolarization in fetal sheep

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    Hooper Stuart B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is closely associated with an arrest of alveolar development and pulmonary capillary dysplasia, it is unknown whether these two features are causally related. To investigate the relationship between pulmonary capillaries and alveolar formation, we partially embolized the pulmonary capillary bed. Methods Partial pulmonary embolization (PPE was induced in chronically catheterized fetal sheep by injection of microspheres into the left pulmonary artery for 1 day (1d PPE; 115d gestational age; GA or 5 days (5d PPE; 110-115d GA. Control fetuses received vehicle injections. Lung morphology, secondary septal crests, elastin, collagen, myofibroblast, PECAM1 and HIF1α abundance and localization were determined histologically. VEGF-A, Flk-1, PDGF-A and PDGF-Rα mRNA levels were measured using real-time PCR. Results At 130d GA (term ~147d, in embolized regions of the lung the percentage of lung occupied by tissue was increased from 29 ± 1% in controls to 35 ± 1% in 1d PPE and 44 ± 1% in 5d PPE fetuses (p VEGF and Flk-1, although a small increase in PDGF-Rα expression at 116d GA, from 1.00 ± 0.12 in control fetuses to 1.61 ± 0.18 in 5d PPE fetuses may account for impaired differentiation of alveolar myofibroblasts and alveolar development. Conclusions PPE impairs alveolarization without adverse systemic effects and is a novel model for investigating the role of pulmonary capillaries and alveolar myofibroblasts in alveolar formation.

  12. CT pulmonary angiography: an over-utilized imaging modality in hospitalized patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

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    Erin Smith

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine if computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA was overemployed in the evaluation of hospitalized patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE. Methods: Data were gathered retrospectively on hospitalized patients (n=185 who had CTPA for suspected PE between June and August 2009 at our institution. Results: CTPA was done in 185 hospitalized patients to diagnose acute PE based on clinical suspicion. Of these, 30 (16.2% patients were tested positive for acute PE on CTPA. The Well's pretest probability for PE was low, moderate, and high in 77 (41.6%, 83 (44.9%, and 25 (13.5% patients, respectively. Out of the 30 PE-positive patients, pretest probability was low in 2 (6.6%, moderate in 20 (66.7%, and high in 8 (26.6% (p=0.003. Modified Well's criteria applied to all patients in our study revealed 113 (61% with low and 72 (39% with high clinical pretest probability. When modified Well's criteria was applied to 30 PE-positive patients, 10 (33.3% and 20 (66.6% were found to have low and high pretest probability, respectively (p=0.006. D-dimer assay was done in 30 (16.2% of the inpatients with suspected PE and all of them were found to have elevated levels. A lower extremity duplex ultrasound confirmed deep venous thrombosis in 17 (9.1% of the patients with suspected PE, at least 1 week prior to having CTPA. Conclusion: Understanding the recommended guidelines, evidence-based literature, and current concepts in evaluation of patients with suspected acute PE will reduce unnecessary CTPA examinations.

  13. Pulmonary embolic syndrome caused by cementing of hip endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, D W

    1980-12-01

    Previous studies have indicated that cementing of the femoral component in total hip replacement produces the features of the pulmonary embolic syndrome (P.E.S.). The present investigations have been carried out to ascertain if newer methods of insertion modify these features. There was no evidence to suggest that any of these approaches has any advantage over the others in relation to the various components of P.E.S.

  14. Pulmonary Embolism as the First Manifestation of Multiple Myeloma

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    N. Vallianou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is considered a hypercoagulable state due to several mechanisms such as the increased IL-6 and immunoglobulins production, the defective fibrinolytic mechanism, and the acquired resistance to activated protein C that are involved in the pathogenesis and clinical futures of the disease. We describe a case of a female patient who presented to the hospital with pulmonary embolism as the first manifestation of the hypercoagulability of multiple myeloma.

  15. Improving the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department is challenging due to the wide range of non-specific symptoms, lack of clinical diagnostic criteria, and imperfect investigations. Various scoring systems exist in an attempt to limit unnecessary investigations in those with low risk of PE. Following a baseline audit and subsequent PDSA cycles we implemented a flowchart for use in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism encouraging the correct use of the Wells Score and Pulmonary Embolism Rule out Criteria (PERC). The standard used for comparison was based on the NICE guidelines for diagnosis of PE with the addition that PERC could also be used if appropriate. Data was collected over four week periods before and after the introduction of our flowchart in two emergency departments in Melbourne. We aimed to increase documentation of pre-test probability, reduce inappropriate investigations, and increase the use of interim parenteral anticoagulation where there was a delay to imaging. Results showed an increase in the documentation of pre-test probability and the proportion of investigations requested that were inappropriate was reduced. The percentage of inappropriate d-dimers was reduced from 36% to 24%; the percentage of inappropriate CTPAs was reduced from 34% to 10%; and the percentage of inappropriate V/Q scans was reduced from 42% to 14%. Implementation of a simple diagnostic algorithm led to an increase in documentation of pre-test probability and a reduction in inappropriate and unnecessary investigations. This intervention may be applicable to other emergency departments where similar issues in diagnosing pulmonary embolism exist.

  16. Spontaneous Pneumothorax as a Complication of Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Intravenous Drug User: A Case Report

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    Chau-Chyun Sheu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis has been the major cause of morbidity and mortality among intravenous drug users (IDUs with infections, mostly involving the tricuspid valve and presenting multiple septic pulmonary embolisms. Numerous pulmonary complications of septic pulmonary embolism have been described, but only a few have reported spontaneous pneumothorax. Our patient, a 23-year-old heroin addict, was hospitalized for tricuspid endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism. Acute onset of respiratory distress occurred on his seventh hospital day and rapidly resulted in hypoxemia. Immediate bedside chest radiograph demonstrated left pneumothorax. It was thought to be a spontaneous pneumothorax, because he had not undergone any invasive procedure before the occurrence of pneumothorax. His clinical condition improved after the insertion of an intercostal chest tube. He later underwent surgery to replace the tricuspid valve as a result of the large size of the vegetation and poor control of infection. He ultimately survived. Pneumothorax is a possible lethal complication of septic pulmonary embolism in IDUs with right-sided endocarditis and should be considered in such patients when respiratory distress occurs acutely during their hospitalization.

  17. Pulmonary cement embolism after pedicle screw vertebral stabilization

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    Massimo Tonolini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial embolization of polymethylmethacrylate cement, most usually occurring after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, is very uncommon following vertebral stabilization procedures. Unenhanced CT scans viewed at lung window settings allow confident identification of cement emboli in the pulmonary circulation along with possible associate parenchymal changes, whereas hyperdense emboli may be less conspicuous on CT-angiographic studies with high-flow contrast medium injection. Although clinical manifestations are largely variable from asymptomatic cases to severe respiratory distress, most cases are treated with anticoagulation.

  18. Mechanical Circulatory Support for High-Risk Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Mahir; Blank, Nimrod; Shemesh, Adi; Pahuja, Mohit; Kaki, Amir; Mohamad, Tamam; Schreiber, Theodore; Giri, Jay

    2018-01-01

    Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices have a role in treating high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism with cardiogenic shock. Mechanical circulatory device selection should be made based on center experience and device-specific features. All current devices are effective in decreasing right arterial pressure and providing circulatory support of 4 to 5 L/min. The pulmonary artery pulsatility index may prove to be an unreliable method to assess right ventricular function. Careful clinical evaluation on an individual patient basis should determine the need for MCS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulmonary embolism: ′the great masquerader′ of pneumonia in a patient with progressive supranuclear palsy

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    Robin G Manappallil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Parkinson′s disease are at risk of developing aspiration pneumonia. Pulmonary embolism is a rare but life-threatening complication in such patients, but could the same be true in progressive supranuclear palsy, an atypical form of Parkinsonism? This case report aims at highlighting the development of unprovoked pulmonary embolism in a patient with progressive supranuclear palsy and also describes how pulmonary embolism can mimic pneumonia in such patients.

  20. Pulmonary embolism: whom to discharge and whom to thrombolyze?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G; Planquette, B; Sanchez, O

    2015-06-01

    Patients with pulmonary embolism can be divided in two groups according to their risk of death or major complication: a small group of high-risk patients defined by the presence of systemic hypotension or cardiogenic shock and a large group of normotensive patients. Among normotensive patients, further risk stratification, based on clinical grounds alone or on the combination of clinical data, biomarkers, and imaging tests, allows selection of low-risk patients and intermediate-risk patients. The safety of outpatient treatment for low-risk patients has been established mainly on the basis of retrospective and prospective cohorts using different selection tools. In most studies, about 50% of the patients have been safely treated at home. Although thrombolytic therapy has a favorable benefit to risk profile in patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism, the risk of major and especially intracranial bleeding outweighs the benefits in terms of hemodynamic decompensation in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. Massive hemoptysis in a patient with pulmonary embolism, a real therapeutic conundrum

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    Yiolanda Herodotou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive Hemoptysis and pulmonary embolism are two very severe and potentially fatal pulmonary emergencies requiring completely different treatments. We present the case of a 45-year old male transmitted to our Hospital for massive hemoptysis who at the same time was found to suffer from pulmonary embolism. Hemoptysis was treated with bronchial artery embolization which resulted in cessation of haemorrhage and allowed the administration of anticoagulant therapy a few days later. This case report gives an answer on how to manage a real therapeutic conundrum which is the coexistence of a massive hemoptysis and a concomitant pulmonary embolism.

  2. Evaluation of Protein C Gene Polymorphism in Patients with Pulmonary Embolism

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    Tuba Ceviz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pulmonary embolism is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and develops as a result of obstruction of pulmonary artery and/or branches with pieces that ruptured from the DVT of the leg. Pulmonary embolism and DVT is also referred as venous thrombo-embolism (VTE, because two events often remain together. In the studies, it was found that protein C (PROC deficiency is a risk factor for pulmonary embolism. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association between pulmonary embolism and PROC gene -1654C>T polymorphism in Turkish population. Methods: The DNAs of 114 pulmonary embolism cases and 120 healthy controls have been analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP to evaluate the relation between PROC gene -1654C>T polymorphism and pulmonary embolism in our study. Statistical analyses were performed by using chisquare and analysis of variance tests. Results: The proportion of individuals with CT genotype carrying polymorphic T allele as heterozygous form was 38.7% in the control group and 21.9% in the pulmonary embolism cases (p=0.047. When demographic and clinical characteristics of cases compared with PROC gene -1654C>T polymorphism, it was observed that the changes in chest CT ratios could be associated with -1654C>T polymorphism (p=0.017. Conclusion: As a result, individuals with CT genotypes carrying the polymorphic T allele as heterozygous form have a lower risk of developing pulmonary embolism.

  3. Treatment options in massive pulmonary embolism during pregnancy; a case-report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Raa, G Doreen; Ribbert, Lucie S M; Snijder, Repke J; Biesma, Douwe H

    2009-05-01

    Systemic thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), streptokinase or urokinase is considered as high-risk treatment in pregnancy. However, several reports have described the successful use of systemic thrombolysis in pregnant patients with massive pulmonary embolism and haemodynamic instability. We describe a 34-year old, pregnant female, who presented at 25 weeks of gestation with an acute collapse with reduced consciousness and shortness of breath caused by massive pulmonary embolism. Because of significant haemodynamic instability, increased right ventricular pressure and no improvement after intravenous heparin, thrombolytic therapy was administered. The response to thrombolytic therapy was excellent. No severe haemorrhagic complications were observed. Anticoagulant therapy with LMWH was continued until delivery. A healthy child was born at term. In English literature, 13 patients received thrombolysis during pregnancy because of pulmonary embolism. No maternal deaths, four non-fatal maternal major bleeding complications, 30.8%;95%CI(9.1-61.4), two fetal deaths, 15.4%;95%CI(1.9-45.5), and five preterm deliveries, 38.5%;95%CI(13.9-68.4), were observed. Surgical embolectomy and catheter embolectomy or catheter thrombolysis has only been performed in 12 patients. The number of reports on thrombolytic therapy, surgical embolectomy and catheter embolectomy or thrombolysis for massive pulmonary embolism during pregnancy are limited. We suggest an international registry for pregnant patients undergoing thrombolysis or embolectomy to gain more information about these treatment options. Nevertheless, complication rates of thrombolytic therapy are acceptable in the light of the underlying disease, and in the meantime, current data do not justify withholding pregnant women from thrombolytic therapy in case of life-threatening PE.

  4. Acute Neurological Symptoms During Hypobaric Exposure: Consider Cerebral Air Embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    WEENINK RP, HOLLMANN MW, VAN HULST RA. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism. Aviat Space Environ Med 2012; 83:1084-91. Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and

  5. Contrast enhanced pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography for pulmonary embolism: Building a successful program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Scott K; Schiebler, Mark L; Repplinger, Michael D; François, Christopher J; Vigen, Karl K; Yarlagadda, Rajkumar; Grist, Thomas M; Reeder, Scott B

    2016-03-01

    The performance of contrast enhanced pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is an effective non-ionizing alternative to contrast enhanced computed tomography and nuclear medicine ventilation/perfusion scanning. However, the technical success of these exams is very dependent on careful attention to the details of the MRA acquisition protocol and requires reader familiarity with MRI and its artifacts. Most practicing radiologists are very comfortable with the performance and interpretation of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) performed to detect pulmonary embolism but not all are as comfortable with the use of MRA in this setting. The purpose of this review is to provide the general radiologist with the tools necessary to build a successful pulmonary embolism MRA program. This review will cover in detail image acquisition, image interpretation, and some key elements of outreach that help to frame the role of MRA to consulting clinicians and hospital administrators. It is our aim that this resource will help build successful clinical pulmonary embolism MRA programs that are well received by patients and physicians, reduce the burden of medical imaging radiation, and maintain good patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Contrast Enhanced Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism: Building a Successful Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Scott K; Schiebler, Mark L; Repplinger, Michael D; François, Christopher J; Vigen, Karl K; Yarlagadda, Rajkumar; Grist, Thomas M; Reeder, Scott B

    2016-01-01

    The performance of contrast enhanced pulmonary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is an effective non-ionizing alternative to contrast enhanced computed tomography and nuclear medicine ventilation/perfusion scanning. However, the technical success of these exams is very dependent on careful attention to the details of the MRA acquisition protocol and requires reader familiarity with MRI and its artifacts. Most practicing radiologists are very comfortable with the performance and interpretation of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) performed to detect pulmonary embolism but not all are as comfortable with the use of MRA in this setting. The purpose of this review is to provide the general radiologist with the tools necessary to build a successful pulmonary embolism MRA program. This review will cover in detail image acquisition, image interpretation, and some key elements of outreach that help to frame the role of MRA to consulting clinicians and hospital administrators. It is our aim that this resource will help build successful clinical pulmonary embolism MRA programs that are well received by patients and physicians, reduce the burden of medical imaging radiation, and maintain good patient outcomes. PMID:26860667

  7. Non-severe pulmonary embolism: Prognostic CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Anne-Line [University J Fourrier, Grenoble (France); Department of Radiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043 Grenoble cedex (France); Bosson, Jean-Luc [University J Fourrier, Grenoble (France); Department of Statistics, CIC, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043 Grenoble cedex (France); Hohn, Noelie [Department of Radiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043 Grenoble cedex (France); Carpentier, Francoise [University J Fourrier, Grenoble (France); Department of Emergency Medicine, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043 Grenoble cedex (France); Pernod, Gilles [University J Fourrier, Grenoble (France); Department of Vascular Diseases, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043 Grenoble cedex (France); Ferretti, Gilbert R., E-mail: gferretti@chu-grenoble.fr [University J Fourrier, Grenoble (France); Department of Radiology, CHU Grenoble, BP 218, 38043 Grenoble cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    The goal of this study was to retrospectively evaluate CT cardiovascular parameters and pulmonary artery clot load score as predictors of 3-month mortality in patients with clinically non-severe pulmonary embolism (PE). We included 226 CT positive for PE in hemodynamically stable patients (112 women; mean age 67.1 years {+-}16.9). CT were independently reviewed by two observers. Results were compared with occurrence of death within 3 months using Cox regression. Twenty-four (10.6%) patients died, for whom 9 were considered to be due to PE. Interobserver agreement was moderate for the shape of interventricular septum ({kappa} = 0.41), and for the ratio between the diameters of right and left ventricle (RV/LV) ({kappa} = 0.76). Observers found no association between interventricular septum shape and death. A RV/LV diameter ratio >1 was predictive of death (OR, 3.83; p < 0.01) only when we also took into account the value of the embolic burden (<40%). In a multivariate model, CT cardiovascular parameters were not associated with death. Concomitant lower limb DVT and comorbid conditions were important predictors of death. In clinically non-severe PE, a RV/LV diameter ratio >1 is predictive of death when the embolic burden is low (<40%).

  8. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  9. [Pulmonary embolism in patients with cancer: foundations of the EPIPHANY study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Carme; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Plasencia, Juana M; Calvo-Temprano, David; Sánchez, Marcelo; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula; Beato, Carmen; Biosca, Mercè; Vicente, Vicente; Otero, Remedios

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Having cancer is an independent risk factor for death in the general series of patients with PE and is included as a variable in the prognostic scales of acute symptomatic PE. This fact limits the discriminatory power of these general scales for patients with cancer and has prompted the development of specific prognostic tools: POMPE-C and a scale derived from the RIETE registry. Whether the increased risk of death by PE in patients with cancer is due to complications related to the neoplasm or to a greater severity of the thromboembolic episode in this population has not been well studied. Moreover, the introduction of computed multidetector tomography in recent years has led to a growing diagnosis of incidental PE, which currently represents up to half of pulmonary embolisms in patients with cancer. The EPIPHANY study attempts to further the understanding of the characteristics of pulmonary embolisms in patients with cancer by including incidental and symptomatic events. Its primary objectives are a) to understand the clinical and epidemiological patterns of pulmonary embolism associated with cancer and b) to develop and validate a specific prognosis model for PE in this population. The registry includes variables of interest to oncology (cancer type and extent, oncospecific treatments, patient's functional condition, cancer progression), radiological variables (thrombotic burden, signs of ventricular overload and other findings), location of treatment (hospital or outpatient), acute complications and causes of death in patients with PE associated with cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism

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    J.H.T. Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 ± 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 ± 8.64 to 39.14 ± 6.77 mmHg and alveolar air (from 92.97 ± 2.14 to 63.91 ± 8.27 mmHg. The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 ± 42.01 to 84.34 ± 44.13 consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 ± 0.34 to 0.33 ± 0.17 fraction. The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 ± 1.71 to 60.76 ± 6.62 mmHg, but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 ± 1.22 to 23.15 ± 8.24 mmHg. Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 ± 1.36 to 37.61 ± 12.79 mmHg, as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 ± 22.47 to 178.09 ± 37.46 mL and physiological (from 0.37 ± 0.05 to 0.75 ± 0.10 fraction dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation redistribution

  11. Pulmonary Embolism Originating from a Hepatic Hydatid Cyst Ruptured into the Inferior Vena Cava: CT and MRI Findings

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    Necdet Poyraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism due to hydatid cysts is a very rare clinical entity. Hydatid pulmonary embolism can be distinguished from other causes of pulmonary embolism with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. MRI especially displays the cystic nature of lesions better than CECT. Here we report a 45-year-old male patient with the pulmonary embolism due to ruptured hydatid liver cyst into the inferior vena cava.

  12. Successful catheter-directed thrombolysis of a massive pulmonary embolism in a patient after recent pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmouk S; Sista, Akhilesh K; Friedman, Oren A; Horowitz, James M; Port, Jeffrey L; Madoff, David C

    2015-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) after major thoracic surgery is an uncommon but life-threatening event that is challenging to manage. At present, the treatment of acute PE is either anticoagulation with or without systemic thrombolytic therapy. We report a case of a 65-year-old female with recent left pneumonectomy who developed a massive PE. The patient was successfully and safely treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis. To our knowledge, this is the first patient treated in this fashion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. New onset S wave in pulmonary embolism: revisited (something old and something new)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prabha Nini; Pillai, Siju B; Ahmad, Sajan Z; Babu, Shifas M

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a young man who had a new onset S wave in lead 1 in his ECG with typical symptoms of acute onset of dyspoena 2 months after an episode of deep vein thrombosis, S wave disappeared 6 days after thrombolysis. We report this case as the clinical course was very typical plus we have reviewed the literature regarding diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary embolism for the student, or the casualty medical officer. PMID:24275333

  14. Systemic Thrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism: Evidence, Patient Selection, and Protocols for Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Chatterjee, Sanjay; Sardar, Partha; Bavishi, Chirag; Giri, Jay; Chatterjee, Saurav

    2018-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism presents a clinical challenge for optimal risk stratification. Although associated with significant morbidity and mortality at the population level, the spectrum of presentation in an individual patient varies from mild symptoms to cardiac arrest. Treatment options include anticoagulation, systemic thrombolysis, catheter-based interventions, and surgical embolectomy. In this article, an attempt is made to optimally identify patients who, based on available evidence, may benefit from systemic thrombolytic therapy. The clinical efficacy of systemic thrombolysis must be balanced against increased risks of major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Current role of lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, A; Angiolillo, D J

    2001-12-01

    The pivotal role of lung scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) has been questioned in recent years due to the introduction of spiral computed tomography. However, the scintigraphic results used for comparisons are often those of the authoritative PIOPED (Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis) study, carried out in the 1980s. Pulmonary scintigraphy has progressed from those years both in the methodological and interpretative fields, although perhaps too slowly. Results better than those of PIOPED's have been presented by study groups who used: 1) perfusion-only approach, 2) SPET imaging; 3) new interpretative criteria; 4) different prediction rules to integrate clinical and scintigraphic probabilities of PE. These advances are still insufficiently recognised by the nuclear medicine community, possibly due to a sort of PIOPED-based "cultural globalisation". This paper reviews the actual advantages and limitations of nuclear medicine techniques, the diagnostic role of scintigraphy within the diagnostic algorithms proposed by international working groups and scientific societies and the results obtained from SPET imaging in the diagnosis of PE.

  16. Mortality due to pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke among incident dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocak, G.; Stralen, K.J. van; Rosendaal, F.R.; Verduijn, M.; Ravani, P.; Palsson, R.; Leivestad, T.; Hoitsma, A.J.; Ferrer-Alamar, M.; Finne, P.; Meester, J. de; Wanner, C.; Dekker, F.W.; Jager, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    See also Zoccali C, Mallamaci F. Pulmonary embolism in chronic kidney disease: a lethal, overlooked and research orphan disease. This issue, pp 2481-3. Summary. Background: It is has been suggested that dialysis patients have lower mortality rates for pulmonary embolism than the general population,

  17. Mortality due to pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke among incident dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocak, G.; van Stralen, K. J.; Rosendaal, F. R.; Verduijn, M.; Ravani, P.; Palsson, R.; Leivestad, T.; Hoitsma, A. J.; Ferrer-Alamar, M.; Finne, P.; de Meester, J.; Wanner, C.; Dekker, F. W.; Jager, K. J.

    2012-01-01

    See also Zoccali C, Mallamaci F. Pulmonary embolism in chronic kidney disease: a lethal, overlooked and research orphan disease. This issue, pp 24813. Summary. Background: It is has been suggested that dialysis patients have lower mortality rates for pulmonary embolism than the general population,

  18. Evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism by sixty-four slice multidetector CT angiography: Correlation between obstruction index, right ventricular dysfunction and clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha M. Attia

    2015-03-01

    Results: Dyspnea and RVD (RVD-ratio >1 were significantly more common in patients with central pulmonary emboli. The mean OI (35% ± 19% was significantly higher in patients with dyspnea, tachycardia and obesity. A positive correlation was found between the OI and both the CT pulmonary artery diameter (r = 0.66, p  43% identified more than 90% of patients with RVD (area under the curve on ROC analysis: 0.825; p  43% proved to be an independent predictor of RVD.

  19. Pulmonary embolism as the primary presenting feature of nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Periwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old previously healthy male presented with subacute onset of shortness of breath and chest pain. He was diagnosed with bilateral extensive pulmonary embolism (PE. In the absence of any predisposing factors, an extensive workup for unprovoked thrombophilia was done. During the course of his illness, the patient developed anasarca and was diagnosed to be suffering from nephrotic syndrome (NS, secondary to membranous glomerulopathy. Although, thrombotic complications are commonly associated with NS, it is unusual for PE to be the primary presenting feature in these patients.

  20. Multiple cardiac arrests induced by pulmonary embolism in a traumatically injured patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shu-Qing; Li, Ke-Peng; Zhi, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Pulmonary embolism-induced cardiac arrest should not be given up arbitrarily, knowing that the etiology of pulmonary embolism is reversible in most cases. Patient concerns: We present a case of continuous resuscitation lasting approximately 4 hours, during which 21 episodes of cardiac arrest occurred in a 46-year-old man who sustained high-level paraplegia after a road traffic accident. Diagnoses: Multiple cardiac arrests induced by pulmonary embolism. Interventions: The patient received cardiopulmonary resuscitation and thrombolytic therapy. Outcomes: The patient was discharged in 2 weeks when his condition turned for the better. Lessons: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation of patients with pulmonary embolism-induced cardiac arrest should not be given up arbitrarily, knowing that the etiology of pulmonary embolism is reversible in most cases. Effective external cardiac compression can not only save the patient's life but also attenuate neurological sequelae. Thrombolytic therapy is the key to the final success of resuscitation. PMID:29245284

  1. Tricuspid Regurgitation Peak Gradient (TRPG)/Tricuspid Annulus Plane Systolic Excursion (TAPSE) - A Novel Parameter for Stepwise Echocardiographic Risk Stratification in Normotensive Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurzyński, Michał; Kurnicka, Katarzyna; Lichodziejewska, Barbara; Kozłowska, Marta; Pływaczewska, Magdalena; Sobieraj, Piotr; Dzikowska-Diduch, Olga; Goliszek, Sylwia; Bienias, Piotr; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Pruszczyk, Piotr

    2018-01-26

    Patients with intermediate-risk acute pulmonary embolism (APE) are a heterogeneous group with an early mortality rate of 2-15%. The tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and tricuspid regurgitation peak gradient (TRPG) can be used for risk stratification, so we analyzed the prognostic value of a new echo parameter (TRPG/TAPSE) for prediction of APE-related 30-day death or need for rescue thrombolysis in initially normotensive APE patients.Methods and Results:The study group consists of 400 non-high-risk APE patients (191 men, age: 63.1±18.9 years) who had undergone echocardiography within the first 24 h of admission. The TRPG/TAPSE parameter was calculated. The clinical endpoint (CE) was a combination of 30-day APE-related death and/or rescue thrombolysis. The CE occurred in 8 (2%) patients. All patients with TAPSE ≥20 mm (n=193, 48.2%) had a good prognosis. Among 206 patients with TAPSE 4.5 were 0.2 and 0.98, respectively. The CE was significantly more frequent in 19 (9.2%) patients with TRPG/TAPSE >4.5 than in 188 (90.8%) with TRPG/TAPSE ≤4.5 (4 (21.1%) vs. 4 (2.1%), P=0.0005). Among normotensive APE patients with TAPSE 4.5 was associated with 21.1% risk of APE-related death or rescue thrombolysis. TRPG/TAPSE, a novel echocardiographic parameter, may be useful for stepwise echocardiographic risk stratification in normotensive patients with APE, and it identifies patients with a poor prognosis.

  2. Clinical utility of ultra high pitch dual source thoracic CT imaging of acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department: Are we one step closer towards a non-gated triple rule out?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Daniel J., E-mail: danieljameshou@gmail.com; Tso, David K., E-mail: david.k.tso@gmail.com; Davison, Chris, E-mail: chrisdavison100@gmail.com; Inacio, Joao, E-mail: joao.r.inacio@gmail.com; Louis, Luck J., E-mail: lucklouis@gmail.com; Nicolaou, Savvakis, E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Reimann, Anja J., E-mail: anja.reimann@gmx.de

    2013-10-01

    Objectives/Purpose: Aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the image quality and the radiation dose of an ultra high pitch CT scan for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism and visualization of cardiac structures in comparison to our institution's standard pulmonary embolism protocol. Method and materials: The study cohort consisted of 115 consecutive patients, 57 underwent CT pulmonary angiography on a dual source 128 slice scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition FLASH) via an ultra high pitch mode (Pitch 2.8) while 58 were scanned on a dual source 64 slice scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition Dual Source) with standard pitch (Pitch 0.9). Qualitative image assessment was determined by two blinded radiologists with 3 and 15 years’ experience in chest and cardiac CT. Quantitative image assessment was determined by the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Effective radiation dose was calculated via the product of the dose length product. Results: For the ultra high pitch protocol, 14% (8/57) were positive for pulmonary embolus compared to 13.7% (8/58) for the standard pitch group. 98.2% of the ultra high pitch scans were diagnostic for pulmonary embolus vs. 94.8% of the standard protocol. Visualization of cardiac structures was significantly improved with the ultra high pitch protocol (p < 0.0001). Significantly more lung parenchymal motion was observed on the standard protocol (p < 0.0001). The mean pulmonary vessel attenuation, SNR, and CNR were not significantly different. The mean effective dose was lower for the ultra high pitch studies (4.09 mSv ± 0.78 vs. 7.72 mSv ± 2.60, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Ultra high pitch CT imaging for pulmonary embolus is a technique which has potential to assess motion free evaluation of most cardiac structures and proximal coronary arteries at lower radiation doses.

  3. High D-dimer levels after stopping anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism with sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Suquia, Angela; Alonso-Fernández, Alberto; de la Peña, Mónica; Romero, David; Piérola, Javier; Carrera, Miguel; Barceló, Antonia; Soriano, Joan B; Arque, Meritxell; Fernández-Capitán, Carmen; Lorenzo, Alicia; García-Río, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a risk factor for pulmonary embolism. Elevated D-dimer levels and other biomarkers are associated with recurrent pulmonary embolism. The objectives were to compare the frequency of elevated D-dimer levels (>500 ng·mL(-1)) and further coagulation biomarkers after oral anticoagulation withdrawal in pulmonary embolism patients, with and without obstructive sleep apnoea, including two control groups without pulmonary embolism.We performed home respiratory polygraphy. We also measured basic biochemical profile and haemogram, and coagulation biomarkers (D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and soluble P-selectin).64 (74.4%) of the pulmonary embolism cases and 41 (46.11%) of the controls without pulmonary embolism had obstructive sleep apnoea. Plasmatic D-dimer was higher in PE patients with OSA than in those without obstructive sleep apnoea. D-dimer levels were significantly correlated with apnoea-hypopnoea index, and nocturnal hypoxia. There were more patients with high D-dimer after stopping anticoagulants in those with pulmonary embolism and obstructive sleep apnoea compared with PE without obstructive sleep apnoea (35.4% versus 19.0%, p=0.003). Apnoea-hypopnoea index was independently associated with high D-dimer.Pulmonary embolism patients with obstructive sleep apnoea had higher rates of elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation discontinuation for pulmonary embolism than in patients without obstructive sleep apnoea and, therefore, higher procoagulant state that might increase the risk of pulmonary embolism recurrence. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  4. Pulmonary Embolism with Right Ventricular Dysfunction: Who Should Receive Thrombolytic Agents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Hem; Natt, Bhupinder; Bime, Christian; Dill, Joshua; Dalen, James E; Alpert, Joseph S

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate management of pulmonary embolism patients with right ventricular dysfunction is uncertain. Recent guidelines have stressed the need for more data on the use of thrombolytic agents in the stable pulmonary embolism patient with right ventricular dysfunction. The objective of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that thrombolytic therapy in hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism patients with right ventricular dysfunction is not associated with improved mortality. We did a retrospective analysis using multi-institutional observational data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes were used to identify the patients with pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dysfunction. In-hospital mortality was defined as the primary outcome of interest. Over the 4 years of the study period, 3668 patients with right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary embolism were found, of which 3253 patients were identified as having hemodynamically stable right-sided heart failure with pulmonary embolism. There was no significant difference in mortality between hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism patients with right ventricular dysfunction who received thrombolytic agents compared with those who did not. When outcomes were assessed for patients with right ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic instability, a significant improvement in mortality was noted for patients with right ventricular dysfunction who received thrombolytic agents, which confirmed previous reports that thrombolytic therapy decreases mortality in pulmonary embolism patients who are hemodynamically unstable. Our data support the use of less aggressive treatment for stable pulmonary embolism patients with right ventricular dysfunction. These results argue against the reflexive use of thrombolytic agents in stable pulmonary embolism patients with right ventricular dysfunction. Copyright © 2016

  5. Pulmonary Embolism Caused by Intravenous Leiomyosarcoma of the Lower Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Soichiro; Goto, Masahide; Yamao, Hidetsugu; Tsukada, Toru; Sato, Masataka; Uekusa, Yoshifumi

    2018-01-11

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is usually caused by thrombosis or tumor. We report the long-term survival of a patient with PE due to a leiomyosarcoma in the deep vein. A 71-year-old woman complained of dyspnea and swelling of the left lower limb. Computed tomography revealed filling defects in the pulmonary arteries and deep vein. She was diagnosed with PE caused by venous thrombosis and treated with anticoagulant therapy. Her symptoms were prolonged, and D-dimer tests remained negative. Biopsy of the substance in the deep vein revealed leiomyosarcoma. The possibility of PE caused by extravascular or intravascular tumors should be considered when a patient is negative for D-dimer.

  6. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization With Spherical Embolic Agent for Pulmonary Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Akihiko, E-mail: sekia@igtc.jp; Hori, Shinichi, E-mail: horishin@igtc.jp; Sueyoshi, Satoru, E-mail: sueyoshis@igtc.jp; Hori, Atsushi, E-mail: horiat@igtc.jp; Kono, Michihiko, E-mail: konom@igtc.jp; Murata, Shinichi, E-mail: muratas@igtc.jp; Maeda, Masahiko, E-mail: maedam@igtc.jp [Gate Tower Institute for Image Guided Therapy, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the safety and local efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with superabsorbent polymer microspheres (SAP-MS) in patients with pulmonary metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Sixteen patients with unresectable pulmonary metastases from RCC refractory to standard therapy were enrolled to undergo TAE with the purpose of mass reduction and/or palliation. The prepared SAP-MS swell to approximately two times larger than their dry-state size (100-150 {mu}m [n = 14], 50-100 {mu}m [n = 2]). Forty-nine pulmonary nodules (lung n = 22, mediastinal lymph node n = 17, and hilar lymph node n = 10) were selected as target lesions for evaluation. Local tumor response was evaluated 3 months after TAE according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST; version 1.1). The relationship between tumor enhancement ratio by CT during selective angiography and local tumor response was evaluated. Results: The number of TAE sessions per patient ranged from 1 to 5 (median 2.9). Embolized arteries at initial TAE were bronchial arteries in 14 patients (87.5 %) and nonbronchial systemic arteries in 11 patients (68.8 %). Nodule-based evaluation showed that 5 (10.2 %) nodules had complete response, 17 (34.7 %) had partial response, 15 (30.6 %) had stable disease, and 12 (24.5 %) had progressive disease. The response rate was significantly greater in 22 lesions that had a high tumor enhancement ratio than in 27 lesions that had a slight or moderate ratio (90.9 vs. 7.4 %, p = 0.01). Severe TAE-related adverse events did not occur. Conclusion: TAE with SAP-MS might be a well-tolerated and locally efficacious palliative option for patients with pulmonary metastases from RCC.

  7. Patent foramen ovale in patients with pulmonary embolism: A prognostic factor on CT pulmonary angiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Tan, Stephanie; Patel, Vishal; Zalta, Benjamin A; Shmukler, Anna; Levsky, Jeffrey M; Jain, Vineet R; Shaban, Nada M; Haramati, Linda B

    2017-12-02

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) represents a risk factor for mortality, but this has not been evaluated for CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between PFO and mortality in patients with acute PE diagnosed on CTPA. This retrospective study included 268 adults [173 women, mean age 61 (range 22-98) years] diagnosed with acute PE on non-ECG-gated 64-slice CTPA in 2012 at our medical center. The images were reviewed for PFO by a panel of cardiothoracic radiologists with an average of 11 years of experience (range 1-25 years). CT signs of right heart strain and PE level were noted. Transthoracic echocardiograms (TTE), when available (n = 207), were reviewed for PFO by a cardiologist with subspecialty training in advanced imaging and with 3 years of experience. The main outcome was 30-day mortality. Fischer's exact test was utilized to compare mortality. PFO prevalence on CTPA was 22% (58/268) and 4% (9/207) on TTE. Overall 30-day mortality was 6% (16/268), 9% (5/58) for patients with PFO and 5% (11/210) for those without (p = 0.35). CT signs of right heart strain trended with higher mortality, but statistically significant only for hepatic vein contrast reflux [14% (6/44) vs 4% (10/224), p = 0.03]; right ventricular (RV) to left ventricular (LV) diameter ratio >1 [8% (13/156) vs RV:LV ≤ 1 3% (3/112), p = 0.07], septal bowing [10% (4/42) vs without 5% (12/226), p = 0.30]. PFO was demonstrated on CTPA in a proportion similar to the known population prevalence, while routine TTE was less sensitive. Mortality was non-significantly higher in patients with acute PE and PFO in this moderate-sized study. A larger study to answer this clinically important question is worthwhile. Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of rheolytic thrombectomy in massive pulmonary embolism with contraindication to systemic thrombolytic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamendi, Dabit; Bilodeau, Luc; Ibrahim, Reda; Noble, Stephane; Gallo, Richard; Lavoie-L'allier, Philippe; Gosselin, Gilbert; Deguise, Pierre; Ly, Hung; Tanguay, Jean-François; Doucet, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Mortality of massive pulmonary embolism remains exceedingly high despite thrombolytic therapy. Despite initial encouraging results, rheolytic thrombectomy has not been considered the first choice of treatment in the current European Guidelines for massive pulmonary embolism, even in cases of major contraindication to thrombolysis. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of rheolytic thrombectomy in the specific treatment of massive pulmonary embolism with contraindication to systemic thrombolytic therapy. Between January 2003 and April 2008 a total of 10 patients with massive pulmonary embolism referred for rheolytic thrombectomy were included. Clinical data including medical history, haemodynamic status, procedural characteristic, in-hospital complications and survival were collected. Seven patients survived after undergoing the procedure, three patients died in during their initial hospitalisation however, two of these deaths were not attributable to the pulmonary embolism or the procedure. Rheolytic thrombectomy resulted in reduction of mean pulmonary artery pressures from 34.6+/-13.1 mmHg to 26.9+/-8.2 mmHg immediately following the procedure. Additionally, the Miller index improved from 22.4+/-2.8 to 9.8+/-2.7. There were no periprocedural bleeding complications associated with the procedure. Rheolytic thrombectomy might be an effective and safe treatment for massive pulmonary embolism when systemic thrombolytic therapy is contraindicated. These data form the basis for further clinical investigation of this novel therapy among patients with massive pulmonary embolism.

  9. Co-existance of Lymph Node Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Embolism: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižbrahim Koc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism is occlusion of pulmonary arteries with a material originating from another part of the body and has a high fatality rate if not diagnosed and managed early. Tuberculosis is an infection caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis, generally effecting lungs but involvement of other parts of the body is possible. Here we report a sixty three years old woman who admitted to our clinic with complaints of shortness of breath, weight loss and night sweats. Weight loss and night sweats in old age were suggestive of a malignancy but tumor markers were negative. Low oxygen saturation in a non-smoking previously healty person arise suspicion of pulmonary embolism. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed lymphadenopathy and pulmonary embolism. Pathology of the servical lymph node revealed caseation necrosis. In conclusion in patients with pulmonary embolism who has weight loss and low oxygen saturation beside the malignancy tuberculosis also should be excluded.

  10. Catheter-Directed Fibrinolysis of Submassive Pulmonary Embolism After IVC Filter Migration to Renal Veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kershaw V; Leef, Jeffrey A; Blair, John E; Shah, Atman P; Nathan, Sandeep; Paul, Jonathan D

    2017-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with a submassive pulmonary embolism despite having an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. Imaging demonstrated pulmonary artery emboli and a deep vein thrombosis in the left common femoral vein. Venography revealed the IVC filter with struts extending into the left and right renal veins. A new IVC filter was deployed below the prior filter. This case demonstrates IVC filter migration complicated by a submassive pulmonary embolism.

  11. Hepatocyte growth factor and the risk of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Dawood

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Our observations suggest that the plasma HGF level may be a useful biological marker of pulmonary ischemia, and a valuable tool for early diagnosis of PE. Clarification of the mechanisms, characteristics, and biological significance of HGF elevation is important for clinical use in diagnosing and treating pulmonary ischemia. The use of both d-dimer and HGF increases the predictive power of both tests when used together. The clinical significance of the role of HGF in PE opens a new therapeutic area in treating acute ischemic pulmonary disease that would be able to prolong the time frame for the application of reperfusion–thrombolytic therapy.

  12. [Pulmonary Embolism Despite Rivaroxaban in an Obese Patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Thomas; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Rivaroxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, is approved for therapy of venous thromboembolism. It is unclear whether the standard dose for patients with a body mass index (BMI) > 40 kg/m2 is sufficient. History The 45-year-old patient was admitted because of increasing respiratory distress. She had a history of pulmonary embolism 30 months before the admission, a factor V Leiden mutation and several hospitalisations due to dermatomycoses. The patient briefly took phenprocoumon which was changed to 20 mg rivaroxaban due to a lack of adherence. Six months before admission, the patient paused the rivaroxaban therapy because of dental surgery and suffered a recurrent pulmonary embolism. Findings and Diagnosis The patient presented with increasing difficulty of breathing, morbid obesity with a BMI of 59.3 kg/m2 and intertrigo of the lower extremities. The ECG showed a right axis deviation, a pulmonary P-wave and an incomplete right bundle branch block. Computed tomography showed pulmonary embolisms of the left lower lobe. The pulmonary artery was dilated, and the right atrium was enlarged. Venous thrombosis of the lower limb could not be certainly ruled out. The D-dimer was elevated with 5.895 mg/L (normal value up to 169 mg/L) and NT-pro-BNP was elevated at 5.580 ng/L (normal value up to 0.5 ng/L). Sixteen hours after the onset of symptoms, 22 hours after the last dose, the serum rivaroxaban level was 137 ng/ml. According to manufacturers, the therapeutic range of rivaroxaban after 2 - 4 hours is 22 - 535 ng/ml, and after 24 hours 6 - 239 ng/ml. Therapy and course After initiation of a therapy with low-molecular weight heparin and subsequent oral anticoagulation with phenprocoumon, the symptoms decreased. Conclusions It is highly probable that the pulmonary embolism occurred at a time when the rivaroxaban level was in the therapeutic range. Since there are only few data about safety and efficacy of rivaroxaban and

  13. New Oral Anticoagulants in the Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism: Efficacy, Bleeding Risk, and Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M. Rudd

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation therapy is mandatory in patients with pulmonary embolism to prevent significant morbidity and mortality. The mainstay of therapy has been vitamin-K antagonist therapy bridged with parenteral anticoagulants. The recent approval of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs: apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban has generated significant interest in their role in managing venous thromboembolism, especially pulmonary embolism due to their improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, predictable anticoagulant response, and lack of required efficacy monitoring. This paper addresses the available literature, on-going clinical trials, highlights critical points, and discusses potential advantages and disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants in patients with pulmonary embolism.

  14. The relationship between tumor markers and pulmonary embolism in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Xu, Mei; Guo, Jian; Pudasaini, Bigyan; Wu, Xueling; Liu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Background Tumor markers (TMs) and D-Dimer are both hallmarks of severity and prognosis of lung cancer. Tumor markers could be related to pulmonary embolism (PE) in lung cancer. Results The number of abnormal tumor markers of lung cancer patients with pulmonary embolism (3.9 ? 1.1vs1.6 ? 0.6,P 0.005) was more than that in patients without pulmonary embolism. TMs panel (P trend < 0.001), CEA (R2 0.735, P0.003) and CYFRA21-1 (R2 0.718, P0.005) were positively correlated with D-Dimer in patients...

  15. Fibrinolysis for patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Guy; Vicaut, Eric; Danays, Thierry; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bluhmki, Erich; Bouvaist, Helene; Brenner, Benjamin; Couturaud, Francis; Dellas, Claudia; Empen, Klaus; Franca, Ana; Galiè, Nazzareno; Geibel, Annette; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Jimenez, David; Kozak, Matija; Kupatt, Christian; Kucher, Nils; Lang, Irene M; Lankeit, Mareike; Meneveau, Nicolas; Pacouret, Gerard; Palazzini, Massimiliano; Petris, Antoniu; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Rugolotto, Matteo; Salvi, Aldo; Schellong, Sebastian; Sebbane, Mustapha; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Stefanovic, Branislav S; Thiele, Holger; Torbicki, Adam; Verschuren, Franck; Konstantinides, Stavros V

    2014-04-10

    The role of fibrinolytic therapy in patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism is controversial. In a randomized, double-blind trial, we compared tenecteplase plus heparin with placebo plus heparin in normotensive patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism. Eligible patients had right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography or computed tomography, as well as myocardial injury as indicated by a positive test for cardiac troponin I or troponin T. The primary outcome was death or hemodynamic decompensation (or collapse) within 7 days after randomization. The main safety outcomes were major extracranial bleeding and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke within 7 days after randomization. Of 1006 patients who underwent randomization, 1005 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Death or hemodynamic decompensation occurred in 13 of 506 patients (2.6%) in the tenecteplase group as compared with 28 of 499 (5.6%) in the placebo group (odds ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.23 to 0.87; P=0.02). Between randomization and day 7, a total of 6 patients (1.2%) in the tenecteplase group and 9 (1.8%) in the placebo group died (P=0.42). Extracranial bleeding occurred in 32 patients (6.3%) in the tenecteplase group and 6 patients (1.2%) in the placebo group (P<0.001). Stroke occurred in 12 patients (2.4%) in the tenecteplase group and was hemorrhagic in 10 patients; 1 patient (0.2%) in the placebo group had a stroke, which was hemorrhagic (P=0.003). By day 30, a total of 12 patients (2.4%) in the tenecteplase group and 16 patients (3.2%) in the placebo group had died (P=0.42). In patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism, fibrinolytic therapy prevented hemodynamic decompensation but increased the risk of major hemorrhage and stroke. (Funded by the Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique in France and others; PEITHO EudraCT number, 2006-005328-18; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00639743.).

  16. Severe pulmonary oedema following therapeutic embolization with Onyx for cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesan, C.; Saravanan, Sundararaj; Rajkumar, John; Prasad, Jagadish; Banakal, Sanjay; Muralidhar, Kanchi [Narayana Hrudayalaya Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2008-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by sudden onset of respiratory distress, infiltrates on radiographs consistent with pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia and increased work in breathing. Infiltrates on radiographs are bilateral, but may be patchy or diffuse and fluffy or dense. It is associated with absence of left heart failure and a PaO{sub 2}/FiO{sub 2} ratio of {<=}200. Ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was approved by the US FDA in July 2005, is used as an embolic agent for cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM). It is a biocompatible liquid polymer that precipitates and solidifies on contact with blood, thus forming a soft and spongy embolus. We report a case of ARDS following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer for cerebral AVM under general anaesthesia. Experienced perioperative physicians adopted standard anaesthetic technique and monitoring for this procedure. Acute respiratory distress and hypoxaemia developed in the patient following extubation of the trachea. Infiltrates seen on postprocedural chest radiographs were consistent with pulmonary oedema. DMSO, the solvent for the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, is excreted via the lungs after administration and we postulate that DMSO was the possible cause of ARDS in this patient. Monitoring of haemodynamic parameters (invasive blood pressure, electrocardiography) and ventilatory parameters (ETCO{sub 2}, SpO{sub 2}, airway pressure monitoring) are important in the recognition of this possible event. One should be vigilant and anticipate this complication following therapeutic embolization with ethylene vinyl alcohol polymer for the treatment of cerebral AVM. (orig.)

  17. An Experimental Model of Large Pulmonary Embolism Employing Controlled Release of Subacute Caval Thrombus in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Israel M.; Schenke, William H.; Halabi, Majdi; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to develop a catheter based model of large pulmonary embolism in swine based on in situ venous thrombus formation. Materials and Methods Ten Yorkshire swine underwent transjugular implantation of a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. A thrombin and collagen mixture was injected into a confined space created by two inflated balloons proximal and distal to the IVC filter. Animals were survived for 7±3 days to allow the thrombus to organize in situ. The caval thrombus was released upon transcatheter retrieval of the IVC filter and embolized into the main and branch pulmonary arteries. The severity of pulmonary embolism was scored by digital subtraction angiography (Miller index). At necropsy thrombi were recovered and analyzed by histopathology. Results Large pulmonary embolism was induced in all animals (average Miller index score of 15±5). Two animals developed saddle embolus with bilateral pulmonary artery occlusion and five developed proximal occlusion of either the left or right pulmonary arteries. Nevertheless no animal exhibited significant hemodynamic compromise. Large tubular thrombi were explanted in the size range of 5–10 cm long and .5–1 cm wide. Histology indicated an organized thrombus with infiltration of white blood cells and fibrin deposition. Conclusions Large caval thrombi can be formed in vivo and released at a predetermined time to induce large pulmonary embolism in a large animal model. This may help developing and testing new therapeutic approaches for pulmonary embolism. PMID:21802315

  18. Adaptive contrast-based computer aided detection for pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, M. S.; Devarakota, Pandu; Raghupathi, Laks; Lakare, Sarang; Salganicoff, Marcos; Krishnan, Arun

    2009-02-01

    This work involves the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in contrast-enhanced computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Contrast plays an important role in analyzing and identifying PE in CTPA. At times the contrast mixing in blood may be insufficient due to several factors such as scanning speed, body weight and injection duration. This results in a suboptimal study (mixing artifact) due to non-homogeneous enhancement of blood's opacity. Most current CAD systems are not optimized to detect PE in sub optimal studies. To this effect, we propose new techniques for CAD to work robustly in both optimal and suboptimal situations. First, the contrast level at the pulmonary trunk is automatically detected using a landmark detection tool. This information is then used to dynamically configure the candidate generation (CG) and classification stages of the algorithm. In CG, a fast method based on tobogganing is proposed which also detects wall-adhering emboli. In addition, our proposed method correctly encapsulates potential PE candidates that enable accurate feature calculation over the entire PE candidate. Finally a classifier gating scheme has been designed that automatically switches the appropriate classifier for suboptimal and optimal studies. The system performance has been validated on 86 real-world cases collected from different clinical sites. Results show around 5% improvement in the detection of segmental PE and 6% improvement in lobar and sub segmental PE with a 40% decrease in the average false positive rate when compared to a similar system without contrast detection.

  19. Techniques and Devices for Catheter-Directed Therapy in Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Alok; Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Benenati, James F

    2017-09-01

    The clinical presentation of a patient with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) can be classified into 3 categories: low-risk, submassive (presence of right heart strain), and massive (hemodynamic compromise). Massive PE is associated with high morbidity or mortality and typically treated with systemic intravenous thrombolysis. Over the last 2 decades, however, catheter-directed techniques have become an increasingly popular treatment modality for patients with a contraindication to systemic thrombolysis or without clinical improvement after systemic thrombolysis. Furthermore, endovascular treatment for patients with submassive PE has been of great interest due to the significantly increased mortality associated with right heart strain, and prospective clinical trials have demonstrated catheter-directed thrombolysis to decrease right heart strain earlier than systemic anticoagulation alone. This article describes available devices and endovascular techniques used to treat patients with massive and submassive acute PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. "Pulmonary Vein Sign" for Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis in Computed Tomography Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Luciana Volpon Soares; Zanon, Matheus; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus; Penha, Diana; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Marchiori, Edson; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2017-12-01

    Considering that pulmonary arterial obstruction decreases venous flow, we hypothesized that filling defects in pulmonary veins can be identified in areas adjacent to pulmonary embolism (PE). This sign was named the "pulmonary vein sign" (PVS), and we evaluated its prevalence and performance for PE diagnosis in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). This retrospective study enrolled consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of PE who underwent CTPA scan. The PVS was defined by the following criteria: (a) presence of a homogeneous filling defect of at least 2 cm in a pulmonary vein; (b) attenuation of the left atrium > 160 Hounsfield units. Using the cases that presented PE on CTPA as reference, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for PVS. In total, 119 patients (73 female; mean age, 62 years) were included in this study. PE was diagnosed in 44 (35.8%) patients. The PVS was present in 16 out of 44 patients with PE. Sensitivity was 36.36% (95% confidence interval (CI) 22.83-52.26%); specificity, 98.67% (95% CI 91.79-99.93%); positive predictive value, 94.12% (95% CI 69.24-99.69%); negative predictive value, 72.55% (95% CI 62.67-80.70%). The Kappa index for the PVS was good (0.801; 95% CI 0.645-0.957). PVS was correlated with lobar and segmental pulmonary embolism (p < 0.01). Despite a low sensitivity, presence of the pulmonary vein sign was highly specific for PE, with a good agreement between readers. This sign could contribute for PE diagnosis on CTPA studies.

  1. Thrombolytic Therapy by Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-01-01

    Clinicians need to make decisions about the use of thrombolytic (fibrinolytic) therapy for pulmonary embolism (PE) after carefully considering the risks of major complications from bleeding, and the benefits of treatment, for each individual patient. They should probably not use systemic thrombolysis for PE patients with normal blood pressure. Treatment by human recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), alteplase, saves the lives of high-risk PE patients, that is, those with hypotension or in shock. Even in the absence of strong evidence, clinicians need to choose the most appropriate regimen for administering alteplase for individual patients, based on assessment of the urgency of the situation, risks for major complications from bleeding, and patient's body weight. In addition, invasive strategies should be considered when absolute contraindications for thrombolytic therapy exist, serious complications arise, or thrombolytic therapy fails.

  2. Pulmonary embolism in pregnancy: comparison of pulmonary CT angiography and lung scintigraphy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic adequacy of lung scintigraphy with that of pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) in the care of pregnant patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patient characteristics, radiology report content, additional imaging performed, final diagnosis, and diagnostic adequacy were recorded for pregnant patients consecutively referred for lung scintigraphy or pulmonary CTA according to physician preference. Measurements of pulmonary arterial enhancement were performed on all pulmonary CTA images of pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy and pulmonary CTA studies deemed inadequate for diagnosis at the time of image acquisition were further assessed, and the cause of diagnostic inadequacy was determined. The relative contribution of the inferior vena cava to the right side of the heart was measured on nondiagnostic CTA images and compared with that on CTA images of age-matched nonpregnant women, who were the controls. RESULTS: Twenty-eight pulmonary CTA examinations were performed on 25 pregnant patients, and 25 lung scintigraphic studies were performed on 25 pregnant patients. Lung scintigraphy was more frequently adequate for diagnosis than was pulmonary CTA (4% vs 35.7%) (p = 0.0058). Pulmonary CTA had a higher diagnostic inadequacy rate among pregnant than nonpregnant women (35.7% vs 2.1%) (p < 0.001). Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava was identified in eight of 10 nondiagnostic pulmonary CTA studies. CONCLUSION: We found that lung scintigraphy was more reliable than pulmonary CTA in pregnant patients. Transient interruption of contrast material by unopacified blood from the inferior vena cava is a common finding at pulmonary CTA of pregnant patients.

  3. Impending paradoxical embolism presenting as a pulmonary embolism, transient ischemic attack, and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Scott L; Welch, Timothy S; Scally, John P; Bartoszek, Michael W; Sullenberger, Lance E; Pamplin, Jeremy C; Hnatiuk, Oleh W

    2007-10-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with complaints of nonpleuritic, substernal chest pain, dyspnea, and decreasing exercise tolerance. His vital signs were normal, with the exception of an oxygen saturation level of 93% while breathing room air. During his assessment, he developed transient left facial droop, left arm and leg weakness, and an ataxic gait, which lasted 15 min then resolved spontaneously. Cardiac enzyme levels were elevated, and an ECG revealed T-wave inversion in leads III, aVF, V1, and V2 with evolving ST-segment elevation in leads V3 through V5. The findings of a CT scan and MRI of the head were negative; a Doppler ultrasound of the right lower extremity revealed a thrombus extending from the common femoral vein to the popliteal vein. Cardiac catheterization revealed no evidence of epicardial coronary artery disease. CT pulmonary angiography revealed bilateral pulmonary emboli. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) showed a 4-cm, dumbbell-shaped mass lodged in a patent foramen ovale, confirming the diagnosis of an impending paradoxical embolism. The patient was started on therapy with unfractionated heparin, and his thrombus resolved spontaneously by hospital day 5. An impending paradoxical embolism is rare but should be suspected in anyone presenting with evidence of both venous and arterial emboli. The therapeutic options include anticoagulation, thrombolysis, and surgical embolectomy. We would propose that initial treatment with anticoagulation therapy and following with serial TEEs may be appropriate therapy in an otherwise stable patient, with surgical embolectomy or thrombolysis reserved for the treatment of thrombi that do not resolve with anticoagulation therapy or for patients with clinical deterioration.

  4. Factors Influencing Hospital Stay for Pulmonary Embolism. A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Ruano-Raviña, Alberto; Abelleira, Romina; Ferreiro, Lucía; Lama, Adriana; González-Barcala, Francisco J; Golpe, Antonio; Toubes, María E; Álvarez-Dobaño, José M; Valdés, Luis

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing hospital stay due to pulmonary embolism. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients hospitalized between 2010 and 2015. Patients were identified using information recorded in hospital discharge reports (ICD-9-CM codes 415.11 and 415.19). We included 965 patients with a median stay of 8 days (IQR 6-13 days). Higher scores on the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (sPESI) were associated with increased probability of longer hospital stay. The probability of a hospital stay longer than the median was 8.65 (95% CI 5.42-13.79) for patients referred to the Internal Medicine Department and 1.54 (95% CI 1.07-2.24) for patients hospitalized in other departments, compared to those referred to the Pneumology Department. Patients with grade 3 on the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale had an odds ratio of 1.63 (95% CI: 1.07-2.49). The likelihood of a longer than median hospital stay was 1.72 (95% CI: 0.85-3.48) when oral anticoagulation (OAC) was initiated 2-3 days after admission, and 2.43 (95% CI: 1.16-5.07) when initiated at 4-5 days, compared to OAC initiation at 0-1 days. sPESI grade, the department of referral from the Emergency Department, the grade of dyspnea and the time of initiating OAC were associated with a longer hospital stay. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary embolism in old age: usefulness of risk stratification in clinical decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE is a common disease with a not negligible short-term risk of death, in particular in the elderly. An adequate evaluation of the prognosis in patients with PE may guide decision-making in terms of the intensity of the initial treatment during the acute phase. Patients with shock or persistent hypotension are at high risk of early mortality and may benefit from immediate reperfusion. Several tools are available to define the short-term prognosis of hemodynamically stable patients. The pulmonary embolism severity index (PESI score, and the simplified PESI score are particularly useful for identifying patients at low risk of early complications who might be safely treated at home. The identification of patients who are hemodynamically stable at diagnosis but are at a high risk of early complications is more challenging. Current guidelines recommend a multi-parametric prognostic algorithm based on the clinical status, biomarkers and imaging tests. However an aggressive treatment in hemodynamically stable patients is still controversial.

  6. Efficacy and safety of outpatient treatment with direct oral anticoagulation in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazvinian, R; Gottsäter, A; Elf, J L

    2018-01-05

    Anticoagulant treatment of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) has traditionally been hospital-based. The lesser need for monitoring with the increasingly used direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOAC) in comparison to warfarin potentially facilitates outpatient treatment of PE with these drugs. This study aimed to evaluate efficacy and safety of outpatient treatment of PE with DOAC. We extracted data from the Swedish quality registry for patients on oral anticoagulation (AuriculA) for all 245 patients in the southernmost hospital region in Sweden (1.3 million inhabitants) selected for outpatient treatment with of PE with DOAC during 2013-2015. Comorbidites, risk factors, and simplified pulmonary embolism severity index were evaluated at baseline, and death, recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE), and bleeding was recorded during 6 months of follow-up. Outpatient treatment was defined as discharge from the emergency department within 24 h. During 6 months of follow-up, one patient died during DOAC therapy, the cause of death was unrelated to VTE. No VTE recurrences occured, whereas, one patient experienced major bleeding, and five patients experienced minor bleedings. Outpatient treatment of PE with DOAC is efficient and safe in selected patients.

  7. Barometric pressure and the incidence of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Mehmet; Mirici, Arzu; Aslan, Sahin; Akgun, Metin; Kaynar, Hasan; Saglam, Leyla; Gorguner, Metin

    2005-10-01

    Reports in the literature suggest that weather changes may play a role in venous thrombotic disease. An increase in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) during the spring season led us to investigate the relationship between atmospheric pressure (AP) and the incidence of PE, as diagnosed in most of the patients by helical CT angiography, and in the minority of patients by conventional pulmonary angiography and lung scanning. We retrospectively investigated the charts of 91 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of PE who were evaluated by the Department of Pulmonary Medicine between August 2000 and September 2004. We documented AP changes as recorded by the Erzurum Provincial Department of Meteorology. Of the 91 patients, the diagnosis of PE was made by helical CT angiography in 84 patients, isotope lung scan in 5 patients, and conventional pulmonary angiography in 2 patients. More patients presented in the spring months (March, n = 15; April, n = 10; and May, n = 12) than during other seasons (p < 0.001). The frequency of PE was inversely related to general average AP (r = - 0.70; p < 0.01). When the average seasonal AP was correlated with the incidence of PE, however, the relationship was found to not be statistically significant (r = - 0.66; p = 0.34). There was no correlation between the severity of PE or mortality and AP. The incidence of PE was significantly higher in the spring months, when AP was low. A regional study to capture all PE patients will need to be done to confirm our findings. Other meteorologic factors should be investigated regarding their effect on thromboembolic disease.

  8. Acute amiodarone pulmonary toxicity following lung resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadahunsi, Opeyemi; Krol, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Amiodarone is one of the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmic agents. Despite its widespread use, it is associated with systemic side effects. Pulmonary toxicity, the most severe adverse effect of amiodarone, has usually been described in the context of chronic amiodarone use. We report a case of an 80-year-old male presenting acutely following right upper lung lobe resection for stage 1b adenocarcinoma. He developed atrial fibrillation on postoperative day four and received 12.5 g of amiodarone within a 12 day period. On presentation, he had new bilateral lung opacities and a 35% absolute decline in the predicted diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. Pulmonary embolism was ruled out on chest computed tomography. Amiodarone was discontinued and prednisone was initiated. Despite initial improvement, he suffered from multiple hypoxemic episodes until his death in the fourth month. In a subset of patients undergoing thoracic surgery who are intubated and require high levels of oxygen, the risk of amiodarone lung toxicity increases and patients may present acutely.

  9. Oral and inhaled corticosteroid use and risk of recurrent pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneeboer, Marlous M. S.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Majoor, Christof J.; Bel, Elisabeth H. D.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.

    Introduction: Chronic inflammatory diseases predispose for development of a first pulmonary embolism ( PE). Previous studies showed that corticosteroids, which are the mainstay of treatment for inflammatory diseases, enhance the risk of a first venous thromboembolism. Yet, it is unknown whether

  10. Use of bisphosphonates and raloxifene and risk of deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Schwartz, K; Pinholt, E M

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies have associated raloxifene and strontium ranelate with deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism. In a cohort study, we observed an increased risk also with the bisphosphonates. However, the increase was present already before the start of bisphosphonates pointing...

  11. Quality of Life, Dyspnea, and Functional Exercise Capacity Following a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism: Results of the ELOPE Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Susan R; Akaberi, Arash; Granton, John T; Anderson, David R; Wells, Philip S; Rodger, Marc A; Solymoss, Susan; Kovacs, Michael J; Rudski, Lawrence; Shimony, Avi; Dennie, Carole; Rush, Chris; Hernandez, Paul; Aaron, Shawn D; Hirsch, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate health-related quality of life (QOL), dyspnea, and functional exercise capacity during the year following the diagnosis of a first episode of pulmonary embolism. This was a prospective multicenter cohort study of 100 patients with acute pulmonary embolism recruited at 5 Canadian hospitals from 2010-2013. We measured the outcomes QOL (by Short-Form Health Survey-36 [SF-36] and Pulmonary Embolism Quality of Life [PEmb-QoL] measures), dyspnea (by the University of California San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire [SOBQ]) and 6-minute walk distance at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after acute pulmonary embolism. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed at baseline, echocardiogram was performed within 10 days, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing was performed at 1 and 12 months. Predictors of change in QOL, dyspnea, and 6-minute walk distance were assessed by repeated-measures mixed-effects models analysis. Mean age was 50.0 years; 57% were male and 80% were treated as outpatients. Mean scores for all outcomes improved during 1-year follow-up: from baseline to 12 months, mean SF-36 physical component score improved by 8.8 points, SF-36 mental component score by 5.3 points, PEmb-QoL by -32.1 points, and SOBQ by -16.3 points, and 6-minute walk distance improved by 40 m. Independent predictors of reduced improvement over time were female sex, higher body mass index, and percent-predicted VO2 peak pulmonary embolism. However, a number of clinical and physiological predictors of reduced improvement over time were identified, most notably female sex, higher body mass index, and exercise limitation on 1-month cardiopulmonary exercise test. Our results provide new information on patient-relevant prognosis after pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ventilation-perfusion patterns in lung diseases (with reference to those observed in pulmonary embolism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H R; Amir, R; Vandevivere, J

    1985-01-01

    The frequency distributions of ventilation-perfusion (V-P) patterns in various lung diseases were compared to those observed in pulmonary embolism in order to determine whether the specific V-P patterns for pulmonary embolism constituted a frequent finding in these disorders. The results showed that a segmental or lobar perfusion defect with normal ventilation, was associated with a high probability of thromboembolic lung disease, and was not present in any of the other lung diseases studied.

  13. Ventilation-perfusion patterns in lung diseases (with reference to those observed in pulmonary embolism)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, H.R.; Amir, R.; Vandevivere, J.

    1985-02-01

    The frequency distributions of ventilation-perfusion (V-P) patterns in various lung diseases were compared to those observed in pulmonary embolism in order to determine whether the V-P patterns for pulmonary embolism constituted a frequent finding in these disorders. The results showed that a segmental or labor perfusion defect with normal ventilation, was associated with a high probability of thromboembolic lung disease, and was not present in any of the other lung diseases studied.

  14. Limited value of novel pulmonary embolism biomarkers in patients with coronary atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Mortensen, Jann; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker

    2011-01-01

    Recent research supports the efficacy of various plasma biomarkers in diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE) including E-selectin, MMP-9, MPO, sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, adiponectin, hs-CRP and tPAI-1.......Recent research supports the efficacy of various plasma biomarkers in diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE) including E-selectin, MMP-9, MPO, sVCAM-1, sICAM-1, adiponectin, hs-CRP and tPAI-1....

  15. Case-crossover study to examine the change in postpartum risk of pulmonary embolism over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficheur, Grégoire; Caron, Alexandre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Ferret, Laurie; Jung, Yu-Jin; Garabedian, Charles; Beuscart, Régis; Chazard, Emmanuel

    2017-04-14

    Although the current guidelines recommend anticoagulation up until 6 weeks after delivery in women at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the risk of VTE may extend beyond 6 weeks. Our objective was to estimate the risk of a pulmonary embolism in successive 2-week intervals during the postpartum period. In a population-based, case-crossover study, we analyzed the French national inpatient database from 2007 to 2013 (n = 5,517,680 singleton deliveries). Using ICD-10 codes, we identified women who were diagnosed with a postpartum pulmonary embolism between July 1st, 2008, and December 31st, 2013. Deliveries were identified during a case "period" immediately before the pulmonary embolism, and five different control periods one year before the pulmonary embolism. Using conditional logistic regression, Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidential intervals (CIs) were estimated for ten successive 2-week intervals that preceded the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We identified 167,103 cases with a pulmonary embolism during the inclusion period. After delivery, the risk of pulmonary embolism declined progressively over time, with an OR [95%CI] of 17.2 [14.0-21.3] in postpartum weeks 1 to 2 and 1.9 [1.4-2.7] in postpartum weeks 11 to 12. The OR [95%CI] in postpartum weeks 13 to 14 was 1.4 [0.9-2.0], and the OR did not fall significantly after postpartum week 14. Our findings indicate that women are at risk of a pulmonary embolism up to 12 weeks after delivery. The shape of the risk curve suggests that the risk decreases exponentially over time. Future research is needed to establish whether the duration of postpartum anticoagulation should be extended beyond 6 weeks.

  16. Pulmonary Embolism following Cessation of Infliximab for Treatment of Miliary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 41-year-old male who presented with tachycardia and swelling of his left arm six weeks after he started antituberculosis treatment and stopped his rheumatoid arthritis infliximab treatment. He was diagnosed with pulmonary embolism by chest CT and initially treated with warfarin, which interacted with his antituberculosis treatment. This presentation of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as part of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has not been previously reported for infliximab treated patients.

  17. Wells score and Pulmonary Embolism Rule Out Criteria in preventing over investigation of pulmonary embolism in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğdu, Müge; Topbaşi Sinanoğlu, Nazlı; Doğan, Nurettin Ozgür; Oğuzülgen, Ipek Kıvılcım; Demircan, Ahmet; Bildik, Fikret; Ekim, Numan Nadir

    2014-01-01

    Unnecessary diagnostic tests are usually ordered to most of the patients with dyspnea or pleuritic chest pain, because of the worse outcomes of missed diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). To identify rates and causes of over investigation for PE and to search whether it was possible to reduce this over investigation by using Wells score and Pulmonary Embolism Rule Out Criteria (PERC). A retrospective observational cohort study performed in an emergency department of a tertiary care university hospital. All patients who were ordered diagnostic with the suspicion of PE were included in the study. They were grouped into two as PE (+) and PE (-) and compared. Among 108 patients, 53 (49%) were diagnosed as PE (+) and overdiagnosis was present in 55 (51%) patients i.e., PE (-). The sensitivity of high Wells score was 43%, specificity 78%, positive predictive value 66% and negative predictive value 59%. PERC criteria found to be negative (when all of the eight criteria were fulfilled) in only five patients. The sensitivity of the test was 98%, specificity 7%, positive predictive value 50%, negative predictive value 80%. When individual parameters of PERC were evaluated solely for the exclusion of PE; "no leg swelling" and "no previous deep venous thrombosis or PE history" were found significantly negatively correlated with PE diagnosis (p= 0.001, r= -0.325 and p= 0.013, r= -0.214 respectively). Over investigation of PE in emergency departments still remains as an important problem. In order to prevent this, the clinical prediction rules must be developed further and their use in combination should be searched in future studies.

  18. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT imaging of cardiovascular effects of pulmonary embolism: What the radiologists need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Aboul-fotouh E. Mourad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with pulmonary embolism have high mortality and morbidity rate due to right heart failure and circulatory collapse leading to sudden death. Multi-detector computed tomography MDCT can efficiently evaluate the cardiovascular factors related to pulmonary embolism. Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT in differentiation of between sever and non-severe pulmonary embolism groups depending on the associated cardiovascular parameters and create a simple reporting system. Patients & methods: Prospective study contained 145 patients diagnosed clinically pulmonary embolism. All patients were examined by combined electrocardiographically gated computed tomography pulmonary angiography-computed tomography venography (ECG-CTPA-CTV using certain imaging criteria in a systematic manner. Results: Our study revealed 95 and 55 non-severe and severe pulmonary embolism groups respectively. Many cardiovascular parameters related to pulmonary embolism shows significant p value and can differentiate between sever and non-severe pulmonary embolism patients include pulmonary artery diameter, intraventricular septum flattening, bowing, superior vena cava and Azygos vein diameters, right and left ventricular diameters. Conclusion: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT can be valuable to assess the severity of pulmonary embolism using the related cardiovascular parameters and leading the management strategy aim for best outcome. Keywords: Pulmonary embolism, MDCT, Cardiovascular, Computed tomography venography

  19. Thrombolytic treatment given at the and of the first week of stroke due to pulmonary embolism in a patient with middlee cerebral artery infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin Kürşad Akpınar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thrombolytic treatment is the most effective and commonly used method into firs 4,5 hours of acute ischemic stroke and massive pulmonary embolism. It is known that thrombolytic treatment is definitely contraindicated in cases who had an ischemic stroke into last three months. In this paper, it was reported that thrombolytic treatment had given for pulmonary embolism which developed one week after stroke in a case with stroke due to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Here, we presented a case which is rarely seen and required difficulty in deciding.

  20. MDCT of acute thrombotic and nonthrombotic pulmonary emboli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalla, Sanjeev [Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)], E-mail: bhallas@mir.wustl.edu; Lopez-Costa, Ignacio [Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 South Kingshighway Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)], E-mail: ignacio.lc@mac.com

    2007-10-15

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a common clinical challenge. MDCT pulmonary angiography has become the first line imaging study in the diagnosis of PE because of its speed, accuracy, low-interobserver variability, and ability to provide alternative diagnoses. This review article highlights the role of MDCT in the evaluation of acute thrombotic PE in the era of PIOPED 2. MDCT findings of acute PE and some potential pitfalls are covered as well as some of the controversies in imaging young and pregnant patients. MDCT findings of acute non-thrombotic PE are also covered. This latter group may be occult on the angiographic portion of the study but may declare themselves through secondary findings. Their findings and potential mimics are included so that the interpreting radiologist can make the most of a CT to rule out PE.

  1. Time Trends in Pulmonary Embolism in the United States: Evidence of Overdiagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Schwartz, Lisa M.; Woloshin, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Background Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) may improve detection of life-threatening pulmonary embolism. But this sensitive test may have a downside: overdiagnosis and overtreatment (finding clinically unimportant emboli and exposing patients to harms from unnecessary treatment). Methods To assess the impact of CTPA on national pulmonary embolism incidence, mortality, and treatment complications, we conducted a time trend analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and Multiple Cause-of-Death databases. We compared age-adjusted incidence, mortality, and treatment complications (in-hospital gastrointestinal or intracranial hemorrhage or secondary thrombocytopenia) of pulmonary embolism among United States adults before (1993–1998) and after (1998–2006) CTPA was introduced. Results Pulmonary embolism incidence was unchanged before CTPA (p=0.63), but increased substantially after CTPA (81% increase: from 62.1 to 112.3 per 100,000, pPulmonary embolism mortality decreased during both periods: more so before CTPA (8% reduction: from 13.4 to 12.3 per 100,000, ppulmonary embolism: pre-CTPA, the complication rate was stable (p=0.24), but post-CTPA it increased by 71% (from 3.1 to 5.3 per 100,000, p<0.001). Conclusions The introduction of CTPA was associated with changes consistent with overdiagnosis: rising incidence, minimal change in mortality, and lower case-fatality. Better technology allows us to diagnose more emboli, but to minimize harms of overdiagnosis we must learn which ones matter. PMID:21555660

  2. Transcatheter Embolization of Cystic Artery Pseudoaneurysms Secondary to Acute Cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapnio, Richard H; Kolber, Marcin K; Shukla, Pratik A; Berkowitz, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Cystic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare entity most closely associated with trauma to the biliary vasculature (usually iatrogenic) or inflammation from adjacent cholecystitis. Most cases are treated intraoperatively during cholecystectomy. We describe 3 cases of cystic artery pseudoaneurysms secondary to acute cholecystitis, 2 with active hemobilia, treated with transcatheter embolization at our institution.

  3. Prognostic value of computed tomography in acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasencia-Martínez, J M; Carmona-Bayonas, A; Calvo-Temprano, D; Jiménez-Fonseca, P

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being the standard reference for the diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism, CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries can also provide valuable information about the patient's prognosis. Although which imaging findings are useful for prognosis remains controversial, signs of right ventricular dysfunction on CT are now included in clinical algorithms for the management of pulmonary thromboembolism. However, the optimal method for obtaining these measurements while maintaining a balance between the ease of use necessary to include their evaluation in our daily activity and the loss of precision in its predictive capacity remains to be determined. Moreover, other variables associated with pulmonary thromboembolism that often go unobserved can complement the prognostic information we can offer to clinicians. This review aims to clarify some of the more controversial aspects related to the prognostic value of CT in patients with pulmonary embolisms according to the available evidence. Knowing which variables are becoming more important in the prognosis, how to detect them, and why it is important to include them in our reports will help improve the management of patients with pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Reperfusion after pulmonary embolism - long-term follow-up, risk factors, clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Jan; Petrova, Jana; Vaclavkova, Jana; Janovsky, Vladimir; Kraus, Lubos; Jansa, Pavel

    2018-01-24

    Thromboembolic disease is the third most common cardiovascular disorder and deep vein thrombosis carries the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE). Questions related to reperfusion after PE remain, especially risk factors. Incomplete reperfusion after PE is closely related to the development of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between reperfusion after PE in the long term over a period of 24 months, laboratory results and clinical risk factors found during the initial PE event. 85 consecutive patients with a first episode of acute PE, diagnosed at 4 cardiology clinics, were followed up using clinical evaluation, scintigraphy and echocardiography (6, 12 and 24 months after the PE. 35 patients were in the low risk category (41%), 42 (49%) in the intermediate risk group and 8 (9%) in the high risk category. Perfusion defects persisted in 20 patients (26%) after 6 months, in 19 patients (25%) after 12 months and in 14 patients (19%) after 24 months. The incidence was more frequent in older patients, with more serious (higher risk) PE, increased right ventricular internal diameter during the initial episode, and more significant tricuspid insufficiency in the initial echocardiography. Notably, higher hemoglobin levels were also shown as a significant risk factor. The presence of perfusion defects after 24 months correlated with a concurrent higher pulmonary pressure but not with either patient function or adverse events (recurrence of PE, re-hospitalization or bleeding). In 3 cases (4% of patients), long-term echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension was detected. Even after 24 months from acute PE with adequate anticoagulation treatment, incomplete reperfusion was found in 19% of patients with a corresponding risk of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary disease and hypertension.

  5. Clinical impact of findings supporting an alternative diagnosis on CT pulmonary angiography in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, Josien; Douma, Renée A.; Schreuder, Sanne M.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is commonly used as the first imaging test in the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Other CTPA findings may provide an alternative explanation for signs and symptoms in these patients, but the clinical impact is not

  6. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and embolic complications in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angriman, Federico; Ferreyro, Bruno L; Wainstein, Esteban J; Serra, Marcelo M

    2014-07-01

    Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) face higher risk of embolic complications. It is not clear whether poor outcomes are related to PAVM severity or pulmonary symptoms. Furthermore, there is currently no available data on HHT patients in Argentina. We conducted a cross sectional study in a teaching hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina. We describe baseline characteristics of HHT and compare the prevalence of embolic complications in patients with significant PAVM compared to patients without significant PAVM. One hundred and eight consecutive patients were included. Significant PAVM was defined as: contrast echocardiography grade 2 or greater; bilateral PAVM or feeding artery bigger than 3mm; or previous PAVM treatment. Primary composite outcome was defined as: cerebrovascular accident, cerebral abscess or peripheral embolism. 20% of participants had embolic complications, the most frequent one was stroke. Embolic complications were associated with significant PAVM and respiratory symptoms. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging of cardiovascular effects of pulmonary embolism: What the radiologists need to know

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Aboul-fotouh E. Mourad; Ahmed Fathy A. Al Gebaly; Manal F. Abu Samra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with pulmonary embolism have high mortality and morbidity rate due to right heart failure and circulatory collapse leading to sudden death. Multi-detector computed tomography MDCT can efficiently evaluate the cardiovascular factors related to pulmonary embolism. Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in differentiation of between sever and non-severe pulmonary embolism groups depending on the associated cardiovascular ...

  8. Ambulatory vital signs in the workup of pulmonary embolism using a standardized 3-minute walk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Qamar; Perry, Jeffrey J; Stiell, Ian G; Mohapatra, Subhra; Alsadoon, Abdulaziz; Rodger, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosing pulmonary embolism can be difficult given its highly variable clinical presentation. Our objective was to determine whether a decrease in oxygen saturation or an increase in heart rate while ambulating could be used as an objective tool in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. This was a two-site tertiary-care-centre prospective cohort study that enrolled adult emergency department or thrombosis clinic patients with suspected or newly confirmed pulmonary embolism. Patients were asked to participate in a standardized 3-minute walk test, which assessed ambulatory heart rate and ambulatory oxygen saturation. The primary outcome was pulmonary embolism. We enrolled 114 patients, including 30 with pulmonary embolism (26.3%). A ≥2% absolute decrease in ambulatory oxygen saturation and an ambulatory change in heart rate >10 beats per minute (BPM) were significantly associated with pulmonary embolism. An ambulatory heart rate change of >10 BPM had a sensitivity of 96.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.3 to 99.4) and a specificity of 31.0% (95% CI 22.1 to 45.0) for pulmonary embolism. A ≥2% absolute decrease ambulatory oxygen saturation had a sensitivity of 80.2% (95% CI 62.7 to 90.5) and a specificity of 39.3% (95% CI 29.5 to 50.0) for pulmonary embolism. The combination of both variables yielded a sensitivity of 100.0% (95% CI 87.0 to 100.0) and a specificity of 11.0% (95% CI 6.6 to 21.0). In summary, our study found that an ambulatory heart rate change of >10 BPM or a ≥2% absolute decrease in ambulatory oxygen saturation from baseline during a standardized 3-minute walk test are highly correlated with pulmonary embolism. Although the findings appear promising, neither of these variables can currently be recommended as a screening tool for pulmonary embolism until larger prospective studies examine their performance either alone or with pre-existing rules.

  9. Diagnosis of fatal pulmonary fat embolism with minimally invasive virtual autopsy and post-mortem biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filograna, Laura; Bolliger, Stephan A; Spendlove, Danny; Schön, Corinna; Flach, Patricia M; Thali, Michael J

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of a 78-year-old female with a proximal femur fracture caused by an accidental fall who died suddenly 1h after orthopaedic prosthesis insertion. Post-mortem computed tomography (CT) scan and histological examination of samples obtained with post-mortem percutaneous needle biopsies of both lungs were performed. Analysis of the medical history and the clinical scenario immediately before death, imaging data, and biopsy histology established the cause of death without proceeding to traditional autopsy. It was determined to be acute right ventricular failure caused by massive pulmonary fat embolism. Although further research in post-mortem imaging and post-mortem tissue sampling by needle biopsies is necessary, we conclude that the use of CT techniques and percutaneous biopsy, as additional tools, can offer a viable alternative to traditional autopsy in selected cases and may increase the number of minimally invasive forensic examinations performed in the future. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Salvage intraosseous thrombolysis and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for massive pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Cameron Northey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous access is an alternative route of pharmacotherapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO provides cardiac and respiratory support when conventional therapies fail. This case reports the use of intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO in a patient with acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE. A 34-year-old female presented to the emergency department with sudden onset severe shortness of breath. Due to difficulty establishing intravenous access, an intraosseous needle was inserted into the left tibia. Echocardiography identified severe right ventricular dilatation with global systolic impairment and failure, indicative of PE. Due to the patient′s hemodynamic compromise a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase bolus was administered through the intraosseous route. After transfer to the intensive care unit, venous-arterial ECMO was initiated as further therapy. The patient recovered and was discharged 36 days after admission. This is the first report of combination intraosseous thrombolysis and ECMO as salvage therapy for massive PE.

  11. The right atrial thrombus: the sword of Damocles with real risk of massive pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirin, Marijan; Cerić, Reuf; Spoljarić, Marko; Pehar, Mario; Cavrić, Gordana; Spoljarić, Ivana Rajćan; Kirin, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Cases of 6 patients admitted at the intensive care unit for massive pulmonary embolism are reported. All patients presented with dyspnea, tachypnea, and tachycardia, and 4 were hypotensive and had syncope. Lung ventilation/ perfusion scans revealed perfusion defects in 4 patients. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) demonstrated acute cor pulmonale. It also revealed mobile right atrial thrombi in 5 patients, adherent thrombus in the right atrium in 1 patient and patent foramen ovale in 4 patients. Thrombolytic therapy was initiated in 4 patients, and 2 patients received heparin infusion only. Effects of thrombolysis were monitored using bedside TTE during the first 24 hours and in follow-up. The outcome of 4 patients who received thrombolytic therapy was good whereas other 2 patients, who received only heparin, died. Thrombotic mass disappeared 8 to 12 hours after initiation of therapy, and 10 weeks after discharge TTE showed normalized right ventricle dimensions and function in all 4 patients.

  12. Prevalence of Pulmonary Embolism in Patients With Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Giorgio; Ruwald, Martin H; Quinn, James; Camargo, Carlos A; Dalgaard, Frederik; Gislason, Gunnar; Goto, Tadahiro; Hasegawa, Kohei; Kaul, Padma; Montano, Nicola; Numé, Anna-Karin; Russo, Antonio; Sheldon, Robert; Solbiati, Monica; Sun, Benjamin; Casazza, Giovanni

    2018-01-29

    Sparse data and conflicting evidence exist on the prevalence of pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with syncope. To estimate the prevalence of PE among patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of syncope. This retrospective, observational study analyzed longitudinal administrative data from 5 databases in 4 different countries (Canada, Denmark, Italy, and the United States). Data from all adult patients (aged ≥18 years) who presented to the ED were screened to identify those with syncope codes at discharge. Data were collected from January 1, 2000, through September 30, 2016. The prevalence of PE at ED and hospital discharge, identified using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, was considered the primary outcome. Two sensitivity analyses considering prevalence of PE at 90 days of follow-up and prevalence of venous thromboembolism were performed. A total of 1 671 944 unselected adults who presented to the ED for syncope were included. The prevalence of PE, according to administrative data, ranged from 0.06% (95% CI, 0.05%-0.06%) to 0.55% (95% CI, 0.50%-0.61%) for all patients and from 0.15% (95% CI, 0.14%-0.16%) to 2.10% (95% CI, 1.84%-2.39%) for hospitalized patients. The prevalence of PE at 90 days of follow-up ranged from 0.14% (95% CI, 0.13%-0.14%) to 0.83% (95% CI, 0.80%-0.86%) for all patients and from 0.35% (95% CI, 0.34%-0.37%) to 2.63% (95% CI, 2.34%-2.95%) for hospitalized patients. Finally, the prevalence of venous thromboembolism at 90 days ranged from 0.30% (95% CI, 0.29%-0.31%) to 1.37% (95% CI, 1.33%-1.41%) for all patients and from 0.75% (95% CI, 0.73%-0.78%) to 3.86% (95% CI, 3.51%-4.24%) for hospitalized patients. Pulmonary embolism was rarely identified in patients with syncope. Although PE should be considered in every patient, not all patients should undergo evaluation for PE.

  13. [Transarterial embolization for acute massive hemorrhage in patients with duodenal ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-wei; Li, Xiao-guang; Shi, Hai-feng; Pang, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-bo; Yang, Ning; Jin, Zheng-yu

    2014-10-01

    To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of transarterial embolization for management of acute massive hemorrhage in patients with duodenal ulcer. Twenty-two patients with duodenal ulcer underwent transarterial embolization for acute massive hemorrhage in our hospital between January 2007 and December 2012. Embolic agents were coils and gelatin sponge. The clinical data and embolization procedures of these patients were retrospective analyzed. Bleeding was controlled in 20 of 23 patients after the first embolization procedures. In the other 3 patients with rebleeding, one patient was successfully managed by repeat embolization and two patient underwent surgical treatment. The overall clinical success rate for acute hemorrhage after transarterial embolization was 91% (21/23). No severe complication occurred. Transarterial embolization is safe and effective for acute massive hemorrhage in patients with duodenal ulcer.

  14. Massive pulmonary embolism: the predisposing and complicating factors, its current diagnostic approaches and critical importance of early diagnostic physical exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip A. Konecny

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Massive pulmonary embolism (MPE often leads to circulation collapse, a form of shock. The process is set off by thrombus or multiple thrombi dislodgement followed by a rapid perfusion insufficiency of pulmonary arterial system. Patients experience severe hypotension with diastolic and systolic failure with an acute tricuspid regurgitation. On many occasions, release of an obstruction is unattainable and death is occurring frequently within one hour of presentation. A key reported source of MPE is its occurrence as a complication of deep vein thrombosis (DVT. While long-term immobilization and surgery are both directly associated with MPE, others such as previous DVT, malignancy, infectious lung and heart diseases, family thrombophilia, lower limb paralysis and pregnancy have to be considered as risk factors mainly due to its silent nature. Predisposing and complicating risks should be addressed by an early diagnostic physical exam. The clinician might offer a wide variety of diagnostic approaches, combining techniques into algorithms to better deal with the embolism severity. Multiple patient life-style changes and decisions to adhere to the proposed plan should be built up on patient-physician team effort. KEY WORDS: Massive pulmonary embolism, predisposing factors, current diagnostic approaches.

  15. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for pulmonary embolism: a multicenter prospective study (PIOPED III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Paul D; Chenevert, Thomas L; Fowler, Sarah E; Goodman, Lawrence R; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A; Hull, Russell D; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Leeper, Kenneth V; Naidich, David P; Sak, Daniel J; Sostman, H Dirk; Tapson, Victor F; Weg, John G; Woodard, Pamela K

    2010-04-06

    The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. 7 hospitals and their emergency services. 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation-perfusion lung scan, venous ultrasonography, d-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography combined have a higher sensitivity than magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography

  16. Wells Score and Poor Outcomes Among Adult Patients With Subsegmental Pulmonary Embolism: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angriman, Federico; Ferreyro, Bruno L; Posadas-Martinez, María L; Giunta, Diego; Vazquez, Fernando J; Vollmer, William M

    2015-09-01

    Since the introduction of computed tomography pulmonary angiography, isolated subsegmental pulmonary embolism has become a commonly recognized clinical problem, but its clinical relevance remains unclear. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the simplified Wells score discriminates between patients with varying levels of risk of complications after presenting with subsegmental pulmonary embolism. Retrospective cohort study. Patients included had subsegmental pulmonary embolism (1 or multiple emboli limited to subsegmental arteries). Primary explanatory variable was the simplified Wells score, categorized as high (>4) or low (≤4). The primary outcome was time to death or new venous thromboembolism. Kaplan-Meier techniques and Cox regression analysis were used to compare the survival experience of patients with high versus low Wells score with and without adjustment for active malignancy, age, Charlson score, previous venous thromboembolism, and previous major surgery in the last 30 days. Seventy-nine patients with subsegmental pulmonary embolism were included. Patients with a high Wells score had a 4-fold increased risk of the composite outcome (hazard ratio = 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.0-8.9, P pulmonary embolism. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01372514. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Quality of life after pulmonary embolism as assessed with SF-36 and PEmb-QoL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Josien; den Exter, Paul L; Kaptein, Ad A; Andela, Cornelie D; Erkens, Petra M G; Klok, Frederikus A; Douma, Renee A; Mos, Inge C M; Cohn, Danny M; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Huisman, Menno V; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2013-11-01

    Although quality of life (QoL) is recognized as an important indicator of the course of a disease, it has rarely been addressed in studies evaluating the outcome of care for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). This study primarily aimed to evaluate the QoL of patients with acute PE in comparison to population norms and to patients with other cardiopulmonary diseases, using a generic QoL questionnaire. Secondary, the impact of time period from diagnosis and clinical patient characteristics on QoL was assessed, using a disease-specific questionnaire. QoL was assessed in 109 consecutive out-patients with a history of objectively confirmed acute PE (mean age 60.4 ± 15.0 years, 56 females), using the generic Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the disease specific Pulmonary Embolism Quality of Life questionnaire (PEmb-QoL). The score of the SF-36 were compared with scores of the general Dutch population and reference populations with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF), a history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), derived from the literature. Scores on the SF-35 and PEmb-QoL were used to evaluate QoL in the short-term and long-term clinical course of patients with acute PE. In addition, we examined correlations between PEmb-QoL scores and clinical patient characteristics. Compared to scores of the general Dutch population, scores of PE patients were worse on several subscales of the SF-36 (social functioning, role emotional, general health (PSF-36 (P ≤ 0.004) and had scores comparable with patients with AMI the previous year. Comparing intermediately assessed QoL with QoL assessed in long-term follow-up, PE patients scored worse on SF-36 subscales: physical functioning, social functioning, vitality (P<0.05), and on the PEmb-QoL subscales: emotional complaints and limitations in ADL (P ≤ 0.03). Clinical characteristics did not correlate with QoL as measured by PEmb-QoL. Our study demonstrated an impaired QoL in patients after

  18. Successful treatment of massive pulmonary embolism with prolonged catheter-directed thrombolysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Peter

    2012-02-03

    This is a case report of a young woman who presented with an extensive pulmonary embolism and echocardiographic evidence of right ventricular dysfunction. Although hemodynamically stable, the patient\\'s clinical condition failed to improve with standard heparin anticoagulation. Successful local catheter-directed thrombolysis was performed over an extended period of 48 h with regular monitoring of response to therapy by computed tomography-pulmonary angiography and echocardiography. To our knowledge, treatment of a pulmonary embolism by catheter-directed thrombolytic infusion over an extended period of 48 h has not previously been described.

  19. [Treatment of Right Atrial Myxoma Complicated with Pulmonary Embolism;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnouchi, Kouki; Rikitake, Kazuhisa; Furutachi, Akira; Yoshida, Nozomi

    2016-07-01

    Myxomas are account for approximately half of primary cardiac tumors, 75% of which originate in the left atrium. We report a case of a right atrial myxoma complicated with bilateral pulmonary embolism. A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with a complaint of dyspnea. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography showed a right atrial tumor and bilateral pulmonary embolism. We performed an emergency surgery to remove both the right atrial tumor and the pulmonary emboli. Histopathologically, the tumor was revealed to be myxoma. The postoperative course was uneventful. She is now doing well without any symptoms.

  20. The role of nuclear medicine in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, G; Giordano, A

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear medicine procedures and mainly perfusion lung scanning (often associated with ventilation lung scanning), after thirty years still play a major role in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. International study groups with accurate statistical methods have shown their efficacy in the diagnosis and follow-up, in reducing the clinical uncertainty, in directing the therapy and in lowering health care costs. The major limitation of nuclear medicine procedures lies in the high percentage of patients for whom intermediate or indeterminate probability is reported. However this percentage is steadily decreasing based on: patient clinical preselection; improved procedures and especially an extensive use of D-SPET with a three-head gamma camera; the combination with other advanced diagnostic imaging procedures (HRCT, fast-CT, MRI); suitable diagnostic algorithms for nuclear medicine procedures which should consider laboratory data (D-dimer, TAT) and the study of deep vein thrombosis; the use of artificial intelligence; the introduction of radiopharmaceuticals which enable direct scanning of the intravasal embolus (as P180 polypeptide) in combination with perfusion scanning which shows the hemodynamic alterations.

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed a