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Sample records for acute paranoid psychosis

  1. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

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    Egger Jos I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L. A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined

  2. Psychosis with paranoid delusions after a therapeutic dose of mefloquine: a case report

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    Browning Joseph

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Convenient once-a-week dosing has made mefloquine a popular choice as malaria prophylaxis for travel to countries with chloroquine-resistant malaria. However, the increased use of mefloquine over the past decade has resulted in reports of rare, but severe, neuropsychiatric adverse reactions, such as anxiety, depression, hallucinations and psychosis. A direct causality between mefloquine and severe reactions among travelers has been partly confounded by factors associated with foreign travel and, in the case of therapeutic doses of mefloquine, the central nervous system manifestations of Plasmodium infection itself. The present case provides a unique natural history of mefloquine-induced neuropsychiatric toxicity and revisits its dose-dependent nature. Case presentation This report describes an acute exacerbation of neuropsychiatric symptoms after an unwarranted therapeutic dose (1250 mg of mefloquine in a 37-year-old male previously on a once-a-week prophylactic regimen. Neuropsychiatric symptoms began as dizziness and insomnia of several days duration, which was followed by one week of escalating anxiety and subtle alterations in behaviour. The patient's anxiety culminated into a panic episode with profound sympathetic activation. One week later, he was hospitalized after developing frank psychosis with psychomotor agitation and paranoid delusions. His psychosis remitted with low-dose quetiapine. Conclusion This report suggests that an overt mefloquine-induced psychosis can be preceded by a prodromal phase of moderate symptoms such as dizziness, insomnia, and generalized anxiety. It is important that physicians advise patients taking mefloquine prophylaxis and their relatives to recognize such symptoms, especially when they are accompanied by abrupt, but subtle, changes in behaviour. Patients with a history of psychiatric illness, however minor, may be at increased risk for a mefloquine-induced neuropsychiatric toxicity

  3. Bullying victimisation and paranoid ideation in people at ultra high risk for psychosis.

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    Valmaggia, L R; Day, F L; Kroll, J; Laing, J; Byrne, M; Fusar-Poli, P; McGuire, P

    2015-10-01

    Bullying victimisation has been suggested to contribute to paranoid ideation in general population samples and recent evidence found that individuals with an ultra high risk (UHR) for psychosis are twice as likely to have been bullied than controls. This study sought to examine whether a history of bullying would be associated with higher levels of paranoid ideation in individuals with an UHR and in healthy controls (HCs). The study included 64 UHR and 43 HC participants. Following the baseline assessment, participants entered a Virtual Reality (VR) London Underground train. Paranoid ideation was measured immediately after the end of the VR experience. Compared to HCs, UHR participants described higher levels of childhood bullying (OR 5.19, 95% CI=2.21-12.19, pbullying was associated with paranoid ideation during VR in both groups (χ(2)(1)=5.931, p=,021) but prolonged exposure to bullying was not associated with increased paranoid ideation. A history of bullying in childhood is particularly common in young adults at high risk for psychosis. However bullying is associated with paranoid ideation in later life, independent of clinical status, consistent with dimensional models of psychotic phenomena. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute psychosis: a presentation of cyanocobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anemia.

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    Tripathi, A K; Verma, S P; Himanshu, D

    2010-09-01

    Cyanocobalamin deficiency is not rare in India. Patients present with megaloblastic anemia, pancytopenia and sometimes neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subacute combined degeneration of the cord, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, psychotic depression and paranoid schizophrenia are well reported. We are reporting a case of cyanocobalamine deficiency anemia who presented with acute psychosis which readily reversed on cyanocobalamin replacement.

  5. [Acute hallucinatory psychosis].

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    Gaillard, Raphaël; Smadja, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    The concept of acute delirious puff refers to a transient psychotic state characterized by the sudden outbreak of a polymorphic delusional state in its themes and mecha- nisms. Magnan, in the late of nineteenth century, insti- gated the initial description of this concept. Rediscovered by Henri EY, it's current presence in the French psychiatry despite various attempts to dismantle it results from a singularity based on five cardinal points: it affects young adults, its onset is sudden, delusions are polymorphic and not systematic, there is a marked emotional lability and access is rapidly cured. This entity reveals vulnerability and must be understood carefully by the general practitioner, the issue being the prevention of progression to chronic psychosis.

  6. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); H.J. Kuijpers (Harold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional

  7. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Kuijpers, H.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later,

  8. Frequency and correlates of maladaptive responses to paranoid thoughts in patients with psychosis compared to a population sample.

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    Lincoln, Tania M; Möbius, Carolin; Huber, Martin T; Nagel, Matthias; Moritz, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify whether responses to paranoid thoughts distinguish patients with psychotic disorders from people in the population who have paranoid thoughts occasionally and to identify factors that are associated with and might explain the different ways of responding. Paranoid thoughts were assessed in patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder (n = 32) and a population control sample (n = 34) with the Paranoia Checklist. Responses to paranoid thoughts were assessed with the Reactions to Paranoid Thoughts Scale (RePT) and social support, self-efficacy and cognitive insight were assessed as potential correlates of the responses to paranoid thoughts. The patients showed significantly more depressed, physical and devaluating responses to paranoid thoughts and employed less normalising responses than the controls. The differences in normalising responses were explained by perceived social integration, whereas the differences in depressive responses were explained by the overall levels of depression and partly explained by externality and social integration. Maladaptive responses to paranoid thoughts could be relevant to the pathogenesis and maintenance of persecutory delusions. Interventions aimed at reducing paranoia could benefit from targeting dysfunctional responses to paranoid thoughts and by placing a stronger emphasis on treating depression and improving social integration.

  9. [Paranoid syndrome, paranoid reaction, paranoia].

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    Pavlovský, P

    2006-01-01

    The term paranoid is derived from the Greek word paranoia meaning nadnese. It does not only mean self-reference, but there are various personality features as they are hostility, a tendency towards aggressiveness, irritability, a lack of sense of humour, feelings of overestimation of one-self and a tendency towards accusations. These features may appear also within normal psychology and they becomeclinically important after thein increase of intensity and conspicuousness (los sof hearing, long-term abuse of alcohol and psychostimulants) and organic disorders of the brain may contribute to the development of paranoidity. A mechanism of projection is considered as a decivise factor from the point of view of dynamic psychiatry. Clinically unimportant sign sof paranoidity can be observed due to unusual situations. If a paranoid reaction becomes more serious, formation of a paranoid delusion should be taken to account. In our koncept the term paranoid and paranoidity should be used only as a psychopathological term.

  10. ADEM: literature review and case report of acute psychosis presentation.

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    Nasr, J T; Andriola, M R; Coyle, P K

    2000-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a monophasic, immune-mediated disorder that produces multifocal demyelinating lesions within the central nervous system. It is characterized clinically by the acute onset of neurologic abnormalities, including varying degrees of mental state changes ranging from drowsiness to coma. It is unusual for the illness to present as an isolated acute psychosis. The case of a 14-year-old female with biopsy-confirmed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, who was initially diagnosed with an acute psychiatric disorder, is presented, and published reports on this unusual manifestation are reviewed. A Medline database search was performed from 1965 to 1999, using the terms acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, postvaccinal encephalomyelitis, postinfectious encephalomyelitis, and measles encephalomyelitis, combined with the terms psychosis, psychiatric disorder, and behavioral disorder. Selected cross-referenced reports were also reviewed. Nine patients were identified who presented with acute psychosis. We conclude that, although rare, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis can present as an acute psychosis. This immune-mediated condition should be included in the differential diagnosis of neurologic disorders presenting as a psychiatric illness.

  11. paranoid ideation

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    José M. García-Montes

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Con base en el modelo conocido como “Self-Regulatory Executive Function” (S-REF el presente estudio correlacional pretende averiguar si las variables metacognitivas tienen alguna influencia sobre la ideación paranoide en sujetos no-clínicos. Con este fin se administró una batería de tests a 148 participantes dirigida a indagar el tipo de creencias metacognitivas por el que se caracterizaban así como su nivel de ideación paranoide y su nivel de ansiedad-rasgo. Los resultados muestran que, una vez controlado el nivel de ansiedad de los sujetos, la pérdida de la confianza cognitiva es la única variable metacognitiva que predice la puntuación de los sujetos en ideación paranoide. De no efectuarse este control estadístico de la ansiedad-rasgo, se incluirían en la ecuación de regresión dos factores metacognitivos más relativos a la incontrolabilidad y peligro de los pensamientos y a las creencias positivas sobre la preocupación. Estos resultados son discutidos a la luz de recientes aportaciones favorables a la extensión de modelos ya consolidados en el campo de los trastornos emocionales, como el modelo S-REF, a los síntomas psicóticos.

  12. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis in an Incarcerated Adolescent Presents as Acute Psychosis: Case Report and Literature Review.

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    Neeki, Michael M; Au, Christine; Richard, Aurora; Peace, Carlos; Jaques, Sharon; Johansson, Jens

    2016-10-04

    We aimed to describe a case of an incarcerated adolescent with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting as acute psychosis. This was a retrospective case report followed with chart and literature review. An adolescent with ADEM presented with drastic behavior and personality changes that led to her incarceration for serious charges. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis leads to neuropsychiatric effects and can be seen with magnetic resonance imaging as a large mass effect that may result in a poor prognosis. This adolescent made a full recovery from her left facial droop, slurred speech, and left-sided hemiplegia, and her personality changes were reverted. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis can present as acute psychosis; therefore, clinical suspicion is important when treating patients who have a history of past infectious brain diseases, especially encephalitis. Given the rapid onset of disease, physicians must be knowledgeable of the diagnosis and treatment of ADEM and be vigilant in finding organic causes of acute psychosis.

  13. Clinical correlates of acute bipolar depressive episode with psychosis.

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    Caldieraro, Marco Antonio; Sylvia, Louisa G; Dufour, Steven; Walsh, Samantha; Janos, Jessica; Rabideau, Dustin J; Kamali, Masoud; McInnis, Melvin G; Bobo, William V; Friedman, Edward S; Gao, Keming; Tohen, Mauricio; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Ketter, Terence A; Calabrese, Joseph R; McElroy, Susan L; Thase, Michael E; Shelton, Richard C; Bowden, Charles L; Kocsis, James H; Deckersbach, Thilo; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    Psychotic bipolar depressive episodes remain remarkably understudied despite being common and having a significant impact on bipolar disorder. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of depressed bipolar patients with current psychosis compared to those without psychosis. We used baseline data of a comparative effectiveness study of lithium and quetiapine for bipolar disorder (the Bipolar CHOICE study) to compare demographic, clinical, and functioning variables between those with and without psychotic symptoms. Of the 482 participants, 303 (62.9%) were eligible for the present study by meeting DSM-IV criteria for an acute bipolar depressive episode. Univariate analyses were conducted first, and then included in a model controlling for symptom severity. The sample was composed mostly of women (60.7%) and the mean age was 39.5±12.1 years. Psychosis was present in 10.6% (n=32) of the depressed patients. Psychotic patients had less education, lower income, and were more frequently single and unemployed. Psychosis was also associated with a more severe depressive episode, higher suicidality, more comorbid conditions and worse functioning. Most group differences disappeared when controlling for depression severity. Only outpatients were included and the presence of psychosis in previous episodes was not assessed. Psychosis during bipolar depressive episodes is present even in an outpatient sample. Psychotic, depressed patients have worse illness outcomes, but future research is necessary to confirm if these outcomes are only associated with the severity of the disorder or if some of them are independent of it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute Psychosis as Main Manifestation of Central Pontine Myelinolysis

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    Mangala Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is an acute demyelinating neurological disorder affecting primarily the central pons and is frequently associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia. Common clinical manifestations of CPM include spastic quadriparesis, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, and encephalopathy of various degrees; however, coma, “locked-in” syndrome, or death can occur in most severe cases. Rarely, CPM presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, such as personality changes, acute psychosis, paranoia, hallucinations, or catatonia, typically associated with additional injury to the brain, described as extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM. We present a patient with primarily neuropsychiatric manifestations of CPM, in the absence of focal neurologic deficits or radiographic extrapontine involvement. A 51-year-old female without significant medical history presented with dizziness, frequent falls, diarrhea, generalized weakness, and weight loss. Physical examination showed no focal neurological deficits. Laboratory data showed severe hyponatremia, which was corrected rather rapidly. Subsequently, the patient developed symptoms of an acute psychotic illness. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was unremarkable, although a repeat MRI two weeks later revealed changes compatible with CPM. This case demonstrates that acute psychosis might represent the main manifestation of CPM, especially in early stages of the disease, which should be taken into consideration when assessing patients with acute abnormalities of sodium metabolism.

  15. Homicide and Associated Steroid Acute Psychosis: A Case Report

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    G. Airagnes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an old man treated with methylprednisolone for chronic lymphoid leukemia. After two months of treatment, he declared an acute steroid psychosis and beat his wife to death. Steroids were stopped and the psychotic symptoms subsided, but his condition declined very quickly. The clinical course was complicated by a major depressive disorder with suicidal ideas, due to the steroid stoppage, the leukemia progressed, and by a sudden onset of a fatal pulmonary embolism. This clinical case highlights the importance of early detection of steroid psychosis and proposes, should treatment not be stopped, a strategy of dose reduction combined with a mood stabilizer or antipsychotic treatment. In addition have been revised the risks of the adverse psychiatric effects of steroids.

  16. Psychosis

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    ... prescription drugs, such as steroids and stimulants Some types of epilepsy Stroke Psychosis may also be found in: Most people with schizophrenia Some people with bipolar disorder (manic-depressive) or severe depression Some personality disorders

  17. EEG screening for temporal lobe epilepsy in patients with acute psychosis.

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    Raybould, Jillian E; Alfers, Cory; Cho, Yong won; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar M; Epstein, Steven A; Motamedi, Gholam K

    2012-01-01

    Seizures may present with ictal or interictal psychosis mimicking primary psychiatric disorders. The authors reviewed EEG, brain-imaging, and clinical data of 240 patients presenting with acute psychotic episode to assess the diagnostic value of EEG in differentiating ictal psychosis from primary psychosis. Seven patients had interictal spikes, but there were no patients with ictal discharges. There were no significant associations between the tested variables except that taking neuroleptics/antidepressants was associated with abnormal EEG, and older age and taking anti-epileptic drugs were associated with abnormal CT scans. These findings do not support routine use of EEG in patients presenting with acute psychosis.

  18. Psychosis.

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    Arciniegas, David B

    2015-06-01

    Psychosis is a common and functionally disruptive symptom of many psychiatric, neurodevelopmental, neurologic, and medical conditions and an important target of evaluation and treatment in neurologic and psychiatric practice. The purpose of this review is to define psychosis, communicate recent changes to the classification of and criteria for primary psychotic disorders described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), and summarize current evidence-based approaches to the evaluation and management of primary and secondary psychoses. The DSM-5 classification of and criteria for primary psychotic disorders emphasize that these conditions occur along a spectrum, with schizoid (personality) disorder and schizophrenia defining its mild and severe ends, respectively. Psychosis is also identified as only one of several dimensions of neuropsychiatric disturbance in these disorders, with others encompassing abnormal psychomotor behaviors, negative symptoms, cognitive impairments, and emotional disturbances. This dimensional approach regards hallucinations and delusions as arising from neural systems subserving perception and information processing, thereby aligning the neurobiological framework used to describe and study such symptoms in primary psychotic disorders with those used to study psychosis associated with other neurologic conditions. This article provides practicing neurologists with updates on current approaches to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of primary and secondary psychoses.

  19. Paranoid personality disorder

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    Personality disorder - paranoid; PPD ... American Psychiatric Association. Paranoid personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of ental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013:649-652. Blais MA, ...

  20. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires’ Disease

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    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires’ disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms.

  1. An Unusual Case of Acute Psychosis With Obsessive-Compulsive Features Following Arsenic Poisoning.

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    Wu, Hanjing E; Abdel-Gawad, Noha M; Gharbaoui, Yasmine; Teixeira, Antonio L; Pigott, Teresa A

    2017-09-01

    Arsenic exposure, particularly the chronic type, can lead to poisoning with manifestations presenting in multiple organ systems. However, acute psychosis is not a commonly described manifestation of arsenic exposure. In this report, we present the case of a patient who developed acute psychosis with hallucinations, disorganized thinking, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms following chronic occupational arsenic exposure. The patient was treated with the combination of an antipsychotic and an antidepressant and he responded well with significant improvement in both the acute psychosis and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The authors concluded that patients can develop atypical symptoms, including acute psychosis, following arsenic poisoning. In the case described in this report, the patient also presented with a new onset of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Given this rare manifestation of arsenic poisoning for which there is no clearly defined treatment regimen, this case suggests that the use of a combination of an antipsychotic and an antidepressant may be considered in the rare event of psychosis with obsessive-compulsive features following arsenic poisoning.

  2. The induction of acute psychosis in a group setting.

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    Powell, C

    1979-04-01

    The case histories of two patients are described, each of whom suffered a severe psychotic decompensation, one apparently schizophreniform and the other affective, after attending a seven day marathon group conducted by a charismatic, aggressive leader. The work of Yalom and Lieberman is reviewed, with regard to leader and participant characteristics in encounter group casualties. Drawing upon the work of Bion and Kernberg, a specific means for the induction of psychosis is suggested, involving primitive splitting and the projection of "all bad" self-object constellations within a group setting.

  3. [Clinico-psychopathologic varieties of the acute Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome in schizophrenia].

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    Dikaia, V I

    1985-01-01

    Acute cases of the Kandinsky-Clerambault syndrome first manifested in adulthood were studied in schizophrenic patients. On the basis of the clinical mechanisms of the development of psychosis and the specific features of acute delirious disturbances in the structure of psychosis 3 clinical variants of the acute syndrome of psychic automatism were identified: developing according to the type of reaction in the structure of acute paranoid (the first variant), according to the regularities of endogenic paroxysm in the picture of acute sensory delirium (the second variant) and according to the mechanism of exacerbation of chronic delirium entering the structure of acute interpretative delirium (the third variant).

  4. Duration of Untreated Psychosis Is Associated with More Negative Schizophrenia Symptoms after Acute Treatment for First-Episode Psychosis

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    Grano, Niklas; Lindsberg, Jenni; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Gronroos, Peter; Blomberg, Ari-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Evidence of association between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and negative symptoms of schizophrenia in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients is inconsistent in the recent literature. In the present study, DUP, schizophrenia symptoms, duration of medication, and diagnosis were obtained from hospital archives in a sample of FEP patients.…

  5. Recollected experiences of first hospitalisation for acute psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The psychiatric hospital is an important environment for the treatment of people who are severely psychotic. [1] Hospitalisation is vital for a number of reasons: firstly, for providing care for acutely disturbed individuals, in an environment where medication can be quickly altered and side-effects closely monitored. Secondly ...

  6. Acute psychosis in propionic acidemia: 2 case reports.

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    Dejean de la Bâtie, C; Barbier, V; Valayannopoulos, V; Touati, G; Maltret, A; Brassier, A; Arnoux, J B; Grévent, D; Chadefaux, B; Ottolenghi, C; Canouï, P; de Lonlay, P

    2014-02-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inborn deficiency of propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity, which leads to mitochondrial accumulation of propionyl-CoA and its by-products. Neurologic complications are frequent, but only a few cases presenting with psychiatric symptoms have been reported so far. We report 2 cases of children with chronic psychiatric symptoms who presented with an acute psychotic episode as teenagers. Both patients had hallucinations, panic and grossly disorganized behavior, for several weeks to several months. They had signs of moderate metabolic decompensation at the beginning of the episode, although the psychiatric symptoms lasted longer than the metabolic imbalance. We propose that these episodes were at least partially imputable to propionic acidemia. Such episodes require psychiatric examination and antipsychotic treatment, which may have to be adapted in case of cardiomyopathy or long QT syndrome.

  7. Altered Mental Status: Epilepsy, Acute Psychosis, Intoxication or Delirium Tremens?

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    Shannon Toohey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation session can be used for emergency medicine residents or medical students, but it may be more appropriate for senior residents. Junior residents and medical students may also misdiagnose delirium tremens as a seizure disorder. Introduction: Delirium tremens (DT is a rare, severe form of withdrawal that includes tremors, seizures, fever and delirium and occurs in approximately 5% of patients with alcohol withdrawal. Early identification and prompt treatment is essential as DT has a 5%-20% mortality rate which can be reduced to 1%-5% with appropriate therapy. Objectives: At the end of this simulation session the learner will: 1 Recognize signs and symptoms of delirium tremens (DT; 2 promptly treat DT with benzodiazepines and supportive care; 3 appropriately manage a patient with DT and effectively communicate with nurses and other team members during the resuscitation of an acutely ill patient. Method: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  8. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

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    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  9. Self-reported Cognitive Biases Moderate the Associations Between Social Stress and Paranoid Ideation in a Virtual Reality Experimental Study.

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    Pot-Kolder, Roos; Veling, Wim; Counotte, Jacqueline; van der Gaag, Mark

    2017-10-10

    Cognitive biases are associated with psychosis liability and paranoid ideation. This study investigated the moderating relationship between pre-existing self-reported cognitive biases and the occurrence of paranoid ideation in response to different levels of social stress in a virtual reality environment. This study included 170 participants with different levels of psychosis liability (55 recent onset psychosis, 20 ultrahigh risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of psychotic patients, and 53 controls). All participants were exposed to virtual environments with different levels of social stress. The level of experienced paranoia in the virtual environments was measured with the State Social Paranoia Scale. Cognitive biases were assessed with a self-report continuous measure. Also, cumulative number of cognitive biases was calculated using dichotomous measures of the separate biases, based on general population norm scores. Higher belief inflexibility bias (Z = 2.83, P virtual environments. Level of paranoid response increased with number of cognitive biases present (B = 1.73, P < .001). The effect of environmental stressors on paranoid ideation was moderated by attention to threat bias (Z = 2.78, P < .01) and external attribution bias (Z = 2.75, P < .01), whereas data-gathering bias and belief inflexibility did not moderate the relationship. There is an additive effect of separate cognitive biases on paranoid response to social stress. The effect of social environmental stressors on paranoid ideation is further enhanced by attention to threat bias and external attribution bias.

  10. Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

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    D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Sherif, Mohamed; Cortes-Briones, Jose; Cahill, John; Gupta, Swapnil; Skosnik, Patrick D; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the relationship between cannabis and psychosis. The link between cannabis use and psychosis comprises three distinct relationships: acute psychosis associated with cannabis intoxication, acute psychosis that lasts beyond the period of acute intoxication, and persistent psychosis not time-locked to exposure. Experimental studies reveal that cannabis, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and synthetic cannabinoids reliably produce transient positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms in healthy volunteers. Case-studies indicate that cannabinoids can induce acute psychosis which lasts beyond the period of acute intoxication and persisting as long as a month. Exposure to cannabis in adolescence is associated with an increased risk for later psychotic disorder in adulthood; this association is consistent, somewhat specific, shows a dose-response, and is biologically plausible. The link between cannabinoids and psychosis is greater with earlier age of exposure to cannabinoids, childhood abuse and genetic vulnerability. However, cannabinoids are neither necessary nor sufficient to cause a persistent psychotic disorder. More likely cannabinoids are a 'component cause' interacting with other known (family history) and unknown factors to result in psychosis outcomes. While more research is needed to better understand the relationship between cannabinoid use and psychosis, and the neural underpinnings of this link, clinicians should be mindful of the potential risk of psychosis especially in vulnerable populations, including adolescents and those with a psychosis diathesis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. [Postictal psychosis].

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    de Toffol, B

    2009-10-01

    In epilepsy patients, psychotic states are related to a group of psychotic disorders with a specific phenomenology in which potential pathophysiological mechanisms are believed to be closely related to the epileptic disorder itself. Postictal psychosis is a very specific syndrome in relation to seizure activity: a clear temporal relationship exists between the psychotic state of sudden onset and a precipitating bout of complex partial or generalized seizures, with a characteristic lucid interval which lasts from two to 120h. The psychotic state may be related to the withdrawal of anticonvulsants, often in connection with video-EEG monitoring. The phenomenology of the psychotic state is often pleomorphic, with abnormal mood, paranoid delusions and hallucinations, with some clouding of consciousness or no evidence of impaired consciousness. The outcome is characterized by a remission of the psychotic symptoms over several days (mean: 1 week), with or without neuroleptic treatment. The majority of the patients suffer from complex partial seizures with frequent psychic auras that secondarily become generalized. In the majority of cases, prepsychotic EEG abnormalities persist during the psychosis. Frequent bitemporal foci are recorded on the EEG and MRI abnormalities (including mesial temporal sclerosis) are seen in more than half of the cases. The results of clinical, morphologic and metabolic available studies will be briefly discussed.

  12. Acute psychosis in a pregnant patient with Graves' hyperthyroidism and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

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    Lu, Jesslyn; Samson, Susan; Kass, Joseph; Ram, Nalini

    2015-04-22

    A previously healthy 36-year-old woman presented with visual hallucinations and acute psychosis manifested predominantly as hypersexuality. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated free thyroxine levels, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone levels and presence of thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies consistent with Graves' disease. Despite achieving biochemical euthyroidism, she remained profoundly hypersexual. She did not respond to additional treatment with antipsychotics and corticosteroids, prompting further evaluation. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detected pleocytosis, elevated IgG, and presence of antibodies against anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and TPO. These results suggested a diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Prior to initiation of immunomodulator therapy, she was discovered to be pregnant with date of conception around the time of her original presentation. She received plasmapheresis with resolution of psychosis and decrease in free thyroxine levels. Graves' disease remitted during the remainder of the pregnancy but relapsed 5 months post partum. She has not had further neuropsychiatric symptoms. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. The acute effects of synthetic intravenous Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on psychosis, mood and cognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P D; Zois, V; McKeown, D A; Lee, T D; Holt, D W; Powell, J F; Kapur, S; Murray, R M

    2009-10-01

    Recent work suggests that heavy use of cannabis is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia-like psychosis. However, there is a dearth of experimental studies of the effects of the constituents of cannabis, such as Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In a study of intravenous (i.v.) synthetic THC in healthy humans, we aimed to study the relationship of the psychotic symptoms induced by THC to the consequent anxiety and neuropsychological impairment. Twenty-two healthy adult males aged 28+/-6 years (mean+/-s.d.) participated in experimental sessions in which i.v. THC (2.5 mg) was administered under double-blind, placebo-controlled conditions. Self-rated and investigator-rated measurements of mood and psychosis [the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE)] were made at baseline and at 30, 80 and 120 min post-injection. Participants also completed a series of neuropsychological tests [the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Task (RAVLT), Digit Span, Verbal Fluency and the Baddeley Reasoning Task] within 45 min of injection. THC-induced positive psychotic symptoms, and participant- and investigator-rated measurements of these were highly correlated. Participants showed an increase in anxiety ratings but there was no relationship between either self- or investigator-rated positive psychotic symptoms and anxiety. THC also impaired neuropsychological performance but once again there was no relationship between THC-induced positive psychotic symptoms and deficits in working memory/executive function. These findings confirm that THC can induce a transient, acute psychotic reaction in psychiatrically well individuals. The extent of the psychotic reaction was not related to the degree of anxiety or cognitive impairment.

  14. Paranoid Ideation and Violence: Meta-analysis of Individual Subject Data of 7 Population Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, Jeremy W.; Ullrich, Simone; Bebbington, Paul; Fazel, Seena; Keers, Robert

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy whether associations between psychosis and violence are due to coexisting substance misuse and factors increasing risk in nonpsychotic persons. Recent studies in clinical samples have implicated independent effects of paranoid delusions. Research findings suggest that individual psychotic-like-experiences on the psychosis continuum in the general population are associated with violence; it remains unclear whether this association is due to psychiatric comorbidity. We pooled data from 7 UK general population surveys (n = 23 444) and conducted a meta-analysis of individual subject data. Further meta-analyses were performed to identify heterogeneity. Main exposure variables: 5 psychotic-like-experiences and a categorical measure of psychosis. Comorbidity was established through standardized self-report instruments. Information was collected on violence, severity, victims. Paranoid ideation was associated with violence (AOR 2.26, 95% CI 1.75–2.91), severity and frequency, even when controlling for effects of other psychotic-like-experiences. Associations were not explained by comorbid conditions, including substance dependence. Psychotic disorder was associated with violence and injury to the perpetrator but associations were explained by paranoid ideation. Individual associations between hypomania, thought insertion, hallucinations, and violence were nonsignificant after adjustments, and significantly associated only when comorbid with antisocial personality disorder. Strange experiences were only associated with intimate partner violence. Paranoid ideation on a psychosis-continuum in the general population was associated with violence. All other associations were explained by comorbidity. Further investigation should determine whether paranoid ideation among persons in the community require preventive interventions, similar to those presenting to mental health services. Nevertheless, risks are considerably increased for psychotic

  15. Trastorno paranoide de la personalidad

    OpenAIRE

    Palencia de la Fuente, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Se resumen las variantes, características, tratamientos, mitos y relatos históricos referentes al trastorno paranoide de la personalidad, mostrando sus semejanzas y diferencias con otros trastornos mentales y de personalidad. Se recopilan definiciones oficiales y aportaciones de autores diversos que aporten novedades, desmientan rumores y apoyen estudios o hipótesis

  16. The open dialogue approach to acute psychosis: its poetics and micropolitics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikkula, Jaakko; Olson, Mary E

    2003-01-01

    In Finland, a network-based, language approach to psychiatric care has emerged, called "Open Dialogue." It draws on Bakhtin's dialogical principles (Bakhtin, 1984) and is rooted in a Batesonian tradition. Two levels of analysis, the poetics and the micropolitics, are presented. The poetics include three principles: "tolerance of uncertainty," "dialogism," and "polyphony in social networks." A treatment meeting shows how these poetics operate to generate a therapeutic dialogue. The micropolitics are the larger institutional practices that support this way of working and are part of Finnish Need-Adapted Treatment. Recent research suggests that Open Dialogue has improved outcomes for young people in a variety of acute, severe psychiatric crises, such as psychosis, as compared to treatment-as-usual settings. In a nonrandomized, 2-year follow up of first-episode schizophrenia, hospitalization decreased to approximately 19 days; neuroleptic medication was needed in 35% of cases; 82% had no, or only mild, psychotic symptoms remaining; and only 23% were on disability allowance.

  17. First-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    that two-thirds of the patients had a comorbid personality disorder at two-year follow-up, and schizoid, paranoid and avoidant personality disorder were the most frequent. Schizotypal traits were less prevalent, which in relation to the late follow-up is attributed to uncertainty in differentiating....... Patients with first-episode psychosis had significantly high NEO-PI-R scores for neuroticism and agreeableness, and lower scores for conscientiousness and extroversion. The median time for remission in the total sample was three months. Female gender and better premorbid functioning were predictive of less...... negative symptoms and shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was predictive for shorter time to remission, stable remission, less severe positive psychotic symptoms, and better social functioning. Female gender, better premorbid social functioning and more education also contributed to a better...

  18. Tryptophan pathway alterations in the postpartum period and in acute postpartum psychosis and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veen, Cato; Myint, Aye Mu; Burgerhout, Karin M; Schwarz, Markus J; Schütze, Gregor; Kushner, Steven A; Hoogendijk, Witte J; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Bergink, Veerle

    2016-01-01

    Women are at very high risk for the first onset of acute and severe mood disorders the first weeks after delivery. Tryptophan breakdown is increased as a physiological phenomenon of the postpartum period and might lead to vulnerability for affective psychosis (PP) and severe depression (PD). The aim of the current study was to investigate alterations in tryptophan breakdown in the physiological postpartum period compared to patients with severe postpartum mood disorders. We included 52 patients (29 with PP, 23 with PD), 52 matched healthy postpartum women and 29 healthy non-postpartum women. Analyzes of serum tryptophan metabolites were performed using LC-MS/MS system for tryptophan, kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, kynurenic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The first two months of the physiological postpartum period were characterized by low tryptophan levels, increased breakdown towards kynurenine and a downstream shift toward the 3-OH-kynurenine arm, away from the kynurenic acid arm. Kynurenine was significantly lower in patients with PP and PD as compared to healthy postpartum women (p=0.011 and p=0.001); the remaining tryptophan metabolites demonstrated few differences between patients and healthy postpartum women. Low prevalence of the investigated disorders and strict exclusion criteria to obtain homogenous groups, resulted in relatively small sample sizes. The high kynurenine levels and increased tryptophan breakdown as a phenomenon of the physiological postpartum period was not present in patients with severe postpartum mood disorders. No differences were observed in the levels of the 'neurotoxic' 3-OH-kynurenine and the 'neuroprotective' kynurenic acid arms between patients and healthy postpartum women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged psychosis after Amanita muscaria ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brvar, Miran; Mozina, Martin; Bunc, Matjaz

    2006-05-01

    Amanita muscaria has a bright red or orange cap covered with small white plaques. It contains the isoxazole derivatives ibotenic acid, muscimol and muscazone and other toxins such as muscarine. The duration of clinical manifestations after A. muscaria ingestion does not usually exceed 24 hours; we report on a 5-day paranoid psychosis after A. muscaria ingestion. A 48-year-old man, with no previous medical history, gathered and ate mushrooms he presumed to be A. caesarea. Half an hour later he started to vomit and fell asleep. He was found comatose having a seizure-like episode. On admission four hours after ingestion he was comatose, but the remaining physical and neurological examinations were unremarkable. Creatine kinase was 8.33 microkat/l. Other laboratory results and brain CT scan were normal. Toxicology analysis did not find any drugs in his blood or urine. The mycologist identified A. muscaria among the remaining mushrooms. The patient was given activated charcoal. Ten hours after ingestion, he awoke and was completely orientated; 18 hours after ingestion his condition deteriorated again and he became confused and uncooperative. Afterwards paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations appeared and persisted for five days. On the sixth day all symptoms of psychosis gradually disappeared. One year later he is not undergoing any therapy and has no symptoms of psychiatric disease. We conclude that paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations can appear 18 hours after ingestion of A. muscaria and can last for up to five days.

  20. Two cases of "cannabis acute psychosis" following the administration of oral cannabis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Marie

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal drug and its therapeutic aspects have a growing interest. Short-term psychotic reactions have been described but not clearly with synthetic oral THC, especially in occasional users. Case presentations We report two cases of healthy subjects who were occasional but regular cannabis users without psychiatric history who developed transient psychotic symptoms (depersonalization, paranoid feelings and derealisation following oral administration of cannabis. In contrast to most other case reports where circumstances and blood concentrations are unknown, the two cases reported here happened under experimental conditions with all subjects negative for cannabis, opiates, amphetamines, cocaine, benzodiazepines and alcohol, and therefore the ingested dose, the time-events of effects on behavior and performance as well as the cannabinoid blood levels were documented. Conclusion While the oral route of administration achieves only limited blood concentrations, significant psychotic reactions may occur.

  1. Interpersonal sensitivity, bullying victimization and paranoid ideation among help-seeking adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masillo, Alice; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Saba, Riccardo; Brandizzi, Martina; Lo Cascio, Nella; Telesforo, Ludovica; Venturini, Paola; Izzo, Aniello; Mattioli, M Teresa; D'Alema, Marco; Girardi, Paolo; Fiori Nastro, Paolo

    2017-05-30

    The effects of a negative interpersonal experience, such as bullying victimization in childhood and adolescence, can be strong and long lasting. Bullying victimization is associated with paranoid ideation and suspiciousness. Few studies have focused on personality traits of victims of bullying. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a particular personality trait called interpersonal sensitivity may be related to suspiciousness in those who experienced bullying victimization. The study sample consisted of 147 help-seeking adolescents (mean age 17 years) selected after a screening phase (Prodromal Questionnaire) and evaluated with the Structured Interview for Psychosis-risk Syndromes (SIPS). All participants were specifically asked if they had experienced either psychological bullying or physical bullying, and they completed the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM). Of the whole sample, 30 (20%) participants had experienced psychological bullying or physical bullying at least once in their life. Performing a multiple regression, bullying victimization was found to be an independent predictor of subtle paranoid ideation and suspiciousness. Interpersonal sensitivity was also found to be an independent predictor of subtle paranoid ideation; in particular, two IPSM subscales, fragile inner-self and separation anxiety, showed a significant correlation with subtle paranoid ideation. Our results confirmed that bullying victimization is a negative interpersonal experience associated with paranoid ideation and suspiciousness. However, being overly sensitive and having negative beliefs about the self as fragile and vulnerable to threat also lead to a tendency to attribute experiences as externally caused and, in turn, facilitate the formation and maintenance of paranoid ideation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. An emerging problem in clinical practice: how to approach acute psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Markoula

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis (LE is rare, presents with memory impairment, seizures and behavioral disorder. We present a 44-year-old female with an agitation-depressive disorder associated with delusions and hallucinations, admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis of psychosis. A computed tomography (CT scan of the brain and lumbar puncture on admission were normal. Because of clinical deterioration and addition of seizures in the clinical picture, further workup with serum and repeat cerebrospinal fluid studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and electroencephalogram disclosed a lesion in the left medial temporal lobe consistent with LE. The patient was treated symptomatically with antidepressive, antipsychotic and anticonvulsant drugs. Aggressive diagnostic tests for the presence of an occult cancer were negative. An 8-year follow up has not revealed a tumor to support a paraneoplasmatic origin of LE. This case, initially diagnosed and treated as psychosis, is a case of non-paraneoplasmatic, non-infective LE, probably caused by an autoimmune mechanism.

  3. Paranoid schizophrenia versus schizoaffective disorder: Neuropsychological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leposavić Ljubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuropsychological aspects of paranoid schizophrenia have still not been examined enough. These disorders are usually not studied separately, but are included in the studies about schizophrenic patients with positive symptoms. Despite the fact that schizophrenia represents a heterogeneous group of mental disorders, usually it is not separated from schizoaffective disorder in neuropsychological researches. Objective. The essence of this research is to evaluate cognitive functioning of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder by applying neuropsychological tests. Methods. The research included 91 subjects, right handed, from 30 to 53 years old, who were classified into three groups: inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia in remission (n=31, inpatients with schizoaffective disorder in remission (n=30 and healthy subjects (n=30. Results. Both groups of patients showed poorer achievements than healthy subjects in most of the applied tests. Patients with schizoaffective disorder showed global loss of intellectual efficiency, executive dysfunction and compromised visual-construction organization. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed partial loss of intellectual efficiency with verbal IQ and executive functions preserved. Conclusion. In the remission phase, patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed cognitive disorders in moderate degree, but when it comes to patients with schizoaffective disorder, more massive cognitive deficits were registered.

  4. Paranoid Schizophrenia versus Schizoaffective Disorder: Neuropsychological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leposavić, Ljubica; Leposavić, Ivana; Šaula-Marojević, Bijana; Gavrilović, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological aspects of paranoid schizophrenia have still not been examined enough.These disorders are usually not studied separately, but are included in the studies about schizophrenic patients with positive symptoms. Despite the fact that schizophrenia represents a heterogeneous group of mental disorders, usually it is not separated from schizoaffective disorder in neuropsychological researches. The essence of this research is to evaluate cognitive functioning of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder by applying neuropsychological tests. The research included 91 subjects, right handed, from 30 to 53 years old, who were classified into three groups: inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia in remission (n=31), inpatients with schizoaffective disorder in remission (n=30) and healthy subjects (n=30). Both groups of patients showed poorer achievements than healthy subjects in most of the applied tests. Patients with schizoaffective disorder showed global loss of intellectual efficiency, executive dysfunction and compromised visual-construction organization. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed partial loss of intellectual efficiency with verbal IQ and executive functions preserved. In the remission phase, patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed cognitive disorders in moderate degree, but when it comes to patients with schizoaffective disorder, more massive cognitive, deficits were registered.

  5. Childhood trauma, psychosis liability and social stress reactivity: a virtual reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, W; Counotte, J; Pot-Kolder, R; van Os, J; van der Gaag, M

    2016-12-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with higher risk for mental disorders, including psychosis. Heightened sensitivity to social stress may be a mechanism. This virtual reality study tested the effect of childhood trauma on level of paranoid ideations and distress in response to social stress, in interaction with psychosis liability and level of social stress exposure. Seventy-five individuals with higher psychosis liability (55 with recent onset psychotic disorder and 20 at ultra-high risk for psychosis) and 95 individuals with lower psychosis liability (42 siblings and 53 controls) were exposed to a virtual café in five experiments with 0-3 social stressors (crowded, other ethnicity and hostility). Paranoid ideation was measured after each experiment. Subjective distress was self-rated before and after experiments. Multilevel random regression analyses were used to test main effects of childhood trauma and interaction effects. Childhood trauma was more prevalent in individuals with higher psychosis liability, and was associated with higher level of (subclinical) psychotic and affective symptoms. Individuals with a history of childhood trauma responded with more subjective distress to virtual social stress exposures. The effects of childhood trauma on paranoia and subjective distress were significantly stronger when the number of virtual environmental stressors increased. Higher psychosis liability increased the effect of childhood trauma on peak subjective distress and stress reactivity during experiments. Childhood trauma is associated with heightened social stress sensitivity and may contribute to psychotic and affective dysregulation later in life, through a sensitized paranoid and stress response to social stressors.

  6. Attributional biases, paranoia, and depression in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Robyn; Still, Megan; Connors, Michael H; Ward, Philip B; Catts, Stanley V

    2013-11-01

    Attributional biases to externalize blame for negative events (externalizing bias) and to target other people for blame (personalizing bias) may constitute a vulnerability to psychosis. However, most research to date has only examined attributional biases in chronic patients. We examined attributional style, paranoia, and depression in early psychosis patients to assess the primacy of attributional biases in psychosis. A quasi-experimental design was adopted to compare the attributional style of patients and controls. Correlates of attributional style were also examined. Early psychosis patients and age- and gender-matched healthy controls completed the 'Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire'. Paranoid tendencies, suspiciousness, and depression were also assessed in both groups, while severity of current symptoms was assessed in patients. A high proportion of patients had persecutory delusions. These patients, however, did not differ from controls in externalizing or personalizing bias. Whereas suspiciousness and persecutory delusions in patients associated with externalizing bias, no bias measures associated with paranoid tendencies in either patients or controls. Counter to the pattern seen for endogenous depression, depression in patients was associated with an increased tendency to attribute events to self and a decreased tendency to attribute events to circumstances. These preliminary findings raise doubts about the primacy of attributional biases in psychosis. The novel findings with regard to depression warrant further investigation and suggest that young people, who develop depression after the onset of psychosis, may experience a need to re-establish a sense of personal control over life events that appear unpredictable. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Amphetamine-induced psychosis - a separate diagnostic entity or primary psychosis triggered in the vulnerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Use of amphetamine and methamphetamine is widespread in the general population and common among patients with psychiatric disorders. Amphetamines may induce symptoms of psychosis very similar to those of acute schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. This has been an argument for using amphetamine-induced psychosis as a model for primary psychotic disorders. To distinguish the two types of psychosis on the basis of acute symptoms is difficult. However, acute psychosis induced by amphetamines seems to have a faster recovery and appears to resolve more completely compared to schizophrenic psychosis. The increased vulnerability for acute amphetamine induced psychosis seen among those with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality and, to a certain degree other psychiatric disorders, is also shared by non-psychiatric individuals who previously have experienced amphetamine-induced psychosis. Schizophrenia spectrum disorder and amphetamine-induced psychosis are further linked together by the finding of several susceptibility genes common to both conditions. These genes probably lower the threshold for becoming psychotic and increase the risk for a poorer clinical course of the disease. The complex relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis has received much attention but is still not adequately explored. Our paper reviews the literature in this field and proposes a stress-vulnerability model for understanding the relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis. PMID:23216941

  8. Acute psychosis followed by fever: Malignant neuroleptic syndrome or viral encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zvezdana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is rare, but potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to antipsychotic medications. It is sometimes difficult to diagnose some clinical cases as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and differentiate it from the acute viral encephalitis. Case report. We reported a patient diagnosed with acute psychotic reaction which appeared for the first time. The treatment started with typical antipsychotic, which led to febrility. The clinical presentation of the patient was characterised by the signs and symptoms that might have indicated the neuroleptic malignant syndrome as well as central nervous system viral disease. In order to make a detailed diagnosis additional procedures were performed: electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging of the head, lumbar puncture and a serological test of the cerebrospinal fluid. Considering that after the tests viral encephalitis was ruled out and the diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome made, antipsychotic therapy was immediately stopped. The patient was initially treated with symptomatic therapy and after that with atypical antipsychotic and electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete recovery. Conclusion. We present the difficulties of early diagnosis at the first episode of acute psychotic disorder associated with acute febrile condition. Concerning the differential diagnosis it is necessary to consider both neuroleptic malignant syndrome and viral encephalitis, i.e. it is necessary to make the neuroradiological diagnosis and conduct cerebrospinal fluid analysis and blood test. In neuroleptic malignant syndrome treatment a combined use of electroconvulsive therapy and low doses of atypical antipsychotic are confirmed to be successful.

  9. Metacognitive training in patients recovering from a first psychosis: an experience sampling study testing treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pos, Karin; Meijer, Carin J; Verkerk, Oukje; Ackema, Onno; Krabbendam, Lydia; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation in patients with recent onset psychosis in a powerful experience sampling design. 50 patients between the age of 18 and 35 were included in a single-blind, parallel group RCT comparing MCT with occupational therapy (OT) as an active control condition. We assessed via questionnaires and experience sampling treatment effects on paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, the cognitive bias jumping to conclusion (JTC), and cognitive insight, as well as treatment effects on associations between negative affect, negative self-esteem and paranoid ideation. Patients in the MCT group did not show a decrease in paranoid ideation, delusional conviction, JTC-bias or an increase in cognitive insight compared with OT. However, negative affect showed a weaker association with paranoid ideation post-treatment in the MCT condition. In the OT condition, this association was stronger post-treatment. We tentatively suggest that patients with an early psychosis seemed to benefit from MCT in emotional learning compared with the OT condition. Despite the fact that the group training is well-received by patients, subsequent individual MCT (MCT+) may be indicated for stronger favorable effects on paranoid ideation.

  10. Religious content of hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzystanek, Marek; Krysta, Krzysztof; Klasik, Adam; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena

    2012-09-01

    Different environmental factors are thought to be responsible for 15-20% of schizophrenia pathogenesis. Religion has long been considered a major force in human life, regardless of economic, social or political affiliation. How the perception of religion has changed over time, especially in the context of mental illness, was the focal point of this long-term comparative study. A random selection of 100 case histories from the years 1932, 1952, 1972 and 1992 was selected. By reviewing the subject history and medical notes, information on the presence of religious hallucinations and/or delusions were collected and grouped. Religious topics were demonstrated in 46.8% of the test population. Whereas there was a clear diversity of religious-themed delusions, "God", "Christ", "Mary", "Satan/devil" and "hell" all figured prominently across all reviewed years. There is a progressive decrease in the number of religious topics in paranoid schizophrenia. The transfer of holiness from historical saints onto a subject was observed. Evil dominates over good in productive symptoms in paranoid schizophrenia. The phenomenon of apocalyptic subjects in paranoid hallucinations and delusions increased after the Second World War. Religious topics of hallucinations and delusions change over time and relate to objective historical events and reflect changes in religiosity in society.

  11. Postpartum Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traumatic Stress Disorder Bipolar Mood Disorders Postpartum Psychosis Social Support Online Training Tools for Mom Frequently Asked Questions Screening Recommendations Useful Links Media Family International Father’s Mental Health Day Dads for ...

  12. Childhood trauma, psychosis liability and social stress reactivity : a virtual reality study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, W.; Counotte, J.; Pot-Kolder, R.; van Os, J.; van der Gaag, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Childhood trauma is associated with higher risk for mental disorders, including psychosis. Heightened sensitivity to social stress may be a mechanism. This virtual reality study tested the effect of childhood trauma on level of paranoid ideations and distress in response to social

  13. Validation of the Paranoid Thoughts Scale in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Abdolmohammadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Considering that paranoid thought has one-dimensional approach, use of long questionnaires has no clinical and research application, therefore use of short questionnaires seems necessary. The Green et al. paranoid thought scale is a short self-assessment tool for assessing paranoid thought in non-clinical and clinical group. This research was conducted to validate this questionnaire in Iranian population. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, 356 students were selected using stratified sampling method and assessed by GPTS and Minnesota multiphasic paranoid inventory (MMPI in 2015. Validity was assessed simultaneously with MMPI testing. Results: The correlation coefficient of GPTS and MMPI scores was α=0.71 and significant (p<0.001. Internal consistency value was estimated to be 0.81 according to Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Conclusion: GPTS is an appropriate and short tool for screening in paranoid thought-related researches. Keywords: Paranoid disorders; Personality tests; Validation studies.

  14. Paranoid individuals with schizophrenia show greater social cognitive bias and worse social functioning than non-paranoid individuals with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E. Pinkham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Paranoia is a common symptom of schizophrenia that may be related to how individuals process and respond to social stimuli. Previous investigations support a link between increased paranoia and greater social cognitive impairments, but these studies have been limited to single domains of social cognition, and no studies have examined how paranoia may influence functional outcome. Data from 147 individuals with schizophrenia were used to examine whether actively paranoid and non-paranoid individuals with schizophrenia differ in social cognition and functional outcomes. On measures assessing social cognitive bias, paranoid individuals endorsed more hostile and blaming attributions and identified more faces as untrustworthy; however, paranoid and non-paranoid individuals did not differ on emotion recognition and theory of mind tasks assessing social cognitive ability. Likewise, paranoid individuals showed greater impairments in real-world interpersonal relationships and social acceptability as compared to non-paranoid patients, but these differences did not extend to performance based tasks assessing functional capacity and social competence. These findings isolate specific social cognitive disparities between paranoid and non-paranoid subgroups and suggest that paranoia may exacerbate the social dysfunction that is commonly experienced by individuals with schizophrenia.

  15. Violencia de Genero en la Esquizofrenia Paranoide

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo Echeverri, María de los Ángeles; Castro Franco, Bibiana Edivey

    2016-01-01

    El presente estudio pretende explorar la vivencia subjetiva sobre la comprensión de Sí mismos respecto la violencia de género en sujetos con Esquizofrenia Paranoide institucionalizados en centros de Salud Mental de la ciudad de Popayán, departamento del Cauca Colombia, por medio de la identificación e interpretación de elementos subjetivos que el sujeto refiere en su discurso sobre las significaciones del cómo vive el maltrato. Gracias a la investigación Cualitativa Exploratoria-Descriptiva, ...

  16. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19(+) and reduced CD3(+) lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3(+) and CD20(+) lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Priming to Induce Paranoid Thought in a Non Clinical Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isnanda, R.G.; Brinkman, W.P.; Veling, W.; Gaag, M. van der; Neerincx, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Freeman et al. reported that a substantial minority of the general population has paranoid thoughts while exposed in a virtual environment. This suggested that in a development phase of a virtual reality exposure system for paranoid patients initially a non-clinical sample could be used to evaluate

  18. Priming to induce paranoid thought in a non clinical population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isnanda, R.G.; Brinkman, W.P.; Veling, W.; van der Gaag, M.; Neerincx, M.

    2013-01-01

    Freeman et al. reported that a substantial minority of the general population has paranoid thoughts while exposed in a virtual environment. This suggested that in a development phase of a virtual reality exposure system for paranoid patients initially a non-clinical sample could be used to evaluate

  19. Menstrual psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Ian

    2005-02-01

    This paper reviews the literature on menstrual psychosis and proposes a new classification, adapting that of v. Krafft-Ebing (1902) and Jolly (1914). The world literature consists mainly of case reports; they include a few with data good enough for a statistical demonstration of the link between onset and menses. These well-documented cases include examples of pre-menstrual, catamenial, paramenstrual and mid-cycle onsets, and continuous illnesses with phasic shifts rhythmic with the menstrual cycle. In sufferers, episodes seem to be concentrated around the menarche and after childbirth. The clinical picture resembles that of puerperal psychosis, and there are at least 20 women who have suffered both psychoses at different epochs in their lives. Both seem to fall within the manic depressive rubric, so that menstruation can be another trigger of a bipolar episode. Some work suggests an association with anovulatory cycles. Cases starting before the menarche suggest a diencephalic origin.

  20. Apolipoprotein epsilon4 advances appearance of psychosis in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, B; Chapman, J; Korczyn, A D

    2006-01-01

    Psychosis is one of the most serious complications of advanced parkinsonism, but many patients are spared. The genetic factors predisposing to psychosis are unclear. To assess the association between apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphism and the development of psychosis in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Eighty-seven patients with advanced PD were assessed. Psychosis was diagnosed in 50 patients who manifested paranoid delusions, hallucinations without insight, or disorders of perception. Time of onset of psychosis was retrieved from the medical records and caregivers' recall. APOE genotype was determined by restriction enzyme digests of amplified alleles. Cox models of logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to assess factors determining early development of psychosis. APOE epsilon3/epsilon4 allele was carried by 20 patients (14 with psychosis), epsilon2/epsilon3 by 11 patients (10 with psychosis), epsilon3/epsilon3 by 55 patients (25 with psychosis) and epsilon2/epsilon4 by one patient who had psychosis. The mean age of onset of PD symptoms was 60.0 +/- 12.5 years. The mean duration of motor symptoms at the onset of psychosis was 7.3 +/- 4.3 years for the 15 patients harboring an APOE epsilon4 allele and 10.1 +/- 6.2 years among those who did not carry APOE epsilon4 (n = 35). The APOE epsilon4 allele was significantly associated with earlier onset of psychosis (P dementia were included in the Cox regression model. Carrying the APOE epsilon4 allele was a significant risk factor for earlier appearance of psychosis with a hazard ratio of 3.24 (95% CI 1.62-6.46) while dementia by itself did not increase the risk. Parkinson's disease patients who carry the APOE epsilon4 allele develop psychosis earlier.

  1. Psychosis associated with methimazole-induced hypothyroidism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila C. F. Lazaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thyroid dysfunction has often been associated with several psychiatric manifestations. Previous case reports/series suggest the possible role played by acute alteration of thyroid status in the onset of psychotic symptoms. METHODS: Case report and literature review. RESULTS: A 45-year-old woman with no psychiatric antecedents was brought to the ER with a full-blown psychotic episode, marked by paranoid delusions, which developed gradually over two months. She had been treated elsewhere for hyperthyroidism for five years with methimazole 40 mg/d, with poor compliance. One month before the beginning of the psychotic symptoms, methimazole was raised to 60 mg/d and she started taking it correctly. Five months earlier she had TSH: 0.074 uUI/ml and free T4: 1.3 ng/dl. At admission we found a diffuse thyroid goiter, TSH: 70.9 uUI/ml and free T4: 0.03 ng/dl. Brain CT was normal. We hospitalized her with the diagnosis of a psychosis secondary to hypothyroidism, suspended methimazole, and gave her levothyroxine (up to 75 µg/d and risperidone (2 mg/d. The patient had a quick remission and was discharged after 15 days. Within one month she had TSH: 0.7 uUI/ml and was completely recovered psychiatrically. She has been well since then, with risperidone in the first 8 months, and without it for 10 months now. CONCLUSION: This case report is a reminder of the necessity of checking thyroid status as part of clinical assessment of psychoses. It also supports the hypothesis that antithyroid drugs may have severe psychiatric consequences, especially when they lead to an acute change of thyroid status.

  2. Depression predicts persistence of paranoia in clinical high-risk patients to psychosis: results of the EPOS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salokangas, Raimo K R; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Hietala, Jarmo; Heinimaa, Markus; From, Tiina; Ilonen, Tuula; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; von Reventlow, Heinrich Graf; Juckel, Georg; Linszen, Don; Dingemans, Peter; Birchwood, Max; Patterson, Paul; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    The link between depression and paranoia has long been discussed in psychiatric literature. Because the causality of this association is difficult to study in patients with full-blown psychosis, we aimed to investigate how clinical depression relates to the presence and occurrence of paranoid symptoms in clinical high-risk (CHR) patients. In all, 245 young help-seeking CHR patients were assessed for suspiciousness and paranoid symptoms with the structured interview for prodromal syndromes at baseline, 9- and 18-month follow-up. At baseline, clinical diagnoses were assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, childhood adversities by the Trauma and Distress Scale, trait-like suspiciousness by the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire, and anxiety and depressiveness by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. At baseline, 54.3% of CHR patients reported at least moderate paranoid symptoms. At 9- and 18-month follow-ups, the corresponding figures were 28.3 and 24.4%. Depressive, obsessive-compulsive and somatoform disorders, emotional and sexual abuse, and anxiety and suspiciousness associated with paranoid symptoms. In multivariate modelling, depressive and obsessive-compulsive disorders, sexual abuse, and anxiety predicted persistence of paranoid symptoms. Depressive disorder was one of the major clinical factors predicting persistence of paranoid symptoms in CHR patients. In addition, obsessive-compulsive disorder, childhood sexual abuse, and anxiety associated with paranoia. Effective pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment of these disorders and anxiety may reduce paranoid symptoms in CHR patients.

  3. Flakka-Induced Prolonged Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Crespi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In South Florida, there has been a highly addictive new synthetic drug flooding the streets for people looking for a cheap high. Alpha-PVP, better known as Flakka, is an illegal substance that sells on the streets for as little as $5 a hit and delivers an instant high that can last from hours to days with lingering effects for weeks after it has been ingested. Although people use Flakka for its potential euphoric high, symptoms are known to easily escalate into frightening delusions, paranoid psychosis, extreme agitation, and a multitude of other altered mental states. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Florida appears to be the nation’s hot spot for reports of Flakka. In this case report, a 17-year-old female with no prior psychiatric diagnosis presents to the hospital under a 72-hour involuntary placement for altered mental status with agitation and psychotic behaviors. After multiple days of symptomatic treatment with benzodiazepines and antipsychotics, the patient became coherent enough to give a history of a “friend” putting Flakka in her food at school as a joke. Although she continues to have residual symptoms including psychomotor agitation and slowing of cognition, she was alert, oriented, and able to be discharged home with proper follow-up.

  4. Flakka-Induced Prolonged Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Craig

    2016-01-01

    In South Florida, there has been a highly addictive new synthetic drug flooding the streets for people looking for a cheap high. Alpha-PVP, better known as Flakka, is an illegal substance that sells on the streets for as little as $5 a hit and delivers an instant high that can last from hours to days with lingering effects for weeks after it has been ingested. Although people use Flakka for its potential euphoric high, symptoms are known to easily escalate into frightening delusions, paranoid psychosis, extreme agitation, and a multitude of other altered mental states. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Florida appears to be the nation's hot spot for reports of Flakka. In this case report, a 17-year-old female with no prior psychiatric diagnosis presents to the hospital under a 72-hour involuntary placement for altered mental status with agitation and psychotic behaviors. After multiple days of symptomatic treatment with benzodiazepines and antipsychotics, the patient became coherent enough to give a history of a "friend" putting Flakka in her food at school as a joke. Although she continues to have residual symptoms including psychomotor agitation and slowing of cognition, she was alert, oriented, and able to be discharged home with proper follow-up.

  5. Cognitive and psychosocial functioning in bipolar disorder with and without psychosis during early remission from an acute mood episode: a comparative longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Boaz; Medina, Anna Marie; Weiss, Roger D

    2013-08-01

    The current investigation aimed to extend previous findings, which linked psychosis in bipolar disorder (BD) to cognitive impairment during hospital discharge and readmission, by examining the recovery of patients with psychosis who were not re-hospitalized. The study compared mood, cognitive and functional outcomes in patients who had, versus had not, experienced psychosis during a recent psychiatric hospitalization. The hypothesis was that patients admitted to the hospital with psychosis would exhibit more residual symptoms, greater cognitive deficits, and lower psychosocial functioning than patients who presented to care without psychosis. Group differences were expected to emerge both at the time of hospital discharge and at a 3-month follow up. Fifty-five participants (ages 18-59, 25 women, 20 with psychosis) with BD I disorder completed both assessments, which included a clinical and diagnostic interview, functional evaluation, and the administration of mood measures and a neuropsychological battery. The groups were comparable with respect to illness history (e.g., number of previous hospitalizations, age of onset, employment). At discharge and follow-up, the group with psychosis exhibited more mood symptoms, obtained lower GAF scores, and performed more poorly on measures of memory and executive functioning. At follow-up, participants with psychosis exhibited poorer psychosocial adaptation. It is possible that some of the observed group differences in cognitive functioning emerged due to differences in medication efficacy or side effects. The results of this study support the hypothesis that psychosis in BD predicts limited recovery during early remission from mood disturbance, regardless of illness history. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Perceived ethnic discrimination and persecutory paranoia in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Madiha; Ellett, Lyn; Dutt, Anirban; Day, Fern; Laing, Jennifer; Kroll, Jasmine; Petrella, Sabrina; McGuire, Philip; Valmaggia, Lucia R

    2016-07-30

    Despite a consensus that psychosocial adversity plays a role in the onset of psychosis, the nature of this role in relation to persecutory paranoia remains unclear. This study examined the complex relationship between perceived ethnic discrimination and paranoid ideation in individuals at Ultra High Risk (UHR) for psychosis using a virtual reality paradigm to objectively measure paranoia. Data from 64 UHR participants and 43 healthy volunteers were analysed to investigate the relationship between perceived ethnic discrimination and persecutory ideation in a virtual reality environment. Perceived ethnic discrimination was higher in young adults at UHR in comparison to healthy controls. A positive correlation was observed between perceived ethnic discrimination and paranoid persecutory ideation in the whole sample. Perceived ethnic discrimination was not a significant predictor of paranoid persecutory ideation in the VR environment. Elevated levels of perceived ethnic discrimination are present in individuals at UHR and are consistent with current biopsychosocial models in which psychosocial adversity plays a key role in the development of psychosis and attenuated symptomatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rapid onset of treatment effects on psychosis, depression, and mania in patients with acute exacerbation of schizoaffective disorder following treatment with oral extended-release paliperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Bossie, Cynthia A; Patel, Hiren; Alphs, Larry

    2016-03-15

    Patients with schizoaffective disorder (SCA) experience complicated interplays of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms. Paliperidone extended-release (pali ER) tablets have been shown to be efficacious in these patients, but treatment response has not been studied relative to the onset of effects for these symptom domains. In a pooled analysis of data from two 6-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies, the onset of treatment effects with oral pali ER was evaluated by symptom domain (psychosis, depression, mania) in patients with an acute SCA exacerbation. Subjects were categorized as having prominent psychotic (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score >70), depressive (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-21 score ≥16), or manic (Young Mania Rating Scale score ≥16) symptoms at baseline. Of the 614 patients in these analyses, 597 (97.2%), 411 (66.9%), and 488 (79.5%) had prominent psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms at baseline, respectively. Pali ER treatment was associated with rapid and significant improvement of all three symptom domains versus placebo within 1 week of initiation, regardless of whether treatment was given as monotherapy or in combination with mood stabilizers and/or antidepressants. Adverse events were similar to those reported in the original published studies. This post hoc analysis of two phase 3 trials requires confirmation in prospective studies. This pooled analysis suggests that treatment with pali ER is associated with rapid control of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms in patients with SCA. Its findings support the benefit of pali ER as a primary treatment for the management of SCA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Coprophagia in a Nigerian patient with paranoid schizophrenia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coprophagia is the ingestion of one's own faeces. It is associated with severe psychiatric disorders and in certain medical conditions. Both electronic and manual search on this rare disorder yielded no positive findings among Nigerian or African literature. We here report a patient with paranoid schizophrenia who smeared ...

  9. Comic Book Apologia: The "Paranoid" Rhetoric of Congressman George Hansen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Brant

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes George Hansen's apologetic rhetoric from the perspective of a generic, "paranoid-style" of discourse to show why the Congressman was able to defend his character to the satisfaction of nearly one-half of his constituency. Uses the Hansen case to illustrate the development and function of a rhetorical genre in a given historical context.…

  10. Methamphetamine psychosis: epidemiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J

    2014-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms and syndromes are frequently experienced among individuals who use methamphetamine, with recent estimates of up to approximately 40 % of users affected. Although transient in a large proportion of users, acute symptoms can include agitation, violence, and delusions, and may require management in an inpatient psychiatric or other crisis intervention setting. In a subset of individuals, psychosis can recur and persist and may be difficult to distinguish from a primary psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Differential diagnosis of primary vs. substance-induced psychotic disorders among methamphetamine users is challenging; nevertheless, with careful assessment of the temporal relationship of symptoms to methamphetamine use, aided by state-of-the art psychodiagnostic assessment instruments and use of objective indicators of recent substance use (i.e., urine toxicology assays), coupled with collateral clinical data gathered from the family or others close to the individual, diagnostic accuracy can be optimized and the individual can be appropriately matched to a plan of treatment. The pharmacological treatment of acute methamphetamine-induced psychosis may include the use of antipsychotic medications as well as benzodiazepines, although symptoms may resolve without pharmacological treatment if the user is able to achieve a period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Importantly, psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence has a strong evidence base and is the optimal first-line treatment approach to reducing rates of psychosis among individuals who use methamphetamines. Prevention of methamphetamine relapse is the most direct means of preventing recurrence of psychotic symptoms and syndromes. Long-term management of individuals presenting with recurrent and persistent psychosis, even in the absence of methamphetamine use, may include both behavioral treatment to prevent resumption of methamphetamine use and pharmacological treatment

  11. Effects of acute memantine administration on MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery performance in psychosis: Testing an experimental medicine strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Savita G; Chou, Hsun-Hua; Rana, Brinda; Talledo, Jo A; Balvaneda, Bryan; Gaddis, Laura; Light, Gregory A; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-06-01

    Pro-cognitive agents for chronic psychotic disorders (CPDs) might be detected via experimental medicine models, in which neural targets engaged by the drug predict sensitivity to the drug's pro-cognitive effects. This study aims to use an experimental medicine model to test the hypothesis that "target engagement" predicts pro-cognitive effects of the NMDA antagonist, memantine (MEM), in CPDs. MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) performance was assessed in CPD (n = 41) and healthy subjects (HS; n = 41) in a double-blind, randomized cross-over design of acute (single dose) MEM (placebo vs. 10 or 20 mg p.o.). Measures of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and mismatch negativity previously reported from this cohort substantiated target engagement. Biomarkers predicting MEM neurocognitive sensitivity were assessed. Testing confirmed MCCB deficits associated with CPD diagnosis, age, and anticholinergic exposure. MEM (20 mg p.o.) reduced MCCB performance in HS. To control for significant test order effects, an "order-corrected MEM effect" (OCME) was calculated. In CPD subjects, greater age, positive MEM effects on PPI, and SNP rs1337697 (within the ionotropic NMDA receptor gene, GRIN3A) predicted greater positive OCME with 20 mg MEM. An experimental medicine model to assess acute pro-cognitive drug effects in CPD subjects is feasible but not without challenges. A single MEM 20 mg dose had a negative impact on neurocognition among HS. In CPD patients, age, MEM effects on PPI, and rs1337697 predicted sensitivity to the neurocognitive effects of MEM. Any potential clinical utility of these predictive markers for pro-cognitive effects of MEM in subgroups of CPD patients cannot be inferred without a validating clinical trial.

  12. Intranasal substituted cathinone "bath salts" psychosis potentially exacerbated by diphenhydramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Erik W; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Willing, Laura M; Holstege, Christopher P

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a case of intranasal "bath salts"-associated psychosis. Symptoms developed during a 3-week binge and were potentially exacerbated by oral diphenhydramine taken for insomnia. The clinical case conference includes expert discussion from 3 disciplines: emergency medicine toxicology, behavioral pharmacology, and addiction medicine. It is hoped that the discussion will provide insight into the clinical aspects and challenges of addressing acute substituted cathinone toxicity, including acute psychosis, a major adverse effect of bath salts consumption.

  13. Negative and paranoid symptoms are associated with negative performance beliefs and social cognition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maude; Van der Linden, Martial; Menghetti, Sarah; Debbané, Martin; Eliez, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is a neurogenetic condition associated with an increased risk of developing schizophrenia. Previous studies have shown that negative symptoms represent the most specific clinical characteristic of psychosis in 22q11.2DS and are strongly associated with outcome. However, the psychological mechanisms associated with these symptoms in this population are poorly understood. In accordance with recent conceptualizations in the field of schizophrenia, the present study aims at investigating whether negative symptoms are associated with the presence of negative performance beliefs and cognitive deficits. Thirty-five participants with 22q11.2DS and 24 typically developing individuals aged between 11 and 24 years were included in the study. Self-reported schizotypal symptoms (cognitive-perceptual, paranoid, negative and disorganization symptoms) and dysfunctional beliefs (negative performance beliefs and need for approval) were assessed. Measures of processing speed, verbal memory, working memory, executive functioning and face recognition were also extracted from a broad cognitive evaluation protocol. Adolescents with 22q11.2DS reported significantly higher score on the negative dimension of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire than controls, even when controlling for the influence of anxiety/depression and intellectual functioning. Negative and paranoid symptoms were associated with the severity of negative performance beliefs and lower face recognition abilities. Mediation analyses revealed that negative performance beliefs significantly mediated the association between face recognition and negative/paranoid symptoms. These findings suggest that negative performance beliefs and basic social cognitive mechanisms are associated with negative and paranoid symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS. Implications for intervention are discussed in this article. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Guidelines for Individual and Group Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Persons Diagnosed with Psychosis and/or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Slađana Štrkalj; Petrović, Branka Restek; Urlić, Ivan; Grah, Majda; Mayer, Nina; Stijačić, Dubravka; Jendričko, Tihana; Martić-Biočina, Sanja

    2017-09-01

    The hereby presented guidelines for the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy are based on references and research in the field of individual and group therapy and they refer to psychotherapy for patients suffering from the first psychotic episode, schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis, bipolar disorder and paranoid psychosis. The aim was to provide an overview of present literature and to give recommendations based on current knowledge. Clinical experience and research of the outcomes of psychodynamic psychotherapy encourage positioning of such treatments among recommendations for treating various mental disorders, as well as in the field of psychotherapy of patients with psychotic disorders (PD).

  15. Theory of mind, insecure attachment and paranoia in adolescents with early psychosis and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korver-Nieberg, Nikie; Fett, Anne-Kathrin J; Meijer, Carin J; Koeter, Maarten W J; Shergill, Sukhi S; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2013-08-01

    Impaired Theory of Mind (ToM) is found in adults with schizophrenia and is associated with paranoid symptoms. Insecure attachment is proposed to underlie impaired ToM as well as paranoia. Insight into associations between insecure attachment and impaired ToM skills may help clinicians and patients to understand interpersonal difficulties and use this knowledge to improve recovery. This study used a visual perspective-taking task to investigate whether cognitive ToM is already impaired in adolescents with early psychosis as compared to controls. Also investigated was whether perspective-taking and paranoia are associated with insecure (adult) attachment. Thirty-two adolescent patients with early psychosis and 78 healthy controls participated in this cross-sectional study design and completed the level 1 perspective-taking task, psychopathology assessments (CAPE, PANSS), paranoid thoughts (GPTS), attachment style (PAM) and the WASI vocabulary. Patients did not significantly differ in level-1 perspective-taking behaviour compared to healthy controls. No significant associations were found between perspective-taking, paranoia and attachment. Insecure attachment was significantly related to paranoid thoughts, after controlling for illness-related symptoms. No impairment of level-1 perspective-taking was found in adolescent patients with early psychosis compared to healthy controls. Results indicate that level-1 perspective-taking is not impaired during the early stages of psychotic illness. The association between paranoia and attachment support previous findings and provide further insight into the nature of psychotic symptoms. Understanding the role of attachment in paranoia may help patients and their care workers to gain insight into the reasons for the development or persistence of symptoms. Future research should compare early psychosis samples with more chronic samples to explore whether perspective-taking deteriorates during the course of the illness.

  16. The generation of psychosis: a pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zislin, J; Kuperman, V; Durst, R

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of speech in the generation of psychosis. The traditional phenomenological approach describes schizophrenic speech as desocialized, autistic and destructive. Based on 'Speech Act Theory', we argue that patients in an acute psychotic state assign maximal illocutionary force to their utterances and mark these speech acts as felicitous. We hypothesize that the pragmatic approach can serve a special role in bilingual patients, the mother tongue being more pronounced in the generation of the psychosis. This view gains support from clinical experience and case studies and can be used as a treatment strategy for bilingual patients. Copyright 2002 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  17. Incomplete oedipism and chronic suicidality in psychotic depression with paranoid delusions related to eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatarelli Roberto

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-enucleation or oedipism is a term used to describe self-inflicted enucleation. It is a rare form of self-mutilation, found mainly in acutely psychotic patients. We propose the term incomplete oedipism to describe patients who deliberately and severely mutilate their eyes without proper enucleation. We report the case of a 32-year-old male patient with a five-year history of psychotic depression accompanied by paranoid delusions centered around his belief that his neighbors criticized him and stared at him. A central feature of his clinical picture was an eye injury that the patient had caused by pouring molten lead into his right eye during a period of deep hopelessness and suicidality when the patient could not resolve his anhedonia and social isolation. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy dramatically improved his disorder.

  18. Virtual reality study of paranoid thinking in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Pugh, Katherine; Antley, Angus; Slater, Mel; Bebbington, Paul; Gittins, Matthew; Dunn, Graham; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Fowler, David; Garety, Philippa

    2008-04-01

    Judging whether we can trust other people is central to social interaction, despite being error-prone. A fear of others can be instilled by the contemporary political and social climate. Unfounded mistrust is called paranoia, and in severe forms is a central symptom of schizophrenia. To demonstrate that individuals without severe mental illness in the general population experience unfounded paranoid thoughts, and to determine factors predictive of paranoia using the first laboratory method of capturing the experience. Two hundred members of the general public were comprehensively assessed, and then entered a virtual reality train ride populated by neutral characters. Ordinal logistic regressions (controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, education, intellectual functioning, socio-economic status, train use, playing of computer games) were used to determine predictors of paranoia. The majority agreed that the characters were neutral, or even thought they were friendly. However, a substantial minority reported paranoid concerns. Paranoia was strongly predicted by anxiety, worry, perceptual anomalies and cognitive inflexibility. This is the most unambiguous demonstration of paranoid ideation in the general public so far. Paranoia can be understood in terms of cognitive factors. The use of virtual reality should lead to rapid advances in the understanding of paranoia.

  19. Early detection of psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T. K.; Melle, I.; Auestad, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last decades we have seen a new focus on early treatment of psychosis. Several reviews have shown that duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is correlated to better outcome. However, it is still unknown whether early treatment will lead to a better long-term outcome. This st...

  20. Interpretation bias towards vague faces in individuals with paranoid personality disorder traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Doustkam

    2017-10-01

     Conclusion: Individuals with paranoid personality traits have more biases than normal individuals in terms of interpreting vague faces. The results of this study indicated the importance of attention to cognitive biases among individuals with paranoid personality traits or paranoid personality disorder because such biases can significantly influence behavioral patterns in individuals, and consequently degrade their functioning. Also, bias towards the processing of negative signs appears to be the most important cognitive element is involved in interpersonal relationships.

  1. Dealing with feeling: Specific emotion regulation skills predict responses to stress in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M; Hartmann, Maike; Köther, Ulf; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-08-15

    Elevated negative affect is an established link between minor stressors and psychotic symptoms. Less clear is why people with psychosis fail to regulate distressing emotions effectively. This study tests whether subjective, psychophysiological and symptomatic responses to stress can be predicted by specific emotion regulation (ER) difficulties. Participants with psychotic disorders (n=35) and healthy controls (n=28) were assessed for ER-skills at baseline. They were then exposed to a noise versus no stressor on different days, during which self-reported stress responses, state paranoia and skin conductance levels (SCL) were assessed. Participants with psychosis showed a stronger increase in self-reported stress and SCL in response to the stressor than healthy controls. Stronger increases in self-reported stress were predicted by a reduced ability to be aware of and tolerate distressing emotions, whereas increases in SCL were predicted by a reduced ability to be aware of, tolerate, accept and modify them. Although paranoid symptoms were not significantly affected by the stressors, individual variation in paranoid responses was also predicted by a reduced ability to be aware of and tolerate emotions. Differences in stress responses in the samples were no longer significant after controlling for ER skills. Thus, interventions that improve ER-skills could reduce stress-sensitivity in psychosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Canada: psychosis in the immigrant Caribbean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-09-01

    Many reports from European countries suggest that acute episodes of psychosis are more frequent among immigrants from the Caribbean than among their non-immigrant peers. The aim of this selective review is to examine how the social correlates of migration to Canada interact with biological mechanisms to contribute to psychosis in the Caribbean population. PubMed and JSTOR social science databases (between 1966 and 2010) were searched using the following search terms: psychiatric genetics; dopamine pathways; Caribbean family structure and child rearing; cannabis and psychosis; obstetric complications and schizophrenia; social defeat; social capital; racial discrimination; urbanicity; immigration; assimilation; and immigration. This was followed by the cross-checking of references pertinent to Canada. There was no information about the prevalence of psychosis in Afro-Caribbean immigrant groups to Canada. There was a suggestion that the form the acute episode takes may differ, depending perhaps on the island of origin. Ethnicity and migration influence susceptibility and response to psychotic illness in a number of distinct and interacting ways depending both on the host country and the country of origin. Understanding the pathways can help to protect the health of immigrants.

  3. Paranoid-schizoid anxiety, triangulation, and oedipal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waska, R T

    2000-06-01

    The interaction of strong aggressive and libidinal drives, various primitive intrapsychic fantasies linking somatic sensations, body parts, ego, object, and the effects of early environmental stress and trauma all produce a potential crisis in the paranoid-schizoid period of development. Certain innate methods of understanding somatic experiences as well as the interaction between internal and external reality lead to an unconscious triangulation of part objects. A frustrating, stimulating, or punitive "third" that blocks, nullifies, or overgratifies certain wishes then emerges as a pivotal object in the internal landscape. During the paranoid-schizoid, triadic process, there is a fluctuation between separation/individuation and de-differentiation/fusion. If the early triangulation process has been either exceedingly frustrating or overly stimulating in regards to "reaching the third" or "warding off the third," the infantile ego is fixed by aggressive and libidinal forces to de-differentiation experiences rather than to more separate and individuated ways of relating. Therefore, the later oedipal stage will be colored by excessive oral and anal conflicts and will be weighted on the side of primitive maneuvering based on splitting, projection, and introjection. When the child (and later the adult) becomes involved in oedipal situations marked by stimulation or frustration of triadic drives, there can be a regression to the earlier paranoid-schizoid triadic period. A case study was presented in which a patient struggled with a partial working through of these conditions in dreams and in the transference. This pulled her more in the direction of a differentiated Oedipal conflict and whole object functioning.

  4. ANANKASTIK PERSONALITY DISORDER IN SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damarnegara ..

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anankastik personality disorder is a health problem that can disturb the activities of person and can accompany a variety of other mental health problems. The patient in thiscase is a patient with an anankastik or obsessive compulsive personality disorder withthe axis I diagnoses is Paranoid Schizophrenia and was given haloperidol 2x5mg, buthave not done psychotherapy because the patient has not been cooperative. Theprognosis is dependent on patient compliance in taking medication and controls for thesetting of the dose, and the support of her family. 

  5. Mindfulness for psychosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chadwick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness treatments and research have burgeoned over the past decade. With psychosis, progress has been slow and likely held back by clinicians' belief that mindfulness may be harmful for this client group...

  6. First Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us ... and education teaches family members about psychosis, coping, communication, and problem-solving skills. Family members who are informed and involved are ...

  7. Environmental Social Stress, Paranoia and Psychosis Liability: A Virtual Reality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Pot-Kolder, Roos; Counotte, Jacqueline; van Os, Jim; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The impact of social environments on mental states is difficult to assess, limiting the understanding of which aspects of the social environment contribute to the onset of psychotic symptoms and how individual characteristics moderate this outcome. This study aimed to test sensitivity to environmental social stress as a mechanism of psychosis using Virtual Reality (VR) experiments. Fifty-five patients with recent onset psychotic disorder, 20 patients at ultra high risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of patients with psychosis, and 53 controls walked 5 times in a virtual bar with different levels of environmental social stress. Virtual social stressors were population density, ethnic density and hostility. Paranoia about virtual humans and subjective distress in response to virtual social stress exposures were measured with State Social Paranoia Scale (SSPS) and self-rated momentary subjective distress (SUD), respectively. Pre-existing (subclinical) symptoms were assessed with the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), Green Paranoid Thoughts Scale (GPTS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). Paranoia and subjective distress increased with degree of social stress in the environment. Psychosis liability and pre-existing symptoms, in particular negative affect, positively impacted the level of paranoia and distress in response to social stress. These results provide experimental evidence that heightened sensitivity to environmental social stress may play an important role in the onset and course of psychosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cannabis and psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Seshadri, Madhavan; Agius, Mark; Grech, Anton; Zammit, Stanley;

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have established a link between cannabis and psychosis. However the causal role of cannabis in schizophrenia is still not clear. The aim of this paper is to summarise the literature pertaining to whether cannabis causes psychosis, whether the continued use of cannabis by patients with schizophrenia affects the course of the disease and its treatment, and whether it is possible to reduce cannabis use in patients who have a psychotic disorder.

  9. BIOMETRIC INDICES OF CONSTITUTIONAL RISKS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA IN MALE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lebedeva Е.A; Zaichenko A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: the current study examines features and correlations of particular psychodynamic, dermatoglyphic characteristics and body constitution of men with paranoid schizophrenia. Study groups: 25 men having the "paranoid schizophrenia" (F20.0), 27 men having no mental diseases. Methods: psychodiagnostic tests (Hand test, the Big Five Inventory (BFI)), anthropometry; dactyloscopy. Results: there were statistically significant differences in such personality factors as: extroversion and ...

  10. Negative cognition, affect, metacognition and dimensions of paranoia in people at ultra-high risk of psychosis: a multi-level modelling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, A P; Shryane, N; Fowler, D; Birchwood, M; Gumley, A I; Taylor, H E; French, P; Stewart, S L K; Jones, P B; Lewis, S W; Bentall, R P

    2015-01-01

    Paranoia is one of the commonest symptoms of psychosis but has rarely been studied in a population at risk of developing psychosis. Based on existing theoretical models, including the proposed distinction between ‘poor me’ and ‘bad me’ paranoia, we aimed to test specific predictions about associations between negative cognition, metacognitive beliefs and negative emotions and paranoid ideation and the belief that persecution is deserved (deservedness). We used data from 117 participants from the Early Detection and Intervention Evaluation for people at risk of psychosis (EDIE-2) trial of cognitive–behaviour therapy, comparing them with samples of psychiatric in-patients and healthy students from a previous study. Multi-level modelling was utilized to examine predictors of both paranoia and deservedness, with post-hoc planned comparisons conducted to test whether person-level predictor variables were associated differentially with paranoia or with deservedness. Our sample of at-risk mental state participants was not as paranoid, but reported higher levels of ‘bad-me’ deservedness, compared with psychiatric in-patients. We found several predictors of paranoia and deservedness. Negative beliefs about self were related to deservedness but not paranoia, whereas negative beliefs about others were positively related to paranoia but negatively with deservedness. Both depression and negative metacognitive beliefs about paranoid thinking were specifically related to paranoia but not deservedness. This study provides evidence for the role of negative cognition, metacognition and negative affect in the development of paranoid beliefs, which has implications for psychological interventions and our understanding of psychosis.

  11. Paranoia in the therapeutic relationship in cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Caroline; Hall, Katherine; Ellett, Lyn

    2015-07-01

    This study explored therapists' and clients' experiences of paranoia about the therapist in cognitive behaviour therapy. Ten therapists and eight clients engaged in cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Clients reported experiencing paranoia about their therapist, both within and between therapy sessions. Therapists' accounts highlighted a number of dilemmas that can arise in responding to clients' paranoia about them. The findings highlight helpful ways of working with clients when they become paranoid about their therapist, and emphasize the importance of developing a therapeutic relationship that is radically collaborative, supporting a person-based approach to distressing psychotic experience.

  12. Psychological treatment in pre- and early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, John; Larsen, T K; McGorry, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    This article aims to overview a broad range of psychosocial treatments for first-episode psychosis, and for the prodromal phase (or so-called at-risk mental state)--the period preceding the first acute episode (Yung and McGorry, 1996). Firstly, an introduction to the empirically based rationale for early intervention in first-episode psychosis is provided. This is followed by a selective review of individual psychotherapies for early psychosis, which then proceeds to a discussion of family-based interventions for first-episode families and the role of group programs. Next, the role of psychological interventions within the newly emerging indicated preventive approach (Mrazek and Haggerty, 1994) for at-risk mental state is examined before some illustrative case material is presented. It is concluded that integrated psychosocial interventions for first-episode psychosis and for prodrome are newly emerging, innovative fields that offer some preventive opportunities. These opportunities, combined with some initial outcome data, warrant continuing research and clinical innovation.

  13. Unemployment, ethnicity and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, J; Bebbington, P; Bhavsar, V; Kravariti, E; van Os, J; Murray, R M; Dutta, R

    2013-03-01

    This study describes the incidence of psychosis in unemployed people and determines whether unemployment has a greater impact on the development of psychosis amongst Black minority groups than White groups. Patients with a first diagnosis of Research Diagnostic Criteria psychosis, in a defined area of London from 1998 to 2004, were identified. Crude and standardised incidence rates of psychosis amongst unemployed people for each ethnic group were calculated. Poisson regression modelling tested for interactions between unemployment and ethnicity. Hundred cases occurred amongst employed people and 78 cases occurred amongst the unemployed people. When standardised to the employed White population of the area, White unemployed people had a standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 11.7 (95% CI 6.4-19.7), Black Caribbean people had a SIR of 60.1(95% CI 39.3-88) and Black African people had a SIR of 40.7 (95% CI 25.8-61.1). There was no interaction however between ethnicity and unemployment (Likelihood ratio test P = 0.54). Rates of psychosis are high amongst unemployed people in south London and extremely high amongst Black Caribbean and Black African unemployed people. There was no evidence however that the minority groups were particularly sensitive to the stresses, limitations or meaning of unemployment. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Posttraumatic growth in psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Mazor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recent research has shown high rates of exposure to trauma among people with serious mental illness (SMI. In addition studies suggest that psychosis and mental illness-related experiences can be extremely traumatic. While some individuals develop full blown PTSD related to these experiences, it has been noted that some may also experience posttraumatic growth (PTG. However, few studies have examined PTG as a possible outcome in people who have experienced psychosis. Method: To further understand the relationships between psychosis and PTG, 121 participants were recruited from community mental health rehabilitation centers and administered trauma and psychiatric questionnaires. Results: High levels of traumatic exposure were found in the sample. Regarding our main focus of study we observed that people who endured psychosis can experience PTG, and that PTG is mediated by meaning making and coping self-efficacy appraisal. Psychotic symptoms were found to be a major obstacle to meaning making, coping self-efficacy, and PTG, whereas negative symptoms were found to be significantly related to PTG when mediated by meaning making and coping self-efficacy. Conclusion: The current research provides preliminary evidence for potential role of meaning making and coping self-efficacy as mediators of PTG in the clinical, highly traumatized population of people with SMI who have experienced psychosis. This may have both research as well as clinical practice relevance for the field of psychiatric rehabilitation.

  15. [Clinical question for psychosis.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollon, W

    1984-01-01

    The analysis treatment of a psychotic individual presupposes a global problem focus on the causes of psychosis, its structure, its outbreak, and the stages in its development. Here, psychosis is viewed in its specifically psychic dimension, where Lacanian theory, to which the author adheres, places the cause of the sickness: (the "forclusion" of the names of the father). This formula indicates the absence of the paternal function. This lack originates in the fact that a dysfunction of the symbolic order in the family structure presides over the birth of a subject. The locating of the elements (the signifiers) of such symbolic dysfunction is essential because the delusion attempts to repair this defect in the representational order. Against this defect the subject first constructed imaginary assemblings which allow him a provisional articulation, satisfying for him, to others and to social reality. The outbreak of the psychosis results in the collapse of such imaginary scaffoldings. Then after a period of bewilderment and psychic retreat, all the effort of the psychotic is directed at the reconstitution of a new representational order. The work of the analysis consistants of attempting, on the basis of the signifiers put forward by the delusion, to assist the psychotic in his reconstitution of symbolic order. The delusion is the access road to this work in psychosis just as the dream is the royal road to the unconscious in the neurosis. The effort of this article is directed at situating these stages in the treatment of psychosis in their theorical and clinical foundations.

  16. Homicide during postictal psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eisenschenk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postictal psychosis is characterized by a fluctuating combination of thought disorder, auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, affective change, and aggression including violent behavior. We present a case of homicide following a cluster of seizures. The patient's history and postictal behavior were his consistent with postictal psychosis. Contributing factors resulting in homicide may have included increased seizure frequency associated with a change in his AED regimen seizure frequency. The AED change to levetiracetam may also have increased impulsiveness with diminished mood regulation following discontinuation of carbamazepine. There is evidence that he had a cluster of seizures immediately prior to the murder which may have resulted in the postictal disinhibition of frontal lobe inhibitory systems. This homicide and other violent behaviors associated with postictal psychosis may be avoided with earlier recognition and treatment.

  17. [The structure of aggression of the patients with paranoid schizophrenia and compensatory behavioral trends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchuk, I V; Khudyakova, Yu Yu

    To study the structure of aggression of the patients with paranoid schizophrenia depending on sex and illness duration. 102 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 101 healthy people, aged from 18 to 64 years, were examined. Quantitative indicators of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components of aggression were measured using the Buss-Perry questionnaire. The projective Hand-test was administered to assess aggressive behavioral tendencies and inclinations to aggressive behavior. The authors identified the dissociated structure of aggressiveness in patients with paranoid schizophrenia that manifested with dissociated cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components. The specifics of the structure of aggression and compensatory behavioral trends are described.

  18. Severe Psychosis, Drug Dependence, and Hepatitis C Related to Slamming Mephedrone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Dolengevich-Segal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Synthetic cathinones (SCs, also known as “bath salts,” are β-ketone amphetamine compounds derived from cathinone, a psychoactive substance found in Catha edulis. Mephedrone is the most representative SC. Slamming is the term used for the intravenous injection of these substances in the context of chemsex parties, in order to enhance sex experiences. Using IV mephedrone may lead to diverse medical and psychiatric complications like psychosis, aggressive behavior, and suicide ideation. Case. We report the case of a 25-year-old man admitted into a psychiatric unit, presenting with psychotic symptoms after slamming mephedrone almost every weekend for the last 4 months. He presents paranoid delusions, intense anxiety, and visual and kinesthetic hallucinations. He also shows intense craving, compulsive drug use, general malaise, and weakness. After four weeks of admission and antipsychotic treatment, delusions completely disappear. The patient is reinfected with hepatitis C. Discussion. Psychiatric and medical conditions related to chemsex and slamming have been reported in several European cities, but not in Spain. Psychotic symptoms have been associated with mephedrone and other SCs’ consumption, with the IV route being prone to produce more severe symptomatology and addictive conducts. In the case we report, paranoid psychosis, addiction, and medical complications are described.

  19. Major self-mutilation in the first episode of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Matthew; Babidge, Nick; Andrews, Doug; Storey, Philip; Nielssen, Olav

    2009-09-01

    Major self-mutilation (MSM) is a rare but catastrophic complication of severe mental illness. Most people who inflict MSM have a psychotic disorder, usually a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. It is not known when in the course of psychotic illness, MSM is most likely to occur. In this study, the proportion of patients in first episode of psychosis (FEP) was assessed using the results of a systematic review of published case reports. Histories of patients who had removed an eye or a testicle, severed their penis, or amputated a portion of a limb and were diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis were included. A psychotic illness was documented in 143 of 189 cases (75.6%) of MSM, of whom 119 of 143 (83.2%) were diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. The treatment status of a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis could be ascertained in 101 of the case reports, of which 54 were in the FEP (53.5%, 95% confidence interval = 43.7%-63.2%). Patients who inflict MSM in FEP exhibited similar symptoms to those who inflict MSM later in their illness. Acute psychosis, in particular first-episode schizophrenia, appears to be the major cause of MSM. Although MSM is extremely uncommon, earlier treatment of psychotic illness may reduce the incidence of MSM.

  20. Pellagra Associated with Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B B Lal

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of pellagra who had psychosis, dermatitis and gastrointestinal system involvement in the form of constipation has been described. In this case mental symptoms in the form of insomnia appeared prior to dermal lesions. The case was successfully treated both for the mental and skin condition with nicotinamide and other ancillary treatment.

  1. Attachment and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to further our understanding of current psychosocial models by introducing attachment as a relevant developmental framework. Firstly, attachment theory provides a psychosocial model for a developmental pathway to psychosis. Secondly, after expression of psychotic

  2. Case report: recurrent pseudocyesis in a male patient with psychosis, intermittent hyponatremia, and polydipsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutty, M S; Leadbetter, R A

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a case of recurrent pseudocyesis in a man with psychosis, intermittent hyponatremia, and polydipsia. The pseudocyesis was documented on three separate occasions coinciding with bouts of acute hyponatremia and rapid weight gain stemming from ingestion of large amounts of water. In contrast, no pseudocyesis was elicited during intervening normonatremic states. Abdominal distention, neuropsychological deterioration, and worsening of psychosis during acute hyponatremia are considered as contributing factors to the pseudocyesis.

  3. Subjective experience of emotions and emotional empathy in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Anja; Bahçesular, Katja; Brockmann, Eva-Maria; Biederbick, Sarah-Elisabeth; Dziobek, Isabel; Gallinat, Jürgen; Montag, Christiane

    2014-12-30

    Unlike the cognitive dimensions, alterations of the affective components of empathy in schizophrenia are less well understood. This study explored cognitive and affective dimensions of empathy in the context of the subjective experience of aspects of emotion processing, including emotion regulation, emotional contagion, and interpersonal distress, in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls. In addition, the predictive value of these parameters on psychosocial function was investigated. Fifty-five patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 55 healthy controls were investigated using the Multifaceted Empathy Test and Interpersonal Reactivity Index, as well as the Subjective Experience of Emotions and Emotional Contagion Scales. Individuals with schizophrenia showed impairments of cognitive empathy, but maintained emotional empathy. They reported significantly more negative emotional contagion, overwhelming emotions, lack of emotions, and symbolization of emotions by imagination, but less self-control of emotional expression than healthy persons. Besides cognitive empathy, the experience of a higher extent of overwhelming emotions and of less interpersonal distress predicted psychosocial function in patients. People with schizophrenia and healthy controls showed diverging patterns of how cognitive and emotional empathy related to the subjective aspects of emotion processing. It can be assumed that variables of emotion processing are important moderators of empathic abilities in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cannabis and psychosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damjanović, Aleksandar; Pantović, Maja; Damjanović, Aleksandra; Dunjić-Kostić, Bojana; Ivković, Maja; Milovanović, Srđan; Lacković, Maja; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    The association between cannabinoids and psychosis has been known for almost a thousand years, but it is still speculated whether cannabis use may be a contributory cause of psychosis, that is, whether it may precipitate schizophrenia in those at risk. In this paper, we will briefly present the data from individual longitudinal studies in the field, together with the factors that are considered important for the association of cannabis abuse and occurrence of schizophrenia and prevention opportunities in the target population. The reviewed studies clearly suggest that cannabis abuse predicts an increased risk for schizophrenia, particularly in young adults. They underline both the need to create adequate prevention measures and consequently avoid the occurrence of the disease in the young at risk. Particular attention should be additionally devoted toward encouraging the young presenting with psychotic symptoms to stop or, at the very least, reduce the frequency of cannabis abuse. The issues are undoubtedly to be addressed by the health care system in general.

  5. Psychosis following Tramadol Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Rajabizadeh, Ghodratolah; Kheradmand, Ali; Nasirian, Mansoureh

    2009-01-01

    Background: Tramadol is a centrally acting opioid analgesic used to treat moderate to sever pain. It has more advantage and less opioid adverse effects than conventional opioid analgesia. Case Report: This article reports a patient with tramadol dependency that had psychosis after tramadol withdrawal. Conclusion: By the increase of tramadol usage for relief of chronic pain, tramadol abuse and dependency is increased. Some of tramadol withdrawal symptoms are not related to opioid, for example ...

  6. [Body marking in psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliot, Lucie

    Patients with psychosis speak of an uneasy relationship with their body. Between feelings of too little and too much, for them it is a matter of trying to suture an image which is not always unified, a body which they are not always sure they have. The attentive clinician will attempt to support the solutions of each psychotic patient to maintain their body, beyond the death drive which pushes them to tear it apart. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain dysfunction in psychosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warkentin, S.

    1991-05-24

    The present investigation focused on the questions whether previously reported functional brain abnormalities in schizophrenia could be related to the clinical state of the patient (i.e. the degree of psychosis) at time of study, and whether similar findings in patients with schizophrenia, could be made in patients with cycloid psychosis. To this effect, patients were investigated with regional cerebral blood flow measurements and clinical rating on repeated occasions during their most extreme fluctuations during a psychotic episode, i.e. while they were in an exacerbated state and during clinical remission. A subgroup of schizophrenic patients were investigated before and after neuroleptic treatment and during mental activation with a word fluency test. The schizophrenic group has a normal mean hemispheric blood flow irrespective of clinical state and treatment. During exacerbation a highly significant positive correlation was seen between the frontal-occipital (F/O) ratio and the degree of psychosis, suggesting that the more psychotic the patients was, the higher was the ratio. During remission, the F/O ratio decreased. Schizophrenic patients did not activate their prefrontal cortex during exacerbation, but showed a normal frontal response to the word fluency test during remission. The regional cerebral blood flow of the cycloid patients differed clearly from that of the schizophrenic patients. During exacerbation they had elevated mean hemispheric flow levels, and a decreased F/O ration, while rCBF was normal during remission. The findings suggest that variability in the degree of psychosis can be an important factor underlying the heterogeneity of rCBF findings in schizophrenia. (au).

  8. Delusional disorders--are they simply paranoid schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Andreas; Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    This article tries to give an answer to the question of whether International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) delusional disorder (DD) is simply paranoid schizophrenia (PS). Because ICD-10 PDD and DSM-IV DD are identical, we use DD as a synonym. A prospective and longitudinal study compared all inpatients with DD treated at the Halle-Wittenberg university hospital during a 14-year period with a previously investigated selected cohort of patients with PS. Sociodemographic data, symptomatology, course, and outcome parameters were examined using standardized instruments. The duration of the follow-up period in patients with DD was 10.8 years and for the PS patients 12.9 years. Significant differences between DD and PS were found: DD patients are, in comparison to patients with PS, significantly older at onset. Less of their first-degree relatives have mental disorders. They less frequently come from a broken home situation. First-rank symptoms, relevant negative symptoms, and primary hallucinations did not occur in patients with DD. Patients with DD were less frequently hospitalized, and the duration of their hospitalization was shorter. Their outcome is much better regarding employment, early retirement due to the disorder, and psychopharmacological medication. They more often had stable heterosexual partnerships and were autarkic. They had lower scores in the Disability Assessment Scale and in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The diagnosis of DD is very stable over time. The findings of this study support the assumption that DDs are a separate entity and only exceptionally can be a prodrome of schizophrenia.

  9. Delusional Disorders—Are They Simply Paranoid Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Andreas; Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article tries to give an answer to the question of whether International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) delusional disorder (DD) is simply paranoid schizophrenia (PS). Because ICD-10 PDD and DSM-IV DD are identical, we use DD as a synonym. Methods: A prospective and longitudinal study compared all inpatients with DD treated at the Halle-Wittenberg university hospital during a 14-year period with a previously investigated selected cohort of patients with PS. Sociodemographic data, symptomatology, course, and outcome parameters were examined using standardized instruments. The duration of the follow-up period in patients with DD was 10.8 years and for the PS patients 12.9 years. Results: Significant differences between DD and PS were found: DD patients are, in comparison to patients with PS, significantly older at onset. Less of their first-degree relatives have mental disorders. They less frequently come from a broken home situation. First-rank symptoms, relevant negative symptoms, and primary hallucinations did not occur in patients with DD. Patients with DD were less frequently hospitalized, and the duration of their hospitalization was shorter. Their outcome is much better regarding employment, early retirement due to the disorder, and psychopharmacological medication. They more often had stable heterosexual partnerships and were autarkic. They had lower scores in the Disability Assessment Scale and in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The diagnosis of DD is very stable over time. Conclusions: The findings of this study support the assumption that DDs are a separate entity and only exceptionally can be a prodrome of schizophrenia. PMID:21078814

  10. Oral risperidone plus oral lorazepam versus standard care with intramuscular conventional neuroleptics in the initial phase of treating individuals with acute psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Joseph; Larmo, Ilkka; Chrzanowski, Wlodzimierz; Witte, Roel; Karavatos, Athanasios; Schreiner, Andreas; Lex, Alice; Medori, Rossella

    2004-09-01

    Although atypical antipsychotics are now considered first line treatments for schizophrenia, intramuscular (i.m.) conventional neuroleptics are often still considered necessary in emergency treatment of acute psychoses. This European, multicentre, open-label, active-controlled trial compared oral risperidone plus oral lorazepam to standard care with i.m. conventional neuroleptics with or without lorazepam in the emergency treatment of acutely psychotic patients. Patients were allowed to choose either oral risperidone (a single dose of 2 mg and 2.0-2.5 mg lorazepam; 121 patients) or standard i.m. treatment (conventional neuroleptic with or without lorazepam; 105 patients). No additional treatment was allowed for 2 h. Primary outcome was the percentage of patients with treatment success (asleep or at least much improved on Clinical Global Impression-global improvement scale) 2 h after treatment initiation. Baseline characteristics were similar in both treatment groups. Oral risperidone plus oral lorazepam was more successful at 2 h (66.9%) and significantly non-inferior compared to standard i.m. care (54.3%; P=0.0003), and the incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) was lower (1.7%) compared to standard i.m. care (9.5%). In acutely psychotic patients requiring emergency treatment, oral risperidone/oral lorazepam was at least as effective as i.m. conventional neuroleptic treatment with or without lorazepam. Oral risperidone plus lorazepam rapidly reduces symptoms, including aggression, and causes fewer EPS.

  11. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. Results: In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Conclusion: Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  12. Right lateralized white matter abnormalities in first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Zhening; Gao, Keming; Xiao, Changqing; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2012-11-30

    Numerous studies in first-episode schizophrenia suggest the involvement of white matter (WM) abnormalities in multiple regions underlying the pathogenesis of this condition. However, there has never been a neuroimaging study in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia by using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with TBSS method to investigate the brain WM integrity in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia. Twenty patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia and 26 healthy subjects matched with age, gender, and education level were scanned with DTI. An automated TBSS approach was employed to analyze the data. Voxel-wise statistics revealed that patients with paranoid schizophrenia had decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) II, the right fornix, the right internal capsule, and the right external capsule compared to healthy subjects. Patients did not have increased FA values in any brain regions compared to healthy subjects. There was no correlation between the FA values in any brain regions and patient demographics and the severity of illness. Our findings suggest right-sided alterations of WM integrity in the WM tracts of cortical and subcortical regions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contemporary perspectives on Lacanian theories of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    In contemporary Lacanian psychoanalysis, Verhaeghe's theory of actualpathology psychopathology in psychosis and the Millerian idea of "ordinary psychosis" provide diverging conceptual approaches to psychosis. In this paper, the two approaches to psychosis are examined with a particular emphasis on "mild psychosis" and compensatory mechanisms. Despite the shared focus on similar clinical phenomena, particularly body disturbances, these two theories provide different explanations of psychosis. Verhaeghe's theory of psychosis is a synthesis of Lacanian theory, Freud's idea of actual neurosis and psychoanalytic attachment concepts. Moreover, these ideas are situated in the "schizophrenia/paranoia dichotomy" an important heuristic device utilized in clinical practice with psychosis. In contrast, the Millerian field of ordinary psychosis aims to broaden the idea of psychosis by reviving the idea of "mild psychosis" and the different forms of stabilization possible in psychosis. Clinicians adapting the idea of ordinary psychosis aim to rethink pivotal Lacanian concepts-"untriggered" psychosis and stabilization-beyond the scope of the schizophrenia/paranoia dichotomy. Although the idea of ordinary psychosis requires further development, it promise greater utility than Verhaeghe's model, as it provides a broader and more nuanced approach to the complex vicissitudes of triggering and restitution in psychosis.

  14. Contemporary Perspectives on Lacanian Theories of Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Douglas Redmond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:In contemporary Lacanian psychoanalysis, Verhaeghe’s theory of actualpathology / psychopathology in psychosis and the Millerian idea of ordinary psychosis provide diverging conceptual approaches to psychosis. In this paper, the two approaches to psychosis are examined with a particular emphasis on mild psychosis and compensatory mechanisms. Despite the shared focus on similar clinical phenomena, particularly body disturbances, these two theories provide different explanations of psychosis. Verhaeghe’s theory of psychosis is a synthesis of Lacanian theory, Freud’s idea of actual neurosis and psychoanalytic attachment concepts. Moreover, these ideas are situated in the schizophrenia / paranoia dichotomy an important heuristic device utilised in clinical practice with psychosis. In contrast, the Millerian field of ordinary psychosis aims to broaden the idea of psychosis by reviving the idea of mild psychosis and the different forms of stabilisation possible in psychosis. Clinicians adapting the idea of ordinary psychosis aim to rethink pivotal Lacanian concepts - untriggered psychosis and stabilisation - beyond the scope of the schizophrenia / paranoia dichotomy. Although the idea of ordinary psychosis requires further development, it promise greater utility than Verhaeghe’s model, as it provides a broader and more nuanced approach to the complex vicissitudes of triggering and restitution in psychosis.

  15. Neurocognitive dysfunction in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Melle, Ingrid; Friis, Svein

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of neurocognitive function with duration of untreated psychosis, premorbid illness factors, and clinical symptoms to determine whether long duration of untreated psychosis independently compromises cognitive function.......The authors examined the relationship of neurocognitive function with duration of untreated psychosis, premorbid illness factors, and clinical symptoms to determine whether long duration of untreated psychosis independently compromises cognitive function....

  16. The body, adolescence, and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Riccardo; Pola, Marisa

    2010-12-01

    This article explores aspects of the clinical development of a male 17 year-old patient who had four weekly sessions of psychoanalysis during an acute psychotic crisis. In the context of arrested adolescent development, a psychotic crisis can present an opportunity to set the process of maturation in motion again. Adolescent psychosis is examined in the light of Bion's theories of catastrophic change - in which the container/contained relationship becomes explosive and overwhelming - as well as of Ferrari's and Matte Blanco's hypotheses on the mind-body relationship. The authors emphasize the role of denial of the body and its changes in the genesis of adolescent psychotic conflict, and show how the analytic relationship can offer crucial reverie conditions for promoting recognition of the body, bodily sensations and affects, as a prerequisite for the activation of an autonomous mental system. This clinical approach entails recognizing the urgent need to make room for the elaboration of intrasubjective relationships and for mind-body dialogue, transference interpretations being postponed. Clinical material and fragments of analytic dialogue illustrate the authors' hypotheses and demonstrate the patient's development towards recognition of his body and an incipient capacity to think associated with the perception of the limits set by time and reality. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  17. [An integrated program for psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi Tassara, J; Diaz, J P; Mourgues, C

    1980-09-01

    The reciprocal balance between the cognitive normal awareness of reality and the cognitive psychotic awareness of reality in schizophrenia, is proposed, on the basis of the structural psychopathological theory of psychoses of the author. This balance points to the dominance of the operant conditioning of psychotic reality over normal reality during the invasion period of the disease, an equilibrium of both aspects during the steady period, and a dominance of normal reality during the residual period. A comprehensive program for secondary and terciary prevention of schizophrenia is outlined, with five levels of function delegation: D1, psychiatrists and psychologists; D2, nurses and social workers; D3, auxiliary nurses; D4, family co-therapist; D5, patients and other relatives. The functions delegated to D5 include the recognition of symptoms, causes and course, and attitudes conducing to secondary handicaps in patients. To D4, are delegate the administration of psychotropic drugs at home and technique for reinforcing normal reality. To D3, are delegated notions on epidemiology, the supervision of the psychopharmacological treatment and of reinforcement programs for normal reality, attitudes and its change, and notions of urgencies in psychosis. The D2 and D1 levels indicate treatment at all levels and treat the more complicated cases in institutions. The efficacy of the program in 36 cases, after a year, indicates a reduction of acute psychotic productivity from 72 to 6% of the patients, and a rate of hospitalization of only 8%.

  18. Contemporary perspectives on Lacanian theories of psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Redmond, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:In contemporary Lacanian psychoanalysis, Verhaeghe’s theory of actualpathology / psychopathology in psychosis and the Millerian idea of ordinary psychosis provide diverging conceptual approaches to psychosis. In this paper, the two approaches to psychosis are examined with a particular emphasis on mild psychosis and compensatory mechanisms. Despite the shared focus on similar clinical phenomena, particularly body disturbances, these two theories provide different explanations of psyc...

  19. A review of postpartum psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Dorothy; Rothschild, Anthony J; Wisner, Katherine L

    2006-05-01

    The objective is to provide an overview of the clinical features, prognosis, differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of postpartum psychosis. The authors searched Medline (1966-2005), PsycInfo (1974-2005), Toxnet, and PubMed databases using the key words postpartum psychosis, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, organic psychosis, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and electroconvulsive therapy. A clinical case is used to facilitate the discussion. The onset of puerperal psychosis occurs in the first 1-4 weeks after childbirth. The data suggest that postpartum psychosis is an overt presentation of bipolar disorder that is timed to coincide with tremendous hormonal shifts after delivery. The patient develops frank psychosis, cognitive impairment, and grossly disorganized behavior that represent a complete change from previous functioning. These perturbations, in combination with lapsed insight into her illness and symptoms, can lead to devastating consequences in which the safety and well-being of the affected mother and her offspring are jeopardized. Therefore, careful and repeated assessment of the mothers' symptoms, safety, and functional capacity is imperative. Treatment is dictated by the underlying diagnosis, bipolar disorder, and guided by the symptom acuity, patient's response to past treatments, drug tolerability, and breastfeeding preference. The somatic therapies include antimanic agents, atypical antipsychotic medications, and ECT. Estrogen prophylaxis remains purely investigational. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of postpartum psychosis is essential to expedite appropriate treatment and to allow for quick, full recovery, prevention of future episodes, and reduction of risk to the mother and her children and family.

  20. Psychosis and cannabis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Häfner

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and cannabis misuse is currently the most frequent co-morbidity disorder of schizophrenia. The following four issues will be dealt with: 1 the neurobiological basis of the psychosis-inducing, pathogenic effects of THC, the agent contained in cannabis products. 2 Can cannabis use - and for comparison alcohol abuse - prematurely trigger or even cause schizophrenia? 3 Are persons genetically liable to schizophrenia, psychosis-prone individuals or young persons before completion of brain development at an increased risk? 4 What consequences does cannabis use have on the symptomatology and further course of schizophrenia? Results from recent literature and the ABC Schizophrenia Study show that the risk for cannabis use in schizophrenia is about twice the size in healthy controls. In most cases cannabis use starts before first admission, in a third of cases before schizophrenia onset. There is an increased affinity to misuse already at the prodromal stage. Cannabis can prematurely trigger schizophrenia onset - on average eight years earlier than in non-use - and cause the illness partly in interaction with predisposing factors. Cannabis use in the course of schizophrenia increases positive symptoms and reduces affective flattening, thus leading to dysfunctional coping in some cases.

  1. Early intervention in psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, Claudio; Nordentoft, Merete; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is a well-established approach with the intention of early detection and treatment of psychotic disorders. Its clinical and economic benefits are well documented. This paper presents basic aspects of EIP services, discusses challenges to their implementa......AIM: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is a well-established approach with the intention of early detection and treatment of psychotic disorders. Its clinical and economic benefits are well documented. This paper presents basic aspects of EIP services, discusses challenges...... implemented EIP services into the mental healthcare system have generated evidence, concepts and specific strategies that might serve as guidance or inspiration in other countries or systems where EIP is less well developed or not developed at all. Previous experience has made clear that evidence of clinical...... benefits alone is not enough to promote implementation, as economic arguments and political and social pressure have shown to be important elements in efforts to achieve implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Users' narratives, close collaboration with community organizations and support from policy-makers and known...

  2. CSF metabolic and proteomic profiles in patients prodromal for psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T-J Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The initial prodromal state of psychosis (IPS is defined as an early disease stage prior to the onset of overt psychosis characterized by sub-threshold or more unspecific psychiatric symptoms. Little is known regarding the biochemical changes during this period. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the metabolic/proteomic profiles of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of first-onset drug naïve paranoid schizophrenia patients (n = 54 and individuals presenting with initial prodromal symptoms (n = 24, alongside healthy volunteers (n = 70 using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H-NMR spectroscopy and surface enhanced laser desorption ionization (SELDI mass spectrometry, respectively. Partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA showed that 36%/29% of IPS patients displayed proteomic/metabolic profiles characteristic of first-onset, drug naïve schizophrenia, i.e., changes in levels of glucose and lactate as well as changes in a VGF-derived peptide (VGF23-62 and transthyretin protein concentrations. However, only 29% (n = 7 of the investigated IPS patients (who to date have been followed up for up to three years have so far received a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The presence of biochemical alterations in the IPS group did not correlate with the risk to develop schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results imply that schizophrenia-related biochemical disease processes can be traced in CSF of prodromal patients. However, the biochemical disturbances identified in IPS patients, at least when measured at a single time point, may not be sufficient to predict clinical outcome.

  3. Prolonged exposure and EMDR for PTSD v. a PTSD waiting-list condition: effects on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning in patients with chronic psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, P A J M; van den Berg, D P G; van der Vleugel, B M; de Roos, C; de Jongh, A; van der Gaag, M; van Minnen, A M

    2016-08-01

    In patients with psychotic disorders, the effects of psychological post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning are largely unknown In a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) 155 outpatients in treatment for psychosis (61.3% schizophrenic disorder, 29% schizoaffective disorder) were randomized to eight sessions prolonged exposure (PE; n = 53) or eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) (n = 55), or a waiting-list condition (WL, n = 47) for treatment of their co-morbid PTSD. Measures were performed on (1) psychosis: severity of delusions (PSYRATS-DRS), paranoid thoughts (GPTS), auditory verbal hallucinations (PSYRATS-AHRS), and remission from psychotic disorder (SCI-SR-PANSS); (2) depression (BDI-II); (3) social functioning (PSP). Outcomes were compared at baseline, post-treatment, 6-month follow-up and over all data points. Both PE and EMDR were significantly associated with less severe paranoid thoughts post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up, and with more patients remitting from schizophrenia, at post-treatment (PE and EMDR) and over time (PE). Moreover, PE was significantly associated with a greater reduction of depression at post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Auditory verbal hallucinations and social functioning remained unchanged. In patients with chronic psychotic disorders PE and EMDR not only reduced PTSD symptoms, but also paranoid thoughts. Importantly, in PE and EMDR more patients accomplished the status of their psychotic disorder in remission. Clinically, these effects are highly relevant and provide empirical support to the notion that delivering PTSD treatment to patients with psychotic disorders and PTSD deserves increasing recognition and acceptance among clinicians.

  4. Questions and Answers about Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what is not. Symptoms of psychosis include delusions (false beliefs) and hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that ... and work, strained family relations, and separation from friends. The longer the symptoms go untreated, the greater ...

  5. Self psychology as a shift away from the paranoid strain in classical analytic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, David M

    2014-12-01

    Classical psychoanalytic theory has a paranoid strain. There is, in effect, an "evil other"--the id--within each individual that must be tamed in development and confronted and worked through as resistance in treatment. This last has historically endgendered an adversarial relationship between patient and analyst. This paranoid strain came from a paranoid element in Freud's personality that affected his worldview, his relationships, and his theory. Self psychology offers a different view of development and conflict. It stresses the child's need for responsiveness from and admiration of caretakers in order to develop a well-functioning self. Though severe behavioral and character problems may result from faults in the process of self-construction, the essential need is not instinctual discharge but connection. Hence the long-assumed opposition between individual needs and social institutions or between patient and analyst is no longer inevitable or universal. Rather, an understanding of the primary need for connection creates both a different interpretive stance and a more cooperative ambience. These changes in theory and technique are traced to Kohut's personal struggles to emancipate himself from his paranoid mother. © 2014 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  6. BIOMETRIC INDICES OF CONSTITUTIONAL RISKS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA IN MALE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedeva Е.A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the current study examines features and correlations of particular psychodynamic, dermatoglyphic characteristics and body constitution of men with paranoid schizophrenia. Study groups: 25 men having the "paranoid schizophrenia" (F20.0, 27 men having no mental diseases. Methods: psychodiagnostic tests (Hand test, the Big Five Inventory (BFI, anthropometry; dactyloscopy. Results: there were statistically significant differences in such personality factors as: extroversion and openness among two groups. Significantly smaller sizes of the chest and thigh circumferences were found in men with paranoid schizophrenia. The schizophrenic group exhibited higher frequency of "ulnar loop" and "double loop" finger pattern occurrence. Our study found a number of somato-psychic, dermato-psychic and dermato-somatic correlations, as well as correlations between personality factors and age. Conclusion: the examination of personality features correlated with markers of dermatoglyphic and body constitution helped to identify the predictors of risks for developing paranoid schizophrenia. This makes it possible the identification of at-risk groups with their monitoring and focusing on preventive programs

  7. The Prediction of Paranoid Behavior: Comparative Validities of Obvious vs. Subtle MMPI Paranoia (Pa) Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanitz, Christine A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory paranoia subtle, neutral, and obvious subscales and criteria presumed to reflect various paranoid characteristics in a sample of male college students (N=100). Results showed that both the obvious and subtle Pa Items predicted various criteria. (Author/JAC)

  8. s first-rank symptoms in Zulu patients with paranoid schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of Schneider's first-rank symptoms (FRS) in Zulu patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and to ascertain the diagnostic and prognostic significance of Schneider's FRS in this group. Methods: This descriptive study was done on 75 psychiatric Zulu ...

  9. Jack the Giant Tamer: Poetry Writing in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief case report on the use of poetry writing in the treatment of a patient with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Notes that, after 23 sessions in which the patient said nothing, the patient brought a poem for the therapist to read at the 24 session. (SR)

  10. Behavioral Experiments in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia: A Single Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Roger; Nordahl, Hans M.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of cognitive therapy of paranoid delusions appeared in the literature, the empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy in treating psychotic symptoms has been widely established. The aim of the present case study is to show how the behavioral experiment can be used as a powerful tool to change delusional thinking…

  11. President Bush's Pre-War Rhetoric on Iraq: Paranoid Style in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Alexander G.; Porpora, Douglas V.

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the war rhetoric of the Bush administration as reflected in the speeches of President Bush. What was explored is how presidential speeches drew on a variety of rhetorical techniques, from role-taking and punctuation to the adoption of the paranoid style. The purpose of these techniques is to nullify voices of…

  12. Reappraisal of the interplay between psychosis and depression symptoms in the pathogenesis of psychotic syndromes: results from a twenty-year prospective community study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Wulf; Angst, Jules; Gamma, Alex; Haker, Helene; Stulz, Niklaus; Merikangas, Kathleen R; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta

    2011-02-01

    The interplay of psychotic and affective symptoms is a crucial challenge in understanding the pathogenesis of psychosis. In this study, we analyzed the interplay between two subclinical psychosis symptoms dimensions, and one depression symptoms dimension, using longitudinal data from Zurich. The Zurich study started in 1979 with a representative sample of 591 participants who were aged 20/21. Follow-up interviews were conducted at age 23, 28, 30, 35, and 41. The psychiatric symptoms were assessed with a semi-structured interview and the SCL 90-R. In this study, we analyzed three SCL-90-R subscales: the depression symptoms dimension and two distinct symptoms dimensions of subclinical psychosis, one representing a schizophrenia nuclear symptom dimension, the other representing a schizotypal symptoms dimension. Modeling was done with hybrid latent growth models, thereby including simultaneous and cross-lagged effects. The interplay between the two subclinical psychosis symptoms dimensions and the depression symptoms dimension includes several intertwined pathways. The schizotypal symptoms dimension has strong direct effects on the schizophrenia nuclear symptoms dimension, but also on the depression symptoms dimension. The latter has for its part an effect on the schizophrenia nuclear symptoms dimension. The main driving force within the dynamic interplay between depression and psychosis symptoms is a schizotypal symptoms dimension, which represents social and interpersonal deficiencies, ideas of reference, suspiciousness, paranoid ideation, and odd behavior. It does not only directly influence subclinical nuclear schizophrenia symptoms but also the symptoms of depression.

  13. Acute administration of MK-801 in an animal model of psychosis in rats interferes with cognitively demanding forms of behavioral flexibility on a rotating arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Jan; Stankova, Anna; Entlerova, Marie; Stuchlik, Ales

    2015-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia often manifest deficits in behavioral flexibility. Non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists such as MK-801 induce schizophrenia-like symptoms in rodents, including cognitive functions. Despite work exploring flexibility has been done employing behavioral paradigms with simple stimuli, much less is known about what kinds of flexibility are affected in an MK-801 model of schizophrenia-like behavior in the spatial domain. We used a rotating arena-based apparatus (Carousel) requiring rats to avoid an unmarked sector defined in either the reference frame of the rotating arena (arena frame task, AF) or the stationary room (room frame task, RF). We investigated behavioral flexibility in four conditions involving different cognitive loads. Each condition encompassed an initial (five sessions) and a test phase (five sessions) in which some aspects of the task were changed to test flexibility and in which rats were given saline, 0.05 mg/kg or 0.1 mg/kg MK-801 thirty minutes prior to a session. In the first condition, rats acquired avoidance in RF with clockwise rotation of the arena while in the test phase the arena rotated counterclockwise. In the second condition, rats initially acquired avoidance in RF with the sector on the north and then it was reversed to south (spatial reversal). In the third and fourth conditions, rats initially performed an AF (RF, respectively) task, followed by an RF (AF, respectively) task, testing the ability of cognitive set-shifting. We found no effect of MK-801 either on simple motor adjustment after reversal of arena rotation or on spatial reversal within the RF. In contrast, administration of MK-801 at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg interfered with set-shifting in both conditions. Furthermore, we observed MK-801 0.1 mg/kg elevated locomotion in all cases. These data suggest that blockade of NMDA receptors by acute system administration of MK-801 preferentially affects set-shifting in the cognitive domain rather than

  14. Acute Administration of MK-801 in an Animal Model of Psychosis in Rats Interferes with Cognitively Demanding Forms of Behavioral Flexibility on a Rotating Arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eSvoboda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia often manifest deficits in behavioral flexibility. Non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists such as MK-801 induce schizophrenia-like symptoms in rodents, including cognitive functions. Despite work exploring flexibility has been done employing behavioral paradigms with simple stimuli, much less is known about what kinds of flexibility are affected in an MK-801 model of schizophrenia-like behavior in the spatial domain. We used a rotating arena-based apparatus (Carousel requiring rats to avoid an unmarked sector defined in either the reference frame of the rotating arena (arena frame task, AF or the stationary room (room frame task, RF. We investigated behavioral flexibility in four conditions involving different cognitive loads. Each condition encompassed an initial (five sessions and a test phase (five sessions in which some aspects of the task were changed to test flexibility in which rats were given saline, 0.05 mg/kg or 0.1 mg/kg MK-801 thirty minutes prior to a session. In the first condition, rats acquired avoidance in RF with clockwise rotation of the arena while in the test phase the arena rotated counterclockwise. In the second condition, rats initially acquired avoidance in RF with the sector on the north and then it was reversed to south (spatial reversal. In the third and fourth conditions, rats initially performed an AF (RF, respectively task, followed by an RF (AF, respectively task, testing the ability of cognitive set-shifting. We found no effect of MK-801 either on simple motor adjustment after reversal of arena rotation or on spatial reversal within the RF. In contrast, administration of MK-801 at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg interfered with set-shifting in both conditions. Furthermore, we observed MK-801 0.1 mg/kg elevated locomotion in all cases. These data suggest that blockade of NMDA receptors by acute system administration of MK-801 preferentially affects set-shifting in the cognitive domain rather

  15. Brave New Worlds—Review and Update on Virtual Reality Assessment and Treatment in Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Moritz, Steffen; van der Gaag, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality (VR) research on psychotic disorders has been initiated. Several studies showed that VR can elicit paranoid thoughts about virtual characters (avatars), both in patients with psychotic disorders and healthy individuals. Real life symptoms and VR experiences were correlated, lending further support to its validity. Neurocognitive deficits and difficulties in social behavior were found in schizophrenia patients, not only in abstract tasks but also using naturalistic virtual environments that are more relevant to daily life, such as a city or encounters with avatars. VR treatments are conceivable for most dimensions of psychotic disorders. There is a small but expanding literature on interventions for delusions, hallucinations, neurocognition, social cognition, and social skills; preliminary results are promising. VR applications for assessment and treatment of psychotic disorders are in their infancy, but appear to have a great potential for increasing our understanding of psychosis and expanding the therapeutic toolbox. PMID:25193975

  16. Hypothesis: grandiosity and guilt cause paranoia; paranoid schizophrenia is a psychotic mood disorder; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Charles Raymond

    2008-11-01

    Delusional paranoia has been associated with severe mental illness for over a century. Kraepelin introduced a disorder called "paranoid depression," but "paranoid" became linked to schizophrenia, not to mood disorders. Paranoid remains the most common subtype of schizophrenia, but some of these cases, as Kraepelin initially implied, may be unrecognized psychotic mood disorders, so the relationship of paranoid schizophrenia to psychotic bipolar disorder warrants reevaluation. To address whether paranoia associates more with schizophrenia or mood disorders, a selected literature is reviewed and 11 cases are summarized. Comparative clinical and recent molecular genetic data find phenotypic and genotypic commonalities between patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder lending support to the idea that paranoid schizophrenia could be the same disorder as psychotic bipolar disorder. A selected clinical literature finds no symptom, course, or characteristic traditionally considered diagnostic of schizophrenia that cannot be accounted for by psychotic bipolar disorder patients. For example, it is hypothesized here that 2 common mood-based symptoms, grandiosity and guilt, may underlie functional paranoia. Mania explains paranoia when there are grandiose delusions that one's possessions are so valuable that others will kill for them. Similarly, depression explains paranoia when delusional guilt convinces patients that they deserve punishment. In both cases, fear becomes the overwhelming emotion but patient and physician focus on the paranoia rather than on underlying mood symptoms can cause misdiagnoses. This study uses a clinical, case-based, hypothesis generation approach that warrants follow-up with a larger representative sample of psychotic patients followed prospectively to determine the degree to which the clinical course observed herein is typical of all such patients. Differential diagnoses, nomenclature, and treatment implications are

  17. Ziconotide-induced psychosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Stephanie V; Waldfogel, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    Ziconotide is used intrathecally in the management of severe chronic pain that contains a warning against neuropsychiatric adverse events. The definition of psychiatric events is broad and management strategies are vague. This case report describes a 49-year-old female who was admitted to the acute psychiatric unit to address auditory hallucinations and paranoid ideation persisting for 3 weeks. Approximately 3 months ago, an intrathecal pump with ziconotide was implanted to treat pain. Upon hospital admission, the pump was infusing at a rate of 4.9 mcg/24 hours. Because the drug could not be immediately discontinued, risperidone 0.5 mg nightly was initiated and subsequently, the pump was drained of ziconotide, rinsed, and refilled with normal saline. The patient reported no hallucinations or apparent delusions several hours later and was eventually discharged with resolution of psychotic symptoms and continuation of risperidone for 10 days. Despite the identification of neuropsychiatric effects, limited information is available to characterize the presentation and guide specific management aside from recommendations to discontinue the infusion and possible use of psychotropic medications or necessity for hospitalization. This case report characterizes one presentation of hallucinations and paranoia associated with ziconotide intrathecal infusion. Clinicians should be aware of the management strategies to mediate these adverse effects, including expected time to adverse effect resolution, removal of ziconotide from the pump, and role for short-term use of antipsychotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Clinico-diagnostic evaluation of acute delirious syndromes in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleeva, G P

    1989-01-01

    Psychopathologic and nosologic issues of acute paranoid and Kandinsky-Clerambault syndromes are discussed on the background of clinical studies of 225 schizophrenic patients with these syndromes being initial manifestations. The data on the syndromes typology, clinical value and prognosis of acute delirious disorders are presented. These are shown to be not confined to progredient schizophrenia, including its paranoid form. Rather, they can manifest a course of the disease unspecific for schizophrenia, the so-called schizophrenic reactions and phasic states thus reflecting the course of latent schizophrenia. A differentiated approach to clinical and psychopathological analysis of acute delirious syndromes in schizophrenia is essential for adequate choice of medicosocial measures and epidemiologic investigations.

  19. Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress in Psychosis and Psychosis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Barron

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although our understanding of psychotic disorders has advanced substantially in the past few decades, very little has changed in the standard of care for these illnesses since the development of atypical anti-psychotics in the 1990s. Here, we integrate new insights into the pathophysiology with the increasing interest in early detection and prevention. First, we explore the role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in a subpopulation of cortical parvalbumin-containing interneurons (PVIs. Postmortem and preclinical data has implicated these neurons in the positive and negative symptoms, as well as the cognitive dysfunction present in schizophrenia. These neurons also appear to be sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress during the perinatal and peripubertal periods, which may be mediated in large part by aberrant synaptic pruning. After exploring some of the molecular mechanisms through which neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are thought to exert their effects, we highlight the progress that has been made in identifying psychosis prior to onset through the identification of individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR. By combining our understanding of psychosis pathogenesis with the increasing characterization of endophenotypes that precede frank psychosis, it may be possible to identify patients before they present with psychosis and intervene to reduce the burden of the disease to both patients and families.

  20. Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress in Psychosis and Psychosis Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Henry; Hafizi, Sina; Andreazza, Ana C; Mizrahi, Romina

    2017-03-17

    Although our understanding of psychotic disorders has advanced substantially in the past few decades, very little has changed in the standard of care for these illnesses since the development of atypical anti-psychotics in the 1990s. Here, we integrate new insights into the pathophysiology with the increasing interest in early detection and prevention. First, we explore the role of N -methyl-d-aspartate receptors in a subpopulation of cortical parvalbumin-containing interneurons (PVIs). Postmortem and preclinical data has implicated these neurons in the positive and negative symptoms, as well as the cognitive dysfunction present in schizophrenia. These neurons also appear to be sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress during the perinatal and peripubertal periods, which may be mediated in large part by aberrant synaptic pruning. After exploring some of the molecular mechanisms through which neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are thought to exert their effects, we highlight the progress that has been made in identifying psychosis prior to onset through the identification of individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR). By combining our understanding of psychosis pathogenesis with the increasing characterization of endophenotypes that precede frank psychosis, it may be possible to identify patients before they present with psychosis and intervene to reduce the burden of the disease to both patients and families.

  1. Early detection of first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven.......Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven....

  2. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  3. Recovery from Psychosis: A Phenomenological Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Gary; Hagen, Brad; Peters, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    While mainstream psychiatry tends to view psychosis as an enduring and chronic condition, there is growing interest in the possibility of recovery from psychosis. A phenomenological research method was utilized in interviewing 17 individuals who all self-identified as being in recovery from psychosis. The research question was, "What was the lived…

  4. Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emmanuelle R; Moritz, Steffen; Schwannauer, Matthias; Wiseman, Zoe; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Scott, Jan; Beck, Aaron T; Donaldson, Catherine; Hagen, Roger; Ross, Kerry; Veckenstedt, Ruth; Ison, Rebecca; Williams, Sally; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Garety, Philippa A

    2014-03-01

    The Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis (CBQp) was developed to capture 5 cognitive distortions (jumping to conclusions, intentionalising, catastrophising, emotional reasoning, and dichotomous thinking), which are considered important for the pathogenesis of psychosis. Vignettes were adapted from the Cognitive Style Test (CST),(1) relating to "Anomalous Perceptions" and "Threatening Events" themes. Scale structure, reliability, and validity were investigated in a psychosis group, and CBQp scores were compared with those of depressed and healthy control samples. The CBQp showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The 5 biases were not independent, with a 2-related factor scale providing the best fit. This structure suggests that the CBQp assesses a general thinking bias rather than distinct cognitive errors, while Anomalous Perception and Threatening Events theme scores can be used separately. Total CBQp scores showed good convergent validity with the CST, but individual biases were not related to existing tasks purporting to assess similar reasoning biases. Psychotic and depressed populations scored higher than healthy controls, and symptomatic psychosis patients scored higher than their nonsymptomatic counterparts, with modest relationships between CBQp scores and symptom severity once emotional disorders were partialled out. Anomalous Perception theme and Intentionalising bias scores showed some specificity to psychosis. Overall, the CBQp has good psychometric properties, although it is likely that it measures a different construct to existing tasks, tentatively suggested to represent a bias of interpretation rather than reasoning, judgment or decision-making processes. It is a potentially useful tool in both research and clinical arenas.

  5. Commentary: toward a psychodynamic understanding of filicide--beyond psychosis and into the heart of darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapietro, Daniel J; Barbo, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Much of the literature on filicide explores acute psychosis, sociopathy, or malignant narcissism (psychiatrically ill versus not psychiatrically ill) as primary explanations of why parents kill children. In this issue, Hatters Friedman et al. review the literature on acute psychiatric symptoms in an effort to identify key risk factors for filicide that might have predictive value. In this commentary, we assert the argument that filicide is a complex phenomenon that is the result of more than just psychosis or environmental stressors and that, because not all parents who become psychiatrically ill kill, there may be specific risk factors related to individual underlying psychodynamic conflicts.

  6. Flakka-Induced Prolonged Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Craig Crespi

    2016-01-01

    In South Florida, there has been a highly addictive new synthetic drug flooding the streets for people looking for a cheap high. Alpha-PVP, better known as Flakka, is an illegal substance that sells on the streets for as little as $5 a hit and delivers an instant high that can last from hours to days with lingering effects for weeks after it has been ingested. Although people use Flakka for its potential euphoric high, symptoms are known to easily escalate into frightening delusions, paranoid...

  7. A Tale of Two Paranoids: A Critical Analysis of the Use of the Paranoid Style and Public Secrecy by Donald Trump and Viktor Orbán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andria Timmer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decade, a rising tide of right-wing populism across the globe has inspired a renewed push toward nationalism. Capitalizing on an increasingly chaotic public sphere, leaders are stoking fear in their constituents such that their radical ideologies and hardline policy decisions may be enacted. This article offers a comparative study of two leaders exploiting the vulnerabilities of their respective citizenries: United States President Donald Trump and Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orbán. Drawing from and reimagining Richard Hofstadter’s germane essay, “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” we argue that both represent a new manifestation of the paranoid style as it enables (and is enabled by “public secrecy.” By controlling the media and redirecting collective attention by way of rhetorical sleight of hand, the two are able to sow disorder and confusion such that their secrecy may persist out in the open. Despite using similar issues to promulgate fear and paranoia, most prominently the refugee and immigration crises, and their similar end goals, the two must nonetheless engage in different discursive strategies that reflect the distinct cultures and histories of their respective countries.

  8. Evidence for Distinguishable Treatment Costs among Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Hirjak

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia spectrum disorders result in enormous individual suffering and financial burden on patients and on society. In Germany, there are about 1,000,000 individuals suffering from schizophrenia (SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SAD, a combination of psychotic and affective symptoms. Given the heterogeneous nature of these syndromes, one may assume that there is a difference in treatment costs among patients with paranoid SZ and SAD. However, the current the national system of cost accounting in psychiatry and psychosomatics in Germany assesses all schizophrenia spectrum disorders within one category.The study comprised a retrospective audit of data from 118 patients diagnosed with paranoid SZ (F20.0 and 71 patients with SAD (F25. We used the mean total costs as well as partial cost, i.e., mean costs for medication products, mean personal costs and mean infrastructure costs from each patient for the statistical analysis. We tested for differences in the four variables between SZ and SAD patients using ANCOVA and confirmed the results with bootstrapping.SAD patients had a longer duration of stay than patients with SZ (p = .02. Mean total costs were significantly higher for SAD patients (p = .023. Further, we found a significant difference in mean personnel costs (p = .02 between patients with SZ and SAD. However, we found no significant differences in mean pharmaceutical costs (p = .12 but a marginal difference of mean infrastructure costs (p = .05 between SZ and SAD. We found neither a common decrease of costs over time nor a differential decrease in SZ and SAD.We found evidence for a difference of case related costs of inpatient treatments for paranoid SZ and SAD. The differences in mean total costs seem to be primarily related to the mean personnel costs in patients with paranoid SZ and SAD rather than mean pharmaceutical costs, possibly due to higher personnel effort and infrastructure.

  9. A structural equation model of the relationship between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Scott

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence points to relationships between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking. However, studies are needed to examine (i whether negative affect mediates the relation between insomnia and paranoid thinking, (ii whether different types of insomnia exert different effects on paranoia, and (iii to compare the impact of objective and self-reported sleeping difficulties.Structural equation modelling was therefore used to test competing models of the relationships between self-reported insomnia, negative affect, and paranoia. n = 348 participants completed measures of insomnia, negative affect and paranoia. A subset of these participants (n = 91 went on to monitor their sleep objectively (using a portable sleep monitor made by Zeo for seven consecutive nights. Associations between objectively recorded sleep, negative affect, and paranoia were explored using linear regression.The findings supported a fully mediated model where self-reported delayed sleep onset, but not self-reported problems with sleep maintenance or objective measures of sleep, was directly associated with negative affect that, in turn, was associated with paranoia. There was no evidence of a direct association between delayed sleep onset or sleep maintenance problems and paranoia.Taken together, the findings point to an association between perceived (but not objective difficulties initially falling asleep (but not maintaining sleep and paranoid thinking; a relationship that is fully mediated by negative affect. Future research should seek to disentangle the causal relationships between sleep, negative affect, and paranoia (e.g., by examining the effect of an intervention using prospective designs that incorporate experience sampling. Indeed, interventions might profitably target (i perceived sleep quality, (ii sleep onset, and / or (iii emotion regulation as a route to reducing negative affect and, thus, paranoid thinking.

  10. A structural equation model of the relationship between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alexander J; Rowse, Georgina; Webb, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence points to relationships between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking. However, studies are needed to examine (i) whether negative affect mediates the relation between insomnia and paranoid thinking, (ii) whether different types of insomnia exert different effects on paranoia, and (iii) to compare the impact of objective and self-reported sleeping difficulties. Structural equation modelling was therefore used to test competing models of the relationships between self-reported insomnia, negative affect, and paranoia. n = 348 participants completed measures of insomnia, negative affect and paranoia. A subset of these participants (n = 91) went on to monitor their sleep objectively (using a portable sleep monitor made by Zeo) for seven consecutive nights. Associations between objectively recorded sleep, negative affect, and paranoia were explored using linear regression. The findings supported a fully mediated model where self-reported delayed sleep onset, but not self-reported problems with sleep maintenance or objective measures of sleep, was directly associated with negative affect that, in turn, was associated with paranoia. There was no evidence of a direct association between delayed sleep onset or sleep maintenance problems and paranoia. Taken together, the findings point to an association between perceived (but not objective) difficulties initially falling asleep (but not maintaining sleep) and paranoid thinking; a relationship that is fully mediated by negative affect. Future research should seek to disentangle the causal relationships between sleep, negative affect, and paranoia (e.g., by examining the effect of an intervention using prospective designs that incorporate experience sampling). Indeed, interventions might profitably target (i) perceived sleep quality, (ii) sleep onset, and / or (iii) emotion regulation as a route to reducing negative affect and, thus, paranoid thinking.

  11. A structural equation model of the relationship between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowse, Georgina; Webb, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence points to relationships between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking. However, studies are needed to examine (i) whether negative affect mediates the relation between insomnia and paranoid thinking, (ii) whether different types of insomnia exert different effects on paranoia, and (iii) to compare the impact of objective and self-reported sleeping difficulties. Method Structural equation modelling was therefore used to test competing models of the relationships between self-reported insomnia, negative affect, and paranoia. n = 348 participants completed measures of insomnia, negative affect and paranoia. A subset of these participants (n = 91) went on to monitor their sleep objectively (using a portable sleep monitor made by Zeo) for seven consecutive nights. Associations between objectively recorded sleep, negative affect, and paranoia were explored using linear regression. Results The findings supported a fully mediated model where self-reported delayed sleep onset, but not self-reported problems with sleep maintenance or objective measures of sleep, was directly associated with negative affect that, in turn, was associated with paranoia. There was no evidence of a direct association between delayed sleep onset or sleep maintenance problems and paranoia. Conclusions Taken together, the findings point to an association between perceived (but not objective) difficulties initially falling asleep (but not maintaining sleep) and paranoid thinking; a relationship that is fully mediated by negative affect. Future research should seek to disentangle the causal relationships between sleep, negative affect, and paranoia (e.g., by examining the effect of an intervention using prospective designs that incorporate experience sampling). Indeed, interventions might profitably target (i) perceived sleep quality, (ii) sleep onset, and / or (iii) emotion regulation as a route to reducing negative affect and, thus, paranoid thinking

  12. The role of experiential avoidance in paranoid delusions: an experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udachina, Alisa; Varese, Filippo; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Bentall, Richard P

    2014-11-01

    The study examined (1) the role of experiential avoidance (EA), conceptualized as intolerance towards aversive mental states, in paranoid delusions and (2) the mechanisms underlying EA. A 6-day prospective momentary assessment study. Paranoid patients (N = 41) were studied using the experience sampling method (ESM), a structured diary technique, assessing psychopathology and current context in daily life. The results showed that both low self-esteem and EA contributed to paranoid thinking. The relationship between low self-esteem and paranoia was partially mediated by EA and the relationship between EA and paranoia was partially mediated by low self-esteem. The detrimental effect of EA on self-esteem was more pronounced under high activity-related stress. Both EA and social stress were independently associated with low self-esteem. EA was associated with self-esteem instability. Our results implicate mental control strategies in the development of paranoia and are compatible with the attributional model of paranoia, which suggests that persecutory delusions arise as a result of dysfunctional attempts to avoid unpleasant thoughts about the self. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Clothiapine for acute psychotic illness: a meta-analysis | Carpenter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the effects of clothiapine, a dibenzothiazepine neuroleptic, for the management of acute psychosis. Methods: Six databases were searched, reference lists were inspected and relevant industry and authors contacted. Randomised clinical trials involving clothiapine for acute psychosis were identified ...

  14. An examination and appreciation of the dimensions of locus of control in psychosis: issues and relationships between constructs and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, C; Fleming, M P; Martin, C R

    2014-12-01

    Internal locus of control is associated with better psychological outcomes in comparison with external locus of control. Individuals experiencing a psychotic episode have a more external orientation, an externalizing bias for negative events and associations between paranoid delusions and external locus of control. The concept of multidimensional locus of control as measured by the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale may provide important information about the nature and course of psychotic symptoms. This narrative review explored the relationship between the orientation of locus of control and psychosis. Few studies have used the scale in samples with people experiencing psychotic symptoms and so there is limited evidence about the psychometric properties of the MHLC scale within this client group, although the findings from studies that have explored the properties of this tool in other groups suggest it could be a valuable instrument for use in psychosis. Further research is required to determine both the relationship between locus of control and psychosis in terms of therapeutic factors and outcome, and also the veracity of the MHLC scale as an instrument of choice in this group. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Virtual reality in the assessment and treatment of psychosis: a systematic review of its utility, acceptability and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus-Calafell, M; Garety, P; Sason, E; Craig, T J K; Valmaggia, L R

    2018-02-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been a rapid increase of studies testing the efficacy and acceptability of virtual reality in the assessment and treatment of mental health problems. This systematic review was carried out to investigate the use of virtual reality in the assessment and the treatment of psychosis. Web of Science, PsychInfo, EMBASE, Scopus, ProQuest and PubMed databases were searched, resulting in the identification of 638 articles potentially eligible for inclusion; of these, 50 studies were included in the review. The main fields of research in virtual reality and psychosis are: safety and acceptability of the technology; neurocognitive evaluation; functional capacity and performance evaluation; assessment of paranoid ideation and auditory hallucinations; and interventions. The studies reviewed indicate that virtual reality offers a valuable method of assessing the presence of symptoms in ecologically valid environments, with the potential to facilitate learning new emotional and behavioural responses. Virtual reality is a promising method to be used in the assessment of neurocognitive deficits and the study of relevant clinical symptoms. Furthermore, preliminary findings suggest that it can be applied to the delivery of cognitive rehabilitation, social skills training interventions and virtual reality-assisted therapies for psychosis. The potential benefits for enhancing treatment are highlighted. Recommendations for future research include demonstrating generalisability to real-life settings, examining potential negative effects, larger sample sizes and long-term follow-up studies. The present review has been registered in the PROSPERO register: CDR 4201507776.

  16. Influence of Family and Childhood Memories in the Development and Manifestation of Paranoid Ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Célia Barreto; da Motta, Carolina; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Peixoto, Ermelindo

    2016-09-01

    Several studies point out to the influence of social experiences on perceptions of the environment and others in cognitive functioning and different aspects of psychopathology. The current study aimed at studying the influence of the psychosocial risk factors in a mixed sample of participants from the general population and affected by paranoid schizophrenia. The extent to which the existence of negative life events and events that are threatening to the inner models of the self (i.e., history of maltreatment, physical, social or psychological abuse) or the memories of these traumatic events occurring during childhood are related to the existence of paranoid beliefs in adulthood was explored. Results suggested that memories of parental behaviours characterized by antipathy from both parental figures, submissiveness and bullying victimization were important predictors of paranoid ideation in adult life. This further emphasizes the need for understanding the family and social dynamics of people presenting paranoid ideations to the development of therapeutic interventions that can effectively reduce the invalidation caused by severe psychopathology, as is the case of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Memories of family dynamics characterized by behaviours of antipathy from both parental figures, submissiveness and bullying victimization are important predictors of paranoid ideation in adult life. The study highlights the importance of exploring subjective recalls of feelings and behaviours associated with early rearing experiences, peer relationships and themes related to social rank theory in the roots of internal models of relationship with the self and others in the general sample, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives. Our findings indicate that schizophrenic patients in active phase differ regarding memories of threat and submission and are more likely to remember childhood experiences perceived as

  17. Neurocognition and Duration of Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Evensen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of schizophrenia-spectrum patients exhibit a cognitive impairment at illness onset. However, the long-term course of neurocognition and a possible neurotoxic effect of time spent in active psychosis, is a topic of controversy. Furthermore, it is of importance to find out...

  18. Personality traits and psychotic symptoms in recent onset of psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla-Llewellyn-Jones, Julia; Cano-Domínguez, Pablo; de-Luis-Matilla, Antonia; Peñuelas-Calvo, Inmaculada; Espina-Eizaguirre, Alberto; Moreno-Kustner, Berta; Ochoa, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Personality in patients with psychosis, and particularly its relation to psychotic symptoms in recent onset of psychosis (ROP) patients, is understudied. The aims of this research were to study the relation between dimensional and categorical clinical personality traits and symptoms, as well as the effects that symptoms, sex and age have on clinically significant personality traits. Data for these analyses were obtained from 94 ROP patients. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were used to assess personality and symptoms. Correlational Analysis, Mann-Whitney test, and, finally, logistic regression were carried out. The negative dimension was higher in patients with schizoid traits. The excited dimension was lower for those with avoidant and depressive traits. The anxiety and depression dimension was higher for patients with dependent traits. The positive dimension was lower for patients with histrionic and higher for patients with compulsive traits. Logistic regression demonstrated that gender and the positive and negative dimensions explained 35.9% of the variance of the schizoid trait. The excited dimension explained 9.1% of the variance of avoidant trait. The anxiety and depression dimension and age explained 31.3% of the dependent trait. Gender explained 11.6% of the histrionic trait, 14.5% of the narcissistic trait and 11.6% of the paranoid trait. Finally gender and positive dimension explained 16.1% of the compulsive trait. The study highlights the importance of studying personality in patients with psychosis as it broadens understating of the patients themselves and the symptoms suffered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychoanalytic treatment of psychosis in institutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackie, Belinda S.

    2017-01-01

    Psychoanalysis can provide a conceptual foundation for the treatment of psychosis and for understanding how institutions that care for patients with psychosis function. The research of this thesis aims to examine theoretic, therapeutic and institutional approaches to psychosis. What is of significance is the priority that psychoanalysis places on the individual patient's treatment, how it is conceived psychoanalytically and incorporated in the overall organisation of an institution. Psychoan...

  20. Persecutory beliefs, attributions and theory of mind: comparison of patients with paranoid delusions, Asperger's syndrome and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jaime S; Hatton, Christopher; Craig, Fiona B; Bentall, Richard P

    2004-07-01

    Schizophrenia patients with persecutory delusions and patients with Asperger's syndrome were compared using two measures of theory of mind (ToM; the ability to infer mental states in other people), the Hints task, and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task, and a new measure of attributional style (style of inferring the causes of important events), the Attributional Style Structured Interview (ASSI). Paranoid beliefs were measured using Fenigstien and Vanable's Paranoia Scale (PS). The deluded group had the highest scores on the Paranoia Scale but the scores of the Asperger's group's were higher than those of the controls. Paranoid patients made more external-personal attributions for negative events than the Asperger's and control groups. Both the paranoid and Asperger's groups performed poorly on the ToM tasks compared to the controls. The findings support the hypothesis that both ToM and attributional abnormalities contribute to paranoid delusions. The lack of attributional abnormalities in the Asperger's group suggests that their low-level paranoid symptoms arise as a consequence of different mechanisms than those involved in psychotic delusions. Copyright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  1. The effect of unfavourable and favourable social comparisons on paranoid ideation: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascone, Leonie; Jaya, Edo S; Lincoln, Tania M

    2017-09-01

    Low social rank is associated with paranoia, but there is a lack of evidence for causality. We tested the effects of social comparisons on negative affect and paranoia with an online social rank paradigm, and whether striving to avoid inferiority or fears of social rejection moderated paranoid reactions. Female students (N = 172) were randomly exposed to one of two validated online profiles depicting a same-aged, high (unfavourable comparison) vs. low rank (favourable comparison) female student. Moderators were assessed at baseline. Social rank, anxiety, sadness and paranoia were assessed pre and post profile-exposure. There was a large effect of the experimental manipulation on social rank (p  0.38). Sadness was significantly altered (p = 0.016, η 2 partial  = 0.033). There were significant moderation effects between the experimental conditions and insecure striving (trend-level) as well as fears of rejection. Our findings may be biased (overestimation of effects) as students are likely to be more competitive compared to the general population. Our rank manipulations did not alter paranoia. This suggests that changes in the cognitive representation of social rank alone - without triggering a strong emotional response - do not suffice to evoke paranoia. Although our results do not support the notion that threats to social rank cause paranoid symptoms, they suggest that threats to social rank are more likely to trigger paranoid states in those who are insecure in regard to their social position. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fragmented attachments: the paranoid-schizoid experience of loss and persecution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waska, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The author discusses paranoid-schizoid patients who have yet to deal with whole-object depressive fears of harming one's object. Their paranoid-schizoid anxiety is more a combination of dread, paranoia, and fear of destroying one's object with neediness, envy, and other oral desires. In this part-self and part-object world, destruction is absolute. Ego functions and object relational capacities such as guilt and grief are not yet fully consolidated. The part-object is not only destroyed but is also equally capable of magically resurrecting itself to seek revenge. Fear of annihilation of the self and object, as well as desperate attempts at keeping each other alive, are the primary focus of this early anxiety state. These infantile fears are at the root of certain difficult treatment situations. Within the transition from paranoid-schizoid to depressive, the ego struggles with highly exaggerated and distorted fantasies of persecution, loss, and primitive guilt by resorting to crude and often self-destructive mechanisms. These include splitting, projective identification, and idealization. During the course of analytic treatment, three overlapping phases are distinguishable. Acting out is the main theme of early treatment. As this externalization of internal conflict is analyzed and contained, a second phase of intrapsychic struggle emerges. The patient exhibits a paralyzing battle between certain ego-object ties and the striving of a defensive death instinct. If the analytic relationship is able to withstand passage through these difficult phases, the patient begins to work through more core issues of persecutory loss and annihilation. Case material is used for illustration.

  3. IFNGR2 genetic polymorphism associated with sex-specific paranoid schizophrenia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemli, Achraf; Inoubli, Oumaima; Trifa, Fatma; Mechri, Anouar; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi; Jrad, Besma Bel Hadj

    2017-01-01

    Considering current scientific evidence about the significant role of chronic low grade inflammation in the physiopathology of schizophrenia, it has been hypothesized that changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon gamma may have a significant role in the predisposition to schizophrenia. This study focuses on identifying whether the functional polymorphism of interferon gamma receptor 2 (IFNGR2) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. This study was conducted by the RFLP-PCR on a Tunisian population composed of 225 patients with different sub-types of schizophrenia and 166 controls. The IFNGR2 (Q64R) polymorphism analysis showed higher frequencies of minor homozygous genotype (RR) and allele (R) in all patients compared to controls (21.8% vs 10.2%; p = .006, OR = 2.54) and (44% vs 34.9%; p = .01; OR = 1.46), respectively. This correlation was confirmed only for males. This study also noted a significant increase of the mutated homozygous (RR) genotype and (R) allele frequencies of IFNGR2 in paranoid schizophrenics compared to controls (31.4% vs 10.2%; p = .001; OR = 3.34 and 47.2% vs 34.9%; p = .009; OR = 1.66, respectively). This increase remains significant after using binary logistic regression to eliminate confounding factors such as age and sex. Additionally, carriers of RR genotype have significant lower scores on the Scale of Assessment of Positive (SAPS) and negative (SANS) symptoms comparatively to the carrier of the QQ + QR genotypes, suggesting that the R recessive allele carriers could have milder symptoms. The IFNGR2Q64R polymorphism is correlated with male sex and paranoid schizophrenia. It is suggested that a chronic neuroinflammation may predispose to the paranoid schizophrenia development in men.

  4. Treatment outlines for paranoid, schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders. The Quality Assurance Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Treatment outlines for paranoid, schizotypal and schizoid personality disorders were developed by having nominated experts consider their own views in the light of the treatment literature and the responses of practising psychiatrists. In the detailed recommendations it is clear that while patients with all three disorders often present for treatment in a crisis and often see no issue other than the resolution of the crisis, patients with schizoid personality disorder can use long-term psychotherapy to develop and change to the extent of no longer being handicapped.

  5. An investigation of the "jumping to conclusions" data-gathering bias and paranoid thoughts in Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänsch, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a data-gathering bias, in the form of jumping to conclusions, and links to paranoid ideation was investigated in Asperger syndrome (AS). People with AS (N = 30) were compared to a neurotypical control group (N = 30) on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes and the Beads tasks, with self-report measures of depression, general anxiety, social anxiety, self-consciousness and paranoid ideation. The AS group performed less well than the control group on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task with regard to accuracy but responded more quickly and tended to make decisions on the basis of less evidence on the Beads Task with 50 % demonstrating a clear 'jumping to conclusions bias', whereas none of the control group showed such a bias. Depression and general anxiety were associated with paranoid ideation but not data-gathering style, which was contrary to expectation.

  6. Paranoid, moi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Ole; Løhmann Stephensen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    film analytical approaches based on Moore’s 1989 debut Roger & Me is used evaluate the aesthetic and conceptual coherence in Bonds work.     Following this, a three-part taxonomy for the analytical and normative understand of the surveillance phenomenon and its socio-cultural and political implications...... approach to Bonds film determine problematic weaknesses in his project. Bond tends to invest more in cracking the ‘formula’ for a successful presentation of his material, than discovering new formalistic or analytical territory in the filmic exposure of current surveillance culture. ...

  7. Paranoid, moi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Ole; Stephensen, Jan Løhmann

    2013-01-01

    The authors research the ways in which surveillance discourse and studies on surveillance phenomena manifest itself in mainstream documentary filmmaking. The subject of this critical case study is David Bond’s Erasing David (2010), a hybrid documentary which aesthetics and conceptual roots...... are clearly embedded in the tradition of Michael Moore’s subjective, populist filmmaking. Pedersen and Stephenson’s critical analysis of Bond’s documentary follows issues of both the form and the problematic way in which surveillance was represented and conceptualized by the filmmaker. In order to articulate...... their reservations they introduce a typology of discoursed and critical perspectives dominating the ways in which surveillance phenomena is usually introduced. The authors ask about the character of interrelations between documentary cinema (artistic practice), surveillance (social practice), and academic discourses...

  8. Disorders of working memory and selected cognitive processes inpatients treated for paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Giętkowski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Already since the times of Baddeley and Hitch the dorsolateral part of the frontal lobe was regarded as the function‑ al centre of the working memory. Working memory disorders are, on the other hand, one of the basic and consoli‑ dated disorders in the course of paranoid schizophrenia. The concept of neurodevelopmental schizophrenia com‑ bines these elements and associates the illness with the changes occurring in the brain in the prenatal period. The efficiency of the working memory system, which acts as a buffer manipulating with the possessed and inflowing information, influences the quality of other cognitive processes, such as long‑term memory, short‑term memory, con‑ centration and thinking. A study was performed on two groups: one experimental consisting of 31 people suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and one control group of 31 healthy people. In both groups a replica of Wisconsin Card Sorting Task was used in order to measure the efficiency of the working memory and selected tests from WAIS‑R (PL: the Polish adaptation of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale to assess the functioning of concentration, memory and thinking. The results of the study showed that in the experimental group the efficiency of the working memory is very low and that the illness affects the performance of concentration, memory and thinking. Moreover the tests proved that the working memory disorder increases with time.

  9. Chronic non-fatal Datura abuse in a patient of paranoid schizophrenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanra, Sourav; Khess, C R J; Srivastava, Naveen

    2015-04-01

    A range of psychoactive substances used by patients suffering from schizophrenia varies and may include those which are fatal and may cause serious toxicity leading to death. We here present a case report of a patient suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, who was abusing Datura stramonium over a prolonged period. A 32 year old male presented with aggressive behaviour, irritability for 6 years and regular intake of Datura seeds for 3 years. After taking detailed history and mental status examination (MSE), diagnoses of paranoid schizophrenia and mental and behavioral disorder due to use of hallucinogen were made. He had shown improvement on standard treatment with antipsychotics. D. stramonium is recognized among emerging new psychoactive substances being used across the world. Among various theories we discuss self-medication hypothesis as a mediating factor for this case. Though D. stramonium is notorious for its life threatening sequelae, clinicians should be aware of its chronic abuse as self-medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistent paranoid delusions following the September 11 terrorist attacks in a man with no pre-existing mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Roy R; Beddingfield, John J

    2006-03-01

    The effects of modern day terrorism on mental health are not well understood. Described here is a 51-year-old male with no pre-existing mental illness who developed paranoid delusions related to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks shortly after they occurred. After about two years of treatment with quetiapine the patient was no longer delusional about terrorism but experienced extensive paranoid delusions about commonly encountered persons, requiring treatment which continues to the current time. Clinicians should be aware of the possible impact of terrorist activities on the mental health of vulnerable individuals.

  11. Treatment emergent psychosis associated with mirtazapine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    tic serotonergic 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 antagonist.Tianeptine differs from. Correspondence: Prof L Sevincok email:lsevincok@hotmail.com. ABSTRACT. Psychosis, in vulnerable individuals, may emerge on anti - depressant treatment. Treatment emergent psychosis is reported with two newer generation antidepressants.

  12. Apathy in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evensen, Julie; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Barder, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored.......Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored....

  13. Alternative psychosis (forced normalisation) in epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy who undergo unilateral anterior temporal lobectomy have been observed to develop a de novo psychosis with diminished seizures. This is thought to be an alternative psychosis related to forced normalisation of the EEG.8,12-14. The absence of clear diagnostic criteria for ...

  14. Alternative psychosis (forced normalisation) in epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    depression and psychosis. If anticonvulsants have recently been changed, this should ... psychosis with thought disorder, delusions, hallucinations. • significant mood change, mania/hypomania or depression ... He denied smoking cannabis or taking any other illicit substance. There was a positive family history of epilepsy, ...

  15. Obstetric Characteristics and Management of Patients with Postpartum Psychosis in a Tertiary Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Shehu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postpartum psychosis is the most severe and uncommon form of postnatal affective illness. It constitutes a medical emergency. Acute management emphasizes hospitalization to ensure safety, antipsychotic medication adherence, and treatment of the underlying disorder. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the obstetric characteristics and management of patients with postpartum psychosis in a tertiary centre in North-Western Nigeria. Methodology. This was a 10-year retrospective study. Records of the patients diagnosed with postpartum psychosis from January 1st, 2002, to December 31st, 2011, were retrieved and relevant data extracted and analyzed using the SPSS for Windows version 16.0. Results. There were 29 cases of postpartum psychosis giving an incidence of 1.1 per 1000 deliveries. The mean age of the patients was 20.6 ± 4 years. Twelve (55% were primiparae, 16 (72.7% were unbooked, and 13 (59% delivered at home. All had vaginal deliveries at term. There were 12 (52.2% live births, and 11 (47.8% perinatal deaths and the fetal sex ratio was equal. The most common presentation was talking irrationally. Conclusion. There is need for risk factor evaluation for puerperal psychosis during the antenatal period especially in primigravidae and more advocacies to encourage women to book for antenatal care in our environment.

  16. Anatomía de una confusión: error diagnóstico de patología paranoide en víctimas de mobbing Anatomia de uma confusão: erro diagnóstico de patologia paranoide em vítimas de mobbing Anatomy of a misunderstanding: wrong diagnosis of paranoid pathology in victims of mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Martínez-Hernáez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Diversas investigaciones subrayan el alto riesgo de error diagnóstico de trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad entre víctimas de mobbing o acoso psicológico en el trabajo (APT. OBJETIVO: Analizar hasta qué punto los síntomas asociados con el mobbing son confundidos con criterios de dos nosologías del espectro paranoide (trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad. MÉTODOS: Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica desde 1990 hasta Junio de 2009 en PubMed y SciELO. RESULTADOS: La identificación de síntomas del espectro paranoide en las víctimas de mobbing no resulta consistente con la literatura que, en cambio, indica una fuerte presencia de síntomas del espectro del estrés postraumático (hasta el 92%, aunque no se cumpla el criterio A1 de esta nosología. Se apuntan algunas causas del error diagnóstico, tales como la tendencia a confundir hipervigilancia (criterio D4 del trastorno por estrés postraumático en el DSM-IV-TR con ideación paranoide, la existencia de un perfil defensivo en las víctimas de APT y la falta de reconocimiento por parte de los clínicos del impacto estresante y traumatizante del mobbing. CONCLUSIÓN: Se requieren investigaciones longitudinales y mixtas (cualitativos/cuantitativos para establecer criterios robustos de diagnóstico diferencial entre las manifestaciones clínicas asociadas al mobbing y los síntomas paranoides.CONTEXTO: Diversos estudos evidenciam o alto risco de erro diagnóstico de transtorno delirante e transtorno da personalidade paranoide entre as vítimas de mobbing ou assédio psicológico no trabalho (APT. OBJETIVO: Analisar a associação dos sintomas atribuídos ao mobbing com os critérios de duas nosologias do grupo paranoide (transtorno delirante e transtorno da personalidade paranoide. MÉTODOS: Realiza-se uma revisão bibliográfica de 1990 a junho de 2009 em PubMed e SciELO. RESULTADOS: A identificação de sintomas paranoides em

  17. What is a psychosis and where is it located?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2008-06-01

    pruning of excitatory synapses. Silent spots are the result of insufficient fill-in mechanisms following a breakdown of circuitry. They may affect the SMA in the case of very late puberty. An acute reduction in excitation and concomitantly a marked increase in silent spots might lead to an acute psychosis. A frontal preference is likely, given that a reduction might occur anywhere in the cortex, but particularly in the areas maturing latest. The varying localisations probably explain the difficulty in accepting schizophrenia as a disease entity. The multifactorial inheritance of the dichotomy implies that the genetics are not fate, a psychotic development might be prevented given enough epigenetic factors: brain food (omega 3). Might the present dietary adversity, with its lack of brain food, be responsible for a rising incidence in psychosis? A psychosis is an understandable and preventable dysfunction of the brain, and its mechanisms are known. Primarily a disorder of reduced excitation in an attenuated CNS, this explains why all the neuroleptics are convulsants, raising excitation, in contrast to all antidepressives, which are anti-epileptic.

  18. Early psychosis workforce development: Core competencies for mental health professionals working in the early psychosis field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Helen; Jorm, Anthony F; Killackey, Eoin; Francey, Shona; Mulcahy, Dianne

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this study was to identify the core competencies required of mental health professionals working in the early psychosis field, which could function as an evidence-based tool to support the early psychosis workforce and in turn assist early psychosis service implementation and strengthen early psychosis model fidelity. The Delphi method was used to establish expert consensus on the core competencies. In the first stage, a systematic literature search was conducted to generate competency items. In the second stage, a panel consisting of expert early psychosis clinicians from around the world was formed. Panel members then rated each of the competency items on how essential they are to the clinical practice of all early psychosis clinicians. In total, 1023 pieces of literature including textbooks, journal articles and grey literature were reviewed. A final 542 competency items were identified for inclusion in the questionnaire. A total of 63 early psychosis experts participated in 3 rating rounds. Of the 542 competency items, 242 were endorsed as the required core competencies. There were 29 competency items that were endorsed by 62 or more experts, and these may be considered the foundational competencies for early psychosis practice. The study generated a set of core competencies that provide a common language for early psychosis clinicians across professional disciplines and country of practice, and potentially are a useful professional resource to support early psychosis workforce development and service reform. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Too paranoid to see progress: Social psychology is probably liberal, but it doesn't believe in progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winegard, Bo; Winegard, Benjamin; Geary, David C

    2015-01-01

    We agree with Duarte et al. that bias in social psychology is a serious problem that researchers should confront. However, we are skeptical that most social psychologists adhere to a liberal progress narrative. We suggest, instead, that most social psychologists are paranoid egalitarian meliorists (PEMs). We explain the term and suggest possible remedies to bias in social psychology.

  20. Prediction of Somatization on the Basis of Self-steem, Insomnia and Paranoid Thoughts in University Students

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    Farhad Ghadiri Sourman Abadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Somatization is a somatoform disorder, which medical examinations are not able to explain its reason. In the present research, the role of self-esteem, insomnia, and paranoid thoughts was investigated in somatization disorder. Methods: This descriptive and correlational study was conducted on all students studying at University of Tabriz in the academic year 2014-2015. A total of 270 subjects were selected using stratified random sampling method. In this research, Eysenck Self-Esteem Inventory, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, Somatization Questionnaire (PHQ-15, and Green et al. Paranoid Thought Scales (GPTS were used. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis tests. Results: Correlation results indicated that somatization disorder has a significant positive relationship with paranoid thoughts and insomnia and a significant negative relationship with self-esteem. Also, based on the results of multiple regression analysis, Insomnia Index had the greatest ability to predict somatization disorder. Conclusion: The findings of this research revealed that factors, such as insomnia, paranoid thoughts, and low self-esteem should be considered in the treatment of somatization disorder.

  1. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  2. Catha edulis chewing effects on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb El-Sayed MI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed-I Kotb El-Sayed, Hatem-K Amin Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Helwan University, Ain Helwan, Helwan, Cairo, Egypt Background: The current study’s aim is to evaluate the possible interaction effects of khat chewing on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients.Patients and methods: In the study group, 42 male subjects suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and were classified according to their khat chewing habits into two subgroups: either khat-chewer subgroup (SKc; n=21; r=11, h=10 or non-khat-chewer subgroup (SNKc; n=21, r=11, h=10. Each subgroup was further subdivided according to type of treatment into r (risperidone and h (haloperidol. Healthy male subjects (37 were subdivided into healthy khat-chewer as positive controls (HKc, n=17 and healthy non-khat-chewer as negative controls (HNKc, n=20. Plasma dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were estimated.Results: ANOVA and post hoc analysis showed that dopamine was illustrating significant elevation in all khat chewing groups. DOPAC was illustrating significant decrease in all khat chewing groups with an interesting outcome showing significant increase in DOPAC in SNKcr group due to risperidone effect. Homovanillic acid, serotonin, hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and norepinephrine were illustrating significant elevations in all khat chewing groups. Epinephrine was illustrating significant elevation in all chewers than non-chewers groups. Unexpected significant decrease in epinephrine in the SNKcr group indicated that risperidone drug is decreasing epinephrine through indirect mechanism involving calcium.Conclusion: Khat chewing in schizophrenic patients is contraindicated because it aggravates the disease symptoms, attenuates all used treatment medications, and deteriorates all biochemical markers of the patients. Keywords

  3. Neurolépticos en el tratamiento de la esquizofrenia paranoide del paciente hospitalizado Neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of paranoid squizophrenia in the hospitalizad patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismary González Hernánde

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio de utilización de medicamentos: indicación-prescripción, con elementos de consumo y consecuencias prácticas en el Hospital Psiquiátrico de Santa Clara durante el año 2006. Se elaboró un formulario con datos como: edad, sexo, tiempo de evolución, neurolépticos usados, estadía hospitalaria y precio de los medicamentos por unidad. Se propuso describir el uso de neurolépticos en el manejo de la esquizofrenia paranoide del paciente hospitalizado, contrastar el número de neurolépticos utilizados según estadía hospitalaria y tiempo de evolución, así como los costos del tratamiento en estos pacientes. El análisis se realizó mediante pruebas paramétricas y no paramétricas, con un nivel de significación de 0,01 ó 0,05. Como resultados relevantes se observaron que los fármacos usados con mayor frecuencia fueron flufenacina y clorpromacina. La combinación más empleada resultó ser la flufenacina y clorpromacina. El grupo de pacientes con más de 63 días de estadía hospitalaria, mostró el más alto gasto promedio en medicamentos. Se concluyó que los neurolépticos más utilizados fueron la flufenacina, la clorpromacina y el levomepromacina. Existe asociación entre el número de neurolépticos utilizados y el tiempo de evolución de la enfermedad. La estadía hospitalaria constituye el indicador que más encareció la terapéutica del paciente esquizofrénico.A drug use evaluation study that considered prescription, consumption elements and practical consequences was carried out in the Psychiatric Hospital of Santa Clara city in Villa Clara province during 2006. A form to collect data such as age, sex, time of evolution, neuroleptic drugs used, stay at hospital and price of drug per unit was made. The objective was to describe the use of neuroleptic drugs in the management of paranoid squizophrenia of the hospitalized patient, to compare the number of neuroleptic drugs that was used according to stay at

  4. The relationship between paranoia and aggression in psychosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrell-Berry, Hannah; Berry, Katherine; Bucci, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Aggression in the context of schizophrenia has significant detrimental personal, clinical and societal implications. Whilst understanding the precise pathways to aggression in people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia is critical for risk management and treatment, these pathways remain unclear. A paranoid belief that others intend harm is one psychotic symptom that might contribute to aggressive behaviours. This is the first review to investigate the relationship between paranoia and aggression in psychosis. A systematic review of published literature pertinent to the relationship between paranoia and aggression was conducted. A search of online databases from inception to November 2014 was performed with keywords related to 'schizophrenia', 'paranoia' and 'aggression'. Fifteen studies, primarily cross-sectional in design (n=9), met eligibility criteria. Studies reviewed showed mixed support for an association between paranoia and aggression in both inpatients and community settings. However, when study quality was taken into account, more methodologically rigorous studies tended to show a positive association between factors. Mixed findings are most likely due to important methodological shortcomings, including heterogeneous samples and studies using a diverse range of aggression/violence measures. In light of methodological limitations of individual studies reviewed, further investigation of the relationship between paranoia and aggression in psychosis using robust methodology is needed before definitive clinical recommendations regarding the hypothesised relationship between paranoia and aggression can be made. This paper sets out key recommendations for future studies, including operationalizing the specific components of aggression and paranoia under investigation and methods to delineate important mediators in the paranoia and aggression relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anatomía de una confusión: error diagnóstico de patología paranoide en víctimas de mobbing

    OpenAIRE

    Ángel Martínez-Hernáez; Leticia Medeiros-Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXTO: Diversas investigaciones subrayan el alto riesgo de error diagnóstico de trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad entre víctimas de mobbing o acoso psicológico en el trabajo (APT). OBJETIVO: Analizar hasta qué punto los síntomas asociados con el mobbing son confundidos con criterios de dos nosologías del espectro paranoide (trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad). MÉTODOS: Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica desde 1990 hasta Junio de 2009 ...

  6. Long term functioning in early onset psychosis: Two years prospective follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Ghada RA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There were few studies on the outcome of schizophrenia in developing countries. Whether the outcome is similar to or different from developed world is still a point for research. The main aim of the current study was to know if patients with early onset non affective psychosis can behave and function properly after few years from start of the illness or not. Other aims included investigation of possible predictors and associated factors with remission and outcome. Method The study prospectively investigated a group of 56 patients with onset of psychosis during childhood or adolescence. Diagnosis made according to DSM-IV criteria and included; schizophrenia, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified and acute psychosis. Severity of psychosis was measured by PANSS. Measures of the outcome included; remission criteria of Andreasen et al 2005, the children's global assessment scale and educational level. Results Analysis of data was done for only 37 patients. Thirty patients diagnosed as schizophrenia and 7 with Psychotic disorder not otherwise specified. Mean duration of follow up was 38.4 +/- 16.9 months. At the end of the study, 6 patients (16.2% had one episode, 23(62.1% had multiple episodes and 8 (21.6% continuous course. Nineteen patients (51.4% achieved full remission, and only 11(29.7% achieved their average educational level for their age. Twenty seven percent of the sample had good outcome and 24.3% had poor outcome. Factors associated with non remission and poor outcome included gradual onset, low IQ, poor premorbid adjustment, negative symptoms at onset of the illness and poor adherence to drugs. Moreover, there was tendency of negative symptoms at illness start to predict poor outcome. Conclusion Some patients with early onset non affective psychosis can behave and function properly after few years from the start of the illness. Although remission is a difficult target in childhood psychosis, it is still achievable.

  7. A Transdiagnostic Network Approach to Psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, Johanna T. W.; de Vos, Stijn; Wichers, Marieke; van Os, Jim; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A.

    Our ability to accurately predict development and outcome of early expression of psychosis is limited. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying psychopathology, a broader, transdiagnostic approach that acknowledges the complexity of mental illness is required. The upcoming network paradigm may be

  8. Methamphetamine psychosis, the efficacy of atypical antipsychotics

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    Amir Rezaei Ardani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide growing methamphetamine abuse is one of the most serious health problems with several different consequences for victims, especially in developing countries. Chronic methamphetamine abuse is associated with several psychiatric problems in all countries which are faced to epidemic methamphetamine abuse. Methamphetamine-induced psychosis is a major medical challenge for clinical practitioner from both diagnostic and therapeutic viewpoints. Stimulant psychosis commonly occurs in people who abuse stimulants, but it also occurs in some patients taking therapeutic doses of stimulant drugs under medical supervision. The main characteristic of meth psychosis is the presence of prominent hallucinations and delusions. Other drugs, such as cocaine and marijuana, can trigger the onset of psychosis in someone who is already at increased risk because they have “vulnerability”.The current literature review attends to explain several aspects of MIP epidemiologically and clinically. Investigators proposed pharmacologically treatment based on recently published data.

  9. An exploration of emotion regulation in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Karen; Harper, Sean; Gillanders, David

    2009-01-01

    The emotional experience of individuals who experience psychosis has historically been neglected, possibly due to the divide between the psychoses and neuroses. This study examined emotional experience and regulation in individuals who had experienced psychosis, individuals experiencing anxiety or mood disorders, and non-patient controls. Participants completed validated measures of emotional experience and emotion regulation. Both clinical groups were found to experience similar levels of emotions, and in comparison to the non-patient controls, they experienced greater levels of negatively valenced emotions and lower levels of happiness. Both clinical groups also used similar emotion regulation strategies, and in comparison to non-patient controls, they used significantly more dysfunctional and less functional strategies, suggesting that the emotional experience and emotion regulation strategies of people who have experienced psychosis are more similar to non-psychotic disorders than have previously been thought to be the case. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. *Individuals with psychosis experience similar emotions as individuals with anxiety and mood disorders, namely more unhappiness, fear and less happiness. *People with psychosis attempt to regulate these emotions in similar ways to people with mood and anxiety problems, by using more dysfunctional emotional regulation strategies such as ruminating. *Clinicians may want to pay closer attention to assessing the emotion regulation strategies of those who experience psychosis and consider the implications of these in therapy. *They may also want to consider the role emotional dysregulation may play in the development, maintenance and course of psychosis. *An emotion regulation approach to psychosis may be characterised by focussing on emotional experiences and the individual's response to these, as opposed to psychotic symptoms.

  10. [Clinic and psychotherapy of psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimano, Alberto L

    2009-01-01

    Even though Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis share the idea that the basic characteristic of psychosis is a disorder of the relation with reality, the difference is that for psychoanalysis said relation is libidinal, which means that it is essentially based on the object relation. According to these grounds, psychoanalysis considers that psychotic symptoms make sense beyond the deficit and dysfunction, a meaning to be understood through the subject's history. This conception of reality, which includes both the external reality and the psychic one, also determines a specific psychotherapeutic approach as long as the purpose is not "verifying" the external reality, but containing and eventually analysing the psychic reality. There are clinical examples that show the primary failure in the relation with reality and the use of Projective Identification to be deposited into the therapist.

  11. Postpartum psychosis and the courts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Melissa L; McNiel, Dale E; Binder, Renée L

    2012-01-01

    Although mental state defenses frequently are raised in cases of infanticide, legal criteria for these defenses vary across jurisdictions. We reviewed outcomes of such cases in states using M'Naughten or model penal code (MPC) standards for insanity, and the factors considered by the courts in reaching these decisions. LexisNexis and Westlaw searches were conducted of case law, legal precedent, and law review articles related to infanticide. Google and other Internet search engines were used to identify unpublished cases. Despite the differing legal standards for insanity among states, the outcomes of infanticide cases do not appear to be dependent solely on which standard is used. The presence of psychosis was important in the successful mental state defenses. This case series suggests that states that use the stricter M'Naughten standard have not been less likely than states with an MPC standard to adjudicate women who have committed infanticide as not guilty by reason of insanity.

  12. Early intervention services in psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, Claudio; Nordentoft, Merete; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Early intervention (EI) in psychosis is a comprehensive and evidence-based approach aimed at detection and treatment of psychotic symptoms in their early stages. This paper presents core features and noteworthy aspects of the evidence basis and limitations of EI, the importance of programme ....... Wider dissemination of EI services will probably benefit from better integration of potential funders, promotion of joint targets and shared financial or budgetary incentives....... overcome these difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Funding for mental health in general and for EI services appears low relative to need. One key argument for better funding for EI can be found in its favourable cost-effectiveness, but not all stakeholders beyond mental health administrators are aware of this...

  13. [Brain imaging of first-episode psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardri, R

    2013-09-01

    In the last decades, schizophrenia has intensively been studied using various brain imaging techniques. However, several potential confounding factors limited their interpretation power (e.g. chronicity, the impact of antipsychotic medication). By considering psychosis as a continuum of changes starting from mild cognitive impairments to serious psychotic symptoms, it became possible to provide deeper insight in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the onset of psychosis by focusing on at-risk individuals and first-episodes. Recent brain imaging meta-analyses of the first episode psychosis (FEP), noteworthy reported conjoint bilateral structural and functional differences at the level of the insula, the superior temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, encompassing the anterior cingulate cortex. In the present review, we thus provide an update of brain imaging studies of FEP with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, functional and molecular explorations. Specifically, we provide 1) a review of the common features observed in individuals with high risk for psychosis and changes characterizing the transition to psychosis, 2) a description of the environmental and drug factors influencing these abnormalities, 3) how these findings in FEP may differ from those observed in chronic individuals with schizophrenia, and 4) a short overview of new classification algorithms able to use MRI findings as valuable biomarkers to guide early detection in the prodromal phase of psychosis. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  14. Brave new worlds--review and update on virtual reality assessment and treatment in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Moritz, Steffen; van der Gaag, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, virtual reality (VR) research on psychotic disorders has been initiated. Several studies showed that VR can elicit paranoid thoughts about virtual characters (avatars), both in patients with psychotic disorders and healthy individuals. Real life symptoms and VR experiences were correlated, lending further support to its validity. Neurocognitive deficits and difficulties in social behavior were found in schizophrenia patients, not only in abstract tasks but also using naturalistic virtual environments that are more relevant to daily life, such as a city or encounters with avatars. VR treatments are conceivable for most dimensions of psychotic disorders. There is a small but expanding literature on interventions for delusions, hallucinations, neurocognition, social cognition, and social skills; preliminary results are promising. VR applications for assessment and treatment of psychotic disorders are in their infancy, but appear to have a great potential for increasing our understanding of psychosis and expanding the therapeutic toolbox. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Morbid risk of schizophrenia for relatives of patients with cannabis-associated psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, P K; Jones, P; Harvey, I; Williams, M; McGuffin, P; Murray, R M

    1995-05-01

    Twenty-three patients admitted with acute psychosis who were cannabis positive on urinary screening were each matched, with respect to sex, with two psychotic controls who screened negatively for all substances. The lifetime morbid risk of psychiatric disorder was estimated among the first degree relatives of cases and controls, using RDC-FH criteria to define diagnoses, and Weinberg's shorter method of age correction. The cases had a significantly greater familial morbid risk of schizophrenia (7.1%) than the controls (0.7%), while the risks of other psychoses, and of non-psychotic conditions were similar. The same pattern of familial risk was evident when the analysis was restricted to patients with DSM-III schizophrenia. The data suggest that the development or recurrence of acute psychosis in the context of cannabis use may be associated with a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia.

  16. Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share your story Mental Illness ADHD Anxiety Disorders Autism Bipolar Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Depression Dissociative Disorders Eating Disorders Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Schizoaffective Disorder Schizophrenia Related Conditions Anosognosia Dual ...

  17. Insight dimensions and cognitive function in psychosis: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta Victor

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that lack of insight is significantly associated with cognitive disturbance in schizophrenia. This study examines the longitudinal relationships between insight dimensions and cognitive performance in psychosis. Methods Participants were 75 consecutively admitted inpatients with schizophrenia, affective disorder with psychotic symptoms or schizoaffective disorder. Assessments were conducted at two time points during the study: at the time of hospital discharge after an acute psychotic episode and at a follow-up time that occurred more than 6 months after discharge. A multidimensional approach of insight was chosen and three instruments for its assessment were used: the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD, three items concerning insight on the Assessment and Documentation in Psychopathology (AMDP system and the Insight and Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire. The neuropsychological battery included a wide range of tests that assessed global cognitive function, attention, memory, and executive functions. Results After conducting adequate statistical correction to avoid Type I bias, insight dimensions and cognitive performance were not found to be significantly associated at cross-sectional and longitudinal assessments. In addition, baseline cognitive performance did not explain changes in insight dimensions at follow-up. Similar results were found in the subset of patients with schizophrenia (n = 37. The possibility of a Type II error might have increased due to sample attrition at follow-up. Conclusion These results suggest that lack of insight dimensions and cognitive functioning may be unrelated phenomena in psychosis.

  18. An Investigation of the "Jumping to Conclusions" Data-Gathering Bias and Paranoid Thoughts in Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänsch, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a data-gathering bias, in the form of jumping to conclusions, and links to paranoid ideation was investigated in Asperger syndrome (AS). People with AS (N = 30) were compared to a neurotypical control group (N = 30) on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes and the Beads tasks, with self-report measures of depression, general anxiety,…

  19. Association of the IFN-γ (+874A/T) Genetic Polymorphism with Paranoid Schizophrenia in Tunisian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemli, Achraf; Eshili, Awatef; Trifa, Fatma; Mechri, Anouar; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi; Juckel, George; Tensaout, Besma Bel Hadj Jrad

    2017-02-01

    Since growing evidence suggests a significant role of chronic low-grade inflammation in the physiopathology of schizophrenia, we have hypothesized that functional genetic variant of the IFN gamma (IFN-γ; +874A/T; rs2430561) gene may be involved in the predisposition to schizophrenia. This research is based on a case-control study which aims to identify whether polymorphism of the IFN-γ gene is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. The RFLP-PCR genotyping of the IFN-γ gene was conducted on a Tunisian population composed of 218 patients and 162 controls. The IFN-γ (+874A/T) polymorphism analysis showed higher frequencies of minor homozygous genotype (TT) and allele (T) in all patients compared with controls (11.5 vs. 4.9%; p = 0.03, OR = 2.64 and 30.7 vs. 24.1%, p = 0.04, OR = 1.4, respectively). This correlation was confirmed for male but not for female patients. Also, the T allele was significantly more common among patients with paranoid schizophrenia when compared with controls (25.8 vs. 4.9%, p = 0.0001; OR = 6.7). Using the binary regression analysis to eliminate confounding factors as age and sex, only this last association remained significant (p = 0.03; OR = 1.76, CI = 1.05-2.93). In conclusion, our results showed a significant association between +874A/T polymorphism of IFN-γ and paranoid schizophrenia, suggesting that this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or another at proximity could predispose to paranoid schizophrenia. Since the minor allele of this polymorphism was correlated with an increased expression of their product, our study validates the hypothesis of excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine in the physiopathology of paranoid schizophrenia.

  20. Disease biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with first-onset psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T-J Huang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychosis is a severe mental condition that is characterized by a loss of contact with reality and is typically associated with hallucinations and delusional beliefs. There are numerous psychiatric conditions that present with psychotic symptoms, most importantly schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and some forms of severe depression referred to as psychotic depression. The pathological mechanisms resulting in psychotic symptoms are not understood, nor is it understood whether the various psychotic illnesses are the result of similar biochemical disturbances. The identification of biological markers (so-called biomarkers of psychosis is a fundamental step towards a better understanding of the pathogenesis of psychosis and holds the potential for more objective testing methods. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry was employed to profile proteins and peptides in a total of 179 cerebrospinal fluid samples (58 schizophrenia patients, 16 patients with depression, five patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, ten patients with Alzheimer disease, and 90 controls. Our results show a highly significant differential distribution of samples from healthy volunteers away from drug-naïve patients with first-onset paranoid schizophrenia. The key alterations were the up-regulation of a 40-amino acid VGF-derived peptide, the down-regulation of transthyretin at approximately 4 kDa, and a peptide cluster at approximately 6,800-7,300 Da (which is likely to be influenced by the doubly charged ions of the transthyretin protein cluster. These schizophrenia-specific protein/peptide changes were replicated in an independent sample set. Both experiments achieved a specificity of 95% and a sensitivity of 80% or 88% in the initial study and in a subsequent validation study, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the application of modern proteomics techniques, particularly mass

  1. [PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AS A WAY OF CORRECTING MOTIVATIONAL COMPONENTS IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH ABDOMINAL OBESITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of motivational and targeted psychoeducational programs designed for patients with paranoid schizophrenia with abdominal obesity. We observed 34 women aged 18-42 with continuous-flow type paranoid schizophrenia. All patients had a concomitant abdominal obesity, which developed secondarily after long-term administration of second generation antipsychotic medications (at least 1 year). Based on clinical-psychopathological and psychometric methods of assessment and on the analysis of Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire we have developed modules for psychoeducational programs. Based on the results of the treatment we conclude that the application of psychoeducational programs is an effective component of complex treatment of patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Abdominal obesity should be regarded as an important and the main side effect of long-term therapy with atypical antipsychotic medications. It has a marked negative effect on subjective assessment of patients and decreases the level of their mental and social adaptation. This factor should be the basis for the formation of re-socialization and compliance-oriented actions.

  2. Evidence from paranoid schizophrenia for more than one component of theory of mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Peter; Achim, André; Léveillé, Edith; Boisseau, Emilie; Stip, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported finding that performance was impaired on four out of five theory of mind (ToM) tests in a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (pScz), relative to a non-clinical group of 29 individuals (Scherzer et al., 2012). Only the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test did not distinguish between groups. A principal components analysis revealed that the results on the ToM battery could be explained by one general ToM factor with the possibility of a latent second factor. As well, the tests were not equally sensitive to the pathology. There was also overmentalization in some ToM tests and under-mentalisation in others. These results led us to postulate that there is more than one component to ToM. We hypothesized that correlations between the different EF measures and ToM tests would differ sufficiently within and between groups to support this hypothesis. We considered the relationship between the performance on eight EF tests and five ToM tests in the same diagnosed and non-clinical individuals as in the first study. The ToM tests shared few EF correlates and each had its own best EF predictor. These findings support the hypothesis of multiple ToM components. PMID:26579026

  3. Can interpersonal hypersensitivity under subconscious condition explain paranoid symptom in schizophrenia?

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    Zhu, Yikang; Yang, Zhi; Zhao, Jinping; Li, Ting; Wang, Meijuan; Qian, Jie; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Jijun; Weng, Xuchu; Yu, Dehua; Li, Chunbo

    2017-06-01

    Interpersonal hypersensitivity is often observed in schizophrenia and has been associated with psychopathological deficits in schizophrenia. Here, we investigated dysfunctions of interpersonal information processing in schizophrenia at both conscious and subconscious levels. The experiment included 143 schizophrenia patients and 59 healthy controls. A continuous flashing suppression approach based on binocular rivalry was employed, which included two modes: invisible (subconscious) and visible (conscious). The accuracy and reaction time of a Gabor patch direction-detection task were assessed under three types of stimuli in both modes: images with no person (type 1), images with two to three noncommunicating persons (type 2), and images with more than three communicating individuals (type 3). In the visible mode, the accuracy of the Gabor patch direction-detection task in the case group was significantly lower than in the control group for the third type of stimuli (P = 0.015). In the invisible mode, however, the accuracy was higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.037). The response time difference of the Gabor patch direction-detection task for the third type of images in the invisible mode was negatively correlated with the duration of the illness (P = 0.008). These findings suggest that schizophrenia patients exhibit attentional bias to interpersonal interaction behaviors at both conscious and subliminal levels but toward opposite directions. Our findings shed light on the subconscious deficits under the paranoid symptom in schizophrenia. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Facial emotion linked cooperation in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: a test on the Interpersonal Communication Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wai S; Yan Lu; Bond, Alyson J; Chan, Raymond Ck; Tam, Danny W H

    2011-09-01

    Patients with schizophrenia consistently show deficits in facial affect perception and social behaviours. It is illusive to suggest that these deficits in facial affect perception cause poor social behaviours. The present research aims to study how facial affects influence ingratiation, cooperation and punishment behaviours of the patients. Forty outpatients with paranoid schizophrenia, 26 matched depressed patients and 46 healthy volunteers were recruited. After measurement of clinical symptoms and depression, their facial emotion recognition, neurocognitive functioning and the facial affects dependent cooperative behaviour were measured using a modified version of Mixed-Motive Game. The depressed control group showed demographic characteristics, depression levels and neurocognitive functioning similar to the schizophrenic group. Patients with schizophrenia committed significantly more errors in neutral face identification than the other two groups. They were significantly more punitive on the Mixed-Motive Game in the neutral face condition. Neutral face misidentification was a unique emotion-processing deficit in the schizophrenic group. Their increase in punitive behaviours in the neutral face condition might confuse their family members and trigger more expressed emotion from them, thus increasing the risk of relapse. Family members might display more happy faces to promote positive relationships with patients.

  5. Long-lasting changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognition in an animal model of NMDA receptor dysfunction in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescholleck, Valentina; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2013-11-01

    It is postulated that disruptions of glutamatergic signalling may underlie the pathophysiology of psychosis and schizophrenia. A strong body of evidence indicates that antagonism of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) leads to similar molecular, cellular, cognitive and behavioural changes in rodents and/or humans to those that have been identified to occur in psychosis. One of the main loci of change appears to comprise the hippocampus, raising the question as to whether changes in hippocampal glutamatergic transmission may drive changes in GABAergic and dopaminergic-mediated signalling in schizophreniform diseases. NMDAR antagonists such as MK801, PCP and ketamine all elicit similar psychosis-related effects, with MK801 inducing the most potent psychotomimetic reactions. Treatment with MK801 is associated with a loss of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, hippocampus-dependent learning and cognitive deficits. These findings have raised the question as to whether targeting the NMDA receptors or its modulators could prove an effective strategy in treatment of psychosis and schizophrenia. Specifically, the otherwise untreatable negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia currently comprise the highest research priority. A single injection with MK801 has been used to emulate first-episode psychosis in animals. This treatment induces both psychosis-related acute effects but interestingly also persisting consequences, which might be more sensitive as indicators of drug efficacy. Here, we review the current status of the field with regard to the MK801 animal model of first-episode psychosis and its relevance for the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, we argue that synaptic plasticity may be a better assay for assessing novel schizophrenia therapeutics than behavioural evaluation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Glutamate Receptor-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The dynamics of attachment insecurity and paranoid thoughts: An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitko, Katarzyna; Varese, Filippo; Sellwood, William; Hammond, Amy; Bentall, Richard

    2016-12-30

    It has been proposed that insecure attachment can have adverse effects on the course of psychosis once symptoms have emerged. There is longitudinal evidence that increased insecure attachment is associated with increased severity of psychotic symptoms. The present study examined whether in the flow of daily life attachment insecurity fluctuates, whether elevated stress precedes the occurrence of attachment insecurity, and whether elevated attachment insecurity precedes the occurrence of paranoia. Twenty clinical participants with a psychosis-spectrum diagnosis and twenty controls were studied over six consecutive days using the experience sampling method (ESM). The findings revealed that fluctuations in attachment insecurity were significantly higher in the clinical group, that elevated stress predicted a subsequent increase in attachment insecurity, and that elevated attachment insecurity predicted a subsequent increase in paranoia; this effect was not observed in auditory hallucinations once co-occurring symptoms were controlled for. Finally, although previous ESM studies have shown that low self-esteem precedes the occurrence of paranoia, attachment insecurity continued to predict paranoia even when self-esteem was controlled for. The findings suggest that attachment security may be associated with a lower risk of paranoia, and that psychological interventions should address attachment beliefs and work towards establishing a sense of attachment security. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Do paranoid delusions exist on a continuum with subclinical paranoia? A multi-method taxometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, A; Perez Algorta, G; Varese, F; McIntyre, J C; Bentall, R P

    2017-12-01

    There is widespread interest in whether psychosis exists on a continuum with healthy functioning. Previous research has implied that paranoia, a common symptom of psychosis, exists on a continuum but this has not been investigated using samples including both patients and non-patients and up-to-date taxometric methods. To assess the latent structure of paranoia in a diverse sample using taxometric methods. We obtained data from 2836 participants, including the general population as well as at-risk mental state and psychotic patients using the P-scale of the Paranoia and Deservedness Scale. Data were analysed using three taxometric procedures, MAMBAC, MAXEIG and L-MODE (Ruscio, 2016), and two sets of paranoia indicators (subscales and selected items from the P scale), including and excluding the patient groups. Eleven of the twelve analyses supported a dimensional model. Using the full sample and subscales as indicators, the MAMBAC analysis was ambiguous. Overall, the findings converged on a dimensional latent structure. A dimensional latent structure of paranoia implies that the processes involved in sub-clinical paranoia may be similar to those in clinical paranoia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sustained attention in psychosis: Neuroimaging findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepede, Gianna; Spano, Maria Chiara; Lorusso, Marco; De Berardis, Domenico; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Gambi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    To provide a systematic review of scientific literature on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on sustained attention in psychosis. We searched PubMed to identify fMRI studies pertaining sustained attention in both affective and non-affective psychosis. Only studies conducted on adult patients using a sustained attention task during fMRI scanning were included in the final review. The search was conducted on September 10th, 2013. 15 fMRI studies met our inclusion criteria: 12 studies were focused on Schizophrenia and 3 on Bipolar Disorder Type I (BDI). Only half of the Schizophrenia studies and two of the BDI studies reported behavioral abnormalities, but all of them evidenced significant functional differences in brain regions related to the sustained attention system. Altered functioning of the insula was found in both Schizophrenia and BDI, and therefore proposed as a candidate trait marker for psychosis in general. On the other hand, other brain regions were differently impaired in affective and non-affective psychosis: alterations of cingulate cortex and thalamus seemed to be more common in Schizophrenia and amygdala dysfunctions in BDI. Neural correlates of sustained attention seem to be of great interest in the study of psychosis, highlighting differences and similarities between Schizophrenia and BDI. PMID:24976929

  9. Acute psychotic disorders induced by topiramate: report of two cases Episódio psicótico agudo induzido por topiramato: relato de dois casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florindo Stella

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on two epileptic patients who developed acute psychosis after the use of topiramate (TPM. One patient exhibited severe psychomotor agitation, heteroaggressiveness, auditory and visual hallucinations as well as severe paranoid and mystic delusions. The other patient had psychomotor agitation, depersonalization, derealization, severe anxiety and deluded that he was losing his memory. Both patients had to be taken to the casualty room. After interruption of TPM in one patient and reduction of dose in the other, a full remission of the psychotic symptoms was obtained without the need of antipsychotic drugs. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of development of acute psychotic symptoms in patients undergoing TPM treatment.Relatamos dois pacientes epilépticos que manifestaram quadro psicótico agudo induzido por topiramato (TPM. Um paciente apresentou agitação psicomotora grave, heteroagressividade, alucinações auditivas e visuais, e delírios de conteúdo paranóide e místico. O outro paciente apresentou agitação psicomotora, despersonalização, desrealização, ansiedade intensa e delírio de que estava perdendo a memória. Ambos os pacientes foram conduzidos ao serviço de emergência e, após a interrupção do TPM em um deles e redução da droga em outro, houve remissão total dos sintomas psicóticos sem necessidade de medicação antipsicótica. Alertamos os clínicos para o risco de surgimento de sintomas psicóticos em pacientes em uso do TPM.

  10. [Risk factors of schizophrenia development in patients with amphetamines dependence and psychosis (amphetamine-induced psychosis and schizophrenia), and without psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta; Mirek, Marta; Pawełczyk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Amphetamine and its derivates can induce, usually after many intoxications, schizophrenia-like psychosis. These disorders appeared only in part patients with amphetamine dependence. Aim of the study was to establish prevalence of selective risk factors of schizophrenia development in amphetamine users: 1) with amphetamine-induced schizophrenia-like psychosis, 2) with schizophrenia, and 2) without psychotic symptoms. In the study 3 groups of subjects were included: 30 amphetamine users with amphetamine induced schizophrenia-like psychosis, 30 amphetamine users with schizophrenia and 30 amphetamine users without psychotic symptoms (37 female and 53 male in mean age = 17.78 years). Amphetamine dependence, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis induced amphetamine were diagnosed according to ICD-10 criteria after at least 1 year of amphetamine abstinence. The next procedure was used: 1) Structured interview with subjects and their mothers/caregivers regarding: a) amphetamines use (duration of abuse, doses of psychoactive substance) b) family history of psychosis (especially schizophrenia) 2) The Questionnaire of Child Development for assessment of prevalence of selected risk factors of schizophrenia development 3) The Premorbid Adjustment Scale (Cannon--Spoor) for assessment of premorbid psychosocial functioning in thelast year before psychosis. Amphetamines users with amphetamine-induced psychosis were more similar in prevalence of selective risk factors of schizophrenia development to subjects with schizophrenia and amphetamine dependence than to amphetamine users without psychosis. Amphetamine-induced psychosis developed more frequently in amphetamine users who used higher amphetamine doses and with familial history of psychosis.

  11. Parenting in children and adolescents with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Sharma, I; Bhatia, M S

    2014-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms appear in children and adolescents in the most crucial years, during the individual's career development. The challenges faced by parents of psychotic children are in dealing with their disruptive behaviours, negative symptoms, cognitive deficits, delusions and hallucinations. This paper presents an overview of the childhood psychosis and how parenting can be done effectively for this population. Articles were retrieved from the Medline, Cochrane database, Google Scholar, Medscape; using the search terms 'parenting and childhood psychosis', and 'childhood psychoses; and standard textbooks were consulted. Educating parents how to recognize early symptoms, explaining treatment adherence, side effects of medications along with non-pharmacological measures like dealing with expressed emotions, lowering expectations, enhancing social supports, healthy lifestyle, and making patients independent. Awareness, early identification and effective parenting for psychosis may help bridge the wide gap between scarce skilled mental health professionals, inefficient resources and large paediatric population.

  12. WELLFOCUS PPT: Modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Simon; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline that has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying well-being rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g., strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savoring) are not emphasized in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The goal in modifying PPT is to develop a new clinical approach to helping people experiencing psychosis. An evidence-based theoretical framework was therefore used to modify 14-session standard PPT into a manualized intervention, called WELLFOCUS PPT, which aims to improve well-being for people with psychosis. Informed by a systematic review and qualitative research, modification was undertaken in 4 stages: qualitative study, expert consultation, manualization, and stake-holder review. The resulting WELLFOCUS PPT is a theory-based 11-session manualized group therapy. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. ['Steroid psychosis' during treatment for premature labour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Myrthe I M E; de Jong, Mark H; Derksen, Marees Th; Van Gool, Arthur R

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman, 33 weeks pregnant, without a significant psychiatric history, was admitted for treatment of premature labour. She was treated with betamethasone intramuscularly, with a total dose of 24 mg divided over 2 days, and nifedipine orally with beneficial effect on the contractions. However, within 24 h after completion of tocolytic treatment, she developed a psychosis with delusions and hallucinations necessitating readmission, first to an obstetric ward, later to a psychiatric ward. At least part of this episode may be characterized as delirium. Eventually, she was treated with haloperidol. It is argued that her psychosis was caused by the corticosteroid, since psychiatric disturbance is a well-known complication of corticosteroid therapy. To our knowledge, psychosis during pregnancy as a result of treatment with corticosteroids has not been reported previously.

  14. Social, familial and psychological risk factors for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevlin, Mark; McElroy, Eoin; Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    A broad range of biological, genetic, environmental, and psychological riskfactors for psychosis have been reported. However most research studies have tended to focus on one explanatory factor. The aim of this study wasto use data from a large Danish birth cohort to examine the associationsbetween...... psychosis and a broad range of familial (advanced paternal age, family dissolution, parental psychosis), environmental (urbanicity,deprivation) and psychological factors (childhood adversity). Findings indicated that all types of risk factors were significantly associated with psychosis. In conclusion......, large scale cohort studies using the Danish registry system is a powerful way of assessing the relative impact ofdifferent risk factors for psychosis....

  15. Pharmacological management of psychosis in elderly patients with parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Mehrul; Vieweg, W Victor R; Baron, Mark S; Beatty-Brooks, Mary; Fernandez, Antony; Pandurangi, Anand K

    2009-07-01

    Parkinsonism is a characteristic feature of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies and is commonly seen in Alzheimer's disease. Psychosis commonly appears during the course of these illnesses. Treatment of parkinsonism with antiparkinsonian medications constitutes an additional risk factor for the appearance or worsening of psychosis. Conversely, treatment of psychosis with antipsychotic drugs in patients with parkinsonism might worsen the underlying movement disorder, especially in the elderly. In this article, we review parkinsonian conditions in the elderly and offer guidelines to assess and manage comorbid psychosis. We focus on the pharmacologic management of psychosis with atypical antipsychotic medications and briefly review the role of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  16. [Acute psychotic disorders related to bupropion: review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javelot, T; Javelot, H; Baratta, A; Weiner, L; Messaoudi, M; Lemoine, P

    2010-12-01

    associated with buproprion appear after an average of 10 days of 300 mg/d bupropion intake. In about two third of cases, the patients have no history of psychiatric conditions. In one third of cases, they have a history of thymic disorders. In our review, auditory, visual or cenaesthetic hallucinations frequently occur (85% of the reported cases), and are sometimes characterized by single episodes and/or are rationalized. Some of them occur along with delusional episodes (mystical, paranoid, etc.). The patients are restless, confused, but seldom exhibit dissociative and thymic symptoms. From an aetiopathogenic, clinical and evolutive standpoint, buproprion-induced psychotic episodes share many similarities with acute organic or toxic psychosis (notably induced by amphetamines). The hypothesis of a dopaminergic hyper-reactivity should be analyzed. Moreover, most of these patients were taking other medication, and the possibility of a dopaminergic potentialization prior to buproprion intake could be suggested. In such cases, bupropion should be discontinued and complete remission is expected within an average of 10 days. Even though neuroleptic drugs are still frequently used in these cases, benzodiazepines could become a valid alternative, according to the model of amphetamine-induced acute psychosis. Copyright © 2010 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. MMPI-2 restructured form over-reporting scales in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdon, Scot E; Purser, Stacey M; Goddard, Kim M

    2011-07-01

    MMPI-2-RF over-reporting scales for physical, cognitive, or psychological symptoms were examined in 130 consecutive referrals to a first-episode psychosis (FEP) clinic. Although acutely ill upon presentation, consistent and responsive profiles were obtained in 79% of the sample. There was no indication of under-reporting on defensive scales, and anticipated elevations were observed on clinical scales sensitive to thought disorder, ideas of persecution, and aberrant experiences. The Infrequent Somatic (Fs), Symptom Validity Scale (FBS-r), and Response Bias (RBS) scales did not indicate somatic or cognitive over-reporting, but the Infrequent Psychopathology Scale (Fp-r) showed a moderate elevation that may suggest a propensity for over-reporting or an effect of clinical symptoms on the over-reporting scale. Clinician ratings of positive symptoms of psychosis were related to the Fp-r. Although the over-reporting classifications with the RBS were relatively low, RBS scores were directly related to positive and general symptoms of psychosis. The MMPI-2-RF appears to have clinical value in an acutely ill FEP sample. The sample was not prone to over-reporting pathology, but associations between both the Fp-r and the RBS with clinical symptoms will warrant further investigation.

  18. Ethical and Epidemiological Dimensions of Labeling Psychosis Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2016-06-01

    The past two decades have marked an increase in research on the prodromal stages of schizophrenia that precede a first episode of psychosis. Criteria for a clinical high risk (CHR) state for psychosis have been validated and included in the DSM-5 as the attenuated psychosis syndrome and as requiring further study. This was hotly debated, given the concern of stigmatizing young people who would receive this psychosis risk label. In this article, I review ethical issues related to the psychosis risk label, including the potential harm of stigma and paternalism if risk labels are withheld in the context of the observed low predictive power of the psychosis risk designation. I review data that supports that the psychosis risk label need not be harmful, and could even confer benefit, and set out strategies for reducing stigma through individualized risk assessment and public health education. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. ISSN 2376-6980.

  19. [Psychosis and addiction: The evidence cemetery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Stéphane; Lalonde, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The comorbidity between psychosis and substance use has attracted wide attention over the years, and a vast literature is now available for meta-analytic treatment. In the field, a majority of authors assume that cannabis smoking is a risk factor for psychosis, that substance abuse is highly prevalent in schizophrenia, that substance abuse worsens the prognosis of schizophrenia, and that integrated treatments have greater efficacy than treatment-as-usual for this complex population. The objective of the current article is to review the meta-analyses that have been published in the comorbidity field in order to determine if the above-mentioned assumptions are substantiated by evidence or not. Methods A search of the literature was performed using PubMed, PsycINFO and EMBASE. The literature search retrieved a total of 25 systematic quantitative reviews, addressing the following issues: etiology, age at onset, prevalence rates, cognition, treatment, as well as psychiatric, neurologic and functional outcomes. Results Evidence shows that the prevalence of tobacco smoking, cannabis smoking and alcohol use is elevated in psychosis. However, this prevalence is likely to be over-estimated since studies have been performed in clinical settings rather than the general population. Reliable evidence also suggests that cannabis smoking is a risk factor for psychosis outcomes. However, the association is rather small and it remains difficult to draw an unequivocal public health message from this literature. In the same vein, evidence suggests that cannabis smoking is associated with an earlier age at onset of psychosis. However, this observation is derived from cross-sectional studies, not longitudinal ones; thus, no undisputable claims on causality can be made from them. On clinical grounds, some evidence also suggests that substance use is associated with self-harm, increased positive and depressive symptoms in psychosis patients, but this evidence is derived from

  20. Time-lagged moment-to-moment interplay between negative affect and paranoia: new insights in the affective pathway to psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ingrid; Simons, Claudia J P; Wigman, Johanna T W; Collip, Dina; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Wichers, Marieke

    2014-03-01

    Evidence suggests that affect plays a role in the development of psychosis but the underlying mechanism requires further investigation. This study examines the moment-to-moment dynamics between negative affect (NA) and paranoia prospectively in daily life. A female general population sample (n = 515) participated in an experience sampling study. Time-lagged analyses between increases in momentary NA and subsequent momentary paranoia were examined. The impact of childhood adversity, stress sensitivity (impact of momentary stress on momentary NA), and depressive symptoms on these time-lagged associations, as well as associations with follow-up self-reported psychotic symptoms (Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised) were investigated. Moments of NA increase resulted in a significant increase in paranoia over 180 subsequent minutes. Both stress sensitivity and depressive symptoms impacted on the transfer of NA to paranoia. Stress sensitivity moderated the level of increase in paranoia during the initial NA increase, while depressive symptoms increased persistence of paranoid feelings from moment to moment. Momentary paranoia responses to NA increases were associated with follow-up psychotic symptoms. Examination of microlevel momentary experience may thus yield new insights into the mechanism underlying co-occurrence of altered mood states and psychosis. Knowledge of the underlying mechanism is required in order to determine source and place where remediation should occur.

  1. Prepartum Psychosis and Neonaticide: Rare Case Study and Forensic-Psychiatric Synthesis of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasi, Maria-Valeria; Markopoulou, Maria; Tentes, Ioannis K; Tsikouras, Panagiotis N; Vasilikos, Epameinondas; Pavlidis, Pavlos

    2017-07-01

    Peripartum psychosis is a rare but serious psychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of a mood episode with psychotic features. Although controversy surrounds the nosological status of peripartum mental disorders, these conditions continue to be of exceptional interest to the medical and forensic mental health communities. The aim of this study was to report a rare case of prepartum psychosis which escalated to the endpoint of neonaticide and summarize literature on peripartum mental disorders and infanticide. A 30-year-old mother murdered her newborn with the spike of her serum delivery system and planned to commit suicide while in hospital after hallucinating due to an acute puerperal psychotic disorder with a prepartum onset and postpartum deterioration. Her disorder was not managed until neonaticide. Throughout this paper, the significance of a multidisciplinary approach for the optimal management of these incidents is highlighted and diagnostic as well as therapeutic issues are addressed. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. PROP1 gene mutations in a 36-year-old female presenting with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgesh Prasad Chaudhary

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Combined pituitary hormonal deficiency (CPHD is a rare disease that results from mutations in genes coding for transcription factors that regulate the differentiation of pituitary cells. PROP1 gene mutations are one of the etiological diagnoses of congenital panhypopituitarism, however symptoms vary depending on phenotypic expression. We present a case of psychosis in a 36-year-old female with congenital panhypopituitarism who presented with paranoia, flat affect and ideas of reference without a delirious mental state, which resolved with hormone replacement and antipsychotics. Further evaluation revealed that she had a homozygous mutation of PROP1 gene. In summary, compliance with hormonal therapy for patients with hypopituitarism appears to be effective for the prevention and treatment of acute psychosis symptoms.

  3. Psychological treatments for psychosis: history and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Silke; Resch, Franz; Mundt, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    This article is part of the ISPS (International Society for the Psychological Treatment of the Schizophrenias and other Psychoses) task force report on the PORT (Patients Outcome Research Team) recommendations for treatment of schizophrenia. It reviews psychological treatment approaches in psychosis to date and assesses recent trends. The most influential therapies have been psychoanalytic/psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral (CBT), and supportive therapy.

  4. Mental health nursing and first episode psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dusseldorp, L. van; Goossens, P.J.J.; Achterberg, T. van

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to identify mental health nursing's contribution to the care and treatment of patients with a first episode of psychosis; A systematic literature review was undertaken, with 27 articles selected for study. Five domains were identified: development of

  5. Dexamethasone induced psychosis presenting with catatonic features

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    corticosteroids, there are however, few reported cases of catatonia due to steroids. A literature search revealed very few articles written on catatonia due to steroids. We report a case of apparent dexamethasone induced psychosis presenting with features of catatonia. B.O, a 20year old female undergraduate in Nigeria, was.

  6. Dexamethasone induced psychosis presenting with catatonic features

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disorders, delirium and anxiety disorders due to use of corticosteroids, there are however, few reported cases of catatonia due to steroids. A literature search revealed very few articles written on catatonia due to steroids. We report a case of apparent dexamethasone induced psychosis presenting with features of catatonia.

  7. Predictors of recovery in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen; Mors, Ole; Secher, Rikke Gry

    2013-01-01

    Recovery, the optimal goal in treatment, is the attainment of both symptomatic and functional remission over a sustained period of time. Identification of factors that promote recovery can help develop interventions that facilitate good outcomes for people with first episode psychosis....

  8. The traumagenic neurodevelopmental model of psychosis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, John; Fosse, Roar; Moskowitz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    of this paper, therefore, is to summarize the literature on biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis published since 2001. A comprehensive search for relevant papers was undertaken via Medline, PubMed and psycINFO. In total, 125 papers were identified...

  9. First-episode psychosis: An update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birchwood M, Iqbal Z, Chadwick P, Trower P. Cognitive approach to depression and suicidal thinking in psychosis. 1. Ontogeny of post-psychotic depression. Br J Psychiatry. 2000; 177: 516-521. 23. Oosthuizen P, Emsley RA, Roberts MC, et al. Depressive symptoms at baseline predict fewer negative symptoms at follow-up ...

  10. Reasons for increased substance use in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Lynsey; Barrowclough, Christine; Haddock, Gillian

    2007-05-01

    Around half of all patients with schizophrenia are thought to abuse drugs or alcohol and there is good evidence to suggest that they have poorer outcomes than their non substance using counterparts. However, despite more than twenty years of research there is still no consensus on the aetiology of increased rates of substance use in people with psychosis. There is a clear need to understand the reasons for such high rates of substance use if treatments designed to help patients abstain from substance use are to be successful. This paper provides an update of the literature examining the reasons for substance use by people with psychosis, and includes a comprehensive review of the self report literature. The main theories as to why people with psychosis use substances are presented. There is evidence to suggest that cannabis may have a causal role in the development of psychopathology but not for other substances. The self report literature provides support for an 'alleviation of dysphoria' model of substance use but there is little empirical support for the self medication hypothesis, or for common factor models and bidirectional models of comorbidity. It is likely that there are multiple risk factors involved in substance use in psychosis and more work to develop and test multiple risk factor models is required.

  11. Childhood and later life stressors and psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie J. Roper

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of psychosis consists of a complex integration of several risk factors including genetic vulnerability, adverse life events and trauma, and substance use. This review discusses the current theories of the genesis of psychosis, with an emphasis on the importance of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs and later life events. ACEs in particular have a profound impact on an individual’s health later in life; and specifically, those who have experienced ACEs are at an increased risk for psychosis. In addition, stressful life events later in life may be relevant for onset and relapse of psychotic episodes. Associations between types of life adversity and specific symptomatology of a psychotic episode have also been suggested. A multi-factorial approach is suggested for linking genetic and environmental contributors to the onset of psychosis. This approach may have an advantage over a purely bio-medical model by focusing less on disability and more on underlying contributors that may be responsive to intervention.

  12. Primary psychosis and Borna disease virus infection in Lithuania: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliunaite, Violeta; Steibliene, Vesta; Bode, Liv; Podlipskyte, Aurelija; Bunevicius, Robertas; Ludwig, Hanns

    2016-11-03

    The hypothesis that microbial infections may be linked to mental disorders has long been addressed for Borna disease virus (BDV), but clinical and epidemiological evidence remained inconsistent due to non-conformities in detection methods. BDV circulating immune complexes (CIC) were shown to exceed the prevalence of serum antibodies alone and to comparably screen for infection in Europe (DE, CZ, IT), the Middle East (IR) and Asia (CN), still seeking general acceptance. We used CIC and antigen (Ag) tests to investigate BDV infection in Lithuania through a case-control study design comparing in-patients suffering of primary psychosis with blood donors. One hundred and six acutely psychotic in-patients with no physical illness, consecutively admitted to the regional mental hospital, and 98 blood donors from the Blood Donation Centre, Lithuania, were enrolled in the study. The severity of psychosis was assessed twice, prior and after acute antipsychotic therapy, by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). BDV-CIC and Ag markers were tested once after therapy was terminated. What we found was a significantly higher prevalence of CIC, indicating a chronic BDV infection, in patients with treated primary psychosis than in blood donor controls (39.6 % vs. 22.4 %, respectively). Free BDV Ag, indicating currently active infection, did not show significant differences among study groups. Higher severity of psychosis prior to treatment was inversely correlated to the presence of BDV Ag (42.6 vs. 34.1 BPRS, respectively; p = 0.022). The study concluded significantly higher BDV infection rates in psychotic than in healthy Lithuanians, thus supporting similar global trends for other mental disorders. The study raised awareness to consider the integration of BDV infection surveillance in psychiatry research in the future.

  13. Validation of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC in a naturalistic sample of 278 patients with acute psychosis and agitation in a psychiatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Luis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide use of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC in a clinical setting to assess agitated patients, a validation study to evaluate its psychometric properties was missing. Methods Data from the observational NATURA study were used. This research describes trends in the use of treatments in patients with acute psychotic episodes and agitation seen in emergency departments. Exploratory principal component factor analysis was performed. Spearman's correlation and regression analyses (linear regression model as well as equipercentile linking of Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S, Agitation and Calmness Evaluation Scale (ACES and PANSS-EC items were conducted to examine the scale's diagnostic validity. Furthermore, reliability (Cronbach's alpha and responsiveness were evaluated. Results Factor analysis resulted in one factor being retained according to eigenvalue ≥1. At admission, the PANSS-EC and CGI-S were found to be linearly related, with an average increase of 3.4 points (p Conclusions The factorial analyses confirm the unifactorial structure of the PANSS-EC subscale. The PANSS-EC showed a strong linear correlation with rating scales such as CGI-S and ACES. PANSS-EC has also shown an excellent capacity to detect real changes in agitated patients.

  14. A case of Hashimoto`s encephalopathy presenting with seizures and psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Joo Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE is a rare, poorly understood, autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased anti-thyroid antibody levels. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HE and briefly review the literature. The patient presented with acute mental changes and seizures, but no evidence of infectious encephalitis. In the acute stage, the seizures did not respond to conventional antiepileptic drugs, including valproic acid, phenytoin, and topiramate. The clinical course was complicated by the development of acute psychosis, including bipolar mood, insomnia, agitation, and hallucinations. The diagnosis of HE was supported by positive results for antithyroperoxidase and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Treatment with methylprednisolone was effective; her psychosis improved and the number of seizures decreased. HE is a serious but curable, condition, which might be underdiagnosed if not suspected. Anti-thyroid antibodies must be measured for the diagnosis. HE should be considered in patients with diverse neuropsychiatric manifestations.

  15. [EEG frequency and regional properties in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: effects of positive and negative symptomatology prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V K; Kirenskaya, A V; Tkachenko, A A; Samylkin, D V; Novototsky-Vlasov, V Yu; Kovaleva, M E

    2015-01-01

    EEG changes in schizophrenic patients are caused by a multitude of factors related to clinical heterogeneity of the disease, current state of patients, and conducted therapy. EEG spectral analysis remains an actual methodical approach for the investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of the disease. The goal of the investigation was the study of frequency and regional EEG correlating with the intensity of productive and negative disorders. Models of summary prevalence of positive/negative disorders and evidence of concrete clinical indices of the PANSS scale were used. Spectral characteristics of background EEG in the frequency range of 1-60 Hz were studied in 35 patients with paranoid schizophrenia free from psychoactive medication and in 19 healthy volunteers. It was established that the main index of negative symptomatology in summary assessment was diffuse increase of spectral power of gamma and delta ranges. Deficient states with the predominance of volitional disorders were characterized by a lateralized increase of spectral power of beta-gamma ranges in the left hemisphere, and of delta range - in frontal areas of this hemisphere. Positive symptomatology was noticeably less reflected in EEG changes than negative ones. An analysis of psychopathological symptom complexes revealed the significance of spatially structured EEG patterns in the beta range: for the delusion disturbances with psychic automatism phenomena - in frontal areas of the left hemisphere, and for the paranoid syndrome with primary interpretative delusion - in cortical areas of the right hemisphere.

  16. SNP8NRG433E1006 NEUREGULIN-1 GENETIC VARIATION IN BATAKS ETHNIC WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID AND HEALTHY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmeida Effendy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The neuregulin 1 (NRG1 gene which influences the development of white matter connectivity has been associated with schizophrenia. It influences neuronal migration, synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, neuron-glia communication, myelination, and neurotransmission in the brain and others. NRG1 is located in 8p13, and it is frequently replicated in schizphrenia. SNP8NRG433E1006 gene NRG1 is one of core at risk haplotype of schizphrenia. This study looked forward differences SNP8NRG433E1006 neuregulin 1 between Bataks ethnic with schizophrenia paranoid and Bataks ethnic healthy control. Methods: Batak ethnic with schizophrenia paranoid were recruited and interviewed with semi-structured MINI ICD-X to establish the diagnosis. All the eligible subjects were requested their permission for blood sampling. Healthy Batak ethnic were also recruited by mathcing the age and gender. The blood samples went through DNA isolation, Nested PCR, and DNA sequencing. Results: Ninety three subjects were recruited, but only 74 blood samples were succesfully sequenced. We found three types of polymorphisms, i.e. G/A allele at base pair (bp 76, G/T allele at bp 112, and deletion at bp 110 in Batak ethnic with schizophrenia. There were two kind sequences at bp 113-116 in Batak ethnics, and Batak ethnics with ATCG were at higher risk for having schizophrenia. This study support that NRG1 is a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene.

  17. Demographic features and premorbid personality disorder traits in relation to age of onset and sex in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokou, Maria; Gourzis, Philippos

    2014-03-30

    Personality disorders in the premorbid period of schizophrenia and particularly in relation to age of onset and sex, seem to be a rather under-researched area. In the present study, 88 patients with paranoid schizophrenia were examined, regarding demographic characteristics and premorbid personality disorder traits, in order to investigate for differences in the premorbid period of the disease, in relation to age of onset and sex. Age cutoff points were set at personality disorder traits were retrospectively assessed by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-Patient Edition for Axis II disorders (SCID-II). Comparisons were performed by applying the two-tailed Wilcoxon rank-sum and the χ(2) statistical tests. Young onset patients were characterized by significantly higher proportion of urban birth, single status, more avoidant premorbid personality disorder traits, and less passive-aggressive premorbid personality disorder traits, than late onset counterparts. Differences were more prominently shown in men. Earlier age of onset seems to be associated to increased social inhibition and worse psychosocial adaptation in the premorbid period of paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mental models and language registers in the psychoanalysis of psychosis: an overview of a thirteen-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Riccardo

    2003-08-01

    The author suggests that the use of mental models and language registers may help an analysis to proceed, especially in psychosis, when the patient has not yet developed a mental space that will allow him/her the functions of knowledge and containment of emotions. Models, according to Bion, are a primitive approach to abstraction and a manifestation of the analyst's reverie that enables him/her to transform sense data into alpha-elements. Ferrari, in a further development of Bion's theories, hypothesises a relationship between the transference and the internal level of body-mind communication, and proposes the use of language registers to sustain the psychoanalytic process. The author presents several clinical examples from a thirteen-year, four-session-a-week analysis of a psychotic analysand who was initially confused, paranoid and altogether unable to bring self-reflective thought to bear on her overwhelming emotions and had, by the end of the analysis, completely recovered from her psychotic symptoms. The clinical material shows how the technical tools of mental models and language registers helped in the construction of a mental space and spatio-temporal parameters, permitting the patient to tolerate overwhelming concrete emotions and finally to recognise and work through the emotions of an intense transference.

  19. Cannabidiol inhibits THC-elicited paranoid symptoms and hippocampal-dependent memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Amir; Morrison, Paul D; Nottage, Judith; Hague, Dominic; Kane, Fergus; Bonaccorso, Stefania; Stone, James M; Reichenberg, Avi; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Holt, David; Feilding, Amanda; Walker, Lucy; Murray, Robin M; Kapur, Shitij

    2013-01-01

    Community-based studies suggest that cannabis products that are high in Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) but low in cannabidiol (CBD) are particularly hazardous for mental health. Laboratory-based studies are ideal for clarifying this issue because THC and CBD can be administered in pure form, under controlled conditions. In a between-subjects design, we tested the hypothesis that pre-treatment with CBD inhibited THC-elicited psychosis and cognitive impairment. Healthy participants were randomised to receive oral CBD 600 mg (n=22) or placebo (n=26), 210 min ahead of intravenous (IV) THC (1.5 mg). Post-THC, there were lower PANSS positive scores in the CBD group, but this did not reach statistical significance. However, clinically significant positive psychotic symptoms (defined a priori as increases ≥ 3 points) were less likely in the CBD group compared with the placebo group, odds ratio (OR)=0.22 (χ²=4.74, pTHC paranoia, as rated with the State Social Paranoia Scale (SSPS), was less in the CBD group compared with the placebo group (t=2.28, pTHC/low-CBD cannabis products are associated with increased risks for mental health.

  20. Paranoid symptoms and hallucinations among the older people in Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östling, Svante; Bäckman, Kristoffer; Waern, Margda; Marlow, Thomas; Braam, Arjan W; Fichter, Manfred; Lawlor, Brian A; Lobos, Antonio; Reischies, Friedel M; Copeland, John R M; Skoog, Ingmar

    2013-06-01

    It is not clear whether the prevalence of psychosis increases with age. We studied the age-specific prevalence of psychotic symptoms in older people in Western Europe. Older people without dementia (age 65-104 years, N = 8762) from the western part of Europe in the EURODEP concerted action took part in psychiatric examinations. In total, 2.4% of the men and 2.9% of the women had psychotic symptoms. Using a multilevel logistic regression model that included gender and age as a continuous variable, we found that a 5-year increase in age increased the prevalence of psychotic symptoms (odds ratio 1.2 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.3, p = 0.001). A second multilevel regression model showed that wishing to be dead, depressed mood, functional disability, not being married and cognitive impairment measured with Mini mental state examination were all associated with psychotic symptoms whereas gender was not. The prevalence of psychotic symptoms in non-demented older people increases with age, and these symptoms are associated with other psychopathology, social isolation and problems with daily living. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Caregiver Reports of Patient-Initiated Violence in Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Onwumere, Juliana; Grice, Sarah; Garety, Philippa; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive behaviour in psychosis is not uncommon. Community provision for people with psychosis has left informal caregivers to take on a greater role in their care. However, few studies have explored links between patient-initiated violence in mental health caregiving relationships and caregiver functioning. Our study investigated caregiver reports of aggressive acts committed by their relative with psychosis and their links to caregiver appraisals of the caregiving relationship ...

  2. Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis with Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AND TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION, DEMENTIA, AND PSYCHOSIS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common in people with Parkinson disease. These conditions can affect how people with ...

  3. The use of videoconferencing with patients with psychosis: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobak Kenneth A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Videoconferencing has become an increasingly viable tool in psychiatry, with a growing body of literature on its use with a range of patient populations. A number of factors make it particularly well suited for patients with psychosis. For example, patients living in remote or underserved areas can be seen by a specialist without need for travel. However, the hallmark symptoms of psychotic disorders might lead one to question the feasibility of videoconferencing with these patients. For example, does videoconferencing exacerbate delusions, such as paranoia or delusions of reference? Are acutely psychotic patients willing to be interviewed remotely by videoconferencing? To address these and other issues, we conducted an extensive review of Medline, PsychINFO, and the Telemedicine Information Exchange databases for literature on videoconferencing and psychosis. Findings generally indicated that assessment and treatment via videoconferencing is equivalent to in person and is tolerated and well accepted. There is little evidence that patients with psychosis have difficulty with videoconferencing or experience any exacerbation of symptoms; in fact, there is some evidence to suggest that the distance afforded can be a positive factor. The results of two large clinical trials support the reliability and effectiveness of centralized remote assessment of patients with schizophrenia.

  4. [Psychosis and grammatical reality. Preliminary to an axiomatic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P

    1981-05-01

    This paper is elaborated in the same order of those who developpe the idea that, Psychosis is pleaded as an alibi of a totalitarian reality (Psychosis alibi). So it may allow to disengage the evolution of the Psychiatry outside of the anti-psychiatry ideologies. The main subject of this work, is to analyse the gap between the Reality which includes the psychosis as a part of herself (Psychosis as disease). On the second hand the Reality of the psychosis from the psycho-pathologic point of view (delirium, hallucinations, autism, etc...). Considering the importance of the formal grammatical functions in the linguistic matter to site the reference to the reality according to the rules of the communication and the oral expression; so we propose a grammatical analysis. Two parts are distinguishable in this work. The first part concerns a review of languages proposed in different psychiatric "theorization" established previously about mental disorder. So it could be considered that the psychosis is the one who "speaks" the psychiatry. The second part concerns an abstract of the "semiotiques" studies by which we can tackle the psychosis with a scientific language: The Psychiatric "speaking" the psychosis not the opposite. This way of analyse allows to realize the modifications in the part of both protagonists in the game. By the same way, it authorizes to introduce the psychiatry from the axiomatic point of view, allowing a self-contained definition as a branch of the medicine, and disengaging his subject: The psychosis; as a syntactic subject.

  5. Pathways from Cannabis to Psychosis: A Review of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jonathan K.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between cannabis use (CU) and psychosis is complex and remains unclear. Researchers and clinicians remain divided regarding key issues such as whether or not cannabis is an independent cause of psychosis and schizophrenia. This paper reviews the field in detail, examining questions of causality, the neurobiological basis for such causality and for differential inter-individual risk, the clinical and cognitive features of psychosis in cannabis users, and patterns of course and outcome of psychosis in the context of CU. The author proposes two major pathways from cannabis to psychosis based on a differentiation between early-initiated lifelong CU and a scenario where vulnerable individuals without a lifelong pattern of use consume cannabis over a relatively brief period of time just prior to psychosis onset. Additional key factors determining the clinical and neurobiological manifestation of psychosis as well as course and outcome in cannabis users include: underlying genetic and developmental vulnerability to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders; and whether or not CU ceases or continues after the onset of psychosis. Finally, methodological guidelines are presented for future research aimed at both elucidating the pathways that lead from cannabis to psychosis and clarifying the long-term outcome of the disorder in those who have a history of using cannabis. PMID:24133460

  6. Pathways from cannabis to psychosis: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K Burns

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the relationship between cannabis use and psychosis is complex and remains unclear. Researchers and clinicians remain divided regarding key issues such as whether or not cannabis is an independent cause of psychosis and schizophrenia. This paper reviews the field in detail, examining questions of causality, the neurobiological basis for such causality and for differential inter-individual risk, the clinical and cognitive features of psychosis in cannabis users, and patterns of course and outcome of psychosis in the context of cannabis use. The author proposes two major pathways from cannabis to psychosis based on a differentiation between early-initiated lifelong cannabis use and a scenario where vulnerable individuals without a lifelong pattern of use consume cannabis over a relatively brief period of time just prior to psychosis onset. Additional key factors determining the clinical and neurobiological manifestation of psychosis as well as course and outcome in cannabis users include: underlying genetic and developmental vulnerability to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders; and whether or not cannabis use ceases or continues after the onset of psychosis. Finally, methodological guidelines are presented for future research aimed at both elucidating the pathways that lead from cannabis to psychosis and clarifying the long-term outcome of the disorder in those who have a history of using cannabis.

  7. Recent life events and psychosis: The role of childhood adversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansueto, Giovanni; Faravelli, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    Life events are commonly reported to be related to psychosis. However, less attention has been given to the role that recent events play on psychosis, in relation to exposure to childhood adversity. The current study aimed to evaluate the relationship between recent events and psychosis, taking into account the role of early adversities. 78 psychotic patients and 156 controls were enrolled. Childhood adversity was evaluated using a validated semi-structured interview and the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Recent events were recorded using a semi-structured interview with a normative and contextual approach. The diagnosis of psychosis was made according to Jablenski's criteria. Chi-square, t-test, odds ratio, and binary logistic regression statistical analyses were performed. Psychotic patients reported an excess of recent events. The occurrence of more than one recent event increased the risk of psychosis; there was a cumulative effect between recent and childhood events on psychosis. Recent events were significantly related to psychosis, even in the absence of childhood adversity or when adjusted for it. Our findings suggested that the effect of recent events on psychosis may be amplified by previous exposure to early adversity. Recent events alone, could be also linked to psychosis independently of childhood adversity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathways to psychosis in cannabis abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amresh; Johnston, Megan; Terpstra, Kristen; Bureau, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Cannabis has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia, but the exact biological mechanisms remain unclear. In this review, we attempt to understand the neurobiological pathways that link cannabis use to schizophrenia. This has been an area of great debate; despite similarities between cannabis users and schizophrenia patients, the evidence is not sufficient to establish cause-and-effect. There have been advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of cannabis dependence as well as the role of the cannabinoid system in the development of psychosis and schizophrenia. The neurobiological mechanisms associated with the development of psychosis and effects from cannabis use may be similar but remain elusive. In order to better understand these associations, this paper will show common neurobiological and neuroanatomical changes as well as common cognitive dysfunction in cannabis users and patients of schizophrenia. We conclude that epidemiologic evidence highlights potential causal links; however, neurobiological evidence for causality remains weak.

  9. Progression of postictal to interictal psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, A; Devinsky, O; Alper, K

    2001-11-01

    To describe a case series of patients with both postictal psychosis (PIP) and chronic interictal psychosis (IIP). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 43 patients with PIP from a comprehensive epilepsy center to find evidence of both PIP and IIP in the same patient. Six (13.9%) of the 43 patients met all the criteria for both PIP and IIP. Five of our six patients had multiple documented PIPs before they became chronically psychotic. The range of length of time between PIP and IIP was 7 to 96 months. Postictal and interictal psychotic behavior was similar or identical in five of six cases. The results of this study suggest a progression from PIP to IIP: there is a similarity between the symptoms of the two psychoses, a history of multiple PIPs before the first IIP, and a period of months to years between PIP and IIP onset.

  10. Early intervention in psychosis: a rural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M; O'Meara Howard, A; Smith, J

    2007-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been great interest in both the development and delivery of early intervention in psychosis services in the United Kingdom, supported by national policy and a Policy Implementation Guide (PIG). Despite this, the PIG fails to distinguish the delivery of early intervention services to different population groups. The paper aims to augment available literature with the range of complex issues that practitioners may face when working in rural settings and link this to the development of early intervention services in rural communities. This paper will also outline some of the fundamental factors that challenge delivery of early intervention to individuals with a first episode of psychosis and their families in rural communities. Important key areas for consideration will be highlighted for both the planning and delivery of early intervention to rural communities.

  11. Sensory deprivation leading to late onset psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnajeet Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory deprivation is understood as diminution or absence of perceptual experiences to the usual external stimuli. Sensory deprivation in elderly is reported to be associated with depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, etc. In this report, we present the case of an 84-year- elderly man who developed auditory hallucination and after 1 year of onset of hearing difficulties. He was managed with quetiapine, with which he showed significant improvement.

  12. Gone to Pot - A Review of the Association between Cannabis and Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv eRadhakrishnan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, with approximately 5 million daily users worldwide. Emerging evidence supports a number of associations between cannabis and psychosis/psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. These associations based on case-studies, surveys, epidemiological studies, and experimental studies indicate that cannabinoids can produce acute, transient effects; acute, persistent effects as well as delayed, persistent effects that recapitulate the psychopathology and psychophysiology seen in psychotic illness such as schizophrenia. Acute exposure to both cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids (Spice/ K2 can produce a full range of transient psychotomimetic symptoms, cognitive deficits, and psychophysiological abnormalities that bear a striking resemblance to symptoms of schizophrenia. In individuals with an established psychotic disorder, cannabinoids can exacerbate symptoms, trigger relapse, and have negative consequences on the course of the illness. Several factors appear to moderate these associations, including family history, genetic factors, history of childhood abuse, and the age at onset of cannabis use. Exposure to cannabinoids in adolescence confers a higher risk for psychosis outcomes in later life and the risk is dose-related. Individuals with polymorphisms of COMT and AKT1 genes may be at increased risk for psychotic disorders in association with cannabinoids, as are individuals with a family history of psychotic disorders or a history of childhood trauma. The relationship between cannabis and schizophrenia fulfills many but not all of the standard criteria for causality, including temporality, biological gradient, biological plausibility, experimental evidence, consistency, and coherence. At the present time, the evidence indicates that cannabis may be a component cause in the emergence of psychosis, and warrants serious consideration from the point of view of public health policy.

  13. Gone to Pot – A Review of the Association between Cannabis and Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Wilkinson, Samuel T.; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, with ~5 million daily users worldwide. Emerging evidence supports a number of associations between cannabis and psychosis/psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. These associations-based on case-studies, surveys, epidemiological studies, and experimental studies indicate that cannabinoids can produce acute, transient effects; acute, persistent effects; and delayed, persistent effects that recapitulate the psychopathology and psychophysiology seen in schizophrenia. Acute exposure to both cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids (Spice/K2) can produce a full range of transient psychotomimetic symptoms, cognitive deficits, and psychophysiological abnormalities that bear a striking resemblance to symptoms of schizophrenia. In individuals with an established psychotic disorder, cannabinoids can exacerbate symptoms, trigger relapse, and have negative consequences on the course of the illness. Several factors appear to moderate these associations, including family history, genetic factors, history of childhood abuse, and the age at onset of cannabis use. Exposure to cannabinoids in adolescence confers a higher risk for psychosis outcomes in later life and the risk is dose-related. Individuals with polymorphisms of COMT and AKT1 genes may be at increased risk for psychotic disorders in association with cannabinoids, as are individuals with a family history of psychotic disorders or a history of childhood trauma. The relationship between cannabis and schizophrenia fulfills many but not all of the standard criteria for causality, including temporality, biological gradient, biological plausibility, experimental evidence, consistency, and coherence. At the present time, the evidence indicates that cannabis may be a component cause in the emergence of psychosis, and this warrants serious consideration from the point of view of public health policy. PMID:24904437

  14. [Can men be included in the population subjected to puerperal psychosis? A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombel, M; Rebillard, C; Nathou, C; Dollfus, S

    2016-08-01

    Puerperal psychosis (PP) is a psychiatric disorder that occurs in 1 out of 1000 pregnancies. Well known since antiquity, its symptoms have often been described in mothers, but few studies have successfully investigated a related disorder in fathers. The characteristic of this pathology is more related to its appearance than to its semiological description which is why its nosographic place is always discussed. The objective here is to focus on the definition of PP and to suggest an entity for both genders. Our case report focused on the clinical description of an eighteen-year-old man suffering from an acute psychosis episode that occurred around the birth of his first child. Delusion followed a sudden decline in mood that lasted for a short period of time during the course of the third trimester of his wife's pregnancy. The delirium was rich with auditory and cenesthesic hallucinations, pregnancy and birth denial, feeling movements and hearing voices in his stomach. The symptoms disappeared after one month of treatment via an antipsychotic drug, risperidone. We can confirm that the symptomatic description of the disorder in this patient fits the classical descriptions of PP. Two elements make the PP different from other acute psychoses: the context of pregnancy and delirium focused on the child which can lead to a child murder. The absence of a framework precisely defining the PP does not improve its prevention and can lead to legal attitudes rather than medical care. Men suffering from acute psychosis in a context of pregnancy are submitted to the same risks as women. It is necessary to emphasize descriptions of PP in men to redefine the disease and consider that this entity involves both men and women. Copyright © 2016 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Posttraumatic Reactions to Psychosis: A Qualitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Lu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to evaluate the potentially traumatic aspects of psychotic symptoms and psychiatric treatment of psychosis using qualitative methods. Participants included 63 people with first episode psychosis or multiple psychotic episodes recruited from an inpatient psychiatric unit and an urban state psychiatric hospital in the North East region of the United States. Quasi-structured interviews were used to explore those aspects of symptoms and treatment that were perceived as traumatic Emotional reactions to the most traumatic aspect of symptoms and treatment, during and after the event, were also examined. Participants described a number of traumatogenic aspects of psychotic symptoms, including frightening hallucinations; suicidal thought/attempts, thoughts/attempts to hurt others; paranoia/delusions and bizarre/disorganized behavior or catatonia. Traumatic aspects of psychosis elicited emotions including anger, sadness and confusion, anxiety, and numbness at the time of event. Furthermore, many participants found aspects of treatment to be traumatic, including: being forced to stay in the hospital for a long time; experiencing upsetting side-effects; coercive treatments, including involuntary hospitalization, use of restraints, and forced medication; being exposed to aggressive patients; and mistreatment by professionals. These experiences elicited emotions of anger, sadness, distrust, and a sense of helplessness. Study findings suggest that the experiences both of psychotic symptoms and psychiatric treatment, potentially traumatic, can be a powerful barrier to engaging people in mental health services and facilitating recovery. Clinical implications were discussed.

  16. Gendering psychosis: the illness of Zelda Fitzgerald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric textbooks tend to describe psychosis as it is experienced by men. The well-documented illness of Zelda Fitzgerald illustrates the feminine side of psychosis. The distinctive features of Zelda's illness--its specific precipitants, the timing of its onset, the discontinuities in its course, the pronounced mood swings, the preservation of intellect and of agency, the maintenance of human ties, the association of flare-ups with immune and hormonal changes, the responsiveness to treatment, the lifelong creativity and productivity--show the female side of psychotic illness, one that is rarely described in diagnostic manuals. This paper relies on Nancy Milford's biography of Zelda, as well as on several other biographical sources and, using Zelda's own words and the words of her husband and friends, allows entry into a feminine world of psychosis, not encountered in textbooks. The expression of psychotic illness varies from person to person, its exact shape depending on many factors, most of them still undetermined, but gender is a critically important core component of variance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Theory of mind in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Robyn; Still, Megan; Connors, Michael H; Ward, Philip B; Catts, Stanley V

    2014-08-01

    A deficit in theory of mind--the ability to infer and reason about the mental states of others - might underpin the poor social functioning of patients with psychosis. Unfortunately, however, there is considerable variation in how such a deficit is assessed. The current study compared three classic tests of theory of mind in terms of their ability to detect impairment in patients in the early stages of psychosis. Twenty-three patients within 2 years of their first psychotic episode and 19 healthy controls received picture-sequencing, joke-appreciation and story-comprehension tests of theory of mind. Whereas the picture-sequencing and joke-appreciation tests successfully detected a selective theory-of-mind deficit in patients, the story-comprehension test did not. The findings suggest that tests that place minimal demands on language processing and involve indirect, rather than explicit, instructions to assess theory of mind might be best suited to detecting theory-of-mind impairment in early stages of psychosis. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. [Glutamate receptors genes polymorphism and the risk of paranoid schizophrenia in Russians and tatars from the Republic of Bashkortostan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareeva, A E; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that affects about 1% of the world population, leading to disability and social exclusion. Glutamatergic neurotransmission is a violation of one of the main hypotheses put forward to explain the neurobiological mechanisms of schizophrenia. Post mortem studies have found changes in the degree of affinity glutamate receptors, their transcription, and altered expression of their subunits in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus in patients with schizophrenia. As a result of genetic studies of gene family encoding ionotropic AMPA and kainate glutamate receptors in schizophrenia, ambiguous results were received. The association of polymorphic variants of genes GRIA2 and GRIK2 with paranoid schizophrenia and response to therapy with haloperidol in Russian and Tatar of the Republic of Bashkortostan was conducted in the present study. DNA samples of 257 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and of 349 healthy controls of Russian and Tatar ethnic group living in the Republic of Bashkortostan were involved into the present study. In the result of the present study: (1) high risk genetic markers of paranoid schizophrenia (PSZ) were obtained: in Russians-GR4IA2*CCC (OR = 9.60) and in Tatars-GRIK2*ATG (OR = 3.5), GRIK2*TGG (OR = 3.12) (2) The following low risk genetic markers of PSZ were revealed: in Tatars-GRIA2*T/T (rs43025506) of GRIA2 gene (OR = 0.34); in Russians.- GRIA2*CCT (OR = 0.481). (3) Genetic markers of low haloperido! treatment efficacy in respect of negative and positive symptoms GRIK2*T/T (rs2227281) of GRIK2 gene and GRAL42*C/C in Russians, GRIK2*A/A (rs995640) of GRIK2 gene in Tatars. (4) Genetic markers of low haloperidol treatment efficacy in respect of positive symptoms GRL42*C/C in Russians. The results of the present study support the hypothesis of the involvement of glutamate receptor genes in schizophrenia pathway. Considerable inter-ethnic'diversity of genetic risk factors for this disease was

  19. The relationship of the Severe Personality disorders with behavioral activation and inhibition systems in patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Jani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the disruptive effects of personality disorders on personal and family life, it is essential to recognize their predisposing factors to understand them more accurately, and identify their preventive measures treatment facilitators. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the relationship of severe personality disorders with behavioral activation and inhibition systems in patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders. Methods: The present descriptive-correlational study recruited patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders presenting to psychiatry clinics in Ardabil using convenient sampling method. A total of 30 paranoid patients, 30 borderline patients and 20 schizotypal patients were selected by a psychiatrist through psychiatric examination, clinical interview and completing Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III. The following instruments were used: MCMI- III and behavioral activation-inhibition system scale (BIS-BAS. The data were analyzed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and stepwise regression. Results: BIS and BAS systems were both significant for predicting borderline and paranoid personality disorders, but only BIS was significant for predicting schizotypal personality disorder. Conclusion: These findings can help experts to have a better and more accurate understanding of personality disorders and use proper methods to predict the probability of these disorders and develop treatments.

  20. A Case of Acute Psychosis Following Energy Drink Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgülü, Yasemin; Taşdelen, Öznur; Sönmez, Mehmet Bülent; Köse Çinar, Rugül

    2014-03-01

    Interest in energy drinks is increasing every day. Energy drink consumption is increasing proportionally. Users often utilize these drinks in order to enjoy, have fun and to increase performance and attention. However, consumption of the energy drinks sometimes may also cause adverse physical and psychological consequences. Unwanted physical results are in the more foreground, noticeable and visible but the data about psychological problems caused by energy drinks is accumulated over the years in the literature. In this case report, we describe the case of a young man with no psychiatric history who was hospitalized for psychotic symptoms following excessive consumption of energy drinks.

  1. Citrin deficiency: A treatable cause of acute psychosis in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Bijarnia-Mahay Sunita; Häberle Johannes; Rüfenacht Véronique; Shigematsu Yosuke; Saxena Renu; Verma Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Citrin deficiency is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a defect in the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate antiporter, citrin. The disorder manifests either as neonatal intra-hepatic cholestasis or occurs in adulthood with recurrent hyperammonemia and neuropsychiatric disturbances. It has a high prevalence in the East Asian population, but is actually pan-ethnic. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient presenting with episodes of abnormal neuro-psychiatric behavior asso...

  2. Recollected experiences of first hospitalisation for acute psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    alleviate this.[5]. South African hospital staff also face understaffing, staff attrition, and reduced job satisfaction. The shortage of mental health practitioners increases the workload of existing staff members, raising levels of stress, fatigue and emotional exhaustion, all of which compromise both the quality and safety of care.

  3. Cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum presenting with acute psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Giacomo; Causin, Francesco; Feletti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms may occasionally be related to anatomic alterations of brain structures. Particularly, corpus callosum lesions seem to play a role in the change of patients' behavior. We present a case of a sudden psychotic attack presumably due to a hemorrhagic cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum, which was surgically removed with complete resolution of symptoms. Although a developmental defect like agenesis or lipoma is present in the majority of these cases, a growing lesion of the corpus callosum can rarely be the primary cause. Since it is potentially possible to cure these patients, clinicians should be aware of this association.

  4. Cavernous Angioma of the Corpus Callosum Presenting with Acute Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomo Pavesi; Francesco Causin; Alberto Feletti

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms may occasionally be related to anatomic alterations of brain structures. Particularly, corpus callosum lesions seem to play a role in the change of patients’ behavior. We present a case of a sudden psychotic attack presumably due to a hemorrhagic cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum, which was surgically removed with complete resolution of symptoms. Although a developmental defect like agenesis or lipoma is present in the majority of these cases, a growing lesion of t...

  5. Cavernous Angioma of the Corpus Callosum Presenting with Acute Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Pavesi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric symptoms may occasionally be related to anatomic alterations of brain structures. Particularly, corpus callosum lesions seem to play a role in the change of patients’ behavior. We present a case of a sudden psychotic attack presumably due to a hemorrhagic cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum, which was surgically removed with complete resolution of symptoms. Although a developmental defect like agenesis or lipoma is present in the majority of these cases, a growing lesion of the corpus callosum can rarely be the primary cause. Since it is potentially possible to cure these patients, clinicians should be aware of this association.

  6. Economic aspects of peer support groups for psychosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stant, A.D.; Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; Busschbach, J.T.; van der Gaag, M.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer support groups are rarely available for patients with psychosis, despite potential clinical and economic advantages of such groups. In this study, 106 patients with psychosis were randomly allocated to minimally guided peer support in addition to care as usual (CAU), or CAU only. No relevant

  7. Premorbid adjustment in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Friis, Svein; Haahr, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge about premorbid development in psychosis can shed light upon theories about aetiology and schizophrenic heterogeneity, and form a basis for early detection initiatives.......Knowledge about premorbid development in psychosis can shed light upon theories about aetiology and schizophrenic heterogeneity, and form a basis for early detection initiatives....

  8. Intrinsic motivation and amotivation in first episode and prolonged psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Lauren; Lysaker, Paul H; Firmin, Ruth L; Breier, Alan; Vohs, Jenifer L

    2015-12-01

    The deleterious functional implications of motivation deficits in psychosis have generated interest in examining dimensions of the construct. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding whether dimensions of motivation differ over the course of psychosis. Therefore, this study examined two motivation dimensions, trait-like intrinsic motivation, and the negative symptom of amotivation, and tested the impact of illness phase on the 1) levels of these dimensions and 2) relationship between these dimensions. Participants with first episode psychosis (FEP; n=40) and prolonged psychosis (n=66) completed clinician-rated measures of intrinsic motivation and amotivation. Analyses revealed that when controlling for group differences in gender and education, the FEP group had significantly more intrinsic motivation and lower amotivation than the prolonged psychosis group. Moreover, intrinsic motivation was negatively correlated with amotivation in both FEP and prolonged psychosis, but the magnitude of the relationship did not statistically differ between groups. These findings suggest that motivation deficits are more severe later in the course of psychosis and that low intrinsic motivation may be partially independent of amotivation in both first episode and prolonged psychosis. Clinically, these results highlight the importance of targeting motivation in early intervention services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Learning to trust: trust and attachment in early psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fett, A.J.; Shergill, S.; Korver-Nieberg, N.; Yakub, F.; Gromann, P.; Krabbendam, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Distrust and social dysfunction are characteristic in psychosis and may arise from attachment insecurity, which is elevated in the disorder. The relationship between trust and attachment in the early stages of psychosis is unknown, yet could help to understand interpersonal difficulties

  10. Diabetes and glucose disturbances in patients with psychosis in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Eric; Westman, Jeanette; Sudic Hukic, Dzana; Eriksson, Sven V; Edman, Gunnar; Bodén, Robert; Jedenius, Erik; Reutfors, Johan; Berntsson, Anders; Hilding, Agneta; Schalling, Martin; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Ösby, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to (1) analyze the prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, and antidiabetic medication in patients with psychosis compared with control subjects and (2) determine what factors in patients with psychosis were associated with antidiabetic medication. Method We studied 977 patients with psychosis recruited from outpatient clinics in Stockholm County, Sweden, and they were compared with 3908 non-psychotic control subjects for fasting plasma glucose levels; prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, antidiabetic treatment, and tobacco use; and blood pressure, weight, height, and waist circumference. Group differences were evaluated with analysis of variance and χ2 test, and factors associated with antidiabetic treatment were evaluated with logistic regression. Results Diabetes was observed in 94 (10%) patients with psychosis, 2.7 times the prevalence observed in control subjects. Among patients with psychosis, 87 (10%) had prediabetes (fasting glucose, 6.1–6.9 mmol/L) compared with 149 (3.8%) control subjects. Most patients with psychosis (77%) who had prediabetes fulfilled criteria for metabolic syndrome. In patients with psychosis, both lipid-lowering medication and fasting glucose were significantly associated with antidiabetic treatment. There was no significant relation between antidiabetic treatment and lifestyle factors such as smoking or degree of psychiatric illness. Conclusions The high prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and metabolic syndrome in patients with psychosis warrants further clinical research in preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes in these patients by pharmacotherapy and/or lifestyle intervention. PMID:26468398

  11. The key to reducing duration of untreated first psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Auestad, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    The TIPS early intervention program reduced the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) in first-episode schizophrenia from 16 to 5 weeks in a health care sector using a combination of easy access detection teams (DTs) and a massive information campaign (IC) about the signs and symptoms of psychosis...

  12. Cannabis and Psychosis: a Critical Overview of the Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksir, Charles; Hart, Carl L

    2016-02-01

    Interest in the relationship between cannabis use and psychosis has increased dramatically in recent years, in part because of concerns related to the growing availability of cannabis and potential risks to health and human functioning. There now exists a plethora of scientific articles addressing this issue, but few provide a clear verdict about the causal nature of the cannabis-psychosis association. Here, we review recent research reports on cannabis and psychosis, giving particular attention to how each report provides evidence relating to two hypotheses: (1) cannabis as a contributing cause and (2) shared vulnerability. Two primary kinds of data are brought to bear on this issue: studies done with schizophrenic patients and studies of first-episode psychosis. Evidence reviewed here suggests that cannabis does not in itself cause a psychosis disorder. Rather, the evidence leads us to conclude that both early use and heavy use of cannabis are more likely in individuals with a vulnerability to psychosis. The role of early and heavy cannabis use as a prodromal sign merits further examination, along with a variety of other problem behaviors (e.g., early or heavy use of cigarettes or alcohol and poor school performance). Future research studies that focus exclusively on the cannabis-psychosis association will therefore be of little value in our quest to better understand psychosis and how and why it occurs.

  13. Relationship between substance abuse and first-episode psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the effect of substance abuse on psychosis in terms of onset, duration, severity of symptoms, use of medication ... Subjects in the first-episode psychosis group were more likely to choose cannabis as their substance of abuse than controls. They also started abusing substances at a younger age than controls.

  14. [Resolution of a treatment impasse by combining two Dutch laws regarding a patient with paranoid thoughts and a testicular cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manschot, G M; Hondius, A J K; van Dijk, M M; Honig, A

    2015-01-01

    Doctors dealing with patients who simultaneously have both psychiatric and somatic disorders often find themselves 'trapped' between two Dutch laws, the WBGO (the Law on the Medical Contract) and the Bopz (Law on Compulsory Admission to Psychiatric Hospitals). In order to illustrate a typical situation we present a case-study concerning a 50-year-old male with a probable seminoma testis and paranoid thoughts arising from an autistic disorder. The patient had refused the investigations and treatment that were considered necessary. His compulsory attendance at the Court of Law and the adoption, by the doctors, of a multidisciplinary approach led to a successful outcome and patient satisfaction. We hope that the new Involuntary Mental Health Care Act (WvGGZ) will bridge the current gap between WGBO and the Bopz.

  15. The role of predisposition to hallucinations on non-clinical paranoid vs. socially anxious individuals after hearing negative affective-laden sounds: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Bárbara; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2013-03-01

    Research suggested that negative affective-laden sounds act as environmental stressors that elicit negative affect (Bradley and Lang, 2000a). We tried to test for the role of an interaction between predisposition to hallucinatory experiences and exposure to negative affective laden sounds for the presence of paranoid ideation. We used an experimental design that followed the vulnerability × stress model. We defined three groups from a sample of students: paranoia group vs. social anxiety group vs. control group. Their psychological characteristics were measured through self-reports of paranoia, anxiety, predisposition to hallucinations and depressive symptoms at Time 1 (before the experiment). Participants had to listen to either negative affective laden sounds (e.g. screaming) or positive affective laden sounds (e.g. sound of ocean waves). Their paranoid ideation and positive vs. negative emotional reactions to sounds were measured through self-reports at Time 2 (after the experiment). Data showed that the paranoia group presented more serious psychological vulnerabilities than the social anxiety group. A MANCOVA also showed that the independent variables ("group" and "experimental sound conditions") had statistically significant main effects on general paranoia ideation at Time 2. Furthermore, there was a significant three-way interaction between group x predisposition to hallucinatory experiences × experimental condition of sounds for the presence of general paranoid ideation at Time 2. Limitations included the small sample size and the effects of parasite variables, e.g. noise. Individuals' predisposition for hallucinatory experiences increases the probability of possessing paranoid ideation. This tendency is a characteristic of paranoid non-clinical individuals.

  16. Paranoia as an Antecedent and Consequence of Getting Ahead in Organizations: Time-Lagged Effects Between Paranoid Cognitions, Self-Monitoring, and Changes in Span of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Quaquebeke, Niels

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month, time-lagged online survey among 441 employees in diverse industries was conducted to investigate the role paranoia plays as an antecedent and as a consequence of advancement in organizations. The background of the study is the argument that it requires active social sense-making and behavioral adaptability to advance in organizations. The present paper thus explores the extent to which employees' paranoid cognitions-representative of a heightened albeit suspicious sense-making and behavioral adaptability-link with their advancement in organizations (operationalized as changes in afforded span of control), both as an antecedent and an outcome. Following the strategy to illuminate the process by interaction analysis, both conditions (antecedent and outcome) are examined in interaction with employees' self-monitoring, which is considered representative of a heightened but healthy sense-making and behavioral adaptability. Results support the expected interference interaction between paranoid cognitions and self-monitoring in that each can to some degree compensate for the other in explaining employees' organizational advancement. Reversely, changes in span of control also affected paranoid cognitions. In particular, low self-monitors, i.e., those low in adaptive sense-making, reacted with heightened paranoid cognitions when demoted. In effect, the present study is thus the first to empirically support that paranoid cognitions can be a consequence but also a prerequisite for getting ahead in organizations. Practical advice should, however, be suspended until it is better understood whether and under what circumstances paranoia may relate not only to personally getting ahead but also to an increased effectiveness for the benefit of the organization.

  17. Paranoia as an Antecedent and Consequence of Getting Ahead in Organizations: Time-Lagged Effects Between Paranoid Cognitions, Self-Monitoring, and Changes in Span of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Quaquebeke, Niels

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month, time-lagged online survey among 441 employees in diverse industries was conducted to investigate the role paranoia plays as an antecedent and as a consequence of advancement in organizations. The background of the study is the argument that it requires active social sense-making and behavioral adaptability to advance in organizations. The present paper thus explores the extent to which employees’ paranoid cognitions—representative of a heightened albeit suspicious sense-making and behavioral adaptability—link with their advancement in organizations (operationalized as changes in afforded span of control), both as an antecedent and an outcome. Following the strategy to illuminate the process by interaction analysis, both conditions (antecedent and outcome) are examined in interaction with employees’ self-monitoring, which is considered representative of a heightened but healthy sense-making and behavioral adaptability. Results support the expected interference interaction between paranoid cognitions and self-monitoring in that each can to some degree compensate for the other in explaining employees’ organizational advancement. Reversely, changes in span of control also affected paranoid cognitions. In particular, low self-monitors, i.e., those low in adaptive sense-making, reacted with heightened paranoid cognitions when demoted. In effect, the present study is thus the first to empirically support that paranoid cognitions can be a consequence but also a prerequisite for getting ahead in organizations. Practical advice should, however, be suspended until it is better understood whether and under what circumstances paranoia may relate not only to personally getting ahead but also to an increased effectiveness for the benefit of the organization. PMID:27713724

  18. Paranoia as an Antecedent and Consequence of Getting Ahead in Organizations: Time-Lagged Effects Between Paranoid Cognitions, Self-Monitoring, and Changes in Span of Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Van Quaquebeke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A six-month, time-lagged online survey among 441 employees in diverse industries was conducted to investigate the role paranoia plays as an antecedent and as a consequence of advancement in organizations. The background of the study is the argument that it requires active social sense-making and behavioral adaptability to advance in organizations. The present paper thus explores the extent to which employees’ paranoid cognitions—representative of a heightened albeit suspicious sense-making and behavioral adaptability—link with their advancement in organizations (operationalized as changes in afforded span of control, both as an antecedent and an outcome. Following the strategy to illuminate the process by interaction analysis, both conditions (antecedent and outcome are examined in interaction with employees’ self-monitoring, which is considered representative of a heightened but healthy sense-making and behavioral adaptability. Results support the expected interference interaction between paranoid cognitions and self-monitoring in that each can to some degree compensate for the other in explaining employees’ organizational advancement. Reversely, changes in span of control also affected paranoid cognitions. In particular, low self-monitors, i.e. those low in adaptive sense-making, reacted with heightened paranoid cognitions when demoted. In effect, the present study is thus the first to empirically support that paranoid cognitions can be a consequence but also a prerequisite for getting ahead in organizations. Practical advice should, however, be suspended until it is better understood whether and under what circumstances paranoia may relate not only to personally getting ahead but also to an increased effectiveness for the benefit of the organization.

  19. 10 year course of IQ in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2015-01-01

    are largely uninvestigated, but may identify subgroups with different intellectual trajectories. Eighty-nine first-episode psychosis patients were investigated on IQ at baseline and at 10-years follow-up. Total time in psychosis was defined as two separate variables; Duration of psychosis before start...... of treatment (i.e. duration of untreated psychosis: DUP), and duration of psychosis after start of treatment (DAT). The sample was divided in three equal groups based on DUP and DAT, respectively. To investigate if diagnosis could separate IQ-trajectories beyond that of psychotic duration, two diagnostic...... categories were defined: core versus non-core SSDs. No significant change in IQ was found for the total sample. Intellectual course was not related to DUP or stringency of diagnostic category. However, a subgroup with long DAT demonstrated a significant intellectual decline, mainly associated with a weaker...

  20. The role of a family history of psychosis for youth at clinical high risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Grace; Stowkowy, Jacqueline; Liu, Lu; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Cannon, Tyrone D; Cornblatt, Barbara A; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Seidman, Larry J; Tsuang, Ming T; Walker, Elaine F; Woods, Scott W; Bearden, Carrie E; Mathalon, Daniel H; Addington, Jean

    2017-08-09

    On average, there is a 10% to 12% likelihood of developing a psychotic disorder solely based on being at familial high risk. However, the introduction of the criteria for clinical high risk (CHR) of psychosis suggested for CHR individuals, 20% to 30% will go on to develop a full-blown psychotic illness within 3 years. Several studies suggest a role for family history in conversion to psychosis among those at CHR. However, we know very little about those who meet the CHR criteria and have a positive family history for psychosis compared to those at CHR with no known family history. The aim of this study was to compare these 2 groups on demographics, clinical symptoms, social and role functioning, IQ, environmental factors and conversion to psychosis. A total of 762 participants met criteria for being at CHR, 119 of whom had a family history (CHR + FH) and 643 without (CHR-FH). Groups were compared on attenuated symptoms, role and social functioning, IQ, past trauma, perceived discrimination and cannabis use. Survival analysis was used to compare groups on conversion rates. There were no major differences between the groups in symptoms, functioning, IQ, cannabis use or in the rate of conversion between the groups. The CHR + FH group reported increased amounts of early trauma. There is a possibility that CHR + FH individuals believe that it is more difficult for them to cope with circumstances such as abuse or potential abuse. Future research on this subject should investigate family environment and its role in conversion to psychosis among CHR + FH individuals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Information and support needs during recovery from postpartum psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Jessica; Gilbert, Naomi; Dolman, Clare; Shah, Sonal; Beare, Ines; Dearden, Sarah; Muckelroy, Nicola; Jones, Ian; Ives, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    Postpartum Psychosis (PP) is a severe and debilitating psychiatric illness with acute onset in the days following childbirth. Recovering from an episode can be a long and difficult process. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the difficulties faced by recovering women and to inform the planning of post-discharge information and support services. A study was designed collaboratively by service user and academic researchers. Women with experience of PP were trained in qualitative research methodology. Service user researchers (SURs) led in-depth interviews into women's experiences of recovery. PP is a life-changing experience that challenges women's sense of personal and social identity. Recovery themes are organised around ruminating and rationalising, rebuilding social confidence, gaining appropriate health service support, the facilitation of family functioning, obtaining appropriate information, and understanding that recovery will take time. Women suffering from PP must be adequately supported following discharge from psychiatric hospital if we are to address maternal suicide rates. We describe a successful collaboration between academics and service users exploring the needs of women and their families.

  2. Psychotherapies in Acute and Transient Psychoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González de Chávez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available From a comprehensive and global view -psychological, biological and social - acute and transient psychoses could be considered identity breakdowns with fragmentation of its structure, paranoid mechanism and cognitive regression. Psychotherapies favour evolution of psychotic identity through disorder awareness and knowledge of aspects of patients that make them more vulnerable to psychotic experiences. We underline the key role of group psychotherapy to improve therapeutic relationships and best use of patient’s coping strategies in the chronology of therapeutic interventions and recovery process of these patients.

  3. The psychosis-like effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol are associated with increased cortical noise in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Cahill, John D; Skosnik, Patrick D; Mathalon, Daniel H; Williams, Ashley; Sewell, R Andrew; Roach, Brian J; Ford, Judith M; Ranganathan, Mohini; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-12-01

    Drugs that induce psychosis may do so by increasing the level of task-irrelevant random neural activity or neural noise. Increased levels of neural noise have been demonstrated in psychotic disorders. We tested the hypothesis that neural noise could also be involved in the psychotomimetic effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), the principal active constituent of cannabis. Neural noise was indexed by measuring the level of randomness in the electroencephalogram during the prestimulus baseline period of an oddball task using Lempel-Ziv complexity, a nonlinear measure of signal randomness. The acute, dose-related effects of Δ(9)-THC on Lempel-Ziv complexity and signal power were studied in humans (n = 24) who completed 3 test days during which they received intravenous Δ(9)-THC (placebo, .015 and .03 mg/kg) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover, and counterbalanced design. Δ(9)-THC increased neural noise in a dose-related manner. Furthermore, there was a strong positive relationship between neural noise and the psychosis-like positive and disorganization symptoms induced by Δ(9)-THC, which was independent of total signal power. Instead, there was no relationship between noise and negative-like symptoms. In addition, Δ(9)-THC reduced total signal power during both active drug conditions compared with placebo, but no relationship was detected between signal power and psychosis-like symptoms. At doses that produced psychosis-like effects, Δ(9)-THC increased neural noise in humans in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, increases in neural noise were related with increases in Δ(9)-THC-induced psychosis-like symptoms but not negative-like symptoms. These findings suggest that increases in neural noise may contribute to the psychotomimetic effects of Δ(9)-THC. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Vestibular activation, smooth pursuit tracking, and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A M; Pivik, R T

    1985-04-01

    Pursuit tracking and vestibular activation procedures were combined in an investigation to determine if smooth pursuit tracking deficits could be related to abnormalities of visual-vestibular interaction in psychiatric patients. In actively psychotic patients, but not in comparison groups of schizophrenic outpatients with remitted symptomatology or normal controls, a significant failure of visual fixation to suppress caloric nystagmus was related to a higher incidence of disordered tracking during both baseline and postirrigation conditions. Other vestibular irregularities including dysrhythmia and reduced fast phase velocity were observed in these same patients. The results are supportive of a central deficit in visual-vestibular interaction that may contribute to pursuit tracking deficits in psychosis.

  5. Understanding the social costs of psychosis: the experience of adults affected by psychosis identified within the second Australian National Survey of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, Helen J; Galletly, Cherrie A; Clark, Scott; Wilson, Jacqueline; Killen, Emily A; Anthes, Lauren; Campbell, Linda E; Hanlon, Mary-Claire; Harvey, Carol

    2012-09-01

    Social inclusion is a key priority of the Fourth National Mental Health Plan for Australia (2009-2014), with strong evidence for its protective impact on mental health. Social integration has been associated with enhanced well-being for people with mental illnesses such as psychosis. To explore the impact of psychosis on an individual's social and community participation. The second Australian national survey of psychosis was conducted across seven Australian sites. Semi-structured interviews with adults living with psychosis assessed mental health status, social and role functioning, life satisfaction and future goals. The cohort comprised 1825 adults with a psychotic illness (59.6% were male; 42.4% were aged 18-34 years; 31.5% had 12 years or more of education) of whom 32.7% had been employed in the past year. Most adults indicated experiencing loneliness (80.1%) and a need for more friends (48.1%). Men were more likely to have never had a long-term relationship (59.4% M, 33.2% F). Even though women were more likely to experience anxiety in social situations [(χ(2)(1) = 8.95, p social activity in the past year [χ(2)(2) = 11.84, p social activity and 43% described stigma as a barrier. Although 63.2% showed significant impairment in social functioning, only 29.5% had received help for this in the last year. Social isolation and loneliness were rated as major challenges by 37.2% of the cohort. Social isolation and dysfunction experienced by people with psychosis have not decreased since the last Australian national survey of people with psychosis. Alongside education and employment, social functioning and participation must be addressed to improve social inclusion for people with psychosis. Programs targeting social opportunities (befriending, peer support), social anxiety and social functioning for all stages of psychosis are warranted.

  6. Neuropsychology of the prodrome to psychosis in the NAPLS consortium: relationship to family history and conversion to psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Larry J; Giuliano, Anthony J; Meyer, Eric C; Addington, Jean; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Cannon, Tyrone D; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Tsuang, Ming T; Walker, Elaine F; Woods, Scott W; Bearden, Carrie E; Christensen, Bruce K; Hawkins, Keith; Heaton, Robert; Keefe, Richard S E; Heinssen, Robert; Cornblatt, Barbara A

    2010-06-01

    Early detection and prospective evaluation of clinical high-risk (CHR) individuals who may develop schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders is critical for predicting psychosis onset and for testing preventive interventions. To elucidate the neuropsychology of the CHR syndrome, to determine the association of neuropsychological function with conversion to psychosis and family history of psychosis, and to examine whether baseline neuropsychological functioning predicts subsequent psychosis. Longitudinal study with 2(1/2) years of follow-up. Eight centers participating in the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study. Three hundred four prospectively identified CHR individuals meeting Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes criteria, 52 non-CHR persons with a family history of psychosis in first- or second-degree relatives (family high-risk group), and 193 normal controls with neither a family history of psychosis nor a CHR syndrome, all of whom underwent baseline neuropsychological evaluations. A neurocognitive composite score, 8 individual neuropsychological measures, an IQ estimate, and high-risk status. Global ("composite") neuropsychological functioning was comparably impaired in the CHR and family high-risk groups compared with controls, but profiles differed significantly between groups. Neuropsychological functioning in the CHR group was significantly lower in persons who progressed to psychosis than in those who did not and was worst in the subgroup with a family history of psychosis. Tests of processing speed and verbal learning and memory were most sensitive in discriminating CHR individuals from controls, although reductions were less severe than in established schizophrenia. Neuropsychological functioning did not contribute uniquely to the prediction of psychosis beyond clinical criteria, but worse verbal memory predicted more rapid conversion. These findings document that CHR individuals have significant neuropsychological difficulties

  7. Intrinsic motivation as a mediator between metacognition deficits and impaired functioning in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Lauren; Firmin, Ruth L; Vohs, Jenifer L; Buck, Kelly D; Rand, Kevin L; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-09-01

    individuals with psychosis. The cross-sectional design of this study is a limitation, and additional longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the direction of the findings and rule out rival hypotheses. Generalization of the findings may be limited by the sample composition. It may be that different relationships exist between metacognition, intrinsic motivation, and functioning in those with early psychosis or among those in an acute phase or who decline treatment. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Very Low-Dose Risperidone in First-Episode Psychosis: A Safe and Effective Way to Initiate Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. McGorry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients experiencing a first psychotic episode have high rates of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPSs when treated with the doses of neuroleptics used in multiepisode or chronic schizophrenia. There is some evidence that lower doses may be equally, if not more, effective but less toxic in this population. Here, we report the results of a biphasic open label trial designed to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of low-dose (2–4 mg/day risperidone treatment in a group of 96 first-episode nonaffective psychosis patients. At the end of the trial, 62% of patients met the response criteria although approximately 80% had achieved a response at some time during the study. Reports of EPS remained low, and there were no dystonic reactions. We conclude that even at a dose of 2 mg/day, risperidone was highly effective in reducing acute symptomatology in a real world sample of young first-episode psychosis patients.

  9. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years, consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification. No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age.

  10. Forgotten family members: the importance of siblings in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Siann; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Wade, Darryl; McGorry, Patrick; Howie, Linsey

    2014-08-01

    This paper reviews the evidence on the significance of sibling inclusion in family interventions and support during early psychosis. This narrative review presents the current research related to the importance of family work during early psychosis, the needs and developmental significance of siblings during adolescence and early adulthood, the protective effects of sibling relationships, and the characteristics of early psychosis relevant to the sibling experience. It will also review the evidence of the sibling experience in chronic physical illness and disability, as well as long-term psychotic illness. Despite the evidence that working with families is important during early psychosis, siblings have been largely ignored. Siblings are an important reciprocal relationship of long duration. They play an important role in development during adolescence and early adulthood. These relationships may be an underutilized protective factor due to their inherent benefits and social support. Developmental theories imply that early psychosis could negatively impact the sibling relationship and their quality of life, effecting personality development and health outcomes. The evidence shows that adolescent physical illness or disability has a significantly negative impact on the sibling's quality of life and increases the risk for the onset of mental health issues. Long-term psychotic illness also results in negative experiences for siblings. Current evidence shows that siblings in early psychosis experience psychological distress and changes in functional performance. Further research using standard measures is required to understand the impact early psychosis has on the sibling relationship and their quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Theory of mind and social functioning in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Herzig, Daniela; Mohr, Christine; Lewis, Glyn; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    There is evidence of associations between social functioning and theory of mind performance and between social functioning and negative symptoms in chronic psychosis. This study investigates these associations in those with first episode psychosis who are unaffected by factors related to long-term mental illness. Our first hypothesis states that there is an association between theory of mind and social functioning. The second hypothesis states that there is no association between symptoms of psychosis and social functioning. Fifty-two individuals with first episode psychosis were assessed for social functioning, theory of mind ability (using the Hinting test with verbal stimuli and the Visual Cartoon test with pictorial stimuli), and symptoms of psychosis. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations. Social functioning and theory of mind were associated when measured by the Hinting test (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.08, 2.66), but not with the Visual Cartoon test (ToM jokes OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.15, 2.53). There was no association between social functioning and symptoms (psychotic symptoms; OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.81, 1.12; selected negative symptoms; OR 1.33, 95% CI 0.78, 2.25). Theory of mind assessed by verbal stimuli is associated with social functioning in a population with first episode psychosis. These findings may be related to language disorders in psychosis.

  12. From treating to preventing psychosis: personal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashan, Thomas H

    2015-05-01

    The psychoanalytic treatment model of neurotic disorders was applied "experimentally," usually without concomitant pharmacotherapy, to psychotic disorders in the mid to late 20th century at a private institution (Chestnut Lodge) in Maryland. A long-term follow-up (by this author) essentially documented such an approach to be ineffective but suggested that initial treatment earlier in the development of disorder might prevent or ameliorate the "dementia" of dementia praecox. The opportunity to actually measure the effect of earlier detection and treatment became apparent to this author on sabbatical leave in Stavanger, Norway. The sectorized Norwegian health care system made it possible to engineer early detection of first psychosis in an "experimental" health care sector and compare their outcome to that of first onset patients from two control "usual detection" health care sectors. Early detection was engineered in the experimental sector with educational campaigns about the signs and symptoms of first psychosis targeting the sector's doctors, educators, and the general public through massive educational campaigns. The result was clear. Early detection and treatment resulted in a significantly better symptomatic, social, and instrumental outcome in the experimental sectors compared with "usual detection" sectors, a difference that lasted up to a 10-year follow-up (and perhaps permanently). These events and findings will be reviewed to assert that intervention timing may be far more important than intervention type in the overall strategy of antipsychotic interventions.

  13. Domiciliary intervention in psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis, Ona; Palma, Carol; Farriols, Núria

    2017-11-01

    This theoretical study reviews the main findings and research on home-based treatment for psychosis. The principal purpose was to analyze the various types of home-based service and make recommendations for a service that would meet the needs of both first-episode and resistant patients. We compare the Early Intervention Service, which aims to reduce the range of untreated psychosis (DUP) with other types of home-care and similar interventions that have already been implemented: crisis resolution home teams (CRHTs), Open Dialogue Approach (ODA), social skills training (SST) and foster homes. We searched electronic bibliographic databases including PubMed, PsycINFO, and Discovery for relevant publications appearing between 2005 and 2015. Ninetythree publications were deemed eligible for inclusion; 9 of these were systematic reviews and the rest were scientific papers or books. We describe in this review the most widely used home-based interventions, including individual and family therapy. Multidisciplinary teams carry out all the interventions discussed. There does not appear to be a form of psychotherapy, which is effective in treating resistant patients. Home-based interventions improve adherence to treatment, everyday living and social skills and also have a beneficial impact on family conflicts and other social conflicts. As a whole result, the number of incomes is reduced, patients’ quality of life and autonomy are increased and inclusion and community living are improved.

  14. Premorbid multivariate prediction of adult psychosis-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Kline, Emily; Jameson, Nicole D.

    2015-01-01

    whose parents had no mental illness, and children with at least one parent with a non-psychotic psychiatric diagnosis). Premorbid neurological factors and an indication of social function, as measured when participants were 10-13years of age, were combined to predict psychosis-spectrum disorders...... in adulthood. Through a combination of childhood predictors, the model correctly classified 82% (27 of 33) of the participants who eventually developed a psychosis-spectrum outcome in adulthood. With replication, multivariate premorbid prediction, including genetic risk, social, and neurological variables......, could potentially be a useful complementary approach to identifying individuals at risk for developing psychosis-spectrum disorders....

  15. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Neuropsychological profiles in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis: relationship to psychosis and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodberry, Kristen A; Seidman, Larry J; Giuliano, Anthony J; Verdi, Mary B; Cook, William L; McFarlane, William R

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing neuropsychological (NP) functioning of individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis may be useful for prediction of psychosis and understanding functional outcome. The degree to which NP impairments are associated with general cognitive ability and/or later emergence of full psychosis in CHR samples requires study with well-matched controls. We assessed NP functioning across eight cognitive domains in a sample of 73 CHR youth, 13 of whom developed psychotic-level symptoms after baseline assessment, and 34 healthy comparison (HC) subjects. Groups were matched on age, sex, ethnicity, handedness, subject and parent grade attainment, and median family income, and were comparable on WRAT-3 Reading, an estimate of premorbid IQ. Profile analysis was used to examine group differences and the role of IQ in profile shape. The CHR sample demonstrated a significant difference in overall magnitude of NP impairment but only a small and nearly significant difference in profile shape, primarily due to a large impairment in olfactory identification. Individuals who subsequently developed psychotic-level symptoms demonstrated large impairments in verbal IQ, verbal memory and olfactory identification comparable in magnitude to first episode samples. CHR status may be associated with moderate generalized cognitive impairments marked by some degree of selective impairment in olfaction and verbal memory. Impairments were greatest in those who later developed psychotic symptoms. Future study of olfaction in CHR samples may enhance early detection and specification of neurodevelopmental mechanisms of risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Early psychosis and aggression: predictors and prevalence of violent behaviour amongst individuals with early onset psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidel, Alicia; Lecomte, Tania; Greaves, Caroline; Sahlstrom, Kimberly; Yuille, John C

    2010-01-01

    Studies in the area of psychosis and violence to date suggest that those who suffer from psychosis are at higher risk for perpetration of such aggressive behaviours. In fact, it has been suggested that variables such as substance use and personality may mediate this relationship. Other variables, such as childhood physical abuse, might also be implicated in the etiology. In the current study, a sample of one hundred and eighteen participants with a primary diagnosis of psychosis were interviewed and prevalence rates for aggressive experiences were as follows: history of trouble with the law (45%), history of emotional abuse (9.6%), physical abuse (38.8%), and sexual abuse (60.2%). With regard to perpetration, 69.6% reported verbal or physical aggression (69.6%), and further, 61% reported problems with substances. Logistic regression procedures were used with a number of the variables under study and relationships were evidenced between psychopathy scores, history of abuse, and regular drug use. History of child abuse was related to violence history, with those who were victims of child abuse being more likely to be violent in later life. In addition higher scores on the psychopathy measure were linked with violence history. This study was a first step towards identifying persons suffering from a mental illness who may be at risk for violence by identifying who, among first episode clients, may be more likely to perpetrate violent behaviours. Targeted interventions and strategies may be further refined so that individuals receiving mental health services may be better served.

  18. Dependency, detachment and psychopathology in a nonclinical sample: General relations and gender differences. Is there a new line of inquiry on paranoid pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Abuín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio, se administraron tanto el Test del Perfil de la Relación de Bornstein (RPT como el cuestionario de 90 síntomas de Derogatis (SCl-90-R a una muestra no clínica de 119 sujetos de Madrid. La dependencia saludable, el desapego disfuncional y la sobredependencia destructiva (subescalas del RPT fueron evaluadas y correlacionadas con las dimensiones de psicopatología del SCL-90- R. La sobredependencia destructiva correlacionó positivamente con todas las dimensiones de psicopatología. Por el contrario, la dependencia saludable correlacionó negativamente con todas estas dimensiones de psicopatología. Se han encontrado diferencias de género con respecto a la correlación entre el desapego disfuncional y la ideación paranoide. En las mujeres, el desapego disfuncional correlacionó positivamente con al ideación paranoide, mientras que en los hombres esta correlación fue negativa y no significativa. Estas diferencias de género en la relación entre el desapego disfuncional y la ideación paranoide sugieren una nueva línea de investigación sobre la patología paranoide. Se exploran además las puntuaciones de psicopatología del SCL-90-R en diferentes grupos de individuos con diferentes perfiles de dependenciadesapego, a partir de las puntuaciones del Test del Perfil de Relación.

  19. Psychosis and the control of lucid dreaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Bezerra Mota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dreaming and psychosis share important features, such as intrinsic senseperceptions independent of external stimulation, and a general lack of criticism that is associated with reduced frontal cerebral activity. Awareness of dreaming while a dream is happening defines lucid dreaming (LD, a state in which the prefrontal cortex is more active than during regular dreaming. For this reason, LD has been proposed to be potentially therapeutic for psychotic patients. According to this view, psychotic patients would be expected to report LD less frequently, and with lower control ability, than healthy subjects. Furthermore, psychotic patients able to experience LD should present milder psychiatric symptoms, in comparison with psychotic patients unable to experience LD. To test these hypotheses, we investigated LD features (occurrence, control abilities, frequency, and affective valence and psychiatric symptoms (measure by PANSS, BPRS and automated speech analysis in 45 subjects with psychotic symptoms (25 with Schizophrenia (S and 20 with Bipolar Disorder (B diagnosis versus 28 non-psychotic control (C subjects. Psychotic lucid dreamers reported control of their dreams more frequently (67% of S and 73% of B than non-psychotic lucid dreamers (only 23% of C; S > C with p=0. 0283, B > C with p=0.0150. Importantly, there was no clinical advantage for lucid dreamers among psychotic patients, even for the diagnostic question specifically related to lack of judgment and insight. Despite some limitations (e.g. transversal design, large variation of medications, these preliminary results support the notion that lucid dreaming is associated with psychosis, but falsify the hypotheses that we set out to test. A possible explanation is that psychosis enhances the experience of internal reality in detriment of external reality, and therefore lucid dreamers with psychotic symptoms would be more able to control their internal reality than non-psychotic lucid dreamers

  20. Psychosis and the Control of Lucid Dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Natália B; Resende, Adara; Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2016-01-01

    Dreaming and psychosis share important features, such as intrinsic sense perceptions independent of external stimulation, and a general lack of criticism that is associated with reduced frontal cerebral activity. Awareness of dreaming while a dream is happening defines lucid dreaming (LD), a state in which the prefrontal cortex is more active than during regular dreaming. For this reason, LD has been proposed to be potentially therapeutic for psychotic patients. According to this view, psychotic patients would be expected to report LD less frequently, and with lower control ability, than healthy subjects. Furthermore, psychotic patients able to experience LD should present milder psychiatric symptoms, in comparison with psychotic patients unable to experience LD. To test these hypotheses, we investigated LD features (occurrence, control abilities, frequency, and affective valence) and psychiatric symptoms (measure by PANSS, BPRS, and automated speech analysis) in 45 subjects with psychotic symptoms [25 with Schizophrenia (S) and 20 with Bipolar Disorder (B) diagnosis] versus 28 non-psychotic control (C) subjects. Psychotic lucid dreamers reported control of their dreams more frequently (67% of S and 73% of B) than non-psychotic lucid dreamers (only 23% of C; S > C with p = 0.0283, B > C with p = 0.0150). Importantly, there was no clinical advantage for lucid dreamers among psychotic patients, even for the diagnostic question specifically related to lack of judgment and insight. Despite some limitations (e.g., transversal design, large variation of medications), these preliminary results support the notion that LD is associated with psychosis, but falsify the hypotheses that we set out to test. A possible explanation is that psychosis enhances the experience of internal reality in detriment of external reality, and therefore lucid dreamers with psychotic symptoms would be more able to control their internal reality than non-psychotic lucid dreamers. Training dream

  1. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Inpatients with Psychosis (the REACH Study): Protocol for Treatment Development and Pilot Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Davis, Carter H.; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Johnson, Jennifer E.; Mueser, Kim T.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders frequently require treatment at inpatient hospitals during periods of acute illness for crisis management and stabilization. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a “third wave” cognitive-behavioral intervention that employs innovative mindfulness-based strategies, has shown initial efficacy in randomized controlled trials for improving acute and post-discharge outcomes in patients with psychosis when studied in acute-care psychiatric hospitals in the U.S. However, the intervention has not been widely adopted in its current form because of its use of an individual-only format and delivery by doctoral-level research therapists with extensive prior experience using ACT. The aim of the Researching the Effectiveness of Acceptance-based Coping during Hospitalization (REACH) Study is to adapt a promising acute-care psychosocial treatment for inpatients with psychosis, and to pilot test its effectiveness in a routine inpatient setting. More specifically, we describe our plans to: (a) further develop and refine the treatment and training protocols, (b) conduct an open trial and make further modifications based on the experience gained, and (c) conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial in preparation for a future fully-powered clinical trial testing the effectiveness of ACT. PMID:28475123

  2. Measuring quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Friis, Svein; Haahr, U

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) measures are increasingly recognized as necessary parts of outcome assessments in psychosis. The present paper is a comprehensive study of patients with first-episode psychosis where QoL is measured by the commonly used Lehman Quality of Life Interview (L-QoLI). The aim...... is to examine if the L-QoLI maintain its original structure when used in a group of patients with first-episode psychosis, and to investigate what determines global subjective QoL with a specific emphasis on premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and clinical symptoms. The study indicates...... of compromised function at this stage produces poor satisfaction with life rather than a downward readjustment of expectations....

  3. Depression and quality of life in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renwick, Laoise

    2012-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has gained recognition as a valid measure of outcome in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to determine the influence of specific groups of depressive symptoms on separate domains of subjectively appraised QOL.

  4. Depression and depressive symptoms in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romm, Kristin Lie; Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Berg, Akiah Ottesen; Barrett, Elizabeth Ann; Faerden, Ann; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence and pattern of lifetime Diagnostic and Structural Manual of Mental Disorders (fourth version) major depressive episodes, and the relationship between patient characteristics and current severity of depressive symptoms in first episode psychosis patients (FEPP). A total of 122 FEPP from the ongoing longitudinal thematically organized psychosis research study were included at first treatment. A total of 58 patients (48%) had experienced one or more major depressive episodes; 21 (17%) before onset of psychosis and 37 (30%) during or after onset of psychosis. Poor premorbid childhood adjustment, substance abuse, and excitative symptoms at start of treatment were statistically significant associated with higher current severity of depressive symptoms. Alcohol use was significantly associated with current severity of depression in men, while excitative symptoms were associated in women. Thus depressive symptoms are frequent among FEPP, with indications of gender specific differences in patient characteristics that might imply different approaches to treatment.

  5. Complete remission of epileptic psychosis after temporal lobectomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Renato Luiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient with refractory complex partial seizures since 15 years of age, recurrent postictal psychotic episodes since 35 which evolved to a chronic refractory interictal psychosis and MRI with right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. After a comprehensive investigation (video-EEG intensive monitoring, interictal and ictal SPECT, and a neuropsychological evaluation including WADA test she was submitted to a right temporal lobectomy. Since then, she has been seizure-free with remission of psychosis, although with some persistence of personality traits (hiperreligiosity, viscosity which had been present before surgery. This case supports the idea that temporal lobectomy can be a safe and effective therapeutic measure for patients with MTS, refractory epilepsy and recurrent postictal epileptic psychosis or interictal epileptic psychosis with postictal exacerbation.

  6. Social anxiety in first-episode psychosis: the role of childhood trauma and adult attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Birchwood, Max

    2014-07-01

    Social anxiety is among the most prevalent affective disturbances among people with psychosis. The developmental pathways associated with its emergence in psychosis, however, remain unclear. The aim of this study is to identify the developmental risk factors associated with social anxiety disorder in first-episode psychosis and to investigate whether social anxiety in psychosis and non-psychosis is associated with similar or different adult attachment styles. This is a cross-sectional study. A sample of individuals with social anxiety disorder (with or without psychosis) was compared with a sample with psychosis only and healthy controls on childhood trauma, dysfunctional parenting and adult attachment. Childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting (psocial anxiety (with or without psychosis) compared to those with psychosis only and healthy controls. There were no differences in childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting between socially anxious people with and without psychosis. Higher levels of insecure adult attachment (x(2)1=38.5, psocial anxiety group (with or without psychosis) compared to the psychosis only and healthy controls. Childhood adversities were not associated with insecure adult attachment in people with social anxiety (with or without psychosis). Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study we cannot infer causal relationships between early risk factors, including childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting, and social anxiety. Also, the use of self-report measures of attachment could be subject to biases. Shared developmental risk factors are implicated in the emergence of affective disorders in psychosis and non-psychosis. Social anxiety in psychosis is associated with insecurity in adult attachments which does not arise a result of adverse developmental pathways. Understanding the bio-psycho-social risk factors for affective dysregulation in psychosis could inform psychological interventions about the role of developmental anomaly and

  7. GAD65 Antibodies, Chronic Psychosis, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Yarlagadda, Atmaram; Taylor, Jerome H.; Hampe, Christiane S.; Alfson, Elizabeth; Clayton, Anita H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of gamma aminobutyric acid, an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Autoantibodies to the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 isoform have been associated with chronic psychotic disorders and are found in neurons and pancreatic islets. Blood samples were collected from normal controls (n=16), individuals with chronic psychosis with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=3), and patients with chronic psychosis without diabetes (n=8). No differe...

  8. Childhood psychosis and neurofibromatosis--more than a coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillberg, C; Forsell, C

    1984-03-01

    Three children with both childhood psychosis and neurofibromatosis are reported from a total population screening of psychotic disorder in childhood that had produced 51 cases born in the years 1962-1976 in the Göteborg region, Sweden. The findings suggest that the simultaneous occurrence of neurofibromatosis and childhood psychosis might be more than a coincidence. Underlying monoaminergic dysfunction is postulated as one possible reason for the finding.

  9. Premorbid Personality and Insight in First-Episode Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Maria S.; Garcia-Jalon, Elena; Gilleen, James K.; David, Anthony S.; Peralta MD, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Insight in psychosis and schizophrenia is considered a complex biopsychosocial phenomenon. Premorbid personality is regarded by some authors as part of the substrate to many psychiatric phenomena, but it is not clear if this applies to insight. Aim: To examine longitudinal relationships between personality traits and insight dimensions in first-episode psychosis. Methods: One hundred consecutive antipsychotic-naïve first-episode nonaffective psychotic patients admitted to hospital...

  10. Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in Untreated First-Episode Psychosis in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şimşek, Şeref; Gençoğlan, Salih; Yüksel, Tuğba; Kaplan, İbrahim; Alaca, Rümeysa; Aktaş, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been reported to play a role in the psychopathology of schizophrenia, though only a few studies have investigated the relationship between early-onset schizophrenia and oxidative stress. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the level of oxidative stress and the presence of DNA damage in first-episode psychosis (FEP) in adolescents. This study was conducted in the Department of Child Psychiatry of the Dicle University Hospital. It included 20 adolescent patients (age 11-17 years) with psychosis (acute psychosis, schizophreniform disorder, or schizophrenia) according to DSM-IV criteria who had received no previous psychiatric therapy (patient group) and 20 age/gender-matched healthy adolescents (control group). Structured psychiatric interviews [Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL) and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS)] were conducted on the patients, and the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale was used to evaluate the severity of disease. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), coenzyme Q (CoQ), and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were determined using the ELISA method and commercial ELISA kits. The mean age was 14.5 ± 1.6 years in the FEP group (male-to-female ratio: 8/12) and 14.4 ± 1.5 years in the control group (male-to-female ratio: 8/12). There were no differences between the patient and control groups in terms of SOD, GPx, or 8-OHdG values (p > 0.05). This study on DNA damage and oxidative stress in FEP in adolescents had a small sample size, and our data suggest that oxidative stress is associated with a chronic disease course rather than being an early sign of early-onset schizophrenia. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Disguised hysteria in a child psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pualuan de Gomberoff, L; Gomberoff, M

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the stages are presented in the psychoanalysis of an eight-and-a-half-year-old boy consulting with a worsening symptomatology that has been evolving for more than one year. The trigger element seems to have been the birth of a brother. During the analysis the relation was clear between this brother's birth, the mother's abortions, and the previous death of a brother. The interpretation of the homicidal omnipotent fantasies and the analyst's reception of projective identifications, destructive anxieties, and castrating anxieties of the patient produced, apparently, an unimagined fast improvement of the psychotic symptoms. This took the authors retrospectively to raise the hypothesis that this patient's psychosis could be a disguised child hysteria.

  12. Schizencephaly and Psychosis: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Carvalho Aguiar Melo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizencephaly is a rare malformation of the central nervous system defined as a gray matter-lined cleft filled with cerebrospinal fluid that extends from the pial surface to the ventricle. Few cases of association with psychosis were reported in the scientific literature. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman, admitted into a psychiatric hospital with crises of psychomotor agitation, disorganized and erotized behavior, persecutory and self-reference delusions, and auditory and visual hallucinations. She also reported seizures since her childhood. A head CT scan revealed a large subarachnoid space communication with the adjacent lateral ventricle in the topography of occipital, temporal, and parietal lobes to the right, suggestive of schizencephaly.

  13. Depressive symptoms in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmez, Nasrettin; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Evensen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The present study examined if any patient characteristics at baseline predicted depressive symptoms at 10 years and whether patients prone to depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment had a different prognosis in the following years. METHOD: A total of 299 first-episode psychosis...... (FEP) patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were assessed for depressive symptoms with PANSS depression item (g6) at baseline, and 1, 2, 5 and 10 years of follow up. At 10 years, depressive symptoms were also assessed with Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). A PANSS g6 ≥ 4......: Depressive symptoms are frequent among FEP patients at baseline but decrease after treatment because their general symptoms have been initiated. Patients with poor social functioning in childhood and alcohol use at baseline are more prone to have depressive symptoms at 10 years of follow up. Patients...

  14. Dissociative Disorders: Between Neurosis and Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Devillé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissociative disorders are a set of disorders defined by a disturbance affecting functions that are normally integrated with a prevalence of 2.4 percent in industrialised countries. These disorders are often poorly diagnosed or misdiagnosed because of sharing common clinical features with psychotic disorders, but requiring a very different trajectory of care. Repeated clinical situations in a crisis centre in Geneva provided us with a critical overview of current evidence of knowledge in clinical and etiopathological field about dissociative disorders. Because of their multiple expressions and the overlap with psychotic disorders, we focused on the clinical aspects using three different situations to better understand their specificity and to extend our thinking to the relevance of terms “neurosis” and “psychosis.” Finally, we hope that this work might help physicians and psychiatrists to become more aware of this complex set of disorders while making a diagnosis.

  15. Dissociative Disorders: Between Neurosis and Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillé, C.; Moeglin, C.; Sentissi, O.

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative disorders are a set of disorders defined by a disturbance affecting functions that are normally integrated with a prevalence of 2.4 percent in industrialised countries. These disorders are often poorly diagnosed or misdiagnosed because of sharing common clinical features with psychotic disorders, but requiring a very different trajectory of care. Repeated clinical situations in a crisis centre in Geneva provided us with a critical overview of current evidence of knowledge in clinical and etiopathological field about dissociative disorders. Because of their multiple expressions and the overlap with psychotic disorders, we focused on the clinical aspects using three different situations to better understand their specificity and to extend our thinking to the relevance of terms “neurosis” and “psychosis.” Finally, we hope that this work might help physicians and psychiatrists to become more aware of this complex set of disorders while making a diagnosis. PMID:25405051

  16. Personality disorders in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Haahr, Ulrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of personality disorders in the early course of fi rst-episode psychosis and their likely presence in the premorbid period. Fifty-fi ve patients were enrolled at baseline and premorbid function was evaluated by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale....... Thirty-three of these of the patients were assessed at two-year follow-up for comorbid personality disorders by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders and by the self-report instrument Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. Half of the patients met the criteria of two...... or more personality disorders, while one-third of the patients did not fulfi l the criteria for any personality disorder. The schizoid and the avoidant were the most frequent per- sonality disorders and both were associated with social withdrawal during childhood and adolescence. The limitation...

  17. Personality disorders in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Haahr, Ulrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of personality disorders in the early course of first-episode psychosis and their likely presence in the premorbid period. Fifty-five patients were enrolled at baseline and premorbid function was evaluated by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale....... Thirty-three of these of the patients were assessed at two-year follow-up for comorbid personality disorders by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders and by the self-report instrument Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II. Half of the patients met the criteria of two...... or more personality disorders, while one-third of the patients did not fulfil the criteria for any personality disorder. The schizoid and the avoidant were the most frequent personality disorders and both were associated with social withdrawal during childhood and adolescence. The limitation of the study...

  18. A shared genetic propensity underlies experiences of bullying victimization in late childhood and self-rated paranoid thinking in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; McGuire, Phillip; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Plomin, Robert; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-05-01

    Bullying is a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences (PEs). Whether bullying is associated with particular PEs, and the extent to which genes and environments influence the association, are unknown. This study investigated which specific PEs in adolescence are associated with earlier bullying victimization and the genetic and environmental contributions underlying their association. Participants were 4826 twin pairs from a longitudinal community-based twin study in England and Wales who reported on their bullying victimization at the age of 12 years. Measures of specific PEs (self-rated Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive disorganization, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and parent-rated Negative Symptoms) were recorded at age of 16 years. Childhood bullying victimization was most strongly associated with Paranoia in adolescence (r = .26; P bullying victimization and Paranoia were both heritable (35% and 52%, respectively) with unique environmental influences (39% and 48%, respectively), and bullying victimization showed common environmental influences (26%). The association between bullying victimization and Paranoia operated almost entirely via genetic influences (bivariate heritability = 93%), with considerable genetic overlap (genetic correlation = .55). In contrast to the assumed role of bullying victimization as an environmental trigger, these data suggest that bullying victimization in late childhood is particularly linked to self-rated Paranoia in adolescence via a shared genetic propensity. Clinically, individuals with a history of bullying victimization are predicted to be particularly susceptible to paranoid symptoms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  19. Is the comprehension of idiomatic sentences indeed impaired in paranoid Schizophrenia? A window into semantic processing deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciarelli, Francesca; Gamberoni, Tania; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Lo Russo, Leo; Pedrazzi, Francesca; Melati, Ermanno; Cacciari, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients have been reported to be more impaired in comprehending non-literal than literal language since early studies on proverbs. Preference for literal rather than figurative interpretations continues to be documented. The main aim of this study was to establish whether patients are indeed able to use combinatorial semantic processing to comprehend literal sentences and both combinatorial analysis, and retrieval of pre-stored meanings to comprehend idiomatic sentences. The study employed a sentence continuation task in which subjects were asked to decide whether a target word was a sensible continuation of a previous sentence fragment to investigate idiomatic and literal sentence comprehension in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Patients and healthy controls were faster in accepting sensible continuations than in rejecting non-sensible ones in both literal and idiomatic sentences. Patients were as accurate as controls in comprehending literal and idiomatic sentences, but they were overall slower than controls in all conditions. Once the contribution of cognitive covariates was partialled out, the response times (RTs) to sensible idiomatic continuations of patients did not significantly differ from those of controls. This suggests that the state of residual schizophrenia did not contribute to slower processing of sensible idioms above and beyond the cognitive deficits that are typically associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25346676

  20. The Flexible Function of the Modern Kleinian Psychoanalytic Approach: Interpreting Through the Unbearable Security of Paranoid and Depressive Phantasies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waska, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Working to establish analytic contact (Waska, 2007) with a patient involves the verbal act of interpretation. But, how one interprets and what we try to hold in words is not the same with each patient. Each patient requires, invites, provokes and responds to a unique mixture of interpretive elements or approaches. The projective identification process that is so often the bedrock of the transference, and therefore the catalyst of the counter-transference, forms the psychological climate between patient and analyst. Case material is used to explore a Modern Kleinian interpretive approach with both a very entrenched depressive position (Klein, 1935, 1940) patient and a very primitive paranoid-schizoid (Klein, 1946) patient. Both these individuals desired relief from their symptoms of anxiety, anger, emptiness, and guilt. But, their unbearable unconscious phantasies offered pathological security that they were familiar with and therefore they preferred the known internal trauma and chaos to facing the unknown and undefined reality of self and other that change, grief, and growth would bring.

  1. A Shared Genetic Propensity Underlies Experiences of Bullying Victimization in Late Childhood and Self-Rated Paranoid Thinking in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; McGuire, Phillip; Cardno, Alastair G.; Freeman, Daniel; Plomin, Robert; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a risk factor for developing psychotic experiences (PEs). Whether bullying is associated with particular PEs, and the extent to which genes and environments influence the association, are unknown. This study investigated which specific PEs in adolescence are associated with earlier bullying victimization and the genetic and environmental contributions underlying their association. Method: Participants were 4826 twin pairs from a longitudinal community-based twin study in England and Wales who reported on their bullying victimization at the age of 12 years. Measures of specific PEs (self-rated Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive disorganization, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and parent-rated Negative Symptoms) were recorded at age of 16 years. Results: Childhood bullying victimization was most strongly associated with Paranoia in adolescence (r = .26; P bullying victimization and Paranoia were both heritable (35% and 52%, respectively) with unique environmental influences (39% and 48%, respectively), and bullying victimization showed common environmental influences (26%). The association between bullying victimization and Paranoia operated almost entirely via genetic influences (bivariate heritability = 93%), with considerable genetic overlap (genetic correlation = .55). Conclusion: In contrast to the assumed role of bullying victimization as an environmental trigger, these data suggest that bullying victimization in late childhood is particularly linked to self-rated Paranoia in adolescence via a shared genetic propensity. Clinically, individuals with a history of bullying victimization are predicted to be particularly susceptible to paranoid symptoms. PMID:25323579

  2. Practical psychological management of old age psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera-Ortiz, L; Reneses-Prieto, B

    2003-01-01

    Late-onset forms of psychosis have been the object of increasing interest in recent years. Despite the fact that there are still many obscure areas, significant advances in the pathophysiology, delimitation of risk factors, clinical presentation, neuropsychology and the pharmacological treatment have been made. Nevertheless, the psychological aspects of both aetiology and treatment of these late forms of psychosis have received much less attention than the rest. In contrast with that, the clinician is confronted with the need to manage patients that are reluctant to take medications and in which the outcome of pharmacological treatments is not always optimal. The elderly psychotic patient should not be excluded from the possibility of receiving any kind of psychological help. He may benefit from adaptations of different psychotherapeutic measures that can include the more classical techniques as psychodynamic oriented and behavioural-cognitive therapies or the newer forms of treatment specially designed for the aged, as reminiscence or psychomotor therapy. In any case, to obtain any result the patient needs to be managed in a way that goes well further the prescription of a neuroleptic drug. In this paper we review some of the most important psychological cues for the understanding of the elderly psychotic patient. Furthermore, we divide the therapeutic relationship over the time in three parts: The initial contact, the central phase and the termination. We offer some keys for the practical management of the patient in each of these phases, with special attention to the adherence to treatment and early identification of treatment-emergent complications like depressive symptoms or hypochondriac concerns.

  3. Online social networking in people with psychosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Priebe, Stefan; Giacco, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    Online social networking might facilitate the establishment of social contacts for people with psychosis, who are often socially isolated by the symptoms and consequences of their disorder. We carried out a systematic review exploring available evidence on the use of online social networking in people with psychosis. The review was conducted following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Included studies examined the use of the online social networking by people with an a priori diagnosis of psychosis (inclusive of bipolar disorder). Data from included studies were extracted and narratively synthesised. A total of 11 studies, published between 2005 and 2013, reported data on online social networking in people with psychosis. People with psychosis seem to spend more time in chat rooms or playing online games than control groups. The use of other online tools, such as Facebook or communication through e-mail, is lower or the same than controls. Online social networking was used by patients with psychosis for establishing new relationships, maintaining relationships/reconnecting with people and online peer support. Online social networking, in the form of forums or online chats, could play a role in strategies aimed at enhancing social networks and reduce the risk of isolation in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. [Acute paraphrenic states in the clinical presentation of attack-like schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotskaya, N V

    2015-01-01

    To study a psychopathological structure of the acute paraphrenic syndrome in different variants of schizophrenia course. Sixty patients were examined. Three variants of acute paraphrenic syndrome with the domination of sensitive delusions, Kandinsky-Clerambault's syndrome or confabulatory disorders were singled out. Acute paraphrenic syndrome with sensitive delusions was characteristic of recurrent schizophrenia. Slow-progressive attack-like schizophrenia was characterized by the acute paraphrenic syndrome with sensitive delusions in the combination with interpretative delusions. Juvenile malignant schizophrenia was characterized by the acute paraphrenic syndrome with the domination of Kandinsky-Clerambault's syndrome and sensitive delusions. Acute paraphrenic syndrome with the domination of Kandinsky-Clerambault's syndrome and acute paraphrenic syndrome with confabulatory disorders were identified in patients with paranoid attack-like schizophrenia similar to chronic schizophrenia. The nosologic specificity of the acute paraphrenic syndrome for attack-like schizophrenia was confirmed.

  5. Medical evaluation abnormalities in acute psychotic patients seen at the emergency department of Muhimbili national hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Yusuf*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: In our cohort, history and physical examination findings were not sufficient to rule out serious medical conditions among patients presenting with acute psychosis. The observed rate of laboratory abnormalities was higher than previously published rates from high-resource settings. Based on our findings, patients presenting with psychosis to an acute care facility in this region should be evaluated with physical examination and laboratory studies to rule out serious underlying medical pathology.

  6. Predisposition to depressive symptoms in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: constitutional-biological, socio-demographic factors and the debut of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. S. Zhyvago

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify the constitutional-biological, socio-demographic (microsocial and clinical-dynamic (the debut of the disease factors of predisposition to the depressive symptoms development in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Materials and methods. A clinical-anamnestic, socio-demographic, clinical-psychopathological and pathopsychological examinations of 82 patients with paranoid schizophrenia with depressive symptoms identified and compared with 47 patients with paranoid schizophrenia without depressive symptoms. The study was managed using the PANSS, CDSS, HDRS scales and a questionnaire for the assessment of social functioning and quality of the mentally ill life. Groups did not differ in the basic demographic indicators. The study of constitutional and biological predisposition factors included the study of heredity and premorbid characterological features of patients. Socio-demographic (before the onset of the disease microsocial conditions and the current stage factors –family relationships; characteristics of living conditions; financial position; the quality of nutrition. To factors of the disease onset were attributed: age debut; factors that preceded the first episode; syndromes of the first episode; the first reference to a psychiatrist; suicidal statements and intentions. Results. It was evaluated the prognostic significance of individual predisposing factors to depression in patients with paranoid schizophrenia and found the following factors of predisposition (p<0.05: the heredity of schizophrenia and affective disorders; low level of erudition, combined with emotional and volitional immaturity, anxiety, prone to mood swings; low income and the cost of food, clothing and leisure; poor living conditions; unstable or conflictual family relationships; the presence of the first episode of affective symptoms, such as depressive, which is stored in the further course of the disease, as well as anhedonia, sleep and appetite

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Individual Second-Generation vs First-Generation Antipsychotics in First Episode Psychosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Gallego, Juan A.; Robinson, Delbert G.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Kane, John M.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2012-01-01

    Because early treatment choice is critical in first episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (FES), this meta-analysis compared efficacy and tolerability of individual second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) with first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) in FES. We conducted systematic literature search (until 12/31/2010) and meta-analysis of acute, randomized trials with ≥1 FGA vs. SGA comparison; patients in their first episode of psychosis and diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders; ...

  8. Haloperidol plus promethazine for psychosis-induced aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huf, Gisele; Alexander, Jacob; Gandhi, Pinky; Allen, Michael H

    2016-11-25

    Health services often manage agitated or violent people, and such behaviour is particularly prevalent in emergency psychiatric services (10%). The drugs used in such situations should ensure that the person becomes calm swiftly and safely. To examine whether haloperidol plus promethazine is an effective treatment for psychosis-induced aggression. On 6 May 2015 we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register of Trials, which is compiled by systematic searches of major resources (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, BIOSIS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, and registries of clinical trials) and their monthly updates, handsearches, grey literature, and conference proceedings. All randomised clinical trials with useable data focusing on haloperidol plus promethazine for psychosis-induced aggression. We independently extracted data. For binary outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we estimated the mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% CI. We employed a fixed-effect model for analyses. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created 'Summary of findings' tables using GRADE. We found two new randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from the 2015 update searching. The review now includes six studies, randomising 1367 participants and presenting data relevant to six comparisons.When haloperidol plus promethazine was compared with haloperidol alone for psychosis-induced aggression for the outcome not tranquil or asleep at 30 minutes, the combination treatment was clearly more effective (n=316, 1 RCT, RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.87, high-quality evidence). There were 10 occurrences of acute dystonia in the haloperidol alone arm and none in the combination group. The trial was stopped early as haloperidol alone was considered to be too toxic.When haloperidol plus promethazine was compared with olanzapine, high-quality data showed both approaches to be tranquillising. It was

  9. Do People With Psychosis Have Specific Difficulties Regulating Emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M; Hartmann, Maike; Köther, Ulf; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties in emotion regulation (ER) are present in psychotic disorders, but their precise nature is not yet fully understood and it is unclear which difficulties are unique to psychosis compared with other disorders. This study investigated whether ER difficulties in psychosis are more prominent for the ability to modify emotions or for the ability to tolerate and accept them. Furthermore, it investigated whether ER difficulties occur for sadness, anxiety, anger and shame likewise. ER skills were assessed in participants with psychotic disorders (n = 37), participants with depression (n = 30) and healthy controls (n = 28) using the Emotion Regulation Skill Questionnaire that asks participants to rate the intensity of different emotions over the past week and the skills employed to handle each of them. Compared with healthy controls, participants with psychosis showed reduced skills related to awareness, understanding and acceptance of potentially distressing emotions, but not in the ability to modify them. These differences remained significant after controlling for depression. Participants with psychosis showed reduced ER skills in regard to all of the assessed emotions compared with the healthy controls, despite the fact that they only reported sadness as being significantly more intense. The participants with depression showed a similar pattern of ER skills to the psychosis sample, although with a tendency towards even more pronounced difficulties. It is concluded that psychosis is characterized by difficulties in using specific ER skills related to awareness, understanding and acceptance to regulate anger, shame, anxiety and sadness. These difficulties are not unique to psychosis but nevertheless present a promising treatment target. The participants with psychosis found it more difficult to be aware of their emotions, to understand them and to accept them than the healthy control group. However, they reported equal skills when it came to

  10. Trust, choice and power in mental health care: experiences of patients with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugharne, Richard; Priebe, Stefan; McCabe, Rose; Garland, Natasha; Clifford, Damian

    2012-09-01

    Trust, choice and power are critical issues in clinical practice, public policies and a post-modern understanding of mental health care. We aimed to investigate the experiences and attitudes of patients with psychosis in relation to trust, choice and power. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews with patients with psychotic disorders in care of NHS services. The interviews were subjected to thematic analysis. Patients discussed aspects of their care in terms of dimensions that enhance or undermine trust, choice and power. Two interpretive themes emerged from this data. First, patients perceive the need for a shifting balance of power, according to the severity of their illness and their own experience of care, but feel that threats of coercion and neglect disable them. Second, they appreciate the expertise of clinicians, but particularly value 'the personal touch' that goes beyond this expertise, including personal disclosure about their own lives, common acts of kindness and conversation outside clinical matters. Patients view trust as a two-way process with responsibility shared between patient and clinician. The active involvement of patients with psychosis in their individual care may be strengthened, particularly when they are not acutely ill and have more experience of their illness. While patients value expertise and respect in interactions with clinicians, they also appreciate a 'personal touch', which may go beyond current notions of professionalism.

  11. First aid guidelines for psychosis in Asian countries: A Delphi consensus study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langlands Robyn L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for how a member of the public should give first aid to a person who is becoming psychotic have been developed for English-speaking countries. However, these guidelines may not be appropriate for use in other cultures. A study was therefore carried out to examine whether it was possible to achieve consensus on guidelines that could apply in a range of Asian countries. Methods A Delphi consensus study was carried out with a panel of 28 Asian mental health clinicians drawn from Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Mongolia, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam. The panel was given a 211 item questionnaire about possible first aid actions and asked to rate whether they thought these should be included in guidelines. Panel members were invited to propose additional items. Results After three Delphi rounds, there were 128 items that were rated as "essential" or "important" by 80% or more of the panel members. These items covered: recognition of psychosis, encouraging and assisting the person to seek help, how to interact with the person, responding to acute psychosis, responding to aggression, and what to do if the person refuses to get professional help. Conclusion Despite the diversity of the countries involved, there was consensus on a core set of first aid items that were considered as suitable for assisting a psychotic person. Future work is needed to develop guidelines for specific countries.

  12. Presenile dementia in a 41-year old male Nigerian medical doctor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Presenile dementia reflects an underlying pathology that affects the cerebral cortex, its sub-cortical connections or both occurring in persons below 65 years of age. In this study, a case report of a 41-yr old medical doctor whose mental illness spanned 8 yrs is presented. Initially he came with paranoid psychosis of the acute ...

  13. Severe psychological disturbance resulting from abuse of nasal decongestants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, G W

    1982-04-01

    A case is reported in which a lady suffered long-term personality change, a paranoid psychosis of several months duration, and an acute delirium, secondary to abuse of Vicks Sinex Nasal Spray and Vicks Vaporub. The problems were reversible on withdrawal of these well used products which have not previously been reported to cause psychological disturbance.

  14. Risk for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy: population based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Ping; Xu, Huilan; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Vestergaard, Mogens; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether age at onset of epilepsy, type of epilepsy, family history of psychosis, or family history of epilepsy affect the risk of schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy.

  15. Visual working memory deterioration preceding relapse in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C L M; Li, Y K; Li, A W Y; Lee, E H M; Chang, W C; Chan, S K W; Lam, S Y; Thornton, A E; Sham, P; Honer, W G; Chen, E Y H

    2016-08-01

    Relapse is distressingly common after the first episode of psychosis, yet it is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Investigating changes in cognitive function preceding relapse may provide new insights into the underlying mechanism of relapse in psychosis. We hypothesized that relapse in fully remitted first-episode psychosis patients was preceded by working memory deterioration. Visual memory and verbal working memory were monitored prospectively in a 1-year randomized controlled trial of remitted first-episode psychosis patients assigned to medication continuation (quetiapine 400 mg/day) or discontinuation (placebo). Relapse (recurrence of positive symptoms of psychosis), visual (Visual Patterns Test) and verbal (Letter-Number span test) working memory and stressful life events were assessed monthly. Remitted first-episode patients (n = 102) participated in the study. Relapsers (n = 53) and non-relapsers (n = 49) had similar baseline demographic and clinical profiles. Logistic regression analyses indicated relapse was associated with visual working memory deterioration 2 months before relapse [odds ratio (OR) 3.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-7.92, P = 0.02], more stressful life events 1 month before relapse (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.20-3.72, P = 0.01) and medication discontinuation (OR 5.52, 95% CI 2.08-14.62, P = 0.001). Visual working memory deterioration beginning 2 months before relapse in remitted first-episode psychosis patients (not baseline predictor) may reflect early brain dysfunction that heralds a psychotic relapse. The deterioration was found to be unrelated to a worsening of psychotic symptoms preceding relapse. Testable predictors offer insight into the brain processes underlying relapse in psychosis.

  16. A three-month longitudinal study of changes in day/night serum total antioxidant capacity in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando L Morera-Fumero

    Full Text Available Free radicals and an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance have been involved in the schizophrenia pathophysiology. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC is a measure of the antioxidant capacity of a system. Day/night changes are a biological characteristic of hormones such as melatonin or cortisol. There is little information about TAC day/night changes in schizophrenia patients. The aim of this research is to study if there are day/night changes in serum TAC levels of schizophrenia patients. Thirty-two DSM-IV schizophrenia paranoid patients were studied. Blood was sampled at 12:00 and 00:00 h at admission, discharge and three months after hospital discharge (TMAHD. TAC results are expressed as mmol of Trolox/L. Patients did not have day/night TAC differences at admission (12:00: 0.67±0.12 vs. 00:00: 0.61±0.14, p>0.14 or discharge (12:00: 0.65±0.15 vs. 00:00: 0.65±0.12, p>0.99. At TMHD, patients had significantly higher TAC levels at midday than midnight (12:00: 0.83±0.10 vs. 00:00: 0.74±0.12, p<0.006 as it has been reported in healthy subjects. There were no significant TAC differences at 12.00 and 00:00 between admission and discharge. At TMAHD, patients had significantly higher TAC levels than at admission and discharge, both at 12:00 and 00:00 h. In conclusion, the absence of day/night serum TAC changes when clinically relapsed and the normalization of day/night serum TAC changes at TMHD can be considered as a biological marker of schizophrenia evolution.

  17. Childhood trauma and cognitive function in first-episode affective and non-affective psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aas, Monica

    2011-06-01

    A history of childhood trauma is reportedly more prevalent in people suffering from psychosis than in the general population. Childhood trauma has also been linked to cognitive abnormalities in adulthood, and cognitive abnormalities, in turn, are one of the key clinical features of psychosis. Therefore, this study investigated whether there was a relationship between childhood trauma and cognitive function in patients with first-episode psychosis. The potential impact of diagnosis (schizophrenia or affective psychosis) and gender on this association was also examined.

  18. Diagnostic and Prognostic Significance of DSM-5 Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in Services for Individuals at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; De Micheli, Andrea; Cappucciati, Marco; Rutigliano, Grazia; Davies, Cathy; Ramella-Cravaro, Valentina; Oliver, Dominic; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Rocchetti, Matteo; Gavaghan, Lauren; Patel, Rashmi; McGuire, Philip

    2017-05-17

    The diagnostic and prognostic significance of the DSM-5-defined Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (DSM-5-APS) in individuals undergoing an ultra high risk (UHR) clinical assessment for suspicion of psychosis risk is unknown. Prospective cohort study including all consecutive help-seeking individuals undergoing both a DSM-5-APS and a Comprehensive Assessment of At Risk Mental States (CAARMS 12/2006) assessment for psychosis risk at the Outreach and Support in South London (OASIS) UHR service (March 2013-April 2014). The diagnostic significance of DSM-5-APS was assessed with percent overall agreement, prevalence bias adjusted kappa, Bowker's test, Stuart-Maxwell test, residual analysis; the prognostic significance with Cox regression, Kaplan-Meier failure function, time-dependent area under the curve (AUC) and net benefits analysis. The impact of specific revisions of the DSM-5-APS was further tested. In 203 help-seeking individuals undergoing UHR assessment, the agreement between the DSM-5-APS and the CAARMS 12/2006 was only moderate (kappa 0.59). Among 142 nonpsychotic cases, those meeting DSM-5-APS criteria had a 5-fold probability (HR = 5.379) of developing psychosis compared to those not meeting DSM-5-APS criteria, with a 21-month cumulative risk of psychosis of 28.17% vs 6.49%, respectively. The DSM-5-APS prognostic accuracy was acceptable (AUC 0.76 at 24 months) and similar to the CAARMS 12/2006. The DSM-5-APS designation may be clinically useful to guide the provision of indicated interventions within a 7%-35% (2-year) range of psychosis risk. The removal of the criterion E or C of the DSM-5-APS may improve its prognostic performance and transdiagnostic value. The DSM-5-APS designation may be clinically useful in individuals accessing clinical services for psychosis prevention.

  19. Strauss (1969) revisited: a psychosis continuum in the general population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Os, J; Hanssen, M; Bijl, R V; Ravelli, A

    2000-09-29

    Although dichotomously defined for clinical purposes, psychosis may exist as a continuous phenotype in nature. A random sample of 7076 men and women aged 18-64years were interviewed by trained lay interviewers with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Those with evidence of psychosis according to the CIDI were additionally interviewed by psychiatrists. For the 17 CIDI core psychosis items, we compared a psychiatrist's rating of hallucinations and/or delusions (Clinical Psychosis; sample prevalence 4.2%) with three other possible positive CIDI ratings of the same items: (i) symptom present, but not clinically relevant (NCR Symptom; sample prevalence 12.9%); (ii) symptom present, but the result of drugs or somatic disorder (Secondary Symptom; sample prevalence 0.6%); (iii) symptom appears present, but there is a plausible explanation (Plausible Symptom; sample prevalence 4.0%). Of the 1237 individuals with any type of positive psychosis rating (sample prevalence 17.5%), only 26 (2.1%) had a DSM-III-R diagnosis of non-affective psychosis. All the different types of psychosis ratings were strongly associated with the presence of psychiatrist-rated Clinical Psychosis (NCR Symptom: OR=3.4; 95% CI: 2.9-3.9; Secondary Symptom: OR=4.5; 95% CI: 2.7-7.7; Plausible Symptom: OR=5.8; 95% CI: 4.7-7.1). Associations with lower age, single marital status, urban dwelling, lower level of education, lower quality of life, depressive symptoms and blunting of affect did not differ qualitatively as a function of type of rating of the psychotic symptom, were similar in individuals with and without any CIDI lifetime diagnosis, and closely resembled those previously reported for schizophrenia. Presence of any rating of hallucinations was strongly associated with any rating of delusions (OR=6.7; 95% CI: 5.6-8.1), regardless of presence of any CIDI lifetime diagnosis. The observation by Strauss (1969. Hallucinations and delusions as points on continua function. Arch. Gen

  20. Clinical correlates of first episode early onset psychosis in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The study of first episode early onset psychosis can yield many clues to understanding the early development of psychosis and guide interventions to decrease psychosis risk and improve outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate the socio-demographic profile and clinical correlates in early onset ...

  1. The clinical impact of a positive family history of psychosis or mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A family history of psychosis is associated with negative clinical characteristics of psychosis. Aim: We aimed to determine the relationship between a family history (in first-degree relatives) of psychosis (FHP) or of any mental illness (FHM), and the clinical features (including cannabis use) of first episode early ...

  2. Psychosocial outcome in patients at clinical high risk of psychosis: a prospective follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salokangas, Raimo K. R.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Heinimaa, Markus; Svirskis, Tanja; Luutonen, Sinikka; From, Tiina; von Reventlow, Heinrich Graf; Juckel, Georg; Linszen, Don; Dingemans, Peter; Birchwood, Max; Patterson, Paul; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    In patients at clinical high risk (CHR) of psychosis, transition to psychosis has been the focus of recent studies. Their broader outcome has received less attention. We studied psychosocial state and outcome in CHR patients. In the European Prediction of Psychosis Study, 244 young help-seeking CHR

  3. Persistence of the extended psychosis phenotype in young people: Link between vulnerability and clinical need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, J.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosis is one of the most severe psychiatric conditions, in terms of both individual and societal burden. The pathway from the earliest and mildest expressions of psychosis to clinical disorder is highly variable and heterogeneous. A better understanding of the psychosis phenotype and its

  4. Social Dysfunction and Diet Outcomes in People with Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Mucheru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis aimed to examine the association of social dysfunction with food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption in people with psychosis from the Hunter New England (HNE catchment site of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP. Social dysfunction and dietary information were collected using standardised tools. Independent binary logistic regressions were used to examine the association between social dysfunction and food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption. Although social dysfunction did not have a statistically significant association with most diet variables, participants with obvious to severe social dysfunction were 0.872 (95% CI (0.778, 0.976 less likely to eat breakfast than those with no social dysfunction p < 0.05. Participants with social dysfunction were therefore, 13% less likely to have breakfast. This paper highlights high rates of social dysfunction, significant food insecurity, and intakes of fruits and vegetables below recommendations in people with psychosis. In light of this, a greater focus needs to be given to dietary behaviours and social dysfunction in lifestyle interventions delivered to people with psychosis. Well-designed observational research is also needed to further examine the relationship between social dysfunction and dietary behaviour in people with psychosis.

  5. Risk factors for psychosis: impaired social and role functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornblatt, Barbara A; Carrión, Ricardo E; Addington, Jean; Seidman, Larry; Walker, Elaine F; Cannon, Tyronne D; Cadenhead, Kristin S; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Tsuang, Ming T; Woods, Scott W; Heinssen, Robert; Lencz, Todd

    2012-11-01

    Risk for psychosis is currently defined primarily on the basis of attenuated positive symptoms (APS), with no inclusion of the functional deficits characteristic of schizophrenia. Impaired social and role functioning have been of interest for reflecting poor outcome but far less is known about the developmental impact of these deficits as vulnerability or risk factors. Age-appropriate social and role functioning were prospectively assessed in 100 individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis included in the 8-site North American Prodromal Longitudinal Study database. A nested case-control design was used to compare changes in social and role functioning in 26 individuals converting to psychosis shortly after baseline assessment and 24 converting over a year later. Individuals in each converter subgroup were directly matched to a non-converter at the same site, controlling for time to conversion, age, gender, and severity of baseline symptoms. At baseline, CHR subjects who later became psychotic were significantly more likely to be impaired socially than matched non-converters. Onset of psychosis did not further disrupt social difficulties. Role functioning showed some of the same trends, but the overall pattern was not as consistent as for the social domain. Controlling for neurocognition did not change the pattern of group differences. Early impaired social functioning appears to be a risk factor for psychosis and, added to APS, could potentially contribute to accurate identification of CHR individuals and provide a new direction for early intervention to reduce long-term disability.

  6. Learning to trust: trust and attachment in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, A-K J; Shergill, S S; Korver-Nieberg, N; Yakub, F; Gromann, P M; Krabbendam, L

    2016-05-01

    Distrust and social dysfunction are characteristic in psychosis and may arise from attachment insecurity, which is elevated in the disorder. The relationship between trust and attachment in the early stages of psychosis is unknown, yet could help to understand interpersonal difficulties and disease progression. This study aimed to investigate whether trust is reduced in patients with early psychosis and whether this is accounted for by attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety. We used two trust games with a cooperative and unfair partner in a sample of 39 adolescents with early psychosis and 100 healthy controls. Patients had higher levels of attachment anxiety, but the groups did not differ in attachment avoidance. Basic trust was lower in patients than controls, as indicated by lower initial investments. During cooperation patients increased their trust towards levels of controls, i.e. they were able to learn and to override initial suspiciousness. Patients decreased their trust less than controls during unfair interactions. Anxious attachment was associated with higher basic trust and higher trust during unfair interactions and predicted trust independent of group status. Discussion Patients showed decreased basic trust but were able to learn from the trustworthy behaviour of their counterpart. Worries about the acceptance by others and low self-esteem are associated with psychosis and attachment anxiety and may explain behaviour that is focused on conciliation, rather than self-protection.

  7. Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna; Fox, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    Psychotic symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are associated with poorer quality of life and increased caregiver burden. PD psychosis is correlated with several factors, such as more advanced disease, cognitive impairment, depression, and sleep disorders. The underlying causes of psychosis in PD thus involve a complex interplay between exogenous (e.g., drugs, intercurrent illnesses) and endogenous (e.g., PD disease pathology) factors. Current theories of the pathophysiology of PD psychosis have come from several neuropathological and neuroimaging studies that implicate pathways involving visual processing and executive function, including temporo-limbic structures and neocortical gray matter with altered neurotransmitter functioning (e.g., dopamine, serotonin, and acetylcholine). Treatment of PD psychosis requires a step-wise process, including initial careful investigation of treatable triggering conditions and a comprehensive evaluation with adjustment of PD medications and/or initiation of specific antipsychotic therapies. Clozapine remains the only recommended drug for the treatment of PD psychosis; however, because of regular blood monitoring, quetiapine is usually first-line therapy, although less efficacious. Emerging studies have focused on agents involving other neurotransmitters, including the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist pimavanserin, cholinesterase inhibitors, and antidepressants and anxiolytics.

  8. Cannabis and psychosis/schizophrenia: human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Richard Andrew; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2010-01-01

    The association between cannabis use and psychosis has long been recognized. Recent advances in knowledge about cannabinoid receptor function have renewed interest in this association. Converging lines of evidence suggest that cannabinoids can produce a full range of transient schizophrenia-like positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms in some healthy individuals. Also clear is that in individuals with an established psychotic disorder, cannabinoids can exacerbate symptoms, trigger relapse, and have negative consequences on the course of the illness. The mechanisms by which cannabinoids produce transient psychotic symptoms, while unclear may involve dopamine, GABA, and glutamate neurotransmission. However, only a very small proportion of the general population exposed to cannabinoids develop a psychotic illness. It is likely that cannabis exposure is a “component cause” that interacts with other factors to “cause” schizophrenia or a psychotic disorder, but is neither necessary nor sufficient to do so alone. Nevertheless, in the absence of known causes of schizophrenia, the role of component causes remains important and warrants further study. Dose, duration of exposure, and the age of first exposure to cannabinoids may be important factors, and genetic factors that interact with cannabinoid exposure to moderate or amplify the risk of a psychotic disorder are beginning to be elucidated. The mechanisms by which exposure to cannabinoids increase the risk for developing a psychotic disorder are unknown. However, novel hypotheses including the role of cannabinoids on neurodevelopmental processes relevant to psychotic disorders are being studied. PMID:19609589

  9. Diagnosis telling in people with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Alyssa C; Mullan, Barbara A

    2014-07-01

    There are complexities in communicating diagnostic information relating to schizophrenia spectrum disorders. There is a current dearth of research in understanding how clinicians effectively communicate with service users about such diagnostic news. In this review, we aim to synthesize the latest research throughout 2012 and 2013 that presented data relating to the communication of a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, including individuals who had experienced first-episode psychosis or were in at-risk mental states. Comprehensive database and manual searches were conducted which obtained data from both service users and health professional groups. Fourteen quantitative and qualitative studies were found. The majority of studies were descriptive and heterogeneous in content. Key themes included service user preferences towards disclosure and diagnostic terminology, health professional training, stigma-related issues and the use of diagnostic communication models. Overall, communication models that foster therapeutic relationships and actively encourage the health professional to reduce stigma may be a key to initial diagnostic discussions in clinical practice. Such communication models and intervention require further more rigorous evaluation, as none have been tested through randomized controlled protocols in clinical settings.

  10. The Subjective Experiences of Psychosis Scale (SEPS): psychometric evaluation of a scale to assess outcome in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Gillian; Wood, Lisa; Watts, Rachel; Dunn, Graham; Morrison, Anthony P; Price, Jason

    2011-12-01

    A range of outcome measures has been developed to assess psychotic symptoms. Many of these are observer based assessments which rate the presence and severity of broad symptom types. There is a need for service-user generated multi-dimensional scales to assess psychosis. To investigate the psychometric properties of a service user generated, self-report scale to assess recovery in relation to psychotic symptoms. The reliability and validity of the Subjective Experiences of Psychosis Scale (SEPS) was investigated with 100 participants experiencing psychosis against observer rated assessments of psychosis and self report measures of affect, esteem, recovery and functioning. Two factors emerged representing positive and negative aspects of psychotic experiences. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency and sensitivity to change were good and the scales correlated with the PANSS, PSYRATS and measures of affect, esteem, recovery and functioning. The SEPS is a reliable and valid tool which can be used to evaluate outcome from treatment and which reflects the multi-dimensional experience of psychosis. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Prediction of psychosis by stepwise multilevel assessment--the Basel FePsy (Early Recognition of Psychosis)-Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecher-Rössler, A; Aston, J; Borgwardt, S; Bugra, H; Fuhr, P; Gschwandtner, U; Koutsouleris, N; Pflueger, M; Tamagni, C; Radü, E-W; Rapp, C; Smieskova, R; Studerus, E; Walter, A; Zimmermann, R

    2013-05-01

    We have conducted various studies in Basel with the aim of improving the methods for the early detection of psychosis (Früherkennung von Psychosen, FePsy). From 1.3.2000 to 29.2.2004 234 individuals were screened using the Basel Screening Instrument for Psychosis (BSIP). 106 patients were identified as at risk for psychosis; out of these 53 remained in follow-up for up to 7 years (mean 5.4 years). The assessments were done with a specifically developed instrument for history taking, various scales for the psychopathology, assessments of neuropsychology and fine motor functioning, clinical and quantitative EEG, MRI of the brain, laboratory etc. Based on the BSIP alone, a relatively reliable prediction was possible: 21 (39.6%) of the individuals identified as at risk developed psychosis within the follow-up time. Post-hoc prediction could be improved to 81% by weighting psychopathology and including neuropsychology. Including the other domains obviously allows further improvements of prediction. The risk for psychosis should be assessed in a stepwise procedure. In a first step, a clinically oriented screening should be conducted. If an at-risk status is found, further assessments in various domains should be done in a specialised centre. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Substance abuse in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and drugs is an important and clinically challenging aspect of first-episode psychosis. Only a few studies have been carried out on large-sized and reliably characterized samples. These are reviewed, and the results are compared with a sample of 300 first-episode psychosis patients...... recruited for the TIPS (Early Treatment and Identification of Psychosis) study from Norway and Denmark. Prevalence rates from the literature vary from 6% to 44% for drugs and 3% to 35% for alcohol. In our sample, 23% abused drugs and 15% abused alcohol during the last 6 months. When compared to non-abusers......, the drug-abusing group is characterized by the following: male gender, younger age, better premorbid social, poor premorbid academic functioning, and more contact with friends in the last year before onset. Alcohol abusers were the oldest group and they had the least contact with friends. A group...

  13. Cyberbullying in those at Clinical High Risk for psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaud, Emilie; Nyman, Karissa; Addington, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Aim Several studies suggest an association between experiences of childhood trauma including bullying and the development of psychotic symptoms. The use of communications technology has created a new media for bullying called ‘cyberbullying’. Research has demonstrated associations between traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Negative effects of cyberbullying appear similar in nature and severity to the reported effects of traditional bullying. Our aim was to examine the prevalence and correlates of cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods Fifty young people at CHR for psychosis were administered the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire with added questions about cyberbullying. Results Cyberbullying was reported in 38% of the sample. Those who experienced cyberbullying also reported experiencing previous trauma. Conclusion It is possible that cyberbullying may be a problem for those at CHR of psychosis and due to the vulnerable nature of these young people, may have longitudinal implications. PMID:23343259

  14. Drugs of abuse and increased risk of psychosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Anand; Manning, Elizabeth E; Klug, Maren; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2012-12-01

    There is considerable evidence to suggest that the abuse of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis and methamphetamine, has aetiological roles in the pathogenesis of psychosis and schizophrenia. Factors that may increase susceptibility to the propsychotic effects of these drugs include the age at which the abuse starts as well as family history of genetic polymorphisms relevant to the pathophysiology of this disorder. However, the neurobiological mechanisms involved in drug abuse-associated psychosis remain largely unclear. This paper presents an overview of the available evidence, including clinical, animal model, and molecular studies, with a focus on brain regions and neurotransmitters systems, such as dopamine and glutamate, previously implicated in psychosis. It is clear that further studies are urgently needed to provide a greater insight into the mechanisms that mediate the long-term and neurodevelopmental effects of cannabis and methamphetamine. A dialogue between basic science and clinical research may help to identify at-risk individuals and novel pathways for treatment and prevention.

  15. Cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaud, Emilie; Nyman, Karissa; Addington, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Several studies suggest an association between experiences of childhood trauma including bullying and the development of psychotic symptoms. The use of communications technology has created a new media for bullying called 'cyberbullying'. Research has demonstrated associations between traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Negative effects of cyberbullying appear similar in nature and severity to the reported effects of traditional bullying. Our aim was to examine the prevalence and correlates of cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Fifty young people at CHR for psychosis were administered the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire with added questions about cyberbullying. Cyberbullying was reported in 38% of the sample. Those who experienced cyberbullying also reported experiencing previous trauma. It is possible that cyberbullying may be a problem for those at CHR of psychosis, and due to the vulnerable nature of these young people may have longitudinal implications. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. A descriptive study of first presentation psychosis in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, A

    1999-12-01

    This report describes the characteristics of a sample of elderly subjects presenting with their first episode of psychosis in old age. Forty-six (38 females and eight males) patients were assessed on a variety of cognitive, psychopathological and personality measures. Female preponderance, social isolation and early cognitive deficits were findings of this study which have been replicated by other studies of late-onset psychosis. In contrast, hearing loss was not overly represented in this sample. Personality style differed significantly from accepted norms of adult personality traits, with lower scores for dimensional ratings of neuroticism, extraversion and openness to change. The descriptive findings in this study suggest that psychosocial factors require further investigation in patients presenting with late-onset psychosis. Comparison with younger first-onset psychotic subjects will be the subject of a later report.

  17. Caregiver Reports of Patient-Initiated Violence in Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Juliana; Grice, Sarah; Garety, Philippa; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive behaviour in psychosis is not uncommon. Community provision for people with psychosis has left informal caregivers to take on a greater role in their care. However, few studies have explored links between patient-initiated violence in mental health caregiving relationships and caregiver functioning. Our study investigated caregiver reports of aggressive acts committed by their relative with psychosis and their links to caregiver appraisals of the caregiving relationship and caregiver outcomes. Method: Caregivers of patients with a recent relapse of psychosis, recruited to a psychological therapy trial, completed the audiotaped Camberwell Family Interview at baseline. This semi-structured interview includes questions on the quality of the relationship between caregiver and patient, and patient history of violence. Seventy-two transcripts of interviews were assessed for reports of patient-initiated violence. Results: One-half of the caregiver sample (52.9%) reported an incident of patient-initiated violence during their interview; 62.2% of these involved violence toward themselves, and 24.3% toward property. Reports of patient violence were associated with caregiver ratings of hostility expressed toward patients, lower self-esteem, and emotion-focused coping. People caring on their own were more likely to report incidents of patient violence. Younger patients, males, and inpatients were more frequently identified as having a history of this kind of violence. Conclusions: Our findings suggested that caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis are not uncommon. Mental health staff need to be aware of the risks of such violence for caregivers of people with psychosis, and consider appropriate procedures for minimizing it. Clinical Trial Registration Number: ISRCTN83557988 PMID:25007421

  18. Caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Juliana; Grice, Sarah; Garety, Philippa; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Aggressive behaviour in psychosis is not uncommon. Community provision for people with psychosis has left informal caregivers to take on a greater role in their care. However, few studies have explored links between patient-initiated violence in mental health caregiving relationships and caregiver functioning. Our study investigated caregiver reports of aggressive acts committed by their relative with psychosis and their links to caregiver appraisals of the caregiving relationship and caregiver outcomes. Caregivers of patients with a recent relapse of psychosis, recruited to a psychological therapy trial, completed the audiotaped Camberwell Family Interview at baseline. This semi-structured interview includes questions on the quality of the relationship between caregiver and patient, and patient history of violence. Seventy-two transcripts of interviews were assessed for reports of patient-initiated violence. One-half of the caregiver sample (52.9%) reported an incident of patient-initiated violence during their interview; 62.2% of these involved violence toward themselves, and 24.3% toward property. Reports of patient violence were associated with caregiver ratings of hostility expressed toward patients, lower self-esteem, and emotion-focused coping. People caring on their own were more likely to report incidents of patient violence. Younger patients, males, and inpatients were more frequently identified as having a history of this kind of violence. Our findings suggested that caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis are not uncommon. Mental health staff need to be aware of the risks of such violence for caregivers of people with psychosis, and consider appropriate procedures for minimizing it.

  19. Improving outcomes of first-episode psychosis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; McGorry, Patrick D; Kane, John M

    2017-10-01

    Outcomes of psychotic disorders are associated with high personal, familiar, societal and clinical burden. There is thus an urgent clinical and societal need for improving those outcomes. Recent advances in research knowledge have opened new opportunities for ameliorating outcomes of psychosis during its early clinical stages. This paper critically reviews these opportunities, summarizing the state-of-the-art knowledge and focusing on recent discoveries and future avenues for first episode research and clinical interventions. Candidate targets for primary universal prevention of psychosis at the population level are discussed. Potentials offered by primary selective prevention in asymptomatic subgroups (stage 0) are presented. Achievements of primary selected prevention in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (stage 1) are summarized, along with challenges and limitations of its implementation in clinical practice. Early intervention and secondary prevention strategies at the time of a first episode of psychosis (stage 2) are critically discussed, with a particular focus on minimizing the duration of untreated psychosis, improving treatment response, increasing patients' satisfaction with treatment, reducing illicit substance abuse and preventing relapses. Early intervention and tertiary prevention strategies at the time of an incomplete recovery (stage 3) are further discussed, in particular with respect to addressing treatment resistance, improving well-being and social skills with reduction of burden on the family, treatment of comorbid substance use, and prevention of multiple relapses and disease progression. In conclusion, to improve outcomes of a complex, heterogeneous syndrome such as psychosis, it is necessary to globally adopt complex models integrating a clinical staging framework and coordinated specialty care programmes that offer pre-emptive interventions to high-risk groups identified across the early stages of the disorder. Only a

  20. Future-directed thinking in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodby, Emmeline; MacLeod, Andrew K

    2016-06-01

    This study employed the Future Thinking Task (MacLeod et al., 2005, Br. J. Clin. Psychol., 44, 495) to investigate whether future-directed thinking in first-episode psychosis is significantly different from that of matched controls, and to identify its correlates in this patient group. Cross-sectional, mixed-model, case-control design. Participants were 30 patients with first-episode psychosis and 27 matched controls. The Future Thinking Task was used to assess future-directed thinking in both groups. Anxiety and depression were also measured as well as self-report measures of hopelessness, suicide ideation and a measure of negative symptoms. Individuals with psychosis were impaired in future-directed thinking in both positive and negative domains, particularly with respect to the coming year. Increased self-reported hopelessness was associated with reduced positive future thinking and increased negative future thinking. Increased positive future thinking was also associated with reduced severity of negative symptoms, whilst negative future thinking was associated with suicide ideation. Individuals with first-episode psychosis show a reduction in positive future thinking in line with that seen in other clinical groups, but this is accompanied by an unexpected reduction in negative future thinking. The findings suggest a general disengagement with the future in this group that may affect recovery and functioning. Individuals with first-episode psychosis may benefit from interventions to help them engage with their future, in particular in the mid-range, up to 1 year. The Future Thinking Task may be a helpful addition to the assessment of suicide risk in those with first-episode psychosis. Decreased positive future thinking was associated with increased severity of negative symptoms, indicating a potential new treatment angle for this resistant aspect of psychosis. The cross-sectional design of this study does not allow for conclusions about the causal relationship

  1. The relationship between psychosis and epilepsy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisesa, A

    1997-05-01

    This is a case study of a 49 year old spinster, with a history of temporal lobe epilepsy for more than 20 years. She was admitted to a psychiatric ward twice in one month, with two distinct types of psychoses, peri-ictal and inter-ictal psychosis. During peri-ictal psychoses, EEG tracing showed seizure activity, while a relatively normal EEG tracing was present during inter-ictal psychosis. The importance of a good clinical assessment to differentiate these two conditions is discussed.

  2. Haloperidol for psychosis-induced aggression or agitation (rapid tranquillisation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostinelli, Edoardo G; Brooke-Powney, Melanie J; Li, Xue; Adams, Clive E

    2017-07-31

    Haloperidol used alone is recommended to help calm situations of aggression or agitation for people with psychosis. It is widely accessible and may be the only antipsychotic medication available in limited-resource areas. To examine whether haloperidol alone is an effective treatment for psychosis-induced aggression or agitation, wherein clinicians are required to intervene to prevent harm to self and others. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study-Based Register of Trials (26th May 2016). This register is compiled by systematic searches of major resources (including AMED, BIOSIS CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and registries of clinical trials) and their monthly updates, handsearches, grey literature, and conference proceedings, with no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records into the register. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving people exhibiting aggression and/or agitation thought to be due to psychosis, allocated rapid use of haloperidol alone (by any route), compared with any other treatment. Outcomes of interest included tranquillisation or asleep by 30 minutes, repeated need for rapid tranquillisation within 24 hours, specific behaviours (threat or injury to others/self), adverse effects. We included trials meeting our selection criteria and providing useable data. We independently inspected all citations from searches, identified relevant abstracts, and independently extracted data from all included studies. For binary data we calculated risk ratio (RR), for continuous data we calculated mean difference (MD), and for cognitive outcomes we derived standardised mean difference (SMD) effect sizes, all with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and using a fixed-effect model. We assessed risk of bias for the included studies and used the GRADE approach to produce 'Summary of findings' tables which included our pre-specified main outcomes of interest. We found nine new RCTs from the

  3. Emotional experiences predict the conversion of individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome to psychosis: A six-month follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa Zhan Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the conversion rate in individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS and potential predictor for transition in China. Sixty-three participants were identified as APS were followed up six months later. The results showed that 17% of individuals with APS converted to psychosis. The converters exhibited poorer emotional experience and expression than the non-converters at baseline. A further binary logistic regression analysis showed that emotional experience could predict the transition (Wald = 4.18, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 1.04~6.82. The current study suggested an important role of emotional processing in the prediction of the development of full-blown psychosis.

  4. Can positive family factors be protective against the development of psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pinto, Ana; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Ibáñez, Berta; Otero-Cuesta, Soraya; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Graell-Berna, Montserrat; Ugarte, Amaia; Parellada, Mara; Moreno, Dolores; Soutullo, Cesar; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso

    2011-03-30

    Genetic and environmental factors are both involved in the aetiology of psychotic disorders. The aim of this study was to assess if positive and negative environmental factors, together with psychotic family antecedents, are associated with the recent development of psychosis. We also investigated the interactions between family history of psychosis and positive and negative family environment. The sample comprised 110 children and adolescents, who had suffered a first psychotic episode and 98 healthy controls. All subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic status, family history of psychosis and family environment (Family Environment Scale, FES). Early onset psychosis was significantly associated with a family history of psychosis. Family environment was perceived as more negative and less positive among patients than among controls. A negative family environment increased the risk of psychosis independently of the family history of psychosis. However, there was a significant protective effect of a positive family environment for persons with a family history of psychosis. This effect was not seen in subjects without a family history of psychosis. Therefore, our results support the importance of considering both family history of psychosis and family environment in the early stages of psychosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The cannabis pathway to non-affective psychosis may reflect less neurobiological vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else-Marie eLøberg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of cannabis use reported in non-affective psychosis. Early prospective longitudinal studies conclude that cannabis use is a risk factor for psychosis, and neurochemical studies on cannabis have suggested potential mechanisms for this effect. Recent advances in the field of neuroscience and genetics may have important implications for our understanding of this relationship. Importantly, we need to better understand the vulnerability x cannabis interaction to shed light on the mediators of cannabis as a risk factor for psychosis. Thus, the present study reviews recent literature on several variables relevant for understanding the relationship between cannabis and psychosis, including age of onset, cognition, brain functioning, family history, genetics and neurological soft signs (NSS in non-affective psychosis. Compared with non-using non-affective psychosis, the present review shows that there seem to be fewer stable cognitive deficits in patients with cannabis use and psychosis, in addition to fewer NSS and possibly more normalized brain functioning, indicating less neurobiological vulnerability for psychosis. There are, however, some familiar and genetic vulnerabilities present in the cannabis psychosis group which may influence the cannabis pathway to psychosis by increasing sensitivity to cannabis. Furthermore, an earlier age of onset suggests a different pathway to psychosis in the cannabis-using patients. Two alternative vulnerability models are presented to integrate these seemingly paradoxical findings.

  6. The Cannabis Pathway to Non-Affective Psychosis may Reflect Less Neurobiological Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løberg, Else-Marie; Helle, Siri; Nygård, Merethe; Berle, Jan Øystein; Kroken, Rune A.; Johnsen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of cannabis use reported in non-affective psychosis. Early prospective longitudinal studies conclude that cannabis use is a risk factor for psychosis, and neurochemical studies on cannabis have suggested potential mechanisms for this effect. Recent advances in the field of neuroscience and genetics may have important implications for our understanding of this relationship. Importantly, we need to better understand the vulnerability × cannabis interaction to shed light on the mediators of cannabis as a risk factor for psychosis. Thus, the present study reviews recent literature on several variables relevant for understanding the relationship between cannabis and psychosis, including age of onset, cognition, brain functioning, family history, genetics, and neurological soft signs (NSS) in non-affective psychosis. Compared with non-using non-affective psychosis, the present review shows that there seem to be fewer stable cognitive deficits in patients with cannabis use and psychosis, in addition to fewer NSS and possibly more normalized brain functioning, indicating less neurobiological vulnerability for psychosis. There are, however, some familiar and genetic vulnerabilities present in the cannabis psychosis group, which may influence the cannabis pathway to psychosis by increasing sensitivity to cannabis. Furthermore, an earlier age of onset suggests a different pathway to psychosis in the cannabis-using patients. Two alternative vulnerability models are presented to integrate these seemingly paradoxical findings PMID:25477825

  7. Attention in schizophrenia and in epileptic psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C.J Kairalla

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive behavior of human beings is usually supported by rapid monitoring of outstanding events in the environment. Some investigators have suggested that a primary attention deficit might trigger symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, researchers have long discussed the relationship between schizophrenia and the schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy (SLPE. On the basis of these considerations, the objective of the present study was to investigate attention performance of patients with both disorders. Patient age was 18 to 60 years, and all patients had received formal schooling for at least four years. Patients were excluded if they had any systemic disease with neurologic or psychiatric comorbidity, or a history of brain surgery. The computer-assisted TAVIS-2R test was applied to all patients and to a control group to evaluate and discriminate between selective, alternating and sustained attention. The TAVIS-2R test is divided into three parts: one for selective attention (5 min, the second for alternating attention (5 min, and the third for the evaluation of vigilance or sustained attention (10 min. The same computer software was used for statistical analysis of reaction time, omission errors, and commission errors. The sample consisted of 36 patients with schizophrenia, 28 with interictal SLPE, and 47 healthy controls. The results of the selective attention tests for both patient groups were significantly lower than that for controls. The patients with schizophrenia and SLPE performed differently in the alternating and sustained attention tests: patients with SLPE had alternating attention deficits, whereas patients with schizophrenia showed deficits in sustained attention. These quantitative results confirmed the qualitative clinical observations for both patient groups, that is, that patients with schizophrenia had difficulties in focusing attention, whereas those with epilepsy showed perseveration in attention focus.

  8. Outcome of individuals "not at risk of psychosis" and prognostic accuracy of the Basel Screening Instrument for Psychosis (BSIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papmeyer, Martina; Aston, Jacqueline; Everts-Graber, Judith; Heitz, Ulrike; Studerus, Erich; Borgwardt, Stefan J; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter; Riecher-Rössler, Anita

    2017-04-21

    We aimed to determine the prognostic accuracy of the Basel Screening Instrument for Psychosis (BSIP) in terms of specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value by following up individuals that were initially not considered to be at increased risk of psychosis based on the BSIP. Moreover, clinical characteristics of these individuals were examined given the relative lack of such information in the literature. As part of the "Früherkennung von Psychosen" (FePsy) study, 87 individuals were screened with the BSIP. Of these, 64 were classified at baseline as being in an at-risk mental state (ARMS+) for psychosis using the BSIP and followed up at regular time intervals for at least 2 years to determine a putative transition to psychosis. Twenty-three individuals were classified at baseline as not being in an at-risk mental state (ARMS-) using the BSIP and re-assessed after 4 years. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the BSIP were computed. Clinical characteristics of the ARMS- group were analysed descriptively. During the follow-up period, none of the ARMS- individuals, but 21 of ARMS+ had developed psychosis. Sensitivity of the BSIP was 1.0, specificity was 0.35. The majority of ARMS- individuals showed depressive disorders or anxiety disorders and varying levels of functioning. The BSIP has good prognostic accuracy for detecting the prodromal phase of psychosis with an excellent sensitivity and a specificity similar to other risk instruments and the advantage of a relatively short duration. Depressive and anxiety symptoms commonly develop in ARMS- individuals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Persistent deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity accompany losses of hippocampus-dependent memory in a rodent model of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescholleck, Valentina; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Irreversible N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism is known to provoke symptoms of psychosis and schizophrenia in healthy humans. NMDAR hypofunction is believed to play a central role in the pathophysiology of both disorders and in an animal model of psychosis, that is based on irreversible antagonism of NMDARs, pronounced deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity have been reported shortly after antagonist treatment. Here, we examined the long-term consequences for long-term potentiation (LTP) of a single acute treatment with an irreversible antagonist and investigated whether deficits are associated with memory impairments. The ability to express LTP at the perforant pathway - dentate gyrus synapse, as well as object recognition memory was assessed 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after a single treatment of the antagonist, MK801. Here, LTP in freely behaving rats was significantly impaired at all time-points compared to control LTP before treatment. Object recognition memory was also significantly poorer in MK801-treated compared to vehicle-treated animals for several weeks after treatment. Histological analysis revealed no changes in brain tissue. Taken together, these data support that acute treatment with an irreversible NMDAR-antagonist persistently impairs hippocampal functioning on behavioral, as well as synaptic levels. The long-term deficits in synaptic plasticity may underlie the cognitive impairments that are associated with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  10. Persistent deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity accompany losses of hippocampus-dependent memory in a rodent model of psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eWiescholleck

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Irreversible N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antagonism is known to provoke symptoms of psychosis and schizophrenia in healthy humans. NMDAR hypofunction is believed to play a central role in the pathophysiology of both disorders and in an animal model of psychosis, that is based on irreversible antagonism of NMDARs, pronounced deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity have been reported shortly after antagonist treatment. Here, we examined the long-term consequences for long-term potentiation (LTP of a single acute treatment with an irreversible antagonist and investigated whether deficits are associated with memory impairments.The ability to express long-term potentiation (LTP at the perforant pathway – dentate gyrus synapse, as well as object recognition memory was assessed 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after a single -treatment of the antagonist, MK801. Here, LTP in freely behaving rats was significantly impaired at all time-points compared to control LTP before treatment. Object recognition memory was also significantly poorer in MK801-treated compared to vehicle-treated animals for several weeks after treatment. Histological analysis revealed no changes in brain tissue.Taken together, these data support that acute treatment with an irreversible NMDAR antagonist persistently impairs hippocampal functioning on behavioral, as well as synaptic levels. The long-term deficits in synaptic plasticity may underlie the cognitive impairments that are associated with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  11. Cannabis-induced psychosis or Cannabis-associated psychosis: Diagnostically no clear winner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide including India. The role of Cannabis in the causation of psychiatric disorders, especially psychosis remains debatable. Cannabis use has been reported to present with symptoms similar to those of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. The distinction between Cannabis-induced psychoses and primary psychotic disorder is important from management perspective as it would determine the need and duration of antipsychotic medications, as well as relative focus on the management of substance use. At times, however, such a distinction may be difficult to make. We present a case where we were faced with difficulty labeling the origin of psychotic symptoms in a patient who was otherwise a heavy user of Cannabis. Management options considered in the presence of insoluble diagnostic problem have also been discussed.

  12. Effects of handedness (left vs right) and cannabis abuse on intermanual coordination and negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients of the paranoid type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynia, Inge; Schwaiger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Intermanual coordination as an index of interhemispheric transfer and negative symptoms were investigated in 50 left- and 42 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients of the paranoid type, also including drug abusers. The primary objective was to show that there were higher values in intermanual coordination and fewer manifestations of negative symptoms in the left-handed compared to the right-handed patients. This assumption was based on previous studies. Most importantly, right- and left-handed patients showed a different behaviour in intermanual coordination, when the duration of illness was taken into consideration. Thus, long-term left-handed paranoid patients performed better in intermanual coordination and showed fewer manifestations of negative symptoms than did long-term right-handed patients. These results were true for the large group of all patients, and among them for the subgroup of patients without drug abuse. Consequently, higher scores in intermanual coordination in left-handed patients may be related to a better interhemispheric crosstalk resulting in less pronounced negative symptoms. Secondary objectives assessed by explorative data analysis included the effects of cannabis abuse. While cannabis abuse may be more prevalent in left-handed patients, its effects may be more pronounced in right-handed patients, scoring higher in intermanual coordination and lower in manifestations of negative symptoms.

  13. Clozapine Use in First-Episode Psychosis: The Singapore Early Psychosis Intervention Programme (EPIP) Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Charmaine; Subramaniam, Mythily; Ng, Boon Tat; Abdin, Edimansyah; Poon, Lye Yin; Verma, Swapna K

    2016-11-01

    Early symptomatic response is pertinent in improving outcomes in first-episode psychosis. One of the ways in which this may be achieved is by reducing inappropriate delays in clozapine initiation. This study aimed to examine clozapine prescribing practices among clinicians by establishing the prevalence of clozapine use, identifying baseline clinical and demographic factors that were associated with clozapine use, examining outcomes in clozapine users versus nonusers, and identifying inappropriate antipsychotic prescription patterns prior to clozapine initiation. A retrospective study including all consecutive patients who had presented to the Singapore Early Psychosis Intervention Programme (EPIP) from April 2001 to June 2012 was conducted. Clinical and demographic data were extracted from the EPIP database. Incident cases of clozapine users were identified, and additional treatment histories were obtained from medical records. In addition to descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors associated with clozapine initiation. Data from 1,603 patients were available for baseline analyses. Of these, 69 patients (4.3%) had been prescribed clozapine. Having a younger age at onset, lack of employment, a lower Global Assessment of Functioning disability score, and a higher Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score at baseline were factors associated with clozapine use. After adjustment was made for confounders, clozapine users were found to have attained similar rates of remission and recovery as patients who did not use clozapine. Clozapine initiation was delayed by a mean of 19.3 weeks (SD = 27.1; range, 0-117). Prior to commencing clozapine, 29.4% of patients had received antipsychotic treatments above maximum limits, whereas 75% of patients were prescribed ≥ 3 different antipsychotics (median = 3; range, 2-7). This study has confirmed that the prescribing of clozapine is low, delayed, and preceded by dosing of antipsychotic

  14. An Integrative Cognitive Model of Internalized Stigma in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Byrne, Rory; Morrison, Anthony P

    2017-11-01

    Internalized stigma is a significant difficulty for those who experience psychosis, but it has never been conceptualized using cognitive theory. The aim of this paper is to outline a cognitive model conceptualizing internalized stigma experienced by people who also experience psychosis. Previous literature is reviewed, critiqued and synthesized to develop the model. It draws upon previous social cognitive models of internalized stigma and integrates cognitive behavioural theory and social mentality theory. This paper identifies key cognitive, behavioural and emotional processes that contribute to the development and maintenance of internalized stigma, whilst also recognizing the central importance of cultural context in creating negative stereotypes of psychosis. Moreover, therapeutic strategies to alleviate internalized stigma are identified. A case example is explored and a formulation and brief intervention plan was developed in order to illustrate the model in practice. An integrative cognitive model is presented, which can be used to develop individualized case formulations, which can guide cognitive behavioural interventions targeting internalized stigma in those who experience psychosis. More research is required to examine the efficacy of such interventions. In addition, it is imperative to continue to research interventions that create change in stigma at a societal level.

  15. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, William Frans Christian; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder...

  16. The impact of psychosis on social inclusion and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Lalvani, Nabeela; Berg, Rachel; Thachil, Ajoy; Kallumpuram, Sen; Nasiruddin, Omar; Wright, Christine; Mezey, Gill

    2014-03-01

    People with mental health problems are known to be socially excluded but the contribution of pre-morbid characteristics, symptoms and needs, and the impact on quality of life is unknown. To investigate change in social inclusion after the development of a psychotic Illness and factors associated with this. A cross-sectional community survey of people with psychosis was carried out in three areas of London. Five domains of social inclusion (social integration, consumption, access to services, productivity, political engagement) were assessed prior to the onset of illness and currently using the Social Inclusion Questionnaire User Experience. Quality of life, symptoms and needs were also assessed using standardized measures. Factors associated with change in social inclusion were investigated using multiple regression. Productivity and social integration among the 67 participants reduced after the onset of psychosis. Older age at onset and longer duration of illness were associated with greater reduction in productivity. Less reduction in social integration was associated with greater quality of life. Participants reported barriers to social inclusion that were directly related to symptoms of their illness, low confidence and poor self-esteem. A greater focus on interventions that can facilitate the occupation and the social networks of people with psychosis is required. Interventions that tackle 'self-stigma' may also prove useful in mitigating the social exclusion experienced by people with psychosis.

  17. Neurophysiology for Detection of High Risk for Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara N. Pantlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex and often disabling disorder that is characterized by a wide range of social, emotional, and cognitive deficits. Increasing research suggests that the greatest social and cognitive therapeutic impact comes from early identification. The present study applied a well-established neurophysiological paradigm in the schizophrenia literature, mismatch negativity (MMN, to college students identified as high risk (HR for psychosis to investigate MMN as a potential biomarker for the onset of psychosis. The hypothesis was that HR would exhibit attenuated MMN amplitudes compared to controls, as has been established in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Participants (N=121 were separated into Group 1 (controls (n1=72 and Group 2 (HR (n2=49 based on the established cutoff score of the 16-item Prodromal Questionnaire. Participants then completed a time based MMN paradigm during which brain activity was recorded with EEG. For all electrode locations, controls demonstrated significantly more negative amplitudes than HR (Cz: F(1,119=8.09, p=.005; Fz: F(1,119=5.74, p=.018; Pz: F(1,119=5.88, p=.017. Results suggested that MMN may assist in identifying those who appear high-functioning but may be at risk for later development of psychosis or cognitive and psychological difficulties associated with psychosis.

  18. Psychosis and the dynamics of the psychotherapy process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment...

  19. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, W F C; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, delusi...... already at illness onset in young schizophrenia spectrum patients, suggests aberrant neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Gray matter volume changes, however, appear not to be a key feature in early onset first-episode psychosis.......BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder......, delusional disorder or other non-organic psychosis), aged 10-18 to those of 29 matched controls, using optimized voxel-based morphometry. RESULTS: Psychotic patients had frontal white matter abnormalities, but expected (regional) gray matter reductions were not observed. Post hoc analyses revealed...

  20. Attachment, neurobiology, and mentalizing along the psychosis continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Debbané

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to the psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioural studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis.

  1. First-episode psychosis: An update | Chiliza | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in the subject of first-episode psychosis has increased considerably in the last two decades. At present, a number of centres around the world focus on early identification and intervention in people with psychotic disorders. Researchers have focused particularly on people who are possibly experiencing the ...

  2. A case report of isotretinoin-induced manic psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha M Lucca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotretinoin, an oral vitamin A derivative, used to treat severe treatment-resistant acne. Psychiatric side effects of isotretinoin particularly depression and suicidal thoughts have been well documented. We report a case of isotretinoin-induced manic psychosis in a young female without a family history and history of mental illness.

  3. Using Digital Media Advertising in Early Psychosis Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L; Garrett, Chantel; Baumel, Amit; Scovel, Maria; Rizvi, Asra F; Muscat, Whitney; Kane, John M

    2017-07-17

    Identifying and engaging youth with early-stage psychotic disorders in order to facilitate timely treatment initiation remains a major public health challenge. Although advertisers routinely use the Internet to directly target consumers, limited efforts have focused on applying available technology to proactively encourage help-seeking in the mental health community. This study explores how one might take advantage of Google AdWords in order to reach prospective patients with early psychosis. A landing page was developed with the primary goal of encouraging help-seeking individuals in New York City to contact their local early psychosis intervention clinic. In order to provide the best opportunity to reach the intended audience, Google AdWords was utilized to link more than 2,000 selected search terms to strategically placed landing page advertisements. The campaign ran for 14 weeks between April 11 and July 18, 2016 and had a total budget of $1,427. The ads appeared 191,313 times and were clicked on 4,350 times, at a per-click cost of $.33. Many users took additional help-seeking steps, including obtaining psychosis-specific information/education (44%), completing a psychosis self-screener (15%), and contacting the local early treatment program (1%). Digital ads appear to be a reasonable and cost-effective method to reach individuals who are searching for behavioral health information online. More research is needed to better understand the many complex steps between online search inquiries and making first clinical contact.

  4. A Case of Epilepsy and Psychosis in the Seventeenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ovsiew

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventeenth-century painter left an account of his seizures, trances and visions; in 1923 Freud commented on this “demonological neurosis” without discussing the seizures. Attention is drawn to the concurrence of epilepsy and psychosis in this early autobiographical source.

  5. Cycloserine induced psychosis among patient's on second line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cycloserine induced psychosis among patient's on second line treatment for drug resistant tuberculosis in Bauchi and Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ... Conclusion: Patients with MDR-TB on Cycloserine containing CAT IV regimen should be monitored closely for neuropsychiatric side effects for early diagnosis, prevention and ...

  6. Cycloserine Induced Psychosis among Patient's on Second Line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    hallucination and suicidal ideation. He was reviewed by the neuropsychiatrist who made a diagnosis of depressive psychosis probably induced by cycloserine. He was placed on. 100mg dose of IM chlorpromazine BD stat, followed by tabs risperidone 5mg BD and. Haloperidol5mg BD. In spite of treatment for. 1 week the ...

  7. Pre and post craniotomy psychosis and seizure disorder in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report highlights psychosis and seizures presenting at two distinct periods of time in the course of Meningioma, in a 43 year old Nigerian medical doctor and buttresses the fact that the risk for post operative seizures and other symptoms include a history of pre-operative seizures and the site of the tumor. The subject ...

  8. Neural correlates of insight in dreaming and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresler, M.; Wehrle, R.; Spoormaker, V.I.; Steiger, A.; Holsboer, F.; Czisch, M.; Hobson, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that dreaming can serve as a model for psychosis has a long and honourable tradition, however it is notoriously speculative. Here we demonstrate that recent research on the phenomenon of lucid dreaming sheds new light on the debate. Lucid dreaming is a rare state of sleep in which the

  9. Social capital, pathway to care and duration of untreated psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use in children from socioeconomically deprived neighbourhoods in Maastricht in The Netherlands,19 while low levels of linking social capital was associated with increased hospitalisation due to psychosis in the Swedish adult population, even after adjustment for neighbourhood deprivation.21. Whether aspects of the ...

  10. Preventing Poor Vocational Functioning in Psychosis Through Early Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S; Barder, Helene Eidsmo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study tested the hypothesis that early detection of psychosis improves long-term vocational functioning through the prevention of negative symptom development. METHODS: Generalized estimating equations and mediation analysis were conducted to examine the association between employ...... from a usual-detection area, which seemed to have facilitated vocational careers....

  11. Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; McGlashan, T H; Larsen, Tor Ketil

    2001-01-01

    -episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis. System variables and first results from the four...

  12. The Nature of Puerperal Psychosis at Muhimbili National Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty six in-patients suffering from puerperal psychosis within six weeks after childbirth were prospectively investigated in Muhimbili National Hospital during two years. Formal psychiatric history, mental status evaluation, research and diagnostic criteria including ICD 10 and clinical progression were employed for ...

  13. Social capital, pathway to care and duration of untreated psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social capital, pathway to care and duration of untreated psychosis: Findings from a low- and middle-income country context. ... to formal health services. This is especially likely in contexts where mental health services are scarce and inaccessible, which has important implications for mental health education campaigns.

  14. Investigating the Role of Serotonin in Methamphetamine Psychosis: Unaltered Behavioral Effects of Chronic Methamphetamine in 5-HT1A Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van den Buuse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (Meth is a widely abused stimulant drug, but this abuse is associated with an increased risk of developing psychosis. In addition to its well-known action on brain dopamine, Meth also affects serotonergic (5-HT neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate this role in mice, which lack one of the main serotonin receptors, the 5-HT1A receptor, which has been implicated in both schizophrenia and Meth-induced psychosis. Male and female wild-type or 5-HT1A knockout (KO mice received daily treatment with increasing doses of methamphetamine from 6 to 9 weeks of age (1–4 mg/kg/day twice a day. At least 2 weeks after the last injection, the mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests focusing on psychosis-related behaviors, including Meth-induced hyperactivity, prepulse inhibition (PPI, social interaction, elevated plus maze (EPM, and Y-maze. Meth pretreatment resulted in significantly increased hyperlocomotion in response to an acute Meth challenge, but this effect was independent of genotype. Chronic Meth treatment resulted in decreased levels of anxiety in the EPM in both sexes, as well as increased startle responses in female mice only, again independent of genotype. 5-HT1A KO mice showed an increased locomotor response to acute Meth in both sexes, as well as increased PPI and decreased startle responses in female mice only, independent of Meth pretreatment. In conclusion, the effects of chronic Meth appear unaffected by the absence of the 5-HT1A receptor. These results do not support a role of the 5-HT1A receptor in Meth-induced psychosis.

  15. Diagnostic pitfalls in a young Romanian ranger with an acute psychotic episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy EE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Elöd Ernö Nagy,1,2 Attila Rácz,3 Edit Urbán,4 Gabriella Terhes,4 Timea Berki,5 Emöke Horváth,6 Anca M Georgescu,7 Iringó E Zaharia-Kézdi71Department of Pharmaceutical Biochemistry, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Târgu-Mureş, 2Laboratory of Medical Analysis, Mures Clinical County Hospital, 3II. Psychiatry Clinic, Mures Clinical County Hospital, Târgu Mureş, Romania; 4Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Microbiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, 5Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Immunology and Biotechnology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary; 6Department of Pathology, 7I. Clinic of Infectious Disease, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Târgu Mureş, RomaniaAbstract: The identification and distinction of the pathological conditions underlying acute psychosis are often challenging. We present the case of a 35-year-old ranger who had no history of acute or chronic infectious disease or any previous neuropsychiatric symptoms. He arrived at the Psychiatry Clinic and was admitted as an emergency case, displaying bizarre behavior, hallucinations, paranoid ideation, and delusional faults. These symptoms had first appeared 7 days earlier. An objective examination revealed abnormalities of behavior, anxiety, visual hallucinations, choreiform, and tic-like facial movements. After the administration of neuroleptic and antidepressant treatment, he showed an initial improvement, but on day 10 entered into a severe catatonic state with signs of meningeal irritation and was transferred to the intensive care unit. An electroencephalogram showed diffuse irritative changes, raising the possibility of encephalitis. Taking into consideration the overt occupational risk, Borrelia antibody tests were prescribed and highly positive immunoglobulin (IgM and IgG titers were obtained from serum, along with IgG and antibody index positivity in cerebrospinal fluid. In parallel, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies and a whole

  16. Psychosis in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gossink FT

    2017-04-01

    , hallucinatory behavior, and suspiciousness were present in one-fifth of bvFTD patients, whereas negative psychotic symptoms such as social and emotional withdrawal, blunted affect, and formal thought disorders were more frequently present. This suggests that negative psychotic symptoms and formal thought disorders have an important role in the psychiatric misdiagnosis in bvFTD; misdiagnosis in bvFTD might be reduced by systematically exploring the broad spectrum of psychiatric symptoms. Keywords: frontotemporal dementia, psychosis, schizophrenia, formal thought disorders 

  17. Social networks, support and early psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer-Anderson, C; Morgan, C

    2013-06-01

    Background. There is strong evidence that those with a long-standing psychotic disorder have fewer social contacts and less social support than comparison groups. There is less research on the extent of social contacts and support prior to or at the onset of psychosis. In the light of recent evidence implicating a range of social experiences and contexts at the onset of psychosis, it is relevant to establish whether social networks and support diminished before or at the time of onset and whether the absence of such supports might contribute to risk, either directly or indirectly. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review of this literature to establish what is currently known about the relationship between social networks, support and early psychosis. Methods. We identified all studies investigating social networks and support in first episode psychosis samples and in general population samples with measures of psychotic experiences or schizotype by conducting systematic searches of electronic databases using pre-defined search terms and criteria. Findings were synthesized using non-quantitative approaches. Results. Thirty-eight papers were identified that met inclusion criteria. There was marked methodological heterogeneity, which limits the capacity to draw direct comparisons. Nonetheless, the existing literature suggests social networks (particularly close friends) and support diminished both among first episode samples and among non-clinical samples reporting psychotic experiences or with schizotype traits, compared with varying comparison groups. These differences may be more marked for men and for those from minority ethnic populations. Conclusions. Tentatively, reduced social networks and support appear to pre-date onset of psychotic disorder. However, the substantial methodological heterogeneity among the existing studies makes comparisons difficult and suggests a need for more robust and comparable studies on networks, support and early psychosis.

  18. Treatment of psychosis and dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Holden, Samantha

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been increasingly recognized as having a multitude of nonmotor symptoms including psychosis, cognitive impairment and dementia, mood disturbances, fatigue, apathy, and sleep disorders. Psychosis and dementia, in particular, greatly affect quality of life for both patients and caregivers and are associated with poor outcomes. Safe and effective treatment options for psychosis and dementia in PD are much needed. Antipsychotics with dopamine-blocking properties can worsen parkinsonian motor features and have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in elderly, dementia patients. For treating PD psychosis, a first step would be eliminating confounding variables, such as delirium, infections, or toxic-metabolic imbalances, followed by simplifying parkinsonian medications as tolerated. If additional treatment is warranted after such interventions, clozapine or quetiapine can be implemented at the low dose levels typically needed by PD patients. Although quetiapine is easy-to-use in clinical settings, does not require blood count monitoring like clozapine, and is anecdotally beneficial, it remains "investigational" in evidence-based medicine reviews. Though not currently available, the novel 5-HT2a inverse agonist, pimavanserin has shown promise in the treatment of PD psychosis. Current treatments for PD dementia are mostly derived from those utilized in Alzheimer's disease, focusing mainly on cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, a NMDA receptor antagonist. Rivastigmine, the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for PD dementia, is a reasonable first choice. Other cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have not yet achieved recommendation status in evidence-based medicine reviews but are well tolerated in studies of PD dementia patients. At present, there are no approved treatments for mild cognitive impairment in PD, but rasagiline, a selective MAO-B inhibitor, and atomoxetine, a serotonin norepinephrine

  19. Markers of neurodevelopmental impairments in early-onset psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petruzzelli MG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria Giuseppina Petruzzelli,1 Lucia Margari,1 Francesco Craig,1 Maria Gloria Campa,1 Domenico Martinelli,2 Adriana Pastore,3 Marta Simone,1 Francesco Margari3 1Child and Adolescence Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University “Aldo Moro” of Bari, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences; University of Foggia, Foggia, 3Psychiatry Unit, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organ, University “Aldo Moro” of Bari, Bari, Italy Background: The aim of this study was to assess the association between the clinical and neurobiological markers of neurodevelopmental impairments and early-onset schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. Methods: A sample of 36 patients with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum psychosis was compared to a control sample of 36 patients with migraine. We assessed early childhood neurodevelopmental milestones using a modified version of the General Developmental Scale, general intellectual ability using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Revised or Leiter International Performance Scale–Revised for patients with speech and language abnormalities, and neurological soft signs with specific regard to subtle motor impairment. Results: Subjects with early-onset psychosis had a higher rate of impaired social development (P=0.001, learning difficulties (P=0.04, enuresis (P=0.0008, a lower intelligence quotient (P<0.001, and subtle motor impairments (P=0.005 than control subjects. Conclusion: We suggest that neurodevelopment in early-onset psychosis is characterized by a global impairment of functional and adaptive skills that manifests from early childhood, rather than a delay or limitation in language and motor development. The current evidence is based on a small sample and should be investigated in larger samples in future research. Keywords: early-onset psychosis, early-onset schizophrenia, neurodevelopment, social cognition

  20. De-escalation techniques for psychosis-induced aggression or agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Maolin; Wang, Xuemei; Yin, Shaohua; Shu, Wei; Hao, Ruiqi; Zhao, Sai; Rao, Harish; Yeung, Wan-Ley; Jayaram, Mahesh B; Xia, Jun

    2017-04-03

    Aggression is a disposition, a willingness to inflict harm, regardless of whether this is behaviourally or verbally expressed and regardless of whether physical harm is sustained.De-escalation is a psychosocial intervention for managing people with disturbed or aggressive behaviour. Secondary management strategies such as rapid tranquillisation, physical intervention and seclusion should only be considered once de-escalation and other strategies have failed to calm the service user. To investigate the effects of de-escalation techniques in the short-term management of aggression or agitation thought or likely to be due to psychosis. We searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study-Based Register of Trials (latest search 7 April, 2016). Randomised controlled trials using de-escalation techniques for the short-term management of aggressive or agitated behaviour. We planned to include trials involving adults (at least 18 years) with a potential for aggressive behaviour due to psychosis, from those in a psychiatric setting to those possibly under the influence of alcohol or drugs and/or as part of an acute setting as well. We planned to include trials meeting our inclusion criteria that provided useful data. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors inspected all abstracts of studies identified by the search process. As we were unable to include any studies, we could not perform data extraction and analysis. Of the 345 citations that were identified using the search strategies, we found only one reference to be potentially suitable for further inspection. However, after viewing the full text, it was excluded as it was not a randomised controlled trial. Using de-escalation techniques for people with psychosis induced aggression or agitation appears to be accepted as good clinical practice but is not supported by evidence from randomised trials. It is unclear why it has remained such an under-researched area. Conducting

  1. The association between pre-morbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis and outcome in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P; Petersen, L; Thorup, A

    2008-01-01

    The association between the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and outcome of schizophrenia may be confounded by other factors such as poor pre-morbid adjustment. The aim of the present study was to examine the independent contributions of DUP and of pre-morbid adjustment to the clinical...

  2. Greater extracellular free-water in first-episode psychosis predicts better neurocognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, A E; Pasternak, O; Robinson, D G; Newell, D; Trampush, J W; Gallego, J A; Fava, M; Malhotra, A K; Karlsgodt, K H; Kubicki, M; Szeszko, P R

    2017-03-28

    Free Water Imaging is a novel diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method that is able to separate changes affecting the extracellular space from those that reflect changes in neuronal cells and processes. A previous Free Water Imaging study in schizophrenia identified significantly greater extracellular water volume in the early stages of the disorder; however, its clinical and functional sequelae have not yet been investigated. Here, we applied Free Water Imaging to a larger cohort of 63 first-episode patients with psychosis and 70 healthy matched controls to better understand the functional significance of greater extracellular water. We used diffusion MR imaging data and the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analytic pipeline to first analyze fractional anisotropy (FA), the most commonly employed metric for assessing white matter. This comparison was then followed by Free Water Imaging analysis, where two parameters, the fractional volume of extracellular free-water (FW) and cellular tissue FA (FA-t), were estimated and compared across the entire white matter skeleton between groups, and correlated with cognitive measures at baseline and following 12 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Our results indicated lower FA across the whole brain in patients compared with healthy controls that overlap with significant increases in FW, with only limited decreases in FA-t. In addition, higher FW correlated with better neurocognitive functioning following 12 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. We believe this is the first study to suggest that an extracellular water increase during the first-episode of psychosis, which may be indicative of an acute neuroinflammatory process, and/or cerebral edema may predict better functional outcome.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 28 March 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.43.

  3. Subthreshold Psychosis in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome: Multisite Naturalistic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Omri; Guri, Yael; Gur, Raquel E; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Calkins, Monica E; Tang, Sunny X; Emanuel, Beverly; Zackai, Elaine H; Eliez, Stephan; Schneider, Maude; Schaer, Marie; Kates, Wendy R; Antshel, Kevin M; Fremont, Wanda; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Pontillo, Maria; Kushan, Leila; Jalbrzikowski, Maria; Bearden, Carrie E; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Walker, Elaine F; Simon, Tony J; Stoddard, Joel; Niendam, Tara A; van den Bree, Marianne B M; Gothelf, Doron

    2017-09-01

    Nearly one-third of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) develop a psychotic disorder during life, most of them by early adulthood. Importantly, a full-blown psychotic episode is usually preceded by subthreshold symptoms. In the current study, 760 participants (aged 6-55 years) with a confirmed hemizygous 22q11.2 microdeletion have been recruited through 10 medical sites worldwide, as part of an international research consortium. Of them, 692 were nonpsychotic and with complete measurement data. Subthreshold psychotic symptoms were assessed using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS). Nearly one-third of participants met criteria for positive subthreshold psychotic symptoms (32.8%), less than 1% qualified for acute positive subthreshold symptoms, and almost a quarter met criteria for negative/disorganized subthreshold symptoms (21.7%). Adolescents and young adults (13-25 years) showed the highest rates of subthreshold psychotic symptoms. Additionally, higher rates of anxiety disorders and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were found among the study participants with subthreshold psychotic symptoms compared to those without. Full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, and global functioning (GAF) scores were negatively associated with participants' subthreshold psychotic symptoms. This study represents the most comprehensive analysis reported to date on subthreshold psychosis in 22q11.2DS. Novel findings include age-related changes in subthreshold psychotic symptoms and evidence that cognitive deficits are associated with subthreshold psychosis in this population. Future studies should longitudinally follow these symptoms to detect whether and how early identification and treatment of these manifestations can improve long-term outcomes in those that eventually develop a psychotic disorder. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For

  4. How is substance use linked to psychosis? A study of the course and patterns of substance dependence in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddichha, Sahoo; Sur, Shravani; Sinha, Baxi Neeraj Prasad; Khess, Christoday Raja Jayant

    2010-01-01

    Substance use in mentally ill patients is now a major problem that influences the course and outcome of psychosis. With prevalence ranging up to 60%, several theories were postulated to explain the link. It would be interesting to know if substances have different effects in persons with psychosis than in those without. This study aimed to explore patterns of symptomatology of dependence and comorbid psychiatric illness by comparing and contrasting it with a group suffering from pure substance dependence. Consecutively admitted patients who were matched for age, sex, and tobacco use were divided into 3 groups. These were substance dependence without any comorbid psychiatric disorder (SD; n = 32), schizophrenia with substance dependence (SC; n = 31), and bipolar disorder with substance dependence (BD; n = 31). Patients were administered the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory (MINI) to evaluate the chronology of criterion of International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 dependence. Results showed that cannabis was the most common substance used by both the SC (100%) and BD (80%) groups. This was followed by alcohol as the most common substance used, with prevalence of 87% in SC and 77% in BD groups. There was a significant difference in the pattern of use of cannabis in patients with psychosis, who developed tolerance much faster (P = .018) and had longer durations of cannabis use (P = .001) than the SD group. The presence of "loss of control" over drug use criterion seems to be a specific marker predicting development of dependence and psychosis. Cannabis use is more strongly associated with development of psychosis than any other substance.

  5. Feasibility and Effects of a Brief Compassion-Focused Imagery Intervention in Psychotic Patients with Paranoid Ideation: A Randomized Experimental Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascone, Leonie; Sundag, Johanna; Schlier, Björn; Lincoln, Tania M

    2017-03-01

    Paranoia is characterized by a lack of perceived social safeness and associated negative affect. Low self-esteem, negative self-concepts and negative emotions have been shown to contribute to paranoid symptom formation. Thus, interventions focusing on affiliation and positive affect might be particularly helpful for patients with paranoia. The present study experimentally tested the effect of a one-session, brief compassion-focused imagery derived from Compassion-Focused Therapy (Gilbert, ) versus a control imagery condition in a repeated measures randomized design. A negative affective state was induced via in-sensu exposure to a recent distressful social situation in order to provide a minimum level of threat-related arousal to be down-regulated by the interventions thereafter. The sample consisted of psychotic patients with paranoid ideation (N = 51) who were randomly assigned to one of the experimental conditions. Effects on postulated causal mechanisms, i.e., self-relating (self-reassurance, self-compassion, self-criticism), and affect (self-reported affective states, skin conductance levels) as well as on state paranoia, were tested. Subjective benefit and appraisals of the intervention were explored. There were no specific intervention effects on negative self-relating, negative affect and skin-conductance or on paranoia. However, compassion-focused imagery had significant effects on self-reassurance and happiness. Explorative analyses revealed that the majority of the participants appraised the intervention in a positive manner, indicating good acceptance. The intervention showed an effect on some of the postulated mechanisms but not on others, which might have been because of its brevity. Further investigation of interventions targeting affiliation for people with paranoid experiences appears worthwhile. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Affiliative imagery work is feasible and appraised positively in psychotic patients. Brief compassion

  6. Suicide and filicide in postpartum psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Brockington, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the frequency of suicide and filicide in a literature of over 4000, and personal series of 321, childbearing psychoses. Suicide is rare during the acute episode, but the rate is high later in the mother?s life and in first degree relatives. The filicide rate is high in depressive psychoses (4.5?%), but lower in episodes without overt depression (less than 1?%), and some of these appear to be accidental, without intent to kill.

  7. Suicide and filicide in postpartum psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Ian

    2017-02-01

    This paper reviews the frequency of suicide and filicide in a literature of over 4000, and personal series of 321, childbearing psychoses. Suicide is rare during the acute episode, but the rate is high later in the mother's life and in first degree relatives. The filicide rate is high in depressive psychoses (4.5 %), but lower in episodes without overt depression (less than 1 %), and some of these appear to be accidental, without intent to kill.

  8. [Analysis of the Structure of Acute Psychotic Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardo, Téllez R; Ricardo, Sánchez P; Luis, Eduardo Jaramillo

    2012-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder. A multifactorial structure of this syndrome has been described in previous reports. The aim of this study was to evaluate what are the possible diagnostic categories in patients having acute psychotic symptoms, studying their clinical characteristics in a cross-sectional study. An instrument for measuring psychotic symptoms was created using previous scales (SANS, SAPS, BPRS, EMUN, Zung depression scale). Using as criteria statistical indexes and redundance of items, the initial instrument having 101 items has been reduced to 57 items. 232 patients with acute psychotic symptoms, in most cases schizophrenia, attending Clínica Nuestra Señora de la Paz in Bogotá and Hospital San Juan de Dios in Chía have been evaluated from April, 2008 to December, 2009. Multivariate statistical methods have been used for analyzing data. A six-factor structure has been found (Deficit, paranoid-aggressive, disorganized, depressive, bizarre delusions, hallucinations). Cluster analysis showed eight subtypes that can be described as: 1) bizarre delusions-hallucinations; 2) deterioration and disorganized behavior; 3) deterioration; 4) deterioration and paranoid-aggressive behavior; 5) bizarre delusions; 6) paranoia-anxiety- aggressiveness; 7) depressive symptoms and bizarre delusions; 8) paranoia and aggressiveness with depressive symptoms These subtypes allow a more exhaustive characterization that those included in standard classification schemes and should be validated in longitudinal studies. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing cognitive therapies into routine psychosis care: organisational foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Frances; Whiteford, Harvey; Ashkanasy, Neal M; Harvey, Carol; Crompton, David; Newman, Ellie

    2015-08-05

    Treatment outcomes for people diagnosed with psychosis remain suboptimal due in part to the limited systematic application of evidence based practice (Adm Policy Ment Health, 36: 1-7, 2009) [1]. The Implementation science literature identifies a number of factors organisationally that need to be considered when planning to introduce a particular EBP. Profiling these organisational characteristics at baseline, prior to commencement of service reform can determine the focus of a subsequent implementation plan. This study examined the organisational baseline factors existing in two services promoting the routine use of cognitive interventions for psychosis. One of the services studied has since undertaken organisational structural reform to facilitate the greater uptake of Evidence Based Practice (EBP). The results of this study were used to design an implementation strategy to make cognitive therapies a part of routine psychosis care. One hundred-and-six mental health staff from two metropolitan mental health services in Australia was surveyed to ascertain their attitudes, competencies and interest in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) and Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT). In addition perceptions of organisational values were profiled using the Organisational Culture Profile (OCP). Fifty five participants were excluded because they completed less than 50% of the survey. The final sample consisted of 51 participants. 48.1% of surveys were completed. Over 50% of staff were interested in CBTp and CRT approaches to psychosis. Staff were aware of existing CBTp and CRT programs but these were not uniformly available throughout the services. Fourteen percent of staff identified as CBT therapist and 35% were trained CRT facilitators. Only 12% of staff were receiving therapy specific supervision. The Organisational Culture Profile (OCP) at baseline revealed highest scores amongst leadership, planning, and humanistic workplace domains, with communication

  10. [The Basel Interview for Psychosis (BIP): structure, reliability and validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecher-Rössler, A; Ackermann, T; Uttinger, M; Ittig, S; Koranyi, S; Rapp, C; Bugra, H; Studerus, E

    2015-02-01

    Although several instruments have been developed to identify patients with an at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis and first episode of psychosis (FEP), up to now there were no instruments for a detailed assessment of risk factors and indicators of emerging psychosis and the temporal development of psychiatric symptoms over the whole life span in these patients. We therefore developed the Basle Interview for Psychosis (BIP). The aim of this study is to describe the development of the BIP and to report about its psychometric properties. The BIP is a comprehensive semi-structured interview that was developed for the Basel early detection of psychoses (FePsy) study. Its items were derived from the most important risk factors and indicators of psychosis described in the literature and from several existing instruments. It contains the following six sections: 1) social and physical development and family, 2) signs and symptoms, 3) vulnerability, 4) help-seeking behavior, 5) illness insight, 6) evaluation of the interview. To estimate the inter-rater reliabilities of the items of sections 2 and 3, 20 interviews were conducted and rated by 8 well-trained raters. The factorial structure of the BIP section "signs and symptoms" was explored in a sample of 120 ARMS and 77 FEP patients. On the basis of the discovered factorial structure, we created new subscales and assessed their reliabilities and validities. Of the 153 studied items of sections 2 and 3, 150 (98 %) were rated with sufficiently high agreement (inter-rater reliability > 0.4). The items of section "signs and symptoms" could be grouped into 5 subscales with predominantly good to very good internal consistencies, homogeneities, and discriminant and convergent validities. Predictive validities could be demonstrated for the subscales "Positive Psychotic Symptoms", "Disturbance of Thinking" and the total score. The BIP is the first interview for comprehensively assessing risk factors and indicators of

  11. Gender differences in the association between childhood physical and sexual abuse, social support and psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Fisher, Helen; Fearon, Paul; Hutchinson, Gerard; Morgan, Kevin; Dazzan, Paola; Boydell, Jane; Doody, Gillian A; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Robin M.; Craig, Thomas K.; Morgan, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Childhood adversity (variously defined) is a robust risk factor for psychosis, yet the mitigating effects of social support in adulthood have not yet been explored. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between childhood sexual and physical abuse and adult psychosis, and gender differences in levels of perceived social support. Methods A sample of 202 individuals presenting for the first time to mental health services with psychosis and 266 population-based controls from s...

  12. Cannabis and Neuropsychiatry, 2: The Longitudinal Risk of Psychosis as an Adverse Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-06-01

    Psychosis is one of the most serious among the adverse effects associated with cannabis use. The association between cannabis use and psychosis has been variously explored in a series of recent meta-analyses. The results of these meta-analyses show that persons who develop psychosis experience onset of psychosis about 2-3 years earlier if they are cannabis users; this effect is not observed with alcohol or other substance use. Higher levels of cannabis use are associated with greater risk of psychosis. Current cannabis abuse or dependence (but not past use or lower levels of current use) increases the risk of transition into psychosis in persons at ultrahigh risk of psychosis. About a third of patients with first-episode psychosis are cannabis users, and, at follow-up, about half of these users are found to continue their cannabis use. Continued cannabis use (in those who are treated after developing psychosis) is associated with higher risk of relapse into psychosis, and discontinuation of cannabis use reduces the risk of relapse to that in cannabis nonusers. Finally, persons with psychosis who continue to use cannabis have more severe positive symptoms and poorer levels of functioning. Because experimental studies in humans show that cannabinoids and cannabis can induce psychotic symptoms, it is reasonable to assume that the epidemiologic data indicate a causal effect of cannabis in anticipating, triggering, or exacerbating psychosis in vulnerable individuals and in worsening the course and outcome of the illness in those who continue to use the substance. Given the public health implications of these findings, the trend to legalize medical marijuana must be viewed with concern, and efforts are necessary to educate patients and the public about the serious mental and physical health risks associated with cannabis use and abuse. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  13. Impact of Interpersonal Trauma on the Social Functioning of Adults With First-Episode Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stain, Helen J.; Brønnick, Kolbjørn; Hegelstad, Wenche T. V.; Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan O.; Langeveld, Johannes; Mawn, Lauren; Larsen, Tor K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Social functioning is an important treatment outcome for psychosis, and yet, we know little about its relationship to trauma despite high rates of trauma in people with psychosis. Childhood trauma is likely to disrupt the acquisition of interpersonal relatedness skills including the desire for affiliation and thus lead to impaired social functioning in adulthood. Aims: We hypothesized that childhood trauma would be a predictor of poor social functioning for adults with psychosis a...

  14. [Psychopathology of acute paraphrenic syndrome, its typological forms and their relation to variants of paroxysm-like progredient schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotskaia, I V

    2011-01-01

    A total of 60 patients with different forms of paroxysm-like progredient schizophrenia were examined to clarify psychopathology of acute paraphrenic syndrome in different variants of the disease. Three typological variants were distinguished: with picturesque delirium, manifestations of Knadinsky-Clerambault syndrome, and confabulation disorders. It was shown that paroxysm-like progredient schizophrenia akin to recurrent one is characterized by acute paraphrenic syndrome with picturesque delirium; paroxysm-like progredient schizophrenia akin to juvenile malignant one is characterized by acute paraphrenic syndrome dominated by Knadinsky-Clerambault syndrome and picturesque delirium; paroxysm-like progredient schizophrenia akin to paranoid one is characterized by acute paraphrenic syndrome dominated by Knadinsky-Clerambault syndrome or acute paraphrenic syndrome with confabulation disorders. The study confirms specificity of acute paraphrenic syndrome for paroxysm-like progredient schizophrenia

  15. Mutilation of self and object: the destructive world of the paranoid-schizoid patient and the struggle for containment and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waska, Robert T

    2002-06-01

    Using case material, I have described the three overlapping phases of treatment that occur with some borderline, narcissistic, or psychotic patients. These patients are dealing with paranoid-schizoid experiences of the self and the object. In this part-self, part-object world, many shifting, opposing, and contrary states of feeling and thought occur. Acting out is the first phase of analytic treatment. This is an externalization of persecutory anxiety, primitive guilt, and phantasies of annihilation. Projective identification, splitting, and denial are common and tend to make for difficult transference and countertransference problems. During the middle phase of treatment, pathological superego states and manifestations of death instinct color the analysis. The death instinct reacts defensively to the sadistic superego. Technically, the destructive internal conflicts created by these two elements must be clarified and interpreted in the transference. Flexible analytic management and containment are crucial supplements to ongoing interpretation. If these chaotic patients are able to stay in treatment for a period time, the acting out and the superego/death instinct phase gradually give way to phantasies of loss. This is still a paranoid-schinoid perspective of loss, making it persecutory experience. Although depressive anxieties do enter the picture, these still involve pathological anddestructive states of guilt and all-or-nothing threats of abandonment and attack. A case was presented in which the patient managed to continue into the third stage of analytic treatment, long enough to benefit frominternal, structure change. In this final stage, the patient "O" was able to acknowledge, work through, and integrate her prior feelings and phantasies of loss, persecution, and abandonment anxiety into more manageable and reality-based depressive functioning.

  16. Relationship between cannabis and psychosis: Reasons for use and associated clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mané, Anna; Fernández-Expósito, Miguel; Bergé, Daniel; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Sabaté, Agnés; Toll, Alba; Diaz, Laura; Diez-Aja, Cristobal; Perez, Victor

    2015-09-30

    The mechanism underneath the relationship between cannabis and psychosis remains controversial, for which several hypotheses have been proposed, including cannabis as self-medication and cannabis as a risk for the development of psychosis. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between cannabis and psychosis in first-episode psychosis cannabis users and non-users, and non-psychotic cannabis users. The age at the first psychotic episode, duration of untreated psychosis, psychopathology and reasons for cannabis use were assessed. First-episode psychosis cannabis users showed an earlier age at psychosis onset than non-user patients. No significant differences in symptomatology were found. The distinguishing reasons to use cannabis for patients with first-episode psychosis with respect to non-psychotic users were to arrange their thoughts and deal with hallucinations and suspiciousness. These findings are in agreement with both hypotheses: self-medication and secondary psychosis hypothesis. However, longitudinal prospective cohort studies assessing reasons for cannabis use are needed to investigate both hypotheses and their complementarity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The promise of biological markers for treatment response in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fond, Guillaume; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Jamain, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    to side effects in first-episode psychosis. The present systematic review provides (1) trials that assessed biological markers associated with antipsychotic response or side effects in first-episode psychosis and (2) potential biomarkers associated with biological disturbances that may guide the choice......Successful treatment of first-episode psychosis is one of the major factors that impacts long-term prognosis. Currently, there are no satisfactory biological markers (biomarkers) to predict which patients with a first-episode psychosis will respond to which treatment. In addition, a non...

  18. [On the case management of youth with early psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Case management lies at the foundation of clinical activities for youth with early psychosis. While introducing the systems and skills accumulated in Anglo-American countries, the author affirms tasks associated with care management in Japan. The characteristics of case management for youths with early psychosis are as follows: 1) a primary therapeutic model, 2) emphasizing engagement by means of outreach, 3) limiting caseloads for the sake of fostering collaborative relationships, 4) adopting a method of active brokerage, and 5) establishing time limits of two or three years. The author calls for the establishment of a new training system for implementing these activities in Japan, due to the existence of significant misunderstandings of care management in that country.

  19. Empathy in individuals clinically at risk for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derntl, B.; Michel, T. M.; Prempeh, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Empathy is a basic human ability, and patients with schizophrenia show dysfunctional empathic abilities on the behavioural and neural level. Aims These dysfunctions may precede the onset of illness; thus, it seems mandatory to examine the empathic abilities in individuals at clinical...... high risk for psychosis. Method Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured 15 individuals at clinical high risk of psychosis (CHR group) and compared their empathy performance with 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients with schizophrenia. Results Behavioural data analysis indicated...... no significant deficit in the CHR group. Functional data analysis revealed hyperactivation in a frontotemporoparietal network including the amygdala in the CHR group compared with the other two groups. Conclusions Despite normal behavioural performance, the CHR group activated the neural empathy network...

  20. Caring for an intimate stranger: parenting a child with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmi, E; Bellali, T; Papazoglou, I; Karamitri, I; Papadatou, D

    2017-05-01

    The care of an adult son or daughter with psychosis is filled with overwhelming demands caused by the symptomatology and illness exacerbations. Parents display disenfranchised grief over multiple losses and report increased levels of emotional burden. Most studies use quantitative methods and rely on pre-existing theoretical frameworks to investigate, through psychometric measures, the effects of being a carer. Meaning attributions to the disorder, and changes in parent-child relations over time, are poorly understood. This hermeneutic phenomenological study illuminates the subjective experience of parenting a son or daughter with psychosis, as it is lived and described by parents of young adults with psychosis. Findings suggest that the parents' perceptions of their child changes over the course of the disorder, leading to a redefinition of the parent-child relationship, causing alternations in attachment. Findings illuminate the parents' profound guilt over having contributed or not prevented the disorder, over not being 'good' parents and feeling ambivalent towards an 'intimate stranger.' Guilt is compensated by absolute dedication to the son or daughter's care, at the expense of their own well-being. Interventions for parents must be available as soon as possible, both during hospitalization and after discharge. Professionals should provide a therapeutic space, where parents could express intimate thoughts and feelings, address guilt, fear and resentment issues, be assisted in their parenting role as well as in the reconstruction of a sense of self and self-esteem. Professionals are invited to facilitate illness acceptance, provide accurate information, assist parents to redefine their relationship to the child and facilitate the integration of the traumatic experience into their personal and family narrative. Professionals must develop in depth awareness of their biases and attitudes, have an ongoing training on how to respond to the parents' needs, facilitate

  1. Ten year neurocognitive trajectories in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Barder, Helene E.; Sundet, Kjetil

    2013-01-01

    Memory for patients with psychotic relapse in the first year[F-(4,F- (38)) = 5.8, p = 0.001, eta(2) = 0.40]. Conclusions: Main findings are long-term stability in neurocognitive functioning in FEP patients, with the exception of verbal memory in patients with psychotic relapse or non-remission early......Objective: Neurocognitive impairment is commonly reported at onset of psychotic disorders. However, the long-term neurocognitive course remains largely uninvestigated in first episode psychosis (FEP) and the relationship to clinically significant subgroups even more so. We report 10 year...... longitudinal neurocognitive development in a sample of FEP patients, and explore whether the trajectories of cognitive course are related to presence of relapse to psychosis, especially within the first year, with a focus on the course of verbal memory. Method: Forty-three FEP subjects (51% male, 28 +/- 9...

  2. Positive and negative caregiver experiences in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Harder, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While caregivers of persons with first-episode psychosis often report a range of negative experiences, little is known about what psychological factors are involved. The aim of this study was to examine how caregivers' general wellbeing, emotional overinvolvement and metacognition...... influenced their reports of both positive and negative caregiving experiences. Design A prospective consecutive cross-sectional study. Methods Forty caregivers of patients with first-episode psychosis were interviewed using semi-structured interview and questionnaires. Results Greater levels of distress...... and overinvolvement were associated with more negative experiences of caregiving while greater metacognitive capacity was associated with more positive experiences of caregiving. Conclusions The experience of positive and negative aspects of caregiving seems to be associated with different variables. Greater...

  3. The association between serum creatine kinase, mood and psychosis in inpatients with schizophrenia, bipolar and schizoaffective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Sarah; Hochman, Eldar; Shoval, Gal; Taler, Michal; Trommer, Sharon; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham; Krivoy, Amir

    2016-04-30

    Previous studies demonstrated levels of serum CK (sCK) in the majority of patients undergoing acute psychosis. Records of 1054 patients hospitalized in Geha Mental Health Center during the study period were analyzed. Of them, 743 have been diagnosed with schizophrenia (Sz), 170 with schizoaffective disorder (SzA), and 158 with bipolar disorder (BP-I). Baseline sCK and PANSS values were obtained from each patient upon admission. Our results show that LnsCK is higher in patients with BP-I in comparison with patients with SZ, but not significantly different compared to patients with SzA. A multivariate analysis using linear regression model in which LnsCK was predicted by factors such as PANSS-total and sub-scores, IM injection, BMI, gender, and age among patients at each admission, revealed that PANSS-depression was inversely associated with LnsCK level in SzA and BP-I and not in SZ. A positive association was found between PANSS-total and sCK in SzA and BP-I; however, PANSS-positive scores correlated with sCK only in SzA. After controlling for confounders, it seems that sCK level is associated with the both affective and psychotic components. Serum CK may serve as a biomarker for affective exacerbation rather than psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Managing risk when considering the use of atypical antipsychotics for elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recupero, Patricia R; Rainey, Samara E

    2007-05-01

    In 2005, responding to several studies, the FDA issued a black box warning on atypical (second generation) antipsychotic medications, noting that the drugs may increase the risk of cerebrovascular adverse events in elderly patients with dementia-related behavior disturbances. The black box warning has raised concern for clinicians, among whom atypical antipsychotics have gained favor for having a more tolerable side-effect profile than many other pharmacological treatment options. Complicating this concern are studies suggesting that other medications may have similar risks and a dearth of unbiased head-to-head studies comparing different treatment options. To effectively manage risk when treating elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis, physicians, patients, and caregivers must consider both acute risks (such as danger of bodily harm to the patient and others) and long-term risks (such as placement in a restrictive nursing home). If an atypical antipsychotic is chosen, additional risk management may be warranted. This paper presents a brief overview of relevant concerns and suggests some techniques to help minimize and manage risk, such as increased monitoring, informed consent, and thorough documentation. A sample clinical risk management form and a sample letter to the primary care physician are provided to help guide clinicians in improving their risk management practices when working with elderly patients suffering from dementia-related psychosis and related behavioral difficulties.

  5. GAD(67): the link between the GABA-deficit hypothesis and the dopaminergic- and glutamatergic theories of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkman, H O; Loetscher, E

    2003-07-01

    Decreases in the 67 kDa isoenzyme of brain glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(67)) expression have been consistently found in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. In animals GAD(67) expression is diminished by chronic, but not acute stimulation of dopamine D(2) receptors and by short-term blockade of NMDA receptors. In contrast, chronic treatment with D(2) receptor antagonists enhances GAD(67) expression. Thus, antipsychotic treatment cannot explain the reduction in GAD(67) levels in patients with psychotic disorders. Rather, pathophysiological findings such as reduced viability of cortical glutamatergic neurones (in schizophrenia) or enhanced dopamine sensitivity (in bipolar disorder) might explain the observed reduction in GAD(67). Since reduction in GAD(67) expression leads to reduced levels of GABA, the GABAergic inhibitory control over glutamatergic cells is reduced. Psychosis could result from AMPA receptor activation caused by overactivity of the glutamatergic system. GAD(67) levels would thus be a surrogate marker for psychosis liability. Pharmacological principles that raise GAD(67) expression levels could represent novel targets for antipsychotic therapy.

  6. Suicidal behavior and mortality in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Madsen, Trine; Fedyszyn, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health problem, with more than 800,000 deaths taking place worldwide each year. Mental disorders are associated with increased risk of suicide. In schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, the lifetime risk of suicide death is estimated to be 5.6%. The risk is parti...... in first-episode psychosis, and staff members should, in collaboration with the patients, monitor the risk of suicide and develop and revise crisis plans....

  7. The validity of the severity-psychosis hypothesis in depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Bille, Jim; Søltoft-Jensen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Psychotic depression (PD) is classified as a subtype of severe depression in the current diagnostic manuals. Accordingly, it is a common conception among psychiatrists that psychotic features in depression arise as a consequence of depressive severity. The aim of this study was to determine wheth...... the severity of depressive and psychotic symptoms correlate in accordance with this "severity-psychosis" hypothesis and to detect potential differences in the clinical features of PD and non-psychotic depression (non-PD)....

  8. Models to predict relapse in psychosis: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sullivan

    Full Text Available There is little evidence on the accuracy of psychosis relapse prediction models. Our objective was to undertake a systematic review of relapse prediction models in psychosis.We conducted a literature search including studies that developed and/or validated psychosis relapse prediction models, with or without external model validation. Models had to target people with psychosis and predict relapse. The key databases searched were; Embase, Medline, Medline In-Process Citations & Daily Update, PsychINFO, BIOSIS Citation Index, CINAHL, and Science Citation Index, from inception to September 2016. Prediction modelling studies were assessed for risk of bias and applicability using the PROBAST tool.There were two eligible studies, which included 33,088 participants. One developed a model using prodromal symptoms and illness-related variables, which explained 14% of relapse variance but was at high risk of bias. The second developed a model using administrative data which was moderately discriminative (C = 0.631 and associated with relapse (OR 1.11 95% CI 1.10, 1.12 and achieved moderately discriminative capacity when validated (C = 0.630. The risk of bias was low.Due to a lack of high quality evidence it is not possible to make any specific recommendations about the predictors that should be included in a prognostic model for relapse. For instance, it is unclear whether prodromal symptoms are useful for predicting relapse. The use of routine data to develop prediction models may be a more promising approach, although we could not empirically compare the two included studies.

  9. Self-cannibalism (autosarcophagy) in psychosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbon, Randi; Hamalian, Gareen; Yager, Joel

    2015-02-01

    Only nine previous cases of self- or auto-cannibalism (autosarcophagy) have previously been reported in the literature. Here, we report a 29-year-old man with psychosis and a history of polysubstance use who presented after his second attempt to self-cannibalize. This case raises questions about the underlying causes and dynamics of self-cannibalism in psychiatric illness and its relation to other types of self-harm behavior.

  10. Delayed preattentional functioning in early psychosis patients with cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesa, Nicole; Hermens, Daniel F; Battisti, Robert A; Kaur, Manreena; Hickie, Ian B; Solowij, Nadia

    2012-08-01

    Cannabis use is prevalent among the early psychosis (EP) population. The event-related potentials, mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are reduced in EP. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors which are involved in MMN generation. This study is the first to investigate the effects of cannabis use on MMN/P3a in EP. EP was defined as a history of psychosis or psychotic symptoms with no progression to date to chronic schizophrenia. Twenty-two EP patients with cannabis use (EP + CANN), 22 non-cannabis-using EP patients (EP-CANN) and 21 healthy controls participated in this study. MMN/P3a was elicited using a two-tone, auditory paradigm with 8% duration deviants. As expected, EP-CANN showed marked reductions in MMN/P3a amplitudes compared to controls. However, EP + CANN showed evidence of a different pattern of neurophysiological expression of MMN/P3a compared to non-using patients, most notably in terms of delayed frontal MMN/P3a latencies. This study provides further evidence that MMN/P3a deficits are present during early psychosis and suggests that this biomarker may have utility in differentiating substance- from non-substance-related psychoses.

  11. Self-help interventions for psychosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alexander J; Webb, Thomas L; Rowse, Georgina

    2015-07-01

    Self-help has been shown to be an effective intervention for a wide range of mental health problems. However, there is less evidence on the efficacy of self-help for psychosis and, to date, there has been no systematic review. A search of bibliographic databases identified 24 relevant studies with a total sample size of N=1816. Ten studies adopted a repeated measures design and 14 an independent group design (including RCTs and quasi-experimental studies). Self-help interventions had, on average, a small-to-medium-sized effect on overall symptoms (d+=0.33, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.48). Sub-analyses revealed that self-help interventions had a small-to-medium-sized effect on positive symptoms (d+=0.42, 95% CI: 0.13 to 0.72), a small-to-medium-sized effect on negative symptoms (d+=0.37, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.66), and a small-sized effect on outcomes associated with the symptoms of psychosis such as quality of life (d+=0.13, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.24). Moderation analysis identified a number of factors that influenced treatment effects including the complexity of the intervention and amount of contact time. Self-help interventions for psychosis have a lot of potential and recommendations for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural correlates of insight in dreaming and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler, Martin; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I; Steiger, Axel; Holsboer, Florian; Czisch, Michael; Hobson, J Allan

    2015-04-01

    The idea that dreaming can serve as a model for psychosis has a long and honourable tradition, however it is notoriously speculative. Here we demonstrate that recent research on the phenomenon of lucid dreaming sheds new light on the debate. Lucid dreaming is a rare state of sleep in which the dreamer gains insight into his state of mind during dreaming. Recent electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data for the first time allow very specific hypotheses about the dream-psychosis relationship: if dreaming is a reasonable model for psychosis, then insight into the dreaming state and insight into the psychotic state should share similar neural correlates. This indeed seems to be the case: cortical areas activated during lucid dreaming show striking overlap with brain regions that are impaired in psychotic patients who lack insight into their pathological state. This parallel allows for new therapeutic approaches and ways to test antipsychotic medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabry's disease and psychosis: causality or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairing, S; Wiest, R; Metzler, S; Theodoridou, A; Hoff, P

    2011-01-01

    A 21-year-old female with Fabry's disease (FD) presented acute psychotic symptoms such as delusions, auditory hallucinations and formal thought disorders. Since the age of 14, she had suffered from various psychiatric symptoms increasing in frequency and intensity. We considered the differential diagnoses of prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia and organic schizophrenia-like disorder. Routine examinations including cognitive testing, electroencephalography and structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed no pathological findings. Additional structural and functional imaging demonstrated a minor CNS involvement of FD, yet without functional limitations. In summary our examination results support the thesis that in the case of our patient a mere coincidence of FD and psychotic symptoms is more likely than a causal connection. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Psychosis, Socioeconomic Disadvantage, and Health Service Use in South Australia: Findings from the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney, Shaun; Air, Tracy; Zannettino, Lana; Galletly, Cherrie

    2015-01-01

    The association between mental illness and poor physical health and socioeconomic outcomes has been well established. In the twenty-first century, the challenge of how mental illnesses, such as psychosis, are managed in the provision of public health services remains complex. Developing effective clinical mental health support and interventions for individuals requires a coordinated and robust mental health system supported by social as well as health policy that places a priority on addressi...

  15. Psychosis, Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Health Service Use in South Australia: Findings from the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shaun eSweeney

    2015-01-01

    The association between mental illness and poor physical health and socioeconomic outcomes has been well established. In the twenty-first century, the challenge of how mental illnesses such as psychosis are managed in the provision of public health services remains complex. Developing effective clinical mental health support and interventions for individuals requires a coordinated and robust mental health system supported by social as well as health policy that places a priority on addressing...

  16. Psychosis prevalence and physical, metabolic and cognitive co-morbidity: data from the second Australian national survey of psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, V A; McGrath, J.J.; Jablensky, A; Badcock, J.G.; Waterreus, A.; Bush, R.; Carr, V.; Castle, D; Cohen, M.; Galletly, C.; Harvey, C.; Hocking, B.; McGorry, P; Neil, A.L.; Saw, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. There are insufficient data from nationwide surveys on the prevalence of specific psychotic disorders and associated co-morbidities. Method. The 2010 Australian national psychosis survey used a two-phase design to draw a representative sample of adults aged 18–64 years with psychotic disorders in contact with public treatment services from an estimated resident population of 1 464 923 adults. This paper is based on data from 1642 participants with an International Classificatio...

  17. Acute psychiatric in-patients tested for HIV status: a clinical profile

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-11

    Nov 11, 2005 ... Predominantly risperidone and haloperidol in combination with valproate were used in treatment and at relatively high dosages. Conclusion: Amongst HIV positive service users acute psychiatric symptoms almost exclusively consisted of associated psychosis or manic symptoms rather than depression.

  18. Reward Learning, Neurocognition, Social Cognition, and Symptomatology in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Whitton, Alexis E; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Norris, Lesley A; Ongur, Dost; Hall, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychosis spectrum disorders exhibit deficits in social and neurocognition, as well as hallmark abnormalities in motivation and reward processing. Aspects of reward processing may overlap behaviorally and neurobiologically with some elements of cognitive functioning, and abnormalities in these processes may share partially overlapping etiologies in patients. However, whether reward processing and cognition are associated across the psychoses and linked to state and trait clinical symptomatology is unclear. The present study examined associations between cognitive functioning, reward learning, and clinical symptomatology in a cross-diagnostic sample. Patients with schizophrenia (SZ; n = 37), bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BD; n = 42), and healthy controls (n = 29) were assessed for clinical symptoms (patients only), neurocognitive functioning using the MATRICS Battery (MCCB) and reward learning using the probabilistic reward task (PRT). Groups were compared on neurocognition and PRT response bias, and associations between PRT response bias and neurocognition or clinical symptoms were examined controlling for demographic variables and PRT task difficulty (discriminability). Patients with SZ performed worse than controls on most measures of neurocognition; patients with BD exhibited deficits in some domains between the level of patients with SZ and controls. The SZ - but not BD - group exhibited deficits in social cognition compared to controls. Patients and controls did not differ on PRT response bias, but did differ on PRT discriminability. Better response bias across the sample was associated with poorer social cognition, but not neurocognition; conversely, discriminability was associated with neurocognition but not social cognition. Symptoms of psychosis, particularly negative symptoms, were associated with poorer response bias across patient groups. Reward learning was associated with symptoms of psychosis - in particular negative

  19. White noise speech illusion and psychosis expression: An experimental investigation of psychosis liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Lotta-Katrin; Guloksuz, Sinan; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Decoster, Jeroen; van Winkel, Ruud; Collip, Dina; Delespaul, Philippe; De Hert, Marc; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Jacobs, Nele; Wichers, Marieke; Simons, Claudia J P; Rutten, Bart P F; van Os, Jim

    2017-01-01

    An association between white noise speech illusion and psychotic symptoms has been reported in patients and their relatives. This supports the theory that bottom-up and top-down perceptual processes are involved in the mechanisms underlying perceptual abnormalities. However, findings in nonclinical populations have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine the association between white noise speech illusion and subclinical expression of psychotic symptoms in a nonclinical sample. Findings were compared to previous results to investigate potential methodology dependent differences. In a general population adolescent and young adult twin sample (n = 704), the association between white noise speech illusion and subclinical psychotic experiences, using the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R) and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), was analyzed using multilevel logistic regression analyses. Perception of any white noise speech illusion was not associated with either positive or negative schizotypy in the general population twin sample, using the method by Galdos et al. (2011) (positive: ORadjusted: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.6-1.12, p = 0.217; negative: ORadjusted: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.56-1.02, p = 0.065) and the method by Catalan et al. (2014) (positive: ORadjusted: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79-1.57, p = 0.557). No association was found between CAPE scores and speech illusion (ORadjusted: 1.25, 95% CI: 0.88-1.79, p = 0.220). For the Catalan et al. (2014) but not the Galdos et al. (2011) method, a negative association was apparent between positive schizotypy and speech illusion with positive or negative affective valence (ORadjusted: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24-0.81, p = 0.008). Contrary to findings in clinical populations, white noise speech illusion may not be associated with psychosis proneness in nonclinical populations.

  20. Relation between premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis and close interpersonal trauma in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Simonsen, Erik; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Joa, Inge; Rossberg, Jan Ivar; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Langeveld, Johannes; Evensen, Julie; Trauelsen, Anne Marie Hyldgaard; Vaglum, Per; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Friis, Svein; McGlashan, Thomas; Melle, Ingrid

    2016-01-23

    Interpersonal traumas are highly prevalent in patients with psychotic disorders. Trauma caused by those close to the patient might have a more profound impact than other types of trauma and may influence early life social functioning. The aim is to investigate the associations between different types of trauma, in particular close interpersonal traumas experienced before the age of 18, premorbid factors and baseline clinical characteristics in a sample of first-episode psychosis patients. A total of 191 patients from the 'TIPS' cohort completed assessment with the Brief Betrayal Trauma Survey at their 5 years follow-up interview. Half of the patients reported that they had experienced interpersonal trauma and one-third reported having experienced close interpersonal trauma before the age of 18. Women reported more sexual abuse, physical attacks and emotional and physical maltreatment than men. There were significant associations between early interpersonal trauma and premorbid adjustment and duration of untreated psychosis, but no significant associations with length of education, comorbid substance use or baseline clinical symptomatology. Close interpersonal trauma before the age of 18 is associated with poorer premorbid adjustment and a longer duration of untreated psychosis. This may indicate that traumatic experiences delay help-seeking behaviour. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Brave New Worlds-Review and Update on Virtual Reality Assessment and Treatment in Psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, Wim; Moritz, Steffen; van der Gaag, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality (VR) research on psychotic disorders has been initiated. Several studies showed that VR can elicit paranoid thoughts about virtual characters (avatars), both in patients with psychotic disorders and healthy individuals. Real life symptoms and VR experiences were

  2. Brave new worlds-review and update on virtual reality assessment and treatment in psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, W.; Moritz, S.; van der Gaag, M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality (VR) research on psychotic disorders has been initiated. Several studies showed that VR can elicit paranoid thoughts about virtual characters (avatars), both in patients with psychotic disorders and healthy individuals. Real life symptoms and VR experiences were

  3. Theory of mind, insecure attachment and paranoia in adolescents with early psychosis and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver-Nieberg, N.; Fett, A.J.; Meijer, C.J.; Koeter, M.W.; Shergill, S.S.; de Haan, L.; Krabbendam, L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Impaired Theory of Mind (ToM) is found in adults with schizophrenia and is associated with paranoid symptoms. Insecure attachment is proposed to underlie impaired ToM as well as paranoia. Insight into associations between insecure attachment and impaired ToM skills may help clinicians and

  4. Theory of mind, insecure attachment and paranoia in adolescents with early psychosis and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver-Nieberg, Nikie; Fett, Anne-Kathrin J.; Meijer, Carin J.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Shergill, Sukhi S.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Impaired Theory of Mind (ToM) is found in adults with schizophrenia and is associated with paranoid symptoms. Insecure attachment is proposed to underlie impaired ToM as well as paranoia. Insight into associations between insecure attachment and impaired ToM skills may help clinicians and patients

  5. Metacognitive training in patients recovering from a first psychosis: an experience sampling study testing treatment effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, Karin; Meijer, Carin J.; Verkerk, Oukje; Ackema, Onno; Krabbendam, Lydia; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive biases, negative affect and negative self-esteem are associated with paranoia in people with psychotic disorders. Metacognitive group training (MCT) aims to target these biases although research has shown mixed results. Our objective was to establish the effect of MCT on paranoid ideation

  6. The adverse health effects of synthetic cannabinoids with emphasis on psychosis-like effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Brunt, Tibor; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of psychosis in vulnerable individuals. Cannabis containing high levels of the partial cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) agonist tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is associated with the induction of psychosis in susceptible subjects and with the

  7. Psychosis literacy in a Canadian health region: results from a general population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Donald; Berzins, Sandy; Yeo, Maryann

    2012-06-01

    To assess the public's level of mental health literacy for psychosis. A cross-sectional telephone survey using a random phone number selection procedure was conducted to identify a sample of 1685 participants comprised of youth at risk (aged 15 to 39 [corrected] years) and parents of youth at risk of psychosis (aged 35 to 59 years). The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry regrets the error and any inconvenience it might have caused. [corrected]. Participants were asked about their awareness of symptoms and causes of schizophrenia and psychosis, treatment options, and preferred channels for obtaining information about health and mental health. The response rate was 73%. There was a high reported knowledge of the term schizophrenia (76%), but a low reported knowledge of the term psychosis (23%). Ninety-one per cent of participants agreed that medications can control symptoms of schizophrenia. Significant barriers to getting help included not knowing the early signs of psychosis, concerns about being labelled mentally ill or psychotic, and not knowing where to go for help. Preferred communication elements to reach at-risk youth and their families were pamphlets at family physicians' and school counsellors' offices, posters on buses, television and radio advertisements, and information on websites. Whereas there is good knowledge about recognition and treatment of schizophrenia, there is less awareness of the broader concept of psychosis. Barriers to accessing care included recognition of early signs of psychosis and stigma. Public education programs aimed at promoting earlier intervention would need to address information about both psychosis and stigma.

  8. Psychosis in autism: comparison of the features of both conditions in a dually affected cohort†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Felicity V.; Wagner, Adam P.; Jones, Peter B.; Tantam, Digby; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Holland, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the presentation and characteristics of psychotic illness experienced by people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Aims To describe autistic and psychotic phenomenology in a group of individuals with comorbid ASD and psychosis (ASD–P) and compare this group with populations affected by either, alone. Method We studied 116 individuals with ASD–P. We compared features of their ASD with people with ASD and no comorbid psychosis (ASD–NP), and clinical characteristics of psychosis in ASD–P with people with psychosis only. Results Individuals with ASD–P had more diagnoses of atypical psychosis and fewer of schizophrenia compared with individuals with psychosis only. People with ASD–P had fewer stereotyped interests/behaviours compared with those with ASD–NP. Conclusions Our data show there may be a specific subtype of ASD linked to comorbid psychosis. The results support findings that psychosis in people with ASD is often atypical, particularly regarding affective disturbance. PMID:27979819

  9. Psychosis in autism: comparison of the features of both conditions in a dually affected cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Felicity V; Wagner, Adam P; Jones, Peter B; Tantam, Digby; Lai, Meng-Chuan; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Holland, Anthony J

    2017-04-01

    Background There is limited information on the presentation and characteristics of psychotic illness experienced by people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Aims To describe autistic and psychotic phenomenology in a group of individuals with comorbid ASD and psychosis (ASD-P) and compare this group with populations affected by either, alone. Method We studied 116 individuals with ASD-P. We compared features of their ASD with people with ASD and no comorbid psychosis (ASD-NP), and clinical characteristics of psychosis in ASD-P with people with psychosis only. Results Individuals with ASD-P had more diagnoses of atypical psychosis and fewer of schizophrenia compared with individuals with psychosis only. People with ASD-P had fewer stereotyped interests/behaviours compared with those with ASD-NP. Conclusions Our data show there may be a specific subtype of ASD linked to comorbid psychosis. The results support findings that psychosis in people with ASD is often atypical, particularly regarding affective disturbance. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  10. Brain development in adolescents at ultra-high risk for psychosis : Longitudinal changes related to resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Sanne; Wierenga, Lara M; Oranje, Bob; Ziermans, Tim B; Schothorst, Patricia F; van Engeland, Herman; Kahn, René S; Durston, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main focus of studies of individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR) has been on identifying brain changes in those individuals who will develop psychosis. However, longitudinal studies have shown that up to half of UHR individuals are resilient, with symptomatic remission and

  11. Nicotine dependence and psychosis in Bipolar disorder and Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Elena; Hartz, Sarah M; Tran, Jeffrey; Hilty, Donald M; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W; Pato, Michele T; Pato, Carlos N

    2016-06-01

    Patients with Bipolar disorder smoke more than the general population. Smoking negatively impacts mortality and clinical course in Bipolar disorder patients. Prior studies have shown contradictory results regarding the impact of psychosis on smoking behavior in Bipolar disorder. We analyzed a large sample of Bipolar disorder and Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type patients and predicted those with a history of psychosis would be more likely to be nicotine dependent. Data from subjects and controls were collected from the Genomic Psychiatry Cohort (GPC). Subjects were diagnosed with Bipolar disorder without psychosis (N = 610), Bipolar disorder with psychosis (N = 1544). Participants were classified with or without nicotine dependence. Diagnostic groups were compared to controls (N = 10065) using logistic regression. Among smokers (N = 6157), those with Bipolar disorder had an increased risk of nicotine dependence (OR = 2.5; P disorder with psychosis were more likely to be dependent than Bipolar disorder patients without psychosis (OR = 1.3; P = 0.03). Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar Type patients had more risk of nicotine dependence when compared to Bipolar disorder patients with or without psychosis (OR = 1.2; P = 0.02). Bipolar disorder patients experiencing more severity of psychosis have more risk of nicotine dependence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Multivariate pattern classification reveals differential brain activation during emotional processing in individuals with psychosis proneness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip K.; Aleman, Andre; Mechelli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Among the general population, individuals with subthreshold psychotic-like experiences, or psychosis proneness (PP), can be psychometrically identified and are thought to have a 10-fold increased risk of psychosis. They also show impairments in measures of emotional functioning parallel to

  13. Affective dysfunctions in adolescents at risk for psychosis : Emotion awareness and social functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Schothorst, Patricia; van 't Wout, Mascha; Sprong, Mirjam; Ziermans, Tim; van Engeland, Herman; Aleman, Andre; Swaab, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    Studies of individuals at ultra high risk (UHR) for psychosis have revealed deviations in cognitive and neural development before the onset of psychosis. As affective impairments are among the core dysfunctions in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, this study assessed emotion processing and

  14. The Strauss and Carpenter Prognostic Scale in subjects clinically at high risk of psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieman, D. H.; Velthorst, E.; Becker, H. E.; de Haan, L.; Dingemans, P. M.; Linszen, D. H.; Birchwood, M.; Patterson, P.; Salokangas, R. K. R.; Heinimaa, M.; Heinz, A.; Juckel, G.; von Reventlow, H. G.; Morrison, A.; Schultze-Lutter, F.; Klosterkötter, J.; Ruhrmann, S.; McGorry, Patrick D.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Knapp, Martin; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Klaassen, Rianne; Picker, Heinz; Neumann, Meike; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; Pukrop, Ralf; Svirskis, Tanja; Huttunen, Jukka; Laine, Tiina; Ilonen, Tuula; Ristkari, Terja; Hietala, Jarmo; Skeate, Amanda; Gudlowski, Yehonala; Ozgürdal, Seza; French, Paul; Stevens, Helen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of the Strauss and Carpenter Prognostic Scale (SCPS) for transition to a first psychotic episode in subjects clinically at high risk (CHR) of psychosis. Two hundred and forty-four CHR subjects participating in the European Prediction of Psychosis Study were

  15. "La CLAve" to Increase Psychosis Literacy of Spanish-Speaking Community Residents and Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven R.; Lara, Ma. Del Carmen; Kopelowicz, Alex; Solano, Susana; Foncerrada, Hector; Aguilera, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed and tested a 35-min psychoeducational program with the goal of increasing Spanish-speaking persons' literacy of psychosis. The program uses popular cultural icons derived from music, art, and videos, as well as a mnemonic device--La CLAve (The Clue)--to increase (a) knowledge of psychosis, (b) efficacy beliefs that one can…

  16. The effectiveness of psychoeducation programs following first episode psychosis: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoba, Kei; Kajiwara, Tomomi; Endo, Yoshimi; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this review is to establish whether psychoeducational programs can lead to improved outcomes (reduced relapse or readmission) in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) compared with usual care. Specifically, the review question is: Are psychoeducational programs for patients with first-episode psychosis effective in improving outcomes compared with those receiving usual care?

  17. First-episode psychosis patients recruited into treatment via early detection teams versus ordinary pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; Joa, Inge; Auestad, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    To compare the 5-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients recruited via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus ordinary referral channels (not-DT).......To compare the 5-year course and outcome of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients recruited via active outreach detection teams (DTs) versus ordinary referral channels (not-DT)....

  18. Semantic fluency deficits and reduced grey matter before transition to psychosis: a voxelwise correlational analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Julia H.; Schmitz, Nicole; Nieman, Dorien H.; Becker, Hiske E.; van Amelsvoort, Therese A. M. J.; Dingemans, Peter M.; Linszen, Don H.; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2011-01-01

    Early identification of subjects with an increased risk of psychosis is necessary to develop interventions to delay or prevent disease onset. We recently reported that decreased semantic verbal fluency performance in ultra high risk (UHR) subjects predicts the development of psychosis (Becker et

  19. Mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude in young adolescents with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydkjær, J; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Pagsberg, A K

    2017-01-01

    and reorienting responses, measured as MMN and P3a amplitude, are present in young adolescents with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and whether findings are specific to psychosis compared to young adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHOD: MMN and P3a amplitude were assessed in young...... expressed on a continuum shared with other neuropsychiatric disorders....

  20. Psychological interventions for Psychosis: A meta-analysis of comparative outcome studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, D.T.; van der Gaag, M.; Karyotaki, E.; Cuijpers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Meta-analyses have demonstrated the efficacy of various interventions for psychosis, and a small number of studies have compared such interventions. The aim of this study was to provide further insight into the relative efficacy of psychological interventions for psychosis. Method:

  1. Trauma and psychosis: The mediating role of self-concept clarity and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gavin John; Reid, Graeme; Preston, Phil; Palmier-Claus, Jasper; Sellwood, William

    2015-08-30

    Childhood trauma (CT) and psychosis may be associated. Drawing on the dissociation and social psychological literature, the current study examined the mediating role of structural aspects of self in explaining the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis. Twenty-nine individuals with psychosis were compared with 31 healthy volunteers regarding childhood trauma, dissociation and self-concept clarity (SCC). High rates of maltreatment were found in the psychosis sample. Additionally, clinical participants reported more dissociation and less self-concept clarity. Mediational analyses were carried out on pooled data from across both clinical and non-clinical samples. These suggested that the influence of physical neglect in increasing the likelihood of experiencing psychosis was explicable through the effects of increased dissociation. Self-concept clarity mediated the relationship between psychosis and total childhood trauma, emotional abuse, physical abuse, emotional and physical neglect. Furthermore, dissociation and self-concept clarity were strongly correlated providing evidence that they may form a unitary underlying concept of 'self-concept integration'. The study provides further evidence of the link between childhood trauma and psychosis. Self-concept integration may be adversely affected by negative childhood experiences, which increases psychosis risk. Methodological limitations, clinical implications and suggestions for future research are considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Morbid risk for psychiatric disorder among the relatives of methamphetamine users with and without psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ken; Lin, Shih-Ku; Sham, Pak C; Ball, David; Loh, El-Wui; Murray, Robin M

    2005-07-05

    It is not clear why some methamphetamine (MAMP) abusers develop psychotic symptoms, while others use MAMP regularly over long periods and remain unscathed. We tested the hypotheses that those users who develop MAMP-induced psychosis (MIP) have greater familial loading for psychotic disorders than users with no psychosis. Four hundred forty-five MAMP users were recruited from a psychiatric hospital and a detention center in Taipei, and were assessed with the Diagnostic Interview for genetic studies (DIGS-C) and the Family Interview for genetic study (FIGS-C). Morbid risk (MR) for psychiatric disorders in first-degree relatives was compared between those MAMP users with a lifetime diagnosis of MAMP psychosis and those without. The relatives of MAMP users with a lifetime diagnosis of MAMP psychosis had a significantly higher MR for schizophrenia (OR = 5.4, 95% CI: 2.0-14.7, P < 0.001) than the relatives of those probands who never became psychotic. Furthermore, the MR for schizophrenia in the relatives of the subjects with a prolonged MAMP psychosis (MIP-P) was higher than in the relatives of those users with a brief MAMP psychosis (MIP-B) (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.0-8.0, P = 0.042). The greater his or her familial loading for schizophrenia, the more likely a MAMP user is to develop psychosis, and the longer that psychosis is likely to last. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Integrated treatment of first-episode psychosis: effect of treatment on family burden: OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Pia; Petersen, Lone; Thorup, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The families of patients with first-episode psychosis often play a major role in care and often experience lack of support.......The families of patients with first-episode psychosis often play a major role in care and often experience lack of support....

  4. Processing Speed and Neurodevelopment in Adolescent-Onset Psychosis: Cognitive Slowing Predicts Social Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Peter; Niendam, Tara A.; Jalbrzikowkski, Maria; Park, Chan Y.; Daley, Melita; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Onset of psychosis may be associated with abnormal adolescent neurodevelopment. Here we examined the neurocognitive profile of first-episode, adolescent onset psychosis (AOP) as compared to typically developing adolescents, and asked whether neurocognitive performance varied differentially as a function of age in the cases compared with controls.…

  5. Psychophysiological deficits in young adolescents with psychosis or ADHD: Preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydkjær, Jacob; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    Background: Schizophrenia and ADHD share a number of attention related symptoms and cognitive impairments. Early onset psychosis may precede a development of schizophrenia and must be distinguished from ADHD. Psychophysiological deficits are studied as endophenotypic markers of psychosis and may...... add valuable information on how to differentiate premature stages of early onset psychosis from ADHD. Aim: To characterize psychophysiological deficits in young adolescents with psychosis or ADHD and compare the profiles of impariments between the two groups. Materials and methods: A cohort of young...... adolescents (age 12-17 years) with either first episode psychosis or ADHD and age and gender matched healthy controls has been recruited. The assessments include a diagnostic interview, psychopathological ratings and psychophysiological assessment of prepulse inhibiton of the startle reflex (PPI) with high...

  6. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

  7. Distinguishing prodromal from first-episode psychosis using neuroanatomical single-subject pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgwardt, Stefan; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Aston, Jacqueline; Studerus, Erich; Smieskova, Renata; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Meisenzahl, Eva M

    2013-09-01

    The at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) and the first episode of psychosis have been associated with structural brain abnormalities that could aid in the individualized early recognition of psychosis. However, it is unknown whether the development of these brain alterations predates the clinical deterioration of at-risk individuals, or alternatively, whether it parallels the transition to psychosis at the single-subject level. We evaluated the performance of an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based classification system in classifying disease stages from at-risk individuals with subsequent transition to psychosis (ARMS-T) and patients with first-episode psychosis (FE). Pairwise and multigroup biomarkers were constructed using the structural MRI data of 22 healthy controls (HC), 16 ARMS-T and 23 FE subjects. The performance of these biomarkers was measured in unseen test cases using repeated nested cross-validation. The classification accuracies in the HC vs FE, HC vs ARMS-T, and ARMS-T vs FE analyses were 86.7%, 80.7%, and 80.0%, respectively. The neuroanatomical decision functions underlying these discriminative results particularly involved the frontotemporal, cingulate, cerebellar, and subcortical brain structures. Our findings suggest that structural brain alterations accumulate at the onset of psychosis and occur even before transition to psychosis allowing for the single-subject differentiation of the prodromal and first-episode stages of the disease. Pattern regression techniques facilitate an accurate prediction of these structural brain dynamics at the early stage of psychosis, potentially allowing for the early recognition of individuals at risk of developing psychosis.

  8. Aggression and trauma experiences among carer-relatives of people with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Carmel M; Lawrence, Gali; Allen, Joanne; Hunter, Mick; Lewin, Terry J; Oud, Nico E; Carr, Vaughan J

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to aggression and associated psychological outcomes are poorly characterised among carer-relatives of people with psychosis. Carer-relatives (N = 106) completed questionnaires assessing socio-demographics and perceived prevalence of aggression in their caring role in the last 12 months. Carers exposed to moderate-severe levels of aggression were re-approached to assess PTSD and coping strategies. Most respondents (77.4%) reported experiencing moderate-severe levels of aggression. Increased contact with (M = 15.12 vs. M = 6.71 days per month), and significantly higher ratings of affective, antisocial, negative and psychotic symptomology in affected relatives were associated with experiences of moderate-severe aggression. Approximately half of the moderate-severe respondents reported potentially significant levels of PTSD (52%, N = 34), which was associated with greater exposure to verbal aggression and increased usage of coping strategies. Comparable ratios of physical to non-physical aggression to those reported by professional carers working in acute psychiatric treatment settings were reported. Carer-relatives require greater levels of information and support to assist them in their community caring roles.

  9. Factores ambientales y genéticos asociados a la esquizofrenia paranoide en el área de salud "28 de septiembre"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio César Núñez Copo

    Full Text Available Introducción: la esquizofrenia es una enfermedad con una marcada expresividad variable, que sugiere la existencia de factores etiológicos y procesos fisiopatológicos heterogéneos y donde se considera cada vez más la hipótesis de la interacción gen-ambiente como su principal modo de transmisión. Objetivo: determinar los posibles factores ambientales y genéticos asociados con en el debut de la esquizofrenia. Método: se realizó un estudio analítico observacional de casos y controles en el área de salud "28 de Septiembre" del municipio Santiago de Cuba, durante el cuatrimestre enero-abril de 2011, que incluyó 40 casos con diagnóstico de esquizofrenia paranoide seleccionados mediante muestreo aleatorio estratificado por sexo y a 80 controles sin este diagnóstico. Se aplicó la prueba de chi cuadrado, se calculó la oportunidad relativa (odds ratio y el intervalo de confianza. Resultados: el estado civil soltero resultó significativo al debut y en tres cuartas partes de los casos se constató algún acontecimiento estresante al inicio de la misma. Hubo asociación de los antecedentes familiares de la afección en los casos; se registró un mayor número de familiares de primer grado afectados en ambos grupos, más significativo en el grupo de los casos, lo que explica la agregación familiar de la afección más frecuentemente en las personas que padecen la enfermedad. Conclusiones: existió asociación de los antecedentes familiares de la enfermedad en los pacientes con esquizofrenia paranoide; hubo mayor porcentaje de personas afectadas en familiares de primer grado en ambos grupos; se observó agregación familiar de la enfermedad; los antecedentes prenatales aumentaron el riesgo de la enfermedad y los patrones premórbidos desde la niñez resultaron altamente significativos.

  10. Reproducibility of Cognitive Profiles in Psychosis Using Cluster Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Baker, Justin T; McCarthy, Julie M; Norris, Lesley A; Öngür, Dost

    2017-10-18

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core symptom dimension that cuts across the psychoses. Recent findings support classification of patients along the cognitive dimension using cluster analysis; however, data-derived groupings may be highly determined by sampling characteristics and the measures used to derive the clusters, and so their interpretability must be established. We examined cognitive clusters in a cross-diagnostic sample of patients with psychosis and associations with clinical and functional outcomes. We then compared our findings to a previous report of cognitive clusters in a separate sample using a different cognitive battery. Participants with affective or non-affective psychosis (n=120) and healthy controls (n=31) were administered the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery, and clinical and community functioning assessments. Cluster analyses were performed on cognitive variables, and clusters were compared on demographic, cognitive, and clinical measures. Results were compared to findings from our previous report. A four-cluster solution provided a good fit to the data; profiles included a neuropsychologically normal cluster, a globally impaired cluster, and two clusters of mixed profiles. Cognitive burden was associated with symptom severity and poorer community functioning. The patterns of cognitive performance by cluster were highly consistent with our previous findings. We found evidence of four cognitive subgroups of patients with psychosis, with cognitive profiles that map closely to those produced in our previous work. Clusters were associated with clinical and community variables and a measure of premorbid functioning, suggesting that they reflect meaningful groupings: replicable, and related to clinical presentation and functional outcomes. (JINS, 2017, 23, 1-9).

  11. Social networks of patients with psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Claudia; Volpe, Umberto; Matanov, Aleksandra; Priebe, Stefan; Giacco, Domenico

    2015-10-12

    Social networks are important for mental health outcomes as they can mobilise resources and help individuals to cope with social stressors. Individuals with psychosis may have specific difficulties in establishing and maintaining social relationships which impacts on their well-being and quality of life. There has been a growing interest in developing social network interventions for patients with psychotic disorders. A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate the size of social networks of patients with psychotic disorders, as well as their friendship networks. A systematic electronic search was carried out in MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsychINFO databases using a combination of search terms relating to 'social network', 'friendship' and 'psychotic disorder'. The search identified 23 relevant papers. Out of them, 20 reported patient social network size. Four papers reported the mean number of friends in addition to whole network size, while three further papers focused exclusively on the number of friends. Findings varied substantially across the studies, with a weighted mean size of 11.7 individuals for whole social networks and 3.4 individuals for friendship networks. On average, 43.1 % of the whole social network was composed of family members, while friends accounted for 26.5 %. Studies assessing whole social network size and friendship networks of people with psychosis are difficult to compare as different concepts and methods of assessment were applied. The extent of the overlap between different social roles assessed in the networks was not always clear. Greater conceptual and methodological clarity is needed in order to help the development of effective strategies to increase social resources of patients with psychosis.

  12. Evaluation of bullying in persons with different risk for psychosis

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    Vasić Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emerging research suggests that being exposed to bullying during childhood can increase the risk of psychotic experiences in adulthood. Aggressive peer relations among adolescents are more frequent in boys, both for being victims or perpetrators. Aim: To evaluate whether bullying was more prevalent among Serbian clinical population of patients with psychosis in comparison to their healthy siblings and controls, and to analyze gender differences regarding bullying. Material and methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated schizophrenia spectrum patients (n = 52, age = 29.3 ± 5.9 yrs, in remission, illness duration <10 yrs, their healthy siblings (n = 55, age = 28.6 ± 6.8 yrs and controls (n=50, age=25.3±1.5 yrs. The subjects fulfilled the bullying questionnaire, five item self-rating scale. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney nonparametric test were used to analyze the data. Results: Compared to their healthy siblings, the patients were more likely to report that they were bullied (patients: 7.0 ± 3.5, siblings: 5.2 ± 2.0, p = 0.000, but patients also bullied others more (patients: 1.4 ± 0.8, siblings: 1.1 ± 0.4, p = 0.02. Comparing the group of patients and controls, we did not find statistically significant difference in any category. The male gender brings higher risk of being physically bullied which has been proven for all examined groups (patients- p = 0.03, controls and siblings- p = 0.00. Conclusion: Aggressive peer relations possibly contribute to the evolution of psychosis, as they were more prevalent in patients in comparison to their healthy siblings, particularly in males. Improved prevention of bullying and use of treatments against its psychological consequences might be one of the possible methods to ameliorate the course of psychosis.

  13. Neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome in bipolar disorder with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Satoshi Ueda,1 Takeshi Sakayori,1 Ataru Omori,2 Hajime Fukuta,3 Takashi Kobayashi,3 Kousuke Ishizaka,1 Tomoyuki Saijo,4 Yoshiro Okubo1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Tamachuo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 3Kurumegaoka Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 4Saijo Clinic, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Neuroleptics can induce not only physical adverse effects but also mental effects that produce deficit status in thought, affect, cognition, and behavior. This condition is known as neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS, which includes apathy, lack of initiative, anhedonia, indifference, blunted affect, and reduced insight into disease. Although this old concept now appears almost forgotten, neuroleptics, whether typical or atypical, can make depression or bipolar disorder resemble other more refractory conditions, readily leading to mistaken diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. The authors describe three cases of NIDS superimposed on depressive phase in bipolar disorder with psychosis, where the attending psychiatrist’s failure to recognize NIDS prevented patients from receiving effective treatment and achieving remission. All cases achieved remission after reduction of neuroleptics and intensive therapy, including electroconvulsive therapy, for bipolar depression. The concept of NIDS was originally introduced for schizophrenia, and it has rarely been highlighted in other diseases. In recent years, however, atypical antipsychotics are being more often administered to patients with bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists, therefore, should also remember and exercise caution regarding NIDS in the pharmacotherapy of bipolar disorder with and without psychosis. The authors believe that the concept of NIDS needs to be reappraised in current psychiatry. Keywords: neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS, bipolar disorder, psychosis, atypical antipsychotics, electroconvulsive therapy

  14. Did Christianity lead to schizophrenia? Psychosis, psychology and self reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Both geographically and historically, schizophrenia may have emerged from a psychosis that was more florid, affective, labile, shorter lived and with a better prognosis. It is conjectured that this has occurred with a reflexive self-consciousness in Western and globalising societies, a development whose roots lie in Christianity. Every theology also presents a psychology. Six novel aspects of Christianity may be significant for the emergence of schizophrenia-an omniscient deity, a decontexualised self, ambiguous agency, a downplaying of immediate sensory data, and a scrutiny of the self and its reconstitution in conversion.

  15. Psychosis precipitated by marriage: a culture-bound syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, R Z

    1992-12-01

    A retrospective study of 258 psychiatric out-patients in Jerusalem compared 122 patients from an ultra-orthodox Jewish community with 136 other Jewish patients. It was found that six patients who had a psychosis within a month of marriage all belonged to the ultra-orthodox community. The possible links between cultural and educational practice in the ultra-orthodox community and the vulnerability to the stress of marriage are discussed. It seems feasible to regard the precipitation of major mental illness by marriage as a largely culture-bound phenomenon.

  16. [The assessment of spirituality and religiousness in patients with psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguelet, P; Brandt, P-Y; Mohr, S

    2016-06-01

    There is evidence that psychiatrists are rarely aware of how religion may intervene in their patient's life. That is particularly obvious concerning patients with psychosis. Yet, even for patients featuring delusions with religious content, religious activities and spiritual coping may have a favourable influence. Indeed, patients with psychosis can use religion to cope with life difficulties related to their psychotic condition, in a social perspective but also in order to gain meaning in their lives. Also, religion may be part of explanatory models about their disorder with, in some cases, a significant influence on treatment adhesion. This paper describes a prospective randomized study about a spiritual assessment performed by the psychiatrists of patients with schizophrenia. The outpatient clinics in which the sample was collected are affiliated with the department of psychiatry at the university hospitals of Geneva. Eighty-four outpatients with psychosis were randomized into two groups: an experimental group receiving both traditional treatment and spiritual assessment with their psychiatrist and a control group of patients receiving only their usual treatment. Psychiatrists were supervised by a clinician (PH) and a psychologist of religions (PYB) for each patient in the spiritual assessment group. Data were collected from both groups before and after 3 months of clinical follow-up. Spiritual assessment was well-tolerated by all patients. Moreover, their wish to discuss religious matters with their psychiatrist persisted following the spiritual assessment. Even though clinicians acknowledged the usefulness of the supervision for some patients, especially when religion was of importance for clinical care, they reported being moderately interested in applying spiritual assessments in clinical settings. Compared to the control group, there were no differences observed in the 3 months' outcome in terms of primary outcome measures for satisfaction with care, yet

  17. [Supporting people with psychosis with and despite their denial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard-Bosson, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Denial is an unconscious defence mechanism. Found in people with psychosis, it can make the task of supporting these patients difficult. The French service for the medical-social support of disabled adults (SAMSAH) is confronted with this defence mechanism. Rather than a therapeutic relationship, the mission of this service is one of psychosocial rehabilitation. Placed in a position of impotence, those supporting the patients need to analyse the notion of the relationship and the feelings which the person makes them experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine and Recurrent Episodes of Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBianca, Sonja; Jensen, Rigmor; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare autosomal dominant form of migraine with motor aura. We present a case report of a father and son with very similar attacks of hemiplegic migraine and recurrent episodes of accompanying psychoses. Previously, such episodes led to hospitalization...... and extended clinical examinations, which further worsened the psychoses. Since the episodes were recognized as related to the hemiplegic migraine, a treatment strategy combining sleep and sedation was initiated and progression onto psychosis was almost completely avoided in both father and son. Genetic...

  19. Postnatal risk environments, epigenetics, and psychosis: putting the pieces together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundakovic, Marija

    2014-10-01

    Postnatal environmental factors, such as early life adversity, cannabis use, and social stressors are associated with increased risk for psychotic disorders. Understanding mechanisms that underlie increased psychosis risk is of great importance for the development of novel preventive approaches and early interventions. In a timely review article, Pishva et al. discuss available evidence suggesting that postnatal environmental risk factors contribute to psychotic disorders via epigenetic mechanisms. While the evidence supporting this hypothesis is limited and primarily based on the epigenetic profiling of psychotic patients and animal models, further investigation in this area is warranted and may bring exciting results.

  20. Duration of Untreated Psychosis in Chinese and Mauritian: Impact of Clinical Characteristics and Patients' and Families' Perspectives on Psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prishni Devi Thakoor

    Full Text Available Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP is a potentially modifiable prognostic factor of course and prognosis of psychiatric disorders. Few studies have demonstrated that different cultural backgrounds or perspectives on psychosis may be important factors to the DUP. This study attempted to explore whether the DUP was different in Chinese and Mauritians and to clarify potential influencing factors to a long DUP (>3 months.200 patients from China and 100 patients from Mauritius were enrolled in the study. Their respective family members were also recruited. Demographic and clinical characteristics were collected, and the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI scale was adapted to measure the stigma in all subjects. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to find the potential influencing factors to the long DUP.35.3% of the enrolled patients had a long DUP. No significant difference was found in frequency of long DUP between the two countries. Chinese patients had relatively less perceptions of stigma. Furthermore, Chinese patients with a long DUP had more perception of breakup due to mental illness (OR = 2.22, p = 0.04 and more families' perception of the patient being disinherited due to mental illness (OR = 6.47, p = 0.01. Mauritian patients with a long DUP were less likely to have high monthly income (OR = 0.12, p<0.01, while they had less patients' awareness of mental illness (OR = 0.31, p<0.05 and less families' awareness of mental illness (OR = 0.14, p<0.01.The results of this study underlined the importance of DUP in economic conditions, racial and sociocultural factors, and public awareness on psychosis in developing countries.

  1. The Psychosis Recent Onset GRoningen Survey (PROGR-S: defining dimensions and improving outcomes in early psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith J Liemburg

    Full Text Available Psychotic disorders are among the most complex medical conditions. Longitudinal cohort studies may offer further insight into determinants of functional outcome after a psychotic episode. This paper describes the Psychosis Recent Onset in GRoningen Survey (PROGR-S that currently contains data on 1076 early-episode patients with psychosis, including symptoms, personality, cognition, life events and other outcome determinants. Our goal in this report is to give an overview of PROGR-S, as a point of reference for future publications on the effect of cognition, personality and psychosocial functioning on outcomes. PROGR-S contains an extensive, diagnostic battery including anamnesis, biography, socio-demographic characteristics, clinical status, drug use, neuropsychological assessment, personality questionnaires, and physical status tests. Extensive follow-up data is available on psychopathology, physical condition, medication use, and care consumption. Sample characteristics were determined and related to existing literature. PROGR-S (period 1997-2009, n = 718 included the majority of the expected referrals in the catchment area. The average age was 27 (SD = 8.6 and two-thirds were male. The average IQ was lower than that in the healthy control group. The majority had been diagnosed with a psychotic spectrum disorder. A substantial number of the patients had depressive symptoms (479/718, 78% and current cannabis or alcohol use (465/718, 75%. The level of community functioning was moderate, i.e. most patients were not in a relationship and were unemployed. The PROGR-S database contains a valuable cohort to study a range of aspects related to symptomatic and functional outcomes of recent onset psychosis, which may play a role in the treatment of this complex and disabling disorder. Results reported here show interesting starting points for future research. Thus, we aim to investigate long-term outcomes on the basis of cognition, personality, negative

  2. Cannabis use in first episode psychosis: Meta-analysis of prevalence, and the time course of initiation and continued use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, Hannah; Myles, Nicholas; Large, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis use is prevalent among people with first episode psychosis and the epidemiology of its use in early psychosis is unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of observational studies to determine; (1) the interval between age at initiation of cannabis use and age at onset of first episode psychosis, (2) the prevalence of cannabis use at time of first episode psychosis, and (3) the odds of continuing cannabis following treatment for first episode psychosis. Search of electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and CINAHL for English-language papers using search terms (psychosis OR schizophrenia) AND (cannabis OR marijuana) IN (title OR keyword OR abstract), current to October 2014. Studies were included if they reported on prevalence of current cannabis use in first episode psychosis cohorts. A total of 37 samples were included for meta-analysis. Rates of cannabis use in each sample were extracted to determine prevalence estimates. The age at initiation of regular cannabis and age at onset of psychosis were used to determine the length of cannabis use preceding psychosis. Prevalence estimates at first episode psychosis and various time points of follow-up following first episode psychosis were analysed to determine odds ratio of continuing cannabis use. Data synthesis was performed using random-effects meta-analyses. The pooled estimate for the interval between initiation of regular cannabis use and age at onset of psychosis was 6.3 years (10 samples, standardised mean difference = 1.56, 95% confidence interval = [1.40, 1.72]). The estimated prevalence of cannabis use at first episode psychosis was 33.7% (35 samples, 95% confidence interval = [31%, 39%]). Odds of continued cannabis use between 6 months and 10 years following first episode psychosis was 0.56 (19 samples, 95% confidence interval = [0.40, 0.79]). © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  3. Psychosis, Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Health Service Use in South Australia: Findings from the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eSweeney

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The association between mental illness and poor physical health and socioeconomic outcomes has been well established. In the twenty-first century, the challenge of how mental illnesses such as psychosis are managed in the provision of public health services remains complex. Developing effective clinical mental health support and interventions for individuals requires a coordinated and robust mental health system supported by social as well as health policy that places a priority on addressing socioeconomic disadvantage in mental health cohorts. This paper thus examines the complex relationship between socioeconomic disadvantage, family/social supports, physical health and health service utilisation in a community sample of 402 participants diagnosed with psychosis. The paper utilises quantitative data collected from the 2010 Survey of High Impact Psychosis research project conducted in a socioeconomically disadvantaged region of Adelaide, South Australia. Participants (42% female provided information about socio-economic status, education, employment, physical health, contact with family and friends, and health service utilisation. The paper highlights that socio-economic disadvantage is related to increased self-reported use of emergency departments, decreased use of general practitioners for mental health reasons, higher body mass index, less family contact and less social support. In particular, the paper explores the multifaceted relationship between socioeconomic disadvantage and poor health confronting individuals with psychosis, highlighting the complex link between socioeconomic disadvantage and poor health. It emphasizes that mental health service usage for those with higher levels of socioeconomic disadvantage differs from those experiencing lower levels of socioeconomic disadvantage. The paper also stresses that the development of health policy and practice that seeks to redress the socioeconomic and health inequalities created by

  4. Social Identity and Psychosis: Associations and Psychological Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Jason C; Wickham, Sophie; Barr, Ben; Bentall, Richard P

    2017-08-26

    Humans possess a basic need to belong and will join groups even when they provide no practical benefit. Paranoid symptoms imply a disruption of the processes involved in belonging and social trust. Past research suggests that joining social groups and incorporating those groups into one's identity (social identification) promotes positive self-views and better physical and mental health. However, no research has investigated whether social identity is associated with paranoia, nor the mechanisms by which this effect may emerge. Here, we examined the relationship between social identity and mental health (paranoia, auditory verbal hallucinations [AVHs], and depression), and tested the mediating role of self-esteem. In study 1, we analyzed data collected from 4319 UK residents as part of the NIHR CLAHRC NWC Household Health Survey. Study 2 comprised data collected from 1167 students attending a large UK university. The studies provided convergent evidence that social identification reduces symptoms of paranoia and depression by furnishing people with self-esteem. There was no consistent effect of social identification on AVHs. People developing mental health assessments, treatments, and policies are encouraged to consider the notion that joining and identifying with social groups may reduce people's risk of paranoia and depression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  5. Exploring the Associations between Social Rank and External Shame with Experiences of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Irons, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Low social rank and external shame have been found to be significantly associated with anxiety and depression. However, their relevance to experiences of psychosis has rarely been explored. This study aims to examine the relationship of social rank and external shame to personal recovery, depression and positive symptoms in psychosis. A cross sectional correlational design was adopted to examine the relationship between all variables. Fifty-two service users, aged between 18 to 65 years, with experiences of psychosis were recruited for the study. Participants were administered outcome measures examining social rank, external shame, positive symptoms of psychosis, depression and personal recovery. Multiple regression analyses were conducted on the data. Significant correlations were found between all variables. Low social rank was significantly associated with lower reported personal recovery, and higher levels of external shame and depression symptomology. The relationship between external shame and positive symptoms of psychosis and personal recovery was found to be mediated by participants' level of depression. Findings suggest that social rank and external shame are relevant to those who experience psychosis. Therapeutic approaches may need to focus on perceptions of social rank and external shame in working with experiences of psychosis.

  6. Risk for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy: population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Xu, Huylan; Laursen, Thomas Munk

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether age at onset of epilepsy, type of epilepsy, family history of psychosis, or family history of epilepsy affect the risk of schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy. DESIGN: Comparison of population based data. SETTING: Danish lon...... first admitted for epilepsy at later ages. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong association between epilepsy and schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. The two conditions may share common genetic or environmental causes.......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether age at onset of epilepsy, type of epilepsy, family history of psychosis, or family history of epilepsy affect the risk of schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy. DESIGN: Comparison of population based data. SETTING: Danish...... longitudinal registers. SUBJECTS: The cohort comprised 2.27 million people. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Epilepsy, psychosis, personal birth data. RESULTS: We found an increased risk of schizophrenia (relative risk 2.48, 95% confidence interval 2.20 to 2.80) and schizophrenia-like psychosis (2.93, 2.69 to 3...

  7. Self-reference in psychosis and depression: a language marker of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, S K; Leavitt, J; Deutsch-Link, S; Dealy, S; Landry, C D; Pirruccio, K; Shea, S; Trent, S; Cecchi, G; Corlett, P R

    2016-09-01

    Language use is of increasing interest in the study of mental illness. Analytical approaches range from phenomenological and qualitative to formal computational quantitative methods. Practically, the approach may have utility in predicting clinical outcomes. We harnessed a real-world sample (blog entries) from groups with psychosis, strong beliefs, odd beliefs, illness, mental illness and/or social isolation to validate and extend laboratory findings about lexical differences between psychosis and control subjects. We describe the results of two experiments using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count software to assess word category frequencies. In experiment 1, we compared word use in psychosis and control subjects in the laboratory (23 per group), and related results to subject symptoms. In experiment 2, we examined lexical patterns in blog entries written by people with psychosis and eight comparison groups. In addition to between-group comparisons, we used factor analysis followed by clustering to discern the contributions of strong belief, odd belief and illness identity to lexical patterns. Consistent with others' work, we found that first-person pronouns, biological process words and negative emotion words were more frequent in psychosis language. We tested lexical differences between bloggers with psychosis and multiple relevant comparison groups. Clustering analysis revealed that word use frequencies did not group individuals with strong or odd beliefs, but instead grouped individuals with any illness (mental or physical). Pairing of laboratory and real-world samples reveals that lexical markers previously identified as specific language changes in depression and psychosis are probably markers of illness in general.

  8. Psychotic-like experiences in the general population: characterizing a high-risk group for psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, I

    2011-01-01

    Recent research shows that psychotic symptoms, or psychotic-like experiences (PLEs), are reported not only by psychosis patients but also by healthy members of the general population. Healthy individuals who report these symptoms are considered to represent a non-clinical psychosis phenotype, and have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. Converging research now shows that this non-clinical psychosis phenotype is familial, heritable and covaries with familial schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. A review of the research also shows that the non-clinical phenotype is associated extensively with schizophrenia-related risk factors, including social, environmental, substance use, obstetric, developmental, anatomical, motor, cognitive, linguistic, intellectual and psychopathological risk factors. The criterion and construct validity of the non-clinical psychosis phenotype with schizophrenia demonstrates that it is a valid population in which to study the aetiology of psychosis. Furthermore, it suggests shared genetic variation between the clinical and non-clinical phenotypes. Much remains to be learned about psychosis by broadening the scope of research to include the non-clinical psychosis phenotype.

  9. Relationship between substance abuse and first-episode psychosis - a South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Brink

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Co-morbidity between substance abuse and psy- chotic disorders is high. Few studies have examined therelationship between first-episode psychosis and substance abuse. Several questions emerge from this common relationship and many of them remain unanswered. Objectives. To determine the effect of substance abuse on psychosis in terms of onset, duration, severity of symptoms, use of medication and outcome. Method. Thirty - three subjects with first-episode psychosis, as well as primary caregivers, were interviewed re g a rding substance abuse and its relation to illness. Thirty-six control subjects were also interv i e w e d . Results. Twenty-seven per cent of subjects abused substances in the 3 months before onset of illness, and 77.8% of the abusers w e re male. Subjects in the first-episode psychosis group were m o re likely to choose cannabis as their substance of abuse than c o n t rols. They also started abusing substances at a younger age than controls. Subjects with first-episode psychosis who abused substances presented at an earlier age than non-abusers. Substances affected symptoms at baseline presentation . Conclusions. Substance abuse has a significant impact on first- onset psychosis as far as age of onset and symptom severity are c o n c e rned. Subjects with an underlying vulnerability to psychosis seem to start abusing substances at an earlier age than the general population. Males are more likely to abuse substances than females.

  10. Sex differences in sub-clinical psychosis--results from a community study over 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, Wulf; Hengartner, Michael P; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Haker, Helene; Angst, Jules

    2012-08-01

    Sex differences in schizophrenia have long been reported. They are found within almost all aspects of the disease, from incidence and prevalence, age of onset, symptomatology, and course to its psycho-social outcome. Many sex-related hypotheses have been developed about the biology, psychology, or sociology of that disease. A further approach to study sex differences would be to examine such differences in sub-clinical psychotic states as well. If factors related to full-blown psychosis were equally meaningful over the entire psychosis continuum, we should expect that "true" sex differences could also be identified in sub-clinical psychosis. Here, we studied sex differences in sub-clinical psychosis within a community cohort in Zurich, Switzerland. This population was followed for over 30 years and included males and females between the ages of 20/21 and 49/50. We applied two different measures of sub-clinical psychosis representing schizotypal signs and schizophrenia nuclear symptoms. Using cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, we found no significant sex differences in sub-clinical psychosis over time with respect to age of onset, symptomatology, course, or psycho-social outcome. Thus it appears that sex differences in psychosis manifest themselves at the high end of the continuum (full-blown schizophrenia) rather than within the sub-threshold range. Possibly males and females have separate thresholds for certain symptoms because they are differently vulnerable or exposed to various risk factors. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Resumption of work or studies after first-episode psychosis: the impact of vocational case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Baki, Amal; Létourneau, Geneviève; Morin, Caroline; Ng, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Psychosis compromises the educational and professional projects of young patients. Vocational case management (VCM) offers comprehensive support for reintegration into work or studies within an early psychosis intervention programme. To evaluate the effectiveness of VCM in resumption of work or school and to identify the predictive factors of occupational outcome. This descriptive study focused on occupational status of an early psychosis cohort during the first 5 years of VCM. 56.6% of 97 study subjects had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 32% had type I bipolar disorder with psychotic features. 68% held a productive occupation the year prior to admission, and 47.4% at admission. The occupational rate rose from 57.1% at 12 months to over 70% after 48 months. 65.6% maintained or improved their occupational status. Most subjects held competitive employment, and the employment rate was similar to that of the general population. Prior employment and affective psychosis were associated with better outcome. [Correction added on 2 April 2013, after first online publication: 'Non-affective psychosis' has been changed to 'affective psychosis' in the Results section.] The majority of individuals suffering from early psychosis resume productive activity rapidly when offered VCM within an early intervention programme during a follow-up period of up to 5 years. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Automated analysis of free speech predicts psychosis onset in high-risk youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Gillinder; Carrillo, Facundo; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Slezak, Diego Fernández; Sigman, Mariano; Mota, Natália B; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Javitt, Daniel C; Copelli, Mauro; Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatry lacks the objective clinical tests routinely used in other specializations. Novel computerized methods to characterize complex behaviors such as speech could be used to identify and predict psychiatric illness in individuals. In this proof-of-principle study, our aim was to test automated speech analyses combined with Machine Learning to predict later psychosis onset in youths at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis. Thirty-four CHR youths (11 females) had baseline interviews and were assessed quarterly for up to 2.5 years; five transitioned to psychosis. Using automated analysis, transcripts of interviews were evaluated for semantic and syntactic features predicting later psychosis onset. Speech features were fed into a convex hull classification algorithm with leave-one-subject-out cross-validation to assess their predictive value for psychosis outcome. The canonical correlation between the speech features and prodromal symptom ratings was computed. Derived speech features included a Latent Semantic Analysis measure of semantic coherence and two syntactic markers of speech complexity: maximum phrase length and use of determiners (e.g., which). These speech features predicted later psychosis development with 100% accuracy, outperforming classification from clinical interviews. Speech features were significantly correlated with prodromal symptoms. Findings support the utility of automated speech analysis to measure subtle, clinically relevant mental state changes in emergent psychosis. Recent developments in computer science, including natural language processing, could provide the foundation for future development of objective clinical tests for psychiatry.

  13. High psychosis liability is associated with altered autonomic balance during exposure to Virtual Reality social stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counotte, Jacqueline; Pot-Kolder, Roos; van Roon, Arie M; Hoskam, Olivier; van der Gaag, Mark; Veling, Wim

    2017-06-01

    Social stressors are associated with an increased risk of psychosis. Stress sensitisation is thought to be an underlying mechanism and may be reflected in an altered autonomic stress response. Using an experimental Virtual Reality design, the autonomic stress response to social stressors was examined in participants with different liability to psychosis. Fifty-five patients with recent onset psychotic disorder, 20 patients at ultra-high risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of patients with psychosis and 53 controls were exposed to social stressors (crowdedness, ethnic minority status and hostility) in a Virtual Reality environment. Heart rate variability parameters and skin conductance levels were measured at baseline and during Virtual Reality experiments. High psychosis liability groups had significantly increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability compared to low liability groups both at baseline and during Virtual Reality experiments. Both low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) power were reduced, while the LF/HF ratio was similar between groups. The number of virtual social stressors significantly affected heart rate, HF, LF/HF and skin conductance level. There was no interaction between psychosis liability and amount of virtual social stress. High liability to psychosis is associated with decreased parasympathetic activity in virtual social environments, which reflects generally high levels of arousal, rather than increased autonomic reactivity to social stressors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pre-morbid characteristics and co-morbidity of methamphetamine users with and without psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C K; Lin, S K; Sham, P C; Ball, D; Loh, E W; Hsiao, C C; Chiang, Y L; Ree, S C; Lee, C H; Murray, R M

    2003-11-01

    The long-term use of methamphetamine (MAMP) can result in psychosis but it is not clear why some individuals develop psychotic symptoms, while others use MAMP regularly over long periods and remain unscathed. We set out to characterize MAMP users and to examine the relationship of pre-morbid personality, pre-morbid social function and other psychiatric disorders to MAMP psychosis. Four hundred and forty-five amphetamine users were recruited from a psychiatric hospital and a detention centre in Taipei, and were assessed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS). Their parents were interviewed with the Premorbid Schizoid and Schizotypal Traits (PSST) and the Premorbid Social Adjustment (PSA) schedules. Pre-morbid characteristics and psychiatric co-morbidity were compared between the MAMP users with a lifetime diagnosis of MAMP psychosis and those without. The MAMP users with psychosis presented a clinical picture which mimicked the positive symptoms of schizophrenia: 85% had auditory hallucinations; 71% persecutory delusions; 63% delusions of reference. Compared with their non-psychotic counterparts, these MAMP users were younger at first MAMP use, used larger amounts of MAMP, had a significantly higher mean PSST score, and higher rates of major depressive disorder, alcohol dependence and antisocial personality disorder. Earlier and larger use of MAMP was associated with increased risk of psychosis. Our data are also compatible with the view that pre-morbid schizoid/schizotypal personality predisposes MAMP users to develop psychosis, and that the greater the personality vulnerability, the longer the psychosis will persist.

  15. A Longitudinal Study of Violent Behavior in a Psychosis-Risk Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, Gary; Appelbaum, Paul S; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Wall, Melanie M; Feng, Tianshu; Masucci, Michael D; Altschuler, Rebecca; Girgis, Ragy R

    2018-01-01

    There is a lack of insight into the relationships between violent ideation, violent behavior, and early, particularly attenuated, psychosis. Our aims were to examine the relationships between baseline violent behavior and violent ideation and outcome violent behavior and conversion to psychosis in at-risk individuals. We longitudinally assessed 200 individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis for violent ideation and violent behavior using the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS), and rated these according to MacArthur Community Violence categories. Fifty-six individuals (28%) reported violent ideation at baseline, 12 (6%) reported violent behavior within 6 months pre-baseline, and 8 (4%) committed acts of violence during the follow-up time period. Information about violent ideation was obtained only by indirect, but not direct, inquiry about violent ideation. Both violent ideation and violent behavior at baseline significantly predicted violent behavior (RR=13.9, p=0.001; RR=8.3, p=0.003, respectively) during follow-up, as well as a diagnosis of psychosis (RR=2.3 and 2.4, respectively; both pviolent ideation at baseline were completely different than their subsequent targets of violent behavior. Violent behavior occurred within 7 days (SD 35 days) of a diagnosis of syndromal psychosis. These data suggest that checking carefully for violent ideation and behavior in clinical high-risk patients is essential, as these have predictive value for conversion to psychosis and likelihood of violence in the future.

  16. Gender differences in pathways to care for early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Manuela; Flora, Nina; Anderson, Kelly K; Haughton, Asante; Tuck, Andrew; Archie, Suzanne; Kidd, Sean; McKenzie, Kwame

    2016-03-28

    Gender is a critical demographic determinant in first-episode psychosis research. We used data from the ACE Pathways to Care Project, which examined pathways to care in African-origin, Caribbean-origin and European-origin participants, to investigate the role of gender in pathways to early intervention programmes. A qualitative approach was used to examine gender differences in the routes to care. We conducted four focus groups and four individual in-depth interviews with 25 service users of early intervention services from African-origin, Caribbean-origin and European-origin populations. Gender stereotypes negatively influence the first service contact for women, and the early phase of the help seeking process for men. Women reported trying to seek care. However, family members and service providers often questioned their calls for help. Men described having difficulties in talking about their symptoms, as the act of seeking help was perceived as a sign of weakness by peers. The findings of this study suggest that gender stereotypes shape the journey to specialized care in different ways for men and women. Awareness of the impact that gender stereotypes have when a young person is seeking care for psychosis could help to promote a shift in attitudes among health-care providers and the provision of more compassionate and patient-centred care during this critical time. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Psychosis and the dynamics of the psychotherapy process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment of the 's......The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment...... of the 'self' from the 'world which results in changed abilities in inter-subjective relating to oneself and others. This understanding has led to guidelines for psychotherapists who engage in treatment of psychoses and these are summarized in this article. As a result of the disturbance in the inter......-subjective process, a therapeutic relationship is disrupted and a therapeutic alliance is not assured. Therapists have to pay particular attention to the empathic aspects of the interaction as they attempt to integrate affects to restore meaning to the inner life of the patient. The psychodynamics of this process...

  18. Cognitive Function in Individuals With Psychosis: Moderation by Adolescent Cannabis Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Rebecca C; Shalvoy, Alexandra; Cullum, C Munro; Ivleva, Elena I; Keshavan, Matcheri; Pearlson, Godfrey; Hill, S Kristian; Sweeney, John A; Tamminga, Carol A; Ghose, Subroto

    2016-11-01

    Prior cannabis use, compared to nonuse, is reported to be associated with less cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. The age of cannabis use and the persistent influence of cannabis use on cognitive function has not been examined across the psychosis dimension. Ninety-seven volunteers with psychosis (schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or bipolar psychosis) and 64 controls were recruited at the Dallas site of the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes consortium. Cannabis use history obtained in a semi-structured manner was used to categorize subjects into nonusers, adolescent-onset users, and late-onset users. The a priori hypothesis tested was that individuals with psychosis and a history of adolescent cannabis use (ACU) would have better global neuropsychological performance, as measured by the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) battery, compared to those with psychosis and no cannabis use history. BACS Composite scores were significantly higher in individuals with psychosis with ACU compared to individuals with psychosis and no prior cannabis use. In subgroup analyses, ACU influenced global cognition in the schizophrenia/schizoaffective (SCZ) subgroup but not the bipolar psychosis subgroup. Exploratory analyses within the SCZ group, suggest that ACU was associated with better performance in specific domains compared to non-ACU groups. There are distinct associations between age of cannabis use and neuropsychological function across psychotic illnesses. Specifically, ACU is associated with better cognitive function in SCZ but not bipolar psychosis. This age-dependent and diagnosis-specific influence of cannabis may need to be factored into the design of future cognitive studies in SCZ. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Domain-specific cognitive impairment in non-demented Parkinson's disease psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jared T; Perepezko, Kate; Bakker, Catherine C; Dawson, Ted M; Johnson, Vanessa; Mari, Zoltan; Marvel, Cherie L; Mills, Kelly A; Pantelyat, Alexander; Pletnikova, Olga; Rosenthal, Liana S; Shepard, Melissa D; Stevens, Daniel A; Troncoso, Juan C; Wang, Jiangxia; Pontone, Gregory M

    2017-05-16

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), psychosis is associated with cognitive impairment that may be more profound in particular cognitive domains. Our goal was to determine whether psychosis in non-demented PD participants is associated with domain-specific cognitive impairment on the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE). The Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease Research Center of Excellence Longitudinal Study at Johns Hopkins is a prospective study that was initiated in 1998. Clinical assessments are conducted at two-year intervals at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. We analyzed data from 137 enrolled participants with idiopathic PD. Psychosis diagnoses were established by psychiatrist interview per DSM-IV criteria. An incident dementia diagnosis resulted in exclusion from analysis for that evaluation and any future evaluations in that participant. We used logistic regression with generalized estimated equations (GEE) to model the time-varying relationship between MMSE subscale scores and psychosis, adjusting for potential confounding variables identified through univariable analysis. Thirty-one unique psychosis cases were recorded among non-demented participants. Fifty total evaluations with psychosis present were analyzed. In multivariable regressions, psychosis was associated with lower scores on the orientation (relative odds ratio, rOR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.58-0.93; p = 0.011), language (rOR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.48-0.86; p = 0.003), and intersecting pentagon (rOR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.20-0.92 p = 0.030) subscales of the MMSE. In PD, executive dysfunction, disorientation, and impaired language comprehension may be associated with psychosis. Our findings suggest that the corresponding MMSE subscales may be useful in identifying participants with a higher likelihood of developing psychosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Examining gender difference in adult-onset psychosis in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Christy L-M; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry K-W; Lee, Edwin H-M; Chen, Eric Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Gender-specific treatment strategies for psychosis have been suggested in recent years. Data on gender difference were largely consistent regarding premorbid functioning, age of onset and negative symptoms; however, results regarding neurocognitive function and duration of untreated psychosis were mixed and inconclusive. In this study, we aimed at a thorough examination on the gender differences in 360 Chinese patients with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. From June 2009 to August 2011, participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis targeting first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. Comprehensive data on basic demographics, premorbid functioning and schizoid and schizotypal traits, clinical, functioning, medication side effects and a battery of neurocognitive measures were collected upon entry into the service. In 360 patients with first-episode psychosis aged between 26 and 55 years, 43.6% (n = 157) were male and 56.4% (n = 203) were female. Males had poorer premorbid functioning and adjustment, earlier age of onset, more negative symptoms and poorer functioning in terms of work productivity, independent living and immediate social network relationships at presentation of first-episode psychosis. Interestingly, our data indicate that males tend to be more educated, and also characterized by higher IQ, better neurocognitive performance on visual domain compared with females. Duration of untreated psychosis was not different between the two genders. Data from this homogeneous cohort of Chinese populations enabled tailored and culturally sensitive recommendation on gender-specific treatment strategies, hence improving patients' care and facilitate better diagnostic and interventional decisions for patients with psychosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.