WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute necrotizing encephalopathy

  1. Moyamoya disease in a child with previous acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taik-Kun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Kim, Baek Hyun; Chung, Hwan Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, 516 Kojan-Dong, Ansan City, Kyungki-Do 425-020 (Korea); Eun, Baik-Lin [Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-09-01

    A previously healthy 24-day-old boy presented with a 2-day history of fever and had a convulsion on the day of admission. MRI showed abnormal signal in the thalami, caudate nuclei and central white matter. Acute necrotising encephalopathy was diagnosed, other causes having been excluded after biochemical and haematological analysis of blood, urine and CSF. He recovered, but with spastic quadriparesis. At the age of 28 months, he suffered sudden deterioration of consciousness and motor weakness of his right limbs. MRI was consistent with an acute cerebrovascular accident. Angiography showed bilateral middle cerebral artery stenosis or frank occlusion with numerous lenticulostriate collateral vessels consistent with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  2. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skelton, Brandon W.; Phillips, C.D. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Neuroradiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Hollingshead, Michael C.; Castillo, Mauricio [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Neuroradiology Section, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sledd, Andrew T. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Pediatrics, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a disease entity seen nearly exclusively in East Asian children that is characterized by multifocal, symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. We present a child who developed dramatic neurologic symptoms following a viral prodrome. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated characteristic lesions of ANEC, while laboratory analyses revealed evidence of acute infection with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6). We highlight the MRI findings in both the acute and convalescent phases of ANEC, discuss the implications of neuroimaging on the child's clinical course, and emphasize the integral role of the radiologist in correctly diagnosing this rare disease. (orig.)

  3. Novel Influenza A (H1N1)-Associated Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Sook; Chang, Hyun Jung; Suh, Miri; Rha, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Several cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) with influenza A (H1N1) have been reported to date. The prognosis of ANE associated with H1N1 is variable; some cases resulted in severe neurologic complication, whereas other cases were fatal. Reports mostly focused on the diagnosis of ANE with H1N1 infection, rather than functional recovery. We report a case of ANE with H1N1 infection in a 4-year-old Korean girl who rapidly developed fever, seizure, and altered mentality, as well as ha...

  4. Novel Influenza A (H1N1)-Associated Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jung; Park, Eun Sook; Chang, Hyun Jung; Suh, Miri

    2013-01-01

    Several cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) with influenza A (H1N1) have been reported to date. The prognosis of ANE associated with H1N1 is variable; some cases resulted in severe neurologic complication, whereas other cases were fatal. Reports mostly focused on the diagnosis of ANE with H1N1 infection, rather than functional recovery. We report a case of ANE with H1N1 infection in a 4-year-old Korean girl who rapidly developed fever, seizure, and altered mentality, as well as had neurologic sequelae of ataxia, intentional tremor, strabismus, and dysarthria. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed lesions in the bilateral thalami, pons, and left basal ganglia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ANE caused by H1N1 infection and its long-term functional recovery in Korea. PMID:23705127

  5. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilson, Derek E; Adams, Mark D; Orr, Caitlin M D

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a ...

  6. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A 14-month-old girl who presented with sudden onset of unreponsiveness following a fever for 2 days developed decerebrate posturing within 9 hours after admission to Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL.

  7. Encefalopatia necrotizante aguda: paciente com evolução recidivante e letal Acute necrotizing encephalopathy: patient with a relapsing and lethal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erasmo B. Casella

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A encefalopatia necrotizante aguda foi descrita inicialmente em crianças japonesas e se caracteriza por rápida evolução e lesões simétricas no tronco encefálico, cerebelo e especialmente nos tálamos. Avaliamos uma menina de 7 meses de idade, que apresentou dois episódios de depressão da consciência de rápida instalação e paresias, sem alterações metabólicas. Houve uma rápida melhora na primeira crise, porém o segundo episódio foi fulminante, tendo evoluído para estado de morte encefálica em dois dias. Os estudos de ressonância magnética mostraram lesões simétricas nos tálamos e acometimento também do tronco encefálico e cerebelo.Acute necrotizing encephalopathy was initially reported in Japanese children. The rapid evolution and symmetrical brain lesions seen in the brainstem, cerebellum and specially in the thalamus characterize the disease. We studied a 7-month-old-girl, who presented with two episodes of rapid loss of consciousness and paresis without metabolic disturbances. At the first time she had a rapid improvement, but at the second episode the course was fulminant and in two days she lapsed into a clinical state of brain death. The magnetic resonance studies showed symmetrical lesions in the thalamus and additional lesions involving the brainstem and the cerebellum.

  8. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy secondary to diphtheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hale; Ozgul, Esra; Agildere, Ahmet Muhtesem [Baskent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    We present a previously healthy 6-month-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with lethargy, hypotonia and focal clonic seizures 6 days following diptheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination. A diagnosis of acute necrotising encephalopathy was made with the aid of MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  9. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E. Kman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 34-year-old HIV positive female presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of swollen, painful gums. She had difficulty eating and chewing, along with aches and general malaise. The patient was an everyday smoker and was not taking any antiretroviral medication. Significant findings: Physical examination revealed inflamed gingiva, ulceration, and soft tissue necrosis (Image 1 along with mandibular lymphadenopathy (not shown. Given her symptoms, poor oral care, and her immunocompromised state, she was given a diagnosis of Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG or Vincent’s Angina. Discussion: Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG, Vincent’s Angina, or Trench Mouth is the only periodontal disease in which bacteria invade non-necrotic tissue. The etiology is usually secondary to fusobacteria and spirochete overgrowth of bacteria which is normally present in the oral cavity. HIV infection, previous necrotizing gingivitis, poor oral hygiene, malnutrition, smoking, and stress are predisposing factors. Antibiotics and improved nutrition have significantly decreased the incidence of ANUG. The prevalence of ANUG among HIV infected patients varies from 4.3% to 16.0%. ANUG is 20.8 times more likely to be seen in AIDS patients with CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3. In developing countries, like those in Sub-Saharan Africa, incidence of ANUG is increasing among children with a prevalence as high as 23% in children under 10 years of age.1 Treatment for ANUG is multifactorial. Patients need good debridement under anesthesia so dental referral is imperative. Pain control with Ibuprofen or low dose opioids is indicated. Oral hygiene instructions include Chlorhexidine 0.12% twice daily, proper nutrition, appropriate fluid intake, and smoking cessation. For signs of systemic involvement, the recommended antibiotics are Amoxicillin and Metronidazole.2 If left untreated, ANUG may lead to rapid

  10. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  11. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  13. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Associated with Vildagliptin

    OpenAIRE

    Purnima Kunjathaya; Pradeep Kakkadasam Ramaswami; Anupama Nagar Krishnamurthy; Naresh Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Context To report a case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient receiving vildagliptin. Case report A 49-year-old manpresented to us with severe abdominal pain and was diagnosed to have pancreatitis three weeks after the commencement of vildagliptin for the treatment of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. His serum amylase was 2,215 U/L at admission, with contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of the abdomen and pelvis showing features of acute pancreatitis. The patient had a...

  14. Candesartan mediates microcirculation in acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci, H; Sahin, T T; Dikmen, K; Dikmen, A U; Yuksel, O; Gulbahar, O; Poyraz, A; Tekin, E

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to determine the effect of an AT-II antagonist candesartan on pancreatic microcirculation in an experimental model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. There were five study groups with 10 animals in each. Pancreatitis was induced by intravenous infusion of cerulein and coadministration of glycodeoxycholate into biliopancreatic canal. Candesartan is given at 6th and 18th hour to the 24th and 48th hour groups, respectively. At 24th and 48th hours; following anaesthesia laparotomy was performed and laser Doppler flowmetry was performed in the pancreatic tissue of the animals. Following scarification blood samples were obtained for amylase, myeloperoxidase, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha. Tissue samples from the pancreas were obtained for histopathological analysis, endothelial cell apoptosis (TUNEL assay) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 immunohistochemistry. Pancreatic microcirculation was higher in the candesartan treated groups (p candesartan treated groups (p candesartan treated groups (p 0.05). Tissue matrix metalloproteinase -9 levels were found to be reduced with candesartan treatment (p candesartan in the early phases of acute necrotizing pancreatitis effective on microcirculation of pancreatic tissue (Tab. 3, Fig. 6, Ref. 28).

  15. [Leigh's encephalopathy (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Documentation of its evolution through neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J A; González-Ferrer, S; Martínez, C; Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Delgado, W; Mora La Cruz, E

    1996-09-01

    A 30 months-old boy developed bilateral nistagmus, tremor, gait disturbance, hypotonia and disartria. The diagnose of Leigh encephalopathy was suggested on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and laboratory findings. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at an early stage revealed bilateral and symmetric lesions in the putamen, appearing as hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images. Twelve months later a relatively large hypertense area in the posterior brainstem was observed. At this stage, the patient exhibited marked deterioration, dystonic manifestations, rigidity and respiratory disturbances. He died 6 months later for respiratory arrest during bronconeumonic infection. We believe MRI is a valuable means to allow assessment of the evolution of the disease.

  16. Necrotizing Enteritis and Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy Associated With Equine Coronavirus Infection in Equids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, F; Diab, S; Mete, A; Stanton, J B; Fielding, L; Crossley, B; Sverlow, K; Fish, S; Mapes, S; Scott, L; Pusterla, N

    2015-11-01

    Equine coronavirus (ECoV) is a Betacoronavirus recently associated clinically and epidemiologically with emerging outbreaks of pyrogenic, enteric, and/or neurologic disease in horses in the United States, Japan, and Europe. We describe the pathologic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular findings in 2 horses and 1 donkey that succumbed to natural infection with ECoV. One horse and the donkey (case Nos. 1, 3) had severe diffuse necrotizing enteritis with marked villous attenuation, epithelial cell necrosis at the tips of the villi, neutrophilic and fibrinous extravasation into the small intestinal lumen (pseudomembrane formation), as well as crypt necrosis, microthrombosis, and hemorrhage. The other horse (case No. 2) had hyperammonemic encephalopathy with Alzheimer type II astrocytosis throughout the cerebral cortex. ECoV was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in small intestinal tissue, contents, and/or feces, and coronavirus antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry in the small intestine in all cases. Coronavirus-like particles characterized by spherical, moderately electron lucent, enveloped virions with distinct peplomer-like structures projecting from the surface were detected by negatively stained transmission electron microscopy in small intestine in case No. 1, and transmission electron microscopy of fixed small intestinal tissue from the same case revealed similar 85- to 100-nm intracytoplasmic particles located in vacuoles and free in the cytoplasm of unidentified (presumably epithelial) cells. Sequence comparison showed 97.9% to 99.0% sequence identity with the ECoV-NC99 and Tokachi09 strains. All together, these results indicate that ECoV is associated with necrotizing enteritis and hyperammonemic encephalopathy in equids. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  18. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Denis Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA, from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational, retrospective, single-center study. Results. The study shows different types of diagnostic algorithm and therapeutical approaches, in correlation with morbidity and mortality rates. Conclusions. Our study highlighted the fact that speed is critical, early management being the key to outcome.

  19. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bi; Wei, QianQian; Wang, YunHan; Chen, YongPing; Shang, HuiFang

    2014-09-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria is an inherited disease that is rarely diagnosed in prepubertal children. It can affect the autonomic, peripheral, and central nervous system. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, seizures, altered consciousness, and visual disorder associated with potentially reversible neuroradiological abnormalities predominantly in the parieto-occipital lobes. We report a child with acute intermittent porphyria who presented with radiological manifestations suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. A 9-year-old girl underwent an appendectomy after developing abdominal pain. She subsequently developed bilateral visual disturbance, confusion, seizures, hypertension, tachycardia, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dark tea-colored urine, and recurrent abdominal pain. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense gyriform lesions on T2-weighted images and hypointense to isointense lesions on T1-weighted images in both parieto-occipital lobes with mild enhancement. The diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria was confirmed by increased urinary excretion of porphyrin precursors. Her clinical signs gradually improved after intravenous high-dose glucose treatment and symptomatic therapies. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging confirmed complete resolution of the parieto-occipital lesions, suggesting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The association of abdominal pain, mental status changes, and autonomic dysfunction should arouse the suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. Acute intermittent porphyria can be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Complicating Uteroplacental Apoplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-U Cheang

    2007-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is difficult to diagnose during pregnancy. It presents as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting in hemodynamic changes and may lead to abruptio placentae. Nonsurgical conservative treatment may be useful in such patients.

  1. Neuroimaging findings in acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Pipitone, Nicolò

    2009-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Early recognition is important because timely thiamine supplementation can reverse the clinical features of the disease. The aim of this article is to provide an update on the typical and atypical neuroimaging findings of the acute phase of the disease. Wernicke's encephalopathy is characterized by a quite distinct pattern of MR alterations, which include symmetrical alterations in the thalami, mamillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area, but atypical alterations may also been seen. A thorough knowledge of the neuroimaging findings of Wernicke's encephalopathy will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thus reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  2. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  3. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Adrienne Hughes; Alisha Brown; Matthew Valento

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. [West J Emerg Med. 20XX;XX(X...

  4. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  5. Percutaneous necrosectomy in patients with acute, necrotizing pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruennler, T.; Langgartner, J.; Lang, S.; Salzberger, B.; Schoelmerich, J. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Regensburg (Germany); Zorger, N.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Hamer, O.W. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy. By searching the radiological, surgical and internal medicine databases, all patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy between 1992 and 2004 were identified. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical data, and details about invasive procedures were collected by reviewing patient charts, radiological and surgical reports. The computed tomography severity index (CTSI) scores were determined by reviewing CT images. Eighteen patients were identified. Median Ranson score on admission was 2. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was median 22. Median CTSI score was 7. Initially all patients were treated with CT-guided drainage placement. Because passive drainage proved not to be effective, subsequent minimally invasive, percutaneous necrosectomy was performed. Eight out of 18 patients recovered fully without the need for surgery. Ten of 18 patients required additional surgical necrosectomy. For one of ten patients, percutaneous necrosectomy allowed postponing surgery by 39 days. Four of ten surgically treated patients died: three from septic multiorgan failure, one from pulmonary embolism. Percutaneous minimally invasive necrosectomy can be regarded as a safe and effective complementary treatment modality in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. It is suitable for a subset of patients to avoid or delay surgery. (orig.)

  6. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  7. About pathognomonic images: an infrequent case of acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The occurrence of acute encephalopathy is a dramatic clinical dilemma when usual diagnostic techniques (blood tests, cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid analysis show no abnormalities. CLINICAL CASE We describe a case of a 73 years old man admitted in our Internal Medicine Unit for acute diarrhoea with vomiting and fever who developed a prolonged gastrointestinal dysmotility syndrome with poor nutritional intake. Although a parenteral support was provided, he developed acute encephalopathy followed by hypotension and lactic acidosis without evidence of renal and hepatic disease or glycemic alterations. Likewise, no cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid alterations were found. Conversely, cerebral MRI showed marked and diffuse DP-2 and FLAIR hyperintensity of the mesencephalic tectal plate, of the periaqueductal area, and of the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the median thalamic area. These MRI descriptions were considered pathognomonic of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thus, the immediate use of ev thiamine was followed by a prompt and complete recovery of neurological, hemodinamic and metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS Non-alcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy is a rare and dramatic clinical event with high mortality. In this context, brain MRI is the best diagnostic tool providing a typical picture.

  8. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim : In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design : A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods : A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis : The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion : Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest

  9. Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, or lack of oxygen or blood flow to the brain. The hallmark of encephalopathy is an altered mental state. Depending on the ...

  10. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT including a CT perfusion (CTP scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report.

  11. Prognostic factors for acute encephalopathy with bright tree appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Junji; Nabatame, Shin; Nakano, Sayaka; Iwatani, Yoshiko; Kitai, Yukihiro; Tominaga, Koji; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Okinaga, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Nagai, Toshisaburo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prognostic factors for encephalopathy with bright tree appearance (BTA) in the acute phase through retrospective case evaluation. We recruited 10 children with encephalopathy who presented with BTA and classified them into 2 groups. Six patients with evident regression and severe psychomotor developmental delay after encephalopathy were included in the severe group, while the remaining 4 patients with mild mental retardation were included in the mild group. We retrospectively analyzed their clinical symptoms, laboratory data, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings. Patients in the severe group developed subsequent complications such as epilepsy and severe motor impairment. Univariate analysis revealed that higher maximum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (p=0.055) were a weak predictor of poor outcome. Maximum creatinine levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) and minimal platelet counts were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the severe group than in the mild group. Acute renal failure was not observed in any patient throughout the study. MRS of the BTA lesion during the BTA period showed elevated lactate levels in 5 children in the severe group and 1 child in the mild group. MRI performed during the chronic phase revealed severe brain atrophy in all patients in the severe group. Higher creatinine and LDH levels and lower platelet counts in the acute phase correlated with poor prognosis. Increased lactate levels in the BTA lesion during the BTA period on MRS may predict severe physical and mental disability. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. ACUTE BILATERAL VIRAL NECROTIZING RETINITIS : AN UNCOMMON CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year old male with a history of high grade fever 2 days, diarrhea 3 times and vomiting 2 times presented with diminution of vision in right eye of 1 days duration. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was counting finger 1 meter with no pin hole im provement and 20/20 ( S nellen ’ s in the right and left eye respectively. Fundus examination RE revealed white lesion in geographic fashion with clear edge involving macula and in left eye small peanut size white lesion present at paramacular area. Clinicall y a diagnosis of acute necrotizing was made. We started treatment by intra venous antiviral and systemic steroid. ELISA (serum and PCR (aqueous were positive for herpes simplex virus ( I ndex above 1.1 i.e. 1.54 . 1,2 The lesions showed a good response to t he above treatment. At 2 months follow - up, lesion had resolved well with BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 in right and left eye respectively

  14. Septic Encephalopathy Characterized by Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion and Early Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, whether viral or bacterial, can result in various forms of brain dysfunction (encephalopathy. Septic encephalopathy (SE is caused by an excessive immune reaction to infection, with clinical features including disturbed consciousness and seizures. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD is usually accompanied by viral infection in children and is characterized by biphasic seizures and impaired consciousness. The initial neurologic symptom of AESD is typically a febrile seizure that frequently lasts longer than 30 minutes. However, the possible forms this seizure takes are unclear. For example, it is unknown if nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE could be an early seizure symptomatic of AESD. In addition, thus far no cases of combined SE and AESD have been reported. Here, we describe the first reported case of SE with AESD that notably demonstrated NCSE as an early seizure.

  15. Quantitative EEG evaluation in patients with acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Souza Marques da Silva Braga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the use of quantitative EEG (qEEG in patients with acute encephalopathies (AEs and EEG background abnormalities. Method Patients were divided into favorable outcome (group A, 43 patients and an unfavorable outcome (group B, 5 patients. EEGLAB software was used for the qEEG analysis. A graphic of the spectral power from all channels was generated for each participant. Statistical comparisons between the groups were performed. Results In group A, spectral analysis revealed spectral peaks (theta and alpha frequency bands in 84% (38/45 of the patients. In group B, a spectral peak in the delta frequency range was detected in one patient. The remainder of the patients in both groups did not present spectral peaks. Statistical analysis showed lower frequencies recorded from the posterior electrodes in group B patients. Conclusion qEEG may be useful in the evaluations of patients with AEs by assisting with the prognostic determination.

  16. Multiple Ascending Aortic Mural Thrombi and Acute Necrotizing Mediastinitis Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwon Chong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The formation of aortic thrombi is an extremely rare complication of acute pancreatitis. Here we report a case of acute pancreatitis complicated by a paraesophageal pseudocyst, necrotizing mediastinitis, and the formation of multiple thrombi in the ascending aorta. The patient was successfully treated by surgical therapy, which included extensive debridement of the mediastinum and removal of the aortic thrombi under cardiopulmonary bypass. Although esophageal resection was not carried out concomitantly, the lesions were resolved and the patient remained free of complications over 2 years of follow-up care.

  17. Prognostic Value of Cytochrome C and Cytokines in Acute Viral Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum cytochrome c and cytokines were evaluated as prognostic predictors in 29 children (ages 9 mos to 9 yrs 11 mos with viral acute encephalopathies and multiple organ failure at Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

  18. [Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: traditional laparotomy vs. minimally invasive procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, R; Havlůj, J

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis continues to evolve. The standard therapeutic method for infected pancreatic necrosis and its subsequent septic complications is open surgical drainage. The advances in radiological imaging and interventional radiology have enabled the development of minimally invasive procedures, i.e. percutaneous drainage (PCD) under CT/USG control, endoscopic transgastric necrosectomy (ENE), laparoscopic transperitoneal necrosectomy (LNE) and retroperitoneal access to pancreatic necrosis (RENE). Patients with acute pancreatitis treated from 2002 to 2013 (n=932) were included in the study. In patients with a severe form of the disease, results obtained in two groups of patients were compared: the first group was treated by classic laparotomy (group A), the second one was treated by means of minimally invasive procedures (group B). Statistical analysis employed the chi-square test. During the mentioned period, 677 (72.6%) patients with a mild form and 255 (27.4%) with a severe form of the disease were treated. The male/female ratio was 1.4:1. In the group of patients suffering from a severe form of acute pancreatitis, 171 patients were treated conservatively, mortality rate being at 16.4% (28/171). Surgery was indicated in a total of 84 patients, mortality rate reaching 26.2% (22/84). Fifty-two of the patients underwent laparotomy (group A), minimally invasive procedures were used in a total of 32 patients (group B). Overall mortality in group A was 30.8% (16/52) vs. 18.8% (6/32) in group B, p = 0.224. The average length of hospitalization was longer in group A (65.4 days; median 52.4 vs. 49 days; median 36.5 in group B). PCD was the most frequent procedure performed in 19 patients; 5 of them died due to ongoing sepsis and multiorgan failure and 2 of them underwent revisional laparotomy. RENE was performed in 8 patients; lumbotomy was used in 5 of them. ENE was performed on 2 patients, 1 of them died, and LNE was used once. A less invasive

  19. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal Findings Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using “universal” PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98–99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Conclusions Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent. PMID:22413030

  20. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bolivar

    Full Text Available Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods.Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites were amplified using "universal" PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis, gender, and site status (diseased or control site. Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98-99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries.Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent.

  1. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, Ignacio; Whiteson, Katrine; Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using "universal" PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98-99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent.

  2. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The accurate diagnosis of neonatal AKI, irrespective of the cause, relies on suboptimal methods such as identification of rising serum creatinine, decreased urinary output and glomerular filtration rate. Studies of AKI biomarkers in adults and children have shown that biomarkers can improve the early diagnosis of AKI. Hypoxia-ischaemia is the proposed aetiological basis of AKI in both NE and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, there is a paucity of studies examining the role of AKI biomarkers specifically in NE. Urinary cystatin C (CysC), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18, kidney injury molecule-1, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, serum CysC and serum NGAL all show good ability to predict early AKI in a heterogeneous critically ill neonatal population including infants post-CPB. Moreover, serum and urinary NGAL and urinary CysC are early predictors of AKI secondary to NE. These findings are promising and open up the possibility of biomarkers playing a significant role in the early diagnosis and treatment of NE-related AKI. There is an urgent need to explore the role of AKI biomarkers in infants with NE as establishing the diagnosis of AKI earlier may allow more timely intervention with potential for improving long-term outcome.

  3. Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood after exanthema subitum outside Japan or Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, L.; Lanferman, H.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Jacobi, G.; Zanella, F. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is an uncommon disease which predominantly affects infants and young children living in Japan and Taiwan. A multifocal encephalopathy with symmetrical lesions in the thalamus, tegmentum of the brain stem, cerebral periventricular white matter and cerebellar medulla is characteristic. We present the imaging features in a 4-year-old Japanese boy who had been living in Germany for 2{sup 1}/{sub 2} years before presentation. (orig.)

  4. Acute anter ior necrotizing scler itis: A case repor t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Keat Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing scleritis is an uncommon but potential disastrous infection to the eye. It is commonly caused by vaso-occlusive autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or surgically-induced, and rarely due to infections. In this article, we presented a rare case of necrotizing scleritis caused by herpes infection in an immunocompromised patient. A 49 years old, retroviral positive gentleman presented to our clinic with a painful, red right eye associated with watering, photophobia and blurring of vision. His right eye rapidly deteriorated leading to an impending perforation of the sclera despite intensive antimicrobial therapy. The patient was started on acyclovir ointment and subsequently improved remarkably salvaging the eye from the need of an evisceration. Although the visual prognosis was poor, structural integrity of the eye was achieved.

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a survivor of valproate-induced acute liver failure: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mettananda, Sachith; Fernando, Asvini D; Ginige, Nimasari

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is an extremely rare radiological diagnosis that has not been reported previously in association with acute liver failure. Case presentation A 6-year-old Sri Lankan girl developed acute liver failure with severe hepatic encephalopathy due to sodium valproate. She was successfully treated medically with N-acetylcysteine and L-carnitine. During recovery she again developed features of encephalopathy and had repeated convulsions associate...

  6. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-03-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland, Ltd.

  7. A case of necrotizing mediastinitis induced by acute pyoper icardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep neck infection is a potentially life-threatening disease, especially complicated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM. The mean age of DNM is 49–57.8 years old. The commonly seen causes are tonsillar, pharyngeal infection and odontogenic origins. When the deep neck infection extended to the mediastinal spaces, the pleural effusion or pericardial effusion may appear. Here is a rare young lady who had fever and sore throat for 2 weeks, and chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion. After surgical drainage, the Escherichia coli grew over the culture of pericardial effusion. This case is rarely seen in the presence of Escherichia coli pyopericardium originating from DNM in the past. Overall mortality rate of DNM is around 11.2%–17% nowadays. We should keep in mind that for DNM, early diagnosis and aggressively surgical intervention with suitable drainage, and intensive postoperative care should be conducted to lower the morbidity and mortality.

  8. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a survivor of valproate-induced acute liver failure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettananda, Sachith; Fernando, Asvini D; Ginige, Nimasari

    2013-05-31

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is an extremely rare radiological diagnosis that has not been reported previously in association with acute liver failure. A 6-year-old Sri Lankan girl developed acute liver failure with severe hepatic encephalopathy due to sodium valproate. She was successfully treated medically with N-acetylcysteine and L-carnitine. During recovery she again developed features of encephalopathy and had repeated convulsions associated with moderate hypertension. The diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was made on clinical and radiological grounds and she showed a gradual improvement with control of blood pressure. This report adds to the evidence behind treatment of valproate-induced acute liver failure with N-acetylcysteine and L-carnitine and illustrates a rare but interesting association between acute liver failure and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

  10. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  11. Diffusion MRI features of acute encephalopathy due to stopping steroid medication abruptly in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Serter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is characterized by adrenal steroid biosynthesis defect. Steroid replacement therapy should be performed regularly in these patients. Adrenal crisis may be present in acute stress due to increased cortisol requirements or in steroid deficiency due to stopping steroid medication abruptly. In patients with acute adrenal insufficiency, severe hypotension or hypovolemic shock occurs typically. Acute encephalopathy can be seen due to hypoxia, hypervolemia, or hypoglycemia. Diffusion restriction can be seen in cortical-subcortical regions of frontal and parieto-occipital lobes and in splenium of corpus callosum. In CAH patients with neurologic symptoms, Diffusion weighted images (DWI is very important in the diagnosis and follow-up of acute encephalopathy.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis mimicking breakthrough seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamille Abdool

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with a past history of primary generalized seizures, who had been seizure-free for 2 years on sodium valproate and presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures suggestive of breakthrough seizures. Examination revealed hypertension, impetiginous lesions of the lower limbs, microscopic hematuria, elevated antistreptolysin O titre and low complement levels consistent with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension was controlled with intravenous nitroglycerin followed by oral captopril and amlodipine. Brain MRI changes returned normal within 2 weeks. The nephritis went in to remission within 2 months and after 8 months the patient has been seizure free again. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome appeared to have neither short nor intermediate effect on seizure control in this patient. The relationship between posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and seizures is reviewed.

  13. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Acute Post-Streptococcal Glomerulonephritis Mimicking Breakthrough Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdool, Kamille; Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Bhagwandass, Neal; Persad, Navindra; Temull, Vasant; Seegobin, Karan; Mike, Cassie

    2015-03-23

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with a past history of primary generalized seizures, who had been seizure-free for 2 years on sodium valproate and presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures suggestive of breakthrough seizures. Examination revealed hypertension, impetiginous lesions of the lower limbs, microscopic hematuria, elevated anti-streptolysin O titre and low complement levels consistent with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension was controlled with intravenous nitroglycerin followed by oral captopril and amlodipine. Brain MRI changes returned normal within 2 weeks. The nephritis went in to remission within 2 months and after 8 months the patient has been seizure free again. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome appeared to have neither short nor intermediate effect on seizure control in this patient. The relationship between posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and seizures is reviewed.

  14. Necrotizing myofasciitis: an atypical cause of ``acute abdomen`` in an immunocompromised child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, L.F.; Frush, D.P.; O`Hara, S.M.; Bisset, G.S. III [Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Box 3808, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    We report the case of an immunocompromised 15-year-old boy who presented with symptoms mimicking an ``acute abdomen`` related to necrotizing myofasciitis of the anterior abdominal wall. CT demonstrated the abdominal wall process as the cause of the patient`s symptoms and sonographically guided aspiration confirmed the diagnosis. Despite prompt diagnosis and aggressive surgical debridement, the infection continued to progress and the patient died within 24 h of presentation. (orig.) With 1 fig., 16 refs.

  15. A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyun Seok; Lee, Se-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is known to be caused by a variety of clinical disorders. The authors encountered a case of PRES associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism. A 49-year-old man presented with altered mental status. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) displayed vasogenic edema at the bilateral posterior temporal and parieto-occipital lobes and cerebellum. Laboratory tests and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered completely, and follow-up brain MRI and abdominal CT exhibited resolution of the previous lesions. We suggest that acute pancreatitis might be an etiology of PRES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spectral Electroencephalogram Analysis for the Evaluation of Encephalopathy Grade in Children With Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Craig A; Morgan, Lindsey; Mills, Michele; Stack, Cynthia V; Goldstein, Joshua L; Alonso, Estella M; Wainwright, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    Spectral electroencephalogram analysis is a method for automated analysis of electroencephalogram patterns, which can be performed at the bedside. We sought to determine the utility of spectral electroencephalogram for grading hepatic encephalopathy in children with acute liver failure. Retrospective cohort study. Tertiary care pediatric hospital. Patients between 0 and 18 years old who presented with acute liver failure and were admitted to the PICU. None. Electroencephalograms were analyzed by spectral analysis including total power, relative δ, relative θ, relative α, relative β, θ-to-Δ ratio, and α-to-Δ ratio. Normal values and ranges were first derived using normal electroencephalograms from 70 children of 0-18 years old. Age had a significant effect on each variable measured (p spectral analysis. The median age was 4.3 years, 14 of 33 were male, and the majority had an indeterminate etiology of acute liver failure. Neuroimaging was performed in 26 cases and was normal in 20 cases (77%). The majority (64%) survived, and 82% had a good outcome with a score of 1-3 on the Pediatric Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended at the time of discharge. Hepatic encephalopathy grade correlated with the qualitative visual electroencephalogram scores assigned by blinded neurophysiologists (rs = 0.493; p Spectral electroencephalogram characteristics varied significantly with the qualitative electroencephalogram classification (p Spectral electroencephalogram variables including relative Δ, relative θ, relative α, θ-to-Δ ratio, and α-to-Δ ratio all significantly varied with the qualitative electroencephalogram (p 0.05). Spectral electroencephalogram classification correlated with outcome (p Spectral electroencephalogram analysis can be used to evaluate even young patients for hepatic encephalopathy and correlates with outcome. Spectral electroencephalogram may allow improved quantitative and reproducible assessment of hepatic encephalopathy grade in children with acute

  17. Short and long-term outcomes in children with suspected acute encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Masahiro; Nagase, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tsukasa; Fujita, Kyoko; Kusumoto, Mayumi; Kajihara, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Yoshimichi; Maruyama, Azusa; Takeda, Hiroki; Uetani, Yoshiyuki; Tomioka, Kazumi; Toyoshima, Daisaku; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Morioka, Ichiro; Takada, Satoshi; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-09-01

    The time-dependent changes that occur in children after acute encephalopathy are not clearly understood. Therefore, we assessed changes in brain function after suspected acute encephalopathy over time. We created a database of children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit at Kobe Children's Hospital because of convulsions or impaired consciousness with fever between 2002 and 2013. Clinical courses and outcomes were reviewed and patients who met the following criteria were included in the study: (1) 6months to 15years of age, (2) no neurological abnormality before onset, (3) treated for suspected acute encephalopathy, and (4) followed after 1 (0-2) month and 12 (10-17) months of onset. Outcomes were assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) scale, with a score of 1 representing normal performance; 2, mild disability; 3, moderate disability; 4, severe disability; 5, vegetative state; and 6, brain death. A total of 78 children (32 male) with a median (range) age at onset of 20 (6-172) months were enrolled. Fifty-one cases scored 1 on the PCPC, 13 scored 2, three scored 3, five scored 4, one scored 5, and five cases scored 6 at discharge. Whereas seven of the 13 cases that scored a 2 on the PCPC recovered normal brain function after 12months, none of the nine cases that scored a 3-5 on the PCPC recovered normal function. Our findings suggest moderate to severe disability caused by acute encephalopathy had lasting consequences on brain function, whereas mild disability might result in improved function. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE.

  19. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  20. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hepatic encephalopathy, to ascertain whether this was related to the changes in liver function and whether these changes gave any prognostic information. CBF, determined by the intravenous xenon-133 method......, and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... any differences between patients with acute or chronic liver diseases or the different degrees of hepatic encephalopathy. In conclusion, a marked reduction of the CBF was seen in hepatic encephalopathy, irrespective of the etiology of the disease....

  1. Necrotizing mycotic vasculitis with cerebral infarction caused by Aspergillus niger in a horse with acute typholocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunev, S S; Ehrhart, E J; Jensen, H E; Foreman, J H; Richter, R A; Messick, J B

    1999-07-01

    An 18-year-old Morgan mare was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Illinois, with a 10-day history of watery diarrhea, depression, and dysphagia. On admission, the animal was severely dehydrated, depressed, and unable to swallow and had no clinical signs of diarrhea. The respiratory and heart rate and body temperature were within normal limits. Following fluid therapy, the mare developed severe watery diarrhea and continued to be depressed, incoordinated, and dysphagic. The animal died on the fourth day after admission and was sent to the Laboratories of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine for necropsy. Gross postmortem findings were consistent with an acute cerebral infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, an acute necrotizing typhlocolitis, multifocal petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, enlarged and congested pars intermedia of the pituitary gland, and marked bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia with multifocal areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Histologic evaluation of the affected brain demonstrated an area of coagulative necrosis of the gray matter, with hemorrhage, vasculitis, and thrombosis. There were many fungal hyphae 3.5-6.0 microm, pale basophilic, septate, and occasionally branching at 45 degrees present in the arterial walls and throughout the necrotic tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed Aspergillus niger as the etiologic agent responsible for the mycotic vasculitis and infarction in the brain. Bacteria culture and immunohistochemical staining of the colon and cecum failed to demonstrate specific pathogens.

  2. Spider Bite: A Rare Case of Acute Necrotic Arachnidism with Rapid and Fatal Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzi, Mario; Giglio, Anna Maria; Scozzafava, Annamaria; Filippelli, Orazio; Serafino, Giuseppe; Verre, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spider bites are quite frequent and often resolve quickly without leaving outcomes; only some species are capable of causing necrotic and systematic lesions in humans. Among them, we should mention the genus Loxosceles. The venom released from the spider bite of Loxosceles species is composed of proteins, enzymes, and nonenzymatic polypeptides. The phospholipase D family was identified as the active component of the venom. This family of enzymes is responsible for the local and systemic effects observed in loxoscelism. Phospholipases D interact with cell membranes triggering alterations which involve the complement system and activation of neutrophils and they cause the dermonecrotic skin lesions and systemic effects. We describe a fatal case of acute intoxication caused by a spider bite probably belonging to the species Loxosceles. The initial lesion was localized to a finger of a hand. Clinical course was worsening with deep necrotic lesions on limb, shock, hemolysis, acute kidney failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. All therapies were ineffective. This is the first fatal case described in Europe.

  3. Spider Bite: A Rare Case of Acute Necrotic Arachnidism with Rapid and Fatal Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pezzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spider bites are quite frequent and often resolve quickly without leaving outcomes; only some species are capable of causing necrotic and systematic lesions in humans. Among them, we should mention the genus Loxosceles. The venom released from the spider bite of Loxosceles species is composed of proteins, enzymes, and nonenzymatic polypeptides. The phospholipase D family was identified as the active component of the venom. This family of enzymes is responsible for the local and systemic effects observed in loxoscelism. Phospholipases D interact with cell membranes triggering alterations which involve the complement system and activation of neutrophils and they cause the dermonecrotic skin lesions and systemic effects. We describe a fatal case of acute intoxication caused by a spider bite probably belonging to the species Loxosceles. The initial lesion was localized to a finger of a hand. Clinical course was worsening with deep necrotic lesions on limb, shock, hemolysis, acute kidney failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. All therapies were ineffective. This is the first fatal case described in Europe.

  4. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic abscess due to Prevotella species in a diabetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonavane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis occasionally presents as pancreatic abscess with complications like pleural effusion and ascites. There are several pre-disposing factors, the most common being cholelithiaisis, alcohol abuse, infective causes, trauma, and metabolic causes such as diabetic ketoacidosis, while some cases are idiopathic. Here, we report a rare case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 40-year-old male who presented with pain in the abdomen, ascites and left basal pleural effusion. A computerized tomography (CT scan showed findings suggestive of pancreatic necrosis, with abscess formation and free-fluid surrounding area. The aspirated pus sample was processed for Gram staining and culture, which yielded growth of Prevotella species in an anaerobic culture. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and intra-abdominal collection drained. Necrosectomy of the distal tail and body of the pancreas was performed. The patient was started on antibiotics and along with supportive treatment, responded well.

  5. Use of Vacuum-assisted Wound Closure to Manage Limb Wounds in Patients Suffering from Acute Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shyan Huang

    2006-07-01

    Conclusion: The VAC technique of wound closure was found to be effective in managing non-healing limb wounds consequential to surgical treatment for patients suffering from acute necrotizing fasciitis. Although the cost of the VAC device was high, morbidity was much lower when compared to the CWD technique.

  6. Time-course proteomic analysis of taurocholate-induced necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fétaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Pastor, Catherine M; Jorge-Costa, Manuel; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Morel, Denis R; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2013-06-24

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, which varies greatly in course and severity. Severe forms are associated with serious local and/or systemic complications, and eventually death. The pathobiology of acute pancreatitis is complex. Animal models have been developed to investigate pathobiological processes and identify factors determining disease course. We performed a time-course proteomic analysis using a rat model of severe necrotizing acute pancreatitis induced by taurocholate perfusion in the pancreatic ducts. Results showed that levels of proteins associated to a given biological process changed in a coordinated fashion after disease onset. It was possible to follow the response of a particular pathobiological process to pancreatitis induction and to compare the course of protein pathways. Proteins involved in acinar cell secretion were found to follow a different kinetics than other cellular processes. After an initial decrease, secretory pathway-associated proteins raised again at 18 h post-induction. This phenomenon coincided with a burst in the expression of pancreatitis-associated protein (REG3A), an acute phase protein produced by the exocrine pancreas, and with the decrease of classical markers of pancreatic injury, suggesting that the expression of proteins associated to the secretory pathway may be a modulating factor of pancreas injury. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complex inflammatory disease, the pathobiology of which is not yet fully understood. Various animal models, relying on different mechanisms of disease induction, have been developed in order to investigate pathobiological processes of AP. In this study, we performed a time-course proteomic analysis to investigate changes of the pancreas proteome occurring in an experimental model of AP induced by perfusion of taurocholate, a bile acid, into the pancreatic duct. This experimental model is characterized by a severe disease with pancreatic necrosis and systemic

  7. Calendula officinalis ameliorates l-arginine-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-12-01

    Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) has been traditionally used in treating inflammation of internal organs, gastrointestinal tract ulcers and wound healing. The present study investigates the effect of ethanol extract (95%) of Calendula officinalis flowers in l-arginine induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Rats were divided into four groups: normal control, l-arginine control, Calendula officinalis extract (COE) treated and melatonin treated (positive control), which were further divided into subgroups (24 h, day 3 and 14) according to time points. Two injections of l-arginine 2 g/kg i.p. at 1 h intervals were administered in l-arginine control, COE and melatonin-treated groups to produce acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Biochemical parameters [serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, total proteins, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen content, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and nitrite/nitrate] and histopathological studies were carried out. COE treatment (400 mg/kg p.o.) was found to be beneficial. This was evidenced by significantly lowered histopathological scores (2 at day 14). Nucleic acid content (DNA 21.1 and RNA 5.44 mg/g pancreas), total proteins (0.66 mg/mL pancreas) and pancreatic amylase (1031.3 100 SU/g pancreas) were significantly improved. Marked reduction in pancreatic oxidative and nitrosative stress; collagen (122 μmoles/100 mg pancreas) and TGF-β1 (118.56 pg/mL) levels were noted. Results obtained were comparable to those of positive control. The beneficial effect of COE may be attributed to its antioxidant, antinitrosative and antifibrotic actions. Hence, the study concludes that COE promotes spontaneous repair and regeneration of the pancreas.

  8. Non-alcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: Role of MRI in non typical cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elefante, Andrea, E-mail: aelefant@unina.it [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Puoti, Gianfranco [I Division of Neurology, General Medicine Department, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Senese, Rossana [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Coppola, Cinzia [I Division of Neurology, General Medicine Department, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Russo, Carmela [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Tortora, Fabio [Department of Neuroradiology, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Divitiis, Oreste de [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Brunetti, Arturo [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Aim: Acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, most commonly found in chronic alcoholics. It is not so easy to suspect acute WE when the clinical picture does not include all the typical symptoms and alcohol abuse is not reported. Three rare cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in non-alcoholic patients are reported. Cases presentation: Two patients developed the disease following prolonged intravenous feeding, the third was carrying a gastric lymphoma. None of them presented with the classic clinical triad of WE (ophtalmoplegia/nystagmus, ataxia and consciousness disturbance), showing just one or two of the typical symptoms. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) represented the key tool to suspect and define WE diagnosis, showing a picture characterized by bilaterally altered signal of the thalamic pulvinar, mesencephalic cup, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal grey matter and floor of fourth ventricle. All patients dramatically improved within 48 h after administration of thiamine. Conclusion: We emphasize that WE should be suspected in all patients showing typical MRI features presenting with at least one of the clinical triad of WE.

  9. Disrupted glutamate-glutamine cycle in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Terai, Masaru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University Yachiyo Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Yachiyo-shi (Japan); Mizuguchi, Masashi [The University of Tokyo, Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Barkovich, A.J. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype of infectious pediatric encephalopathy in Japan. It is sometimes difficult to make an early diagnosis of AESD; excitotoxicity is postulated to be the pathogenesis based on elevated glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) complex (Glx = Glu + Gln) observed on MR spectroscopy. It is uncertain whether Gln or Glu contributes to the elevated Glx, or whether MR spectroscopy is useful for an early diagnosis. Five Japanese patients with AESD (three boys and two girls, 1 year of age) were enrolled in this study. MR spectroscopy was acquired from the frontal white matter (repetition time (TR) of 5000 ms, echo time (TE) of 30 ms) with a 1.5- or 3.0-T scanner. MR spectroscopy was performed four times for two patients, three times for one patient, and two times for two patients. Quantification of Glu and Gln was performed using LCModel. Glu was elevated in three of four studies on days 1-4 and became normal or low afterward. Gln was normal in three studies on days 1-2, elevated in all seven studies on days 4-12, and became normal or low afterward. These findings suggest that MR spectroscopy may be useful for an early diagnosis. Acute Glu elevation changes to subacute Gln elevation, suggesting that a disrupted Glu-Gln cycle may play an important role. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and genetic features of acute encephalopathy in children taking theophylline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Makiko; Shinohara, Mayu; Ishii, Atsushi; Ihara, Yukiko; Hirose, Shinichi; Shiomi, Masashi; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Kubota, Masaya; Yamagata, Takanori; Miyamoto, Akie; Yamanaka, Gaku; Amemiya, Kaoru; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Kamei, Atsushi; Akasaka, Manami; Anzai, Yuki; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Theophylline has recently been suspected as a risk factor of acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), although there has been no systematic study on the relationship between acute encephalopathy in children taking theophylline (AET) and AESD. We recruited 16 Japanese patients (11 male and 5 female, median age of 2 years and 7 months) with AET from 2008 to 2013. We evaluated their clinical features, such as the duration of first seizure, biphasic clinical course and cranial CT/MRI imaging and compared them with those of AESD. We analyzed the polymorphisms or mutations of genes which are associated with AESD. Clinically, 12 patients had neurological and/or radiological features of AESD. Only one patient died, whereas all 15 surviving patients were left with motor and/or intellectual deficits. Genetically, 14 patients had at least one of the following polymorphisms or mutations associated with AESD: thermolabile variation of the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) gene, polymorphism causing high expression of the adenosine receptor A2A (ADORA2A) gene, and heterozygous missense mutation of the voltage gated sodium channel 1A (SCN1A) and 2A (SCN2A) gene. Our results demonstrate that AET overlaps with AESD, and that AET is a multifactorial disorder sharing a genetic background with AESD. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin-Induced Acute Transient Encephalopathy in a Patient with Breast Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Baker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has a unique pharmacokinetic profile and is widely used to treat a variety of malignancies, alone or in combination with other agents. Case Report: A 57-year-old female patient with metastatic breast cancer developed dural metastases to the brain and underwent craniotomy and whole-brain radiation. She continued to receive chemotherapy with carboplatin without any serious complications. Four months later, there was evidence of progression leading to the institution of PLD. During the first course of PLD, there was evidence of acute encephalopathy which resolved after 18 h with discontinuation of this agent. Interestingly, she did well when she was rechallenged with conventional doxorubicin in the following cycles. Conclusion: We hereby report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of acute transient encephalopathy induced by PLD. We postulate that partial disruption of the blood-brain barrier may have been responsible for PLD-induced encephalopathy.

  12. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hepatic encephalopathy, to ascertain whether this was related to the changes in liver function and whether these changes gave any prognostic information. CBF, determined by the intravenous xenon-133 method......, and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... encephalopathy it was 28.7 +/- 3.8 ml/100 g/min in acute (n = 8; age, 28 +/- 3 years) and 32.9 +/- 3.7 ml/100 g/min in chronic patients (n = 12; age, 49 +/- 3 years). CBF did not correlate with the liver function and was of no prognostic value. The liver function was markedly reduced in all the patients, without...

  13. Mielitis aguda necrotizante en un paciente con Sida Acute necrotizing myelitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Corti

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Como consecuencia de la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana tipo-1 (HIV-1, otros patógenos como citomegalovirus (CMV y herpes simple tipo 1-2 (HSV 1-2 pueden comprometer tanto el sistema nervioso central como el periférico. Estos agentes pueden involucrar también a la médula espinal y causar una mielitis aguda necrotizante. Esta complicación ocurre por lo general en pacientes con enfermedad HIV/sida avanzada y marcada inmunodeficiencia, con recuentos de linfocitos T CD4+ de menos de 50 cél/µL. El cuadro clínico, los cambios en el LCR y las neuroimágenes generan una importante sospecha diagnóstica. Es fundamental el inicio precoz de la terapia antiviral específica. Se presenta un paciente con enfermedad avanzada debida al HIV-1 y mielitis aguda necrotizante por CMV y HSV bajo la forma clínica de síndrome de la cola de caballo.In the setting of HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV and herpes simplex virus type 1-2 (HSV 1-2 can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. These agents can involve the spinal cord and produce a necrotizing transverse myelitis. This usually occurs in AIDS patients with severe immunodeficiency: CD4 + lymphocyte counts typically are less than 50 cell/µL. The clinical presentation, CSF and imaging studies can provide a high level of suspicion diagnosis. Prompt initiation of antiviral specific drugs is essential. We report a patient with an acute necrotizing myelitis (cauda equina syndrome secondary to CMV and HSV infections.

  14. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Sheybani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed.

  15. Risk factors and outcome of splanchnic venous thrombosis in patients with necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) is considered a rare but important complication in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) and literatures regarding this topic were sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the risk factors of SVT in necrotizing acute pancreatitis (NAP) and assess the prognosis of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied using 15 indices including age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores (APACHE II), CRP (C - reactive protein) levels, etc to explore potential risk factors for the development of SVT in NAP patients. Moreover, clinical outcome measures such as mortality, organ failure and length of hospital and ICU stay were also compared between NAP patients with or without SVT. According to the statistical results, only intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was proved to be an independent risk factor for SVT (OR, 1.283; 95% CI, 1.091-1.509,P=0.003). In addition, Balthazar's CT score and occurrence of IPN (infected pancreatic necrosis) also reached statistical significance (P=0.040 and 0.047, respectively), but the 95% confidence interval shown in the multivariate logistic regression suggested that the observed ORs are not significant (1.326;95% CI 0.984-1.787 and 2.61;95 CI 0.972-7.352, respectively), which indicates weaker association between the two parameters and SVT. Regarding the clinical outcomes, patients with SVT showed higher mortality, longer hospital and intensive care unit duration, higher rates of a variety of complications and more utilization of invasive interventions. IAP is an independent risk factor for the development of SVT in patients with NAP, while Balthazar's CT score and occurrence of IPN are also associated with SVT, although not as strong as IAP. Moreover, occurrence of SVT relates with extremely poor prognosis in NAP patients, evidenced by increased mortality, morbidity and need for invasive interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in an AIDS patient with acute renal failure and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Bargiacchi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a neurological entity characterized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI evidence of bilateral subcortical edema in the occipital regions of the brain. Case report: We report the case of a female patient with AIDS, pulmonary aspergillosis, CMV infection, and acute renal failure due to Clostridium difficile diarrhea. Her clinical course was complicated by seizures and hypertension. MRI findings were consistent with PRES. The patient was treated with anticonvulsants and antihypertensive agents with clinical improvement. Discussion and conclusions: Few cases of PRES in HIV-infected patients have been described, and it is not clear whether HIV infection is a predisposing factor for this syndrome. The article reviews the literature on PRES in HIV and discusses the role of HIV-associated endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  17. [Acute encephalopathy associated with centrilobular necrosis of liver mimicking Reye's syndrome--report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lii, Y P; Chi, S C; Mak, S C

    1993-02-01

    Recent experience suggests that a diagnosis of Reye's syndrome based on clinical and biochemical grounds alone may be unreliable. Two patients are presented here, whose clinical manifestation suggested Reye's syndrome. The biochemistry data were also compatible with Reye's syndrome except that the levels of serum AST and ALT were significantly higher with normal serum ammonia level. Blood amino acid and urinary organic acid assay all showed negative findings. Histological findings of the liver showed marked centrilobular necrosis rather than fatty metamorphosis. The muscle biopsies did not show lipid accumulation in the muscle fibers as well. The findings in our patients suggested that a confirmatory diagnosis of Reye's syndrome requires a characteristic pathological findings of the liver in order to differentiate Reye's syndrome from Reye-like syndrome, especially acute encephalopathy associated with centrilobular necrosis of the liver.

  18. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Arthur J; Forte, Sophie S; Bhatti, Nasir A; Gelda, Steven E

    2016-03-09

    Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), this condition readily resolves following discontinuation of the responsible pharmacological agent. Here, we present an unusual case of life-threatening encephalopathy due to adverse drug-related effects, in which a rapid clinical response facilitated emergent treatment to avert life-threatening acute cerebral edema. A 63-year-old woman with refractory depression was admitted for inpatient psychiatric care with a normal physical examination and laboratory values, including a serum sodium [Na+] of 144 mEq/L. She had a grand mal seizure and became unresponsive on the fourth day of treatment with the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine while being continued on a thiazide-containing diuretic for a hypertensive disorder. Emergent infusion of intravenous hypertonic (3%) saline was initiated after determination of a serum sodium [Na+] of 103 mEq/L with a urine osmolality of 314 mOsm/kg H20 and urine [Na+] of 12 mEq/L. Correction of hyposmolality in accordance with current guidelines resulted in progressive improvement over several days, and she returned to her baseline mental status. Seizures with life-threatening hyponatremic encephalopathy in this case likely resulted from co-occurring SIADH and sodium depletion due to duloxetine and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively. A rapid clinical response expedited diagnosis and emergent treatment to reverse life-threatening acute cerebral edema and facilitate a full recovery without neurological complications.

  19. Transient widespread cortical and splenial lesions in acute encephalitis/encephalopathy associated with primary Epstein–Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is very common and usually occurs in childhood or early adulthood. Encephalitis/encephalopathy is an uncommon but serious neurological complication of EBV. A case of EBV-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy with involvement of reversible widespread cortical and splenial lesions is presented herein. An 8-year-old Chinese girl who presented with fever and headache, followed by seizures and drowsiness, was admitted to the hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted imaging in widespread cortical and splenial lesions. The clinical and laboratory examination results together with the unusual radiology findings suggested acute encephalitis/encephalopathy due to primary EBV infection. After methylprednisolone pulse therapy together with ganciclovir, the patient made a full recovery without any brain lesions. The hallmark clinical–radiological features of this patient included severe encephalitis/encephalopathy at onset, the prompt and complete recovery, and rapidly reversible widespread involvement of the cortex and splenium. Patients with EBV encephalitis/encephalopathy who have multiple lesions, even with the widespread involvement of cortex and splenium of the corpus callosum, may have a favorable outcome with complete disappearance of all brain lesions.

  20. MRI findings in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy resulting from decompensated chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureka, Jyoti; Jakkani, Ravi Kanth; Panwar, Sanuj

    2012-06-01

    Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a type of metabolic encephalopathy with diversified etiology. Hyperammonemia is the end result of several metabolic disorders such as congenital deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, hepatic encephalopathy, Reye's syndrome and other toxic encephalopathies. Non-specific clinical presentation poses a great challenge in early diagnosis of this entity. Irrespective of the underlying etiology, hyperammonemia causes a distinctive pattern of brain parenchymal injury. The cingulate gyrus and insular cortex are more vulnerable to this type of toxic insult. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings in combination with laboratory parameters can help to differentiate this entity from other metabolic encephalopathy and thus aiding in early diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  2. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  3. Outcomes of Children With and Without Hepatic Encephalopathy From the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Vicky L; Li, Ruosha; Loomes, Kathleen M; Leonis, Mike A; Rudnick, David A; Belle, Steven H; Squires, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is challenging to identify in children with acute liver failure and was not a requirement for enrollment into the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group (PALFSG). The outcomes of PALFSG participants presenting with and without HE are presented. PALFSG participants were classified based on daily assessment of HE during the first 7 days following study enrollment: group 1-never developed HE; group 2-no HE at enrollment with subsequent HE development; and group 3-HE at study enrollment. Clinical and biochemical parameters and outcomes of death, spontaneous recovery, or liver transplantation were compared between groups. Data from 769 PALFSG (54% boys; median age 4.2 years; range 0-17.9 years) participants were analyzed, with 277 in group 1 (36%), 83 in group 2 (11%), and 409 in group 3 (53%). Mortality occurred in 11% of all participants and was highest among group 3 participants who demonstrated persistent grade III-IV HE (55%) or showed progression of HE (26%). Eleven (4%) group 1 participants died within 21 days of enrollment. Spontaneous recovery was highest in group 1 (79%) and lowest in group 2 (25%; P pediatric acute liver failure prognostication schema are needed.

  4. [Acute encephalopathy caused by cyanogenic fungi in 2004, and magic mushroom regulation in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonmori, Kunio; Yokoyama, Kazumasa

    2009-03-01

    Two topics, related to mushroom poisoning of recent interest in Japan, have been presented. In autumn 2004, 59 cases of acute encephalopathy were reported across 9 prefectures in Japan (24 from Akita Prefecture with 8 deaths; age 48-93, average 70; female 14, male 10). Of 24 cases, 20 had kidney dysfunction. Four poisoned subjects showed no kidney trouble. Of the 24 poisoning cases, 23 people ate Pleurocybella porrigens, and one ate Grifola frondosa. The latter subject (female, late 40's) was receiving dialysis for more than 35 years. In August, she felt dizziness, headache and tinnitus. She visited hospital and asked to stay there. In the hospital she ate 5g of stewed G. frondosa and 10g of the same fungus boiled with chicken and taro on different days. Fourteen to 18 days after the eatings, she developed cramps and lost consciousness, and fell into a coma. Her cramp and coma continued for about 10 days almost until her death. Her symptoms caused by G. frondosa were similar to those observed for the above 23 cases of P. porrigens ingestion. Therefore, we concluded that encephalopathy experienced in Akita Prefecture caused by was the cyanogenic fungi such as P. porrigens , G. frondosa, Pleurotus eringii etc. Although the amounts of mushrooms eaten by poisoned subjects were not so clear, we estimated that the amounts of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) taken into human bodies exceeded the detoxication limit of HCN, resulting in HCN poisoning. However, it has not been proved that the encephalopathy is directly or indirectly caused by the HCN poisoning. Many typhoons came across Japan and landed 10 times in 2004, and mushroom size was larger than usual one, and HCN contents in fruit-bodies seemed to be increased especially in the late-stage of their growth. Thirteen species of magic mushrooms were prohibited by the law from 2002 in Japan. They include Copelandia (Panaeolus) cyanescens, Panaeolus papilionaceus, Panaeolus sphinctrinus, Panaeolus subbalteatus, Psilocybe argentipes

  5. [Methods for the prevention and treatment of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy in patients with acute severe poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The study included 147 patients with toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy resulting from acute poisoning. It was shown that intensive therapy with cytoflavin (20 ml in 400 ml of 5% glucose solution twice daily for 7 days) reduced severity of hypoxic brain lesions and suppression of CNS as apparent from the improvement of its bioelectric activity. The recovery of CNS regulatory action on the life-sustaining systems of the body promoted normalization of the respiratory component of oxygen transport. The improvement of the patients' conditions in the acute phase contributed to accelerated recovery of cognitive-amnestic functions and social adaptation. Cytoflavin therapy improved the clinical picture of toxico-hypoxic encephalopathy due to the reduction in the duration of the comatose state from 45.3 +/- 8.2 to 27.7 +/- 6.9 hr and the decrease in the frequency of secondary pulmonary complications from 72.7 to 35.9%.

  6. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity on EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Diosely C; Bashir, Mahrukh; Daniel, Joshua; Lucena, Michelle H; Bonpietro, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 20-year-old patient with a 6-month history of recurrent abdominal pain and a 3-day history of vomiting, hypertension, seizures, and encephalopathy. The brain MRI showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, and continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring showed lateralized periodic discharges plus fast activity. Comprehensive CSF studies were negative. Because of severe abdominal pain without a definite etiology, we requested urine porphobilinogen and serum and fecal porphyrins, which suggested acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The patient had a complete resolution of her symptoms with carbohydrate loading and high caloric diet. Acute intermittent porphyria is potentially life-threatening without proper management and prevention of triggers if it is not recognized.

  7. Kontribusi Higiene Mulut terhadap Timbulnya Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG (Survei Epidemiologi di Kecamatan Pacet Kabupaten Cianjur Jawa Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mirna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This analytical epidemiological survey was aimed to investigate the correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of an infectious, necrotic, ulcerative disease called acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG. The study involved 319 elementary school children consisting of 163 (52% male and 156 (48% female pupils from Kecamatan Pacet, Cianjur, WestJawa. Samples were chosen by stratified simple random sampling. The obtained data were analyzed with Bivariant Test (Chi2Ttest, and the results showed a quite high prevalence of ANUG, aboout 15.3% in total and consisting 9% male and 6.3% female subjects. The correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of ANUG was found to be significant (p<0.05. It was concluded that oral hygiene has an important contribution to the onset of ANUG.

  8. Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Necrotizing Acute Pancreatitis Complicated by Perforated Ileum Due to Nonocclusive Mesenteric Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia López-Cuenca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing acute pancreatitis is the most severe form of pancreatitis, and it is a potentially life-threatening condition. Its diagnosis and severity are based on radiological signs. Although computed tomography is the most used imaging tool, ultrasound can be a quick and useful technique in emergency and intensive care scenarios. The use of abdominal ultrasound is generally limited to ruling out cholecystitis. Bowel gas can limit the accuracy of pancreatic imaging. When the pancreas is visualized, ultrasound can reveal pancreatic enlargement, echotextural changes, and peripancreatic fluid. We present a patient with necrotizing pancreatitis who developed peritonitis due to ileal perforation, where the use of ultrasound as a bedside imaging technique was very useful.

  9. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    , and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... in healthy young subjects (age, 23-42 years) was 44-61 ml/100 g/min; in patients with grade I + II encephalopathy (mean +/- SEM) it was 32.8 +/- 3.6 ml/100 g/min in acute (n = 4; age, 28 +/- 8 years) and 37.0 +/- 3.3 ml/100 g/min in chronic liver patients (n = 10; age, 51 +/- 2 years). In grade III + IV...... encephalopathy it was 28.7 +/- 3.8 ml/100 g/min in acute (n = 8; age, 28 +/- 3 years) and 32.9 +/- 3.7 ml/100 g/min in chronic patients (n = 12; age, 49 +/- 3 years). CBF did not correlate with the liver function and was of no prognostic value. The liver function was markedly reduced in all the patients, without...

  10. Fecal microbiota transplantation prevents hepatic encephalopathy in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced acute hepatic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Xiao-Bing; You, Nan; Zheng, Lu; Li, Jing

    2017-10-14

    To investigate whether fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) prevents hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in rats with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute hepatic dysfunction. A rat model of HE was established with CCl4. Rat behaviors and spatial learning capability were observed, and hepatic necrosis, intestinal mucosal barrier, serum ammonia levels and intestinal permeability were determined in HE rats receiving FMT treatment. Furthermore, the expression of tight junction proteins (Claudin-1, Claudin-6 and Occludin), Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4/TLR9, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was examined. FMT improved rat behaviors, HE grade and spatial learning capability. Moreover, FMT prevented hepatic necrosis and intestinal mucosal barrier damage, leading to hepatic clearance of serum ammonia levels and reduced intestinal permeability. The expression of TLR4 and TLR9, two potent mediators of inflammatory response, was significantly downregulated in the liver of rats treated with FMT. Consistently, circulating pro-inflammatory factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were remarkably decreased, indicating that FMT is able to limit systemic inflammation by decreasing the expression of TLR4 and TLR9. Importantly, HE-induced loss of tight junction proteins (Claudin-1, Claudin-6 and Occludin) was restored in intestinal tissues of rats receiving FMT treatment. FMT enables protective effects in HE rats, and it improves the cognitive function and reduces the liver function indexes. FMT may cure HE by altering the intestinal permeability and improving the TLR response of the liver.

  11. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause ne...

  12. Diagnosis of a case of relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on oral manifestation of leukemic gingival enlargement and acute necrotizing gingivitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopikrishna Kolli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most common malignancy in childhood. They represent approximately 30% of malignant diseases in patients under the age of 15 years. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most frequent type of leukemia in children. Despite high cure rates, approximately 20% of patients with ALL have disease relapse. Oral manifestations are common in leukemia, particularly in acute leukemias. One of the oral manifestations of leukemia is diffuse gingival enlargement thought to be, at least partly, the result of gross infiltration of the gingiva by blast cells. The occurrence of acute necrotizing gingivitis, although a rare occurrence, is seen in such immunocompromised individuals. This is a case report of a 19-year-old patient who was under remission after treatment for ALL in whom a recurrence of leukemia was detected based on the oral findings and highlights the importance of its early detection by the dentist in preventing further complications and for instituting therapy swiftly.

  13. Acute urinary retention in a 23-year-old woman with mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Hideyuki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Patients with clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion present with relatively mild central nervous system disturbances. Although the exact etiology of the condition remains poorly understood, it is thought to be associated with infective agents. We present a case of a patient with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion, who had the unusual feature of acute urinary retention. Case presentation A 23-year-old Japanese woman developed mild confusion, gait ataxia, and urinary retention seven days after onset of fever and headache. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated T2 prolongation in the splenium of the corpus callosum and bilateral cerebral white matter. These magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities disappeared two weeks later, and all of the symptoms resolved completely within four weeks. Except for the presence of acute urinary retention (due to underactive detrusor without hyper-reflexia, the clinical and radiologic features of our patient were consistent with those of previously reported patients with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of acute urinary retention recognized in a patient with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion can be associated with impaired bladder function and indicate that acute urinary retention in this benign disorder should be treated immediately to avoid bladder injury.

  14. Acute hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread small-vessel disease at MRI in a diabetic patient: pathogenetic hypotheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, F. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Department of Radiology, Pierre Benite (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Laennec (France); Kamoun, S.; Rety-Jacob, F.; Tran-Minh, V.A. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Department of Radiology, Pierre Benite (France); Nighoghossian, N. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Department of Neurology, Bron (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France); Hermier, M. [Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Department of Neuroradiology and MRI, Bron (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-I, CREATIS, UMR CNRS (France)

    2005-08-01

    We report unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a diabetic patient with neglected hypertension and hyperglycemia, presenting with seizures and coma. Outcome was fatal despite intensive care. The MRI findings included bilateral insular and temporo-occipital grey and white matter involvement, and numerous, scattered, lacunar-like lesions involving the peripheral and deep white matter, basal ganglia grey matter, and brainstem. Lesions had a low apparent diffusion coefficient, and some enhanced following contrast injection. Hypertensive encephalopathy with widespread and severe acute small-vessel disease was considered. Pathophysiology is discussed. (orig.)

  15. [Unusual acute encephalopathy in a young patient with end-stage renal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadili, Wafaa; Louhab, Nissrine; Knidiri, Hafsa; Esqalli, Imane; El Kissani, Najib; Laouad, Inass

    2013-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy represents a neurotoxic state which can be associated to different pathological situations. The key to diagnosis are characteristic features on magnetic resonance imaging and rapidly evolving neurological symptoms if recognized and treated rapidly. Arterial hypertension and preeclampsia are the main causes of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Metabolic disorders including renal failure can also be associated with this syndrome. We report the clinical observation of an 18-year-old young patient on chronic hemodialysis who presented a status epilepticus associated with hypertensive crisis, two weeks after his transfer to peritoneal dialysis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a typical aspect of posterior reversible encephalopathy with intracerebral haemorrhage. The evolution was favorable with a clear improvement of encephalic lesions. Copyright © 2013 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH ENCEPHALOPATHY CAUSED BY ACUTE CHEMICAL AGENTS POISONING. P300 OF AUDITORY EVENT RELATED POTENTIALS AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. U. Berezina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RELEVANCE. Patients with encephalopathy due to acute chemical agents poisoning have some brain functioning changes and a cognitive impairment during the rehabilitation program. These changes require correction of appropriate diagnostic protocol and treatment.AIM. The aim of this study was to estimate changes of electroencephalography (EEG and the P3 component of the event related potential (P300 ERP that are observed in patients with encephalopathy due to acute chemical agents poisoning during stage of rehabilitation.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study was included 25 patients (age 37 (32; 51 poisoned different kind of neurotoxic substances (drugs, ethanol and complicated by toxic and hypoxic encephalopathy. They have got the treatment of encephalopathy by mexidol intravenously, mesodiencephalic modulation (MDM and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT. All patients were recoded EEG (electroencephalograph of “MBN” company, Russia and P300 ERP (“Neuron-Spectrum-5/EP” of “Neurosoft”, Russia according to the international recommendations of clinical neurophysiologists. Neuropsychological testing was used for the assessment of cognitive functions.RESULTS. There were some disturbances in primary electroencephalograms of all subjects. The follow-up EEG recording showed the main group of patients who had got the treatment (mexidol, MDM, HBOT had more often (11 patients the EEG improvements compared to the controls (1 patient. The main group had more rarely the EEG impairments compared to the control group. 6 patients of main group and 3 patients of controls did not have EEG changes during the follow-up EEG recordings. All controls and 17 patients of the main group patients had different cognitive disturbances. After the treatment 15 patients of the main group had improved on neuropsychological tests (MMSE, Munsterberg test, Schulte table, Number Connecting Test. They also had a decrease in the N200, P300 peak latency and an increase in the N200, P300

  17. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won E-mail: neuroman@catholic.ac.kr

    2003-03-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, an acute neurological syndrome due to reversible multifactorial brain edema: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Cicognani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The essential features of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES are headache, mental changes, seizures, visual symptoms and often arterial hypertension. Brain RMN typically shows cortico-sottocortical parieto-occipital edema, with a bilateral and symmetric distribution. PRES develops in clinical conditions as hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia/ eclampsia, autoimmune diseases, after transplantation, infections and as an adverse effect of immunosuppressive drugs or chemotherapy. It usually completely reverses with treatment, although permanent sequelae are possible in case of delayed or missed diagnosis. Case report: We describe the case of a transsexual (M!F and tetraplegic patient, admitted for neck and low back pain. She suddenly developed headache, confusion, seizures and severe hypertension with normal blood tests. RMN showed multiple cortico-sottocortical areas of vasogenic and citotoxic edema in temporo-occipital, parietal, frontal, and cerebellar regions. Soon after the beginning of the antihypertensive therapy, clinical recovery was observed, as well as the disappearance of edema at RMN. Discussion and conclusions: Although PRES is usually associated with definite pathological conditions, it is not always the case, as was for the patient here described, who had no predisposing factors in her past clinical history, and presented hypertension only in the acute phase of the syndrome. Since, moreover, PRES usually presents with acute non specific features and it can be misdiagnosed with other serious diseases, the clinician will be helped by the knowledge of this syndrome to promptly start diagnostic workup and treatments, and avoid permanent neurological deficits.

  19. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  20. Hypertensive encephalopathy with CT confirmatin in four children with acute renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Andronikou

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertensive encephalopathy (HE isa clinical syndrome that occurs infrequentlyin children and is oftenunderdiagnosed. We review fourpatients with HE and describe theirclinical presentation and radiologicalfindings on computed tomography(CT. Our cases demonstrate typicalfeatures on CT and correlate clinicallywith the syndrome of HE. Promptrecognition of the syndrome aids inearlier diagnosis and treatment, andhence proves beneficial to the patient.

  1. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p encephalopathy did not modify CSF-SG (-0.09 %, p = 0.1757). Specific gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to both stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. This pattern is observed even in the absence of hepatic encephalopathy suggesting that blood-CSF barrier impairment is manifest even in absence of overt

  2. Binding of the ligand [3H]MK-801 to the MK-801 binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor during experimental encephalopathy from acute liver failure and from acute hyperammonemia in the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Knegt (Robert); J. Kornhuber (Johannes); S.W. Schalm (Solko); K. Rusche (K.); P.F. Riederer (Peter); J. Tan (J.)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBinding of the ligand [3H]MK-801 to the MK-801 binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor population on brain homogenates in rabbits was studied during experimental encephalopathy from acute liver failure and from acute hyperammonemia in the rabbit. Homogenates were

  3. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, Arthur J; Forte, Sophie S.; Bhatti, Nasir A.; Gelda, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Drug-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy Symptoms: Seizures ? coma Medication: Hypertonic 3% saline infusion Clinical Procedure: ? Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate anti...

  4. A rare case of acute poster ior reversible encephalopathy syndrome involving brainstem in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Olfa Chakroun-Walha; Ichrak Bacha; Mehdi Frikha; Kheireddine Ben Mahfoudh; Noureddine Rekik

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare entity involving brainstem in very rare reported cases. We describe here the case of a boy who presented to the emergency department for headaches and strabismus. Diagnosis of PRES was retained by magnetic resonance imaging. The causes were blood pressure urgency and renal failure. Location of lesions was very rarely reported in literature and neurological troubles were persistent. Emergency physicians should evocate...

  5. Hemolytic–uremic syndrome with acute encephalopathy in a pregnant woman infected with epidemic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: characteristic brain images and cytokine profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A food-poisoning outbreak due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC occurred in Toyama, Japan. The case of a 26-year-old pregnant woman with hemolytic–uremic syndrome who developed acute encephalopathy due to EHEC infection after eating raw meat is presented herein. On day 2 following admission, a cesarean section was performed because of a non-reassuring fetal status. Fecal bacterial culture confirmed an O111/O157 superinfection. Intensive care therapies including continuous hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange were performed. After the operation, the patient developed encephalopathy for which steroid pulse therapy was added. Her condition improved gradually and she was discharged 55 days after delivery.

  6. [The relationship between lactate clearance rate and delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-zhan; Ma, Guo-ying; Zhao, Ling-jun; Li, Jing; Wang, Pu; Li, Ya-qin; Xiao, Qing-mian; Liu, Yong-jian

    2013-10-01

    To study the relationship between lactate clearance rate (LCR) and prognosis after acute carbon monoxide poisoning in patients with delayed encephalopathy (DEACMP). Data from 354 patients with acute severe carbon monoxide poisoning (ASCOP) were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into hyperlactacidemia group (arterial lactic acid > 2 mmol/L, n=263) and low lactic acidosis group (arterial lactate ≤2 mmol/L, n=91) according to the blood lactic acid level at admission. Arterial blood (1 mL) was collected from all patients before and 6, 24, 72 hours after treatment at ambient air, and arterial blood lactic acid was determined, and LCR was calculated. The initial level of blood lactic acid and LCR at 6, 24, 72 hours were compared between two groups. At the same time, the patients with hyperlactacidemia were divided into high LCR group (LCR more than 10%, n=101) and low LCR group (LCR less than or equal to 10%, n=162) according to 6-hour LCR, and the incidence of DEACMP was compared between two groups. The relationship between LCR and the incidence of DEACMP was analyzed with Spearman linear correlation analysis. The risk factors associated with DEACMP were analyzed with logistic regression analysis. The initial level of blood lactic acid (2.73±0.57 mmol/L vs. 1.69±0.20 mmol/L, t=5.327, P=0.001) and LCR at 6, 24, 72 hours [6 hours: (9.0±2.4)% vs. (1.2±0.6)%, t=9.468, P=0.001; 24 hours: (8.6±3.7)% vs. (1.2±0.4)%, t=4.889, P=0.001; 72 hours: (14.0±3.9)% vs. (1.7±1.0)%, t=5.211, P=0.001] in hyperlactacidemia group were significantly higher than those in low lactic acidosis group. The initial level of blood lactic acid in high LCR group was significantly lower than that in low LCR group (2.41±0.23 mmol/L vs. 2.92±0.63 mmol/L, t=2.429, P=0.023), and LCR at 6 hours and 24 hours were significantly higher than those in low LCR group [6 hours: (11.0±1.2)% vs. (8.0±2.1)%, t=4.487, P=0.001; 24 hours: (12.2±3.0)% vs. (6.3±1.8)%, t=6.264, P=0.001]. But

  7. Non-invasive detection of infection in acute pancreatic and acute necrotic collections with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islim, Filiz; Salik, Aysun Erbahceci; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Guven, Koray; Alis, Halil; Turhan, Ahmet Nuray

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-related collections. A total of 21 DW-MRI, and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 20 patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with acute peri-pancreatic fluid or necrotic collections. Collections were classified as infected or sterile according to the culture and follow-up results. Collections with gas bubbles on CT images were considered to be infected. Collections with peripheral bright signals on DW-MRI images were considered to be positive, whereas those without signals were considered to be negative. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the peripheral and central parts of the collections were measured. Student's t test was used to compare the means of ADC values of independent groups. Apart from one false positive result, the presence of infection was detected by DW-MRI with 95.2% accuracy. The sensitivity and accuracy of DW-MRI were higher than CT for the detection of infection. The ADC values in the central parts of the collections were significantly different between the infected and sterile groups. DW-MRI can be used as a non-invasive technique for the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-associated collections.

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? ... portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with ...

  9. A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis: Practical and ethical challenges of a North-South partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Jonathan C; Ludzu, Enock K; Cairns, Bruce A; Varela, Carlos; Charles, Anthony G

    2013-01-01

    The Departments of Surgery at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and Kamuzu Central Hospital (KCH) in Lilongwe, Malawi, formed a partnership of service, training, and research in 2008. We report a case of recurrent pancreatitis leading to pancreatic necrosis treated at KCH. A 42 year-old male presented to KCH with his fourth episode of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. He had tachycardia, guarding, rebound tenderness, and free fluid on abdominal ultrasonography. He underwent laparotomy and had fat saponification with pancreatic necrosis. A large drain was placed, he was given antibiotics, and he recovered. He had normal lipids, no gallstones, and did not consume alcohol. He was encouraged to seek further evaluation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or computed tomography in South Africa, however this was prohibitively expensive. This case illustrates the limitations that are often faced by surgeons visiting developing countries. What we consider standard resources and treatment algorithms in managing necrotizing pancreatitis in developed countries (such as serum lipase and percutaneous interventions) were not available. Visiting surgeons and trainees must be both familiar with local resource limitations and aware of the implications of such limitations on patient care. To support training and promote advances in health care, local surgeons and trainees should understand optimal treatment strategies regardless of their particular resource limitations. North-South partnerships are an excellent means to uphold our professional obligation to humanity, promote health care as a right, and shape the future of health care in developing countries. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute necrotizing enterocolitis of preterm piglets is characterized by dysbiosis of ileal mucosa-associated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Foster, Derek M; Cadenas, Maria B; Stone, Maria R; Jacobi, Sheila K; Stauffer, Stephen H; Pease, Anthony; Gookin, Jody L

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of bacteria involved in pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is limited by infant fragility, analysis restricted to feces, use of culture-based methods, and lack of clinically-relevant animal models. This study used a unique preterm piglet model to characterize spontaneous differences in microbiome composition of NEC-predisposed regions of gut.  Preterm piglets (n=23) were cesarean-delivered and nurtured for 30 hours over which time 52% developed NEC. Bacterial DNA from ileal content, ileal mucosa, and colonic mucosa were PCR amplified, subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis and targeted 16S rDNA qPCR.  Preterm ileal mucosa was specifically bereft in diversity of bacteria compared to ileal content and colonic mucosa. Preterm ileum was restricted to representation by only Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi. In piglets with NEC, ileal mucosa was uniquely characterized by increases in number of Firmicutes and diversity of phyla to include Actinobacteria and uncultured bacteria. Five specific TRFLP profiles, corresponding in closest identity to Clostridium butyricum, C. neonatale, C. proteolyticum, Streptomyces spp., and Leptolyngbya spp., were significantly more prevalent or observed only among samples from piglets with NEC. Total numbers of Clostridium spp. and C. butyricum were significantly greater in samples of NEC ileal mucosa but not ileal content or colonic mucosa. These results provide strong support for ileal mucosa as a focus for investigation of specific dysbiosis associated with NEC and suggest a significant role for Clostridium spp., and members of the Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria in the pathogenesis of NEC in preterm piglets.

  11. A rare case of acute poster ior reversible encephalopathy syndrome involving brainstem in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Chakroun-Walha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a rare entity involving brainstem in very rare reported cases. We describe here the case of a boy who presented to the emergency department for headaches and strabismus. Diagnosis of PRES was retained by magnetic resonance imaging. The causes were blood pressure urgency and renal failure. Location of lesions was very rarely reported in literature and neurological troubles were persistent. Emergency physicians should evocate PRES each time there is a clinical context associated with neurological troubles by a normal brain CT scan. Early diagnosis is very important to treat its causes and improve prognosis.

  12. Surgical management of acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a 13-year experience and a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Besselink, M. G. H.; van Minnen, L. P.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The course of acute pancreatitis (AP) is unpredictable and can vary from mild to lethal. Mortality varies from low ( <2%) in mild cases to high (20%-70%) in the case of infected pancreatic necrosis. Surgical management has not been investigated in well-designed trials. Based on

  13. Changes in somatostatin receptor expression of the pancreas and effectiveness of octreotide in rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian Xin; Yuan, Yao Zong; Xu, Jia Yu; Xia, Zong Qin; Qin, Lan Feng; Zheng, Zheng Lin; Li, Ding Guo; Lu, Han Ming

    2004-01-01

    To investigate changes in the expression of the somatostatin receptor (SSTR) of the pancreas and of pancreatic blood flow, and its relationship to the metabolism of eicosanoids in order to elucidate the effectiveness of octreotide, an analog of somatostatin, in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). A model of ANP was induced in rats with injection of sodium taurocholate via the pancreaticobiliary duct. The SSTR was detected using a radioligand binding assay (RBA) with 125I-somatostatin-14, and the SSTR2 mRNA of the pancreas was analyzed using in situ hybridization. Pancreatic blood flow and the metabolites of eicosanoids were also determined. The SSTR of the pancreas was 109.70 +/- 58.32 fmol/mg protein in normal rats. A significant decrease in the SSTR, together with the signals of SSTR2 mRNA, was shown at 3, 6 and 12 h after onset of ANP. Pancreatic blood flow was reduced and thromboxin-2 was increased significantly in the course of ANP. In the ANP group treated with octreotide, both the decrease in pancreatic blood flow and the abnormal metabolism of eicosanoids were corrected, and the pathological damage was relieved. SSTR expression of the pancreas is significantly reduced in ANP. Correction of the abnormal metabolism of eicosanoids and improvement in pancreatic microcirculation may be the major mechanism of somatostatin analogs in the treatment of ANP and inhibition of pancreatic enzymes via their receptors plays a minor role.

  14. Impetigo presenting as an acute necrotizing swelling of the lower lip in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Mohammed; Halsnad, Moorthy; Fowell, Christopher; Millar, Brian G

    2012-06-01

    The authors present an unusual case of an acute swelling of the lower lip and septicemia in a 35-year-old, recent immigrant male arriving from India. The patient presented in our emergency department with a 48-hour history of a worsening, painful swelling of the lower lip. On presentation, he was pyrexial and the lip was found to be acutely inflamed with honey-colored crusting, pustular lesions, and induration . A diagnosis of impetigo leading to necrosis of the lip was established, a rare phenomenon potentially resulting in significant tissue destruction. Appropriate medical management achieved a good outcome and prevented disabling tissue loss of the orofacial region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolated acute non-cystic white matter injury in term infants presenting with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, Michael Joseph

    2013-03-01

    We discuss possible aetiological factors, MRI evolution of injury and neuro-developmental outcomes of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Thirty-six consecutive infants diagnosed with NE were included. In this cohort, four infants (11%) were identified with injury predominantly in the deep white matter on MRI who were significantly of younger gestation, lower birthweight with higher Apgars at one and five minutes compared to controls. Placental high grade villitis of unknown aetiology (VUA) was identified in all four of these infants. Our hypothesis states VUA may induce white matter injury by causing a local inflammatory response and\\/or oxidative stress during the perinatal period. We underline the importance of continued close and systematic evaluation of all cases of NE, including examination of the placenta, in order to come to a better understanding of the clinical presentation, the patterns of brain injury and the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  16. MR imaging findings in alcoholic and nonalcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Gaetana; De Gennaro, Angela; Cozzolino, Attilio; Serino, Antonietta; Fenza, Giacomo; Manto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area) and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex), is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease.

  17. Difficulty in Distinguishing Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Hypoxic-Ischemic Insult, and Acute Toxic Leukoencephalopathy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Judith; Zahavi, Alon; Efrati, Shai; Gilad, Gil; Snir, Moshe; Michowiz, Shalom; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to describe our experience of unique pediatric neurological cases and associated difficulty in differentiating posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) from hypoxic-ischemic insult (HII), and acute toxic leukoencephalopathy (ATL). The study included three children with a clinical picture suggestive of PRES, HII, and ATL of different etiologies who were diagnosed and treated at a tertiary pediatric medical center in 2011 to 2014. All patients presented with blindness following seizures with asphyxia/aspiration in a syndromatic child, too-rapid lipid infusion in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and repeated vomiting in a child with cerebral palsy, hydrocephalus, and malfunction of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. All patients had cortical blindness and high-signal foci in the cortical and subcortical regions on magnetic resonance imaging. All children improved. Familiarity with the clinical and radiological characteristics of neurological conditions leading to reversible cortical blindness is essential for diagnosis and management. Distinguishing PRES from HII and ATL can be challenging. Our cases most likely combined these etiologies, with the first patient diagnosed with PRES with HII, the second with PRES with ATL, and the third with focal HII. Given the diversity of the findings and the unclear prognostic significance, studies of the pathophysiology of PRES are warranted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Hepato- and neuro-protective influences of biopropolis on thioacetamide-induced acute hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Rasha E; Salama, Abeer A A; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab F; Ogaly, Hanan A

    2017-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that ultimately occurs as a complication of acute or chronic liver failure; accompanied by hyperammonemia. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of biopropolis as a hepato- and neuro-protective agent using thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute HE in rats as a model. Sixty Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: Group 1 (normal control) received only saline and paraffin oil. Group 2 (hepatotoxic control) received TAA (300 mg/kg, once). Groups 3, 4, and 5 received TAA followed by vitamin E (100 mg/kg) and biopropolis (100 and 200 mg/kg), respectively, daily for 30 days. Evidences of HE were clearly detected in TAA-hepatotoxic group including significant elevation in the serum level of ammonia, liver functions, increased oxidative stress in liver and brain, apoptotic DNA fragmentation and overexpression of iNOS gene in brain tissue. The findings for groups administered biopropolis, highlighted its efficacy as a hepato- and neuro-protectant through improving the liver functions, oxidative status and DNA fragmentation as well as suppressing the brain expression of iNOS gene. In conclusion, biopropolis, at a dose of 200 mg/kg per day protected against TAA-induced HE through its antioxidant and antiapoptotic influence; therefore, it can be used as a protective natural product.

  19. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiess, Nicoline; Pardo, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial neurological disorder that comprises a heterogenous group of neurological symptoms that manifest in patients with high titers of antithyroid antibodies...

  20. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  1. DNA pooling base genome-wide association study identifies variants at NRXN3 associated with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Li

    Full Text Available Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning (DEACMP is more characteristic of anoxic encephalopathy than of other types of anoxia. Those who have the same poisoning degree and are of similar age and gender have a greater risk of getting DEACMP. This has made it clear that there are obvious personal differences. Genetic factors may play a very important role. The authors performed a genome-wide association study involving pooling of DNA obtained from 175 patients and 244 matched acute carbon monoxide poisoning without delayed encephalopathy controls. The Illumina HumanHap 660 Chip array was used for DNA pools. Allele frequencies of all SNPs were compared between delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning and control groups and ranked. A total of 123 SNPs gave an OR >1.4. Of these, 46 mapped in or close to known genes. Forty-eight SNPs located in 19 genes were associated with DEACMP after correction for 5% FDR in the genome-wide association of pooled DNA. Two SNPs (rs11845632 and rs2196447 locate in the Neurexin 3 gene were selected for individual genotyping in all samples and another cohort consisted of 234 and 271 controls. There were significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of rs11845632 and rs2196447 between the DEACMP group and controls group (all P-values <0.05. This study describes a positive association between Neurexin 3 and controls in the Han Chinese population, and provides genetic evidence to support the susceptibility of DEACMP, which may be the resulting interaction of environmental and genetic factors.

  2. No evidence of ischemia in stroke-like lesions of mitochondrial POLG encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoulis, Charalampos; Henriksen, Eilen; Miletic, Hrvoje; Bindoff, Laurence A

    2017-01-01

    Stroke-like lesions are characteristically associated with mitochondrial encephalopathies such as those caused by mutations of polymerase gamma (POLG) and the m.3243A>G mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. The combination of acute clinical onset, MRI and pathological abnormalities, have led to the suggestion that these lesions are ischemic. Here, we sought to determine the role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial stroke-like lesions. We performed a systematic study of cerebral blood vessel morphology, density and distribution in post mortem brain tissue from nine patients with POLG-encephalopathy and seven neurologically healthy controls. We found that patients had significantly higher cerebral vascular density than controls: this was more pronounced in areas of chronic neurodegeneration, where vascular density correlated with the severity of neuronal loss, but was also seen in acute lesions. Further, blood vessels were patent and, in acute lesions, dilated suggesting increased perfusion. In contrast to what would be expected in ischemia, stroke-like lesions were not pan-necrotic and were highly vascularized. Our results suggest that ischemia does not contribute to the pathogenesis of either the chronic neurodegeneration or acute lesions in POLG encephalopathy. Neovascularization and vascular dilatation does occur and suggests a compensatory response. We suggested the acute lesions are more likely to reflect energy insufficiency and our earlier studies suggest that this is driven in large part by seizure activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Isotretinoin-induced encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Adrian; Williams, Matthew; Gibb, William

    2010-11-01

    A 16-year-old male started on isotretinoin 80 mg daily for acne developed persistent headache 3 weeks later, with myoclonus and confusion 10 weeks later. During initial hospital assessment his Glasgow Coma Scale score fell acutely to 8 and he required ventilation. Brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis were normal and an electroencephalogram (EEG) showed features of encephalopathy. No cause was found. He was extubated after 24 hours and made a full recovery. This is the first report of a generalized encephalopathy thought likely to be due to isotretinoin.

  4. Invasive intracranial pressure monitoring is a useful adjunct in the management of severe hepatic encephalopathy associated with pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip; Kunde, Sachin; Vos, Miriam; Vats, Atul; Gupta, Nitika; Heffron, Thomas; Romero, Rene; Fortenberry, James D

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure is often accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema, and raised intracranial pressure. Elevated intracranial pressure can be managed more effectively with intracranial monitoring, but acute-liver-failure-associated coagulopathy is often considered a contraindication for invasive monitoring due to risk for intracranial bleeding. We reviewed our experience with use of early intracranial pressure monitoring in acute liver failure in children listed for liver transplantation. Retrospective review of all intubated pediatric acute liver failure patients with grade III and grade IV encephalopathy requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and evaluated for potential liver transplant who were identified from an institutional liver transplant patient database from 1999 to 2009. None. A total of 14 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. Their ages ranged from 7 months to 20 yrs. Diagnoses of acute liver failure were infectious (three), drug-induced (seven), autoimmune hepatitis (two), and indeterminate (two). Grade III and IV encephalopathy was seen in ten (71%) and four (29%) patients, respectively. Computed tomography scans before intracranial pressure monitor placement showed cerebral edema in five (35.7%) patients. Before intracranial pressure monitor placement, fresh frozen plasma, vitamin K, and activated recombinant factor VIIa were given to all 14 patients, with significant improvement in coagulopathy (p liver transplant, with 100% surviving neurologically intact. Four of 14 (28%) patients had spontaneous recovery without liver transplant. Two of 14 (14%) patients died due to multiple organ failure before transplant. One patient had a small 9-mm intracranial hemorrhage but survived after receiving a liver transplant. No patient developed intracranial infection. In our series of patients, intracranial pressure monitoring had a low complication rate and was associated with a high survival rate despite severe

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in acute Wernicke's encephalopathy associated with pseudomembranous colitis: a case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hye On; Lee, Yong Chul; Park, Tai Hwan; Yoo, Seung Min; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Kun Sang [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a common complication of thiamine deficiency among chronic alcoholics. However, there have been few reports about MR imaging findings, including the diffusion-weighted changes of this neurologic disorder, in nonalcoholic patients. We present here a rare case of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy that developed in a patient who received prolonged total parenteral nutrition for his pseudomembranous colitis. The MR imaging, including the diffusion-weighted imaging, was performed at the onset of disease and during follow-up. The diagnosis was made by the characteristic MR imaging findings and it was supported by the clinical features. The initial and follow-up MR imaging findings with diffusion-weighted imaging changes are described and correlated with the clinical status.

  6. Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rayhana Malek; Amina Gharibi; Nadia Khlil; Jamila Kissa

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is a typical form of periodontal diseases. It has an acute clinical presentation with the distinctive characteristics of rapid onset of interdental gingival necrosis, gingival pain, bleeding, and halitosis. Systemic symptoms such as lymphadenopathy and malaise could be also found. There are various predisposing factors such as stress, nutritional deficiencies, and immune system dysfunctions, especially, HIV infection that seems to play a major role in t...

  7. Dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota and decrease in paneth cell antimicrobial peptide level during acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Huang, Chunlan; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yingying; Lou, Lihong; Zheng, Junyuan; Tian, Ling; Wang, Xingpeng; Cao, Zhongwei; Zeng, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction plays an important role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) and intestinal microbiota dysbiosis was involved in intestinal barrier failure. Paneth cells protect intestinal barrier and are associated with intestinal microbiota. Here, we investigated changes in intestinal microbiota and antimicrobial peptides of Paneth cells in ileum during ANP. Rats with ANP were established by retrograde injection of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct and sacrificed at 24h and 48h, respectively. Injuries of pancreas and distal ileum were evaluated by histopathological score. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by plasma diamine oxidase activity (DAO) and D-lactate. Systemic and intestinal inflammation was evaluated by TNFα, IL-1β and IL-17A concentration by ELISA, respectively. 16S rRNA high throughput sequencing on fecal samples was used to investigate the changes in intestinal microbiota in the ANP group at 48h. Lysozyme and α-defensin5 were measured by real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluoresence. ANP rats had more severe histopathological injuries in pancreas and distal ileum, injured intestinal barrier and increased expression of TNFα, IL-1β and IL-17A in plasma and distal ileum compared with those of the sham-operated (SO) group. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed structural segregation between the SO and ANP groups. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU) number and ACE index revealed decreased microbiota diversity in the ANP group. Taxonomic analysis showed dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota structure. At phyla level, Saccharibacteria and Tenericutes decreased significantly. At genus level, Escherichia-Shigella and Phascolarctobacterium increased significantly, while Candidatus_Saccharimonas, Prevotellaceae_UCG-001, Lachnospiraceae_UCG-001, Ruminiclostridium_5 and Ruminococcaceae_UCG-008 decreased significantly. Lysozyme and α-defensin5 mRNA expression levels decreased significantly in ANP group at 48h

  8. Acute necrotizing gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharap, Satish B; Ghag, Geeta; Biswas, Arundhati

    2003-01-01

    A 17-year-old man presented with signs of peritonitis. Laparotomy revealed gangrene of the stomach without obvious cause. The patient underwent total gastrectomy with esophago-jejunal anastomosis with formation of jejunal pouch. Bacterial culture of the peritoneal fluid grew Strept. pyogenes and E. coli. The patient was discharged on day 21 after a stormy postoperative course.

  9. Logistic regression analysis of prognostic factors in 106 acute-on-chronic liver failure patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Yanping

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the prognostic factors in acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE and to explore the risk factors for prognosis. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 106 ACLF patients with HE who were hospitalized in our hospital from January 2010 to July 2013. The patients were divided into improved group and deteriorated group. The univariate indicators including age, sex, laboratory indicators [total bilirubin (TBil, albumin (Alb, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate amino-transferase (AST, and prothrombin time activity (PTA], the stage of HE, complications [persistent hyponatremia, digestive tract bleeding, hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, ascites, infection, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP], and plasma exchange were analyzed by chi-square test or t-test. Indicators with statistical significance were subsequently analyzed by binary logistic regression. ResultsUnivariate analysis showed that ALT (P=0.009, PTA (P=0.043, the stage of HE (P=0.000, and HRS (P=0.003 were significantly different between the two groups, whereas differences in age, sex, TBil, Alb, AST, persistent hyponatremia, digestive tract bleeding, ascites, infection, SBP, and plasma exchange were not statistically significant (P>0.05. Binary logistic regression demonstrated that PTA (b=-0097, P=0.025, OR=0.908, HRS (b=2.279, P=0.007, OR=9.764, and the stage of HE (b=1873, P=0.000, OR=6.510 were prognostic factors in ACLF patients with HE. ConclusionThe stage of HE, HRS, and PTA are independent influential factors for the prognosis in ACLF patients with HE. Reduced PTA, advanced HE stage, and the presence of HRS indicate worse prognosis.

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE ... liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2017 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Encephalopathy often starts slowly, and at first you may not be aware you have it. The stages ... your doctor right away if you think you may have it. Prompt identification and treatment of HE ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver ... and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are the Symptoms of HE? What Are the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause ... may not be aware you have it. The stages of HE span from mild to severe and ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cirrhosis of the Liver & Symptoms Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of ... Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to ...

  1. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Costa, D. W.; Boerma, D.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Horvath, K. D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C. R.; Bollen, T. L.; Gooszen, H. G.; Besselink, M. G.; Bakker, O. J.

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General

  2. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.W. da; Boerma, D.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Horvath, K.D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C.R.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Besselink, M.G.; Bakker, O.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. METHODS: This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing

  3. Lactose enemas plus placebo tablets vs. neomycin tablets plus starch enemas in acute portal systemic encephalopathy. A double-blind randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, M; Berthier, J M; Lewis, H; Mata, J M; Sierra, J G; García-Ramos, G; Ramírez Acosta, J; Dehesa, M

    1981-07-01

    A randomized, double-blind comparison of lactose enemas plus placebo tablets vs. starch enemas plus neomycin tablets was performed on 18 patients with acute portal systemic encephalopathy. Ten patients received starch enemas (10%; 1000 ml t.i.d.) plus neomycin tablets and 8 patients received lactose enemas (20%; 1000 ml t.i.d.) plus placebo tablets. A significant mental state improvement was demonstrated in the group of patients treated with starch enemas-neomycin tablets (p less than 0.05) and in the group of patients treated with lactose enemas-placebo tablets (p less than 0.025). Both treatments significantly improved the frequency of asterixis, ammonia blood levels, and electroencephalograms. In addition, patients treated with lactose enemas showed significant improvement in number-connection test times (p less than 0.02), and their stools showed a more acid pH (p less than 0.05). No side effects were evident with either treatment. Lactose enemas are a safe and effective treatment for acute portal systemic encephalopathy.

  4. Identification of a novel biomarker candidate, a 4.8-kDa peptide fragment from a neurosecretory protein VGF precursor, by proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid from children with acute encephalopathy using SELDI-TOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujino Osamu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute encephalopathy includes rapid deterioration and has a poor prognosis. Early intervention is essential to prevent progression of the disease and subsequent neurologic complications. However, in the acute period, true encephalopathy cannot easily be differentiated from febrile seizures, especially febrile seizures of the complex type. Thus, an early diagnostic marker has been sought in order to enable early intervention. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel marker candidate protein differentially expressed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of children with encephalopathy using proteomic analysis. Methods For detection of biomarkers, CSF samples were obtained from 13 children with acute encephalopathy and 42 children with febrile seizure. Mass spectral data were generated by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS technology, which is currently applied in many fields of biological and medical sciences. Diagnosis was made by at least two pediatric neurologists based on the clinical findings and routine examinations. All specimens were collected for diagnostic tests and the remaining portion of the specimens were used for the SELDI-TOF MS investigations. Results In experiment 1, CSF from patients with febrile seizures (n = 28, patients with encephalopathy (n = 8 (including influenza encephalopathy (n = 3, encephalopathy due to rotavirus (n = 1, human herpes virus 6 (n = 1 were used for the SELDI analysis. In experiment 2, SELDI analysis was performed on CSF from a second set of febrile seizure patients (n = 14 and encephalopathy patients (n = 5. We found that the peak with an m/z of 4810 contributed the most to the separation of the two groups. After purification and identification of the 4.8-kDa protein, a 4.8-kDa proteolytic peptide fragment from the neurosecretory protein VGF precursor (VGF4.8 was identified as a novel biomarker for encephalopathy. Conclusions

  5. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANNALS

    alcoholic populations at risk for thiamine deficiency and Wernicke's encephalopathy and carrying out a detailed neurological examination in such patients. References. 1. Loh Y, Watson WD, Verma A, Chang ST,. Stocker DJ, Labutta RJ. Acute Wernicke's encephalopathy following bariatric surgery: clinical course and MRI ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up and can travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic Encephalopathy often starts slowly, and at first you may not be ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical ... mild to severe and symptoms vary depending on how bad your liver disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to ... Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and Support program is provided by Salix Pharmaceuticals

  9. Outcome Factors in Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The predictive value of history, examination, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, EEG and sensory evoked potentials (SEP) in the prognosis of children with acute hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) was evaluated at the University Hospital of Lille, France.

  10. Acute necrotizing myopathy and podophyllin toxicity: report of a fatal case Miopatia necrotizante aguda e toxicidade por podofilina: relato de caso fatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acary Souza Bulle Oliveira

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A 21 year old male ingested podophyllin in a suicide attempt. The disorder was marked by seizures, coma, peripheral neuropathy, renal failure and acute necrotizing myopathy, an unusual finding. The coma and systemic disturbances resolved within three weeks. The myopathy resolved in 7 weeks, demonstrating a high capacity of muscle recuperation. The sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy persisted until the patient's death 9 weeks after the ingestion, due to septicemia. This report confirms the transient central neurotoxicity of podophyllin and persistent peripheral neurotoxicity of podophyllin, and describes a reversible necrotizing myopathy associated to mitochondrial abnormalities, a still unreported feature of podophyllin toxicity.Paciente de 21 anos, sexo masculino, ingeriu 20 mL de podofilina a 25% como tentativa de suicídio. O quadro clínico caracterizou-se por crises convulsivas, coma, neuropatia periférica, insuficiência renal e miopatia necrotizante aguda. O estado de coma e os distúrbios sistêmicos resolveram-se em 3 semanas. A miopatia resolveu-se em 7 semanas, demonstrando uma alta capacidade de recuperação muscular. A neuropatia periférica sensitivo-motora persistiu até o óbito do paciente, por septicemia, 9 semanas após a ingestão da podofilina. Esta descrição confirma os achados de literatura com alterações transitórias do sistema nervoso central e persistentes do nervo periférico relacionadas à podofilina, e descreve uma miopatia necrotizante associada com anormalidades mitocondriais, mas de caráter reversível, característica até então não reportada de toxicidade pela podofilina.

  11. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...... and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians.The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism...

  12. Pancreatico-colonic fistula after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Diagnosis with spiral CT using rectal water soluble contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüney, Davut; Altun, Ersan; Barlas, Afsar; Yegen, Cumhur

    2008-01-08

    Colonic complications are rare but lethal events in acute pancreatitis. We report the case of a 42-year-old man who suffered from a pancreatico-colonic fistula following a necrosectomy for severe pancreatitis; the fistula was demonstrated by spiral computed tomography using rectal water soluble contrast media. Computed tomography with rectal contrast detects pancreatico-colonic fistulas.

  13. Wernicke Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Patricia F

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the complaints and associated symptoms/consequences of lacking essential nutrients and vitamins in our central and peripheral nervous systems. This has become important as there has been a rise in malnutrition following the increasing incidence of bariatric surgery for obesity. A case report example involving review of the clinical presentation and treatment. A 30-year-old Caucasian woman who had gastric sleeve surgery did not take the recommended capsules as they were too large to swallow. She noted diplopia and oscillopsia 2 months later, which led her to have full orthoptic and neuro-ophthalmic evaluations. After being treated with chewable vitamins with thiamine, she noted a tremendous improvement in her symptoms. Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that was seen more in the 1940s and 1950s, following war times and mostly in underdeveloped countries. However, with the increasing utilization of bariatric surgery for obesity, neurological offices are seeing more patients with neurological impairments. We recommend inquiring about any obesity surgery in one's history and including Wernicke encephalopathy in possible differential diagnoses in those patients who have a recent onset of strabismus or nystagmus, altered mental status, and/or gait ataxia. © 2015 Board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System, American Orthoptic Journal, Volume 65, 2015, ISSN 0065-955X, E-ISSN 1553-4448.

  14. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMorrow, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only. PMID:29026534

  15. Non-Necrotizing Streptococcal Cellulitis as a Cause of Acute, Atraumatic Compartment Syndrome of the Foot: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toney, James; Donovan, Stephanie; Adelman, Vanessa; Adelman, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is widely accepted as a surgical emergency. Most cases of acute compartment syndrome occur after high-energy trauma, especially crush injuries. We present a unique case of acute, atraumatic compartment syndrome of the foot associated with infectious cellulitis. A 53-year-old male, with a medical history significant for human immunodeficiency virus, presented to the emergency department secondary to an insidious onset of intense foot pain, swelling, and an inability to bear weight on the affected extremity. He had no history of recent trauma. He was admitted to the hospital because of a suspected infection and subsequently was given intravenous antibiotics. During the admission, he developed a severe infection, and blood cultures demonstrated growth of group A streptococcus. No abscess or hematoma was identified on magnetic resonance imaging or during exploratory surgery. The findings from intraoperative cultures were negative. Despite proper medical care for his infection, the lower extremity pain worsened; therefore, compartmental pressures were obtained at the bedside. Multiple compartment pressures were measured and were >40 mm Hg. Compartment syndrome was diagnosed, and the patient was taken to the operating room for emergent fasciotomies. Surgical release of the medial, lateral, interosseous, and adductor compartments revealed copious amounts of serosanguinous drainage. Again, no definitive hematoma or purulence was identified. The patient's symptoms resolved after the fasciotomies, and he healed uneventfully. Our case highlights the need to consider acute compartment syndrome in the differential diagnosis for pain out of proportion to the clinical situation, even when a traditional etiology is absent. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy yields better efficacy for patients with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Wenping; Xue, Hui; Wang, Baojun; Li, Yuechun; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Changchun; Liang, Furu; Pang, Jiangxia; Yu, Lehua

    2017-01-01

    Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (DEACMP) commonly occurs after recovering from acute CO poisoning. This study was performed to assess the efficacy of the combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in patients with DEACMP. A total of 120 patients with DEACMP were recruited and randomly assigned into the experimental group (receiving dexamethasone 5 mg/day or 10 mg/day plus HBO therapy) and control group (HBO therapy as monotherapy). Meanwhile, the conventional treatments were provided for all the patients. We used the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale to assess the cognitive function, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) to assess the neurological function and the remission rate (RR) to assess the clinical efficacy. Myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was also measured. After 4 weeks of treatment, compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly higher remission rate ( P =0.032), a significantly higher average MMSE score ( P =0.037) and a significantly lower average NIHSS score ( P =0.002). Meanwhile, there was a trend toward better improvement with dexamethasone 10 mg/day, and the level of MBP in the CSF of patients was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group ( P incidence of adverse events. These results indicate that the combined application of dexamethasone and HBO therapy could yield better efficacy for patients with DEACMP and should be viewed as a potential new therapy.

  17. A Novel Biosensor for Evaluation of Apoptotic or Necrotic Effects of Nitrogen Dioxide during Acute Pancreatitis in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jacewicz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct and accurate estimation of nitric dioxide levels is an extremely laborious and technically demanding procedure in the molecular diagnostics of inflammatory processes. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that a stop-flow technique utilizing a specific spectroscopic biosensor can be used for detection of nanomolar quantities of NO2 in biological milieu. The use of novel compound cis-[Cr(C2O4(AaraNH2(OH22]+ increases NO2 estimation accuracy by slowing down the rate of NO2 uptake. In this study, an animal model of pancreatitis, where nitrosative stress is induced by either 3g/kg bw or 1.5 g/kg bw dose of L-arginine, was used. Biochemical parameters and morphological characteristics of acute pancreatitis were monitored, specifically assessing pancreatic acinar cell death mode, NO2 generation and cellular glutathione level. The severity of the process correlated positively with NO2 levels in pancreatic acinar cell cytosol samples, and negatively with cellular glutathione levels.

  18. Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayhana Malek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG is a typical form of periodontal diseases. It has an acute clinical presentation with the distinctive characteristics of rapid onset of interdental gingival necrosis, gingival pain, bleeding, and halitosis. Systemic symptoms such as lymphadenopathy and malaise could be also found. There are various predisposing factors such as stress, nutritional deficiencies, and immune system dysfunctions, especially, HIV infection that seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of NUG. The treatment of NUG is organized in successive stages: first, the treatment of the acute phase that should be provided immediately to stop disease progression and to control patient's feeling of discomfort and pain; second, the treatment of the preexisting condition such as chronic gingivitis; then, the surgical correction of the disease sequelae like craters. Moreover, finally, maintenance phase that allows stable outcomes. This case report describes the diagnosis approach and the conservative management with a good outcome of NUG in a 21-year-old male patient with no systemic disease and probable mechanism of pathogenesis of two predisposing factors involved.

  19. Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Rayhana; Gharibi, Amina; Khlil, Nadia; Kissa, Jamila

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is a typical form of periodontal diseases. It has an acute clinical presentation with the distinctive characteristics of rapid onset of interdental gingival necrosis, gingival pain, bleeding, and halitosis. Systemic symptoms such as lymphadenopathy and malaise could be also found. There are various predisposing factors such as stress, nutritional deficiencies, and immune system dysfunctions, especially, HIV infection that seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of NUG. The treatment of NUG is organized in successive stages: first, the treatment of the acute phase that should be provided immediately to stop disease progression and to control patient's feeling of discomfort and pain; second, the treatment of the preexisting condition such as chronic gingivitis; then, the surgical correction of the disease sequelae like craters. Moreover, finally, maintenance phase that allows stable outcomes. This case report describes the diagnosis approach and the conservative management with a good outcome of NUG in a 21-year-old male patient with no systemic disease and probable mechanism of pathogenesis of two predisposing factors involved.

  20. Autopsy prevalence of Wernicke's encephalopathy in alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autopsy prevalence of Wernicke's encephalopathy in alcohol-related disease. ... The histological lesions were classified as either acute (5l, acute on chronic (9) or chronic (3) according to defined pathological criteria Macroscopic abnormalities were not obvious in any of the patients in the study group. Chart analysis ...

  1. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  2. Dysbiosis of Intestinal Microbiota and Decreased Antimicrobial Peptide Level in Paneth Cells during Hypertriglyceridemia-Related Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlan Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG aggravates the course of acute pancreatitis (AP. Intestinal barrier dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of AP during which dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota contributes to the dysfunction in intestinal barrier. However, few studies focus on the changes in intestine during HTG-related acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Here, we investigated the changes in intestinal microbiota and Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in HTG-related ANP (HANP in rats. Rats fed a high-fat diet to induce HTG and ANP was induced by retrograde injection of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct. Rats were sacrificed at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Pancreatic and ileal injuries were evaluated by histological scores. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by plasma diamine oxidase activity and D-lactate level. Systemic and intestinal inflammation was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin (IL-1β, and IL-17A expression. 16S rRNA high throughput sequencing was used to investigate changes in intestinal microbiota diversity and structure. AMPs (α-defensin5 and lysozyme expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunofluorescence. The results showed that compared with those of normal-lipid ANP (NANP groups, the HANP groups had more severe histopathological injuries in pancreas and distal ileum, aggravated intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-17A expression in plasma and distal ileum. Principal component analysis showed structural segregation between the HANP and NANP group. α-Diversity estimators in the HANP group revealed decreased microbiota diversity compared with that in NANP group. Taxonomic analysis showed dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota structure. In the HANP group, at phyla level, Candidatus_Saccharibacteria and Tenericutes decreased significantly, whereas Actinobacteria increased. At genus level, Allobaculum, Bifidobacterium

  3. Dysbiosis of Intestinal Microbiota and Decreased Antimicrobial Peptide Level in Paneth Cells during Hypertriglyceridemia-Related Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunlan; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Yingying; Lou, Lihong; Zheng, Junyuan; Tian, Ling; Wang, Xingpeng; Cao, Zhongwei; Zeng, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) aggravates the course of acute pancreatitis (AP). Intestinal barrier dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of AP during which dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota contributes to the dysfunction in intestinal barrier. However, few studies focus on the changes in intestine during HTG-related acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Here, we investigated the changes in intestinal microbiota and Paneth cell antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in HTG-related ANP (HANP) in rats. Rats fed a high-fat diet to induce HTG and ANP was induced by retrograde injection of 3.5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct. Rats were sacrificed at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Pancreatic and ileal injuries were evaluated by histological scores. Intestinal barrier function was assessed by plasma diamine oxidase activity and D-lactate level. Systemic and intestinal inflammation was evaluated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-17A expression. 16S rRNA high throughput sequencing was used to investigate changes in intestinal microbiota diversity and structure. AMPs (α-defensin5 and lysozyme) expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunofluorescence. The results showed that compared with those of normal-lipid ANP (NANP) groups, the HANP groups had more severe histopathological injuries in pancreas and distal ileum, aggravated intestinal barrier dysfunction and increased TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-17A expression in plasma and distal ileum. Principal component analysis showed structural segregation between the HANP and NANP group. α-Diversity estimators in the HANP group revealed decreased microbiota diversity compared with that in NANP group. Taxonomic analysis showed dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota structure. In the HANP group, at phyla level, Candidatus_Saccharibacteria and Tenericutes decreased significantly, whereas Actinobacteria increased. At genus level, Allobaculum, Bifidobacterium, and

  4. Finasteride Has Regionally Different Effects on Brain Oxidative Stress and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Acute Thioacetamide-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Mladenović

    Full Text Available Finasteride (FIN inhibits neurosteroid synthesis and potentially improves the course of hepatic encephalopathy (HE. This study aimed to investigate the effects of FIN on brain oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity in acute thioacetamide-induced HE in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: 1. control; 2. thioacetamide-treated group (TAA; 900 mg/kg; 3. finasteride-treated group (FIN; 150 mg/kg; 4. group treated with FIN and TAA (FIN+TAA. Daily doses of FIN (50 mg/kg and TAA (300 mg/kg were administered intraperitoneally during three days and in FIN+TAA group FIN was administered 2h before every dose of TAA. FIN pretreatment prevented TAA-induced rise in malondialdehyde level in the cortex due to restoration of catalase activity and increased expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 and induced an increase in malondialdehyde level in the thalamus due to reduction of glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase (GR activity. Although FIN pretreatment did not affect malondialdehyde level in hippocampus and caudate nucleus, hippocampal SOD1 expression was higher (p<0.05 and GR activity lower in FIN+TAA vs. TAA group (p<0.05. GPx activity was lower in caudate nucleus in FIN+TAA vs. TAA group (p<0.01. FIN pretreatment prevented TAA-induced rise in AchE activity in the thalamus and caudate nucleus and AchE activity correlates inversely in the thalamus (p<0.05 and positively in caudate nucleus (p<0.01 with malondialdehyde level. FIN has regionally selective effects on oxidative stress and AchE activity in the brain in acute TAA-induced HE in rats. The prooxidant role of FIN in the thalamus may be causally linked with inhibition of AchE.

  5. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marlene; Schmutzhard, Erich

    2017-08-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological disorder of (sub)acute onset characterized by varied neurological symptoms, which may include headache, impaired visual acuity or visual field deficits, disorders of consciousness, confusion, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. In a majority of patients the clinical presentation includes elevated arterial blood pressure up to hypertensive emergencies. Neuroimaging, in particular magnetic resonance imaging, frequently shows a distinctive parieto-occipital pattern with a symmetric distribution of changes reflecting vasogenic edema. PRES frequently develops in the context of cytotoxic medication, (pre)eclampsia, sepsis, renal disease or autoimmune disorders. The treatment is symptomatic and is determined by the underlying condition. The overall prognosis is favorable, since clinical symptoms as well as imaging lesions are reversible in most patients. However, neurological sequelae including long-term epilepsy may persist in individual cases.

  7. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  8. Unusual Reversible MR Signal Abnormalities In Hypertensive Encephalopathy : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertensive encephalopathy is an acute neurological emergency comprising of headache, seizures, visual disturbances and altered sensorium associated with elevated systemic blood pressure. We report a patient who suffered from two episodes of hypertensive encephalopathy secondary to primary renal disease, with the unusual MRI features involving the cerebellar lobes secondary to hypertensive encephalopathy and subsequent resolution.

  9. Neuroborreliosis and acute encephalopathy: The use of CXCL13 as a biomarker in CNS manifestations of Lyme borreliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrasch, Matthias; Fingerle, Volker; Boden, Katharina; Darr, Andreas; Baier, Michael; Straube, Eberhard; Nenadic, Igor

    2017-12-11

    We report the case of an 80-year-old patient with acute onset confusion initially suspected to reflect delirium in incipient Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrospinal fluid tests revealed an unusually severe form of neuroborreliosis, which resolved following antibiotic treatment. This was mirrored in the measurement of CXCL13, which is suggested as a complementary biomarker. Clinical implications for screening, differential diagnosis and treatment are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Low Cerebral Oxygen Consumption and Blood Flow in Patients With Cirrhosis and an Acute Episode of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2009-01-01

    (15)O-water PET in 6 patients with liver cirrhosis and an acute episode of overt HE, 6 cirrhotic patients without HE, and 7 healthy subjects. RESULTS: Neither whole-brain CMRO(2) nor CBF differed significantly between cirrhotic patients without HE and healthy subjects, but were both significantly...... reduced in cirrhotic patients with HE (P subjects, and CBF was 0.29 +/- 0.01 mL blood/mL brain tissue....../min in patients with HE, 0.47 +/- 0.02 in patients without HE, and 0.49 +/- 0.03 in healthy subjects. CMRO(2) and CBF were correlated, and both variables correlated negatively with arterial ammonia concentration. Analysis of regional values, using individual magnetic resonance co-registrations, showed...

  11. Combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy yields better efficacy for patients with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wenping Xiang,1 Hui Xue,2 Baojun Wang,2 Yuechun Li,2 Jun Zhang,2 Changchun Jiang,2 Furu Liang,2 Jiangxia Pang,2 Lehua Yu1 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2Department of Neurology, Baotou Central Hospital, Baotou, Inner Mongolia, People’s Republic of China Background: Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide (CO poisoning (DEACMP commonly occurs after recovering from acute CO poisoning. This study was performed to assess the efficacy of the combined application of dexamethasone and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy in patients with DEACMP.Patients and methods: A total of 120 patients with DEACMP were recruited and randomly assigned into the experimental group (receiving dexamethasone 5 mg/day or 10 mg/day plus HBO therapy and control group (HBO therapy as monotherapy. Meanwhile, the conventional treatments were provided for all the patients. We used the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scale to assess the cognitive function, the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS to assess the neurological function and the remission rate (RR to assess the clinical efficacy. Myelin basic protein (MBP in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was also measured.Results: After 4 weeks of treatment, compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly higher remission rate (P=0.032, a significantly higher average MMSE score (P=0.037 and a significantly lower average NIHSS score (P=0.002. Meanwhile, there was a trend toward better improvement with dexamethasone 10 mg/day, and the level of MBP in the CSF of patients was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.0001. The addition of dexamethasone did not significantly increase the incidence of adverse events.Conclusion: These results indicate that the combined application of dexamethasone and HBO therapy could yield better efficacy for patients with DEACMP and

  12. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis following periodontal abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Rui; Catunda, Ivson de Sousa; Queiroz, Isaac Vieira; de Morais, Hecio Henrique Araujo; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue infections are characterized by acute inflammation, diffuse edema, and suppuration, and are often associated with symptoms such as malaise, fever, tachycardia, and chills. Necrotizing fasciitis is a destructive bacterial infection affecting subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia and is associated with high rates of mortality. It usually involves the abdomen and extremities, but it also can occur in the head and neck. Early diagnosis is critical and the most commonly accepted treatment includes radical surgical intervention and administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This article reports and discusses the case of a patient with odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, and emphasizes the importance of early and effective treatment.

  13. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summer Camp Tips for Kids With Asthma, Allergies Antioxidants: The Good Health Helpers As Stroke 'Liquefies' Brain ... Video) Skin Cancer Additional Content Medical News Necrotizing Skin Infections By A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD, Private ...

  14. Clinical predictors and differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    della Faille, Laetitia; Fieuws, Steffen; Van Paesschen, W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the clinical predictors and the differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in patients presenting with acute neurological symptoms and risk factors for PRES. Using the diagnostic algorithm for PRES from Fugate and Rabinstein (Lancet Neurol 14(9):914-925, 1), we carried out a retrospective study on 220 patients, presenting with acute neurological symptoms such as seizures, encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbances or o...

  15. Clinical predictors and differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Faille, Laetitia della; Fieuws, S.; Van Paesschen, W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the clinical predictors and the differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in patients presenting with acute neurological symptoms and risk factors for PRES. Using the diagnostic algorithm for PRES from Fugate and Rabinstein (Lancet Neurol 14(9):914?925, 1), we carried out a retrospective study on 220 patients, presenting with acute neurological symptoms such as seizures, encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbances or o...

  16. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition in patient with acute leukaemia: unusual involvement of caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aprile, P.; Tarantino, A.; Carella, A. [Division of Neuroradiology, Policlinico, Univ. of Bari (Italy); Santoro, N. [Inst. of Paediatric Clinic I, Policlinico, University of Bari, Bari (Italy)

    2000-10-01

    We report a 13-year-old girl with leukaemia and Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parenteral nutrition. MRI showed unusual bilateral lesions of the caudate nuclei and cerebral cortex, as well as typical lesions surrounding the third ventricle and aqueduct. After intravenous thiamine, the patient improved, and the abnormalities on MRI disappeared. (orig.)

  17. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  18. [Rota virus encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Kawashima, Hisashi; Suzuki, Shunsuke

    2011-03-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children, but the pathogenesis and immunity of this disease are not completely understood. Less well recognized is the association of rotavirus-induced central nervous system (CNS) involvement, which has been associated with seizure, encephalopathy and death etc. The term 'rotavirus encephalopathy' has been used for cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis with CNS involvement as evidenced by clinical features of encephalopathy with or without CSF pleocytosis. Here, we review the recent advances regarding its causative agent, prognosis, pathogenesis, and treatment.

  19. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... com/home. Accessed Jan. 29, 2016. Concussion: Mayo's multidisciplinary approach. Mayo Clinic Neuroscience Update. 2013;10:2. ... al. Clinical appraisal of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: Current perspectives and future directions. Current Opinion in Neurology. 2011; ...

  20. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  1. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  2. Clinical predictors and differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faille, Laetitia Della; Fieuws, S; Van Paesschen, W

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the clinical predictors and the differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in patients presenting with acute neurological symptoms and risk factors for PRES. Using the diagnostic algorithm for PRES from Fugate and Rabinstein (Lancet Neurol 14(9):914-925, 1), we carried out a retrospective study on 220 patients, presenting with acute neurological symptoms such as seizures, encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbances or other focal neurological signs that appear in the clinical setting of risk factors such as hypertension/blood pressure fluctuations, chemotherapy, renal failure, autoimmune disorders, or eclampsia, in whom imaging of the brain was performed to exclude PRES. Seventeen percent of patients had a radiologically confirmed diagnosis of PRES. Univariable logistic regression showed a significant association between PRES and epileptic seizures, encephalopathy, hypertension, chemotherapy and renal failure. Multivariable logistic regression of acute neurological symptoms and risk factors showed a significant association of epileptic seizures, encephalopathy, visual disturbances, hypertension and chemotherapy with PRES. Using these variables to predict PRES yielded a discriminative ability (AUC) equal to 0.793. Diagnoses when PRES was not confirmed included primary or secondary headaches (26%), toxic-metabolic encephalopathy (21%), vascular pathology (12%) and other less frequent disorders. Epileptic seizures, encephalopathy, visual disturbances, hypertension, renal failure and chemotherapy were the best clinical predictors of PRES, while headache, immune suppression and autoimmune disease were not useful for the clinical diagnosis of PRES in our study.

  3. Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Lahmiti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a gastrointestinal disease that mostly affects premature infants. It involves infection and inflammation that causes destruction of the bowel. Although it affects only 1 in 2,000 to 4,000 births, or between 1 and 5% of neonatal intensive care unit admissions, NEC is the most common and serious gastrointestinal disorder among hospitalized preterm infants. We present a very representative abdominal X-ray of this disease.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ethylmalonic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been identified worldwide, mostly in Mediterranean and Arab populations. Although ethylmalonic encephalopathy appears to be very ... sulfide (H(2)S) metabolism in ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2013 Jan 1;5(1): ...

  5. Management of descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y L; Fahn, H J; Shi, H S; Wu, Y C; Huang, M H; Wang, L S

    1998-09-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is uncommon, and may be lethal if not treated adequately and promptly. Delayed diagnosis of the disease is sometimes encountered in clinical practice. Eight consecutive patients with acute DNM were identified between 1991 and 1995, including five men and three women. The mean age was 45.8 years (range, 22-71 years). The infectious sources consisted of six esophageal perforations, one cervical cutting injury and one tonsillitis. The clinical presentations were evaluated. Diagnostic procedures including chest radiograph, sonogram and computerized tomography scans of the chest and neck were examined. Diagnosis and treatment, including culture results from drained fluids and debrided tissues, and antibiotic and supportive therapies were reviewed. Six patients who underwent aggressive surgical treatment recovered well. Two patients who received supportive treatment died of sepsis alone. The cultured bacteria included: Klebsiella oxytoca, Staphylococcus aureus, Trichosporum and other mixed oral cavity flora. Early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic and support therapies are essential to achieve good patient outcomes in acute descending mediastinitis. Adequate drainage and debridement, appropriate antibiotic therapy, and sufficient nutritional and respiratory support are the main treatment elements.

  6. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. Uremic encephalopathy and other brain disorders associated with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifter, Julian Lawrence; Samuels, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Kidney failure is one of the leading causes of disability and death and one of the most disabling features of kidney failure and dialysis is encephalopathy. This is probably caused by the accumulation of uremic toxins. Other important causes are related to the underlying disorders that cause kidney failure, particularly hypertension. The clinical manifestations of uremic encephalopathy include mild confusional states to deep coma, often with associated movement disorders, such as asterixis. Most nephrologists consider cognitive impairment to be a major indication for the initiation of renal replacement therapy with dialysis with or without subsequent transplantation. Sleep disorders, including Ekbom's syndrome (restless legs syndrome) are also common in patients with kidney failure. Renal replacement therapies are also associated with particular neurologic complications including acute dialysis encephalopathy and chronic dialysis encephalopathy, formerly known as dialysis dementia. The treatments and prevention of each are discussed. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  10. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  11. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schuetz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed for a comprehensive delineation of genetic, functional and phenotypic aspects of GRIN2B encephalopathy and explored potential prospects of personalised medicine. METHODS: Data of 48 individuals with de novo GRIN2B variants were collected from several diagnostic and research c...

  12. Clinical manifestations and treatment response of steroid in pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-07-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical symptoms are characterized by behavioral and cognitive changes, speech disturbance, seizures, myoclonus, psychosis, hallucination, involuntary movements, cerebellar signs, and coma. The standard treatment is the use of corticosteroids along with the treatment of any concurrent dysthyroidism. Other options are immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. We described symptoms and outcomes on 3 teenage girls with Hashimoto encephalopathy. Presenting symptoms were seizure or altered mental status. One patient took levothyroxine due to hypothyroidism before presentation of Hashimoto encephalopathy. After confirmation of elevated antithyroid antibodies, all patients were treated with steroids. One patient needed plasmapheresis because of the lack of response to steroids and immunoglobulins. Hashimoto encephalopathy should be considered in any patient presenting with acute or subacute unexplained encephalopathy and seizures. Even though the use of steroids is the first line of treatment, plasmapheresis can rescue steroid-resistant patients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Sodium valproate-related hyperammonaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Emily Jane; Zaman, Fawad

    2014-04-10

    A 59-year-old man with a background of poststroke epilepsy, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension, presented to the medical assessment unit with acute confusion and altered consciousness. Medications included sodium valproate, aspirin and antihypertensives. On examination he was confused, with his Glasgow Coma Scale fluctuating between 10 and 14. Routine blood tests, thyroid function tests, serum sodium valproate level, urine dip, CT of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were all normal. EEG revealed changes consistent with an encephalopathic process. Serum ammonia was elevated (75 µg/dL), consistent with a diagnosis of valproate-related hyperammonaemic encephalopathy. Sodium valproate was changed to a different antiepileptic drug and his confusion gradually resolved. Valproate-related hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a treatable condition which should be considered as a diagnosis in anyone taking sodium valproate with new onset confusion, even in the presence of therapeutic sodium valproate levels and normal liver function tests.

  14. Lead encephalopathy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janapareddy Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries. We report the varied clinical presentation, diagnostic and management issues in two adult patients with lead encephalopathy. Both patients worked in a battery manufacturing unit. Both patients presented with seizures and one patient also complained of abdominal colic and vomiting. Both were anemic and a lead line was present. Blood lead level in both the patients was greater than 25 µg/dl. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalamus, lentiform nucleus in both patients and also the external capsules, sub-cortical white matter in one patient. All these changes, seen as hyperintensities in T2-weighted images suggested demyelination. They were advised avoidance of further exposure to lead and were treated with anti-epileptics; one patient also received D-penicillamine. They improved well on follow-up. Lead encephalopathy is an uncommon but important manifestation of lead toxicity in adults.

  15. Preterm Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna G Gopagondanahalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic ischemic injury, its clinical course, monitoring and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized, and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies.

  16. Treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Bollen, T.L.; Fockens, P.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Dutch Pancreatitis Study, G.

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially lethal disease. It is associated with significant morbidity and consumes enormous health care resources. Over the last 2 decades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis has undergone fundamental changes based on new conceptual insights and evidence from

  17. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schütz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    presented with neurodevelopmental disorders and a spectrum of hypotonia, movement disorder, cortical visual impairment, cerebral volume loss and epilepsy. Six patients presented with a consistent malformation of cortical development (MCD) intermediate between tubulinopathies and polymicrogyria. Missense...... treatment response in the respective patients still remains to be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to previously known features of intellectual disability, epilepsy and autism, we found evidence that GRIN2B encephalopathy is also frequently associated with movement disorder, cortical visual impairment...

  18. Cerebral lesions in acute arterial hypertension: the characteristic MRI in hypertensive encephalopathy; Zerebrale Veraenderungen bei krisenhafter arterieller Hypertonie: MRT-Befunde der hypertensiven Enzephalopathie sind wegweisend fuer Diagnose und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.P.; Krohmer, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany); Guenther, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany); Zimmer, C. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Purpose: in the nine years since the posterior reversible (leuc) encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was first described, a number of causes have been under discussion. These not only include arterial hypertension, i. e. hypertensive crises, but also various toxic substances, i. e. immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic agents, that are responsible for the formation of the symptoms and characteristic MR tomographic brain findings. Materials and methods: initial and follow-up MRI examinations of 8 patients were analyzed. All patients had acute neurological symptoms (headaches, seizures, visual disorders and vigilance disturbances) together with a detectable hypertensive crisis. Results: MRI disclosed increased signal intensity in subcortical and some cortical lesions in all patient FLAIR sequences. These changes were particularly extensive in the posterior circulation (occipital, cerebellum and brain stem) although they were also detected in brain areas supplied by the carotid artery. However, a cytotoxic genesis of the changes was ruled out in each patient by means of a normal DWI. Furthermore, when the blood pressure was normalized, reversibility of the lesions as proof of the diagnosis was detectable. (orig.)

  19. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in the orthodontic patient. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodríguez-Pulido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: About 0.1% of the population suffers from necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, a disease of rapid progression and acute manifestation, which may progress to necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and eventually to bone sequestration and loss of gingival tissue. Case report: A 21-year-old female patient undergoing orthodontic treatment for six months, diagnosed with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis due to acute pain in the gingival tissue, spontaneous bleeding, halitosis and abundant plaque. The treatment was conservative and effective, obtaining total remission of the lesion after seven days and three months of postoperative follow-up. Conclusion: Today there are no epidemiological or clinical reports that support the relationship of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and orthodontic treatment. Prevention is critical to the success of the treatment, which is why the dentist should recognize the clinical features of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis to raise awareness of its risks in the orthodontic patient.

  20. Hashimoto encephalopathy: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J Y; Xu, B; Lopes, J; Blamoun, J; Li, L

    2017-03-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) presents as an encephalopathy without central nervous system infection or tumor. HE is associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and is thus considered to be an autoimmune disorder. The prevalence of HE is low, but death and status epilepticus have been reported. HE manifests with a wide range of symptoms that include behavioral changes and confusion. Elevated thyroid antibodies are present in the majority of cases and are required for the diagnosis of HE. Normal brain MRI findings are found in the majority of patients diagnosed with HE. The most consistent CSF abnormality noted in HE patients is the presence of elevated protein. Most HE patients respond well to steroid therapy. Clinical improvements are also observed with IV immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. In conclusion, it is now generally accepted that the diagnosis of HE must include encephalopathy characterized by cognitive impairment associated with psychiatric features, such as hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia. Autoimmune encephalitis and prion disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis due to the similarity of the clinical features of these conditions to those of HE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was

  2. Antithyroperoxidase Antibodies in Encephalopathy : Diagnostic Marker or Incidental Finding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, B.; Van Santen, H. M.; Niermeijer, J. M.; Schonenberg-Meinema, D.; Van Trotsenburg, A. S P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute encephalopathy who are thoroughly examined for an underlying diagnosis and in whom infectious, metabolic, and malignant causes are excluded can form a true diagnostic dilemma. If antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO abs) are present, the diagnosis steroid responsive

  3. MRI reveals reversible lesions resembling posterior reversible encephalopathy in porphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, M. [Huesrev Gerede c, 128/4 Tesvikiye, 80690 Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Neurology, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sisli Etfal S., Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey); Forta, H.; Babacan, G. [Department of Neurology, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sisli Etfal S., Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey); Dalkilic, Tuerker [Department of Neurosurgery, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sisli Etfal S., Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2002-10-01

    We report a 20-year-old woman who had an attack of acute intermittent porphyria with seizures, hallucinations, autonomic and somatic neuropathy. T2-weighted MRI revealed multiple lesions which were no longer visible 3 months later. We suggest a similar mechanism to posterior reversible encephalopathy underlying cerebral symptoms in porphyria. (orig.)

  4. An experimental model of acute encephalopathy after total body irradiation in the rat: effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761); Effet de l'extrait de Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) chez le rat sur un modele experimental d'encephalopathie aigue apres irradiation corporelle totale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamproglou, I.; Bok, B. [Hopital Bichat, 75 - Paris (France); Boisserie, G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Drieu, K. [IHB-IPSEN, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-06-01

    To define the therapeutic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) in an experimental model of acute encephalopathy following total body irradiation in rats. Ninety four-month-old rats received 4.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) at day 1 while 15 rats received sham irradiation. A behavioural study based on a conditioning test of negative reinforcement, the one-way avoidance test, was performed test, was performed after irradiation. Orally treatment was started one day (study A) or twenty two days (study B) after irradiation and repeated daily for twelve days. In the irradiated group, three subgroups were defined according to the treatment received: EGb 761 (50 mg/kg), EGb 761 (100 mg/kg), water. This work comprised two consecutive studies. In study A (45 rats) the one-way avoidance test was administered daily from day 7 to day 14. In study B (45 rats) the behavioural test was performed from day 28 to day 35. Study A (three groups of 15 rats): following TBI, irradiated rats treated with water demonstrated a significant delay in a learning the one-way avoidance test in comparison with sham-irradiated rats (P < 0.0002) or irradiated rats treated with EGb 761 (50 mg/kg; P < 0.007) or EGb 761 (100 mg/kg; P < 0.0002). The irradiated rats, treated with EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. Study B (three groups of 15 rats): the irradiated rats, treated with water of EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. (authors)

  5. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  6. Fetal encephalopathy after maternal anaphylaxis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, R; Zuppa, A A; Maragliano, G; Gallini, F; Tortorolo, G

    1997-01-01

    Fetal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy can be diagnosed at birth by means of cerebral ultrasound scanning. The morphological appearance of the lesions depends on the time elapsed between the insult and examination of the brain. We report a case of a neonate affected by multicystic encephalomalacia and corpus callosum atrophy attributable to an episode of maternal anaphylactic shock which occurred at 27 weeks of gestation following intravenous iron injection. The diagnosis was made by means of a cerebral ultrasound scan performed at birth and confirmed by magnetic resonance. This case demonstrates that maternal severe acute hypotension during pregnancy can cause fetal cerebral damage similar to the hypoxicischemic injuries occurring in the perinatal period.

  7. DNM1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Spiczak, Sarah; Helbig, Katherine L; Shinde, Deepali N

    2017-01-01

    evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Two patients had profound global developmental delay without seizures. In addition, we describe a single patient with normal development before the onset of a catastrophic epilepsy, consistent with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome at 4 years. All mutations...... cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one...

  8. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D W; Boerma, D; van Santvoort, H C; Horvath, K D; Werner, J; Carter, C R; Bollen, T L; Gooszen, H G; Besselink, M G; Bakker, O J

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General management strategies for the treatment of complications are discussed in relation to the stage of the disease. Frequent clinical evaluation of the patient's condition remains paramount in the first 24-72 h of the disease. Liberal goal-directed fluid resuscitation and early enteral nutrition should be provided. Urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is indicated when cholangitis is suspected, but it is unclear whether this is appropriate in patients with predicted severe biliary pancreatitis without cholangitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis does not prevent infection of necrosis and antibiotics are not indicated as part of initial management. Bacteriologically confirmed infections should receive targeted antibiotics. With the more conservative approach to necrotizing pancreatitis currently advocated, fine-needle aspiration culture of pancreatic or extrapancreatic necrosis will less often lead to a change in management and is therefore indicated less frequently. Optimal treatment of infected necrotizing pancreatitis consists of a staged multidisciplinary 'step-up' approach. The initial step is drainage, either percutaneous or transluminal, followed by surgical or endoscopic transluminal debridement only if needed. Debridement is delayed until the acute necrotic collection has become 'walled-off'. Outcome following necrotizing pancreatitis has improved substantially in recent years as a result of a shift from early surgical debridement to a staged, minimally invasive, multidisciplinary, step-up approach. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica em recém-nascidos a termo: aspectos da fase aguda e evolução Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: acute period and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. R. Funayama

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Noventa e quatro recém-nascidos com encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica (EHI, atendidos no Hospital das Clínicas de Ribeirão Preto desde 1982, foram avaliados evolutivamente na fase aguda e por período médio de 47 meses. De 43 casos com EHI 1,40 se recuperaram em 96 horas e 3 faleceram. Dos 40 com EHI II, 37,5% se recuperaram até o sétimo dia e demais permaneceram com alterações. Os 11 casos com grau III faleceram até o segundo mês de vida. As crianças com EHI grau I não apresentaram seqüelas motoras. Do grupo com EHI grau II 34,5% apresentaram paralisia cerebral e 17,7% atraso neuromotor. 80% dos casos com sequela apresentaram exame neurológico anormal além do sétimo dia, na fase aguda da EHI. Epilepsia ocorreu em 17,5% dos casos com EHI grau II e somente no grupo com seqüelas motoras. Teste de QI não evidenciou diferença significativa entre os grupos com grau I, II sem seqüelas motoras e o grupo controle. Com esses dados os autores reafirmaram a importância prognostica da evolução da EHI na fase aguda.Ninety four neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy HIE attended at the University of Ribeirão Preto since 1982 were studied in terms of the neurological alterations during the acute phase and outcome over a mean period of 47 months. From 43 newborns with HIE I, 40 recovered within 96 hours and 3 died. Among 40 infants with HIE II, 37.5% recovered within the first week, and the others continued abnormal beyond the 7th day. All 11 infants with HIE III died before the second month of life. The HIE I group had no motor sequelae. Among the HIE II group, 34.5% showed cerebral palsy and 17.7% neuromotor retardation. 80.0% of those with sequelae persisted abnormal beyond 7th day of life, during the acute phase of the HIE. Epilepsy occurred in 17.5% of cases with HIE grade II, only among those with neuromotor sequelae. The 1Q test did not show statistically significant difference between the HIE I, II without motor sequelae

  10. Successful treatment of encephalopathy and myoclonus with levetiracetam in a case of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel; Patel, Anup; Abou-Khalil, Bassel W; Pina-Garza, Jesus E

    2009-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a devastating progressive degenerative disease of the nervous system presumably caused by a persistent measles virus. Patients commonly present with myoclonia or encephalopathy. There are currently no known curative therapeutic options or effective symptomatic therapy. We treated a 12-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis who presented with acute encephalopathy and myoclonus. Electroencephalogram showed characteristic generalized periodic discharges. Levetiracetam produced dramatic improvement in both myoclonus and encephalopathy. The improvement was clear within 4 days. The electroencephalogram pattern showed improvement as well. Levetiracetam is a promising symptomatic therapy in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis for both the myoclonus and the encephalopathy. In this patient, it also appeared to improve the electroencephalographic pattern. We suggest that the generalized periodic discharges associated with the myoclonus contributed to the patient's encephalopathy.

  11. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemann, S; Glockshuber, R

    1998-09-18

    Scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) belong to a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals. Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the brain. The infectious agent, the 'prion,' is believed to be devoid of informational nucleic acid and to consist largely, if not entirely, of PrPSc. The PrP isoforms contain identical amino acid sequences yet differ in their overall secondary structure with the PrPSc isoform possessing a higher beta-sheet and lower alpha-helix content than PrPC. Elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of PrPC has provided important clues on the molecular basis of inherited human TSEs and on the species barrier phenomenon of TSEs. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of the conformational rearrangement of PrPC into PrPSc is still unknown, mainly due to the lack of detailed structural information on PrPSc. Within the framework of the 'protein only' hypothesis, two plausible models for the self-replication of prions have been suggested, the conformational model and the nucleation-dependent polymerization model.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Kadikoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by acute onset of headache, nausea, focal neurological deficits or seizures along with radiological findings of white matter defects in the parietal and occipital lobes. Causes of PRES include uremia, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia and immunosuppressive medications. Usually, the treat-ment of choice involves correcting the underlying abnormality. We describe an unusual case of recurrent PRES caused by uremia during a lupus flare in a patient with biopsy-proven Class IV Lupus Nephritis (LN with vasculitis. PRES in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE is a rare clin-ical phenomenon and, when reported, it is associated with hypertensive encephalopathy. Our patient did not have hypertensive crisis, but had uremic encephalopathy. The patient′s PRES-related symptoms resolved after initiation of hemodialysis. The temporal correlation of the correc-tion of the uremia and the resolution of the symptoms of PRES show the etiology to be uremic encephalopathy, making this the first reported case of uremia-induced PRES in Class IV LN with vasculitis.

  13. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Liere

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only.

  14. Potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Romain; de Montmollin, Etienne; Poujade, Julien; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Souweine, Bertrand; Darmon, Michael; Mariotte, Eric; Argaud, Laurent; Barbier, François; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Marcotte, Guillaume; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Jamali, Samir; Lacave, Guillaume; Ruckly, Stéphane; Mourvillier, Bruno; Timsit, Jean-François

    2017-08-01

    Identifying modifiable factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy may help improve patient care and outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective multicenter database. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) was defined by a score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) encephalopathy. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, site of infection, and type of admission, the following factors remained independently associated with sepsis-associated encephalopathy: acute renal failure [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.67], hypoglycemia 10 mmol/l (aOR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.72), hypercapnia >45 mmHg (aOR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.53-2.38), hypernatremia >145 mmol/l (aOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.48-3.57), and S. aureus (aOR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.25). Sepsis-associated encephalopathy was associated with higher mortality, higher use of ICU resources, and longer hospital stay. After adjusting for age, comorbidities, year of admission, and non-neurological SOFA score, even mild alteration of mental status (i.e., a score on the GCS of 13-14) remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% CI 1.09-1.76). Acute renal failure and common metabolic disturbances represent potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy. However, a true causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Our study confirms the prognostic significance of mild alteration of mental status in patients with sepsis.

  15. Trombosis de la vena yugular interna y mediastinitis aguda necrosante descendente debido a una faringoamigdalitis aguda Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and descending necrotizing mediastinitis due to acute pharyngotonsilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Sánchez Acedo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Lemierre es una patología muy infrecuente en la época actual, pero muy grave, y siempre debe considerarse ante un cuadro de fiebre con antecedente de infección orofaríngea, tumefacción laterocervical a lo largo del músculo esternocleidomastoideo y signos de sepsis. El diagnóstico de este síndrome es fundamentalmente clínico, y las pruebas complementarias tan sólo ayudan a confirmar el cuadro. Presentamos el caso de un varón de 31 años que acudió a urgencias con clínica de faringoamigdalitis junto con tumefacción en la región submandibular izquierda e importante dolor cervical ipsilateral, que mostró un deterioro rápido y progresivo del estado general pese al tratamiento antibiótico intravenoso. Finalmente tuvo que ser intervenido debido al desarrollo de mediastinitis aguda necrosante descendente desde la región pretiroidea hasta el diafragma, con trombosis de la vena yugular interna izquierda. Se le realizó toracotomía urgente y cervicotomía izquierda con drenaje de abundante material purulento y ligadura de la vena yugular interna.Lemierre syndrome is a potentially fatal condition after an oropharyngeal infection. It is characterized by thrombophlebitis of head and neck veins with systemic dissemination of septic emboli. The diagnosis of this syndrome is mainly clinical and complementary test only serve as aid to confirm it. We report an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 31-year-old man caused by Gemella spp. and Streptococcus pyogenes. It developed following a pharyngotonsillitis infection, which deteriorated rapidly and progressively despite intravenous antibiotic treatment. He finally had to be intervened due to developing acute descending necrotizing mediastinitis from the pre-thyroid region to the diaphragm, with thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. An urgent thoracotomy and left cervicotomy was performed, with drainage of abundant purulent material and ligature of the internal jugular vein

  16. Hyperammoneic encephalopathy, valproic acid, and benzodiazepine withdrawal: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starer, Jacquelyn; Chang, Grace

    2010-03-01

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal is accompanied by a risk of seizures, delirium, and death. While a gradual outpatient taper off of benzodiazepines is the most commonly recommended method for discontinuation, acute inpatient detoxification and seizure prophylaxis may be necessary for some. Complications related to the use of valproic acid for seizure prophylaxis are presented. The study's objectives are to highlight an uncommon and possibly unrecognized complication of valproic acid when used for seizure prophylaxis during acute inpatient detoxification from benzodiazepines in the context of current practice. Case series. Three patients with hyperammoneic encephalopathy are described. Hyperammoneic encephalopathy can occur as a distinct entity separate from hepatotoxicity with the use of valproic acid and may be an unrecognized complication among patients receiving this drug during benzodiazepine detoxification. A previously unreported complication among the addiction patient population is reported. This underscores the need for a better evidence base regarding the prevention of seizures during acute benzodiazepine detoxification, particularly in terms of indications, safety, and efficacy.

  17. Early use of noninvasive techniques for clearing respiratory secretions during noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinrong; Cui, Zhaobo; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Gao, Pan; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shufen; Li, Peipei

    2017-03-01

    Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) might be superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPDs). Inefficient clearance of respiratory secretions provokes NPPV failure in patients with hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This study compared CMV and NPPV combined with a noninvasive strategy for clearing secretions in HE and AECOPD patients.The present study is a prospective cohort study of AECOPD and HE patients enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 in a critical care unit of a major university teaching hospital in China.A total of 74 patients received NPPV and 90 patients received CMV. Inclusion criteria included the following: physician-diagnosed AECOPD, spontaneous airway clearance of excessive secretions, arterial blood gas analysis requiring intensive care, moderate-to-severe dyspnea, and a Kelly-Matthay scale score of 3 to 5. Exclusion criteria included the following: preexisting psychiatric/neurological disorders unrelated to HE, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, upper airway obstruction, acute coronary syndromes, preadmission tracheostomy or endotracheal intubation, and urgent endotracheal intubation for cardiovascular, psychomotor agitation, or severe hemodynamic conditions.Intensive care unit participants were managed by NPPV. Participants received standard treatment consisting of controlled oxygen therapy during NPPV-free periods; antibiotics, intravenous doxofylline, corticosteroids (e.g., salbutamol and ambroxol), and subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin; and therapy for comorbidities if necessary. Nasogastric tubes were inserted only in participants who developed gastric distension. No pharmacological sedation was administered.The primary and secondary outcome measures included comparative complication rates, durations of ventilation and hospitalization, number of invasive devices/patient, and in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates

  18. A Case of Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjit Tarafdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-years-old man on phenytoin, levetiracetam, and sodium valproate presented with acute confusion. Routine investigations including serum valproate and phenytoin concentration were normal. His serum ammonia concentration was raised. His valproate was held and 2 days later he recovered with concordant normalisation of serum ammonia concentration. Urea acid cycle disorder was ruled out, and a diagnosis of valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE was made. Asymptomatic hyperammonemia occurs in 15–50% of valproate-treated patients, and while the true incidence of VHE is not known, it is a recognized complication of sodium valproate treatment. VHE typically presents acutely with impaired consciousness, lethargy, and vomiting. Valproate concentrations may be in the therapeutic range, and liver function tests are typically “normal.” Treatment for VHE consists of ceasing valproate and providing supportive care. Some have advocated carnitine replacement.

  19. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  20. [Prevention of hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Rosa M; Sala, Marga; Planas, Ramon

    2014-06-06

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of cirrhosis which, in addition to producing a great social impact, deteriorates the quality of life of patients and is considered a sign of advanced liver disease and therefore a clinical indication for liver transplant evaluation. Patients who have had episodes of HE have a high risk of recurrence. Thus, after the HE episode resolves, it is recommended: control and prevention of precipitating factors (gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, use of diuretics with caution, avoid nervous system depressant medications), continued administration of non-absorbable disaccharides such as lactulose or lactitol, few or non-absorbable antibiotics such as rifaximin and assess the need for a liver transplant as the presence of a HE episode carries a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DARA, Naghi; SAYYARI, Ali-Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Objective As acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy. Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complication typically occurs in patients with severe comorbidities and needs multidisciplinary evaluation and care. Hepatic encephalopathy should be considered in any patient with acute liver failure and cirrhosis who presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, decrease level of consciousness (coma), change of personality, intellectual and behavioral deterioration, speech and motor dysfunction. Every cirrhotic patient may be at risk; potential precipitating factors should be addressed in regular clinic visits. The encephalopathy of liver disease may be prominent, or can be present in subtle forms, such as decline of school performance, emotional outbursts, or depression. “Subtle form” of hepatic encephalopathy may not be obvious on clinical examination, but can be detected by neurophysiologic and neuropsychiatric testing. PMID:24665321

  2. Sugihiratake mushroom (angel's wing mushroom)-induced cryptogenic encephalopathy may involve vitamin D analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hideki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yoshifumi; Kondo, Kazunari; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Kasahara, Yoshimasa; Maitani, Tamio

    2006-12-01

    In autumn 2004, many Japanese patients with renal failure developed cryptogenic encephalopathy by consuming sugihiratake mushroom, a Japanese delicacy. To elucidate the relationship between the cryptogenic cases and this mushroom, we conducted a multivariate analysis of metabolites in 'Probably Toxic' sugihiratake collected from the area of encephalopathy outbreaks, and 'Probably Safe' sugihiratake collected from unaffected areas using UPLC/ToF MS. The results indicate that the presence of milligram quantities of vitamin D-like compounds per 10 g of dried sugihiratake from the areas of encephalopathy outbreaks. Two hypotheses to induce the encephalopathy are proposed: the found metabolites are (1) vitamin D agonists, which induce acute and severe hypercalcemia and/or hyperammonemia and/or vitamin D toxicity, or (2) vitamin D antagonists, which induce acute and severe hypocalcemia.

  3. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the

  4. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... of the trials followed participants after the end of treatment. Only one trial reported adequate bias control; the remaining four trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Random-effects model meta-analyses showed that dopamine agents had no beneficial or detrimental effect on hepatic encephalopathy...

  5. Pure White Cell Aplasia and Necrotizing Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure white cell aplasia (PWCA is a rare hematologic disorder characterized by the absence of neutrophil lineages in the bone marrow with intact megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. PWCA has been associated with autoimmune, drug-induced, and viral exposures. Here, we report a case of a 74-year-old female who presented with severe proximal weakness without pain and was found to have PWCA with nonspecific inflammatory necrotizing myositis and acute liver injury on biopsies. These findings were associated with a recent course of azithromycin and her daily use of a statin. Myositis improved on prednisone but PWCA persisted. With intravenous immunoglobulin and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapies, her symptoms and neutrophil counts improved and were sustained for months.

  6. Granulomatous herpes simplex encephalitis in an infant with multicystic encephalopathy: a distinct clinicopathologic entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Peter W; Fauth, Clarissa T; Al-Rawahi, Ghada N; Pugash, Denise; White, Valerie A; Stockler, Sylvia; Dunham, Christopher P

    2014-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis can manifest as a range of clinical presentations including classic adult, neonatal, and biphasic chronic-granulomatous herpes encephalitis. We report an infant with granulomatous herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis with a subacute course and multicystic encephalopathy. A 2-month-old girl presented with lethargy and hypothermia. Computed tomography scan of the head showed multicystic encephalopathy and calcifications. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis by polymerase chain reaction testing for herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, enterovirus, and cytomegalovirus was negative. Normal cerebrospinal fluid interferon-α levels argued against Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The patient died 2 weeks after presentation. At autopsy, multicystic encephalopathy was confirmed with bilateral gliosis, granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated giant cells, and calcifications. Bilateral healing necrotizing retinitis suggested a viral etiology, but retina and brain were free of viral inclusions and immunohistochemically negative for herpes simplex virus-2 and cytomegalovirus. However, polymerase chain reaction analysis showed herpes simplex virus-2 DNA in four cerebral paraffin blocks. Subsequent repeat testing of the initial cerebrospinal fluid sample using a different polymerase chain reaction assay was weakly positive for herpes simplex virus-2 DNA. Granulomatous herpes simplex virus encephalitis in infants can present with subacute course and result in multicystic encephalopathy with mineralization and minimal cerebrospinal fluid herpes simplex virus DNA load. Infectious etiologies should be carefully investigated in the differential diagnosis of multicystic encephalopathy with mineralization, in particular if multinucleated giant cells are present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Necrotizing periodontitis in a heavy smoker and tobacco chewer - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Afaf; Mukhtar-Un-Nisar Andrabi, Syed; Qadri, Shagufta; Bey, Afshan

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing periodontitis is a distinct and specific disease characterized by rapidly progressing ulceration of the interdental gingiva and then spreading along the gingival margins and leading to acute destruction of periodontal tissues. Necrotizing ulcerative gingival lesions are common in developing countries because of poor nutritional status, poor oral hygiene and debilitating conditions. In the developed world it is mostly seen in patients with the HIV infections and other immune system dysfunctions. The exact etiology of the necrotizing lesions is still unknown; however a fuso-spirochaetal infection along with weakened host immune system seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Presented is the case of acute necrotizing periodontitis in a 21 year old male patient with no systemic disease but a history of tobacco use (chewing and smoking) since 7 years. The patient was managed by conservative treatment followed by surgery for the correction of gingival defects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis following Episiotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Almarzouqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon condition in general practice but one that provokes serious morbidity. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis with relative sparing of skin and underlying muscle. Herein, we report a fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis in a young healthy woman after episiotomy. Case Report. A 17-year-old primigravida underwent a vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy. Necrotizing fasciitis was diagnosed on the 5th postpartum day, when the patient was referred to our tertiary care medical center. Surgical debridement was initiated together with antibiotics and followed by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The patient died due to septic shock after 16 hours from the referral. Conclusion. Delay of diagnosis and consequently the surgical debridement were most likely the reasons for maternal death. In puerperal period, a physician must consider necrotizing fasciitis as a possible diagnosis in any local sings of infection especially when accompanied by fever and/or tenderness. Early diagnosis is the key for low mortality and morbidity.

  9. Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema in a cat associated with necrotizing bronchopneumonia caused by feline herpesvirus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Sofie; Van Goethem, Bart; Saunders, Jimmy; Binst, Dominique; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard

    2011-10-01

    This report describes a 1-year-old cat with acute dyspnea. Thoracic radiography revealed a pneumomediastinum and severe subcutaneous emphysema. Lower airway surgical exploration was unable to determine the cause. At postmortem examination, acute necrotizing bronchopneumonia and fibrinonecrotic tracheitis due to feline herpesvirus-1 were diagnosed.

  10. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, Oskar

    2011-12-12

    Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  11. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover VPB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vijay PB Grover, Joshua M Tognarelli, Nicolas Massie, Mary ME Crossey, Nicola A Cook, Simon D Taylor-Robinson Liver Unit, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhosis, ammonia, pathology, treatment, rifaximin, lactulose

  12. Hashimoto Encephalopathy in Case of Progressive Cognitive Impairment; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tafakhori

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE is a rare condition characterized by atypical psychiatric and heterogeneous neurological manifestations such as acute cerebral ischemia, seizure, tremors, myoclonus, psychosis, depression, cognitive disorders, and fluctuating loss of consciousness. Here, a case of 28 year-old man was reported who referred to the emergency department (ED with different acute neurologic disorders and final diagnose of HE.

  13. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by total parental nutrition Encefalopatía de Wernicke asociada a nutrición parenteral total

    OpenAIRE

    J. T. Sequeira Lopes da Silva; R. Almaraz Velarde; F. Olgado Ferrero; M. Robles Marcos; D. Pérez Civantos; Ramírez Moreno, J.M.; Luengo Pérez, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological syndrome due to thiamine deficiency, which is characterized by a typical triad of mental status changes, oculomotor dysfunction and ataxia. Despite the fact that Wernicke's encephalopathy, in developed countries, is frequently associated with chronic alcoholism, there have been a number of published cases associating this encephalopathy with parenteral feeding without vitamin supplementation. Diagnosis is primarily a clinical one, and can be ...

  14. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely.

  15. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  17. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  18. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, D R; Barros, C S L

    2013-09-01

    An 18-month-old Charolais cow developed depression and drooling and was submitted for necropsy after euthanasia. The cow was 1 of 50 moved between 2 farms approximately 5 days before the onset of clinical disease. Gross findings included swollen and hemorrhagic areas of malacia in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Microscopically there was a necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intranuclear astrocytic and neuronal eosinophilic viral inclusions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cerebral cortex as well as in the basal nuclei and thalamus. The gross and microscopic findings were consistent with necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by bovine herpesvirus (BHV-1 or BHV-5), and the diagnosis was confirmed by detection of bovine herpesviral antigen on fresh samples of brain via fluorescent antibody test using a monoclonal antibody against BHV-1 glycoprotein C.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın, Yasemin; Celayir, Ayşenur Cerrah; Aköz, Tayfun; Civan, Hasret Ayyıldız; Kurt, Gökmen; Ağzıkuru, Turgut; Sahin, Ceyhan

    2013-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis, involving subcutaneous tissues. This rare condition carries a high mortality rate and requires prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment with radical debridement and antibiotics; but early diagnosis, which is essential to successful treatment, remains a challenge. Physical examination findings, preoperative and operative findings, histopathological results of the structure, and follow-up results of the patient are discussed with related reports. A 15-month old girl had a history of trivial perineal dermatitis after treatment of anemia and pneumonia. Perineal dermatitis progressed fastly as necrotizing fasciitis which was successfully managed with intensive medical treatment, surgical debridement and reconstructive surgery. Lack of cutaneous findings early in the disease makes the diagnosis challenging, so a high suspicion is essential. Recovery of the patient from this life-threatening condition needs a multi-disciplinary approach involving pediatrics, pediatric surgery, and plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  20. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  1. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26331018

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  3. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  4. Clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Hoon; Han, Seung-A; Kong, Young Hwa; Kim, Sun Jun

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy according to the underlying etiologies in children. We retrospectively evaluated 33 pediatric patients who were diagnosed as having hypertensive encephalopathy in Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital. Among the patients, 18 were excluded because of incomplete data or because brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was not performed. Finally, 17 patients were enrolled and divided into a renal-origin hypertension group and a non-renal-origin hypertension group according to the underlying cause. We compared the clinical features and brain MRI findings between the 2 groups. The renal group included renal artery stenosis (4), acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (2), lupus nephritis (2), and acute renal failure (1); the nonrenal group included essential hypertension (4), pheochromocytoma (2), thyrotoxicosis (1), and acute promyelocytic leukemia (1). The mean systolic blood pressure of the renal group (172.5±36.9 mmHg) was higher than that of the nonrenal group (137.1±11.1 mmHg, Pencephalopathy syndrome (PRES), which is the most typical finding of hypertensive encephalopathy, was found predominantly in the renal group as compared with the nonrenal group (66.6% vs. 12.5%, Phypertension had a more severe clinical course than those with non-renal-origin hypertension. Furthermore, the renal-origin group was highly associated with PRES on brain MRI.

  5. Clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Hoon; Han, Seung-A; Kong, Young Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy according to the underlying etiologies in children. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 33 pediatric patients who were diagnosed as having hypertensive encephalopathy in Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital. Among the patients, 18 were excluded because of incomplete data or because brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was not performed. Finally, 17 patients were enrolled and divided into a renal-origin hypertension group and a non-renal-origin hypertension group according to the underlying cause. We compared the clinical features and brain MRI findings between the 2 groups. Results The renal group included renal artery stenosis (4), acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (2), lupus nephritis (2), and acute renal failure (1); the nonrenal group included essential hypertension (4), pheochromocytoma (2), thyrotoxicosis (1), and acute promyelocytic leukemia (1). The mean systolic blood pressure of the renal group (172.5±36.9 mmHg) was higher than that of the nonrenal group (137.1±11.1 mmHg, PSeizure was the most common neurologic symptom, especially in the renal group (Phypertensive encephalopathy, was found predominantly in the renal group as compared with the nonrenal group (66.6% vs. 12.5%, Phypertension had a more severe clinical course than those with non-renal-origin hypertension. Furthermore, the renal-origin group was highly associated with PRES on brain MRI. PMID:29042869

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: an urgent diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Maya, Silvia; Dualde Beltran, Delfina [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Lemercier, Pierre; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos [Hospital Politecnico y Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare, life-threatening soft-tissue infection and a medical and surgical emergency, with increasing incidence in the last few years. It is characterized by a rapidly spreading, progressive necrosis of the deep fascia and subcutaneous tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is often underestimated because of the lack of specific clinical findings in the initial stages of the disease. Many adjuncts such as laboratory findings, bedside tests - e.g., the ''finger test'' or biopsy - and imaging tests have been described as being helpful in the early recognition of the disease. Imaging is very useful to confirm the diagnosis, but also to assess the extent of the disorder, the potential surgical planning, and the detection of underlying etiologies. The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic, but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, best seen on magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  7. Metronidazole-Induced Encephalopathy in Chronic Diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Ashwathy; Trivedi, Trupti H; Moulick, Nivedita D; Joshi, Anagha R

    2015-06-01

    Metronidazole-induced encephalopathy (MIE) is a rare cause of drug-induced toxic encephalopathy. We report the clinical and neuroimaging findings of a patient with chronic diarrhoea who developed metronidazole-induced encephalopathy. After the drug was discontinued there was complete reversal of the condition.

  8. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy | van der Watt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encephalopathy may be a presenting sign in a wide range of medical conditions. This review focuses only on the diagnosis and initial management of those inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) prevalent in South Africa that may present with encephalopathy in childhood. Metabolic encephalopathy is a medical emergency, ...

  9. Hashimoto encephalopathy: Neurological and psychiatric perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE is an autoimmune disease with neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations and elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Patients are mostly women. Age varies from 8 to 86 years. Prevalence of HE is estimated to be 2.1/100,000. Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms and signs constitute the clinical picture. The disease responds well to corticosteroid therapy, but sometimes other immunomodulatory therapies must be applied. Autoimmune mechanisms with antibodies against antigens in the brain cortex are suspected. The course of the disease can be acute, subacute, chronic, or relapsing/remitting. Some patients improve spontaneously, but a few died in spite of adequate therapy.

  10. Medical image of the week: necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60-year-old man with a past medical history significant for coronary artery disease status post percutaneous coronary intervention was admitted to Banner University Medical Center for acute pancreatitis complicated by a pericardial effusion requiring pericardiocentesis. The following day, the patient developed severe shortness of breath requiring increasing amounts of supplemental oxygen. The patient was emergently transferred to ICU for noninvasive bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation, but he subsequently required intubation. Throughout his worsening condition, he denied any abdominal pain, only relaying ongoing substernal chest pain. His troponins, however, remained negative and echocardiography failed to show any reaccumulation of the pericardial effusion. CT scan of the chest failed to show any pulmonary embolism. But, CT abdomen displayed acute pancreatitis complicated by peripancreatic gas consistent with necrotizing pancreatitis (Figure 1. Emergent laparotomy was completed. There were no signs of stomach or duodenal perforation. Purulent fluid was removed from the lesser sac and ...

  11. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Anil C.; Garg, Hitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture. PMID:26041951

  13. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  14. Reversible encephalopathy associated with cholesterol embolism syndrome: magnetic resonance imaging and pathological findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreux, F; Marro, B; Khoury, N EI; Seilhean, D; Alamowitch, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a patient found to have acute diffuse and reversible encephalopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with cholesterol emboli syndrome (CES). The initial MRI showed extensive white matter, basal ganglia and cortical damage without evidence of brain infarction. Dramatic clinical and MRI improvement was observed with corticosteroids. Pathologically, cholesterol crystal emboli were found in the lumen of skin and brain arteries and were associated with varying degrees of inflammation of the arteriole wall. This case suggests that CES may be responsible for extensive, acute and reversible encephalopathy underlined by an inflammation of brain arteries. PMID:17229746

  15. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Somerville, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep has not been identified under natural conditions at the time of writing and remains a hypothetical issue. However, rumours about the possible finding of a BSE-like isolate in sheep have led to great unrest within the sheep industry, among the general

  16. Epidemiological features and risk factors of sepsis-associated encephalopathy in intensive care unit patients: 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-na; Wang, Xiao-ting; Ai, Yu-hang; Guo, Qu-lian; Huang, Li; Liu, Zhi-yong; Yao, Bo

    2012-03-01

    Encephalopathy is a common complication of sepsis, and its onset can occur at any stage of sepsis and implies worse prognosis. However, the incidence, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of sepsis-associated encephalopathy remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological features and risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Our retrospective study included all patients with sepsis admitted to our intensive care unit from 2008 to 2011. After excluding 91 patients, 232 patients were assigned to either a sepsis-associated encephalopathy group or sepsis without encephalopathy group. Between-group differences in baseline patient data including vital signs, disease severity, pathogens, sites of infection, biochemical indicators, and time on a mechanical ventilator, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and 28-day mortality rate were analyzed. The incidence of sepsis-associated encephalopathy was 17.7%. The sepsis-associated encephalopathy group had significantly higher 28-day mortality (56.1% vs. 35.1%; P=0.013), spent a significantly longer time on a ventilator ((8.2±2.2) days vs. (2.9±0.4) days; P=0.021), and had a significantly longer ICU stay ((12.4±2.4) days vs. (7.1±0.6) days; P=0.042). Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score, Glasgow coma scale, heart rate, blood lactate, serum sodium, platelets, serum albumin, and pH values were related to the presence of encephalopathy. Patients with biliary tract infections and intestinal infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Acinetobacter spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were more prone to develop sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Encephalopathy increases mortality rate in septic patients. Clinical intervention to reduce risk factors and thereby morbidity and mortality depends on a correct understanding of the differences between patients with sepsis and patients with both sepsis and encephalopathy.

  17. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  18. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Carmona-Aparicio

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  19. Constipation, renovascular hypertension, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Malavika; Wetzler, Graciela; Holtmann, Julia; Dapul, Heda; Kupferman, Juan C

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological entity characterized by variable associations of headaches, encephalopathy, seizures, vomiting, visual disturbance, and focal neurological signs. Neuroimaging shows cerebral edema of different patterns, classically involving the parieto-occipital white matter. PRES has been associated with several conditions predominantly hypertension, eclampsia, and immunosuppressive therapy. However, constipation has not been previously described in association with the development of PRES. In this report, we describe an 11-year-old child with history of severe functional constipation who developed PRES, as a consequence of renovascular hypertension from severe fecal impaction. Both hypertension and neurologic dysfunction resolved after resolution of fecal impaction. Severe functional constipation is a previously unrecognized cause of severe acute hypertension, resulting in life-threatening neurologic dysfunction. We highlight this unrecognized complication of severe functional constipation with fecal impaction that is potentially preventable if managed appropriately.

  20. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and motor neuron disease: a common autoimmune pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzheim, Michael; Feucht, Jeanine; Pauleit, Dirk; Pöhlau, Dieter

    2006-09-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare complication of autoimmune thyroiditis not associated with thyroidal function decline. We report a 50-year-old man presenting with lower motor neuron symptoms evolving over 3 years and changes in behavior associated with attentive and cognitive impairment occurring in the last few months. Memory deficits, emotional instability, marked dysarthria, mild symmetric weakness of the lower extremities and fasciculations were the most striking clinical features. EEG was diffusely slow, cranial MRI revealed multiple subcortical white matter lesions, CSF protein was slightly elevated, electromyographic recordings showed acute and chronic denervation and extremely high TPO antibody titers were found in the serum. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and lower motor neuron disease were diagnosed. As repeated high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone administration followed by oral tapering improved both central nervous system and lower motor neuron symptoms, the question was raised whether there was a common autoimmune pathogenesis of both clinically distinct diseases.

  1. Diabetic Muscle Infarction Masquerading as Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Janga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old male patient with past medical history of diabetes mellitus (DM, end stage renal disease (ESRD on hemodialysis (HD, congestive heart failure (CHF, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, and chronic anemia presented with complaints of left thigh pain. A computerized tomogram (CT of the thigh revealed evidence of edema with no evidence of a focal collection or gas formation noted. The patient’s clinical symptoms persisted and he underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of his thigh which was reported to show small areas of muscle necrosis with fluid collection. These findings in the acute setting concerned necrotizing fasciitis. After careful discussion following a multidisciplinary approach, a decision was made to perform a fasciotomy with tissue debridement. The patient was treated with IV antibiotics and discharged with a vacuum assisted wound drain. The surgical pathology revealed evidence of muscle edema with necrosis. Seven weeks later the patient presented with similar complaints on the other thigh (right thigh. MRI of the thighs revealed worsening edema with features suggestive of myositis and possible muscle infarction. A CT guided biopsy of the right quadriceps muscle revealed fibrotic interstitial connective tissue and no evidence of necrosis. This favored a diagnosis of diabetic muscle infarction. The disease was managed with pain control, strict diabetes management, and aggressive dialysis.

  2. Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft tissue infection that results in rapid local tissue destruction. Type 1 necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by polymicrobial, synergistic infections that are caused by non-Group A streptococci, aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Type 2 necrotizing fasciitis involves Group A Streptococcus (GAS with or without a coexisting staphylococcal infection. Here we provide the first report of necrotizing fasciitis jointly associated with the microbes Group B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. S. lugdunensis is a commensal human skin bacterium known to cause often painful and prolonged skin and soft tissue infections. To our knowledge, however, this is the first case of Staph. lugdunensis-associated necrotizing fasciitis to be reported in the literature.

  3. A fatal case of multidrug resistant acinetobacter necrotizing fasciitis: the changing scary face of nosocomial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nupur; Niazi, Masooma; Lvovsky, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  4. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. Metabolic encephalopathies in the critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A

    2012-06-01

    This article summarizes the most common etiologies and approaches to management of metabolic encephalopathy. Metabolic encephalopathy is a frequent occurrence in the intensive care unit setting. Common etiologies include hepatic failure, renal failure, sepsis, electrolyte disarray, and Wernicke encephalopathy. Current treatment paradigms typically focus on supportive care and management of the underlying etiology. Directed therapies that target neurochemical and neurotransmitter pathways that mediate encephalopathy are not currently available and represent an important area for future research. Although commonly thought of as reversible neurologic insults, delirium and encephalopathy have been associated with increased mortality, prolonged length of stay and hospital complications, and worse long-term cognitive and functional outcomes. Recognition and treatment of encephalopathy is critical to improving outcomes in critically ill patients.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy), ...

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and hypomagnesemia: A frequent association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardain, A; Mesnage, V; Alamowitch, S; Bourdain, F; Crozier, S; Lenglet, T; Psimaras, D; Demeret, S; Graveleau, P; Hoang-Xuan, K; Levy, R

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a serious neurological condition encountered in various medical fields. Pathophysiological factor(s) common to PRES cases of apparently unrelated etiologies are yet to be found. Based on the hypothesis that hypomagnesemia might participate in the cascade leading to PRES, our study sought to verify whether hypomagnesemia is frequently associated with PRES regardless of etiology. From a retrospective study of a cohort of 57 patients presenting with PRES of different etiologies, presented here are the findings of 19 patients with available serum magnesium levels (SMLs) during PRES. In the acute phase of PRES, hypomagnesemia was present in all 19 patients in spite of differences in etiology (including immunosuppressive drugs, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematosus, iatrogenic etiology and unknown). SMLs were within normal ranges prior to PRES and below normal ranges during the first 48h of PRES, with a significant decrease in SMLs during the acute phase. In this retrospective study, constant hypomagnesemia was observed during the acute phase of PRES regardless of its etiology. These results now require larger studies to assess the particular importance of acute hypomagnesemia in PRES and especially the possible need to treat PRES with magnesium sulfate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Micturitional disturbance in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Yasuda, K; Yamanishi, T; Tojo, M; Mori, M

    1997-01-01

    A 24-year-old pregnant woman started to have hyperemesis gravidarum 6 weeks before admission. Four weeks later she had vertigo, diplopia, staggering gait, mild dyspnea, dysphagia, and incontinence of urine. On admission she presented with ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, ataxia, decreased tendon reflex, and memory disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormal intensities in medial thalamic-hypothalamic regions and the periaqueductal area, and she was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. Urodynamic studies revealed decreased bladder volume and detrusor hyperreflexia. Six weeks after the administration of 100 mg/day of thiamine, urge incontinence gradually recovered, together with neurological signs. Lesions of the medial thalamic-hypothalamic area and the periaqueductal gray matter seemed to be mainly responsible for micturitional disturbance in our patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  9. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  10. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Suvasini Sharma; Manjari Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  11. Haematoma in the transverse mesocolon secondary to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of acute haematoma of the transverse mesocolon secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis is presented. with a brief discussion of the pathogenesis and computed tomographic findings. The value of computed tomography in acute complicated pancreatitis is emphasized.

  12. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Yuezhou Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies. Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category.

  13. Hypertensive Encephalopathy with Reversible Brainstem Edema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sungjoon; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Hoon

    2013-01-01

    .... The patient's condition was thus interpreted as hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. While many consider this a vasogenic phenomenon, induced by sudden, severe hypertension, the precise mechanism remains unclear...

  14. Candida albicans-associated necrotizing vasculitis producing life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sargent, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Patients undergoing treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at risk for fungal infections including disseminated candidiasis. We describe a case of systemic Candida albicans infection associated with life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to unusual necrotizing vasculitis involving the gastrointestinal tract. We explore the association between Candida and such vasculopathy.

  15. Venlafaxine as single therapy associated with hypertensive encephalopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bengt Edvardsson

    2015-01-01

      Introduction Hypertensive encephalopathy with the clinicoradiological entity posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the setting of venlafaxine as single therapy has not been reported earlier...

  16. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  17. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  18. Recent advances in the surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Kemppainen, Esko

    2005-08-01

    To summarize advances and new concepts in the surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis published within the past year with emphasis on the evolving importance of the recognition of abdominal compartment syndrome as a significant contributor to early development of organ failure. Underdiagnosed and untreated, abdominal compartment syndrome is a potential contributing factor to the development of early organ failure in patients with severe acute pancreatitis and warrants routine measurement of intra-abdominal pressure in patients treated for severe pancreatitis. The current estimate of the prevalence of intra-abdominal hypertension in severe acute pancreatitis is about 40%, with about 10% overall developing abdominal compartment syndrome, associated with increased hospital mortality rates. Early surgical decompression without exploring the pancreas further seems to be the most effective treatment. Primary fascial closure of the abdominal wall following abdominal decompression can be attempted, but in most cases the prolonged inflammatory process in the abdomen and the risk of recurrent abdominal compartment syndrome favors use of gradual closure or delayed reconstruction of the abdominal wall. Recent studies confirm the overall validity of the established surgical principles for necrotizing pancreatitis: delayed necrosectomy in patients with infected peripancreatic necrosis, mostly nonoperative management of sterile necrosis, and delayed cholecystectomy in severe gallstone-associated pancreatitis. The role of abdominal compartment syndrome as an important contributing factor to early development of multiple organ failure and the potential benefit of surgical decompression are gaining support from recent reports and should be carefully assessed in future studies.

  19. Papulo Necrotic Tuberculid on Glans Penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pavithran

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of papulo-necrotic tuberculids affecting only glans penis is described. A positive Mantoux test, characteristic histology and response to anti tuberculous drugs confirmed the diagnosis.

  20. Fatal encephalopathy complicating persistent vomiting in pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care to a patient with persistent HEG resulted in a fatal metabolic encephalopathy with neurological signs probably in ... Fatal encephalopathy complicating persistent vomiting in pregnancy: Importance of clinical awareness on the .... Since assessment of serum thia mine levels is not routinely available, the diagnosis of WE ...

  1. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  2. Normalization of the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share ... encephalopathy score (PHES) and evaluate the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) among .... that can affect cognitive function; (3) diabetes mellitus;. (4) significant comorbid illness ...

  3. Ganciclovir-induced ataxia and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlmann, M C; Stiksma, J; Kramer, M H H

    2016-12-01

    Ganciclovir can be used to treat a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, however it can cause side effects. We describe a 60-year-old immunocompromised woman with a primary CMV infection who was treated with ganciclovir. She developed an encephalopathy which resolved after discontinuation of ganciclovir. A reversible encephalopathy as a side effect of ganciclovir.

  4. Pellagra encephalopathy in the context of alcoholism: review and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Marta; Olivares, José M; Berrios, German E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review and describe the Alcoholic Pellagra Encephalopathy, a severe neuropsychiatric condition caused by a combination of niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency and alcohol abuse. PsychInfo, Medline and Embase databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies addressing this illness. A historical and conceptual review of the psychopathological aspects of this condition is offered, followed by the report of a patient with a history of chronic alcohol consumption showing signs of pellagra, delusions and visual hallucinations, which was treated successfully with niacin. Pellagra encephalopathy should still be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute psychotic disorders seen in the context of chronic alcoholism.

  5. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  6. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eWassink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the primary phase, many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short latent phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a secondary deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the ‘execution’ phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection.

  7. Predictive factors for successful ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage in necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Li, Ang; Hu, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) is now regarded as an initial minimal access technique of step-up approach for necrotizing pancreatitis. Factors that led to surgical intervention after initial management with PCD have rarely been reported. This study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided PCD in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and identify a subgroup of patients where PCD alone would be effective. We performed a retrospective review of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis who underwent intervention in West China Hospital from January 1, 2009, to March 31, 2013. Patients who underwent initial PCD therapy had lower intra-abdominal bleeding rate (41/235 vs. 1/51, P = 0.002), lower enterocutaneous fistula rate (28/235 vs. 0/51, P = 0.004), and lower mortality rate (46/235 vs. 3/51, P = 0.001) when compared with the patients who underwent operative intervention. The successful PCD group had lower computed tomography (CT) mean density of necrotic fluid collection (18 HU vs. 25 HU, P = 0.01) and higher prevalence of walled-off necrosis (20/35 vs. 5/16, P = 0.04) when compared with failed PCD group. Multivariate analysis of the predictors of surgery showed that only CT mean density of necrotic fluid collection [odd ratio (OR) 1.63, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04-2.94, P = 0.006] was identified as significant factor. CT mean density of necrotic fluid collection and the existence of acute necrotic collection could influence the success rate of PCD.

  8. Reversible hemianopsia in postpartum due to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in pregnant with late eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Marta Ribeiro; Sussela, Alex Oliboni; Marrone, Luiz Carlos Porcello; Costa, Bartira Ercília Pinheiro da; Poli-de-Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo; Gadonski, Giovani

    2016-06-01

    To describe a case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome diagnosed in pregnant women with late-eclampsia, as well as its clinical management. A 34 years old patient in her third pregnancy had started with high blood pressure levels during labor; after eleven days postpartum, she presented a decreased right visual acuity; subsequently one episode of seizure followed by partial loss of vision in the right eye. After conducting tests and ruled out stroke, the patient was diagnosed as Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES). Established the clinical management of seizures and hypertensive crisis, there was complete remission of symptoms and reversal of the initial clinical picture. Once properly diagnosed and treated, the Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome can present satisfactory progress, especially when associated with an acutely triggered factor, as eclampsia.

  9. Autoimmune encephalopathy associated with thyroid autoantibodies as the cause of reversible cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dobbin Chow

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We herewith describe a patient with acute confusion, expressive aphasia and generalized seizures. A through workup excluded most causes of encephalopathy. He was, however, found to have TSH = 18.6 MIU/ml, T3reverse = 0.44nmol/L, T4 = 0.8ng/dl and Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB titer >1000 IU/ml. Based on the above findings the patient was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy and his mental status showed dramatic improvement (MMS 30/30 with high dose prednisone. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rare disorder of presumed autoimmune origin characterized by cognitive decline, seizures, neuro-psychiatric symptoms, high titers of Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB, and a positive response to steroids.

  10. RECENT THEORIES OF PATHOGENESIS OF HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN HEPATITIS C VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Popović Dragonjić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is potentially reversible, or progressive neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior and personality changes, and transient neurologic symptoms and characteristic electroencephalographic patterns associated with acute and chronic liver failure. For some time, there has been controversy regarding the origin of toxins responsible for the change of mental state. It was found that the occurrence of hepatic encephalopathy is responsible for multiple organ peripheral changes (intestinal changes, abnormalities of portal-systemic circulation, liver failure, loss of muscle tissue, changes in brain intracellular communication (osmotic changes, astrocytes and axonal abnormalities in communication, changes in cerebral perfusion and ammonia, endogenous benzodiazepines, gamma amino butyric acid, derivatives of methionine and false neurotransmitters. The aforementioned metabolic factors that contribute to the development of hepatic encephalopathy are not mutually exclusive and multiple factors may be present at the same time.

  11. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung [Young-Deung-Po City Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-07-15

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study.

  12. Wernicke encephalopathy: MR findings and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidauer, Stefan; Nichtweiss, Michael; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E

    2003-05-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. The aim of the study was to analyse MRI findings typical for this disease and to evaluate the significance of their correlations with clinical symptoms. Magnetic resonance images and clinical features of 12 patients with WE were analysed. The patients underwent MR imaging within 3-14 days after onset of clinical symptoms. In 7 of 12 patients MR imaging showed symmetrical diencephalic and midbrain lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images from 5 of 9 patients examined during the initial 6 days of acute WE showed a subtle enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the tectal plate, the periaqueductal area and the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei. In addition, T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images revealed hyperintense signals in these regions (except for 2 patients where the mamillary bodies were normal). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images without any enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images were detected in 2 patients by MR imaging performed 11 or 14 days after onset of WE. Patients with hyperintensities on T2-weighted images of the periventricular region of the third ventricle and the paramedian thalamic nuclei had poor recovery from their mental dysfunction. The MR examination in case of WE shows a typical pattern of lesions in 58% of cases. Enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei, and the periaqueductal area on postcontrast T1-weighted images can be observed in the initial period after clinical onset of symptoms and are characteristic signs of the acute stage of WE. Hyperintense lesions in the periventricular region and the paramedian thalamic nuclei on T2-weighted and FLAIR images in the subacute stage of WE and enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images of the mamillary bodies and the

  13. Wernicke encephalopathy: MR findings and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, Stefan; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Nichtweiss, Michael [Department of Neurology, Municipal Hospital of Wismar, Wismar (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. The aim of the study was to analyse MRI findings typical for this disease and to evaluate the significance of their correlations with clinical symptoms. Magnetic resonance images and clinical features of 12 patients with WE were analysed. The patients underwent MR imaging within 3-14 days after onset of clinical symptoms. In 7 of 12 patients MR imaging showed symmetrical diencephalic and midbrain lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images from 5 of 9 patients examined during the initial 6 days of acute WE showed a subtle enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the tectal plate, the periaqueductal area and the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei. In addition, T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images revealed hyperintense signals in these regions (except for 2 patients where the mamillary bodies were normal). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images without any enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images were detected in 2 patients by MR imaging performed 11 or 14 days after onset of WE. Patients with hyperintensities on T2-weighted images of the periventricular region of the third ventricle and the paramedian thalamic nuclei had poor recovery from their mental dysfunction. The MR examination in case of WE shows a typical pattern of lesions in 58% of cases. Enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei, and the periaqueductal area on postcontrast T1-weighted images can be observed in the initial period after clinical onset of symptoms and are characteristic signs of the acute stage of WE. Hyperintense lesions in the periventricular region and the paramedian thalamic nuclei on T2-weighted and FLAIR images in the subacute stage of WE and enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images of the mamillary bodies and the

  14. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships.

  15. Necrotizing soft-tissue infection: laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing soft tissue infections score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Madhuri; Vijay Kumar, Gs; Sowmya, Gs; Madhu, Cp; Ramya, Sr

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) can be rapidly progressive and polymicrobial in etiology. Establishing the element of necrotizing infection poses a clinical challenge. A 64-year-old diabetic patient presented to our hospital with a gangrenous patch on anterior abdominal wall, which progressed to an extensive necrotizing lesion within 1 week. Successive laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing softtissue infections (LRINEC) scores confirmed the necrotizing element. Cultures yielded Enterococci, Acinetobacter species and Apophysomyces elegans and the latter being considered as an emerging agent of Zygomycosis in immunocompromised hosts. Patient was managed with antibiotics, antifungal treatment and surgical debridement despite which he succumbed to the infection. NSTI's require an early and aggressive management and LRINEC score can be applied to establish the element of necrotizing pathology. Isolation of multiple organisms becomes confusing to establish the etiological role. Apophysomyces elegans, which was isolated in our patient is being increasingly reported in cases of necrotizing infections and may be responsible for high morbidity and mortality. This scoring has been proposed as an adjunct tool to Microbiological diagnosis when NSTI's need to be diagnosed early and managed promptly to decrease mortality and morbidity, which however may not come in handy in an immunocompromised host with polymicrobial aggressive infection.

  16. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transient and reversible neurological disorder clinically characterised by headache, seizures, blindness and altered consciousness associated with radiological ... presented with transient encephalopathy following blood transfusion but involving the anterior brain rather than the posterior part classically described in PRES.

  18. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy associated with crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweikat, Imad; Naser, Enas; Damsah, Nadera; Libdeh, Bassam Abu; Bakri, Izzeddin

    2012-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ETHE1 gene and characterized by chronic diarrhea, encephalopathy, relapsing petechiae and acrocyanosis. Nephrotic syndrome has been described in an infant with EE but the renal histology findings were not described in previous reports. We report a Palestinian girl with EE who presented with chronic diarrhea, encephalopathy, petechial rash and acrocyanosis. Subsequently, she developed progressive deterioration of renal function caused by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis resulting in death within few days. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported occurrence of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in a child with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Its presence is a serious complication associated with poor prognosis and may be explained by the diffuse vascular damage.

  19. Acute esophageal necrosis: a case report and review | Lahbabi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute esophageal necrosis, commonly referred to as "black esophagus" or "acute necrotizing esophagitis", is a rare clinical disorder with an unclear etiology. The definition excludes patients with a history of recent caustic ingestion. Oesophageal necrosis can be diagnosed at endoscopy by the presence of black necroting ...

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  1. Duloxetine-related posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zappella, Nathalie; Perier, Fran?ois; Pico, Fernando; Palette, Catherine; Muret, Alexandre; Merceron, Sybille; Girbovan, Andrei; Marquion, Fabien; Legriel,Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has well-established links with several drugs. Whether a link also exists with serotonin?norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor such as duloxetine is unclear. Methods: We report on a patient who developed PRES with a coma and myoclonus related to hypertensive encephalopathy a few days after starting duloxetine treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and catecholamine metabolites assayed. Results: The patient achie...

  2. Minimally invasive 'step-up approach' versus maximal necrosectomy in patients with acute necrotising pancreatitis (PANTER trial) : Design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial [ISRCTN38327949

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Besselink (Marc); H.C. van Santvoort (Hjalmar); V.B. Nieuwenhuijs (Vincent); M.A. Boermeester (Marja); T.L. Bollen (Thomas); E. Buskens (Erik); C.H. Dejong (Cees); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); H. van Goor (Harry); S. Hofker (Sijbrand); J.S. Laméris (Johan ); M.S. Leeuwen (Maarten); R.J. Ploeg (Rutger); B. van Ramshorst (Bert); A.F.M. Schaapherder (Alexander); M.A. Cuesta (Miguel); E.C. Consten (Esther); D.J. Gouma (Dirk); E. van der Harst (Erwin); E.J. Hesselink (Eric); L.P.J. Houdijk (Lex P.); T.M. Karsten (Thomas); C.J. van Laarhoven (Cees); J.-P.E.N. Pierie (Jean-Pierre); C. Rosman (Camiel); E.J.S. Bilgen; R. Timmer (Robin); I. van der Tweel (Ingeborg); R.J. de Wit (Ralph ); B.J.M. Witteman (Ben); H.G. Gooszen (Hein)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The initial treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis is conservative. Intervention is indicated in patients with (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the Netherlands, the standard intervention is necrosectomy by laparotomy followed by continuous postoperative

  3. Necrotizing gastritis associated with Clostridium septicum in a rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Janet; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis; Diab, Santiago S; Uzal, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of histotoxic infections, including malignant edema and braxy (necrotizing abomasitis) in several animal species. The carcass of a 2-year-old, female New Zealand white rabbit with a history of acute depression and obtundation followed by death was received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (San Bernardino, California) for necropsy and diagnostic workup. No gross lesions were detected at necropsy. Microscopically, there was moderate to severe, multifocal fibrinonecrotizing, transmural gastritis with numerous intralesional Gram-positive, sporulated rods, and disseminated thrombosis of the brain, lungs, heart, and liver, with occasional intravascular rods. The rods observed within the gastric wall and thrombi in the stomach and lung were positive for C. septicum by immunohistochemical staining. However, this microorganism was not isolated from stomach content. Clostridium septicum should be included in the list of possible etiologies of gastritis in rabbits. © 2014 The Author(s).

  4. Differentiation of ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy isolate types, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and CH1641 scrapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.G.; Sauer, M.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Tang, Y.; Bossers, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    With increased awareness of the diversity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains in the ruminant population, comes an appreciation of the need for improved methods of differential diagnosis. Exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been associated with the human TSE,

  5. Necrotizing Soft-Tissue Infections: Clinical Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    streptococcal toxic shock syndrome associated with necrotizing fasciitis: case re- port and review. Pharmacotherapy 1999;19:1094–8. 36. Simmonds M. Necrotising...fasciitis and group A streptococ- cus toxic shock-like syndrome in pregnancy : treatment with plasmapheresis and immunoglobulin. Int J Obstet Anesth

  6. Intestinal proteome changes during infant necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Smith, Birgitte; Qvist, Niels

    2013-01-01

    between necrotic and vital small-intestine sections and 23 proteins were identified for colon sections. Five proteins were similarly affected in the small intestine and colon: histamine receptors (HRs), actins, globins, immunoglobulin, and antitrypsin. Two heat shock proteins (HSPs) were affected...

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  8. Acute periodontal lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Gonzalez, David; Alonso Álvarez, Bettina; Arriba de la Fuente, Lorenzo; Santa- Cruz Astorqui, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz Alonso, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    This is a review and update on acute conditions affecting the gingival tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases, and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious process not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, muco-cutanenous disorders, and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important since it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodo...

  9. Necrotic ulcer: a manifestation of leukemia cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Ayse Esra Koku; Saracoglu, Zeynep Nurhan; Sabuncu, Ilham; Ciftci, Evrim; Gulbas, Zafer; Isiksoy, Serap

    2012-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented to our dermatological clinic with a 3-month history of a wound on his leg. He complained of weakness for the past few months. On his dermatological examination he had a 3x3-cm necrotic ulcer on his left tibia (Figure 1). On physical examination, there was 1 x 1-cm axillary lymphadenopathy. There was no other lymph node enlargement, hepatosplenomegaly, or gingival hypertrophy. Peripheral blood results showed 2.4x103/mm3 leukocytes (normal range 4-11 x 103/mm3) with 66% neutrophils. The hemoglobin value was 10.1 g/dL (13-18 g/dL), and the platelet count was 63x103/mm3 (150-440 x 103/mm3). No blasts were detected in a peripheral blood smear. His lactate dehydrogenase level was 567 U/L (240-480 U/L). All other results of blood chemistry were within normal limits. Punch biopsy of the skin lesion showed ulceration and dense dermal acute and chronic inflammation. There was a superficial and deep perivascular and periadnexal infiltrate of neoplastic cells composed of relatively abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm and large nuclei with blastic chromatin and occasional small nucleoli (Figure 2). Mitotic figures were prominent. Immunohistochemical stains were performed, and the neoplastic cells were CD3, CD20, CD138, and S100 protein negative. Myeloperoxidase and CD68 were positive. The histopathological findings were consistent with leukemic infiltration. Examination of bone marrow biopsy revealed that the blastic cells constituted more than 20% of the bone marrow cellularity. Cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow aspiration with fluorescence in situ hybridization was negative for inversion 16, t(8;21) and t(15;7). Histochemical stains for myeloperoxidase, sudan black, periodic acid-Schiff, and alpha naphthyl acetate were also negative. Blastic cells were DR, CD13, CD117, and CD34 positive and CD5, CD7, CD10, CD14, CD19, CD20, CD33, CD41, CD56, CD64, and CD79 negative according to flow cytometry immunophenotyping. Blastic cells were 35% in the bone

  10. Necrotizing hepatitis associated with Clostridium novyi in a pony in western Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Jennifer L.; Uzal, Francesco A.; Whitehead, Ashley E.

    2017-01-01

    Severe icterus, peritoneal effusion, localized fibrinous peritonitis, and necrotizing hepatitis were found at necropsy of a 20-year-old female pony with a history of acute onset depression, inappetence, fever, and marked elevation in hepatic enzymes. Gross pathology, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry were compatible with a diagnosis of clostridial hepatitis caused by Clostridium novyi-group bacteria. This is believed to be the first reported case of clostridial hepatitis in an equid in...

  11. Case Report: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in two Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of central nervous system in children with typhoid fever is common. However, encephalopathy with focal neurological signs, coma and cerebellitis is rare. We report two children from the South-western part of Nigeria with blood culture proven typhoid fever who developed encephalopathy and acute ...

  12. Necrotizing ulcerative periodontal diseases in children and young adults in Medellín, Colombia, 1965--2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, L Mario; Duque, Francisco L; Baer, Paul N; Jiménez, Sol Beatriz

    2005-04-01

    Previous findings that necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is a precursor to noma or cancrum oris were confirmed by the follow-up of these clinical conditions in a study of 45 Colombian patients: necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG, n = 29), necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis (NUP, n = 7) and noma (n = 9). Patients were diagnosed at the outpatient clinic of the School of Dentistry at the University of Antioquia, at the University Hospital Saint Vincent of Paul, at the Luz Castro de Gutierrez University Hospital, at the Red Cross Hospital and at the private office of one of the authors (Jiménez L., M) in Medellín, Colombia, from 1965 until 2000. Almost all the patients came from low socioeconomic groups and presented with predisposing and/or contributing factors, such as acute herpetic gingivostomatitis, measles, and leukemia (including acute lymphoblastic and chronic lymphoid leukemia). Malnutrition and poor oral hygiene were associated with the necrotizing process and favored progression from the gingiva to deeper periodontal tissues and other structures within the oral cavity or the facial tissues. No patients had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS, which makes these findings different from other reports. Noma can be prevented by vaccinating children against infectious diseases, by controlling malnutrition and by improving their oral hygiene. It is arrested by mechanical lesion debridement, improving oral hygiene and antibiotic therapy. Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis may progress in some cases to ulcerative necrotizing stomatitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis, and, finally, to noma. Microbial studies among new Colombian NUG, NUP and noma patients are necessary, using bacterial culturing and identification methods and molecular techniques such as PCR for viruses and bacteria, in order to establish the exact nature of these lesions.

  13. Prediction of outcome and selection of the liver transplantat candidate in acute liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadem, Johannes; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is characterized by a sudden and severe deterioration of liver function, typically mirrored by a marked increase of the international normalized ratio (INR) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Due to various possible causes hepatocytes get damaged via either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. Anticipating the natural prognosis of a patient with ALF is one of the most challenging tasks in hepatology critical care. Important factors that influence the chance of spontaneous recovery are the underlying etiology of acute liver failure, the acuity of disease, and the severity of HE. Once an estimation of the prognosis in the individual patient has been made, this quickly has to be integrated in the discussion whether high-urgency liver transplantation is necessary and justifiable. This decision has to cover several medical, social, and organizational issues. Well organized liver transplantation programs around the world have achieved an impressive improvement of the 1 year survival rate in ALF from around 40% without transplantation up to nearly 80% with transplantation. The recent debate on whether severe acute alcoholic hepatitis could represent a new candidate eligible for high-urgency liver transplantation shows that the topic is still open for discussion. PMID:22973230

  14. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis: A case report with images and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Lemos Moura

    Full Text Available Summary Necrotizing pancreatitis with fluid collections can occur as a complication of acute pancreatitis. The management of these patients depends on the severity and involves multiple medical treatment modalities, as clinical intensive care and surgical intervention. In this article, we show a severe case of walled-off pancreatic necrosis that was conducted by endoscopic drainage with great clinical outcome.

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, M; Fugate, J E

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is increasingly diagnosed in the emergency department, and medical and surgical intensive care units. PRES is characterized by acute onset of neurologic symptoms in the setting of blood pressure fluctuations, eclampsia, autoimmune disease, transplantation, renal failure, or exposure to immunosuppressive or cytotoxic drugs, triggers known to admit patients to the intensive care unit (ICU). Although the exact pathophysiology remains unknown, there is growing consensus that PRES results from endothelial dysfunction. Because of the heterogeneous nature of the disorder, it is probable that different mechanisms of endothelial injury are etiologically important in different clinical situations. The presence of bilateral vasogenic edema on brain imaging, particularly in parieto-occipital regions, is of great diagnostic utility but PRES remains a clinical diagnosis. Although largely reversible, PRES can result in irreversible neurologic injury and even death. The range of clinical and radiographic manifestations of the syndrome is probably broader than previously thought, and it is imperative that clinicians become familiar with the full spectrum of the disorder, as prompt recognition and elimination of an inciting factor improve outcome. PRES may be the most frequent toxic-metabolic encephalopathy seen in the ICU. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Sorafenib and Successful Retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laruelle, Marie; Filleul, Bertrand; Duprez, Thierry; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-05

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiological syndrome characterized by acute hypertension, headache, decreased level of consciousness, visual disturbances and seizures associated with characteristic neuroimaging changes indicative of vasogenic edema of the posterior cerebral white matter. Several medical conditions have been associated with PRES including hypertensive encephalopathy and eclampsia. The use of cytotoxic and immunosuppressant drugs, such as those which target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), have also been implicated. We report here the case of a 71-year-old woman with metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma who developed PRES 3 months after commencing sorafenib. Elevated blood pressure (BP) was recorded, and MRI of the brain) of the brain showed asymmetric areas of increased signal intensity within the supratentorial white matter suggestive of PRES. Clinical and radiological features rapidly improved with BP control and discontinuation of sorafenib. Sorafenib was resumed with no sign of PRES recurrence. The present case report supports the hypothesis that, in selected patients, the re-introduction of anti-VEGF therapies after PRES is feasible. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Terlipressin-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy in a noncirrhotic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Kuang Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Terlipressin, an analogue of vasopressin, is frequently used for the management of esophageal varices bleeding and hepatorenal syndrome. Terlipressin therapy in portal hypertensive patients is frequently associated with hyponatremia, but is rarely accompanied with serious neurological manifestations. A 39-year-old female with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, liver metastasis, main portal vein thrombosis, and a history of esophageal varices presented to the emergency room because of hematemesis. Terlipressin was given with a loading dose of 2 mg followed by 1 mg every 6 hours. After a total of 6 mg terlipressin injection, she suffered from acute delirium. Pertinent examinations showed there was no gross brain lesion by computed tomography, whereas her serum sodium level dropped from baseline (136 mmol/L to 116 mmol/L with a serum osmolality of 256 mOsm/kg. At that time, urine sodium and urine osmolality were 142 mmol/L and 488 mOsm/kg, respectively. Under the tentative diagnosis of terlipressin-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy, terlipressin was withheld and hypertonic saline infusion was given. Within 12 hours, her serum sodium level recovered to 130 mmol/L and she gradually regained her cognitive functions. Although symptomatic hyponatremic encephalopathy is a rare complication of terlipressin treatment, close monitoring of serum electrolyte level is warranted in patients receiving terlipressin.

  18. A case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Uk Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after successful kidney transplantation. An 11-year-old girl presented with sudden onset of neurologic symptoms, hypertension, and psychiatric symptoms, with normal kidney function, after kidney transplantation. The symptoms improved after cessation of tacrolimus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory in the right frontal lobe. Three days later, she had normal mental function and maintained normal blood pressure with left hemiparesis. Follow-up MRI was performed on D19, showing new infarct lesions at both cerebral hemispheres. Ten days later, MRI showed further improvement, but brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed mild reduction of uptake in both the anterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. One month after onset of symptoms, angiography showed complete resolution of stenosis. However, presenting as a mild fine motor disability of both hands and mild dysarthria, what had been atrophy at both centrum semiovale at 4 months now showed progression to encephalomalacia. There are two points of interest in this case. First, encephalopathy occurred after administration of tacrolimus and improved after discontinuation of the drug. Second, the development of right-side hemiplegia could not be explained by conventional MRI; but through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT of white matter tract, visualization was possible.

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  1. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  2. Joseph Haydn's encephalopathy: new aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahak, Christian; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    With increasing age, Joseph Haydn complained of progressive forgetfulness preventing him from composing for about the last 8 years of his life. He spent his days more and more inactive and immobilized, suffering from a disabling gait disturbance. Still, most biographers consider diffuse atherosclerosis and congestive heart failure to be reasons for Haydn's medical condition and physical decline during the last years of his life. A more sophisticated and detailed inspection of documents and sources, however, leads to the diagnosis of subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), caused by progressive cerebral small vessel disease. Important features of the disease are mood changes, urinary symptoms, and in particular a characteristic gait disturbance, while dementia is only mild and occurs later in the course. Haydn was severely disabled by the symptoms of SVE for several years and often reported difficulties in the completion of his last oratorio "Die Jahreszeiten" (The Seasons). Subsequently, the disease prevented him from composing another large oratorio, "Das jüngste Gericht" (The last judgement), which had been already drafted. Finally, the progress of SVE stopped his long career as a composer and conductor at the age of 73 years. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuromyelitis Optica in Pregnancy Complicated by Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Eclampsia and Fetal Death

    OpenAIRE

    Igel, Catherine; Garretto, Diana; Robbins, Matthew S.; Swerdlow, Michael; Judge, Nancy; Dayal, Ashlesha

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a demyelinating syndrome characterized by optic neuritis and acute myelitis with poor recovery and a progressive course. We report a poor outcome complicated by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and eclampsia and review available literature and current evidence for anticipation of adverse fetal and maternal effects. After a pregnancy complicated by multiple admissions for painful NMO exacerbations, a primiparous patient with seropositive NMO pre...

  4. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of ...

  5. Irreversible encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, M.V.R.; Hofmeijer, J.; Sikma, M.A.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole is rare and, in most cases, reversible following discontinuation. OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of fatal encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole and the potential causes of the irreversibility. CASE SUMMARY: A

  6. Irreversible Encephalopathy After Treatment With High-Dose Intravenous Metronidazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Miriam V. R.; Hofmeijer, Jannette; Sikma, Maaike A.; Meulenbelt, Jan

    Background: Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole is rare and, in most cases, reversible following discontinuation. Objective: We describe a case of fatal encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole and the potential causes of the irreversibility. Case summary: A

  7. Hypertensive encephalopathy in a patient with neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, MWH; Zweens, MJ; Bink, MTE; Odink, RJ

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism may give rise to serious cardiovascular complications. A girl with severe thyrotoxicosis in whom hypertensive encephalopathy developed is described. Conclusion Neonatal thyrotoxicosis can give rise to hypertension and may lead to hypertensive encephalopathy.

  8. Electroencephalography and Brain MRI Patterns in Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabulya, Angela; Lesser, Ronald P; Llinas, Rafael; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) and histology in patients with diffuse encephalopathy, Gloor et al reported that paroxysmal synchronous discharges (PSDs) on EEG required combined cortical gray (CG) and "subcortical" gray (SCG) matter pathology, while polymorphic delta activity (PDA) occurred in patients with white matter pathology. In patients with encephalopathy, we compared EEG findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if MRI reflected similar pathological EEG correlations. Retrospective case control study of 52 cases with EEG evidence of encephalopathy and 50 controls without evidence of encephalopathy. Review of clinical, EEG and MRI data acquired within 4 days of each other. The most common EEG finding in encephalopathy was background slowing, in 96.1%. We found PSDs in 0% of cases with the combination of CG and SCG abnormalities. Although 13.5% (n=7) had PSDs on EEG; 3 of these had CG and 4 had SCG abnormalities. A total of 73.1% (38/52) had white matter abnormalities-of these 28.9% (11/38) had PDA. PSDs were found with either CG or "SCG" MRI abnormalities and did not require a combination of the two. In agreement with Gloor et al, PDA occurred with white matter MRI abnormalities in the absence of gray matter abnormalities. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  9. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Koretz, R L; Kjaergard, L L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  10. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, ...

  11. Predictors of intensive care unit utilization in patients with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Archana; Habetz, Kenneth; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Fitzgerald, Ryan T

    2017-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an acute neurological syndrome that requires prompt, aggressive management to improve outcomes. Our aim was to identify factors that would necessitate care in the intensive care unit (ICU) in patients with PRES and the outcomes on discharge following ICU stay. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and radiological data of adult PRES patients admitted to our tertiary care medical center. We dichotomized them into two groups based on their need for ICU care and compared their clinical, laboratory, imaging characteristics and discharge outcomes. Outcomes were defined using the modified Rankin Score (mRS) and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) on discharge. Out of 100 patients, 67 % required admission to the ICU. On univariate analysis, factors associated with ICU admission were atrial fibrillation (19.4 vs 0 %; p ≤ 0.05), encephalopathy from PRES (89.6 vs 66.7 %; p encephalopathy (odds ratio 10.22; 95 % CI (1.14-91.55; p = 0.04) was the sole predictor of ICU utilization. This correlated with a GCS encephalopathy might aid in prompt identification of patients who require ICU care.

  12. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: 5 chemotherapy related cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín García, I; Urabayen Alberdi, R; Díez Bayona, V; Sagaseta de Ilúrdoz Uranga, M; Esparza Estaun, J; Molina Garicano, J; Berisa Prado, S

    2014-02-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, previously known as Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, is a clinical-radiological condition characterized by headache, altered mental functioning, seizures and visual alterations, with the magnetic resonance imaging showing cerebral edema, predominantly in the white matter with posterior distribution. Multiple clinical conditions can act as triggers. We present five oncology patients, four of them with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, receiving chemotherapy when they presented with this pathology. A prompt diagnosis, an appropriate therapy for hypertension, and a rapid control of the seizures are the keys to avoiding sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen. Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  14. [Wernicke encephalopathy after subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaudan, C; La-Folie, T; Sagui, E; Soulier, B; Dion, A-M; Richez, P; Brosset, C

    2008-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is one of the potential complications of obesity surgery. It is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency often associated with repeated vomiting. The classic triad is frequently reported in these patients (optic neuropathy, ataxia and confusion), associated with uncommon features. Cerebral impairment affects the dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus and the periaqueductal grey area, appearing on MRI, as hyperintense signals on T2, Flair and Diffusion weighted imaging. Early diagnosis and parenteral thiamine are required to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report a case of WE and Korsakoff's syndrome in a young obese patient after subtotal gastrectomy, who still has substantial sequelae. The contribution of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging is illustrated. The interest of nutritional supervision in the first weeks and preventive thiamine supplementation in case of repeated vomiting are of particular importance in these risky situations.

  15. Multimodality magnetic resonance imaging in hepatic encephalopathy: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Long-Jiang; Wu, Sheng-Yong; Lu, Guang-Ming

    2014-08-28

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complication of cirrhosis or acute liver failure. Currently, HE is regarded as a continuous cognitive impairment ranging from the mildest stage, minimal HE to overt HE. Hyperammonaemia and neuroinflammation are two main underlying factors which contribute to the neurological alterations in HE. Both structural and functional impairments are found in the white mater and grey mater involved in HE. Although the investigations into HE pathophysiological mechanism are enormous, the exact pathophysiological causes underlying HE remain controversial. Multimodality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in helping to understand the pathological process of HE. This paper reviews the up-to-date multimodality MRI methods and predominant findings in HE patients with a highlight of the increasingly important role of blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck: case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Marginean

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis represents a severe and rare infectious disease, which is accompanied by extended necrosis of subcutaneous tissues and fascia layers, having as a result gangrene of the teguments. To reduce mortality associated with this disease, a rapid diagnosis is necessary as well as aggressive surgical treatment, accompanied by adequate, aggressive antibiotic therapy. As a rule, etiology is teeth related, with the condition more common in immunology-depressed patients. This article presents the experience of the authors regarding a case presentation of necrotizing fasciitis with typical clinical expression and management of the disease in an immunological-depressed patient. Further data on diagnosis, microbiology, clinical manifestations, therapy principles, and prognosis are yet needed for atypical cases.

  17. Life-threatening cervical necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, A S; Salah, M A; Nawara, H A; Khatab, H; Khalaf, H A; Abd el-Maguid, N

    1997-12-01

    Eight cases of cervical necrotizing fasciitis are presented. Three were odontogenic, two were pharyngeal in origin and three were primary or idiopathic. Soft tissue gas was recognized in four patients. The bacteriology showed streptococci on the top of the list (50%), while for the idiopathic cases, it was monomicrobial and caused by staphylococci. Third generation cephalosporin and metronidazole represent good initial empirical antibacterial coverage. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of the debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the dermal vessels. The mortality rate was 3/8 (37.5%). Early diagnosis of cervical necrotizing fasciitis and initiation of definitive therapy in an intensive care environment is essential to minimize mortality. It is also important to recognize that this devastating infection may occur spontaneously, and it should be suspected in patients with unexplained soft tissue pain and tenderness.

  18. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  19. [Wernicke encephalopathy: Guiding thiamine prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, A S; Paquette, I; Létourneau, G; Richard-Devantoy, S

    2017-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency. The objective of this paper is to systematically review the literature published over the past 15 years pertaining to prophylactic and curative treatment of WE with thiamine. A systematic literature search was performed using Medline to include all studies published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2015. Of the 316 abstracts identified, 20 met the final inclusion criteria. The evidence on the use of prophylactic thiamine was quite heterogeneous. The use of thiamine in this context largely depended on the evaluation of an individual's risk of developing WE. Use of prophylactic thiamine in low-risk patients is not universally indicated. When prescribed in this sub-population, the oral route is suggested but may be insufficient owing to its limited intestinal absorption and the high risk of non-compliance. High-risk patients need parenteral treatment with a recommended posology of 250 mg daily for 3 to 5 days. Intramuscular route is preferred in the outpatient setting, whereas intravenous route is suggested for inpatients. In cases where the diagnosis of WE is suspected or confirmed, a curative treatment with high-dose IV thiamine is justified. The evidence widely accepted in the literature is much clearer in this condition, with treatment regimens consisting of 500 mg IV 3 times daily for 3 to 5 days, followed by 250 mg IV daily for a minimum of 3 to 5 additional days. The literature does indicate that thiamine should be prescribed at high dosages, with the parenteral routes indicated in hospital settings and in high-risk patients. Based on the current literature review, we suggest treatment algorithms guiding thiamine prescription for WE. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Sialometaplasia necrotizing in dog - Case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen Ramos Barboza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Barboza S.R., Braga L.S.F., Maestri L.F. de P., Monteiro B.S., Rassele A.C., Santos R.V., Vicente G. de C. & Gava M.G. [Sialometaplasia necrotizing in dog - Case report.] Sialometaplasia necrotizante em cão - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(3:214-216, 2016. Setor de Clínica Médica de Animais de Pequeno Porte e Patologia Animal, Universidade Vila Velha, Avenida Comissário José Dantas de Melo, 21, Boa Vista, Vila Velha, ES 29102-920, Brasil. E-mail: suellenramosvet@hotmail.com The sialometaplasia is a rare disease of unknown cause in dogs and cats, which usually affects the submandibular salivary gland, caused by trauma, physical-chemical or biological attack in blood vessels that can produce ischemic changes, causing necrosis, scaly inflammation and metaplasia of glandular epithelium and ducts. Animals affected by sialometaplasia necrotizing show pain, an increase in salivary glands and regional lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography associated with biopsy of the affected tissue are effective in diagnosing the disease. The treatment is surgical and symptomatic. In this study, we tried to report the case of a half-breed dog, 6 years old, who presented the symptoms and histopathological diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia.

  1. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  2. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  3. Meningoencefalite necrotizante de cão Maltês Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Maltese dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalan Bastos Violin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A Meningoencefalite Necrotizante (MEN é uma encefalopatia causada por uma disfunção inflamatória de característica necrotizante. O objetivo deste relato é descrever os aspectos clínicos e anatomopatológicos da Meningoencefalite Necrotizante (MEN em um cão Maltês. A doença tem um caráter necrótico único e está relacionada intimamente à Encefalite do Cão Pug (ECP devido a suas semelhanças, bem como à Leucoencefalite Necrotizante (LEN. Embora o primeiro relato de caso de ECP tenha mais de 15 anos e o primeiro relato de caso de MEN em Maltês tenha 11 anos, há muito a ser revelado sobre a etiologia e os mecanismos imunopatológicos da doença. Neste trabalho, relata-se o caso de um cão Maltês com sinais que foram compatíveis com a MEN. Foram detectadas nas imagens macroscópicas, cavitação cerebral, e na microscopia, perda de células do parênquima em certas regiões do córtex cerebral. A partir dessas descobertas descreve-se o primeiro caso de MEN em cão Maltês no Brasil.The Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis (NME is an encephalopathy caused by an inflammatory dysfunction with necrotic characterization. The aim of this report is to describe the anatomopathological features of the NME in a Maltese dog. The disease has a unique necrotic pattern and is closely related to Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE because of their similarity as well as to Necrotizing Leukoencephalitis (NLE. Although the first PDE report has more than 15 years and the first Maltese NME report has 11 years there is a lot to be unveiled about the etiologic and the immunopathologic mechanisms of the disease. Here we report one case of a Maltese dog with signs that were compatible with NME. The gross morphology pictures with the cerebral cavitation and the histological loss of parenchymal cells in some regions of the cerebral cortex were detected. Based on these findings, we describe the first case of NME in Maltese dog in Brazil.

  4. Infections of the neck leading to descending necrotizing mediastinitis: Role of multi-detector row computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Antonio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, A. Cardarelli Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: antopin1968@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano; Scuderi, Maria Giuseppina; Tortora, Giovanni; Daniele, Stefania; Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, A. Cardarelli Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis is an acute, polymicrobial infection of the mediastinum, originating from odontogenic, oropharyngeal and cervical infections. Anatomical continuity of the fascial spaces between the neck and the mediastinum leads to an occasional mediastinal extension of deep neck infection as a serious sequela. An understanding of the anatomy of the deep spaces of the neck and familiarity with the imaging findings in descending necrotizing mediastinitis may allow rapid diagnosis and treatment of this rare and life-threatening complication of deep neck space infection. In this article, we discuss the current role of radiology in diagnosing descending necrotizing mediastinitis, in determining the level of infection and the pathways of spread of infections from the neck to the mediastinum and in planning a successful treatment.

  5. Porphyria Presenting as Diffuse Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old female presenting with seizures, myalgias, abdominal pain, headache and vomiting had multiple large contrast-enhancing white matter lesions on MRI and was diagnosed with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, in a report from the Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

  6. Hyperammonemia Is Associated with Increasing Severity of Both Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperammonemia resulting from chronic liver disease (CLD can potentially challenge and damage any organ system of the body, particularly the brain. However, there is still some controversy regarding the diagnostic or prognostic values of serum ammonia in patients with over hepatic encephalopathy, especially in the setting of acute-on-chronic or chronic liver failure. Moreover, the association of serum ammonia with worsening Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis has not been studied. Objective. This study was conducted to solve the controversy regarding the association between hyperammonemia and cirrhosis, especially hepatic encephalopathy in chronically failed liver. Material and Methods. In this study, 171 cirrhotic patients had their serum ammonia measured and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-squared test and one-way ANOVA were applied. Results. The study had 110 male and 61 female participants. The mean age of all the participants in years was 42.33±7.60. The mean duration (years of CLD was 10.15±3.53 while the mean Child-Pugh (CP score was 8.84±3.30. Chronic viral hepatitis alone was responsible for 71.3% of the cases. Moreover, 86.5% of participants had hepatic encephalopathy (HE. The frequency of hyperammonemia was 67.3%, more frequent in males (N=81, z-score = 2.4, and P<0.05 than in females (N=34, z-score = 2.4, and P<0.05, and had a statistically significant relationship with increasing CP grade of cirrhosis (χ2(2 = 27.46, P<0.001, Phi = 0.40, and P<0.001. Furthermore, serum ammonia level was higher in patients with hepatic encephalopathy than in those without it; P<0.001. Conclusion. Hyperammonemia is associated with both increasing Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate. Ulcerative or necrotizing stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, H P; Petersen, J K; Simonsen, B H

    1976-12-01

    A typical case of the recently described tumor-suspect lesion, necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) of the palate, in a 54-year old Caucasian male is presented. Results of complete blood- and urinanalysis including serum electrophoresis and labial salivary gland biopsy strongly pointed at a local etiologic factor. Previous statements that the disease represents a new entity are questioned. The present authors favor the idea that NS is the necrotizing (ulcerative) or terminal stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (nicotinic stomatitis). It is of particular importance that this lesion is not diagnosed as a malignancy, as it heals spontaneously and uneventfully.

  8. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A

    2016-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is ......Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables...... analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency......, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test...

  9. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  10. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was

  11. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a well-characterized syndrome in alcoholism and malnutrition, little is written of its prevalence or presentation in patients with psychiatric illness. We present a case of a 37-year-old Nigerian male with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium and ophthalmoplegia ...

  12. Cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis. A report of two cases, with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy in one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verity, M A; Wolfson, W L

    1976-10-15

    Neuropathologic findings in 2 cases of cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis with sequelae are presented. A 30-year old male with macular rash and pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis responded to Prednisone terapy but developed acute intracranial hypertension with coma. A necrotizing hemorrhagic lesion was evident in the left putamen surrounded by diffuse and perivascular atypical lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. An 18-year old girl developed pulmonary lymphomatoid granulomatosis, diplopia, slurred speech and right hemiparesis. Brain scan, angiography and EEG suggested a left fronto-parietal mass assumed to represent lymphomatoid granulomatosis. She responded well to cerebral irradiation, intrathecal methotrexate and cytoxan but relapsed with seizures and increasing respiratory insufficiency. At autopsy, stigmata of cerebral lymphomatoid granulomatosis were absent but a parenchymatous degeneration consistent with disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy following antileukemic therapy in children, was found.

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis developing from a brown recluse spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, J

    2001-02-01

    A 20-year retrospective case series was analyzed to identify the brown recluse spider bite as a cause of necrotizing fasciitis. Data from 31 consecutive patients with necrotizing fasciitis were analyzed. Of the 31 patients with necrotizing fasciitis a brown recluse spider bite was found to be the initial cause in two patients. Both patients with spider bites delayed in obtaining medical treatment, and secondary infection of the necrotic tissue occurred. One patient was diagnosed by frozen section tissue biopsy, and the second patient was diagnosed by clinical examination. All patients in this series had immediate aggressive operative debridement. Both patients survived with functional limbs. There were no deaths in this large series. Necrotizing fasciitis can be caused by a secondarily infected brown recluse spider bite. Successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis from any cause is associated with early diagnosis, immediate surgical debridement, and supplemental enteral or parenteral nutrition.

  14. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis: Microbial and Immunologic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    treponemes -2- produced localized abscesses in rabbits (49). Spirochetal abscesses were also observed in the hamster cheek ,"ouch after injection of...postulates in that exudate from an infected lesion has not produced ANUG lesions in humans and animals. Although fusospirochetal abscesses have been...fusospirochetal exudate (46). Sixteen bacterial strains recombined with Treponema microdentium did noi produce fusospirochetal abscesses in -uinea

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis of vulva: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal A

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar necrotizing fascitis is an uncommon infectious disorder. Since the first reported cases almost 100 years, ago, necrotizing fasciitis continues to present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. What usually begins as a subtle infection can become life-threatening. We report two cases of vulvar necrotizing fasciitis, one after posterior colporrhaphy in a woman with four risk factors and the other in a young woman without any risk factor.

  16. Central-Variant Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy due to Sulfasalazine: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocek, Levent; Sener, Ufuk; Demirtas, Burcu S; Ozcelik, Metin M; Oztekin, Ozgur; Zorlu, Yasar

    2015-01-01

    To report a rare case with central-variant posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to sulfasalazine. A 55-year-old female patient presented with seizure and acute-onset hemiparesia. Thirty days earlier, treatment with sulfasalazine was commenced in response to a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Laboratory examinations were normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed symmetric edema within basal ganglia and thalami with sparing of the cerebral cortices. After stopping the treatment of sulfasalazine, clinical and radiological findings regressed dramatically. This was a case of central-variant posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to sulfasalazine, and atypical imaging findings should be kept in mind for early diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A Fatal Case of Wernicke’s Encephalopathy after Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K. Manatakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder, due to thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency. It is traditionally described in chronic alcohol abusers; however obesity surgery is an emerging cause, as the number of bariatric procedures increases. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, since initial symptoms may be nonspecific and the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, gait and stance disorders, and mental confusion is present only in one-third of patients. Laboratory tests can be within normal range and typical MRI brain lesions are found only in 50% of cases. Aggressive supplementation with intravenous thiamine should not be delayed until confirmation of diagnosis, as it may fully reverse symptoms, but almost half the patients will still display permanent neurological deficit. We present our experience with a fatal case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy, following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.

  18. Neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Yeon; Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Lim, Keun Ho; Kim, Sang Tae [Asan Institute for Life Science, NMR Laboratory, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Ki Soo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neonatology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-02-01

    We report two infants with neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy who were evaluated with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as conventional MR. As in conventional MR, DWI and proton MRS revealed a predominance of abnormalities in the parieto-occipital lobes and underlying white matter including the splenium of the corpus callosum. In the acute phase of the disease, lesions on DWI showed restricted water diffusion and on DWI the characteristic lesions seemed to be more readily discernible than on conventional MRI. In the chronic phase, DWI demonstrated increased water diffusion in the affected areas showing atrophy on conventional MRI. Proton MRS revealed an increased lactate-lipid peak and a decreased NAA peak in the involved areas. DWI and proton MRS findings appear helpful in evaluating the extent and the presence of neuronal damage early in the course of neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy. (orig.)

  19. Recurarization in a successfully managed case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) for emergency caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Suchita; Tavri, Snehlata; Mohite, Shubha

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome of headache, visual changes, altered mental status and seizures with radiologic findings of posterior cerebral white matter edema. It is seen in hypertensive encephalopathy, renal failure, and autoimmune disorders or in patients on immunosuppressants. We report a case of 24-year-old primigravida who presented at term with sudden onset hypertension, neurological deficits, and an episode of the visual blackout. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features suggestive of PRES. She was posted for emergency lower segment cesarean section. General anesthesia was administered and blood pressure managed with antihypertensives. Postoperatively, she developed acute respiratory depression after prophylactic administration of injection magnesium sulfate. This case highlights that good clinical acumen along with early neuroimaging helps in prompt diagnosis, treatment and prevention of long-term neurological sequelae in PRES and the anesthetic implications of administering magnesium sulfate in the immediate post neuromuscular block reversal phase.

  20. Autologous creatinine clearance in a case of necrotizing fasciitis and anuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadon, Michael T; Koyner, Jay L

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis can present with concomitant acute kidney injury. The etiology of acute kidney injury is often multifactorial; potential sources include volume depletion, abdominal compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis, and acute tubular necrosis (which may be related to hemodynamic instability, medications, or sepsis/infection). Kidney injury, defined via changes in serum creatinine, portends increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is crucial to accurately diagnose and assess the severity of kidney injury. We present the case of a patient with necrotizing fasciitis who endured 31 consecutive days of complete anuria. His serum creatinine decreased over this interval without the use of extracorporeal hemofiltration or dialysis. The explanation for this novel phenomenon lies in massive daily sero-sanguineous discharge and insensible losses with subsequent volume resuscitation. The patient's own convective clearance was substantial enough to maintain a modest creatinine clearance of 15 ml/min during sustained anuria. Our case emphasizes the importance of employing the creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urine output portions of the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) or Risk Injury Failure Loss End stage (RIFLE) criteria in assessing the severity of kidney injury. It further reinforces the imperfection in using serum creatinine as a primary measure of glomerular filtration rate. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to necrotic toxin-producing Escherichia coli strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gallois

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a fatal case of necrotizing soft tissues infection caused by an Escherichia coli strain belonging to phylogenetic group C and harbouring numerous virulence factors reported to be part of a pathogenicity island (PAI such as PAI IIJ96 and conserved virulence plasmidic region.

  2. Update on management of patients with overt hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Kristina R; Sigal, Samuel H

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a multifactorial neuropsychiatric disease that affects patients with cirrhosis. We review the clinical impact, pathogenesis, evaluation, management, and prevention of overt HE in patients with cirrhosis. Articles published between January 1960 and November 2012 were acquired through a MEDLINE search of different combinations of the terms hepatic encephalopathy, pathophysiology, treatment, prophylaxis, prevention, prognosis, and recurrence. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database was used to obtain prevalence and cost information related to hospitalizations of patients with HE. The literature describes significant morbidity and mortality of HE in patients with cirrhosis. Overt HE develops in 30% to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and is associated with a substantial pharmacoeconomic burden, particularly HE-related hospitalizations. The development of HE in patients with cirrhosis portends a worsened prognosis and is incorporated into the Child-Pugh classification of the severity of liver disease. In the hospitalized patient, the development of HE is associated with precipitating events (eg, gastrointestinal bleeding, dehydration, infection), and in some patients, its course is characterized by frequent and severe relapses. In addition, hospitalized patients with overt HE have a 3.9-fold increased mortality risk. Patient management employs nonabsorbable disaccharides, the nonsystemic antibiotic rifaximin, or both, to treat acute HE episodes and prevent HE relapse. In open-label trials, use of the nonabsorbable disaccharide lactulose reduced the risk of overt HE recurrence in patients compared with no-lactulose control groups for ≤ a median of 14 months. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, rifaximin 550 mg twice daily was more effective in maintaining HE remission compared with placebo and was associated with a reduction in HE-related hospitalizations. Recent advances in treatment and preventative therapies may

  3. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S. [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2006-09-15

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  4. Primary brain tumors and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya-Matsuoka, Carlos; Cachia, David; Olar, Adriana; Armstrong, Terri S; Gilbert, Mark R

    2014-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic encephalopathic state associated with reversible cerebral vasogenic edema. It is an increasingly recognized occurrence in the oncology population. However, it is very uncommon in patients with primary brain tumors (PBTs). The aim of this study was to analyze the clinicoradiological features and report the clinical outcomes of PRES in PBT patients. We identified 4 cases with PBT who developed PRES at MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) between 2012 and 2014. Clinical and radiological data were abstracted from their records. In addition, we also solicited 8 cases from the literature. The median age at PRES onset was 19 years, male-to-female ratio was 1:1, and the syndrome occurred in patients with ependymoma (n = 4), glioblastoma (n = 3), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG; n = 3), juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 1), and atypical meningioma (n = 1). Two glioblastomas and 2 DIPG cases received bevacizumab and vandetanib before the onset of symptoms, respectively. The most common clinical presentation was seizures (n = 7). Three MDACC patients recovered completely in 3-4 weeks after the onset of symptoms. One patient died due to active cancer and several comorbidities including PRES. Hypertension seems to be the most important coexisting risk factor for development of PRES; however, the potential effects of chemotherapeutic agents in the pathogenesis of PRES should also be examined. The clinicoradiological course of PRES in PBT patients did not vary from the classical descriptions of PRES found in other causes. PRES must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in patients with PBTs presenting with seizures or acute encephalopathy.

  5. Growth of Necrotic Cores in Vulnerable Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Pak-Wing

    2011-03-01

    Plaques are fatty deposits that grow mainly in arteries and develop as a result of a chronic inflammatory response. Plaques are called vulnerable when they are prone to mechanical rupture. Vulnerable Plaques (VPs) are characterized by lipid-rich, necrotic cores that are heavily infiltrated with macrophages. The rupture of VPs releases thrombogenic agents into the bloodstream, usually resulting in myocardial infarctions. We propose a quantitative model to predict the development of a plaque's necrotic core. By solving coupled reaction-diffusion equations for macrophages and dead cells, we explore the joint effects of hypoxic cell death and chemo-attraction to Ox-LDL, a molecule that is strongly linked to atherosclerosis. Our model predicts cores that have approximately the right size and shape. Normal mode analysis and subsequent calculation of the smallest eigenvalues allow us to compute the times required for the system to reach its steady state. This study allows us to make quantitative predictions for how quickly vulnerable plaques develop and how their growth depends on system parameters such as chemotactic coefficients and cell death rates.

  6. MRI findings of Wernicke encephalopathy revisited due to hunger strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Ercument; Cakir, Bilge; Asil, Talip

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among a group of patients who presented with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) due to the neurological complications of a long-term hunger strike (HS). MRI studies also including the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of six male patients with WE aged from 25 to 38 years (mean age 31 years) were evaluated. In all subjects, T2-weighted sequences, FLAIR and DWI revealed a signal hyperintensity within the posteromedial thalami and surrounding the third ventricle. In particular, on coronal images, the hyperintense areas around the third ventricle showed a suggestive "double wing" configuration. We observed an increased signal on proton-density and T2-weighted images in the mamillary bodies of three patients. Four patients demonstrated additional hyperintensities within the periaqueductal region and/or the tectal plate. At least one lesion area in five of six patients demonstrated contrast enhancement. The consistent imaging findings of our study suggest that MRI is a reliable means of diagnosing WE. Acute WE is sometimes underdiagnosed, yet early diagnosis and treatment of WE is crucial in order to avoid persistent brain damage. MRI, including postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, DWI beneath standardized T2-weighted imaging, and FLAIR sequences may prove to be a valuable adjunct to clinical diagnosis and to provide additional information in acute and/or subacute WE.

  7. Refractory intracranial hypertension in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Alberto; Magnoni, Sandra; Civelli, Vittorio; Triulzi, Fabio; Nosotti, Mario; Stocchetti, Nino

    2013-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a largely reversible disease with long-term favorable outcome. A minority of patients, however, may develop progressive cerebral edema and ischemia resulting in severe disability or death. We report a case of severe intracranial hypertension associated with PRES that was successfully treated according to intracranial pressure (ICP)- and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP)-driven therapy. Case report. A 42-year-old woman underwent bilateral lung transplantation for severe bronchiectasis. Her immunosuppressive regimen consisted of azathioprine, prednisone, and tacrolimus. She acutely developed an aggressive form of PRES that rapidly resulted in severe refractory intracranial hypertension despite discontinuation of potentially causative medications and adequate supportive therapy. Accordingly, second-tier therapies, including barbiturate infusion, were instituted and immunosuppression was switched to anti-thymocyte globulin followed by mycophenolate mofetil. Within 10 h of barbiturate administration, ICP dropped to 20 mmHg. Thiopental was administered for two days and then rapidly tapered because of severe urosepsis. Six months after discharge from the intensive care unit the patient returned to near-normal life, her only complaint being short-term amnesia. The decision to undertake ICP monitoring in medical conditions in which no clear recommendations exist greatly relies on physicians' judgment. This case suggests that ICP monitoring may be considered in the setting of acute PRES among selected patients, when severe intracranial hypertension is suspected, provided that a multidisciplinary team of neurocritical care specialists is readily available.

  8. MRI findings of Wernicke encephalopathy revisited due to hunger strike

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unlu, Ercument [Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Mimar Sinan m, Muammer Aksoy c, Yorulmaz apt, No 50, D-1 22030 Edirne (Turkey)]. E-mail: drercument@yahoo.com; Cakir, Bilge [Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Mimar Sinan m, Muammer Aksoy c, Yorulmaz apt, No 50, D-1 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Asil, Talip [Department of Neurology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Edirne (Turkey)

    2006-01-15

    Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among a group of patients who presented with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) due to the neurological complications of a long-term hunger strike (HS). Methods: MRI studies also including the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of six male patients with WE aged from 25 to 38 years (mean age 31 years) were evaluated. Results: In all subjects, T2-weighted sequences, FLAIR and DWI revealed a signal hyperintensity within the posteromedial thalami and surrounding the third ventricle. In particular, on coronal images, the hyperintense areas around the third ventricle showed a suggestive 'double wing' configuration. We observed an increased signal on proton-density and T2-weighted images in the mamillary bodies of three patients. Four patients demonstrated additional hyperintensities within the periaqueductal region and/or the tectal plate. At least one lesion area in five of six patients demonstrated contrast enhancement. Conclusion: The consistent imaging findings of our study suggest that MRI is a reliable means of diagnosing WE. Acute WE is sometimes underdiagnosed, yet early diagnosis and treatment of WE is crucial in order to avoid persistent brain damage. MRI, including postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, DWI beneath standardized T2-weighted imaging, and FLAIR sequences may prove to be a valuable adjunct to clinical diagnosis and to provide additional information in acute and/or subacute WE.

  9. A case of Hashimoto`s encephalopathy presenting with seizures and psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Joo Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE is a rare, poorly understood, autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased anti-thyroid antibody levels. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HE and briefly review the literature. The patient presented with acute mental changes and seizures, but no evidence of infectious encephalitis. In the acute stage, the seizures did not respond to conventional antiepileptic drugs, including valproic acid, phenytoin, and topiramate. The clinical course was complicated by the development of acute psychosis, including bipolar mood, insomnia, agitation, and hallucinations. The diagnosis of HE was supported by positive results for antithyroperoxidase and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Treatment with methylprednisolone was effective; her psychosis improved and the number of seizures decreased. HE is a serious but curable, condition, which might be underdiagnosed if not suspected. Anti-thyroid antibodies must be measured for the diagnosis. HE should be considered in patients with diverse neuropsychiatric manifestations.

  10. Necrotizing fasciitis in association with Ludwig's angina - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavarodi, A M

    2011-07-01

    A 28 year old male diabetic patient developed Ludwig's angina which subsequently evolved into cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. The differential characteristic of Ludwig's angina and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, as it relates to this rare presentation is discussed. The clinical and radiological features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management that resulted in a successful outcome are presented.

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis: contribution and limitations of diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Omoumi, Patrick; Maldague, Baudouin E; Vande Berg, Bruno C

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly spreading, deep-seated infection causing thrombosis of the blood vessels located in the fascia. Necrotizing fasciitis is a surgical emergency. The diagnosis typically relies on clinical findings of severe sepsis and intense pain, although subacute forms may be difficult to recognize. Imaging studies can help to differentiate necrotizing fasciitis from infections located more superficially (dermohypodermitis). The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, which can be visualized using computed tomography and, above all, magnetic resonance imaging (high signal on contrast-enhanced T1 images and T2 images, best seen with fat saturation). These findings lack specificity, as they can be seen in non-necrotizing fasciitis and even in non-inflammatory conditions. Signs that support a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include extensive involvement of the deep intermuscular fascias (high sensitivity but low specificity), thickening to more than 3mm, and partial or complete absence on post-gadolinium images of signal enhancement of the thickened fasciae (fairly high sensitivity and specificity). Ultrasonography is not recommended in adults, as the infiltration of the hypodermis blocks ultrasound transmission. Thus, imaging studies in patients with necrotizing fasciitis may be challenging to interpret. Although imaging may help to confirm deep tissue involvement and to evaluate lesion spread, it should never delay emergency surgical treatment in patients with established necrotizing fasciitis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: A potentially fatal disease with varied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis was recognized centuries ago by physicians. It is a rapidly progressive and potentially fatal soft‑tissue infection that is typified by soft‑tissue necrosis, especially affecting the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. Cervico‑facial necrotizing fasciitis is said to be uncommon, but when it occurs, it is often of ...

  13. la sialometaplasie necrosante necrotizing sialometaplasia of the plate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is often confused clinically and histopathologically with malignancies, such as squamous cell carcinoma or mucoepidermoid carcinoma. We report a case of NS in ... Keywords: Necrotizing sialometaplasia; oral; palate; histology. CAS CLINIQUE .... Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the nasal cavity. Am J Oto- laryngol. 1982 ...

  14. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a case of a 64-year-old male with a history of liver failure presenting with altered mental status, initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE by electroencephalogram (EEG. NCSE is a difficult diagnosis to make, given no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria. Especially in the intensive care unit setting of persistent altered mental status with no clear etiology, NCSE must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment can be substantial. EEG can be useful in the evaluation of patients with hepatic encephalopathy who have persistently altered levels of consciousness despite optimal medical management. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:372–374.

  15. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...available, work will commence. Tau, genetics, susceptibility, MAPT, chronic traumatic encephalopathy , Alzheimer disease U U U U 1 USAMRMC Table of

  16. MINIM AL HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN AL COHOLIC CIRRHOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Kavya; Jegan Niwas; Sarah; Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Minimal hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE) has severe and important health implications which affects the quality of life as well as the survival of patients with liver disease. Psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) has been validated for diagnosis of MHE. AIM OF THE STUDY : To detect the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) in alcoholic cirrhosis patients and to compare the patterns of alcohol consumption in patients with MHE t...

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis following saphenofemoral junction ligation with long saphenous vein stripping: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Graeme

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare condition with a mortality rate of around 34%. It can be mono- or polymicrobial in origin. Monomicrobial infections are usually due to group A streptococcus and their incidence is on the rise. They normally occur in healthy individuals with a history of trauma, surgery or intravenous drug use. Post-operative necrotizing fasciitis is rare but accounts for 9 to 28% of all necrotizing fasciitis. The incidence of wound infection following saphenofemoral junction ligation and vein stripping is said to be less than 3%, although this complication is probably under-reported. We describe a case of group A streptococcus necrotizing fasciitis following saphenofemoral junction ligation and vein stripping. Case Presentation A 39-year-old woman presented three days following a left sided saphenofemoral junction ligation with long saphenous vein stripping at another institution. She had a three day history of fever, rigors and swelling of the left leg. She was pyrexial and shocked. She had a very tender, swollen left groin and thigh, with a small blister anteriorly and was in acute renal failure. She was prescribed intravenous penicillin and diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. She underwent extensive debridement of her left thigh and was commenced on clindamycin and imipenem. Post-operatively, she required ventilatory and inotropic support with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration. An examination 12 hours after surgery showed no requirement for further debridement. A group A streptococcus, sensitive to penicillin, was isolated from the debrided tissue. A vacuum assisted closure device was fitted to the clean thigh wound on day four and split-skin-grafting was performed on day eight. On day 13, a wound inspection revealed that more than 90% of the graft had taken. Antibiotics were stopped on day 20 and she was discharged on day 22. Conclusion Necrotizing fasciitis is a very serious complication for a

  18. 'Khatatonia' - cathinone-induced hypertensive encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, P; El-Kininy, N; O'Hara, F; Menon, P; Finegan, E; Healy, D

    2017-12-01

    Khat consumption is an under-recognised cause of hypertensive encephalopathy and intraparenchymal brain haemorrhage. We report the radiological findings of extensive periventricular, subcortical and brain stem white matter pathology of a patient who had consumed excessive amounts of Khat. The Khat plant contains cathinone, an amphetamine-like alkaloid which has been associated with chronic hypertensive end-organ damage, but is seldom considered a cause of cerebrovascular events in northern Europe.

  19. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by hyperemesis gravidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Delgado-García, Silvia; Martín-Bayón, Tina; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a reversible neurological emergency caused by thiamine deficiency. Prolonged vomiting in pregnancy results in thiamine depletion. The early recognition of its clinical signs and symptoms is essential to establish the suspected diagnosis and can be confirmed by MRI. Prompt administration of thiamine is important for preventing the occurrence of sequelae in the mother and for improving the fetal prognostic. We report a case of WE induced by hyperemesis gravidarum with a good maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:22684836

  20. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Adnane Berdai; Smael Labib; Mustapha Harandou

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke’s encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis...

  1. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Agadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditions that are responsive to vitamin or vitamin derivatives.

  2. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Satish Agadi; Quach, Michael M.; Zulfi Haneef

    2013-01-01

    Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditio...

  3. COMPLEX THERAPY FOR HYPERTENSIVE AND MIXED ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sof'ya Alekseevna Rumyantseva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension (AH is one of the main causes of the occurrence and progression of different types of vascular pathology. AH-associated functional and morphological impairments of the brain are the severe symptom complexes of hypertensive encephalopathy (HE, which require continuous correction. The measures for the prevention and treatment of all cardiovascular diseases, including HE, involve adequate correction of AH, correction of energy neuronal homeostatic disorders, as well as a harmonious combination of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological exposures

  4. Norovírus Associated Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Salva, I; Brito, MJ; Farela Neves, J

    2011-01-01

    clinical presentation is self limited. It is classified into five groups (genogroups I through V). There are numerous reports of neurologic complications, namely afebrile seizures, but only two reports of associated encephalopathy. Case Report: A 12 month old girl with previous history of a pneumonia treated with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and clarythromycin, presented in our emergency department with strabismus, ataxia for 3 days, later associated with vomiting and diarrhea. On admission...

  5. Proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Carolyn; Cianciolo, Rachel E; Lees, George E; Brown, Cathy A; Foster, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year-old cat was examined for vomiting and anorexia of 2 days' duration. Azotemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypoalbuminemia were the main biochemical findings. Serial analyses of the urine revealed isosthenuria, proteinuria and eventual glucosuria. Hyperechoic perirenal fat was detected surrounding the right kidney by ultrasonography. Histopathologic evaluation of ante-mortem ultrasound-guided needle biopsies of the right kidney was consistent with proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with fibrin thrombi, proteinaceous and red blood cell casts, and moderate multifocal chronic-active interstitial nephritis. Owing to a lack of clinical improvement, the cat was eventually euthanized. Post-mortem renal biopsies were processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. This revealed severe focal proliferative and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with cellular crescent formation, podocyte injury and secondary segmental sclerosis. Ultrastructural analysis revealed scattered electron-dense deposits in the mesangium, and immunofluorescence demonstrated positive granular staining for λ light chains, consistent with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Severe diffuse acute tubular epithelial injury and numerous red blood cell casts were also seen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic immune complex glomerulonephritis in a cat.

  6. Proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Gross

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Case Summary A 5-year-old cat was examined for vomiting and anorexia of 2 days’ duration. Azotemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypoalbuminemia were the main biochemical findings. Serial analyses of the urine revealed isosthenuria, proteinuria and eventual glucosuria. Hyperechoic perirenal fat was detected surrounding the right kidney by ultrasonography. Histopathologic evaluation of ante-mortem ultrasound-guided needle biopsies of the right kidney was consistent with proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with fibrin thrombi, proteinaceous and red blood cell casts, and moderate multifocal chronic-active interstitial nephritis. Owing to a lack of clinical improvement, the cat was eventually euthanized. Post-mortem renal biopsies were processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. This revealed severe focal proliferative and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with cellular crescent formation, podocyte injury and secondary segmental sclerosis. Ultrastructural analysis revealed scattered electron-dense deposits in the mesangium, and immunofluorescence demonstrated positive granular staining for λ light chains, consistent with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Severe diffuse acute tubular epithelial injury and numerous red blood cell casts were also seen. Relevance and novel information To our knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic immune complex glomerulonephritis in a cat.

  7. Brain-aluminium concentration in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, J R; Smith, A I; Ward, M K; Parkinson, I S; Kerr, D N

    1978-04-29

    Brain-aluminium concentrations were found to be significantly higher in 7 patients dying with dialysis encephalopathy (mean 15.9 microgram aluminium/g dry weight) than in 11 dialysed controls (4.4 microgram/g) and in 2 uraemic patients who were not dialysed (2.7 microgram/g). The grey matter from the patients with dialysis encephalopathy contained about three times as much aluminium as white matter. The results suggest that dialysis with untreated and/or softened tap-water (aluminium concentration 0.1-1.2 mg/1) makes the major contribution to brain-aluminium levels; dialysis with deionised water (aluminium concentration normally less than 0.02 mg/1) and intake of phosphate-binding AL(OH)3 gel are less important. Brain aluminium levels remain elevated for up to four years after restoration of good renal function by transplantation. The association of dialysis encephalopathy with high levels of aluminium in the brain and in the dialysis water emphasises the potential neurotoxicity of aluminium in man.

  8. Epileptic encephalopathies (including severe epilepsy syndromes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covanis, Athanasios

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that appear early in life and are characterized by pharmacoresistant generalized or focal seizures, persistent severe electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. The ictal and interictal epileptic discharges are age-specific and are the main etiologic factors causing cognitive deterioration. This is most obvious in the idiopathic group. In the symptomatic group, the most common causes are structural, congenital, or acquired and rarely some metabolic disorders. In certain cases, clinical and EEG abnormalities persist and may evolve from one type to another as the child grows older. Various factors trigger and sustain the underlying pathophysiologic process and the ongoing epileptic and epileptiform activity during the most critical periods of brain maturation, perpetuating their deleterious effect on the brain. Immune-mediated mechanisms may have a role, suggested by certain encephalopathies responding to immune-modulating treatments and by the finding of various autoimmune antibodies. The chance of a better cognitive outcome improves with early diagnosis and treatment that is appropriate and effective. Current antiepileptic drugs are, in general, not effective: we urgently need new trials in this very special epileptic category. This article briefly reviews the most common epileptic encephalopathies and analyzes the most important clinical issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. BLOOD BIOMARKERS FOR EVALUATION OF PERINATAL ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Marshall Graham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the liquid brain biopsy. A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment.

  10. Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy: Can My Patient Drive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jawaid; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2017-02-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a public health problem and hepatic encephalopathy is one of its main complications, which can be either overt meaning thereby evident and readily diagnosed, or covert/minimal (covert hepatic encephalopathy-CHE) needing psychometric testing for diagnosis. Patients with CHE hepatic encephalopathy have deficits in multiple domains including visuospatial assessment, attention, response inhibition, working memory, along with psychomotor speed to name a few areas. These patients have poor navigational skills, get fatigued easily, and demonstrate poor insight into their driving deficits. The combination of all these leads them to have poor driving skills leading to traffic violations and crashes as demonstrated not only on the simulation testing but also in real-life driving events. There are multiple psychometric tests for CHE testing but these are not easily available and there is no uniform consensus on the gold standard testing as of yet. It does not automatically connote that all patients who test positive on driving simulation testing are unfit to drive. The physicians are encouraged to take driving history from the patient and the caregivers on every encounter and focus their counseling efforts more on patients with recent history of traffic crashes, with abnormal simulation studies and history of alcohol cessation within last year. As physicians are not trained to determine fitness to drive, their approach toward CHE patients in regards to driving restrictions should be driven by ethical principles while as respecting the local laws.

  11. Fatores associados à enterocolite necrosante Factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Campos Vieira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as formas de apresentação clínica da enterocolite necrosante neonatal e os fatores associados à doença. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo dos casos de enterocolite necrosante neonatal (ECN (n = 56 ocorridos na UTI Neonatal Lagoa, entre dezembro de 1986 e julho de 1992. O diagnóstico e estadiamento da doença seguiram o critério de Bell modificado. Foram avaliados o diagnóstico e a evolução de todos os casos. Posteriormente, foram selecionados os casos de enterocolite grau II e III (n =44 e comparados com um grupo controle (n = 44, selecionado pelo peso de nascimento (± 250g e época de internação (± 2 semanas. Para a análise estatística, foi considerado significante p OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the features of clinical presentation of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis and its associated factors. METHODS: retrospective study of the cases of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 56 diagnosed at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Lagoa (NICU, between December 1986 and July 1992. Diagnosis and stages of the disease followed the modified Bell's criteria. Diagnosis and follow-up of all cases were evaluated. The cases of enterocolitis - degrees II and III (n = 44 - were subsequently selected and compared to a case-control group (n = 44, selected according to birthweight ( 250 g and hospitalization period ( 2 weeks. The statistically significant analysis was considered as p < 0.05. RESULTS: out of 2,447 newborns admitted to the NICU, 56 (2.3% presented enterocolitis. Mean weight was 1908.5 g; mean gestational age was 35 weeks and 1 day; mean period for diagnosis was 10.7 days; 51 (91.1% patients were fed before diagnosis; 18 (32.1% needed urgent surgery; nine (16.9% hemocultures were positive; 10 (17.8% patients died. Four clinical standards were observed: fulminant, acute with pneumatosis, insidious and suspect. Comparatively to the case-control group, three factors were significantly associated with enterocolitis: apnea (p = 0

  12. Surgical management of necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NSM is a rare benign, inflammatory disease of both major and minor salivary glands, although more commonly reported in the minor glands of the palate. The characteristic clinical presentation can perplex the clinician and may be mistaken for a malignant neoplasm, such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, as well as invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical and histological similarity between this entity and a malignant lesion may result in unnecessary or mis-treatment. Though clinically mimics malignancy, NSM is considered to be a self-limiting disease, and takes about 3-12 weeks to resolve. Majority of the case resolves itself or by supportive and symptomatic treatment. Surgical intervention is rarely required in NSM except the diagnostic biopsy. Herein we report the clinical, histopathological feature and surgical management of a case of NSM of hard palate in a young adult male.

  13. Impact of probiotics on necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    A large number of randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials and cohort studies have demonstrated a decrease in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis with administration of probiotic microbes. These studies have prompted many neonatologists to adopt routine prophylactic administration of probiotics while others await more definitive studies and/or probiotic products with demonstrated purity and stable numbers of live organisms. Cross-contamination and inadequate sample size limit the value of further traditional placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials. Key areas for future research include mechanisms of protection, optimum probiotic species or strains (or combinations thereof) and duration of treatment, interactions between diet and the administered probiotic, and the influence of genetic polymorphisms in the mother and infant on probiotic response. Next generation probiotics selected based on bacterial genetics rather than ease of production and large cluster-randomized clinical trials hold great promise for NEC prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, Sowmya [V.S Dental College and Hospital, Karnataka (India); Ramnarayan BK [Dayanada Sagar College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Karnataka (India)

    2011-03-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  15. Statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ząber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Myositides comprise a large group of disorders involving limb muscle weakness. In differential diagnosis we have to consider idiopathic myositides, myositides associated with other diseases, and those induced by external factors, e.g. drug-induced. Statins are commonly used drugs, but many patients experience a broad spectrum of adverse effects including symptoms from skeletal muscle. Physicians should pay special attention to patients reporting muscle weakness lasting longer than 12 weeks, despite statin withdrawal, as well as other symptoms: dysphagia, disturbed grip function, elevated creatinine kinase (CK levels and abnormal electromyography. The reported case deals with the problem of differential diagnosis of drug-induced muscle injury, polymyositis with a recently reported myopathy – statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis, related to anti-HMGCR antibodies.

  16. Hypoxic encephalopathy after heart valve replacement: etiology and pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Постнов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed in this paper are modern approaches in the intensive therapy of acute hypoxic encephalopathy developing in a number of occasions after the heart valve replacement surgery. The study is based on the results of neurological, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (EEG examinations of 240 patients who underwent heart valve replacement surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass conditions complicated later by the development of hypoxic encephalopathies of varying severity and who received complex intensive care. Relying on many years of experience in the treatment of heart surgery patients in whom manifestations of encephalopathy developed in the early postoperative period, or were delayed, we have formulated the following algorithms of therapy. (1 Maintenance of normal blood gas: Hb>100 g/L, pH 7.45, PaCO2 35 mmHg. (2 Maintenance of hemodynamics: ABPsystolic>90 mmHg. (3 Supplying fluids and electrolytes: isoosmolar infusion solutions, adding of KCl and MgSO4 to the infusion. (4 Antiedemic therapy: 15% mannitol or 40% glycerol solution. (5 If necessary (in case of psychomotor agitation, seizures, short-acting barbiturates (sodium thiopental, neuroleptics (haloperidol, propofol. No benzodiazepines in case of psychoses (6 Cerebral metabolism stimulation (not earlier than 48 hours after surgery with cholinomimetics, nootropics, cerebral blood flow protectors. Cholinomimetics are allowed on the first day after surgery. This algorithm and the above-mentioned groups of drugs, especially central cholinomimetics, allow for correcting the neurocognitive impairment in the discussed group of patients quickly and effectively.

  17. Encephalopathy from lead poisoning masquerading as a flu-like syndrome in an autistic child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mathew; Heeney, Matthew M; Woolf, Alan D

    2010-05-01

    Acute encephalopathy from childhood lead poisoning is fortunately rare. However, in pediatric patients with developmental disabilities and pica, there is a risk of lead exposure at a dose commensurate with encephalopathy, coupled with a risk of delayed diagnosis because of difficulty in distinguishing between baseline and altered behavior. We report here a 4-year old autistic boy who presented to the pediatrician's office with gastrointestinal symptoms and behavioral changes and was at first thought to have a viral syndrome. He returned 2 days later with a worsening illness; increasing pallor, vomiting, abdominal colic, and changes in consciousness were recognized in the emergency department as lead-induced anemia and encephalopathy, associated with a positive abdominal film for paint chips and a blood lead level equal to 216 microg/dL (10.43 micromol/L) (reference, <10 microg/dL or 0.483 micromol/L). As this case illustrates, prompt recognition is dependent on the skills and suspicions of an astute clinician, especially in the busy emergency department.

  18. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: how serious a sports problem is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tator, Charles H

    2014-01-01

    It is now recognised that there is a spectrum of concussion disorders ranging from acute concussion at one end to various forms of brain degeneration at the other end. The spectrum includes acute concussion, second impact syndrome or acute cerebral swelling, postconcussion syndrome, depression or anxiety, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and possibly other forms of central nervous system degeneration. It is essential to carefully evaluate the clinical and neuropathological correlations of CTE that have been published. This has been accomplished in an excellent paper on this subject by Gardner and colleagues in this issue. There have been significant advances in our knowledge of the clinical and neuropathological features of CTE in athletes in the past 10 years. However, we are just at the beginning of our appreciation of this entity due to the paucity of research and the inability to diagnose CTE during life. At present, it is not possible to assess the validity of the proposed methods of classification and grading of the severity of the disease. Additional studies of large numbers of at-risk athletes are essential, especially prospective longitudinal studies. Obviously, such studies would be even more effective if reliable in vivo biomarkers were discovered, especially non-invasive ones such as advanced MRI or MR spectroscopy or invasive ones such as blood or cerebrospinal fluid tests. The major questions that remain unanswered include the frequency of CTE in various collision sports, the causal or otherwise relationship between concussions and CTE, the number of concussions that need to be involved and their management.

  19. MR Imaging of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chunjiu; Jin, Lirong; Fei, Guoqiang

    2005-10-01

    We investigated the correlation of MR imaging features with the pathological evolution and prognosis of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy. A retrospective review and analysis was conducted of 6 cases of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy, consisting of MR imaging features, clinical characteristics, and outcomes after thiamine administration. One patient died, 1 patient entered a persistent vegetative state, and the others recovered fully from Wernicke encephalopathy within 2 weeks to 1 year after thiamine administration. Typical MR imaging showed areas of increased T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signals symmetrically surrounding the aqueduct and the third ventricle, at the floor of fourth ventricle, in the medial thalami, and in the capita of caudate nuclei. Two patients presenting without coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals of the periaqueductal area only. All 4 patients presenting with coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals symmetrically in the medial thalami and in the capita of caudate nuclei. Of the 4 patients with coma, 2 patients with deep coma showed increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals in the medial thalami and caudate nuclei as well as in the frontal and parietal cortices. According to the follow-up results, increased T2-weighted and FLAIR signals in the 4 patients without cortical damage decreased in intensity, consistent with clinical recovery within 2 weeks to 1 year. The patient in a persistent vegetative state exhibited progressive atrophy of the whole brain during the 2 years of the follow-up study. MR imaging is helpful not only to diagnose acute nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy but also to evaluate the pathologic evolution and prognosis of the disorder.

  20. Reversible MRI abnormalities in an unusual paediatric presentation of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparacia, G.; Banco, A.; Lagalla, R. (Univ. of Palermo (Italy). Inst. of Radiology)

    1999-08-01

    Background. We report an unusual paediatric presentation of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy in a 12-year-old boy affected by chronic gastrointestinal disease. MRI demonstrated, in addition to the typical diencephalic and mesencephalic signal abnormalities on T2-weighted images, enhancement of the mammillary bodies and the floor of the hypothalamus. Materials and methods. Following parenteral administration of thiamine for 4 days, the patient recovered from his neurological deficits and on follow-up enhanced MRI 1 month later, no signal abnormalities were found nor was there diencephalic or mesencephalic atrophy, as is usual in the chronic phase of the disease. Results. MRI provides crucial information in the diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy, either in the acute or chronic phases of the disease. Conclusion. Our report provides an additional clue for recognition of the acute phase of the disease; enhancement of the floor of the hypothalamus has not previously been described despite its recorded involvement at autopsy. (orig.) With 2 figs., 9 refs.

  1. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: An Unusual Consequence of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome—Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Larsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a well-described syndrome characterized by the classic triad of confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy results from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency. Common causes include alcoholism and gastric disorders. Wernicke’s has been described in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS; however, given these patients’ immunosuppressed state, the diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy is not apparent. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old previously healthy male presented to the ER complaining of progressive dyspnea. Workup revealed HIV/AIDS and PCP pneumonia. He was treated and improved. On day 14 he became confused and developed nystagmus and ataxia. Considering his immunocompromised state, infectious and neoplastic etiologies topped the differential diagnosis. CT head was negative. Lumbar puncture was unremarkable. Brain MRI revealed increased T2 signal in the medial thalamus bilaterally. Intravenous thiamine was administered resulting in resolution of symptoms. Discussion. The classic triad of Wernicke’s encephalopathy occurs in 10% of cases. When immunosuppressed patients develop acute neurologic symptoms infectious or neoplastic etiologies must be excluded. However, given the relative safety of thiamine supplementation, there should be a low threshold for initiating therapy in order to reverse the symptoms and prevent progression to Korsakoff dementia, which is permanent.

  2. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwarya Trivedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting, reactive inflammatory disorder of the salivary tissue, which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically. The etiology is unknown, although it most likely represents a local ischemic event, infectious process or perhaps an immune response to an unknown allergen. A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate in a 40-year-old male patient is presented. Histopathological examination is necessary for the diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia because the clinical features of this condition can mimic other diseases, particularly malignant neoplasms.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  4. [The clinical pathological characteristics and follow-up of 4 cases of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingshuang; Sun, Aping; Chen, Lu; Dong, Rongfang; Zhong, Yanfeng; Fan, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the clinical, electrophysiology and neuropathological features of 4 cases with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM). We retrospectively analyzed the clinical, electrophysiology, neuropathological characteristics of 4 IMNM patients with muscular and skin biopsy in our department during 4 years (from January 2011 to January 2014). Among these 4 patients, 2 were men and 2 were women (aged 37 to 58 years) with disease duration ranging from 1 month to 60 months. Two patients were with acute onset and 2 with chronic onset. All 4 patients had proximal muscle weakness with three patients with cervical flexor muscle weakness and one with respiratory muscles weakness and noninvasive ventilator assisted respiration. One patient had interstitial lung disease. The anti-signal recognition particle antibodies were strong positive in all 4 patients. Muscle biopsy showed group necrotizing and regenerating fibers in one patient and few scattered necrotizing and regenerating fibers in the other 3 patients. Both muscle fiber hypertrophy and muscle fiber atrophy together with proliferation of connective tissue on endomysium could be viewed in all 4 patients. However, very few inflammatory cells were detectable in patients. One patient was treated with corticosteroids and the other three were treated with combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs. IMNM is characterized by heterogeneity at disease onset, severity and iInvolvement of muscles with, however, similary pathological changes including the presence of numerous necrotic and regenerating fibers with little or none inflammation. Corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressant is effective for patients.

  5. Are there any reasons to change our behavior in necrotizing fasciitis with the advent of new antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichetti, Francesco; Giuliano, Simone; Fortunato, Simona

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of necrotizing fasciitis requires a multifaceted approach, consisting of surgical source control with immediate surgical debridement along with life support, clinical monitoring, and antimicrobial therapy. Many drugs are now available for the treatment of this life-threatening infectious disease, and the purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an updated overview of the newest therapeutic options. Because most necrotizing soft tissue infections are polymicrobial, broad-spectrum coverage is advisable. Acceptable monotherapy regimens include piperacillin-tazobactam or a carbapenem. However, drugs such as ceftolozane-tazobactam, ceftazidime-avibactam in association with an antianaerobic agent (metronidazole or clindamycin) are currently available as valuable alternatives. The new cephalosporins active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), ceftaroline, and ceftobiprole share similar antibacterial activity against Gram-positive cocci, and they might be considered as an alternative to nonbetalactam anti-MRSA agents for necrotizing fasciitis management. Two new long-acting lypoglycopeptides - oritavancin and dalbavancin - share the indications for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and had similar activity against Gram-positive cocci including MRSA and streptococci. Carbapenem-sparing agents are particularly suitable for antimicrobial stewardship strategy. The new long-acting lypoglycopeptides are very effective in treating necrotizing fasciitis and are uttermost attractive for patients requiring short hospital stays and early discharge.

  6. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Seehra, H.; MacDermott, N.; Lascelles, R. G.; Taylor, T V

    1996-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency is known to lead to certain neurological sequelae including Wernicke- Korsakoff encephalopathy. Signs attributable to this condition include ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, and mental confusion. Recognised predisposing conditions include alcoholism gastric carcinoma, pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged intravenous feeding. We have recently encountered two cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity . O...

  8. Necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis: regarding two clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Carreira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors present two case reports of necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis. This disease is part of a spectrum of clinical conditions caused by the inhalation of Aspergillus spores. The necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (NPA corresponds to an indolent, destructive process of the lung due to invasion by Aspergillus species, usually A. fumigatus. The diagnosis is confirmed by a histological demonstration of tissue invasion by Aspergillus species and its growth on culture. Due to the difficulty in confirming the diagnosis, the following diagnosis criteria were established and when combined are highly indicative of NPA: characteristic clinical and radiological findings, elevation of inflammatory markers and either serological results positive for Aspergillus or the isolation of Aspergillus from respiratory samples. Active tuberculosis, non tuberculosis mycobacteriosis, cavitary histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis should be excluded. It is necessary to raise the level of suspicion and perform the adequate diagnostic tests in order to start therapy and avoiding disease progression. Resumo: Os autores apresentam dois casos clínicos de aspergilose pulmonar necrotizante. Esta patologia faz parte de um espectro de condições clínicas provocadas pela inalação de esporos do fungo Aspergillus. A aspergilose pulmonar necrotizante (APN corresponde a um processo indolente de destruição do pulmão pelo Aspergillus, geralmente A. fumigatus. O diagnóstico definitivo faz-se através da demonstração histológica de invasão tecidual pelo Aspergillus e do seu crescimento em cultura2. Pela dificuldade em obter um diagnóstico definitivo foram estabelecidos os seguintes critérios de diagnóstico que, quando reunidos, são fortemente indicativos de APN: aspectos clínicos e radiológicos consistentes com o diagnóstico, elevação dos parâmetros inflamatórios (PCR, VS e marcadores serol

  9. Histopathological and imaging modifications in chronic ethanolic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folescu, Roxana; Zamfir, Carmen Lăcrămioara; Sişu, Alina Maria; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Ilie, Adrian Cosmin; Moise, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Chronic abuse of alcohol triggers different types of brain damage. The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome gets together Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome. Another type of encephalopathy associated with chronic ethanol consumption is represented by the Marchiafava-Bignami malady or syndrome, an extremely rare neurological disorder, which is characterized by a demielinization of corpus callosum, extending as far as a necrosis. Because the frequency of ethanolic encephalopathy is increased and plays a major role in the sudden death of ethanolic patients, we have studied the chronic ethanolic encephalopathy both in deceased and in living patients, presenting different pathologies related to the chronic ethanol consumption. The present study investigated the effects of chronic ethanolic encephalopathy on the central nervous system based both on the histopathological exam of the tissular samples and the imaging investigation, such as MRI and CT.

  10. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  11. Hashimoto encephalopathy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Koskinas, John; Tzannos, Konstatinos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios; Mailis, Antonis; Tolis, George; Hadziyannis, Stephanos

    2005-10-01

    To report an instance of Hashimoto encephalopathy probably resulting from pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. A 36-year-old woman with a 10-year history of autoimmune thyroiditis presented with symptoms and signs consistent with Hashimoto encephalopathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Hashimoto encephalopathy is a rare autoimmune condition that occurs in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and high titers of antithyroid antibodies. It is characterized by a variety of nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein level, and abnormal brain imaging and electroencephalogram. Prompt response to corticosteroids is observed in most cases. As of August 29, 2005, this is the first report of such an association. An objective causality assessment revealed that the Hashimoto encephalopathy was probably caused by the patient's medications. Hashimoto encephalopathy may rarely be triggered by interferon alfa therapy in susceptible patients.

  12. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  13. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the availability cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in sports has been known for > 85 years, and has experienced a resurgence of interest over the past decade, both in the media and in the scientific community. However, there appears to be a disconnection between the public's perception of CTE and the currently available scientific data. The cognitive bias known as the "availability cascade" has been suggested as a reason to explain this rift in knowledge. This review summarizes and updates the history of CTE in sports, discusses recent epidemiological and autopsy studies, summarizes the evidence base related to CTE in sports, and offers recommendations for future directions.

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Known Causes, Unknown Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Diego; Shively, Sharon B; Edlow, Brian L; Perl, Daniel P

    2017-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neuropathologic diagnosis typically made in human brains with a history of repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI). It remains unknown whether CTE occurs exclusively after rTBI, or whether a single TBI (sTBI) can cause CTE. Similarly, it is unclear whether impact (eg, motor vehicle accidents) and non-impact (eg, blasts) types of energy transfer trigger divergent or common pathologies. While it is established that a history of rTBI increases the risk of multiple neurodegenerative diseases (eg, dementia, parkinsonism, and CTE), the possible pathophysiologic and molecular mechanisms underlying these risks have yet to be elucidated. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...... and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood...

  17. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H.

    2016-01-01

    %) with epileptic spasms or tonic seizures as main seizure type. We found no correlation between severity of seizures and severity of ID or between mutation type and seizure characteristics or cognitive outcome. Neurologic comorbidities including autistic features and movement disorders are frequent. We also report......, and the degree of ID. Accordingly, we hypothesize that seizure severity and ID present 2 independent dimensions of the STXBP1-E phenotype. STXBP1-E may be conceptualized as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder rather than a primary epileptic encephalopathy....

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazi, Apameh; Tator, Charles H; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement.

  19. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  1. Bilirubin encephalopathy due to Rh incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Roberta Ramos Nantes de Castilho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the case of a newborn of an Rh-factorsensitizedmother, who received early hospital discharge while icteric only to be readmitted at an Emergency Service at five days of age with signs of kernicterus. Despite treatment given, the neonate progressed with a clinical picture of bilirubin encephalopathy. The lack of interaction between the obstetric and neonatal teams, premature hospital discharge, and lack of concern of neonatologists with jaundice in a full-term infant are highlighted as causes of a condition that should have disappeared if there had been adequateprevention.

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Transplant-associated Encephalopathy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Jeong; Yum, Mi Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Im, Ho Joon; Kim, Young Hwue; Park, Young Seo; Ko, Tae Sung

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to analyze characteristics of encephalopathy after both hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ pediatric transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 662 pediatric transplant recipients (201 with liver transplantation [LT], 55 with heart transplantation [HT], and 67 with kidney transplantation [KT], 339 with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]) who received their graft organs at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2014. Of the 662 patients, 50 (7.6%) experienced encephalopathy after transplantation. The incidence of encephalopathy was significantly different according to the type of organ transplant: LT, 16/201 (8.0%), HT, 13/55 (23.6%), KT, 5/67 (7.5%), and HSCT, 16/339 (4.7%) (P encephalopathy (n = 14) was the most common encephalopathy for all transplant types, but particularly after HSCT. Hypertensive encephalopathy was the most common after KT and HT, whereas metabolic encephalopathy was the most common after LT. The median time to encephalopathy onset also differed according to the transplant type: 5 days after KT (range 0-491 days), 10 days after HT (1-296 days), 49.5 days after HSCT (9-1,405 days), and 39 days after LT (1-1,092 days) (P = 0.018). The mortality rate among patients with encephalopathy was 42.0% (n = 21/50). Only 5 patients died of neurologic complications. Transplant-associated encephalopathy presented different characteristics according to the type of transplant. Specialized diagnostic approach for neurologic complications specific to the type of transplant may improve survival and quality of life in children after transplantation.

  3. Sudden onset unexplained encephalopathy in infants: think of cannabis intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Eran; Rekhtman, David; Berkun, Yackov; Wexler, Isaiah

    2016-03-01

    The use of cannabis as both a therapeutic agent and recreational drug is common, and its availability is increasing as a result of legalization in many countries. Among older children, the manifestations of cannabis intoxication are numerous and include both neurological and systemic manifestations that are frequently non-specific. There have been only a few reports detailing cannabis intoxication in infants and toddlers. We describe three infants who presented to the emergency department with encephalopathic signs without prominent systemic manifestations. During the initial interview of caregivers, no history of exposure to neurotoxic agents was obtained. All three patients were subsequently diagnosed with cannabis intoxication based on urine toxic screens for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The infants recovered with supportive care that included fluids and monitoring. The non-specific symptomatology of cannabis intoxication in infants together with the wide differential for unexplained acute onset encephalopathy may delay diagnosis and lead to inappropriate procedures and interventions such as antimicrobial treatments and imaging studies. Healthcare personnel of emergency rooms, urgent care centers, and general clinics should be aware of the potential risk of cannabis ingestion in young infants. A thorough medical history and toxic screen are warranted in all infants with unexplained decreased sensorium.

  4. Modeling Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Way Forward for Future Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Robson, Matthew J; Lee, John M; Bailes, Julian E; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Huber, Jason D; Petraglia, Anthony L; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathological, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development, however, remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work, we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single- and repetitive-injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology.

  5. The role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE represents a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by acute or chronic liver failure. Hyperammonemia plays a pivotal role in the development of HE through modulation of neurotransmission, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficit. Neurosteroids contribute significantly to increased GABAergic tone in HE. Ammonia, in combination with manganese and proinflammatory cytokines, stimulate neurosteroid synthesis by up-regulation of translocator protein, a component of multiprotein complex that stimulate cholesterol transport into astrocytic mitochondria. Cholesterol serves as a substrate for the synthesis of neurosteroids allopregnanolone and tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone. After release from astrocytes, allopregnanolone and tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone potentiate GABAergic transmission by positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptor, thus contributing to cognitive deficit and alterations in sleep-wake cycle. Additional potential mechanisms of neurosteroid action in HE include modulation of serotoninergic, cholinergic, glutamatergic, glycinergic, and opioid receptor activities, as well as modulation of gene expression. This review aimed to summarize current knowledge of the role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of HE.

  6. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C

    2010-06-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children.

  7. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children. (orig.)

  8. MODELING CHRONIC TRAUMATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY: THE WAY FORWARD FOR FUTURE DISCOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Turner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE, our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathologic, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development however remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single and repetitive injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children with kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Gera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinic-radiographic entity of heterogeneous etiologies that are grouped together because of similar findings on neuro-imaging and associated symptom complex of headache, vision loss, altered mentation, and seizures. Although usually considered benign and reversible, characteristics of this syndrome in pediatric patients remain obscure. This case series included 11 patients (8 males, 3 females, age 3-15 years of PRES during September 2010 to February 2012 out of a total 660 renal pediatric patients (1.66%. We studied their clinical profile, contributory factors, and outcome. Presenting symptoms were headache in 73%, dimness of vision or cortical blindness in 36%, seizures in 91%, and altered mentation in 55%. The associated renal diseases were acute renal failure (55%, chronic renal failure (9%, and 36% had normal renal function. The contributory factors were uncontrolled hypertension (100%, severe hypoproteinemia (9%, persistent hypocalcemia (9%, hemolytic uremic syndrome (36%, cyclosporine toxicity (9%, lupus nephritis (9%, high hematocrit (9%, and pulse methylprednisolone (9%. Brain imaging showed involvement of occipito-parietal area (100% and other brain areas (63%. All but one patient of hemolytic uremic syndrome had complete clinical neurological recovery in a week, and all had normal neurological imaging after 4-5 weeks. PRES is an underdiagnosed entity in pediatric renal disease patients. Associated hypertension, renal disease, and immunosuppressive treatment are important triggers. Early diagnosis and treatment of comorbid conditions is of prime importance for early reversal of syndrome.

  10. Acute cortical blindness caused by pre-eclampsia in the antepartum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case report of a patient presenting posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), a rare acute neurological condition associated with pre-eclampsia. A possible common aetiology and successful clinical management approach is reported.

  11. Pulp revascularization in an immature necrotic tooth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Richard; Park, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Immature permanent teeth damaged by caries or trauma can present a challenge to dentistry. Currently, triple antibiotic paste (TAP) containing ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline is used to attempt revascularization in necrotic immature teeth. Therefore, the purpose of this report was to present a case of pulp revascularization in an immature necrotic tooth. An 8-year-old male presented with trauma to the permanent maxillary left and right central incisors. Upon clinical and radiographic examination, the left central incisor was deemed necrotic. Revascularization therapy was performed over multiple visits. At 11 months follow-up, healing of the periapical area and apexogenesis were found to be complete. With an increasing breadth of clinical evidence and practitioner acceptance, regenerative techniques may become a standard technique in treating immature necrotic permanent teeth.

  12. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding...

  13. Problems of ileostomy in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlik, A; Höllwarth, M E; Windhager, U; Schober, P H

    1994-01-01

    Exteriorization of the intestine and resection of the gangrenous bowel are major therapeutic regimens for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Ileostomy associated complications are well known, therefore the time of ileostomy closure is a matter for discussion. Between 1975 and 1992, 84 patients with NEC were treated surgically. Ileostomies were performed in 37 children (44%). Of these 37 neonates, 9 (7M, 2F) died. In the remaining 28 patients (16M, 12F) with a mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks and a mean birth weight of 2412 g, ileostomies were performed between the 2nd and 11th days after birth. On average, the stomies were in function for 91 days, and within this period the average weekly weight gain was 153 g. Nineteen patients of this group did not show any problems attributable to the ileostomy. In 9 patients (32%) complications occurred, requiring a preplanned closure of the stoma. Postinflammatory strictures of bowel were diagnosed in 9 patients and resection of the stenotic intestine was performed at the same time as stoma closure. In conclusion, an appropriate weight gain can be achieved in patients with an ileostomy with an adequate feeding regimen. In otherwise uncomplicated cases, ileostomy closure can be delayed by up to 10 weeks when simultaneous surgical correction of additional intestinal strictures is possible. In one-third of patients with an ileostomy, however, complications may occur and urge a preplanned closure of the stoma.

  14. Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Catherine D

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (ALF) is a complex and rapidly progressive syndrome that results from a variety of age-dependent etiologies. It is defined by the acute onset of liver disease with no evidence of chronic liver disease. There must be biochemical or clinical evidence of severe liver dysfunction as defined by an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥2. If hepatic encephalopathy is present, INR should be ≥1.5. Unfortunately, due to the rarity of ALF in pediatric patients, there is a paucity of diagnostic and management algorithms and each patient must have an individualized approach. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(12):e433-e438.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in Pug dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, B D; Levine, J M; Fosgate, G T; de Lahunta, A; Flegel, T; Matiasek, K; Miller, A; Silver, G; Sharp, N; Greer, K; Schatzberg, S J

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) are not well documented. To describe common MRI features of NME, to compare the MRI features to histopathologic findings, and to determine whether or not MRI lesions are predictive of survival time. Eighteen Pugs with NME. Retrospective MRI case study of Pugs identified by a search of medical records at 6 veterinary institutions. Eighteen dogs met inclusion criteria of histopathologically confirmed NME and antemortem MRI exam. MRI lesions were characterized and compared with histopathology with the kappa statistic. Survival times were compared with MRI findings by use of Mann-Whitney U-tests and Spearman's rho. Twelve of 18 lesions were indistinctly marginated with mild parenchymal contrast enhancement. Prosencephalic (17/18) lesion distribution included the parietal (16/18), temporal (16/18), and occipital (16/18) lobes. There were cerebellar (4/18) and brainstem (3/18) lesions. Asymmetric lesions were present in both gray and white matter in all dogs. Falx cerebri shift was common (11/18), and 6 dogs had brain herniation. Leptomeningeal enhancement was present in 9/18 dogs. A moderate positive association was found between parenchymal contrast enhancement and both necrosis (kappa= 0.45; P= .045) and monocytic inflammation (kappa= 0.48; P= .025). Higher MRI lesion burden was correlated with longer time from disease onset to MRI (P= .045). MRI lesion burden did not correlate to survival time. Asymmetric prosencephalic grey and white matter lesions with variable contrast enhancement were consistent MRI changes in Pugs with confirmed NME. While not pathognomonic for NME, these MRI characteristics should increase confidence in a presumptive diagnosis of NME in young Pugs with acute signs of neurologic disease.

  16. Triple diagnostics for early detection of ambivalent necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietbrink, Falco; Bode, Lonneke G; Riddez, Louis; Leenen, Luke P H; van Dijk, Marijke R

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive and potential lethal condition. Over the last decade time to surgery decreased and outcome improved, most likely due to increased awareness and more timely referral. Early recognition is key to improve mortality and morbidity. However, early referral frequently makes it a challenge to recognize this heterogeneous disease in its initial stages. Signs and symptoms might be misleading or absent, while the most prominent skin marks might be in discrepancy with the position of the fascial necrosis. Gram staining and especially fresh frozen section histology might be a useful adjunct. Retrospective analysis of 3 year period. Non-transferred patients who presented with suspected necrotizing fasciitis are included. ASA classification was determined. Mortality was documented. In total, 21 patients are included. Most patients suffered from severe comorbidities. In 11 patients, diagnoses was confirmed based on intra-operative macroscopic findings. Histology and/or microbiotic findings resulted in 6/10 remaining patients in a change in treatment strategy. In total, 17 patients proved to suffer necrotizing fasciitis. In the cohort series 2 patients died due to necrotizing fasciitis. In the early phases of necrotizing fasciitis, clinical presentation can be ambivalent. In the present cohort, triple diagnostics consisting of an incisional biopsy with macroscopic, histologic and microbiotic findings was helpful in timely identification of necrotizing fasciitis.

  17. Clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Seichepine, Daniel R.; Montenigro, Philip H.; Riley, David O.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Stamm, Julie M.; Robbins, Clifford A.; McHale, Lisa; Simkin, Irene; Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in neuropathologically confirmed cases. Methods: Thirty-six adult male subjects were selected from all cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy brain bank. Subjects were all athletes, had no comorbid neurodegenerative or motor neuron disease, and had next-of-kin informants to provide retrospective reports of the subjects' histories and clinical presentations. These interviews were conducted blind to the subjects' neuropathologic findings. Results: A triad of cognitive, behavioral, and mood impairments was common overall, with cognitive deficits reported for almost all subjects. Three subjects were asymptomatic at the time of death. Consistent with earlier case reports of boxers, 2 relatively distinct clinical presentations emerged, with one group whose initial features developed at a younger age and involved behavioral and/or mood disturbance (n = 22), and another group whose initial presentation developed at an older age and involved cognitive impairment (n = 11). Conclusions: This suggests there are 2 major clinical presentations of CTE, one a behavior/mood variant and the other a cognitive variant. PMID:23966253

  18. Prions and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntes Polona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are a unique group of neurodegenerative diseases of animals and humans, which always have a fatal outcome and are transmissible among animals of the same or different species. Scope and Approach. The aim of this work is to review some recent data about animal TSEs, with the emphasis on their causative agents and zoonotic potential, and to discuss why the surveillance and control measures over animal TSEs should remain in force. Key Findings and Conclusions. We still have incomplete knowledge of prions and prion diseases. Scrapie has been present for a very long time and controlled with varied success. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged unnoticed, and spread within a few years to epidemic proportions, entailing enormous economic consequences and public concerns. Currently, the classical BSE epidemic is under control, but atypical cases do, and probably will, persist in bovine populations. The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD of the cervids has been spreading in North America and has recently been detected in Europe. Preventive measures for the control of classical BSE remain in force, including the feed ban and removal of specified risk materials. However, active BSE surveillance has considerably decreased. In the absence of such preventive and control measures, atypical BSE cases in healthy slaughtered bovines might persist in the human food chain, and BSE prions might resurface. Moreover, other prion strains might emerge and spread undetected if the appropriate preventive and surveillance measures were to cease, leaving behind inestimable consequences.

  19. [Clinical Features and Treatment of Hashimoto Encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yoshimitsu; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is characterized by heterogeneous neurological symptoms. HE is diagnosed based on three criteria-the presence of antithyroid antibodies, neurological symptoms from the cerebrum and/or cerebellum, and a positive response to immunotherapy. We clinically analyzed 18 patients (3 men, 15 women; age range, 38-81years) diagnosed with HE in our hospital from May 2013 to January 2016. Eleven patients showed sensory abnormalities such as strong pain, deep muscle pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia, or neuralgia. Surprisingly, the majority of the pain was distributed in a manner that was not explainable anatomically. Seventeen patients showed motor disturbances, such as weakness, paresis of extremities, or dexterity movement disorder, and eight patients showed give-way weakness, which is disruption of continuous muscle contraction. Other symptoms indicative of brain-related anomalies such as tremor, dystonia, involuntary movements, cerebellar ataxia, parkinsonism, memory loss, and chronic fatigue were also seen. In most patients, such motor, sensory, or higher brain functions were markedly improved with immunosuppressive therapies such as prednisolone, azathioprine, or immunoadsorption therapy. Although give-way weakness and anatomically unexplainable pain are typically considered as being psychogenic in origin, the presence of these symptoms is indicative of HE. HE exhibits diffuse involvement of the entire brain and thus, these symptoms are explainable. We propose that physicians should not diagnose somatoform disorders without first excluding autoimmune encephalopathy.

  20. Probiotics in management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Singh, Jatinderpal

    2016-12-01

    Gut microflora leads to production of ammonia and endotoxins which play important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). There is relationship between HE and absorption of nitrogenous substances from the intestines. Probiotics play a role in treatment of HE by causing alterations in gut flora by decreasing the counts of pathogen bacteria, intestinal mucosal acidification, decrease in production and absorption of ammonia, alterations in permeability of gut, decreased endotoxin levels and changes in production of short chain fatty acids. Role of gut microbiota using prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics have been evaluated in the management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), overt HE and prevention of HE. Many studies have shown efficacy of probiotics in reduction of blood ammonia levels, treatment of MHE and prevention of HE. However these trials have problems like inclusion of small number of patients, short treatment durations, variability in HE/MHE related outcomes utilized and high bias risk, errors of systematic and random types. Systematic reviews also have shown different results with one systematic review showing clinical benefits whereas another concluded that probiotics do not have any role in treatment of MHE or HE. Also practical questions on optimal dose, ideal combination of organisms, and duration of treatment and persistence of benefits on long term follow-up are still to be clarified. At present, there are no recommendations for use of probiotics in patients with HE.

  1. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M. (Med-Health, Ltd. Clinic, Lafayette, LA (United States)); Morrow, L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Subramanian, K. (Lafayette General Hospital, LA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Atypical presentation of human bocavirus: Severe respiratory tract infection complicated with encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Hacer; Sık, Guntulu; Salman, Nuran; Sutcu, Murat; Tatli, Burak; Ciblak, Meral Akcay; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Citak, Agop; Somer, Ayper

    2015-11-01

    Human bocavirus (HBOV) has been reported as a worldwide distributed respiratory pathogen. It has also been associated with encephalitis recently by detection of the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presented with encephalitis. This retrospective study aimed to present clinical features of HBOV infections in children with respiratory symptoms and describe unexplained encephalopathy in a subgroup of these patients. Results of 1,143 pediatric nasal samples from mid-December 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed for detection of HBOV. A multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay was used for viral detection. Medical records of the patients were retrospectively analyzed. HBOV was detected in 30 patients (2.6%). Median age was 14 months (5-80). Clinical diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (n = 10), bronchopneumonia (n = 9), acute bronchiolitis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), acute bronchitis (n = 1), and asthma execarbation (n = 1). Hospitalization was required in 16 (53.3%) patients and 10 (62.5%) of them admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Noninvasive mechanical ventilation modalities was applied to four patients and mechanical ventilation to four patients. Intractable seizures developed in four patients while mechanically ventilated on the 2nd-3rd days of PICU admission. No specific reason for encephalopathy was found after a thorough investigation. No mortality was observed, but two patients were discharged with neurological sequela. HBOV may lead to respiratory infections in a wide spectrum of severity. This report indicates its potential to cause severe respiratory infections requiring PICU admission and highlights possible clinical association of HBOV and encephalopathy, which developed during severe respiratory infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical and imaging correlates of EEG patterns in hospitalized patients with encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Raoul; Stevens, Robert D; Kaplan, Peter W

    2013-04-01

    To identify the relationship between pathologic electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, clinical and neuroradiological abnormalities, and outcome in hospitalized patients with acute encephalopathy. This 5-year cohort study was performed at an academic tertiary care center. EEGs in 154 patients with altered mental status were classified according to five predefined patterns: Isolated continuous slowing of background activity (theta, theta/delta, and delta activity) and patterns with slowing background activity with episodic transients [i.e., triphasic waves (TWs) or frontal intermittent delta activity (FIRDA)]. Clinical characteristics, blood tests and neuroimaging were compared among groups. Associations between EEG patterns and structural and non-structural abnormalities were calculated. Glasgow Outcome Score >3 at discharge was defined as favorable and 1-3 as unfavorable outcome. In multivariable analyses, theta was associated with brain atrophy (OR 2.6, p = 0.020), theta/delta with intracerebral hemorrhages (OR 6.8, p = 0.005), FIRDA with past cerebrovascular accidents (OR 2.7, p = 0.004), TWs with liver or multi-organ failure (OR 6, p = 0.004; OR 4, p = 0.039), and delta activity with alcohol/drug abuse with or without intoxication, and HIV infection (OR 3.8, p = 0.003; OR 9, p = 0.004). TWs were associated with death (OR 4.5, p = 0.005); theta/delta with unfavorable outcomes (OR 2.5, p = 0.033), while patients with FIRDA had favorable outcomes (OR 4.8, p = 0.004). In encephalopathic patients, well-defined EEG patterns are associated with specific pathological conditions and outcomes, suggesting that mechanistic hypotheses underlie these abnormal EEG patterns. To clarify the respective contributions of non-structural and structural abnormalities to encephalopathy reflected in specific EEG patterns, prospective studies using continuous EEG monitoring during the acute onset of encephalopathy are needed.

  4. ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHANGES AND PROGNOSIS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF EPILEPSY IN PATIENTS WITH POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE ENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME (PRES: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Bobylova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is an acute and usually reversible condition characterized by a rapid onset, convulsive syndrome, impaired consciousness, headache, visual impairment, nausea or vomiting, transient focal neurological signs, and arterial hypertension. Patients with PRES have changes in the white matter of the brain detected using magnetic resonance imaging; these changes are predominantly located in the occipital-temporal-parietal area. Increased blood pressure and severe metabolic disorders are the risk factors for PRES. Most of the patients have generalized tonic-clonic or focal seizures and epileptiform activity on the electroencephalogram during the acute period of PRES, but they do not develop epilepsy after this episode.

  5. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy by on-line hemodiafiltration: a case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Mitsugi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is thought that a good survival rate of patients with acute liver failure can be achieved by establishing an artificial liver support system that reliably compensates liver function until the liver regenerates or a patient undergoes transplantation. We introduced a new artificial liver support system, on-line hemodiafiltration, in patients with acute liver failure. Methods This case series study was conducted from May 2001 to October 2008 at the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care academic medical center. Seventeen consecutive patients who admitted to our hospital presenting with acute liver failure were treated with artificial liver support including daily on-line hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange. Results After 4.9 ± 0.7 (mean ± SD on-line hemodiafiltration sessions, 16 of 17 (94.1% patients completely recovered from hepatic encephalopathy and maintained consciousness for 16.4 ± 3.4 (7-55 days until discontinuation of artificial liver support (a total of 14.4 ± 2.6 [6-47] on-line hemodiafiltration sessions. Significant correlation was observed between the degree of encephalopathy and number of sessions of on-line HDF required for recovery of consciousness. Of the 16 patients who recovered consciousness, 7 fully recovered and returned to society with no cognitive sequelae, 3 died of complications of acute liver failure except brain edema, and the remaining 6 were candidates for liver transplantation; 2 of them received living-related liver transplantation but 4 died without transplantation after discontinuation of therapy. Conclusions On-line hemodiafiltration was effective in patients with acute liver failure, and consciousness was maintained for the duration of artificial liver support, even in those in whom it was considered that hepatic function was completely abolished.

  6. Retroperitoneoscopic Anatomical Necrosectomy: A Modified Single-Stage Video-Assisted Retroperitoneal Approach for Treatment of Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guodong; Hu, Minggen; Liu, Rong; Xu, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Video-assisted retroperitoneal necrosectomy is a minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis. This study evaluated the safety and feasibility of a modified single-stage video-assisted retroperitoneal necrosectomy, retroperitoneoscopic anatomical necrosectomy (REAN). Between September 2010 and May 2012, a total of 17 patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis underwent REAN. The surgical procedures were similar to retroperitoneoscopic pancreatectomy, in which 3 trocars are utilized. Briefly, the perirenal space was entered through the posterior pararenal space. Dissection proceeded from posterior to anterior direction to expose the dorsal side of the perirenal fascia. This was opened to reach the anterior perirenal space, where the peripancreatic abscess was located. Necrotic tissue was then debrided and catheter drainage was performed in a single stage. Operating time ranged from 45 to 100 minutes with minimal blood loss. All patients recovered except for one who died. Major perisurgical complications included peritoneal injury (1 patient), splenic vein injury (1 patient), retroperitoneal infection with paralytic ileus (1 patient), hydrothorax and atelectasis (2 patients), and subcutaneous cellulitis beneath the incision (3 patients). Two patients required additional percutaneous catheter drainage, and 1 patient required a laparotomy to debride the remaining necrotic tissue. Postoperative hospital stay ranged from 21 to 64 days. This study demonstrates that REAN, a modified single-stage video-assisted retroperitoneal approach, was safe and feasible for the treatment of infected necrotizing pancreatitis. The advantages of this procedure include direct access with shorter operating time, complete necrotic tissue debridement, easy hemostasis, simple manipulation, and easy drainage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Use of recombinant factor VIIa in the treatment of massive retroperitoneal bleeding due to severe necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, a growing number of case reports and case series have suggested that the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa may be effective in treatment of patients with non-hemophilic acquired coagulopathy not responding to conventional treatment such as major surgery, major trauma, sepsis, necrotizing pancreatitis and bleeding due to cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Case report. We presented a septic patient with massive, lifethreatening bleeding caused by retroperitoneal necrosis, due to severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis. As conservative treatment (blood, plasma, cryoprecipitates and platelet transfusions failed to induce cessation of bleeding, the patient was urgently operated on. In spite of usual procedures of surgical hemostasis (ligation, suture, thermocauterisation, fibrin glue, temporary tamponade, hemorrhage could not be stopped. The patient manifested the signs of hypothermia and metabolic acidosis and, therefore, the decision was made to use recombinant activated factor VII (Novo Seven®. The application of rFVIIa resulted in significant discontinuation of hemorrhage, restoration to normal blood count as well as other relevant coagulation parameters. Conclusion. Although application of rFVIIa is still in the initial clinical phase, and the experience is based mainly on uncontrolled series as well as on individual observations, it seems that this drug can be promising, potent and attractive adjunctive prohemostatic agent. This drug may play a beneficial role in the treatment of serious and unresponsive, 'nonsurgical', life-threatening bleeding due to severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

  8. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  9. Role of diffusion weighted MR in the discrimination diagnosis of the cystic and/or necrotic head and neck lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Osman [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya 42080 (Turkey); Paksoy, Yahya [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya 42080 (Turkey)]. E-mail: yahyapaksoy@yahoo.com; Erayman, Ibrahim [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Infectious Disease, Konya (Turkey); Kivrak, Ali Sami [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya 42080 (Turkey); Arbag, Hamdi [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Konya (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose was to determine whether the diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was able to differentiate necrotic tumor or metastatic lesions from infected necrotic lesions such as abscesses and necrotic lymphadenitis in the neck. Materials and methods: DWI was performed on 37 consecutive patients with 85 head and neck necrotic and cystic lesions. The lesions were classified into four categories: metastatic lymph node involvement including lymphoma, necrotic tumor, abscesses and necrotic lymphadenitis. Each lesion was histopathologically studied and proved. Results: In 12 patients, there were 35 necrotic lymphadenitis (necrotic tuberculosis lymphadenitis, n = 18; necrotic nonspecific suppurative lymphadenitis, n = 17). Of the 15 necrotic metastatic nodes, 11 lesions were lymphomatous involvement and 4 lesions were other tumor involvement. Other 11 patients have abscesses. Thirteen primary tumoral necrotic lesions arose in the neck of nine patients. All of the abscesses and necrotic lympadenitis showed hyperintensity on DWI, in contrast to necrotic tumor and necrotic nodal metastasis that showed hypointensity on DWI. DWI successfully differentiated metastatic nodes and necrotic tumors from necrotic lymphadenitis and abscesses. Conclusion: DWI may be supportive for differentiating necrotic tumor lesions such as necrotic tumor and metastatic necrotic nodes from the infective necrotic lesions such as necrotic lymphadenitis and abscesses in the head and neck.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of postresuscitation encephalopathy. Sequential change and correlation with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Yasunobu; Wataya, Takafumi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Hojo, Masato; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen; Kikuta, Kenichiro; Ishii, Akira [Kurashiki Central Hospital, Okayama (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the findings of sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in postresuscitation encephalopathy. Although its outcome is known to be overwhelming, but its acute findings by variable imaging methods are subtle and show only limited values. The correlation of the findings of MRI with clinical outcome were also analyzed. Twelve patients with global cerebral anoxia who underwent MRI with conventional and diffusion-weighted imaging were enrolled in this study. Compared with normal MRI images, abnormal signal regions were checked and described in cortex, basal ganglia and white matter. Also medical records were carefully reviewed to study the cause, the time necessary for resuscitation and long term clinical outcome. The earliest finding was obtained by diffusion-weighted image less than 24 hours (acute period) in bilateral cerebral cortex as bright high signal intensity regions. Similar abnormality of bright high signal area in FLAIR and T2 was followed according to the time elapsed in early subacute period (1-13 days). Succeedingly, white matter was involved and laminar necrosis in cortical area was observed in late subacute period (14-20 days). Finally, diffuse brain atrophy and obtundation of gray-white matter junction were seen in chronic stage (after 21 days). These MR findings were coincided well with histopathological findings reported in literatures. The poor outcome was closely and significantly correlated with abnormality in MR images. MRI was a useful diagnostic modality to diagnose the whole brain ischemic encephalopathy and to predict the prognosis. (author)

  11. Expression of glutamine transporter isoforms in cerebral cortex of rats with chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Escobar, Thayssa D.C.; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that occurs due to acute and chronic liver diseases, the hallmark of which is the increased levels of ammonia and subsequent alterations in glutamine synthesis, i.e. conditions associated with the pathophysiology of HE. Under physiologica...... that the expression of the glutamine transporter isoforms is unchanged during chronic HE, and thus likely not to participate in the pathological mechanisms related to the imbalance in the GABAergic neurotransmitter system observed in this neurologic condition.......Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that occurs due to acute and chronic liver diseases, the hallmark of which is the increased levels of ammonia and subsequent alterations in glutamine synthesis, i.e. conditions associated with the pathophysiology of HE. Under physiological...... conditions, glutamine is fundamental for replenishment of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA. The different isoforms of glutamine transporters play an important role in the transfer of this amino acid between astrocytes and neurons. A disturbance in the GABA biosynthetic pathways has been...

  12. Methotrexate encephalopathy: Two cases in adult cancer patients, who recovered with pathophysiologically based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodeinde A Coker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Neurotoxicity is a serious and sometimes fatal adverse effect that can occur following methotrexate treatment. We describe two adult patients with hematological malignancies with methotrexate encephalopathy who recovered with dextromethorphan therapy. Results: Case 1: A 24-year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed the acute onset of bilateral facial weakness and slurred speech after his first treatment with high-dose intravenous methotrexate. The clinical scenario and a head magnetic resonance imaging supported a diagnosis of methotrexate encephalopathy. Treatment with dextromethorphan was coincident with recovery. Case 2: A 65-year-old female with recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was treated with high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Two weeks after a cycle, she developed hypoactive delirium, marked lethargy, ocular ataxia, and a right-sided facial weakness. Within 2 days of starting dextromethorphan, there was improvement with clinical recovery. Conclusions: These two cases suggest that N-methyl d-aspartate receptor activation by homocysteine may play an important role in the pathogenesis of methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  13. Necrotizing Enterocolitis: Old Problem with New Hope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Fen Wu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC and mortality rate associated with this disease are not decreasing despite more than three decades of intensive research investigation and advances in neonatal intensive care. Although the etiology of NEC is not clearly elucidated, the most accepted hypothesis at present is that enteral feeding in the presence of intestinal hypoxia-ischemia-reperfusion, and colonization with pathogens provokes an inappropriately accentuated inflammatory response by the immature intestinal epithelial cells of the preterm neonate. However, delayed colonization of commensal flora with dysbiotic flora with a predominance of pathologic microorganisms plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of NEC. Recent studies have further identified that NEC infants have less diverse flora compared to age-matched controls without NEC. Increased gastric residual volume may be an early sign of NEC. An absolute neutrophil count of <1.5 × 109/L and platelets below 100 × 109/L are associated with an increased risk for mortality and gastrointestinal morbidity. Nonspecific supportive medical management should be initiated promptly. Sudden changes in vital signs such as tachycardia or impending shock may indicate perforation. A recent meta-analysis investigating using probiotics for prevention of NEC with a total of 2176 preterm very low birth weight infants found a success rate of just 1/25. Careful monitoring of the residual volume, and of serious changes in hemograms and vital signs may help in early diagnosis and prediction of when to perform medical or early surgical intervention. In term of prevention, administration of oral probiotics containing Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus is a simple and safe method that attempts to early establish of commensal flora balance to inhibit pathogenic flora and an inflammatory response.

  14. Epidemiology of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in Pug dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J M; Fosgate, G T; Porter, B; Schatzberg, S J; Greer, K

    2008-01-01

    Although the histopathologic features of necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) have been described previously, little information is available concerning the signalment, geographic distribution, seasonal onset, treatment, and survival of affected dogs. Sixty Pugs with NME and 14 contemporaneous control Pugs with other intracranial diseases (non-NME group). Pugs that were euthanized or died because of intracranial disease were prospectively obtained. All dogs had necropsy, histopathology, and testing for various infectious diseases and were subsequently divided into NME and non-NME groups. Signalment, geographic distribution, seasonal onset, treatment, and survival were compared between groups. In Pugs with NME, median age at onset of clinical signs was 18 months (range, 4-113 months). A greater proportion of female dogs were present in the NME group (40/60) compared with the control group (6/14). Pugs with NME had a significantly lower mean weight (7.81 kg) than control Pugs (9.79 kg) (P= .012). Mean survival in Pugs with NME was 93 days (range, 1-680 days), with dogs receiving any form of treatment living significantly longer than those that were not treated (P= .003). Anticonvulsive drugs were the only treatment significantly associated with longer survival (P= .003). NME appears to be a common cause of intracranial signs in Pugs, based on the high proportion of NME dogs reported in this population. Pugs with NME are most commonly young adult female dogs. Although further investigation is needed to determine the optimal treatment of NME, anticonvulsive drugs appear to beneficially affect duration of survival.

  15. Necrotizing soft tissue infection in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestorović Milica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI is a life-threatening condition, characterized by widely spread necrosis of skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia and muscles. Treatment involves surgical debridement and broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Mortality is still high due to diagnostic delays. NSTI is rare in general population, there are even less literature data of this condition in pregnancy. Timely diagnosis and therapy is crucial for outcome of these patients. Clinicians should have in mind NSTI in patients with perianal infections, especially in cases where immunosuppressive role of pregnancy is present. Case outline. We present a case of a 21-year-old pregnant woman with NSTI spreading from perianal region. The patient was admitted to hospital in the 31st week of otherwise healthy twin pregnancy one day after incision of perianal abscess. At admission she was examined by a gynecologist; vital signs were stable, laboratory results showed the presence of infection. She was referred for another surgical procedure and broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. The next morning the patient complained of intense abdominal pain. Clinical exam revealed only discrete redness of the skin tender on palpation, crepitating. She was immediately referred to surgery. Intraoperative findings revealed massive soft tissue infection spreading up to the chest wall. Wide skin incisions and debridement were performed. The patient developed septic shock and after initial resuscitation gynecologist confirmed intrauterine death of twins and indicated labor induction. Over the next few days the patient’s general condition improved. On several occasions the wounds were aggressively debrided under general anesthesia, which left the patient with large abdominal wall defect. Twenty-three days after the initial operation, the defect was reconstructed with partial-thickness skin grafts, providing satisfactory results. Conclusion. Diagnosis and outcome of

  16. Severe early onset ethylmalonic encephalopathy with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Laura; Garone, Giacomo; Schettini, Livia; Giordano, Carla; Nicita, Francesco; Papoff, Paola; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset encephalopathy, chronic diarrhoea, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis and defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain. High levels of lactic, ethylmalonic and methylsuccinic acids are detected in body fluids. EE is caused by mutations in ETHE1 gene, a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase. Neurologic signs and symptoms include progressively delayed development, hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal movements. We report on the clinical, electroencephalographic and MRI findings of a baby with a severe early onset encephalopathy associated with novel ETHE1 gene mutation. This is the first case described in literature with an early pure epileptic onset, presenting with West syndrome.

  17. Isolated Brainstem Involvement in a Patient with Hypertensive Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with headache, confusion, and bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brainstem edema in hypertensive encephalopathy usually occurs in association with typical supratentorial parieto-occipital changes and is usually asymptomatic. We report here a patient with hypertensive encephalopathy, with isolated brain stem involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Rapid treatment of hypertension resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Prompt recognition of the condition and aggressive treatment of hypertension in such patients is crucial to relieve edema and prevent life-threatening progression.

  18. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli causes cortical tubular necrotic cell death and the release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming-Yuan; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chuang, Chia-Chang; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yu-Huei; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2013-03-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is deregulated in acute kidney injury (AKI) through an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we used a previously described mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection in which uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) were transurethrally inoculated to induce kidney infections. Here, we show that urinary MIF was upregulated during AKI while MIF was abundantly expressed in the renal cortical tubules and that UPEC infection caused a decrease in tubular MIF. Infections with UPEC in vitro caused MIF release in a cell type-dependent manner, which was independent of receptor-mediated internalization, signal transduction, and transcription. Indeed, UPEC infection-induced necrotic cell death in vitro and in vivo correlated with extracellular acidification and processed MIF secretion. These data suggest that MIF is released by necrotic renal cortical tubular cells during UPEC infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  20. Efficacy of liver assisting in patients with hepatic encephalopathy with special focus on plasma exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbøg, Poul; Busk, Troels; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2013-01-01

    , and are used either as a bridge to liver transplantation or liver recovery in patients with fulminant hepatic failure and in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure. This short review will mainly focus on the management and efficacy of doing plasma exchange on HE in patients with acute HE.......Severe liver injury result in development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and often also in brain edema that is a potentially fatal complication. HE and brain edema are correlated to the level and persistence of hyperammonemia and the presence of systemic inflammation. Treatment of HE and brain...... edema is based on restoring and keeping normal physiological variables including tonicity, blood gasses, lactate, temperature and vascular resistance by a wide variety of interventions. In addition liver support devices improve the stage of HE, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and glucose...

  1. Subcutaneous Emphysema in Non-Necrotizing Soft Tissue Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ehsani-Nia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: 63-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis who was sent to the emergency department by his primary care provider for further evaluation of left upper extremity crepitus. The patient fell onto his left elbow two days prior to presentation resulting in immediate swelling and a small laceration. He complained of minimal pain and denied fevers or chills. His medications included metformin, tocilizumab, methotrexate and prednisone. In the ED, the patient was well-appearing, afebrile, with a normal heart rate and in no acute distress. Examination of the left upper extremity revealed no tenderness to palpation but marked crepitus with a scabbed laceration over his olecranon process and was neurovascularly intact. White blood cell count (WBC, sodium, glucose, inflammatory markers and lactate were all within normal limits. Significant findings: X-Rays of the elbow revealed diffuse striated lucencies throughout the soft tissue, consistent with extensive subcutaneous air throughout the superficial and deep tissues. There was no evidence of a fracture. Discussion: The initiating mechanism for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs is a disruption of the fascial planes, most commonly by trauma. The inoculated bacteria rapidly spread and surgical debridement is necessary.1-3 Early recognition and disposition to the operating room in 51 are correlated with increased morbidity and mortality.5 Additionally, it has been found that immunocompromised patients exhibit atypical presentations of NSTIs.6 The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC score is often used to risk stratify patients when there is suspicion for an NSTI.7 The patient discussed here had a LRINEC score of 0. However, the physical exam finding of crepitus, coupled with his history of immunocompromised status and subcutaneous air on X-ray made the diagnosis of NSTI seem likely. However, upon surgical exploration

  2. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-03-14

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE.

  3. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  4. Does this patient have hypertensive encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Foteini; Rizos, Evangelos C; Kosta, Paraskevi; Argyropoulou, Maria I; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for further investigation and management of brain metastases. The patient was initially presented with a 4-day history of confusion. On the day of admission, the patient was confused, agitated, disorientated in place and time, and had visual disturbances. His blood pressure was repeatedly recorded high, with levels of systolic blood pressure between 170-210 mm Hg. A brain magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of high signal on T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, located bilaterally in the white matter of the occipital regions and unilateral in the left frontal lobe, suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Aggressive treatment of hypertension resulted in complete resolution of the clinical and radiologic features of the syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wernicke encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, A; Brandel, J P; Grignon, Y; Sazdovitch, V; Seilhean, D; Faucheux, B; Privat, N; Brault, J L; Vital, A; Uro-Coste, E; Pluot, M; Chapon, F; Maurage, C A; Letournel, F; Vespignani, H; Place, G; Degos, C F; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Hauw, J J

    2009-06-01

    We assessed the prevalence of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) in all 657 cases suspected of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) referred from 2001 to 2006 to the French Neuropathology Network of CJD. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed when the diagnosis of WE was made at autopsy. No CJD was found in five cases suspected of sporadic CJD. In these five cases, myoclonus had been observed in four, CSF 14-3-3 protein in two. In 14 other cases, WE was combined with CJD, 13 of which were sporadic. These belonged mainly to the molecular variants of sporadic CJD associated with a long duration of disease. This stresses the necessity of remaining alert to the diagnosis of WE when CJD is suspected.

  6. Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy a real disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has received widespread media attention and is treated in the lay press as an established disease, characterized by suicidality and progressive dementia. The extant literature on CTE is reviewed here. There currently are no controlled epidemiological data to suggest that retired athletes are at increased risk for dementia or that they exhibit any type of unique neuropathology. There remain no established clinical or pathological criteria for diagnosing CTE. Despite claims that CTE occurs frequently in retired National Football League (NFL) players, recent studies of NFL retirees report that they have an all-cause mortality rate that is approximately half of the expected rate, and even lower suicide rates. In addition, recent clinical studies of samples of cognitively impaired NFL retirees have failed to identify any unique clinical syndrome. Until further controlled studies are completed, it appears to be premature to consider CTE a verifiable disease.

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  8. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2012-01-31

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  9. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2009-09-01

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  10. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  11. Two successive necrotic lesions secondary to presumed loxosceles envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarullo, David B; Jacobsen, Ryan C; Algren, D Adam

    2013-06-01

    Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomations with subsequent necrotic skin lesions occur infrequently, and systemic loxoscelism is rarer still. We report a case of 2 successive developing necrotic lesions, each on adjacent medial aspects of the legs, secondary to presumed Loxosceles envenomation. A 31-year-old man with no significant past medical history presented to the emergency department with 2, large, necrotic lesions, 1 on each medial thigh. They had progressed over the course of 1 month from small blisters to large necrotic lesions with eschar. He underwent surgical debridement without skin grafting with no further complications. Bites from recluse spiders that progress to necrosis usually present as single lesions. The differential diagnoses for a necrotic skin lesion is large. The presence of more than 1 lesion argues against Loxosceles envenomation; however, in the absence of underlying infection, systemic diseases, immunodeficiency, or malignancy, the diagnosis must be considered if the case presents in an endemic area. Brown recluse spiders rarely bite multiple times, thus confounding the diagnosis of an already nonspecific clinical finding. Copyright © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Encephalopathy in Wilson disease: copper toxicity or liver failure?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferenci, Peter; Litwin, Tomasz; Seniow, Joanna; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex syndrome of neurological and psychiatric signs and symptoms that is caused by portosystemic venous shunting with or without liver disease irrespective of its etiology...

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An atypical postpartum complication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul, Debashish; Kulkarni, SachinNarayan; Choudhury, MiliDas; Maity, GD

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is presented by headache, altered mental status, blurring of vision, vomiting and seizure in conjunction with radiological finding of posterior cerebral white matter edema...

  14. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Lise L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production of ...... and safety of long-term treatment with rifaximin and evaluate effects of combination therapy with lactulose and branched-chain amino acids for patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy....... of ammonia by gut bacteria and, to some extent, other toxic derivatives from the gut. Clinical trials show that these effects improve episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. A large randomized trial found that rifaximin prevents recurrent episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. Most patients were treated...

  15. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  16. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Childhood Acute Glomerulonepbritis in Benin City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2000-12-31

    Dec 31, 2000 ... Haematuria and proteinuria of varying degrees occurred in all the patients, while antecedent infections were noted in 49.2 percent. Complications included congestive cardiac failure (39.7 percent), urinary tract infection (20.6 percent), acute renal failure (12.7 percent), and hypertensive encephalopathy.

  18. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. Objectives: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. Search methods: We identified trials through...... included randomised clinical trials, irrespective of the bias control, language, or publication status. Data collection and analysis: The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update...

  19. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Through FDDNP PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    characteristic distribution is felt to be the cardinal pathologic feature of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This project will examine whether FDDNP PET...chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have indicated that a characteristic feature of CTE is accumulation of tau protein in the...with age . Table 1 - Regional uptake in ROIs with Age , Years of Pro Fighting, and Number of Pro Fights (Pearson’s correlations; ns – non significant

  20. Diagnosis and Management of Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathies refer to a group of disorders in which the unremitting epileptic activity contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and these can worsen over time leading to progressive cerebral dysfunction. Several syndromes have been described based on their electroclinical features (age of onset, seizure type, and EEG pattern. This review briefly describes the clinical evaluation and management of commonly encountered epileptic encephalopathies in children.

  1. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  2. Pathology of the Superior Colliculus in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A; McKee, Ann C; Cairns, Nigel J

    2017-01-01

    To investigate neuropathological changes in the superior colliculus in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The densities of the tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, dot-like grains, astrocytic tangles, and neuritic plaques, together with abnormally enlarged neurons, typical neurons, vacuolation, and frequency of contacts with blood vessels, were studied across the superior colliculus from pia mater to the periaqueductal gray in eight chronic traumatic encephalopathy and six control cases. Tau-immunoreactive pathology was absent in the superior colliculus of controls but present in varying degrees in all chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases, significant densities of tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, NT, or dot-like grains being present in three cases. No significant differences in overall density of the tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, dot-like grains, enlarged neurons, vacuoles, or contacts with blood vessels were observed in control and chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases, but chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases had significantly lower mean densities of neurons. The distribution of surviving neurons across the superior colliculus suggested greater neuronal loss in intermediate and lower laminae in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Changes in density of the tau-immunoreactive pathology across the laminae were variable, but in six chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases, densities of tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, or dot-like grains were significantly greater in intermediate and lower laminae. Pathological changes were not correlated with the distribution of blood vessels. The data suggest significant pathology affecting the superior colliculus in a proportion of chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases with a laminar distribution which could compromise motor function rather than sensory analysis.

  3. Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehra, H.; MacDermott, N.; Lascelles, R. G.; Taylor, T. V.

    1996-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency is known to lead to certain neurological sequelae including Wernicke- Korsakoff encephalopathy. Signs attributable to this condition include ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, and mental confusion. Recognised predisposing conditions include alcoholism gastric carcinoma, pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged intravenous feeding. We have recently encountered two cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity . Other neurological sequelae are recognised after vertical banded gastroplasty, including Guillain-Barre syndrome, psychosis, and pseudoathetosis, but the causes are multifactorial. PMID:8601118

  4. Wernicke encephalopathy after obesity surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonal; Kumar, Abhay

    2007-03-13

    To characterize the clinical features, risk factors, radiographic findings, and prognosis of Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE, Embase, Ovid, ISI (Science Citation Index), and Google Scholar for case reports, case series, or cohort studies of Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. We found 32 cases (27 of whom were women) reported, from 2 weeks to 18 months after the procedure. Most patients had vomiting as a risk factor (n = 25) and presented with the triad of Wernicke encephalopathy (confusion, ataxia, and nystagmus; n = 21). Optic neuropathy, papilledema, deafness, seizures, asterixis, weakness, and sensory and motor neuropathy were also reported. Characteristic radiographic findings were hyperintense signals in the periaqueductal gray area and dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus; radiographs were normal in 15 patients. One series from Brazil reported 4 patients (among 50 patients) with Wernicke encephalopathy; all presented with vomiting and concomitant peripheral neuropathy at a median of 2.5 months (1.5 to 3 months) after bariatric surgery. Another series identified 2 of 23 patients (both women) with Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery usually occurs between 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively, especially in young women with vomiting. Atypical neurologic features are common. The diagnosis is mainly clinical, because radiographic findings are normal in some patients. Prospective studies to determine the prevalence of this problem and protocols for preventive thiamine supplementation need evaluation.

  5. Quantification of gut lesions in a subclinical necrotic enteritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholamiandehkordi, Ahmad R.; Timbermont, Leen; Lanckriet, Anouk

    2007-01-01

    Currently Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis is a major problem in broiler flocks. In the present study, broilers were inoculated with a combination of Eimeria maxima or overdose coccidial vaccine (one inoculation) with C. perfringens (repeated inoculations). Single C. perfringens......, E. maxima or an overdose of live coccidial vaccine inoculations did not result in grossly visible necrotic gut lesions, while combined inoculation resulted in typical necrotic lesions at approximately 4 days after inoculations with C. perfringens in approximately one-half of the inoculated animals...... defects. The villus length and the villus length/crypt depth ratio were also analysed. This approach proved to be discriminative between single E. maxima infection, overdose of coccidial vaccine or C. perfringens inoculations and the non-inoculated control group, and between the double...

  6. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis with toxic shock syndrome and rapid fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a serious soft tissue infection with rapid progression of inflammatory process among superficial or deep fascia, systemic host response to infection leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS, and multiple organ failure. Lethality is high. Case Outline. A 46-year-old male without co-morbidities was admitted to the Emergency Department with redness, swelling and pain on his right lower leg. He became sick two day s ea rlier with m alaise, chills and shivering. On admission he was hypotensive, anuric, with erythematous rash on his face, neck and chest, with acute ren al failure and elevated creatine phosphokinase level. During the next several hours, the changes on his right lower leg rapidly spread to the whole leg, followed by skin destruction and subcutaneo us bleeding, indicating NF. Aggressive antimicrobial, supportive and symptom atic therapy was initiated immediately and on the same evening surgical intervention was performed. Despite these measures, a rapid development of severe TSS, with lethal outcome, occurred in less than 40 hours after the admission. Stre ptococcus pyogenes (group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from the throat, skin and tissue obtained duri ng the surgery. Conclusion. Necrotizing fasciitis is a very serious disease with unpre dictable course. For that reason doctors must devote a great deal of a ttention to early, i.e. timely diagnosis of this disease, whose treatment with a multid isciplinary approach is very important.

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and association with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, T S; Reis, F; Appenzeller, S

    2016-10-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological complex disorder with many clinical associations and causative factors. It is important to recognize this condition because early diagnosis and treatment usually result in its complete resolution, radiological imaging becoming the key for the correct diagnosis. We retrospectively reviewed charts and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the University of Campinas from January 2005 to July 2015, selecting three cases of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus syndrome who developed PRES, for whom risk factors, characteristics, magnetic resonance imaging findings and neurological resolution were analyzed. We also conducted a review of the English-language literature. The three cases had neurological symptoms like acute onset of headache, altered mental status, cortical blindness and seizures. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated posterior cortical and white matter alterations involving posterior brain territories, which were more conspicuous on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery. Spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging were also important for neuroradiological evaluation. Immunosuppressive drugs were taken in all cases. Partial clinical and radiological recovery was observed in two cases, and complete resolution was observed in the third patient. We found 52 cases of PRES in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Almost all patients were women 94%, ranging from 8 to 62 years old. Posterior brain territory involvements were found in 98% of patients. Hemorrhagic complications involved 26% of patients, becoming a risk factor for clinical sequels. The total percentage of patients with no complete resolution of radiological findings on follow-up images was 27.5%. In patients with autoimmune disorders, endothelial dysfunction may occur secondary to autoimmunity and the use of cytotoxic drugs, supposedly facilitating the occurrence of more

  8. Cutaneous necrotic ulceration due to BCG re-vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Andersen, Ase Bengård; Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt

    2012-01-01

    The case report describes a severe local reaction with large cutaneous necrotic ulcer following bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) re-vaccination. This is a very rare adverse event, and only a few reports have been described in the literature.......The case report describes a severe local reaction with large cutaneous necrotic ulcer following bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) re-vaccination. This is a very rare adverse event, and only a few reports have been described in the literature....

  9. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani S. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery.

  10. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...... results. The CRT method is a 10-minute computerized test of a patient's motor reaction time stability (CRTindex) to 150 auditory stimuli. The PSE test is a 20-minute paper-pencil test evaluating psychomotor speed. Both tests were performed at the same occasion in 129 patients. Both tests were normal...

  12. Stain- and Culture-Negative Necrotizing Granulomas in an Urban Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burke, A; Paulk, A

    2016-01-01

    Context: A recent study found that 10% of necrotizing granulomas are idiopathic. We aimed to study the rate of stain-negative and culturenegative necrotizing granulomas within an urban population. Design...

  13. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  14. Necrotizing Fasciitis: Diagnostic Challenges in a Mute Bedridden Patient with Atypical Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghan-Shyam Lohiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old mute bedridden patient required parenteral corticosteroids and antibiotics, and hospitalization for an acute respiratory illness. After 2 days, staff noted a ~0.3 cm blister on the patient’s right heel. Within 19 hours, blistering increased and the foot became partly gangrenous. The patient developed high fever (40.3°C, and leukocytosis (count: 13×109/L; was 6.5×109/L ten days earlier. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF was diagnosed and treated with emergency leg amputation. Histopathology revealed necrosis of fascia, muscle, subcutaneous tissue, and skin. In bedridden patients, corticosteroids may particularly facilitate serious infections, and initial NF blistering may be mistaken for pressure ulcers. Vigilant and frequent whole body monitoring is necessary for all patients incapable of verbalizing their symptoms.

  15. CT and MR in non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: radiological findings with pathophysiological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Leonardo Guilhermino; Portela, Luiz Antonio Pezzi [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rovira, Alex [University Hospital Vall d' Hebron, MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Costa Leite, Claudia da [Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lucato, Leandro Tavares [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    Non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a clinical condition often related to cardiopulmonary arrest that demands critical management and treatment decisions. Management depends mainly on the degree of neurological impairment and prognostic considerations. Computed tomography (CT) is often used to exclude associated or mimicking pathology. If any, only nonspecific signs such as cerebral edema, sulci effacement, and decreased gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) differentiation are evident. Pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage, a GM/WM attenuation ratio <1.18, and inverted GM attenuation are associated with a poor prognosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is more sensitive than CT in assessing brain damage in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Some MR findings have similarities to those seen pathologically, based on spatial distribution and time scale, such as lesions distributed in watershed regions and selective injury to GM structures. In the acute phase, lesions are better depicted using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) because of the presence of cytotoxic edema, which, on T2-weighted images, only become apparent later in the early subacute phase. In the late subacute phase, postanoxic leukoencephalopathy and contrast enhancement could be observed. In the chronic phase, atrophic changes predominate over tissue signal changes. MR can be useful for estimating prognosis when other tests are inconclusive. Some findings, such as the extent of lesions on DWI and presence of a lactate peak and depleted N-acetyl aspartate peak on MR spectroscopy, seem to have prognostic value. (orig.)

  16. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Masuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions: A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  17. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion. PMID:24932178

  18. Unexpected Maternal Convulsion: An Idiopathic Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Agah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is associated with various clinical manifestations such as headache, blurred vision, confusion and tonic-clonic convulsion. Some of the predisposing factors for PRES include hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia and eclampsia, lupus erythematosus, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs. This condition rarely occurs after normotensive and uneventful pregnancies. Several theories have been proposed on the etiology of PRES. For instance, endothelial injury and brain edema have been reported as possible causes of PRES. Although PRES is a temporary condition, proper and timely management of the disorder in the acute phase is critical for the prevention of permanent neurological complications. During pregnancy, PRES is normally accompanied with hypertension. In this paper, we present a rare case of PRES in a normotensive pregnancy in a 25-year-old parturient woman (Gravida 2, Ab 1. The patient unexpectedly manifested symptoms of tonic-clonic convulsion one hour after an uneventful vaginal delivery, which were successfully managed. According to our observations, PRES has various clinical manifestations with unexpected occurrence in some cases. Therefore, it is recommended that maternity centers be well-equipped with resuscitation tools, emergency drugs and expert staff so as to manage unforeseen PRES efficiently and prevent permanent maternal neurological complications and mortality.

  19. A reversible lesion of the corpus callosum splenium with adult influenza-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura En

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ABstract Introduction Influenza virus-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe childhood illness with a poor prognosis. Adult case reports are rare and, to date, there have been no reports of adults with a mild subcortical encephalopathy with reversible lesions of the corpus callosum splenium. Case presentation A previously healthy 35-year-old man presented with acute progressive tetraplegia, transcortical motor aphasia and a mild decrease in his consciousness during his recovery after receiving oseltamivir phosphate treatment, and influenza type A antiviral medication. The initial magnetic resonance imaging study at day 1 showed symmetrical diffuse lesions in the white matter and a lesion on the central portion of the corpus callosum splenium. These findings had resolved on follow-up studies at day 8 and day 146. His neurological deficits mostly recovered within 12 hours following methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in his blood and cerebrospinal fluid were initially elevated, but rapidly decreased to normal levels by day 8. Conclusion It is important for clinicians to recognize that even in adulthood, the subcortical encephalopathy observed during the therapeutic treatment for influenza type A infection can occur in conjunction with a reversible lesion of the corpus callosum, which may recover quickly. In addition, the cytokine storm in the blood system and the corticospinal cavity may play an important role in the etiology of the disease process.

  20. Wernicke encephalopathy following splenectomy in a patient with liver cirrhosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia-ping; Lu, Yuan-qiang; Huang, Wei-dong

    2010-06-01

    To report a case of Wernicke encephalopathy in the early stage after surgery. A nonalcoholic female patient with hepatitis B-related cirrhosis and hypersplenism underwent splenectomy in a local hospital. No surgical complications occurred and the patient recovered well. However, on the eighth postoperative day she developed psychiatric and neurological disturbance without an obvious cause. She was then admitted to our hospital. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with FLAIR T2 showed symmetric high-signal intensities in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain, which were consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy. She was thus given intramuscular thiamine immediately. After the administration of thiamine, the patient's confused mental state resolved within 3 d, and her dystaxia gradually improved over the next 5 d. The brain MRI with FLAIR T2 was re-examined one month after the episode, and showed nearly complete resolution of the previously abnormal signal intensities in the periaqueductal area of the midbrain. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of acute Wernicke encephalopathy, especially in patients with liver dysfunction.