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Sample records for acute necrotizing encephalopathy

  1. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a Turkish case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Unver

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC is a rare form of acute encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by typical symmetrical lesions in the thalami, with variable involvement of the white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. Clinically there is a rapid neurologic deterioration after a short period of a nonspecific viral-like illness associated with gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Asian children are especially affected. Here we present a 3-year-old boy admitted to our hospital with fever and deterioration of consciousness. The diagnosis of ANEC was made by radiologic findings [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 641-645

  2. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... induced acute encephalopathy 3 Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? ... National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Flu (Influenza) National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  3. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a fatal complication of swine flu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.; Maheshwari, P.K.; Haque, A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a rare condition characterized by the presence of multifocal symmetrical brain lesions involving mainly thalami, brainstem, cerebellum and white matter. ANEC is a serious and life threatening complication of simple viral infections. We present a case of a young child who developed this condition with classical clinical and radiological findings consistent with ANEC, secondary to swine flu (H1N1). He needed ventilatory support and had profound motor and intellectual deficit on discharge. We report this case with aim of raising awareness about this fatal complication of swine flu which has become a global health care issue these days. (author)

  4. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy in a child with H1N1 influenza infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, Jane B.; Remigio, Cheryl; Milligan, Thomas; Deline, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Since the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic of novel influenza A H1N1 in June 2009, there has been a sustained rise in the number of cases of this strain of influenza. Although most cases are mild with complete and uneventful recovery, multiple cases of severe infection with complications including death have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, the majority of fatal outcomes in the United States have been related to pulmonary complications. We report a 12-year-old girl infected with influenza A H1N1 whose clinical course was complicated by rapid progressive neurologic deterioration and striking CT and MRI findings consistent with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE). To our knowledge this has not been reported in the pediatric radiology literature. We hope this case will alert radiologists to this complication and familiarize radiologists with imaging findings that herald ANE. (orig.)

  5. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood in non-Asian patients: report of three cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroyianni, Sotiria D; Gionnis, Dimitrios; Voudris, Konstantinos; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2006-10-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood is a novel type of parainfectious encephalopathy with a racial and geographic predilection, rarely reported from other than East Asian areas. The objective was to describe the clinical, imaging, and other laboratory findings of non-Asian patients with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. Data were collected from three patients diagnosed in Athens over a 4-year period plus 16 cases reported from other European and North American countries. One of the Greek children died, and the other two had a normal outcome. A neuropathologic examination in the fatal case showed edematous necrosis without inflammatory, reactive, or proliferative changes. Data from Greek and other non-Asian patients support the homogeneity of the disease worldwide.

  6. Fatal H1N1-Related Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy in an Adult

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    Yu-Jin Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE is a severe neurological complication of influenza infection, including H1N1 influenza. Many cases of ANE have been reported in the pediatric literature, but very few cases have been described in adults. The cause of ANE remains unknown—the influenza virus is not known to be neurotropic, and evidence of direct viral involvement of the central nervous system (CNS has not been demonstrated in the limited cases of ANE in which pathological specimens have been obtained. Here we report a fatal case of ANE from H1N1 influenza infection in an adult. Neuroimaging and postmortem analysis both showed widespread brain edema, necrosis, and hemorrhage, but molecular studies and postmortem pathology revealed no evidence of direct viral involvement of the CNS. This case of fatal ANE in an adult is consistent with the hypothesis generated from pediatric cases that the host immune response, and not direct viral invasion of the CNS, is responsible for pathogenesis of ANE.

  7. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neilson, Derek E; Adams, Mark D; Orr, Caitlin M D

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a ...

  8. Infection-triggered familial or recurrent cases of acute necrotizing encephalopathy caused by mutations in a component of the nuclear pore, RANBP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M. D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a

  9. Infection-Triggered Familial or Recurrent Cases of Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy Caused by Mutations in a Component of the Nuclear Pore, RANBP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Derek E.; Adams, Mark D.; Orr, Caitlin M.D.; Schelling, Deborah K.; Eiben, Robert M.; Kerr, Douglas S.; Anderson, Jane; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Bye, Ann M.; Childs, Anne-Marie; Clarke, Antonia; Crow, Yanick J.; Di Rocco, Maja; Dohna-Schwake, Christian; Dueckers, Gregor; Fasano, Alfonso E.; Gika, Artemis D.; Gionnis, Dimitris; Gorman, Mark P.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic J.; Hackenberg, Annette; Kuster, Alice; Lentschig, Markus G.; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Marco, Elysa J.; Mastroyianni, Sotiria; Perrier, Julie; Schmitt-Mechelke, Thomas; Servidei, Serenella; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Uldall, Peter; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Goglin, Karrie C.; Tefft, David L.; Aubin, Cristin; de Jager, Philip; Hafler, David; Warman, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rapidly progressive encephalopathy that can occur in otherwise healthy children after common viral infections such as influenza and parainfluenza. Most ANE is sporadic and nonrecurrent (isolated ANE). However, we identified a 7 Mb interval containing a susceptibility locus (ANE1) in a family segregating recurrent ANE as an incompletely penetrant, autosomal-dominant trait. We now report that all affected individuals and obligate carriers in this family are heterozygous for a missense mutation (c.1880C→T, p.Thr585Met) in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2). To determine whether this mutation is the susceptibility allele, we screened controls and other patients with ANE who are unrelated to the index family. Patients from 9 of 15 additional kindreds with familial or recurrent ANE had the identical mutation. It arose de novo in two families and independently in several other families. Two other patients with familial ANE had different RANBP2 missense mutations that altered conserved residues. None of the three RANBP2 missense mutations were found in 19 patients with isolated ANE or in unaffected controls. We conclude that missense mutations in RANBP2 are susceptibility alleles for familial and recurrent cases of ANE. PMID:19118815

  10. Encefalopatia necrotizante aguda: paciente com evolução recidivante e letal Acute necrotizing encephalopathy: patient with a relapsing and lethal evolution

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    Erasmo B. Casella

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A encefalopatia necrotizante aguda foi descrita inicialmente em crianças japonesas e se caracteriza por rápida evolução e lesões simétricas no tronco encefálico, cerebelo e especialmente nos tálamos. Avaliamos uma menina de 7 meses de idade, que apresentou dois episódios de depressão da consciência de rápida instalação e paresias, sem alterações metabólicas. Houve uma rápida melhora na primeira crise, porém o segundo episódio foi fulminante, tendo evoluído para estado de morte encefálica em dois dias. Os estudos de ressonância magnética mostraram lesões simétricas nos tálamos e acometimento também do tronco encefálico e cerebelo.Acute necrotizing encephalopathy was initially reported in Japanese children. The rapid evolution and symmetrical brain lesions seen in the brainstem, cerebellum and specially in the thalamus characterize the disease. We studied a 7-month-old-girl, who presented with two episodes of rapid loss of consciousness and paresis without metabolic disturbances. At the first time she had a rapid improvement, but at the second episode the course was fulminant and in two days she lapsed into a clinical state of brain death. The magnetic resonance studies showed symmetrical lesions in the thalamus and additional lesions involving the brainstem and the cerebellum.

  11. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy secondary to diphtheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Hale; Ozgul, Esra; Agildere, Ahmet Muhtesem

    2010-01-01

    We present a previously healthy 6-month-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with lethargy, hypotonia and focal clonic seizures 6 days following diptheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination. A diagnosis of acute necrotising encephalopathy was made with the aid of MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  12. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy secondary to diphtheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hale; Ozgul, Esra; Agildere, Ahmet Muhtesem [Baskent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    We present a previously healthy 6-month-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with lethargy, hypotonia and focal clonic seizures 6 days following diptheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination. A diagnosis of acute necrotising encephalopathy was made with the aid of MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  13. Apnea in Acute Bilirubin Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sanjiv B.; Bhutani, Vinod K.; Watchko, Jon F.

    2014-01-01

    Central apnea, defined as cessation of breathing for ≥ 20 seconds, is frequent in premature infants born apnea in neonates. This paper explores the reported association between acute bilirubin encephalopathy and symptomatic apneic events in newborns and the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this phenomenon. The prevalence of symptomatic apneic events in reports of acute bilirubin encephalopathy suggests this clinical finding should be considered a sign of bilirubin neurotoxicity. PMID:25239473

  14. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in

  15. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG

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    Nicholas E. Kman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 34-year-old HIV positive female presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of swollen, painful gums. She had difficulty eating and chewing, along with aches and general malaise. The patient was an everyday smoker and was not taking any antiretroviral medication. Significant findings: Physical examination revealed inflamed gingiva, ulceration, and soft tissue necrosis (Image 1 along with mandibular lymphadenopathy (not shown. Given her symptoms, poor oral care, and her immunocompromised state, she was given a diagnosis of Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG or Vincent’s Angina. Discussion: Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG, Vincent’s Angina, or Trench Mouth is the only periodontal disease in which bacteria invade non-necrotic tissue. The etiology is usually secondary to fusobacteria and spirochete overgrowth of bacteria which is normally present in the oral cavity. HIV infection, previous necrotizing gingivitis, poor oral hygiene, malnutrition, smoking, and stress are predisposing factors. Antibiotics and improved nutrition have significantly decreased the incidence of ANUG. The prevalence of ANUG among HIV infected patients varies from 4.3% to 16.0%. ANUG is 20.8 times more likely to be seen in AIDS patients with CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3. In developing countries, like those in Sub-Saharan Africa, incidence of ANUG is increasing among children with a prevalence as high as 23% in children under 10 years of age.1 Treatment for ANUG is multifactorial. Patients need good debridement under anesthesia so dental referral is imperative. Pain control with Ibuprofen or low dose opioids is indicated. Oral hygiene instructions include Chlorhexidine 0.12% twice daily, proper nutrition, appropriate fluid intake, and smoking cessation. For signs of systemic involvement, the recommended antibiotics are Amoxicillin and Metronidazole.2 If left untreated, ANUG may lead to rapid

  16. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Complicating Uteroplacental Apoplexy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheang, Chong-U; Ho, Sai-Wai; Tee, Yi-Torng; Su, Chi-Feng; Chen, Gin-Den

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Abruptio placentae induced by acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is very rare. We present a pregnant woman with a series of complications due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Case Report: Presented herein is a 21-year-old, nulliparous woman at 33 weeks' gestation. The initial episode of abdominal pain was thought to be acute appendicitis (which in actuality was identified to be acute pancreatitis) and was complicated with abruptio placentae, uteroplacental apoplexy, and intra...

  17. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  18. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

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    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  19. Acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis in falciparum malaria

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    José Felipe Reoyo-Pascual

    Full Text Available Malaria is a pathology caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, characteristic of tropical countries. The most frequent symptomatology includes cerebral malaria, jaundice, convulsive crisis, anemia, hypoglycemia, kidney failure and metabolic acidosis, among others. We are presenting the case of a patient diagnosed with malaria who suffered from acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and evolved poorly, as an example of this combination of symptoms, rarely found in our country.

  20. [Leigh's encephalopathy (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Documentation of its evolution through neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J A; González-Ferrer, S; Martínez, C; Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Delgado, W; Mora La Cruz, E

    1996-09-01

    A 30 months-old boy developed bilateral nistagmus, tremor, gait disturbance, hypotonia and disartria. The diagnose of Leigh encephalopathy was suggested on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and laboratory findings. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at an early stage revealed bilateral and symmetric lesions in the putamen, appearing as hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images. Twelve months later a relatively large hypertense area in the posterior brainstem was observed. At this stage, the patient exhibited marked deterioration, dystonic manifestations, rigidity and respiratory disturbances. He died 6 months later for respiratory arrest during bronconeumonic infection. We believe MRI is a valuable means to allow assessment of the evolution of the disease.

  1. Pathophysiological aspects of acute hepatic encephalopathy in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutz, N.E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to elucidate the pathogenesis of acute hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In order to study acute HE, plasma and brain concentrations were measured of ammonia, aminoacids, lactate and polyamines as well as brain energy rich phosphates. In addition new techniques of brain research were developed and applied. 277 refs.; 29 figs.; 18 tabs

  2. Antibiotics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis --- perspective of a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Khan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Prophylactic antibiotics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis is controversial. The mortality of acute necrotizing pancreatitis is 8-25% in the western world. In view of the limited resources available for managing the complications of infected pancreatitis in developing countries, the use of prophylactic antibiotics may be recommended in selected cases. Various antibiotics show good penetration into the pancreatic tissue; imipenem and quinolones have better penetration. Clinical trials on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in necrotizing pancreatitis have been reviewed. Prophylactic antibiotics have been considered if greater than 30% pancreatic necrosis as documented by CT scan. Imipenem can be given for a duration of 10 to 14 days if no systemic complications are present. In a developing country where the cost of managing complications of pancreatitis can be a limiting factor for patients, the use of prophylactic antibiotics early on in the disease in selected cases can be beneficial. (author)

  3. [Acute necrotizing pancreatitis and postmortem autolysis of pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guang-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Gu; Yu, Lin-Sheng; Li, Xing-Biao; Han, Jun-Ge

    2008-04-01

    To compare the pathomorphologic changes between the pancreas in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) and that in acute deaths of rats (within 48 hours) so as to find the distinctions. The animal models of ANP and other acute deaths (electroshock, mechanic asphyxia/strangle, and acute poisoning with tetramine) were established according to the criteria. Half-quantitative grading and image quantitative analysis methods were employed to observe the gross and microscopic changes of the pancreases. Three features including inflammation infiltrate, fat necrosis and calcium deposit in the ANP group were considerably different from that in other acutely died rat group (Pautolysis.

  4. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

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    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  5. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  6. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Complicating Uteroplacental Apoplexy

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    Chong-U Cheang

    2007-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is difficult to diagnose during pregnancy. It presents as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting in hemodynamic changes and may lead to abruptio placentae. Nonsurgical conservative treatment may be useful in such patients.

  7. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

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    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  8. About pathognomonic images: an infrequent case of acute encephalopathy

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    Alessandro Grasso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The occurrence of acute encephalopathy is a dramatic clinical dilemma when usual diagnostic techniques (blood tests, cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid analysis show no abnormalities. CLINICAL CASE We describe a case of a 73 years old man admitted in our Internal Medicine Unit for acute diarrhoea with vomiting and fever who developed a prolonged gastrointestinal dysmotility syndrome with poor nutritional intake. Although a parenteral support was provided, he developed acute encephalopathy followed by hypotension and lactic acidosis without evidence of renal and hepatic disease or glycemic alterations. Likewise, no cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid alterations were found. Conversely, cerebral MRI showed marked and diffuse DP-2 and FLAIR hyperintensity of the mesencephalic tectal plate, of the periaqueductal area, and of the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the median thalamic area. These MRI descriptions were considered pathognomonic of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thus, the immediate use of ev thiamine was followed by a prompt and complete recovery of neurological, hemodinamic and metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS Non-alcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy is a rare and dramatic clinical event with high mortality. In this context, brain MRI is the best diagnostic tool providing a typical picture.

  9. Percutaneous necrosectomy in patients with acute, necrotizing pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruennler, T.; Langgartner, J.; Lang, S.; Salzberger, B.; Schoelmerich, J. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Regensburg (Germany); Zorger, N.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Hamer, O.W. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy. By searching the radiological, surgical and internal medicine databases, all patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy between 1992 and 2004 were identified. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical data, and details about invasive procedures were collected by reviewing patient charts, radiological and surgical reports. The computed tomography severity index (CTSI) scores were determined by reviewing CT images. Eighteen patients were identified. Median Ranson score on admission was 2. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was median 22. Median CTSI score was 7. Initially all patients were treated with CT-guided drainage placement. Because passive drainage proved not to be effective, subsequent minimally invasive, percutaneous necrosectomy was performed. Eight out of 18 patients recovered fully without the need for surgery. Ten of 18 patients required additional surgical necrosectomy. For one of ten patients, percutaneous necrosectomy allowed postponing surgery by 39 days. Four of ten surgically treated patients died: three from septic multiorgan failure, one from pulmonary embolism. Percutaneous minimally invasive necrosectomy can be regarded as a safe and effective complementary treatment modality in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. It is suitable for a subset of patients to avoid or delay surgery. (orig.)

  10. Acute necrotizing mediastinits: a series of four patients

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    Banazadeh M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Acute Necrotizing Mediastinitis (ANM is a lethal disease that without antibiotic therapy and surgical Intervention has a mortality rate about 40% in best medical centers. With development of imaging technology (spiral CT- Scan and shortening in time of diagnosis and surgery, the outcome and prognosis of the patients are improved. The surgical modalities are trans- cervical and trans- thoracic approaches. "n"nCase series: We present a series of four patients with acute necrotizing mediastinitis that admitted to thoracic surgery ward in vali-e-asr Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during years 2009 and 2010. A 31years old woman and three male patients with ages 21, 25 and 63 years. Odontogenic infection was the cause in two cases while pharyngeal perforation and cervical esophageal perforation were the causes of acute necrotizing mediastinitis the others."n"nResults: Mean±SD of hospitalization time was 24±6 days. Infection of cervical space (periviceral spaces and the superior mediastinum were found in all patients while extension of infection below the carina was found in two of them. All patients were operated by trans- cervical approach. One patient was operated by trans- thoracic

  11. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

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    Alok Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke’s encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT including a CT perfusion (CTP scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke’s encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report.

  12. Acute pyogenic necrotizing encephalomyelitis: a fulminant and fatal infection.

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    Madhugiri, Venkatesh Shankar; Gundamaneni, Sudheer Kumar; Santosh, Vani; Jagadisan, Barath; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan Madhavan; Roopesh-Kumar, Rathakrishnan V; Yadav, Awdhesh Kumar; Singh, Manish; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Pariarath, Nisha; Biswal, Niranjan

    2013-05-01

    In this report the authors describe a rare case of a fulminant, pyogenic, necrotizing infection of the spinal cord and brain. Necrotizing lesions of the brain and spinal cord are usually infectious in origin and are associated with high rates of morbidity and death. Although the pathogens responsible have been identified in a few instances, the causal factors remain unknown in many cases. An 11-year-old girl developed acute, rapidly progressive paraplegia with bladder involvement and sensory loss below T-10. She had been treated recently for a Staphylococcus aureus infection of the knee joint precipitated by a penetrating injury with organic matter in the aftermath of a cyclone. Although appropriate antibiotic therapy was instituted, the spinal cord infection progressed to involve the entire spinal cord, brainstem, and brain. This fulminant course was marked by a rapid deterioration in the patient's clinical condition, ultimately leading to her death. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a previously undescribed pattern of longitudinal enhancement along the spinal cord, as well as the white matter tracts in the brainstem and brain. The possible route of spread of infection along the neuraxis is postulated to be the potential space along the white matter tracts. Treatment is not standardized due to the rarity of the condition.

  13. Patterns of Pathomorphological Changes in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kovalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar necrosis is the basic microscopic sign of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Microcirculation disorder is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of ANP besides free radicals and damage of enzymatic origin. This study is dedicated to the description of microscopic changes in the pancreatic stroma in ANP, which leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas with a putative mechanism of endocrine function preservation. This study has been carried out on histological samples of pancreas from 224 patients with ANP. Histological staining was performed with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E, Masson, Gomori methods, and PAS. Microscopy was performed with magnifications of 40×, 100×, and 400×. Vascular endothelial desquamation, stasis, and sludge are typical changes in microcirculation observed in early stages of ANP. Initially, parietal circular intravascular microthrombosis accompanied by endothelial desquamation as early as stromal swelling occurs with no detectable necrosis. Residual stroma appears between areas of necrosis and intact pancreatic tissue. Mucoid swelling is first seen in the perivascular spaces extending to the parenchyma and changing into fibrinoid imbibition causing further necrosis. Reticulin argyrophilic backbone surrounding the pancreatic acini and small ducts decompose. Pancreatic structures, which may be preserved in necrotic tissue, include nerves, major ducts, and Langerhans islets.

  14. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with pancreatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qing; Liu, Yue-Qin; Liu, Yuan; Guan, Yong-Song

    2008-01-01

    Acute necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with pancreatic pseudoaneurysm is a rare emergency associated with high mortality that demands immediate treatment to save the patient’s life. We treated a 64-year-old man who presented with a bleeding pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery caused by acute pancreatitis, using interventional embolizing therapy. In the present report we show that interventional treatment is an effective therapeutic modality for patients with acute necrotizing...

  15. CT and MR manifestations of acute methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiaofen; Yang Bo; Ye Gengxin; Zhang Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT and MR manifestations of methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy and to improve the diagnosing value of CT and MRI. Methods: 40 patients with methyl alcohol intoxication were collected in this study, in which CT scan was performed on 40 cases and MRI on 4 cases. All CT and MRI radiological data of brain were retrospectively studied. Results: 13 of 40 cases showed abnormal findings on brain CT and MRI. The most common manifestation (6/13, 46%)was hypodensity in frontal parietal white matter and external capsule-putamen on CT, which showed long or short T1 and long T2 on MR. Hemorrhage in right putamen was found only in 1 patient (1/13,7%). CT showed low density inbilateral external capsule in 4 cases (4/13,31%), in which MR showed long or short T1 and long T2. Low density lesions in subcortical white matter of bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, cingulate gyms and insular lobes were found in 2 patients (2/13,15%). The more severe clinic manifestation, the more obvious brain lesion CT and MRI showed. Conclusion: Brain CT and MR manifestations have great diagnostic value of acute methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy. MRI was more sensitive and better than CT in finding early brain damage caused by methanol intoxication. (authors)

  16. Early Prediction and Outcome of Septic Encephalopathy in Acute Stroke Patients With Nosocomial Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Dao-Ming; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Septic encephalopathy (SE) is the most common acute encephalopathy in ICU; however, little attention has been focused on risk of SE in the course of acute stroke. Our aim is to investigate the early prediction and outcome of SE in stroke patients with nosocomial coma (NC). Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an ICU of the tertiary teaching hospital in China from January 2006 to December 2009. Ninety-four acute stroke patients with NC were grouped according to with...

  17. Quantitative EEG evaluation in patients with acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Souza Marques da Silva Braga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the use of quantitative EEG (qEEG in patients with acute encephalopathies (AEs and EEG background abnormalities. Method Patients were divided into favorable outcome (group A, 43 patients and an unfavorable outcome (group B, 5 patients. EEGLAB software was used for the qEEG analysis. A graphic of the spectral power from all channels was generated for each participant. Statistical comparisons between the groups were performed. Results In group A, spectral analysis revealed spectral peaks (theta and alpha frequency bands in 84% (38/45 of the patients. In group B, a spectral peak in the delta frequency range was detected in one patient. The remainder of the patients in both groups did not present spectral peaks. Statistical analysis showed lower frequencies recorded from the posterior electrodes in group B patients. Conclusion qEEG may be useful in the evaluations of patients with AEs by assisting with the prognostic determination.

  18. ACUTE BILATERAL VIRAL NECROTIZING RETINITIS : AN UNCOMMON CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year old male with a history of high grade fever 2 days, diarrhea 3 times and vomiting 2 times presented with diminution of vision in right eye of 1 days duration. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was counting finger 1 meter with no pin hole im provement and 20/20 ( S nellen ’ s in the right and left eye respectively. Fundus examination RE revealed white lesion in geographic fashion with clear edge involving macula and in left eye small peanut size white lesion present at paramacular area. Clinicall y a diagnosis of acute necrotizing was made. We started treatment by intra venous antiviral and systemic steroid. ELISA (serum and PCR (aqueous were positive for herpes simplex virus ( I ndex above 1.1 i.e. 1.54 . 1,2 The lesions showed a good response to t he above treatment. At 2 months follow - up, lesion had resolved well with BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 in right and left eye respectively

  19. Prognostic Value of Cytochrome C and Cytokines in Acute Viral Encephalopathy

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum cytochrome c and cytokines were evaluated as prognostic predictors in 29 children (ages 9 mos to 9 yrs 11 mos with viral acute encephalopathies and multiple organ failure at Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

  20. Lung Inflammation Associated With Clinical Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolyk, V; Wobeser, B K; Al-Dissi, A N; Carr, A; Singh, B

    2017-01-01

    Although dogs with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) can develop respiratory complications, there are no data describing lung injury in clinical cases of ANP in dogs. Therefore, we conducted a study to characterize lung injury and determine if pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are induced in dogs with ANP ( n = 21) compared with control dogs ( n = 6). Two pathologists independently graded histologic sections of pancreas from clinical cases to characterize the severity of ANP (total scores of 3-10) compared with controls showing histologically normal pancreas (total scores of 0). Based on histological grading, lungs from dogs with ANP showed inflammation (median score, 1.5; range, 0-3), but the scores did not differ statistically from the control lungs (median score, 0.5; range, 0-2). A grid intersects-counting method showed an increase in the numbers of MAC387-positive alveolar septal mononuclear phagocyte profiles in lungs of dogs with ANP (ratio median, 0.0243; range, 0.0093-0.0734, with 2 outliers at 0.1523 and 0.1978) compared with controls (ratio median, 0.0019; range, 0.0017-0.0031; P dogs with ANP showed labeling for von Willebrand factor in alveolar septal capillary endothelial cells, septal inflammatory cells, and alveolar macrophages. Toll-like receptor 4 and interleukin 6 were variably expressed in alveolar macrophages and septal inflammatory cells in lungs from both ANP and control dogs. Inducible nitric oxide synthase was detected in alveolar macrophages of dogs with ANP only. These data show that dogs with ANP have lung inflammation, including the recruitment of PIMs and expression of inflammatory mediators.

  1. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The accurate diagnosis of neonatal AKI, irrespective of the cause, relies on suboptimal methods such as identification of rising serum creatinine, decreased urinary output and glomerular filtration rate. Studies of AKI biomarkers in adults and children have shown that biomarkers can improve the early diagnosis of AKI. Hypoxia-ischaemia is the proposed aetiological basis of AKI in both NE and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, there is a paucity of studies examining the role of AKI biomarkers specifically in NE. Urinary cystatin C (CysC), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18, kidney injury molecule-1, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, serum CysC and serum NGAL all show good ability to predict early AKI in a heterogeneous critically ill neonatal population including infants post-CPB. Moreover, serum and urinary NGAL and urinary CysC are early predictors of AKI secondary to NE. These findings are promising and open up the possibility of biomarkers playing a significant role in the early diagnosis and treatment of NE-related AKI. There is an urgent need to explore the role of AKI biomarkers in infants with NE as establishing the diagnosis of AKI earlier may allow more timely intervention with potential for improving long-term outcome.

  2. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal Findings Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using “universal” PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98–99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Conclusions Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent. PMID:22413030

  3. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bolivar

    Full Text Available Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods.Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites were amplified using "universal" PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis, gender, and site status (diseased or control site. Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98-99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries.Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent.

  4. Acute anter ior necrotizing scler itis: A case repor t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Keat Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing scleritis is an uncommon but potential disastrous infection to the eye. It is commonly caused by vaso-occlusive autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or surgically-induced, and rarely due to infections. In this article, we presented a rare case of necrotizing scleritis caused by herpes infection in an immunocompromised patient. A 49 years old, retroviral positive gentleman presented to our clinic with a painful, red right eye associated with watering, photophobia and blurring of vision. His right eye rapidly deteriorated leading to an impending perforation of the sclera despite intensive antimicrobial therapy. The patient was started on acyclovir ointment and subsequently improved remarkably salvaging the eye from the need of an evisceration. Although the visual prognosis was poor, structural integrity of the eye was achieved.

  5. Clinical characteristics of acute encephalopathies associated with influenza H1N1-2009 in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yashihiro; Tsuji, Megumi; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Wada, Takahito; Iai, Mizue; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Hayashi, Takuya; Aida, Noriko; Osaka, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We report 12 cases of acute encephalopathy associated with influenza H1N1-2009 treated according to Japanese guideline (2009). In all 12 cases, electroencephalogram presented diffuse or localized high-amplitude slow waves. Brain CT and MRI showed abnormalities in 4 and 6 cases, respectively. We used hypothermia therapy for 5 patients. One patient showed impairment in short term memory, while the rest of the patients showed no sequelae. These 12 cases presented here suggest the early recognition and therapy according to the newly proposed guideline may reduce severe sequelae and mortality by acute encephalopathy associated with influenza H1N1-2009. (author)

  6. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  7. Fatal Necrotizing Encephalopathy after Treatment with Nivolumab for Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Markus Leitinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibitors are antibodies, which enhance cellular and humoral immune responses and are approved for the treatment of various tumors. Immune-related adverse events (irAE involving different organs and systems are, however, among the side-effects. Recent reports of severe persistent neurological deficits and even fatal cases underpin the need for better understanding of the exact pathomechanisms of central nervous system (CNS toxicity. To our knowledge, we report the first biopsy-proven case of fatal necrotizing encephalopathy after treatment with nivolumab. Nivolumab targets the immune-check point inhibitor programmed cell death-1 and was used for squamous non-small cell lung cancer. Partly reversible neurologic and psychiatric symptoms and unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were observed after the first course. Neurological symptoms progressed and recurrent seizures developed after the second course. Brain MRI disclosed multiple edematous and confluent supra- and infratentorial lesions, partly with contrast-enhancement. We excluded autoimmune and paraneoplastic causes and performed ancillary investigations to rule out common and opportunistic infections. Eventually, postmortem histopathological analysis of the brain revealed a necrotizing process, which contrasts previous cases reporting parenchymal immune cell infiltration or demyelination. Appropriate diagnostic pathways and treatment algorithms need to be implemented for the work-up of CNS toxicity and irAEs related to immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment.

  8. Diagnostic criterions of the postradiation encephalopathy in remote period of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyagu, A.I.; Loganovskij, K.N.; Vashchenko, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Development of post-radiation encephalopathy diagnostic criteria on the base of neuro psychic, neuro- and psychofisiological research in patients who suffered with acute radiation disease after Chernobyl catastrophe was the aim of this work. 110 persons of 20-75 years age were investigated. 55 refs., 6 tab., 6 figs

  9. A case of necrotizing mediastinitis induced by acute pyoper icardium

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    Yu-Jang Su

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep neck infection is a potentially life-threatening disease, especially complicated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM. The mean age of DNM is 49–57.8 years old. The commonly seen causes are tonsillar, pharyngeal infection and odontogenic origins. When the deep neck infection extended to the mediastinal spaces, the pleural effusion or pericardial effusion may appear. Here is a rare young lady who had fever and sore throat for 2 weeks, and chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion. After surgical drainage, the Escherichia coli grew over the culture of pericardial effusion. This case is rarely seen in the presence of Escherichia coli pyopericardium originating from DNM in the past. Overall mortality rate of DNM is around 11.2%–17% nowadays. We should keep in mind that for DNM, early diagnosis and aggressively surgical intervention with suitable drainage, and intensive postoperative care should be conducted to lower the morbidity and mortality.

  10. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis mimicking breakthrough seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamille Abdool

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with a past history of primary generalized seizures, who had been seizure-free for 2 years on sodium valproate and presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures suggestive of breakthrough seizures. Examination revealed hypertension, impetiginous lesions of the lower limbs, microscopic hematuria, elevated antistreptolysin O titre and low complement levels consistent with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension was controlled with intravenous nitroglycerin followed by oral captopril and amlodipine. Brain MRI changes returned normal within 2 weeks. The nephritis went in to remission within 2 months and after 8 months the patient has been seizure free again. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome appeared to have neither short nor intermediate effect on seizure control in this patient. The relationship between posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and seizures is reviewed.

  12. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Acute Post-Streptococcal Glomerulonephritis Mimicking Breakthrough Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdool, Kamille; Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Bhagwandass, Neal; Persad, Navindra; Temull, Vasant; Seegobin, Karan; Mike, Cassie

    2015-03-23

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with a past history of primary generalized seizures, who had been seizure-free for 2 years on sodium valproate and presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures suggestive of breakthrough seizures. Examination revealed hypertension, impetiginous lesions of the lower limbs, microscopic hematuria, elevated anti-streptolysin O titre and low complement levels consistent with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension was controlled with intravenous nitroglycerin followed by oral captopril and amlodipine. Brain MRI changes returned normal within 2 weeks. The nephritis went in to remission within 2 months and after 8 months the patient has been seizure free again. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome appeared to have neither short nor intermediate effect on seizure control in this patient. The relationship between posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and seizures is reviewed.

  13. A case of life-threatening acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy caused by Dioscorea quinqueloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Sik; Heo, Sang Taek

    2015-01-01

    Some herbal medications induce acute kidney injury. The acute kidney injuries caused by herbal medications are mild and commonly treated by palliative care. A 51-years-old man who drank the juice squeezed from the raw tubers of Dioscorea quinqueloba (D. quinqueloba) was admitted with nausea, vomiting and chilling. He developed a seizure with decreased level of consciousness. He was diagnosed with acute kidney injury, which was cured by continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration. Non-detoxified D. quinqueloba can cause severe acute kidney injury with toxic encephalopathy. It is critical to inform possible adverse effects of the medicinal herbs and to implement more strict regulation of these products.

  14. Mental disorders in patients with acute necrotic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The prognosis of patients with acute pancreatitis is still uncertain regardless of modern therapeutic procedures. It is even more emphasized if the acute pancreatitis is followed by psychic disorders. Objective The aim of the study was to provide an overview of the incidence of certain psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis and evaluate priority therapeutic procedures. Method In this study, we analyzed 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by the episode of acute pancreatitis among 202 patients that were hospitalized in the period from 1993 until 2000. The diagnosis was based on anamnesis, clinical and laboratory findings and diagnostic procedures such as X-ray, US, CT and MRI. Results Among 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by acute pancreatitis, 13 (81.25% patients were operated on and 3 (18.75% patients were medically treated. 6 patients experienced hallucinations, 5 memory deficiency, 16 disorientation and 14 confabulation. Conclusion Psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis require complex medical treatment. Due to the already mentioned complications, the management of these conditions is very difficult and with uncertain.

  15. Effects of Tempol on Experimental Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbıs, Halil; Aykota, Muhammed Rasid; Ozturk, Bunyamin; Kabay, Burhan; Sungurtekin, Ugur; Ozden, Akın; Yenisey, Cigdem; Turk, Nilay Sen; Erdem, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of Tempol on local organ damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model. This experimental study was conducted on 40 male Wistar- albino rats. The animals were randomly allocated into four groups: (i) Sham-operated group, laparotomies and cannulations of the pancreatic duct without acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) (n=10); (ii) Sham + Tempol group, identical to group 1 except for intravenous tempol treatment for 4 hours (n = 10); (iii) ANP group, glycodeoxycholic acid was infused into the pancreatic duct and cerulein was infused intravenously for 6 hours for development of ANP (n=10); and (iv) ANP + Tempol treated group, in addition to the procedure in group 3, rats were administered tempol intravenously for 4 hours (n = 10). Injury of the pancreas was evaluated histopathologically. Malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels of the pancreatic tissue, blood gas analysis, leukocyte and hematocrit levels were measured. Wet/dry weight of pancreatic tissue was also measured. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic tissue malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels, wet/dry weight ratio, pancreatic edema, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and hemorrhage, inflammation and perivascular infiltration were significantly lower in the ANP + Tempol group compared with the ANP group. Tempol infusion reduced local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in this experimental study. These findings demonstrate that tempol has protective effects on local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

  16. Acinar cell ultrastructure after taurine treatment in rat acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ates, Y.; Mas, M. R.; Taski, I.; Comert, B.; Isik, A. T.; Mas, N. M.; Yener, N.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the organelle-based changes in acinar cells in experimental acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) after taurine treatment and the association of electron microscopic findings with histopathalogical changes and oxidative stress markers. The study was performed in February 2005at Gulhane School of Medicine and Hacettepe University, Turkey. Forty-five rats were divided into 3 groups. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in groups II and III. Groups I and II were treated with saline and Group III with taurine 1000mg/kg/day, i.p, for 48 hours. Histopathological and ultrastructural examinations were determined using one-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Histopathologic findings improved significantly after taurine treatment. Degree of injury in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulums, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria and nucleus of acinar cells also decreased with taurine in correlation with biochemical and histological results. Taurine improves acinar cell organelle structure, and ultrastructural recovery in ANP reflects histological improvement. (author)

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno Pereira, Vítor; Marote Correia, Luís; Rodrigues, Tiago; Serrão Faria, Gorete

    2016-09-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a neurological syndrome characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures associated with identifiable areas of cerebral edema on imaging studies. The authors report the case of a man, 33 years-old, leukodermic with a history of chronic alcohol and tobacco consumption, who is admitted to the emergency department for epigastric pain radiating to the back and vomiting with about six hours of evolution and an intense holocranial headache for two hours. His physical examination was remarkable for a blood pressure of 190/100 mmHg and tenderness in epigastrium. His analytical results revealed emphasis on amylase 193 U/L and lipase 934 U/L. During the observation in the emergency department,he presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed and suggestive of pancreatitis withoutgallstones signals. Head computed tomography showed subarachnoid haemorrhage and a small right frontal cortical haemorrhage. The brain magnetic resonance imaging done one week after admission showed areas of a bilateral and symmetrical T2 / FLAIR hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter of the parietal and superior frontal regions, suggesting a diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Abdominal computed tomography (10 days after admission) demonstrated a thickened pancreas in connection with inflammation and two small hypodense foci in the anterior part of the pancreas body, translating small foci of necrosis. The investigation of a thrombophilic defect revealed a heterozygous G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The patient was discharged without neurological sequelae and asymptomatic. The follow-up brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the reversal of the lesions, confirming the diagnosis.

  18. Acute and chronic traumatic encephalopathies: pathogenesis and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKosky, Steven T; Blennow, Kaj; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Gandy, Sam

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, public awareness of the long-term pathological consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased. Such awareness has been stimulated mainly by reports of progressive neurological dysfunction in athletes exposed to repetitive concussions in high-impact sports such as boxing and American football, and by the rising number of TBIs in war veterans who are now more likely to survive explosive blasts owing to improved treatment. Moreover, the entity of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)--which is marked by prominent neuropsychiatric features including dementia, parkinsonism, depression, agitation, psychosis, and aggression--has become increasingly recognized as a potential late outcome of repetitive TBI. Annually, about 1% of the population in developed countries experiences a clinically relevant TBI. The goal of this Review is to provide an overview of the latest understanding of CTE pathophysiology, and to delineate the key issues that are challenging clinical and research communities, such as accurate quantification of the risk of CTE, and development of reliable biomarkers for single-incident TBI and CTE.

  19. Laparoscopic necrosectomy in acute necrotizing pancreatitis: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittu John Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pancreatic necrosis is a local complication of acute pancreatitis. The development of secondary infection in pancreatic necrosis is associated with increased mortality. Pancreatic necrosectomy is the mainstay of invasive management. Aims: Surgical approach has significantly changed in the last several years with the advent of enhanced imaging techniques and minimally invasive surgery. However, there have been only a few case series related to laparoscopic approach, reported in literature to date. Herein, we present our experience with laparoscopic management of pancreatic necrosis in 28 patients. Materials And Methods: A retrospective study of 28 cases [20 men, 8 women] was carried out in our institution. The medical record of these patients including history, clinical examination, investigations, and operative notes were reviewed. The mean age was 47.8 years [range, 23-70 years]. Twenty-one patients were managed by transgastrocolic, four patients by transgastric, two patients by intra-cavitary, and one patient by transmesocolic approach. Results: The mean operating time was 100.8 min [range, 60-120 min]. The duration of hospital stay after the procedure was 10-18 days. Two cases were converted to open (7.1% because of extensive dense adhesions. Pancreatic fistula was the most common complication (n = 8; 28.6% followed by recollection (n = 3; 10.7% and wound infection (n = 3; 10.7%. One patient [3.6%] died in postoperative period. Conclusions: Laparoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy is a promising and safe approach with all the benefits of minimally invasive surgery and is found to have reduced incidence of major complications and mortality.

  20. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  1. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hepatic encephalopathy, to ascertain whether this was related to the changes in liver function and whether these changes gave any prognostic information. CBF, determined by the intravenous xenon-133 method......, and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... any differences between patients with acute or chronic liver diseases or the different degrees of hepatic encephalopathy. In conclusion, a marked reduction of the CBF was seen in hepatic encephalopathy, irrespective of the etiology of the disease....

  2. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  3. Necrotizing mycotic vasculitis with cerebral infarction caused by Aspergillus niger in a horse with acute typholocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunev, S S; Ehrhart, E J; Jensen, H E; Foreman, J H; Richter, R A; Messick, J B

    1999-07-01

    An 18-year-old Morgan mare was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Illinois, with a 10-day history of watery diarrhea, depression, and dysphagia. On admission, the animal was severely dehydrated, depressed, and unable to swallow and had no clinical signs of diarrhea. The respiratory and heart rate and body temperature were within normal limits. Following fluid therapy, the mare developed severe watery diarrhea and continued to be depressed, incoordinated, and dysphagic. The animal died on the fourth day after admission and was sent to the Laboratories of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine for necropsy. Gross postmortem findings were consistent with an acute cerebral infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, an acute necrotizing typhlocolitis, multifocal petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, enlarged and congested pars intermedia of the pituitary gland, and marked bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia with multifocal areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Histologic evaluation of the affected brain demonstrated an area of coagulative necrosis of the gray matter, with hemorrhage, vasculitis, and thrombosis. There were many fungal hyphae 3.5-6.0 microm, pale basophilic, septate, and occasionally branching at 45 degrees present in the arterial walls and throughout the necrotic tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed Aspergillus niger as the etiologic agent responsible for the mycotic vasculitis and infarction in the brain. Bacteria culture and immunohistochemical staining of the colon and cecum failed to demonstrate specific pathogens.

  4. [Thrombotic microangiopathy in pregnancy complicated by acute hemorrhagic-necrotic pancreatitis during early puerperium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redechová, S; Féderová, L; Hammerová, L; Filkászová, A; Horváthová, D; Redecha, M

    2014-06-01

    Authors in the article describe a case of a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpurain 37 weeks gestation complicated by acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotic pancreatitis during the early puerperium. Case report. Ist Department of gynaecology and obstetrics of the Comenius University Bratislava. 33-years-old patient in the 37 weeks gestation was admitted to our department with the signs of HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets). Due to the worsening clinical status, we have performed caesarean section. After the transient stabilization of the patient's clinical status, the hemolysis with severe thrombocytopenia reappeared. Based on the clinical signs of abdominal pain and computer tomography, the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic-necrotic pancreatitis was set. The primary diagnosis was thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Therefore, therapeutic plasma exchange was performed with consequent improvement of the patients clinical state. Normalization of the platelet count was achieved after 4.plasma exchanges. Consequently 5 plasma exchanges were performed. However, one month later, the disease relapsed. Therapeutic plasma exchanges were needed again (4x), with anti CD 20 administration. This therapy had good clinical outcome, without the need for further plasma exchanges. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is highly lethal disease. Early diagnosis, treatment, and multidisciplinary approach are essential.

  5. Early prediction and outcome of septic encephalopathy in acute stroke patients with nosocomial coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dao-Ming; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Septic encephalopathy (SE) is the most common acute encephalopathy in ICU; however, little attention has been focused on risk of SE in the course of acute stroke. Our aim is to investigate the early prediction and outcome of SE in stroke patients with nosocomial coma (NC). A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an ICU of the tertiary teaching hospital in China from January 2006 to December 2009. Ninety-four acute stroke patients with NC were grouped according to with or without SE. Risk factors for patients with SE were compared with those without SE by univariate and multivariate analysis. Of 94 stroke patients with NC, 46 (49%) had NC with SE and 48 (51%) had NC without SE. The onset-to-NC time was significant later in stroke patients with SE than those without SE (P stroke patients with SE was higher than those without SE (76.1% vs. 45.8%, P = 0.003). High fever and severe SIRS are two early predictors of stroke patients with SE, and survival rates were worse in stroke patients with SE than those without SE.

  6. Appendectomy and resection of the terminal ileum with secondary severe necrotic changes in acute perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryajev, Yuri N; Volkov, Nikolay N; Kashintsev, Alexey A; Chalenko, Marina V; Radionov, Yuri V

    2015-01-25

    Resectional procedures for advanced and complicated appendicitis are performed infrequently. Their extent can vary: cecal resection, ileocecectomy, and even right hemicolectomy. We present a very rare case of appendectomy that was combined with partial ileal resection for severe necrotic changes and small perforation of the ileum. A 19-year-old female patient was hospitalized with right iliac fossa pain and fever 10 days after the onset of symptoms. On laparoscopy, a large mass in a right iliac fossa was found. The ultrasound-guided drainage of the suspected appendiceal abscess was unavailable. After conversion using McBurney's incision, acute perforated appendicitis was diagnosed. It was characterized by extension of severe necrotic changes onto the ileal wall and complicated by right iliac fossa abscess. A mass was bluntly divided, and a large amount of pus with fecaliths was discharged and evacuated. Removal of necrotic tissues from the ileal wall led to the appearance of a small defect in the bowel. A standard closure of this defect was considered as very unsafe due to a high risk of suture leakage or bowel stenosis. We perform a resection of the involved ileum combined with appendectomy and drainage/tamponade of an abscess cavity. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the 15th day. In advanced appendicitis, the involved bowel resection can prevent possible complications (e.g., ileus, intestinal fistula, peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess). Our case may be the first report of an appendectomy combined with an ileal resection for advanced and complicated appendicitis.

  7. Non-alcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: Role of MRI in non typical cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elefante, Andrea, E-mail: aelefant@unina.it [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Puoti, Gianfranco [I Division of Neurology, General Medicine Department, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Senese, Rossana [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Coppola, Cinzia [I Division of Neurology, General Medicine Department, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Russo, Carmela [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Tortora, Fabio [Department of Neuroradiology, Second University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Divitiis, Oreste de [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy); Brunetti, Arturo [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Aim: Acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, most commonly found in chronic alcoholics. It is not so easy to suspect acute WE when the clinical picture does not include all the typical symptoms and alcohol abuse is not reported. Three rare cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in non-alcoholic patients are reported. Cases presentation: Two patients developed the disease following prolonged intravenous feeding, the third was carrying a gastric lymphoma. None of them presented with the classic clinical triad of WE (ophtalmoplegia/nystagmus, ataxia and consciousness disturbance), showing just one or two of the typical symptoms. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) represented the key tool to suspect and define WE diagnosis, showing a picture characterized by bilaterally altered signal of the thalamic pulvinar, mesencephalic cup, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal grey matter and floor of fourth ventricle. All patients dramatically improved within 48 h after administration of thiamine. Conclusion: We emphasize that WE should be suspected in all patients showing typical MRI features presenting with at least one of the clinical triad of WE.

  8. Non-alcoholic acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: Role of MRI in non typical cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elefante, Andrea; Puoti, Gianfranco; Senese, Rossana; Coppola, Cinzia; Russo, Carmela; Tortora, Fabio; Divitiis, Oreste de; Brunetti, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, most commonly found in chronic alcoholics. It is not so easy to suspect acute WE when the clinical picture does not include all the typical symptoms and alcohol abuse is not reported. Three rare cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in non-alcoholic patients are reported. Cases presentation: Two patients developed the disease following prolonged intravenous feeding, the third was carrying a gastric lymphoma. None of them presented with the classic clinical triad of WE (ophtalmoplegia/nystagmus, ataxia and consciousness disturbance), showing just one or two of the typical symptoms. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) represented the key tool to suspect and define WE diagnosis, showing a picture characterized by bilaterally altered signal of the thalamic pulvinar, mesencephalic cup, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal grey matter and floor of fourth ventricle. All patients dramatically improved within 48 h after administration of thiamine. Conclusion: We emphasize that WE should be suspected in all patients showing typical MRI features presenting with at least one of the clinical triad of WE.

  9. Disrupted glutamate-glutamine cycle in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Terai, Masaru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University Yachiyo Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Yachiyo-shi (Japan); Mizuguchi, Masashi [The University of Tokyo, Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Barkovich, A.J. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype of infectious pediatric encephalopathy in Japan. It is sometimes difficult to make an early diagnosis of AESD; excitotoxicity is postulated to be the pathogenesis based on elevated glutamine (Gln) and glutamate (Glu) complex (Glx = Glu + Gln) observed on MR spectroscopy. It is uncertain whether Gln or Glu contributes to the elevated Glx, or whether MR spectroscopy is useful for an early diagnosis. Five Japanese patients with AESD (three boys and two girls, 1 year of age) were enrolled in this study. MR spectroscopy was acquired from the frontal white matter (repetition time (TR) of 5000 ms, echo time (TE) of 30 ms) with a 1.5- or 3.0-T scanner. MR spectroscopy was performed four times for two patients, three times for one patient, and two times for two patients. Quantification of Glu and Gln was performed using LCModel. Glu was elevated in three of four studies on days 1-4 and became normal or low afterward. Gln was normal in three studies on days 1-2, elevated in all seven studies on days 4-12, and became normal or low afterward. These findings suggest that MR spectroscopy may be useful for an early diagnosis. Acute Glu elevation changes to subacute Gln elevation, suggesting that a disrupted Glu-Gln cycle may play an important role. (orig.)

  10. [Prognostication of course and treatment of peripancreatic infiltrate in patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susak, Ia M; Tkachenko, O A; Malysh, I R; Dirda, O O; Fedorchuk, O H

    2014-04-01

    Results of treatment of 229 patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis, complicated by peripancreatic infiltrate, were analyzed. To all the patients antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy were conducted. In 63 (27.5%) patients the methods of extracorporal hemocorrection were applied, and in 108 (47.1%)--the "four--catheters" rule (catheter for epidural anesthesia, installment of the feeding intestinal probe further than the Treitz ligament level, the central vein catheterization, the programmed laparocentesis). In 31 (13.5%) patients there were determined the activity of mononuclear phagocytes and production of ROS (the oxygen active forms) by them in peripheral blood with objective for the purulent-septic complications prognostication. In 14 (6.1%) patients purulent--septic complications have occurred, postoperative lethality was 21.4%, general lethality--3.4%.

  11. Successful treatment of Pseudomembranous necrotizing Aspergillus tracheobronchitis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pseudomembranous necrotizing Aspergillus tracheobronchitis is a rare form of pulmonary aspergillosis which occurs in immunocompromised patients. Case Outline. A female patient aged 71, suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, developed the symptoms of progressive shortness of breath and inspiratory stridor. The diagnosis in our case was made on the histological findings from tissues obtained by bronchoscopy. A chest CT scan suggested the state of the compromised trachea and left principal bronchus lumen. The long-term regimen with itraconazole in the dose of 400 mg/24 hours proved efficient in our patient. Conclusion. Progressive shortness of breath and inspiratory stridor in immunocompromised patients along with radiological and CT changes should be also considered as pulmonary aspergillosis in differential diagnosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175056

  12. Time-course proteomic analysis of taurocholate-induced necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fétaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Pastor, Catherine M; Jorge-Costa, Manuel; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Morel, Denis R; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2013-06-24

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, which varies greatly in course and severity. Severe forms are associated with serious local and/or systemic complications, and eventually death. The pathobiology of acute pancreatitis is complex. Animal models have been developed to investigate pathobiological processes and identify factors determining disease course. We performed a time-course proteomic analysis using a rat model of severe necrotizing acute pancreatitis induced by taurocholate perfusion in the pancreatic ducts. Results showed that levels of proteins associated to a given biological process changed in a coordinated fashion after disease onset. It was possible to follow the response of a particular pathobiological process to pancreatitis induction and to compare the course of protein pathways. Proteins involved in acinar cell secretion were found to follow a different kinetics than other cellular processes. After an initial decrease, secretory pathway-associated proteins raised again at 18 h post-induction. This phenomenon coincided with a burst in the expression of pancreatitis-associated protein (REG3A), an acute phase protein produced by the exocrine pancreas, and with the decrease of classical markers of pancreatic injury, suggesting that the expression of proteins associated to the secretory pathway may be a modulating factor of pancreas injury. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complex inflammatory disease, the pathobiology of which is not yet fully understood. Various animal models, relying on different mechanisms of disease induction, have been developed in order to investigate pathobiological processes of AP. In this study, we performed a time-course proteomic analysis to investigate changes of the pancreas proteome occurring in an experimental model of AP induced by perfusion of taurocholate, a bile acid, into the pancreatic duct. This experimental model is characterized by a severe disease with pancreatic necrosis and systemic

  13. Calendula officinalis ameliorates l-arginine-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-12-01

    Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) has been traditionally used in treating inflammation of internal organs, gastrointestinal tract ulcers and wound healing. The present study investigates the effect of ethanol extract (95%) of Calendula officinalis flowers in l-arginine induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Rats were divided into four groups: normal control, l-arginine control, Calendula officinalis extract (COE) treated and melatonin treated (positive control), which were further divided into subgroups (24 h, day 3 and 14) according to time points. Two injections of l-arginine 2 g/kg i.p. at 1 h intervals were administered in l-arginine control, COE and melatonin-treated groups to produce acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Biochemical parameters [serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, total proteins, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen content, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and nitrite/nitrate] and histopathological studies were carried out. COE treatment (400 mg/kg p.o.) was found to be beneficial. This was evidenced by significantly lowered histopathological scores (2 at day 14). Nucleic acid content (DNA 21.1 and RNA 5.44 mg/g pancreas), total proteins (0.66 mg/mL pancreas) and pancreatic amylase (1031.3 100 SU/g pancreas) were significantly improved. Marked reduction in pancreatic oxidative and nitrosative stress; collagen (122 μmoles/100 mg pancreas) and TGF-β1 (118.56 pg/mL) levels were noted. Results obtained were comparable to those of positive control. The beneficial effect of COE may be attributed to its antioxidant, antinitrosative and antifibrotic actions. Hence, the study concludes that COE promotes spontaneous repair and regeneration of the pancreas.

  14. The Optimal Management of Acute Febrile Encephalopathy in the Aged Patient: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshte Sheybani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The elderly comprise less than 13 percent of world population. Nonetheless, they represent nearly half of all hospitalized adults. Acute change in mental status from baseline is commonly seen among the elderly even when the main process does not involve the central nervous system. The term “geriatric syndrome” is used to capture those clinical conditions in older people that do not fit into discrete disease categories, including delirium, falls, frailty, dizziness, syncope, and urinary incontinence. Despite the growing number of elderly population, especially those who require hospitalization and the high burden of common infections accompanied by encephalopathy among them, there are several unresolved questions regarding the optimal management they deserve. The questions posed in this systematic review concern the need to rule out CNS infection in all elderly patients presented with fever and altered mental status in the routine management of febrile encephalopathy. In doing so, we sought to identify all potentially relevant articles using searches of web-based databases with no language restriction. Finally, we reviewed 93 research articles that were relevant to each part of our study. No prospective study was found to address how should AFE in the aged be optimally managed.

  15. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in children after acute encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Mana; Nakae, Yoichiro; Kohagizawa, Toshitaka; Eto, Yoshikatsu

    2005-01-01

    We studied single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of 15 children with acute encephalopathy after more than 1 year from the onset, using technetium-99 m-L, L-ethyl cystinate dimer ( 99m Tc-ECD) and a three-dementional stereotaxic region of interest template. Regional cerebral blood flow was evaluated and divided in three groups according to the severity of disability: absent or mild, moderate, and severe. There was no abnormality on SPECT in the patients without disability or with mild disability. Diffuse hypoperfusion was shown in the groups with moderate and severe disability. The patients with severe disability showed hypoperfusion in the pericallosal, frontal and central areas which was more pronounced than in the patients with moderate disability. (author)

  16. Mielitis aguda necrotizante en un paciente con Sida Acute necrotizing myelitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Corti

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Como consecuencia de la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana tipo-1 (HIV-1, otros patógenos como citomegalovirus (CMV y herpes simple tipo 1-2 (HSV 1-2 pueden comprometer tanto el sistema nervioso central como el periférico. Estos agentes pueden involucrar también a la médula espinal y causar una mielitis aguda necrotizante. Esta complicación ocurre por lo general en pacientes con enfermedad HIV/sida avanzada y marcada inmunodeficiencia, con recuentos de linfocitos T CD4+ de menos de 50 cél/µL. El cuadro clínico, los cambios en el LCR y las neuroimágenes generan una importante sospecha diagnóstica. Es fundamental el inicio precoz de la terapia antiviral específica. Se presenta un paciente con enfermedad avanzada debida al HIV-1 y mielitis aguda necrotizante por CMV y HSV bajo la forma clínica de síndrome de la cola de caballo.In the setting of HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV and herpes simplex virus type 1-2 (HSV 1-2 can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. These agents can involve the spinal cord and produce a necrotizing transverse myelitis. This usually occurs in AIDS patients with severe immunodeficiency: CD4 + lymphocyte counts typically are less than 50 cell/µL. The clinical presentation, CSF and imaging studies can provide a high level of suspicion diagnosis. Prompt initiation of antiviral specific drugs is essential. We report a patient with an acute necrotizing myelitis (cauda equina syndrome secondary to CMV and HSV infections.

  17. Transient widespread cortical and splenial lesions in acute encephalitis/encephalopathy associated with primary Epstein–Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is very common and usually occurs in childhood or early adulthood. Encephalitis/encephalopathy is an uncommon but serious neurological complication of EBV. A case of EBV-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy with involvement of reversible widespread cortical and splenial lesions is presented herein. An 8-year-old Chinese girl who presented with fever and headache, followed by seizures and drowsiness, was admitted to the hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted imaging in widespread cortical and splenial lesions. The clinical and laboratory examination results together with the unusual radiology findings suggested acute encephalitis/encephalopathy due to primary EBV infection. After methylprednisolone pulse therapy together with ganciclovir, the patient made a full recovery without any brain lesions. The hallmark clinical–radiological features of this patient included severe encephalitis/encephalopathy at onset, the prompt and complete recovery, and rapidly reversible widespread involvement of the cortex and splenium. Patients with EBV encephalitis/encephalopathy who have multiple lesions, even with the widespread involvement of cortex and splenium of the corpus callosum, may have a favorable outcome with complete disappearance of all brain lesions.

  18. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion in a girl with acute pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jung Sook; Koo, Chung Mo; Park, Ji Sook; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Eun Sil; Lim, Jae-Young; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2018-02-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old girl who had mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) associated with acutepyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli . The patient was admitted with a high fever, and she was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis based on pyuria and the results of urine culture, which detected cefotaxime-sensitive E. coli . Although intravenous cefotaxime and tobramycin were administered, her fever persisted and her C-reactive protein level increased to 307 mg/L. On day 3 of admission, she demonstrated abnormal neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as delirium, ataxia, and word salad. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain performed on day 4 showed marked hyperintensities in the bilateral corpus callosum and deep white matter on diffusion-weighted images, with corresponding diffusion restriction on apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. No abnormalities or pathogens were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid; however, lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) were detected in plasma (41.6 pg/mL), associated with acute neurological deterioration. Her clinical condition gradually improved, and no neurological abnormalities were observed on day 6. Follow-up brain MRI performed 2 weeks later showed near-disappearance of the previously noted hyperintense lesions. In this patient, we first proved endotoxemia in a setting of MERS. The release of LPS following antibiotic administration might be related to the development of MERS in this patient. The possibility of MERS should be considered in patients who present with acute pyelonephritis and demonstrate delirious behavior.

  20. Outcomes of Children With and Without Hepatic Encephalopathy From the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Vicky L; Li, Ruosha; Loomes, Kathleen M; Leonis, Mike A; Rudnick, David A; Belle, Steven H; Squires, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is challenging to identify in children with acute liver failure and was not a requirement for enrollment into the Pediatric Acute Liver Failure Study Group (PALFSG). The outcomes of PALFSG participants presenting with and without HE are presented. PALFSG participants were classified based on daily assessment of HE during the first 7 days following study enrollment: group 1-never developed HE; group 2-no HE at enrollment with subsequent HE development; and group 3-HE at study enrollment. Clinical and biochemical parameters and outcomes of death, spontaneous recovery, or liver transplantation were compared between groups. Data from 769 PALFSG (54% boys; median age 4.2 years; range 0-17.9 years) participants were analyzed, with 277 in group 1 (36%), 83 in group 2 (11%), and 409 in group 3 (53%). Mortality occurred in 11% of all participants and was highest among group 3 participants who demonstrated persistent grade III-IV HE (55%) or showed progression of HE (26%). Eleven (4%) group 1 participants died within 21 days of enrollment. Spontaneous recovery was highest in group 1 (79%) and lowest in group 2 (25%; P pediatric acute liver failure prognostication schema are needed.

  1. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in delayed encephalopathy of acute carbon monoxide poisoning - comparison with CT -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Choo, In Wook

    1986-01-01

    Eleven magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) imaging were performed in nine patients with mild to moderate degree of delayed neuropsychiatric symptoms following acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, to evaluate the capability of MR in demonstrating any additional finding to CT. The MR images were obtained using 0.15 Tesla resistive system with various combination of three pulse sequences, including partial saturation recovery, T2-weighted spin echo and inversion recovery. Bilateral white matter abnormalities suggesting demyelination were demonstrated in 4 patients with MR and in only 2 patients with CT. The contrast discrimination between normal and abnormal white matter proved to be better with T2-weighted spin echo and inversion recovery than with partial saturation recovery and CT. But necrosis of the globus pallidus (1 patient) and diffuse atrophy (3 patients) were equally demonstrated on both MR and CT. It is suggested that MR be used as a initial imaging method in the evaluation of the delayed encephalopathy following acute CO poisoning, especially for the detection of the possible white matter lesions. Acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning produces hypoxia by displacing oxygen from hemoglobin and preventing its release from hemoglobin in tissues, often resulting in fetal event. Victims who survive acute CO poisoning may have various delayed symptoms and signs. Occasionally, an apparent recovery is followed within two days to three weeks by a sudden neurological deterioration. The degree of neuropsychiatric symptoms depends upon the extent and severity of the pathologic changes in the brain. The pathologic effects of CO poisoning are present in almost all organs of patients. However, the most important changes occur in the brain, which consist of necrosis of the globus pallidus and reticular zone of the substantia nigra, and the degeneration of the cerebral white matter. The diagnostic superiority of magnetic resonance (MR) over CT has already

  2. Risk factors and outcome of splanchnic venous thrombosis in patients with necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) is considered a rare but important complication in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) and literatures regarding this topic were sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the risk factors of SVT in necrotizing acute pancreatitis (NAP) and assess the prognosis of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied using 15 indices including age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores (APACHE II), CRP (C - reactive protein) levels, etc to explore potential risk factors for the development of SVT in NAP patients. Moreover, clinical outcome measures such as mortality, organ failure and length of hospital and ICU stay were also compared between NAP patients with or without SVT. According to the statistical results, only intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was proved to be an independent risk factor for SVT (OR, 1.283; 95% CI, 1.091-1.509,P=0.003). In addition, Balthazar's CT score and occurrence of IPN (infected pancreatic necrosis) also reached statistical significance (P=0.040 and 0.047, respectively), but the 95% confidence interval shown in the multivariate logistic regression suggested that the observed ORs are not significant (1.326;95% CI 0.984-1.787 and 2.61;95 CI 0.972-7.352, respectively), which indicates weaker association between the two parameters and SVT. Regarding the clinical outcomes, patients with SVT showed higher mortality, longer hospital and intensive care unit duration, higher rates of a variety of complications and more utilization of invasive interventions. IAP is an independent risk factor for the development of SVT in patients with NAP, while Balthazar's CT score and occurrence of IPN are also associated with SVT, although not as strong as IAP. Moreover, occurrence of SVT relates with extremely poor prognosis in NAP patients, evidenced by increased mortality, morbidity and need for invasive interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  3. Pathophysiological Effects of Pancreatic Sympathetic Denervation in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjun; Qi, Shifang; Liu, Weifeng; Xin, Shiyong; Chang, Yongchao; Yang, Yanhui; Zhou, Liqing; Zhang, Yuming; Chu, Zhijie

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the greater splanchnic nerve (GSN) transection on the pathophysiological process of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The dogs were divided into a sham operation (SO) group, ANP group, and ANP with bilateral GSN transection (GSNT) group. Dogs in the GSNT group underwent bilateral GSNT immediately after ANP induction. The levels of serum pancreatic amylase (AMY), calcium, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HCRP), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and neutrophile granulocyte (NEU) counts were monitored dynamically, and the pathological examinations of the pancreas was performed at postoperative day 7. All the parameters among the 3 groups showed no differences before the experiment (P > 0.05). At different postoperative times, the NEU count and serum AMY, TNF-α, HCRP, and IL-10 were significantly increased; however, the serum calcium had decreased in the ANP group versus SO (P 0.05). The pancreas pathological scoring of the GSNT group was lower versus the ANP group (P < 0.05). Greater splanchnic nerve transection can alleviate development of pathophysiological processes in ANP.

  4. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

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    Joana C. Branco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Walled-off necrosis (WON is a potentially lethal late complication of acute pancreatitis (AP and occurs in less than 10% of AP cases. It can be located in or outside the pancreas. When infected, the mortality rate increases and can reach 100% if the collection is not drained. Its treatment is complex and includes, at the beginning, intravenous antibiotics, which permit sepsis control and a delay in the therapeutic intervention, like drainage. Nowadays, a minimally invasive approach is advised. Depending on the location of the collection, computed tomography (CT-guided drainage or endoscopic necrosectomy are the primary options, then complemented by surgical necrosectomy if needed. Infected WON of the abdominal wall has been rarely described in the literature and there is no report of any infection with Citrobacter freundii. Case: We present the case of a 61-year-old man with necrotizing AP complicated by WON of the left abdominal wall, infected with Citrobacter freundii that was successfully treated with CT-guided percutaneous drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion: Infected WON accounts for considerable mortality and its location in the abdominal wall is rare; it can be treated with antibiotics and CT-guided drainage with no need for further intervention.

  5. The clinical and imaging characteristics of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chuming; Yin Zhao; Fang Yannan; Hong Weimin; Zeng Xianjie; Wang Tianwen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical and imaging characteristics of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning (DEACMP). Methods: The clinical data of 14 patients with DEACMP were respectively analyzed. Results: Initial symptom included mentally falling (MMSE rate < 20 points) in 14 patients (100%), incontinence of urine in 11 patients (78%). Relatively significant increase of hematoma (HCT) (average level 0.503±0.027) was found in 6 patients. Three kinds of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance including diffuse white matter lesion, cortical lesion and basal nuclei lesion often existed in association. Therapy for improving circulation was given in 14 patients, and therapy with hormone was given in 9 patients; with 85% improvement rate. 5 patients without hormone therapy but with improving circulation therapy also received improvement. Conclusion: High level of HCT might be one of the causes of DECACMP due to acute disturbance of brain micro-circulation.. Close monitoring the change of HCT levels should be adopted for at least 3-6 months during therapy. Therapy for improving circulation and for anti-agglutination of platelets should be performed besides the routine high-tension oxygen therapy. Low FA value on DTI indicates the occurrence of a demyelization change in the brain long tract fibers, which indicated therapeutic effect of hormone treatment. And, therefore it would be better to perform DTI scan before therapy for individualized therapy. (authors)

  6. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    , and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... in healthy young subjects (age, 23-42 years) was 44-61 ml/100 g/min; in patients with grade I + II encephalopathy (mean +/- SEM) it was 32.8 +/- 3.6 ml/100 g/min in acute (n = 4; age, 28 +/- 8 years) and 37.0 +/- 3.3 ml/100 g/min in chronic liver patients (n = 10; age, 51 +/- 2 years). In grade III + IV...... encephalopathy it was 28.7 +/- 3.8 ml/100 g/min in acute (n = 8; age, 28 +/- 3 years) and 32.9 +/- 3.7 ml/100 g/min in chronic patients (n = 12; age, 49 +/- 3 years). CBF did not correlate with the liver function and was of no prognostic value. The liver function was markedly reduced in all the patients, without...

  7. Colonic involvement in non-necrotizing acute pancreatitis: correlation of CT findings with the clinical course of affected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, W.; Studler, U.; Buitrago-Tellez, C.H.; Steinbrich, W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Kocher, T. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Degen, L. [Institute of Gastroenterology, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe CT findings of colonic involvement in acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis and to analyze the correlation between colonic wall thickening at CT and the clinical course of these patients. The CT examinations of 19 consecutive patients with acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis who were not treated with antibiotics initially were analyzed retrospectively. The severity of acute pancreatitis was categorized according to the CT severity index (CTSI) and the presence of colonic wall thickening at the initial CT was compared with the clinical course of all patients. Seven of 11 patients with a CTSI of 4 showed a colonic wall thickening, whereas the remaining patients with a CTSI of 4 (n=4), CTSI of 3 (n=5), and CTSI of 2 (n=3) showed no colonic abnormalities at CT. Patients with colonic wall thickening presented more often with fever, showed higher levels of infectious parameters, needed more often antibiotic therapy, and had more requests for additional CT examinations and CT-guided fluid aspirations as well as a longer duration of hospital stay as compared with patients without colonic wall involvement, even if the latter presented with the same CTSI initially. It is well known that translocation of the colonic flora may significantly influence the clinical course of patients with acute pancreatitis, and our results indicate that patients with acute pancreatitis who present with colonic wall thickening at CT have an increased risk for a complicated clinical course regarding systemic infection. (orig.)

  8. Kontribusi Higiene Mulut terhadap Timbulnya Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG (Survei Epidemiologi di Kecamatan Pacet Kabupaten Cianjur Jawa Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mirna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This analytical epidemiological survey was aimed to investigate the correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of an infectious, necrotic, ulcerative disease called acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG. The study involved 319 elementary school children consisting of 163 (52% male and 156 (48% female pupils from Kecamatan Pacet, Cianjur, WestJawa. Samples were chosen by stratified simple random sampling. The obtained data were analyzed with Bivariant Test (Chi2Ttest, and the results showed a quite high prevalence of ANUG, aboout 15.3% in total and consisting 9% male and 6.3% female subjects. The correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of ANUG was found to be significant (p<0.05. It was concluded that oral hygiene has an important contribution to the onset of ANUG.

  9. N-acetylcysteine amid reduces pancreatic damage in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Serdar; Usta, Arif; Cekic, Arif Burak; Alhan, Etem; Kural, Birgül Vanizor; Ercin, Cengiz

    2016-06-15

    Inflammatory explosion and oxidative stress are important mechanisms of injury in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). This study investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine amid (NACA), a novel cell-permeant antioxidant with anti-inflammatory activity, on experimental ANP in rats. Fifty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and ANP was induced by cerulein. The animals were divided into four groups which were sham + saline, sham + NACA, ANP + saline, and ANP + NACA. NACA (2.2 mg/kg, i.p) was administered for 6 h, after the induction of ANP. The extent of acinar cell injury, mortality, systemic cardiorespiratory variables, functional capillary density, renal/hepatic functions, and changes in some enzyme markers for pancreas and lung tissues were investigated. Induction of ANP increased mortality from 0% in the sham group to 43.75% in the ANP + saline group (P pancreatic necrosis, serum amylase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-6, LDH in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum urea, tissue myeloperoxidase in pancreas and lung tissues and malondialdehyde. There was less pronounced increase in these parameters in NACA treated group. Compared with ANP group, ANP + NACA group had lower levels of pancreatic necrosis (0.5 ± 0.2 versus 1.45 ± 0.2, P pancreatitis indicates its potential usefulness in the management of ANP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute encephalopathy in a 2-year-old pot-bellied pig following accidental intoxication with clonazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlakwe, Emilie L; Johnson, Amy L

    2017-05-01

    To describe a case of successful management of clonazepam toxicity causing encephalopathy in a pot-bellied pig. A 2-year-old female pot-bellied pig weighing 13.5 kg was presented for evaluation of clinical signs of acute encephalopathy. Based on the animal's history and clinical signs, a tentative diagnosis of benzodiazepine (BZP) intoxication was made. The results of a urinary drug screening test designed to detect illicit substances in human urine indicated benzodiazepine exposure. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis later confirmed clonazepam (urinary concentration 496 ng/mL) as the intoxicating substance. The pig responded favorably to treatment which included administration of flumazenil, decontamination with enteral activated charcoal, and intravenous isotonic crystalloid administration. The pig had a rapid improvement in mentation 10 minutes following IV flumazenil administration and was considered mentally appropriate following 24 hours of hospitalization. The pig was discharged from the hospital after 48 hours of care, and was reported to be doing well 6 months later. Intoxication with prescription benzodiazepines can occur in companion animals and result in clinical signs of acute encephalopathy. Urinary drug screening tests designed for human use may provide rapid results to indicate drug intoxication and guide therapeutic intervention in veterinary species. Administration of flumazenil resulted in a rapid improvement in mentation following clonazepam intoxication in a pot-bellied pig. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  11. Late-onset epilepsy in children with acute febrile encephalopathy with prolonged convulsions: A clinical and encephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sugai, Kenji; Nakagawa, Eiji; Komaki, Hirofumi; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Ishido, Yusaku; Kaneko, Yuu; Kaido, Takanobu; Takahashi, Akio; Ohtsuki, Taisuke; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of epilepsies as the sequelae of acute febrile encephalopathy with prolonged convulsions during childhood. Sixteen patients (M:F=9:7) aged 2-13years (mean 6.1years) with history of febrile acute encephalopathy were retrospectively reviewed. These patients experienced febrile encephalopathy at the age of 11months to 4years, with 11 individuals presenting with findings of a biphasic clinical course (n=5), frontal predominant (n=8) lesions, and/or reduced diffusivity in the cerebral white matter on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n=3). The remaining 5 patients had unilateral lesions that manifested the phenotype of hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia-epilepsy syndrome (HHES). Epilepsy emerged with a latent period of 2months to 2years after the acute phase of febrile encephalopathy. Head nodding or spasm with subsequent motion arrest and brief tonic seizures were the main seizure phenotypes. Ictal records of epileptic seizures were available in 9 patients. Epileptiform discharges with a focal or uneven distribution appeared at the seizure onset and lasted less than 1s in all patients; these were followed by either generalized attenuation or fast activity in 8 patients with head nodding, spasm, or brief tonic seizures, and by localized fast activity in 1 patient with versive tonic seizures. Notably, the seizure onset area was often located outside the severe lesions on MRI, i.e., in the parietal areas in patients with frontal predominant lesions, and in the spared hemisphere of HHES. Although phenobarbital, zonisamide, carbamazepine, clobazam, clonazepam, and clorazepate were partially effective in some patients, daily seizures persisted in 11 patients. Callosotomy was performed in 2 patients, and beneficial effects were observed in both. These characteristics suggested a broad distribution of augmented excitability in these patients, resulting in the rapid propagation of epileptic activity in the initial phase of ictal

  12. [PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF ELEMENTS OF THE MULTIORGAN INSUFFICIENCY SYNDROME AND ESTIMATION OF THE PATIENTS STATE SEVERITY IN ACCORDANCE TO INTEGRAL SCALES IN AN ACUTE NECROTIC PANCREATITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomyak, I V; Rotar, O V; Rotar, V I; Petrovskiy, G G

    2015-09-01

    There were examined 113 patients, in whom an acute necrotic pancreatitis was diagnosed. While admittance to hospital a constant organ insufficiency was revealed in 50 (44%), a transient one--in 63 (56%) patients. In total 31 (27.4%) patients died. Respiratory insufficiency have occurred in 67% patients, and almost with similar rate--cardio-vascular (in 59%), renal (in 56%) and enteral (in 54%), dominating in the lethality structure. The BISAP (Bedcide Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis) scales applied permit with high probability to prognosticate the organ insufficiency and lethality in patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis.

  13. Quantitative analysis of brain metabolites concentrations using MR spectroscopy in acute hypoxia ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yeyu; Wang HaiYu; Shen Zhiwei; Lin Yan; Chen Yaowen; Xiao Gang; Wu Renhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the absolute quantification of brain metabolites concentrations using external standard MRS in acute hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy (HIE) piglet model. Method: Eight 7-day-old healthy piglets were subjected to insult of hypoxia ischemia (HI). The animals and an external standard phantom containing detectable metabolites of known concentrations were studied on a 1.5 T GE Signa scanner. The single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) data were processed using LCModel software, and the quantification of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr) and lactate (Lac) were accomplished. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed to compare the NAA, Cr, Lac concentration differences in the brains of piglets pre- and post-HI (0h). In addition, the dynamic changes of brain metabolites concentrations of 2 HIE piglets were observed at the time points of 0 h and 2 h. Results: One piglet was excluded because it was over anesthetized to death. Seven piglets' data were analyzed. The concentrations of NAA pre- and post-HI were (6.86±0.49) mmol/kg and (5.73±0.88) mmol/kg respectively, they were (4.65±0.73) mmol/kg and (4.40±0.80) mmol/kg for Cr; and were 0.00 mmol/kg and (0.43±0.39) mmol/kg for Lac. After HI, decreased NAA concentration immediately was observed, and it was of statistical significance (F=8.608, P=0.013). The concentration of Cr was insignificantly decreased (F=0.379, P=0.550). The concentration of Lac was increased, and the difference was of statistical significance (F=8.600, P=0.013). Dynamic observation showed a Lac peak immediately after HI and it decreased after 2 h post-HI. Conclusions: External standard MRS using LCModel has great value in the quantitative analysis of brain metabolites. The changes of NAA and Lac concentrations are sensitive to reflect the early metabolic change of acute HIE. (authors)

  14. Acute urinary retention in a 23-year-old woman with mild encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Hideyuki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Patients with clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion present with relatively mild central nervous system disturbances. Although the exact etiology of the condition remains poorly understood, it is thought to be associated with infective agents. We present a case of a patient with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion, who had the unusual feature of acute urinary retention. Case presentation A 23-year-old Japanese woman developed mild confusion, gait ataxia, and urinary retention seven days after onset of fever and headache. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated T2 prolongation in the splenium of the corpus callosum and bilateral cerebral white matter. These magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities disappeared two weeks later, and all of the symptoms resolved completely within four weeks. Except for the presence of acute urinary retention (due to underactive detrusor without hyper-reflexia, the clinical and radiologic features of our patient were consistent with those of previously reported patients with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of acute urinary retention recognized in a patient with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. Conclusion Our findings suggest that mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion can be associated with impaired bladder function and indicate that acute urinary retention in this benign disorder should be treated immediately to avoid bladder injury.

  15. Diagnosis of a case of relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on oral manifestation of leukemic gingival enlargement and acute necrotizing gingivitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopikrishna Kolli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most common malignancy in childhood. They represent approximately 30% of malignant diseases in patients under the age of 15 years. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most frequent type of leukemia in children. Despite high cure rates, approximately 20% of patients with ALL have disease relapse. Oral manifestations are common in leukemia, particularly in acute leukemias. One of the oral manifestations of leukemia is diffuse gingival enlargement thought to be, at least partly, the result of gross infiltration of the gingiva by blast cells. The occurrence of acute necrotizing gingivitis, although a rare occurrence, is seen in such immunocompromised individuals. This is a case report of a 19-year-old patient who was under remission after treatment for ALL in whom a recurrence of leukemia was detected based on the oral findings and highlights the importance of its early detection by the dentist in preventing further complications and for instituting therapy swiftly.

  16. REHABILITATION OF PATIENTS WITH ENCEPHALOPATHY CAUSED BY ACUTE CHEMICAL AGENTS POISONING. P300 OF AUDITORY EVENT RELATED POTENTIALS AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. U. Berezina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RELEVANCE. Patients with encephalopathy due to acute chemical agents poisoning have some brain functioning changes and a cognitive impairment during the rehabilitation program. These changes require correction of appropriate diagnostic protocol and treatment.AIM. The aim of this study was to estimate changes of electroencephalography (EEG and the P3 component of the event related potential (P300 ERP that are observed in patients with encephalopathy due to acute chemical agents poisoning during stage of rehabilitation.MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study was included 25 patients (age 37 (32; 51 poisoned different kind of neurotoxic substances (drugs, ethanol and complicated by toxic and hypoxic encephalopathy. They have got the treatment of encephalopathy by mexidol intravenously, mesodiencephalic modulation (MDM and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT. All patients were recoded EEG (electroencephalograph of “MBN” company, Russia and P300 ERP (“Neuron-Spectrum-5/EP” of “Neurosoft”, Russia according to the international recommendations of clinical neurophysiologists. Neuropsychological testing was used for the assessment of cognitive functions.RESULTS. There were some disturbances in primary electroencephalograms of all subjects. The follow-up EEG recording showed the main group of patients who had got the treatment (mexidol, MDM, HBOT had more often (11 patients the EEG improvements compared to the controls (1 patient. The main group had more rarely the EEG impairments compared to the control group. 6 patients of main group and 3 patients of controls did not have EEG changes during the follow-up EEG recordings. All controls and 17 patients of the main group patients had different cognitive disturbances. After the treatment 15 patients of the main group had improved on neuropsychological tests (MMSE, Munsterberg test, Schulte table, Number Connecting Test. They also had a decrease in the N200, P300 peak latency and an increase in the N200, P300

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, an acute neurological syndrome due to reversible multifactorial brain edema: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Cicognani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The essential features of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES are headache, mental changes, seizures, visual symptoms and often arterial hypertension. Brain RMN typically shows cortico-sottocortical parieto-occipital edema, with a bilateral and symmetric distribution. PRES develops in clinical conditions as hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia/ eclampsia, autoimmune diseases, after transplantation, infections and as an adverse effect of immunosuppressive drugs or chemotherapy. It usually completely reverses with treatment, although permanent sequelae are possible in case of delayed or missed diagnosis. Case report: We describe the case of a transsexual (M!F and tetraplegic patient, admitted for neck and low back pain. She suddenly developed headache, confusion, seizures and severe hypertension with normal blood tests. RMN showed multiple cortico-sottocortical areas of vasogenic and citotoxic edema in temporo-occipital, parietal, frontal, and cerebellar regions. Soon after the beginning of the antihypertensive therapy, clinical recovery was observed, as well as the disappearance of edema at RMN. Discussion and conclusions: Although PRES is usually associated with definite pathological conditions, it is not always the case, as was for the patient here described, who had no predisposing factors in her past clinical history, and presented hypertension only in the acute phase of the syndrome. Since, moreover, PRES usually presents with acute non specific features and it can be misdiagnosed with other serious diseases, the clinician will be helped by the knowledge of this syndrome to promptly start diagnostic workup and treatments, and avoid permanent neurological deficits.

  18. Necrotizing vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000432.htm Necrotizing vasculitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrotizing vasculitis is a group of disorders that involve inflammation ...

  19. [The value of dual-source dual-energy CT with iodine overlay in the diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Zi-Xing; Li, Zhen-Lin; Song, Bin; Deng, Li-Ping

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the clinical value of dual-source computed tomography dual-energy Iodine overlay technique in the imaging diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The imaging data were retrospectively analyzed in 67 cases of acute necrotizing pancreatitis underwent contrast-enhanced dual-source dual-energy CT in portal venous phase. The CT imaging parameters, including the difference of CT value between pancreatic parenchyma and necrotic lesion, contrast-to-noise ratio of pancreatic parenchyma-to-necrosis, area of pancreatic necrosis and score of subjective diagnosis, were measured and assessed on CT images of 80 kV, 140 kV, weighted-average 120 kV as well as Iodine overlay. The differences of CT value between pancreatic parenchyma and necrosis in the images of 80 kV, 140 kV, weighted-average 120 kV and Iodine overlay were (67.40 +/- 20.82) HU, (42.87 +/- 14.99) HU, (48.69 +/- 15.82) HU, (33.01 +/- 10.26) HU, respectively; contrast-to-noise ratios of pancreatic parenchyma-to-necrosis of each group were 8.36 +/- 3.58, 5.85 +/- 2.65, 7.68 +/- 3.51, 10.60 4.34; area of pancreatic necrosis of each group was (3.78 +/- 2.68) cm2, (3.28 +/- 2.59) cm2, (3.37 +/- 2.46) cm2, (2.42 +/- 1.98) cm2; the score of subjective diagnosis of each group was 3.88 +/- 0.33, 3.31 +/- 0.80, 3.58 +/- 0.66, 2.81 +/- 0.76, respectively. The four indexes in the images of Iodine overlay were significantly different from those of another three groups (P overlay was significantly higher than that of another three groups, while the difference of CT value, area of pancreatic necrosis and score of subjective diagnosis were lower. CONCLUSION; Dual-source CT dual-energy Iodine overlay is not helpful to improve subjective judgment in the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, but contributes to the display of hypoperfusion area around the necrosis.

  20. Hemolytic–uremic syndrome with acute encephalopathy in a pregnant woman infected with epidemic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: characteristic brain images and cytokine profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A food-poisoning outbreak due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC occurred in Toyama, Japan. The case of a 26-year-old pregnant woman with hemolytic–uremic syndrome who developed acute encephalopathy due to EHEC infection after eating raw meat is presented herein. On day 2 following admission, a cesarean section was performed because of a non-reassuring fetal status. Fecal bacterial culture confirmed an O111/O157 superinfection. Intensive care therapies including continuous hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange were performed. After the operation, the patient developed encephalopathy for which steroid pulse therapy was added. Her condition improved gradually and she was discharged 55 days after delivery.

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? ... portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with ...

  2. A rare case of acute poster ior reversible encephalopathy syndrome involving brainstem in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Chakroun-Walha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a rare entity involving brainstem in very rare reported cases. We describe here the case of a boy who presented to the emergency department for headaches and strabismus. Diagnosis of PRES was retained by magnetic resonance imaging. The causes were blood pressure urgency and renal failure. Location of lesions was very rarely reported in literature and neurological troubles were persistent. Emergency physicians should evocate PRES each time there is a clinical context associated with neurological troubles by a normal brain CT scan. Early diagnosis is very important to treat its causes and improve prognosis.

  3. Non-invasive detection of infection in acute pancreatic and acute necrotic collections with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islim, Filiz; Salik, Aysun Erbahceci; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Guven, Koray; Alis, Halil; Turhan, Ahmet Nuray

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-related collections. A total of 21 DW-MRI, and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 20 patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with acute peri-pancreatic fluid or necrotic collections. Collections were classified as infected or sterile according to the culture and follow-up results. Collections with gas bubbles on CT images were considered to be infected. Collections with peripheral bright signals on DW-MRI images were considered to be positive, whereas those without signals were considered to be negative. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the peripheral and central parts of the collections were measured. Student's t test was used to compare the means of ADC values of independent groups. Apart from one false positive result, the presence of infection was detected by DW-MRI with 95.2% accuracy. The sensitivity and accuracy of DW-MRI were higher than CT for the detection of infection. The ADC values in the central parts of the collections were significantly different between the infected and sterile groups. DW-MRI can be used as a non-invasive technique for the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-associated collections.

  4. Surgical management of acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a 13-year experience and a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Besselink, M. G. H.; van Minnen, L. P.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The course of acute pancreatitis (AP) is unpredictable and can vary from mild to lethal. Mortality varies from low ( <2%) in mild cases to high (20%-70%) in the case of infected pancreatic necrosis. Surgical management has not been investigated in well-designed trials. Based on

  5. Appendectomy and Resection of the Terminal Ileum with Secondary Severe Necrotic Changes in Acute Perforated Appendicitis

    OpenAIRE

    Shiryajev, Yuri N.; Volkov, Nikolay N.; Kashintsev, Alexey A.; Chalenko, Marina V.; Radionov, Yuri V.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 19 Final Diagnosis: Acute perforated appendicitis ? appendiceal abscess ? secondary necrosis of the ileal wall Symptoms: Right lower quadrant abdominal pain ? fever Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Diagnostic laparoscopy ? open drainage of an appendiceal abscess ? appendectomy ? ileal resection Specialty: Surgery Objective: Management of emergency care Background: Resectional procedures for advanced and complicated appendicitis are performed infrequently. Their extent can va...

  6. Isolated acute non-cystic white matter injury in term infants presenting with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, Michael Joseph

    2013-03-01

    We discuss possible aetiological factors, MRI evolution of injury and neuro-developmental outcomes of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Thirty-six consecutive infants diagnosed with NE were included. In this cohort, four infants (11%) were identified with injury predominantly in the deep white matter on MRI who were significantly of younger gestation, lower birthweight with higher Apgars at one and five minutes compared to controls. Placental high grade villitis of unknown aetiology (VUA) was identified in all four of these infants. Our hypothesis states VUA may induce white matter injury by causing a local inflammatory response and\\/or oxidative stress during the perinatal period. We underline the importance of continued close and systematic evaluation of all cases of NE, including examination of the placenta, in order to come to a better understanding of the clinical presentation, the patterns of brain injury and the underlying pathophysiological processes.

  7. Adapting a Vacuum Assisted Closure dressing to challenging wounds: negative pressure treatment for perineal necrotizing fasciitis with rectal prolapse in a newborn affected by acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negosanti, Luca; Aceti, Arianna; Bianchi, Tommaso; Corvaglia, Luigi; Negosanti, Francesca; Sgarzani, Rossella; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Cipriani, Riccardo; Negosanti, Massimino; Patrizi, Annalisa; Faldella, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn with acute myeloid leukaemia, who developed perineal necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, after twenty days of life. Following surgical debridement, she was effectively treated with topical negative pressure therapy (V.A.C.(R) device) with silver foam dressings, this achieved complete closure in thirteen days. Negative pressure therapy should be considered when conventional wound care fails to achieve complete wound closure, even in neonates.

  8. Impetigo presenting as an acute necrotizing swelling of the lower lip in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Mohammed; Halsnad, Moorthy; Fowell, Christopher; Millar, Brian G

    2012-06-01

    The authors present an unusual case of an acute swelling of the lower lip and septicemia in a 35-year-old, recent immigrant male arriving from India. The patient presented in our emergency department with a 48-hour history of a worsening, painful swelling of the lower lip. On presentation, he was pyrexial and the lip was found to be acutely inflamed with honey-colored crusting, pustular lesions, and induration . A diagnosis of impetigo leading to necrosis of the lip was established, a rare phenomenon potentially resulting in significant tissue destruction. Appropriate medical management achieved a good outcome and prevented disabling tissue loss of the orofacial region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MR Imaging Findings in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Acute Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Manzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is a severe neurological syndrome caused by thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency and clinically characterized by the sudden onset of mental status changes, ocular abnormalities, and ataxia. Apart from chronic alcoholism, the most common cause of WE, a lot of other conditions causing malnutrition and decreasing thiamine absorption such as gastrointestinal surgical procedures and hyperemesis gravidarum must be considered as predisposing factors. Due to its low prevalence and clinical heterogeneity, WE is often misdiagnosed, leading to persistent dysfunctions and, in some cases, to death. Nowadays, MR imaging of the brain, showing T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities in typical (thalami, mammillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area and atypical areas (cerebellum, cranial nerve nuclei, and cerebral cortex, is surely the most important and effective tool in the diagnostic assessment of WE. The aim of this paper is to propose a state of the art of the role of MR imaging in the early diagnosis of this complex disease.

  10. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  11. DNA pooling base genome-wide association study identifies variants at NRXN3 associated with delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Li

    Full Text Available Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning (DEACMP is more characteristic of anoxic encephalopathy than of other types of anoxia. Those who have the same poisoning degree and are of similar age and gender have a greater risk of getting DEACMP. This has made it clear that there are obvious personal differences. Genetic factors may play a very important role. The authors performed a genome-wide association study involving pooling of DNA obtained from 175 patients and 244 matched acute carbon monoxide poisoning without delayed encephalopathy controls. The Illumina HumanHap 660 Chip array was used for DNA pools. Allele frequencies of all SNPs were compared between delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning and control groups and ranked. A total of 123 SNPs gave an OR >1.4. Of these, 46 mapped in or close to known genes. Forty-eight SNPs located in 19 genes were associated with DEACMP after correction for 5% FDR in the genome-wide association of pooled DNA. Two SNPs (rs11845632 and rs2196447 locate in the Neurexin 3 gene were selected for individual genotyping in all samples and another cohort consisted of 234 and 271 controls. There were significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of rs11845632 and rs2196447 between the DEACMP group and controls group (all P-values <0.05. This study describes a positive association between Neurexin 3 and controls in the Han Chinese population, and provides genetic evidence to support the susceptibility of DEACMP, which may be the resulting interaction of environmental and genetic factors.

  12. Epileptic encephalopathy after HHV6 post-transplant acute limbic encephalitis in children: confirmation of a new epilepsy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Armangué, Thaís; Elorza, Izaskun; Sanchez-Montanez, Angel; Vicente-Rasoamalala, Mònica; Macaya, Alfons

    2013-08-01

    Generalised epilepsy and cognitive deterioration were recently described in three children following human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6)-associated post-transplant acute limbic encephalitis (PALE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral signal change and/or atrophy in the medial temporal structures and there was no evidence of an ongoing viral or immune-mediated process. We report another child who developed this condition after cord blood transplantation for congenital neutropenia at the age of three. He presented with epileptic spasms four months after HHV6-associated PALE. Cognitive regression, prominent electroencephalographic abnormalities and different types of generalised seizures ensued during the following months and proved refractory to antiepileptic and immunomodulating treatment, which included steroids, immunoglobulin and rituximab. MRI was normal at onset of epilepsy but subsequently showed the development of right hippocampal sclerosis. Results from serial blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses were inconclusive, including lack of patient's CSF and serum reactivity with cultures of dissociated rat hippocampal neurons. This report confirms the existence of a new epilepsy syndrome featuring generalised seizures and epileptic encephalopathy after HHV6-associated PALE in children. Presentation with epileptic spasms, lack of CSF and serum reactivity with cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and rituximab inefficacy are novel features that contribute to delineate the syndrome and argue against an immune-mediated basis of this condition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Beneficial effect of splanchnic nerve transection and harmful effect of vagotomy on acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Chu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Qi, Shi-Fang; Chang, Yong-Chao; Xin, Shi-Yong; Liu, Wei-Feng; Yang, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Tian-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system interacts dynamically with the immune system to modulate inflammation through humoral and neural pathways. However, the influence of visceral nerve (VN) on acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) has drawn little attention. To investigate the influence of VN on the pathophysiological process of ANP in dogs. The dogs were divided into a sham operation (SO) group, ANP group, ANP + vagal nerve trunk transection (VNTT) group, and ANP + greater splanchnic nerve transection (GSNT) group. The VNTT and GSNT groups underwent VNTT and GSNT respectively immediately after ANP induction. The levels of serum pancreatic amylase (AMY), calcium, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HCRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were monitored dynamically and the pathological examinations of the pancreas was performed at postoperative day 7. All serum parameters among the four groups showed no differences before the experiment (p > 0.05). At different postoperative times, the serum TNF-α, IL-1β, HCRP, and AMY were significantly increased, however, the serum calcium and IL-10 had dropped in the ANP group versus SO group (p < 0.05); an alike variation trend occurred between the VNTT group and ANP group (p < 0.05); an opposite variation trend occurred between the GSNT group and the ANP group (p < 0.05). The pancreas pathological scoring of VNTT group was highest in the four groups (p < 0.05) and GSNT group was lower versus ANP group (p < 0.05). The GSNT has been shown to alleviate development of ANP, however, VNTT may exacerbate the ANP.

  14. Roux-en-Y drainage of a pancreatic fistula for disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome after acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erik G; Scaife, Courtney L; Mulvihill, Sean J; Glasgow, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    After acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), a pancreatic fistula may occur from disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) where a segment of the pancreas is no longer in continuity with the main pancreatic duct. To study the outcome of patients treated using Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy for DPDS after ANP. Between 2002 and 2011, patients treated for DPDS in the setting of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or magnetic resonance cholangiopanreatography (MRCP) documented main pancreatic duct disruption with Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy. In all, seven patients with DPDS were treated. The median age was 62 years (range 49-78) and five were men. The cause of ANP was gallstones (2), alcohol (1), ERCP (1) and idiopathic (3). Pancreatic necrosectomy was done in six patients. Time from onset of pancreatitis to fistula drainage was 270 days (164-365). Pancreatic fistulae arose from DPDS in the head/neck (4) and body/tail (3). Patients had a median fistula output of 140 ml (100-200) per day before surgery. The median operative time was 142 min (75-367) and estimated blood loss was 150 ml (25 to 500). Patients began an oral diet on post-operative day 4 (3-6) and were hospitalized for a median of 7 days (5-12). The median follow-up was 264 days (29-740). Subsequently, one patient required a distal pancreatectomy. After surgery, three patients required oral hypoglycaemics. No patient developed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Internal surgical drainage using Roux-en-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy is a safe and definitive treatment for patients with DPDS. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  15. Relapsing acute encephalopathy: a complication of diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis immunization in a young boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, J; Chabrol, B; Moulene, E; Pinsard, N

    1996-02-01

    Neurological complications of immunizations are rare. We report the case of relapsing acute encephalitis in a boy after two subsequent diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis vaccinations. First the clinical signs were those of acute disseminated encephalitis. During the second episode, the boy experienced optic neuritis. Recovery was complete after both events. Because of the close temporal relationship of both these demyelinating episodes with the immunizations, we favour a cause and effect relationship. The observation of a 7-year-old boy who developed relapsing acute encephalitis after two diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis vaccinations and a similar case in the literature suggests that this neurological manifestation may occur as a very rare complication of diphtheria-tetanus-poliomyelitis vaccination.

  16. Invasive intracranial pressure monitoring is a useful adjunct in the management of severe hepatic encephalopathy associated with pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip; Kunde, Sachin; Vos, Miriam; Vats, Atul; Gupta, Nitika; Heffron, Thomas; Romero, Rene; Fortenberry, James D

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure is often accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema, and raised intracranial pressure. Elevated intracranial pressure can be managed more effectively with intracranial monitoring, but acute-liver-failure-associated coagulopathy is often considered a contraindication for invasive monitoring due to risk for intracranial bleeding. We reviewed our experience with use of early intracranial pressure monitoring in acute liver failure in children listed for liver transplantation. Retrospective review of all intubated pediatric acute liver failure patients with grade III and grade IV encephalopathy requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and evaluated for potential liver transplant who were identified from an institutional liver transplant patient database from 1999 to 2009. None. A total of 14 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. Their ages ranged from 7 months to 20 yrs. Diagnoses of acute liver failure were infectious (three), drug-induced (seven), autoimmune hepatitis (two), and indeterminate (two). Grade III and IV encephalopathy was seen in ten (71%) and four (29%) patients, respectively. Computed tomography scans before intracranial pressure monitor placement showed cerebral edema in five (35.7%) patients. Before intracranial pressure monitor placement, fresh frozen plasma, vitamin K, and activated recombinant factor VIIa were given to all 14 patients, with significant improvement in coagulopathy (p liver transplant, with 100% surviving neurologically intact. Four of 14 (28%) patients had spontaneous recovery without liver transplant. Two of 14 (14%) patients died due to multiple organ failure before transplant. One patient had a small 9-mm intracranial hemorrhage but survived after receiving a liver transplant. No patient developed intracranial infection. In our series of patients, intracranial pressure monitoring had a low complication rate and was associated with a high survival rate despite severe

  17. Logistic regression analysis of prognostic factors in 106 acute-on-chronic liver failure patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Yanping

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the prognostic factors in acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE and to explore the risk factors for prognosis. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 106 ACLF patients with HE who were hospitalized in our hospital from January 2010 to July 2013. The patients were divided into improved group and deteriorated group. The univariate indicators including age, sex, laboratory indicators [total bilirubin (TBil, albumin (Alb, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate amino-transferase (AST, and prothrombin time activity (PTA], the stage of HE, complications [persistent hyponatremia, digestive tract bleeding, hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, ascites, infection, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP], and plasma exchange were analyzed by chi-square test or t-test. Indicators with statistical significance were subsequently analyzed by binary logistic regression. ResultsUnivariate analysis showed that ALT (P=0.009, PTA (P=0.043, the stage of HE (P=0.000, and HRS (P=0.003 were significantly different between the two groups, whereas differences in age, sex, TBil, Alb, AST, persistent hyponatremia, digestive tract bleeding, ascites, infection, SBP, and plasma exchange were not statistically significant (P>0.05. Binary logistic regression demonstrated that PTA (b=-0097, P=0.025, OR=0.908, HRS (b=2.279, P=0.007, OR=9.764, and the stage of HE (b=1873, P=0.000, OR=6.510 were prognostic factors in ACLF patients with HE. ConclusionThe stage of HE, HRS, and PTA are independent influential factors for the prognosis in ACLF patients with HE. Reduced PTA, advanced HE stage, and the presence of HRS indicate worse prognosis.

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Financial Assistance ALF HE Materials Suggested Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? ...

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My Loved Ones Resources Find ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver ... and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Encephalopathy often starts slowly, and at first you may not be aware you have it. The stages ... your doctor right away if you think you may have it. Prompt identification and treatment of HE ...

  7. [Effects of continuous early enteral nutrition on the gut barrier function in dogs with acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing-Peng; Liu, Pi; Wu, Ka; Xu, Min; Yu, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Gen-Sheng

    2004-10-17

    To evaluate the effects of continuous early enteral nutrition on the gut barrier function in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Thirty mongrel dogs underwent laparotomy and 5% mixed solution of sodium taurocholate with trypsin was infused into the pancreatic ducts so as to induce model of ANP. Permanent duodenal and jejunal fistulas were retained. Then the 30 dogs were randomly divided into 6 groups of 5 dogs: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group, normal saline (NS) group, duodenal nutrison multifibre (DN) group, duodenal PEPTI-2000Varient (DP) group, jejunal nutrison multifibre (JN) group, and jejunal PEPTI-2000Varient (JP) group, the last 4 groups being called enteral nutrition (EN) group together. Infusion of nutritional solutions was performed via the duodenal or jejunal fistulas, beginning 24 hours after the operation and lasting for 5 days. The levels of endotoxin and D-(-)-lactate in the peripheral plasma were measured every day. On the days 2 and 5 after the operation test solution to measure the enteral permeability, containing lactulose and mannitol, was infused via the fistulas and then urine within 6 hours thereafter was collected to detect the concentrations of lactulose and mannitol and calculate the lactulose/mannitol ratio. Seven days after the operation the dogs were killed to take the pancreas and intestines to be examined by microscopy. Feces was collected. ERIC-PCR fingerprint method was used to examine the structure and distribution of ERIC series of the microbial communities in the gut. The plasma D-(-)-lactate of the NS group gradually increased and peaked on the 5th day after the operation, and that of the TPN group gradually increased too, however, lower than that of the NS group at any time points and was significantly lower on the 5th day (P dogs. However, the makeup and distribution of intestinal microbial in the TPN groups were quite different from those of the normal dogs. EN helps maintain gut mucosal barrier, decreases endotoxin

  8. [Epileptic encephalopathy associated with human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) encephalitis after the second cord blood transplantation in a patient with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzuki, Kagehiro; Kato, Itaru; Kato, Takeo; Daifu, Tomoo; Saida, Satoshi; Umeda, Katsutsugu; Hiramatsu, Hidefumi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Ide, Minako; Yoshida, Takeshi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ito, Kiminari; Heike, Toshio; Adachi, Souichi

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in children is thought to be less than that in adults and risk factors, prognosis and complications are virtually unknown. Herein, we report a pediatric case developing epileptic encephalopathy following HHV-6 encephalitis after a second cord blood transplantation (CBT). A 7-year-old boy with relapsed B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission underwent CBT. However, he received a second CBT due to graft failure. On day 25 after the second CBT, he developed short-term memory defects and seizures. He was diagnosed with HHV-6 encephalitis because HHV-6 DNA was detected in his blood and cerebrospinal fluid and abnormal hippocampal signals were seen on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After treatment with foscarnet, HHV-6 DNA levels and MRI findings improved; however, he developed epileptic encephalopathy five months after the onset of encephalitis. There are very few reports on pediatric epileptic encephalopathy associated with HHV-6 encephalitis after HSCT. Detailed studies are needed to analyze risk factors, prognosis, and complications.

  9. A case of severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 38-year-old woman postpartum due to a parathyroid adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupprecht, Holger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lethal necrotizing pancreatitis postpartum due to primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a parathyroid adenoma can be considered as a rarity. Due to the unspecific clinical signs and uncommonness this disorder may be overseen very easily. The reported case illustrates the very importance of early diagnosis of this endocrine disorder in pregnancy in order to avoid a lethal course.

  10. Computed tomography of delayed encephalopathy of acute carbon monoxide poisoning - correlation with clinical findings -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Sung Hoon; Choo, In Wook; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral computed tomography (CT) findings were described in twenty-six cases with the late sequelae of acute carbon monoxide poisoning and were computed with the neurological symptoms and signs. The CT findings include symmetrical periventricular white matter low density in five cases, globes pallidus low density in six cases, ventricular dilatation in seven cases, ventricular dilatation and sulci widening in three cases, and normal findings in ten cases. Only one case showed low densities in both periventricular white matter and globes pallidus. Late sequelae of the interval from of carbon monoxide poisoning were clinically categorized as cortical dysfunction, parkinsonian feature, and cerebella dysfunction. The severity of the clinical symptoms and signs of neurological sequelae is generally correlated with presence and multiplicity of abnormal brain CT findings. But of fourteen cases showing the parkinsonian feature, only five cases had low density of globes pallidus in brain CT. Another case showing small unilateral low density of globes pallidus had no parkinsonian feature but showed mild cortical dysfunction.

  11. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Costa, D. W.; Boerma, D.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Horvath, K. D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C. R.; Bollen, T. L.; Gooszen, H. G.; Besselink, M. G.; Bakker, O. J.

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General

  12. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.W. da; Boerma, D.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Horvath, K.D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C.R.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Besselink, M.G.; Bakker, O.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. METHODS: This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing

  13. Lactose enemas plus placebo tablets vs. neomycin tablets plus starch enemas in acute portal systemic encephalopathy. A double-blind randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, M; Berthier, J M; Lewis, H; Mata, J M; Sierra, J G; García-Ramos, G; Ramírez Acosta, J; Dehesa, M

    1981-07-01

    A randomized, double-blind comparison of lactose enemas plus placebo tablets vs. starch enemas plus neomycin tablets was performed on 18 patients with acute portal systemic encephalopathy. Ten patients received starch enemas (10%; 1000 ml t.i.d.) plus neomycin tablets and 8 patients received lactose enemas (20%; 1000 ml t.i.d.) plus placebo tablets. A significant mental state improvement was demonstrated in the group of patients treated with starch enemas-neomycin tablets (p less than 0.05) and in the group of patients treated with lactose enemas-placebo tablets (p less than 0.025). Both treatments significantly improved the frequency of asterixis, ammonia blood levels, and electroencephalograms. In addition, patients treated with lactose enemas showed significant improvement in number-connection test times (p less than 0.02), and their stools showed a more acid pH (p less than 0.05). No side effects were evident with either treatment. Lactose enemas are a safe and effective treatment for acute portal systemic encephalopathy.

  14. Identification of a novel biomarker candidate, a 4.8-kDa peptide fragment from a neurosecretory protein VGF precursor, by proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid from children with acute encephalopathy using SELDI-TOF-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujino Osamu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute encephalopathy includes rapid deterioration and has a poor prognosis. Early intervention is essential to prevent progression of the disease and subsequent neurologic complications. However, in the acute period, true encephalopathy cannot easily be differentiated from febrile seizures, especially febrile seizures of the complex type. Thus, an early diagnostic marker has been sought in order to enable early intervention. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel marker candidate protein differentially expressed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of children with encephalopathy using proteomic analysis. Methods For detection of biomarkers, CSF samples were obtained from 13 children with acute encephalopathy and 42 children with febrile seizure. Mass spectral data were generated by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS technology, which is currently applied in many fields of biological and medical sciences. Diagnosis was made by at least two pediatric neurologists based on the clinical findings and routine examinations. All specimens were collected for diagnostic tests and the remaining portion of the specimens were used for the SELDI-TOF MS investigations. Results In experiment 1, CSF from patients with febrile seizures (n = 28, patients with encephalopathy (n = 8 (including influenza encephalopathy (n = 3, encephalopathy due to rotavirus (n = 1, human herpes virus 6 (n = 1 were used for the SELDI analysis. In experiment 2, SELDI analysis was performed on CSF from a second set of febrile seizure patients (n = 14 and encephalopathy patients (n = 5. We found that the peak with an m/z of 4810 contributed the most to the separation of the two groups. After purification and identification of the 4.8-kDa protein, a 4.8-kDa proteolytic peptide fragment from the neurosecretory protein VGF precursor (VGF4.8 was identified as a novel biomarker for encephalopathy. Conclusions

  15. Hepatic encephalopathy: experimental studies on the pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Knegt (Robert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAims of this thesis: 1. To study, in rabbits, the suitability of experimental acute liver failure and acute hyperammonemia simulating acute liver failure for the study of hepatic encephalopathy and ammonia toxicity. 2. To study glutamate neurotransmission in rabbits with acute liver

  16. Total corpus callosotomy for epileptic spasms after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) in a case with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanishi, Tohru; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Motoi, Hirotaka; Kanai, Sotaro; Nishimura, Mitsuyo; Yamazoe, Tomohiro; Takagi, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Enoki, Hideo

    2017-05-01

    Corpus callosotomy is a palliative therapy for refractory epilepsy, including West syndrome, without a resectable epileptic focus. The surgical outcome of corpus callosotomy is relatively favorable in cryptogenic (non-lesional) West syndrome. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a disorder that frequently leads to the development of refractory seizures by multiple cortical tubers. The multiple cortical tubers cause multiple or wide epileptic networks in these cases. Most of West syndrome cases in TSC with multiple tubers need additional resective surgery after corpus callosotomy. We describe a case of TSC in a boy aged 4years and 8months. He had multiple cortical tubers on his brain and developed epileptic spasms. The seizures were controlled with valproate. At the age of 1year and 4months, he presented with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), and had relapsed epileptic spasms one month after the onset of the encephalopathy. The seizures were refractory to multiple antiepileptic drugs. A total corpus callosotomy was performed at the age of 3years and 8months. The patient did not show any seizures after the surgery. During 12months of the follow-up, the patient was free from any seizures. Even in cases of symptomatic WS with multiple lesions, total corpus callosotomy may be a good strategy if the patients have secondary diffuse brain insults. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid...... diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...... and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians.The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism...

  18. Wernicke encephalopathy: MR findings in two patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opdenakker, G.; Gelin, G.; Palmers, Y.; Surgeloose, D. de

    1999-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is a serious neurologic disorder caused by vitamin-B1 or thiamine deficiency. In the literature the characteristic symmetric paraventricular lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy are hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences spin-echo (SE) and enhance on T1-weighted SE sequences after intravenous gadolinium administration in the acute phase. We present two patients in the acute phase of Wernicke encephalopathy with special reference to the MR imaging. One of our reported cases is special because of the MR demonstration of a hemorrhagic focus in the caput of the right nucleus caudatus. The other case demonstrates no enhancement on SE T1-weighted sequences after intravenous gadolinium administration. (orig.)

  19. Epileptic Encephalopathies: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Sonia; Al Baradie, Raidah

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are an epileptic condition characterized by epileptiform abnormalities associated with progressive cerebral dysfunction. In the classification of the International League Against Epilepsy eight age-related epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are recognized. These syndromes include early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, West syndrome and Dravet syndrome in infancy, myoclonic status in nonprogressive encephalopathies, and Lennox-Ga...

  20. Chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy: Clinical profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients had acute encephalopathy, while others had acute-on chronic encephalopathy. The risk factors for liver disease included significant alcohol ingestion, hepatitis B virus infection, and previous jaundice, while other complications of liver disease noted were deepening jaundice, ascites, bleeding tendencies, and ...

  1. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein-Angiopoietin-1 Has a Protective Effect of Vascular Endothelial Barrier in Rat With Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Feng; Kong, Ping-Ting; Li, Hong-Chang; Fan, Xin-Juan; Tu, Jia-Min; Xie, Jin-Kun; Tian, Ji-Yun; Pan, Li-Yun; Chen, Teng; Cao, Yi-Jun; Yin, Pei-Hao; Peng, Wen; Feng, Dian-Xu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) from capillary endothelial damage in rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). 96 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly averaged and divided into control group, ANP group, Si-Ang-1 group, and COMP (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein)-Ang-1 group. Animals were killed at 6, 12, and 24 hours after molding. Levels of serum amylase, porcine endothelin 1, C-reactive protein, and Ang-1 were detected; histopathological changes in the pancreas were observed; capillary permeability and Ang-1 expression of the pancreatic tissue were detected by Evans Blue extravasation assay, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. (1) Levels of serum amylase, C-reactive protein, and porcine endothelin-1 increased and level of Ang-1 decrease in the ANP group and Si-Ang-1 group compared with the control group, whereas COMP-Ang-1 group could improve the changes. (2) The order of pancreas pathological changes (mild to severe) is: control group, COMP-Ang-1 group, ANP group, and Si-Ang-1 group. (3) Capillary permeability of the pancreatic tissue in the COMP-Ang-1 group was lower than that in the ANP group. (4) Ang-1 mRNA and protein expression in the COMP-Ang-1 group was significantly higher than in the ANP group. COMP-Ang-1 can upregulate the expression of Ang-1 protein to promote angiogenesis and improve early inflammatory and pathological damage in ANP group.

  2. Effects of dexamethasone on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression and inflammatory response in necrotizing acute pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudo, Laura; Yubero, Sara; Manso, Manuel A; Sanchez-Recio, Javier; Weruaga, Eduardo; De Dios, Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Adhesion molecules are involved in the inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis (AP). We investigated the effect of dexamethasone (Dx) on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression during AP and its consequences on leukocyte recruitment and pancreatic damage. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by 3.5% sodium taurocholate for 3 hours and 6 hours. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) was administered either 30 minutes before or 1 hour after inducing AP. Messenger RNA ICAM-1 expression in pancreas and lung, membrane-bound ICAM-1 in acinar cells, and ICAM-1 plasma levels were analyzed. Histological examination of the pancreas and neutrophil infiltration in pancreas and lung were also measured. Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Dx down-regulated ICAM-1 expression in pancreas and lung from early AP. Dexamethasone given before AP reduced the pancreatic damage, but lung inflammation was not prevented. Therapeutic Dx treatment was ineffective in avoiding leukocyte recruitment into the pancreas and lung in rats with AP. High ICAM-1 concentration was found in plasma during AP, which was not reduced by Dx treatments. Dexamethasone down-regulates ICAM-1 expression, but it does not completely prevent leukocyte recruitment during sodium taurocholate-induced AP.

  3. A Novel Biosensor for Evaluation of Apoptotic or Necrotic Effects of Nitrogen Dioxide during Acute Pancreatitis in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jacewicz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct and accurate estimation of nitric dioxide levels is an extremely laborious and technically demanding procedure in the molecular diagnostics of inflammatory processes. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that a stop-flow technique utilizing a specific spectroscopic biosensor can be used for detection of nanomolar quantities of NO2 in biological milieu. The use of novel compound cis-[Cr(C2O4(AaraNH2(OH22]+ increases NO2 estimation accuracy by slowing down the rate of NO2 uptake. In this study, an animal model of pancreatitis, where nitrosative stress is induced by either 3g/kg bw or 1.5 g/kg bw dose of L-arginine, was used. Biochemical parameters and morphological characteristics of acute pancreatitis were monitored, specifically assessing pancreatic acinar cell death mode, NO2 generation and cellular glutathione level. The severity of the process correlated positively with NO2 levels in pancreatic acinar cell cytosol samples, and negatively with cellular glutathione levels.

  4. Low Cerebral Oxygen Consumption and Blood Flow in Patients With Cirrhosis and an Acute Episode of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2009-01-01

    that the reductions in CMRO(2) and CBF in patients with HE were essentially generalized throughout the brain. CONCLUSIONS: The observations imply that reduced cerebral oxygen consumption and blood flow in cirrhotic patients with an acute episode of overt HE are associated with HE and not cirrhosis as such...

  5. Necrotizing retinitis of multifactorial etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvulescu, Ruxandra Angela; Popa, Cherecheanu Alina; Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Obretin, Dana; Iancu, Raluca; Vasile, Danut

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. We present the case of a 73-year-old woman with osteoporosis, who presented to the emergency room with a sudden vision loss and ocular pain in the right eye, which appeared two days before. The patient mentioned loss of appetite, weight loss for three months and low fever for two weeks. Materials and methods. Among the ophthalmological findings, the most important were panuveitis, and large confluent necrotic areas in the peripheral retina. The patient was diagnosed with RE Panuveitis and acute necrotizing retinitis. Results. Blood exams showed leukocytosis and monocytosis, thrombocytosis and anemia. Further investigations showed high levels of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) anti IgG and Herpes Simplex (HS) type 1 virus anti IgM, urinary infection, and secondary hepatic cytolysis. The CT and MRI of the thorax and abdomen showed no sign of neoplastic disease, and no explanation for the CMV infection was found. The patient received general corticotherapy and antiviral therapy, and, after one month, RE BCVA was 20/ 30. Particularity of the case. Acute necrotizing retinitis in an old patient with CMV and HSV type 1, associated with secondary hepatic cytolysis, without any other immunosuppressive disease and very good outcome.

  6. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendersky VA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria A Bendersky,1 Mohan K Mallipeddi,2 Alexander Perez,2 Theodore N Pappas,2 1School of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. Keywords: necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosectomy, VARD, pancreatic debridement, pancreatic collections

  7. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  8. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  9. Excitotoxicity in encephalopathy associated with STEC O-157 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Shigenobu; Yasukawa, Kumi; Koizumi, Mai; Abe, Katsuhiro; Hirai, Nozomi; Honda, Takafumi; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Tada, Hiroko; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2018-04-01

    Cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of the severe complications of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and acute encephalopathy. A 3-year-old boy with acute encephalopathy associated with STEC O-157 HUS showed increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10, which normalized after methylprednisolone pulse therapy, and additionally exhibited a transient increase of glutamine on MR spectroscopy. This finding suggests that excitotoxicity, in addition to hypercytokinemia, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of HUS encephalopathy. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Chaiqin Chengqi Decoction on cholecystokinin receptor 1-mediated signal transduction of pancreatic acinar cells in acute necrotizing pancreatitis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Jin, Tao; Lin, Zi-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Xiang; Yang, Xiao-Nan; Xia, Qing; Xue, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Chaiqin Chengqi Decoction (,CQCQD) on cholecystokinin receptor 1 (CCKR1)-mediated signal transduction of pancreatic acinar cell in rats with acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP). Twenty-seven Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: the control group, the ANP group, and the CQCQD group (9 in each group). ANP rats were induced by two intraperitoneal injections of 8% L-arginine (pH=7.0, 4.4 g/kg) over a 2-h period. Rats were treated with 1.5 mL/100 g body weight of CQCQD (CQCQD group) or physiological saline (control and ANP groups) at 2 h interval. And 6 h after induction, pancreatic tissues were collected for histopathological examination. Pancreatic acinar cells were isolated for determination of CCKR1 mRNA and protein expression, phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), and determination of fluorescence intensity (FI) as a measure of intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca(2+)]i. The pancreatic histopathological score (6.2 ± 1.1) and the levels of PLC (1,187.2 ± 228.2 μg/mL) and IP3 (872.2 ± 88.4 μg/mL) of acinar cells in the ANP group were higher than those in the control (2.8 ± 0.4, 682.5 ± 121.8 μg/mL, 518.4 ± 115.8 μg/mL) and the CQCQD (3.8 ± 0.8, 905.3 ± 78.5 μg/mL, 611.0 ± 42.5 μg/mL) groups (Ppancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA in the ANP group was up-regulated (expression ratio=1.761; P=0.024) compared with the control group. The expression of pancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA in the CQCQD group was down-regulated (expression ratio=0.311; P=0.035) compared with the ANP group. The ratio of gray values of the CCKR1 and β-actin in the ANP group (1.43 ± 0.17) was higher than those in the control (0.70 ± 0.15) and CQCQD (0.79 ± 0.11) groups (PPancreatic acinar cell calcium overload of ANP induced by L-arginine was related to the up-regulated expressions of pancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA and protein. CQCQD can down-regulate expressions of pancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA and

  11. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    li A. Raouf; Gianluca Tamagno

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. ...

  12. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Aggarwal, BS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 71-year-old woman with a history of metastatic ovarian cancer presented with sudden onset, rapidly progressing painful rash in the genital region and lower abdominal wall. She was febrile to 103°F, heart rate was 114 beats per minute, and respiratory rate was 24 per minute. Her exam was notable for a toxic-appearing female with extensive areas of erythema, tenderness, and induration to her lower abdomen, intertriginous areas, and perineum with intermittent segments of crepitus without hemorrhagic bullae or skin breakdown. Significant findings: Computed tomography (CT of the abdominal and pelvis with intravenous (IV contrast revealed inflammatory changes, including gas and fluid collections within the ventral abdominal wall extending to the vulva, consistent with a necrotizing soft tissue infection. Discussion: Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious infection of the skin and soft tissues that requires an early diagnosis to reduce morbidity and mortality. Classified into several subtypes based on the type of microbial infection, necrotizing fasciitis can rapidly progress to septic shock or death if left untreated.1 Diagnosing necrotizing fasciitis requires a high index of suspicion based on patient risk factors, presentation, and exam findings. Definitive treatment involves prompt surgical exploration and debridement coupled with IV antibiotics.2,3 Clinical characteristics such as swelling, disproportionate pain, erythema, crepitus, and necrotic tissue should be a guide to further diagnostic tests.4 Unfortunately, lab values such as white blood cell count and lactate imaging studies have high sensitivity but low specificity, making the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis still largely a clinical one.4,5 CT is a reliable method to exclude the diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infections (sensitivity of 100%, but is only moderately reliable in correctly identifying such infections (specificity of 81%.5 Given the emergent

  13. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alcides Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  14. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and. Table 1. Confirmed IMD cases associated with metabolic encephalopathy diagnosed at Red Cross Children's Hospital Metabolic Disease. Laboratory, 2006 - 2012. Name of disorder. Number of cases. Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1)*. 23.

  15. Cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wenlong; Wu Aiqin; Xu Chongyong; Ying Binyu; Hong Ruizhen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine and improve the recognition on this disease. Methods: Four cases of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine were collected and their cerebral CT appearances were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Cerebral CT appearances in acute phase (within 8 days): (1) cerebral edema in different degree. CT abnormalities consisted of cortical hypodensities and complete loss of gray-white matter differentiation. The CT value were in 11-13 HU, and to be watery density in serious case, (2) subarachnoid hemorrhage. It demonstrated the signs of poisoning hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in chronic phase. Conclusion: The cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine had some character in acute phase and it can predict the serious degree of intoxication, but there was no characteristic findings in chronic phase

  16. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  17. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  18. Necrotizing enterocolitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajamanyam PK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Phani Kiran Yajamanyam,1 Shree Vishna Rasiah,1 Andrew K Ewer1,2 1Neonatal Unit, Birmingham Women's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, 2School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Necrotizing enterocolitis is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in neonates, particularly in those born very preterm. It is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in extremely low birth weight infants. Despite extensive research, the pathophysiology of necrotizing enterocolitis remains unclear and therapeutic options are limited. Multiple risk factors have been reported, but most are associated with prematurity and its complications. This makes management very challenging in vulnerable preterm infants. In this review, we focus on the risk factors and some of the current research in this area, particularly studies aimed at early detection and potential preventive measures for this potentially lethal condition. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, preterm infants, prematurity, probiotics

  19. Treatment of Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent the most severe epilepsies, with onset in infancy and childhood and seizures continuing in adulthood in most cases. New genetic causes are being identified at a rapid rate. Treatment is challenging and the overall outcome remains poor. Available targeted treatments, based on the precision medicine approach, are currently few. To provide an overview of the treatment of epileptic encephalopathies with known genetic determinants, including established treatment, anecdotal reports of specific treatment, and potential tailored precision medicine strategies. Genes known to be associated to epileptic encephalopathy were selected. Genes where the association was uncertain or with no reports of details on treatment, were not included. Although some of the genes included are associated with multiple epilepsy phenotypes or other organ involvement, we have mainly focused on the epileptic encephalopathies and their antiepileptic treatments. Most epileptic encephalopathies show genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. The treatment of seizures is difficult in most cases. The available evidence may provide some guidance for treatment: for example, ACTH seems to be effective in controlling infantile spams in a number of genetic epileptic encephalopathies. There are potentially effective tailored precision medicine strategies available for some of the encephalopathies, and therapies with currently unexplained effectiveness in others. Understanding the effect of the mutation is crucial for targeted treatment. There is a broad range of disease mechanisms underlying epileptic encephalopathies, and this makes the application of targeted treatments challenging. However, there is evidence that tailored treatment could significantly improve epilepsy treatment and prognosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Stinton, Laura M; Jayakumar, Saumya

    2013-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of cirrhotic patients. By definition, it has no obvious clinical manifestation and is characterized by neurocognitive impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative function. Although often not considered to be clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis o...

  1. Necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, M J

    1999-12-01

    In patients with no known systemic disease or immune dysfunction, necrotizing periodontitis (NUP) appears to share many of the clinical and etiologic characteristics of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) except that patients with NUP demonstrate loss of clinical attachment and alveolar bone at affected sites. In these patients, NUP may be a sequela of a single or multiple episodes of NUG or may be the result of the occurrence of necrotizing disease at a previously periodontitis-affected site. The existence of immune dysfunction may predispose patients to NUG and NUP, especially when associated with an infection of microorganisms frequently associated with periodontal disease such as Treponema and Selenomonas species, Fuscobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The role of immune dysfunction is exemplified by the occasionally aggressive nature of necrotic forms of periodontal disease seen in patients with HIV infection or malnutrition, both of which may impact host defenses. Clinical studies of HIV-infected patients have shown that patients with NUP are 20.8 times more likely to have CD4+ cell counts below 200 cells/mm3. However, these same studies have demonstrated that most patients with CD4+ cell counts below 200 cells/mm do not have NUP, suggesting that other factors, in addition to immunocompromisation, are involved. Further studies are needed to define the complex interactions between the microbial, or viral, etiology of necrotic lesions and the immunocompromised host. It is, therefore, recommended that NUG and NUP be classified together under the grouping of necrotizing periodontal diseases based on their clinical characteristics.

  2. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  3. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea cycle disorders (UCD are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual. [1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain.

  4. Necrotizing colitis associated with carcinoma of the colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Seong Ku; Lim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Soon Yong; Ahn, Chi Yul

    1982-01-01

    Necrotizing colitis associated with carcinoma of the colon, known also as obstructive colitis, is a disorder characterized by anulceration and inflammation of the colon proximal to an obstructive lesion, especially carcinoma of the rectosigmoid colon, and in rare instance, leads to acute gangrene of the colon. The authors analyzed radiologic findings in four cases of necrotizing colitis associated with carcinoma of the colon. Barium enema disclosed mucosal edema, nodular filling defects, irregularity of the colonic contour and typical thumbprinting appearance of involved colon proximal to an obstructing carcinoma of the colon. The mechanism of necrotizing colitis was briefly reviewed

  5. Adult necrotizing enterocolitis and non occlusive mesenteric ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariah, Sanoop Koshy

    2011-01-01

    Adult necrotizing enterocolitis and non occlusive mesenteric ischemia are rare causes of acute abdomen in adults. Accurate preoperative diagnosis is often difficult in these cases. Here, four cases of massive bowel necrosis with varying segments of small and large bowel involvement are described, all of whom underwent surgery. These cases give an opportunity to review the literature on such lethal diseases including non occlusive intestinal necrosis, neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis and adu...

  6. [Encephalopathies caused by valproate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, R; Görtzen, A; Bräunig, P

    1999-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA)-induced encephalopathy is a rarely considered side effect, with somnolence, reduced motor activity and severe deterioration of cognitive and behavioural abilities. In accordance with the increasing clinical importance of valproate clinical symptoms, causes and possibilities of treatment are reviewed by reporting on two cases of valproate-induced encephalopathy. In comparison to VPA intoxication, which is associated to increased VPA blood levels, the mechanisms of encephalopathy may include interactions of the hepatic enzymes, a direct toxic effect on the cerebral receptors, as well as drug interactions, a paradoxical epileptogenic effect and metabolic interactions. In most cases withdrawal of VPA produces regression of the symptoms within a few days; the role of L-carnitin or citrullin supplementation in clinical treatment remains unclear.

  7. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  8. Wernicke's Encephalopathy following Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, V.K.; De Souza, A.

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children. PMID:23859165

  9. Descendent necrotizing mediastinitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Rodrigo Armando; Rueda, Luis Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Descendent necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rare and serious disease with a high mortality. A deep infection in the neck appears generally as the primary focus, as a odontogenic abscess, tonsil infection, pharyngeal or epiglottitis among others. Six cases of descendent necrotizing mediastinitis occurs between January of 1999 to June of 2004 in the hospital santa clara of bogota, colombia, are discussed. Different etiologies were present like odontogenic abscess, submaxillar abscess, retropharyngeal abscess, a cervical esophageal perforation secondary to treatment of a stenosis in the anastomosis between the cenical esophagus and the colon. All of the patients required surgical handling by means of drainage and debridement by cerevicotomy and thoracotomy, and in one case by means of sternotomy, added to antibiotic and intensive care support. Mortality was of 67%, with an average of hospital stay of 17 days

  10. Giant necrotic pituitary apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Andrew A; Quigley, Edward P; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2013-10-01

    Apoplexy of the pituitary gland is a rare complication of pituitary adenomas, involving hemorrhage with or without necrosis within the tumor. This condition may be either asymptomatic or may present with severe headache, visual impairment, ophthalmoplegia, and pituitary failure. Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is usually required to ensure reversal of visual impairment. Reports of pituitary apoplectic lesions exceeding 60.0mm in diameter are very rare. A 39-year-old man with long-standing history of nasal congestion, decreased libido and infertility presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and diplopia. MRI of the head demonstrated a massive skull base lesion of 70.0 × 60.0 × 25.0mm, compatible with a giant pituitary macroadenoma. The lesion failed to enhance after administration of a contrast agent, suggesting complete necrotic apoplexy. Urgent surgical decompression was performed, and the lesion was resected via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathological analysis revealed evidence of necrotic pituitary apoplexy. At the 2 month follow-up, the patient had near-complete to complete resolution of his visual impairment. To the authors' knowledge, this report is unique as the patient demonstrated complete necrotic apoplexy and it underlines the diagnostic dilemma in such a case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  12. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  13. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schütz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    treatment response in the respective patients still remains to be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to previously known features of intellectual disability, epilepsy and autism, we found evidence that GRIN2B encephalopathy is also frequently associated with movement disorder, cortical visual impairment...

  14. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  15. Clinical manifestations and treatment response of steroid in pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-07-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical symptoms are characterized by behavioral and cognitive changes, speech disturbance, seizures, myoclonus, psychosis, hallucination, involuntary movements, cerebellar signs, and coma. The standard treatment is the use of corticosteroids along with the treatment of any concurrent dysthyroidism. Other options are immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. We described symptoms and outcomes on 3 teenage girls with Hashimoto encephalopathy. Presenting symptoms were seizure or altered mental status. One patient took levothyroxine due to hypothyroidism before presentation of Hashimoto encephalopathy. After confirmation of elevated antithyroid antibodies, all patients were treated with steroids. One patient needed plasmapheresis because of the lack of response to steroids and immunoglobulins. Hashimoto encephalopathy should be considered in any patient presenting with acute or subacute unexplained encephalopathy and seizures. Even though the use of steroids is the first line of treatment, plasmapheresis can rescue steroid-resistant patients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Im, Jung Gi; Whang, Sung Il; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Jae Kyo; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia causes necrosis of pulmonary parenchyma and may lead to pulmonary gangrene. Prior to the antibiotic era, extensive pulmonary involvement was potentially fatal, but the incidence of necrotizing pneumoniais now less common. On contrast-enhanced CT scans, consolidation with contrast enhancement containing necrotic foci with low attenuation and cavities is characteristic. Radiologic findings do not differ according to the causative organism and in most of cases, specific diagnosis may be impossible. Clinical findings and certain characteristic radiologic findings may be helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis. We illustrate the clinical and radiologic characteristics of necrotizing pneumonia according to causative bacterial organisms

  17. [Necrotizing fasciitis. 2011 update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, M; Grabein, B; Palm, H-G; Efinger, K; Riesner, H-J; Friemert, B; Willy, C

    2011-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis belongs to a group of complicated soft tissue infections that can be even life threatening. Despite growing knowledge about its etiology, predictors, and the clinical progression, the mortality remains at a high level with 20%. A relevant reduction can be achieved only by an early diagnosis followed by consistent therapy. The clinical findings in about 75% of the cases are pain out of proportion, edema and tenderness, blisters, and erythema. It is elementary to differentiate a necrotizing or a non-necrotizing soft tissue infection early. In uncertain cases it can be necessary to perform a surgical exploration to confirm the diagnosis. The histopathologic characteristics are the fascial necrosis, vasculitis, thrombosis of perforating veins, the presence of the disease-causing bacteria as well as inflammatory cells like macrophages and polymorphonuclear granulocytes. Secondly, both the cutis and the muscle can be affected. In many cases there is a disproportion of the degree of local and systemic symptoms. Depending on the infectious agents there are two main types: type I is a polymicrobial infection and type II is a more invasive, serious, and fulminant monomicrobial infection mostly caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes.Invasive, severe forms of streptococcal infections seem to occur more often in recent years. Multimodal and interdisciplinary therapy should be based on radical surgical débridement, systemic antibiotic therapy as well as enhanced intensive care therapy, which is sometimes combined with immunoglobulins (in streptococcal or staphylococcal infections) or hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, in clostridial infections). For wound care of extensive soft tissue defects vacuum-assisted closure has shown its benefit.

  18. Mortality in necrotizing fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, A.R.; Samad, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the mortality rate in patients presenting with Necrotizing Fasciitis. This prospective study was conducted at ward 26, JPMC Karachi over a period of two years from March 2001 to Feb 2003. All patients above the age of 12 years diagnosed to be having Necrotizing Fasciitis and admitted through the Accident and emergency department were included in this study. After resuscitation, the patients underwent the emergency exploration and aggressive surgical debridement. Post-operatively, the patients were managed in isolated section of the ward. The patients requiring grafting were referred to plastic surgery unit. The patients were followed up in outpatients department for about two years. Over all, 25 male and 5 female patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. The common clinical manifestations include redness, swelling, discharging abscess, pain, fever, skin necrosis and foul smelling discharge etc. The most common predisposing factor was Diabetes mellitus whereas the most commonly involved site was perineum. All patients underwent aggressive and extensive surgical debridements. The common additional procedures included Skin grafting, Secondary suturing, Cystostomy and Orchidectomy. Bacteroides and E. coli were the main micro-organisms isolated in this study. Bacteroides was the most common microorganism isolated among the eight patients who died. Necrotizing Fasciitis is a potentially life threatening emergency condition and carries the mortality rate of about 26.6%. The major contributing factors to increase the mortality missed initially diagnosed, old age, diabetes mellitus truncal involvement and late presentation. Anorectal involvement of disease carry worse prognosis. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and proper use of unprocessed honey reduced the mortality rate. (author)

  19. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Stinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of cirrhotic patients. By definition, it has no obvious clinical manifestation and is characterized by neurocognitive impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative function. Although often not considered to be clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis of MHE has traditionally been achieved through neuropsychological examination, psychometric tests or the newer critical flicker frequency test. A new smartphone application (EncephalApp Stroop Test may serve to function as a screening tool for patients requiring further testing. In addition to physician reporting and driving restrictions, medical treatment for MHE includes non-absorbable disaccharides (eg, lactulose, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not result in reversal of the cognitive deficits associated with MHE.

  20. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, Laura M; Jayakumar, Saumya

    2013-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of cirrhotic patients. By definition, it has no obvious clinical manifestation and is characterized by neurocognitive impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative function. Although often not considered to be clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis of MHE has traditionally been achieved through neuropsychological examination, psychometric tests or the newer critical flicker frequency test. A new smartphone application (EncephalApp Stroop Test) may serve to function as a screening tool for patients requiring further testing. In addition to physician reporting and driving restrictions, medical treatment for MHE includes non-absorbable disaccharides (eg, lactulose), probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not result in reversal of the cognitive deficits associated with MHE.

  1. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Joe Yuezhou; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if u...

  2. Cerebral lesions in acute arterial hypertension: the characteristic MRI in hypertensive encephalopathy; Zerebrale Veraenderungen bei krisenhafter arterieller Hypertonie: MRT-Befunde der hypertensiven Enzephalopathie sind wegweisend fuer Diagnose und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.P.; Krohmer, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany); Guenther, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig AoeR (Germany); Zimmer, C. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Purpose: in the nine years since the posterior reversible (leuc) encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was first described, a number of causes have been under discussion. These not only include arterial hypertension, i. e. hypertensive crises, but also various toxic substances, i. e. immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic agents, that are responsible for the formation of the symptoms and characteristic MR tomographic brain findings. Materials and methods: initial and follow-up MRI examinations of 8 patients were analyzed. All patients had acute neurological symptoms (headaches, seizures, visual disorders and vigilance disturbances) together with a detectable hypertensive crisis. Results: MRI disclosed increased signal intensity in subcortical and some cortical lesions in all patient FLAIR sequences. These changes were particularly extensive in the posterior circulation (occipital, cerebellum and brain stem) although they were also detected in brain areas supplied by the carotid artery. However, a cytotoxic genesis of the changes was ruled out in each patient by means of a normal DWI. Furthermore, when the blood pressure was normalized, reversibility of the lesions as proof of the diagnosis was detectable. (orig.)

  3. Hashimoto encephalopathy: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J Y; Xu, B; Lopes, J; Blamoun, J; Li, L

    2017-03-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) presents as an encephalopathy without central nervous system infection or tumor. HE is associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and is thus considered to be an autoimmune disorder. The prevalence of HE is low, but death and status epilepticus have been reported. HE manifests with a wide range of symptoms that include behavioral changes and confusion. Elevated thyroid antibodies are present in the majority of cases and are required for the diagnosis of HE. Normal brain MRI findings are found in the majority of patients diagnosed with HE. The most consistent CSF abnormality noted in HE patients is the presence of elevated protein. Most HE patients respond well to steroid therapy. Clinical improvements are also observed with IV immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. In conclusion, it is now generally accepted that the diagnosis of HE must include encephalopathy characterized by cognitive impairment associated with psychiatric features, such as hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia. Autoimmune encephalitis and prion disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis due to the similarity of the clinical features of these conditions to those of HE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [An atypical case of necrotizing staphylococcal pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertreau, E; Grard, S; Baudry, T; Freymond, N

    2017-11-01

    Some strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce a toxin known as Panton-Valentine leukocidin. These strains notably cause a necrotizing pneumonia which is associated with a high mortality. A 70-year-old woman presented with sub-acute onset dyspnea, low-grade fever, and hemoptysis after a trip to Dubai and New Zealand. Computed tomography showed bilateral necrotizing pneumonia, suggesting the diagnosis of pneumonia caused by S. aureus producing Panton-Valentine toxin. It was confirmed by microbiological investigation. The rapid initiation of adequate antimicrobial therapy including an effective antitoxin was essential for successful treatment, without the need for ventilatory support. Necrotizing pneumonia caused by S. aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin usually occurs in young subjects without comorbidities. Typical symptoms are a combination of hypoxemia, high fever, hemoptysis, leukopenia, and a rapidly worsening condition. Panton-Valentine leukocidin should not be discarded if not all the symptoms are typical. Antibiotic therapy including an antitoxin drug such as linezolid or clindamycin should be initiated promptly. Copyright © 2017 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. An experimental model of acute encephalopathy after total body irradiation in the rat: effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761); Effet de l'extrait de Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) chez le rat sur un modele experimental d'encephalopathie aigue apres irradiation corporelle totale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamproglou, I.; Bok, B. [Hopital Bichat, 75 - Paris (France); Boisserie, G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Drieu, K. [IHB-IPSEN, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-06-01

    To define the therapeutic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) in an experimental model of acute encephalopathy following total body irradiation in rats. Ninety four-month-old rats received 4.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) at day 1 while 15 rats received sham irradiation. A behavioural study based on a conditioning test of negative reinforcement, the one-way avoidance test, was performed test, was performed after irradiation. Orally treatment was started one day (study A) or twenty two days (study B) after irradiation and repeated daily for twelve days. In the irradiated group, three subgroups were defined according to the treatment received: EGb 761 (50 mg/kg), EGb 761 (100 mg/kg), water. This work comprised two consecutive studies. In study A (45 rats) the one-way avoidance test was administered daily from day 7 to day 14. In study B (45 rats) the behavioural test was performed from day 28 to day 35. Study A (three groups of 15 rats): following TBI, irradiated rats treated with water demonstrated a significant delay in a learning the one-way avoidance test in comparison with sham-irradiated rats (P < 0.0002) or irradiated rats treated with EGb 761 (50 mg/kg; P < 0.007) or EGb 761 (100 mg/kg; P < 0.0002). The irradiated rats, treated with EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. Study B (three groups of 15 rats): the irradiated rats, treated with water of EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. (authors)

  6. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was

  7. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in the orthodontic patient. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodríguez-Pulido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: About 0.1% of the population suffers from necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, a disease of rapid progression and acute manifestation, which may progress to necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and eventually to bone sequestration and loss of gingival tissue. Case report: A 21-year-old female patient undergoing orthodontic treatment for six months, diagnosed with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis due to acute pain in the gingival tissue, spontaneous bleeding, halitosis and abundant plaque. The treatment was conservative and effective, obtaining total remission of the lesion after seven days and three months of postoperative follow-up. Conclusion: Today there are no epidemiological or clinical reports that support the relationship of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and orthodontic treatment. Prevention is critical to the success of the treatment, which is why the dentist should recognize the clinical features of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis to raise awareness of its risks in the orthodontic patient.

  8. SCN2A encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Katherine B.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Tambunan, Dimira; Mackay, Mark T.; Rodriguez-Casero, Victoria; Webster, Richard; Clark, Damian; Freeman, Jeremy L.; Calvert, Sophie; Olson, Heather E.; Mandelstam, Simone; Poduri, Annapurna; Mefford, Heather C.; Harvey, A. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: De novo SCN2A mutations have recently been associated with severe infantile-onset epilepsies. Herein, we define the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A encephalopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with an SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy underwent electroclinical phenotyping. Results: Patients were aged 0.7 to 22 years; 3 were deceased. Seizures commenced on day 1–4 in 8, week 2–6 in 2, and after 1 year in 2. Characteristic features included clusters of brief focal seizures with multiple hourly (9 patients), multiple daily (2), or multiple weekly (1) seizures, peaking at maximal frequency within 3 months of onset. Multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges were seen in all. Three of 12 patients had infantile spasms. The epileptic syndrome at presentation was epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) in 7 and Ohtahara syndrome in 2. Nine patients had improved seizure control with sodium channel blockers including supratherapeutic or high therapeutic phenytoin levels in 5. Eight had severe to profound developmental impairment. Other features included movement disorders (10), axial hypotonia (11) with intermittent or persistent appendicular spasticity, early handedness, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Mutations arose de novo in 11 patients; paternal DNA was unavailable in one. Conclusions: Review of our 12 and 34 other reported cases of SCN2A encephalopathy suggests 3 phenotypes: neonatal-infantile–onset groups with severe and intermediate outcomes, and a childhood-onset group. Here, we show that SCN2A is the second most common cause of EIMFS and, importantly, does not always have a poor developmental outcome. Sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin, may improve seizure control. PMID:26291284

  9. Pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lado, Fred A; Rubboli, Guido; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Capovilla, Pippo; Avanzini, Giuliano; Moshé, Solomon L

    2013-11-01

    The application of metabolic imaging and genetic analysis, and now the development of appropriate animal models, has generated critical insights into the pathogenesis of epileptic encephalopathies. In this article we present ideas intended to move from the lesions associated with epileptic encephalopathies toward understanding the effects of these lesions on the functioning of the brain, specifically of the cortex. We argue that the effects of focal lesions may be magnified through the interaction between cortical and subcortical structures, and that disruption of subcortical arousal centers that regulate cortex early in life may lead to alterations of intracortical synapses that affect a critical period of cognitive development. Impairment of interneuronal function globally through the action of a genetic lesion similarly causes widespread cortical dysfunction manifesting as increased delta slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and as developmental delay or arrest clinically. Finally, prolonged focal epileptic activity during sleep (as occurring in the syndrome of continuous spike-wave in slow sleep, or CSWSS) might interfere with local slow wave activity at the site of the epileptic focus, thereby impairing the neural processes and, possibly, the local plastic changes associated with learning and other cognitive functions. Seizures may certainly add to these pathologic processes, but they are likely not necessary for the development of the cognitive pathology. Nevertheless, although seizures may be either a consequence or symptom of the underlying lesion, their effective treatment can improve outcomes as both clinical and experimental studies may suggest. Understanding their substrates may lead to novel, effective treatments for all aspects of the epileptic encephalopathy phenotype. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. DNM1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Spiczak, Sarah; Helbig, Katherine L; Shinde, Deepali N

    2017-01-01

    evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Two patients had profound global developmental delay without seizures. In addition, we describe a single patient with normal development before the onset of a catastrophic epilepsy, consistent with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome at 4 years. All mutations...... cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one...

  11. Encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica em recém-nascidos a termo: aspectos da fase aguda e evolução Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: acute period and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. R. Funayama

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Noventa e quatro recém-nascidos com encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica (EHI, atendidos no Hospital das Clínicas de Ribeirão Preto desde 1982, foram avaliados evolutivamente na fase aguda e por período médio de 47 meses. De 43 casos com EHI 1,40 se recuperaram em 96 horas e 3 faleceram. Dos 40 com EHI II, 37,5% se recuperaram até o sétimo dia e demais permaneceram com alterações. Os 11 casos com grau III faleceram até o segundo mês de vida. As crianças com EHI grau I não apresentaram seqüelas motoras. Do grupo com EHI grau II 34,5% apresentaram paralisia cerebral e 17,7% atraso neuromotor. 80% dos casos com sequela apresentaram exame neurológico anormal além do sétimo dia, na fase aguda da EHI. Epilepsia ocorreu em 17,5% dos casos com EHI grau II e somente no grupo com seqüelas motoras. Teste de QI não evidenciou diferença significativa entre os grupos com grau I, II sem seqüelas motoras e o grupo controle. Com esses dados os autores reafirmaram a importância prognostica da evolução da EHI na fase aguda.Ninety four neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy HIE attended at the University of Ribeirão Preto since 1982 were studied in terms of the neurological alterations during the acute phase and outcome over a mean period of 47 months. From 43 newborns with HIE I, 40 recovered within 96 hours and 3 died. Among 40 infants with HIE II, 37.5% recovered within the first week, and the others continued abnormal beyond the 7th day. All 11 infants with HIE III died before the second month of life. The HIE I group had no motor sequelae. Among the HIE II group, 34.5% showed cerebral palsy and 17.7% neuromotor retardation. 80.0% of those with sequelae persisted abnormal beyond 7th day of life, during the acute phase of the HIE. Epilepsy occurred in 17.5% of cases with HIE grade II, only among those with neuromotor sequelae. The 1Q test did not show statistically significant difference between the HIE I, II without motor sequelae

  12. Research progress of BOLD-functional MRI of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Zhang Longjiang; Lu Guangming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from behavior abnormality, conscious disorder and even coma, is a consequence of liver dysfunction in both acute and chronic hepatic diseases. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to a subgroup of cirrhotic patients without clinical overt hepatic encephalopathy symptoms hut with abnormalities in neuro -cognitive functions. HE/MHE can have a far-reaching impact on quality of life and prognosis. The exact neuropathology mechanism was still unclear. Recently, functional MRI (fMRI) has been increasingly applied for investigating the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of HE. This paper will review the fMRI research applied on uncovering the neuropathology mechanism of HE. (authors)

  13. Necrotizing arteritis of the appendix

    OpenAIRE

    Ciudad Cavero, Adriana; Purón del Aguila, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    In the pathological study of prophylactically removed appendices or appendicular present clinical pictures , you may find lesions of necrotizing arteritis. In 1932 , Plaut (13 ) described for the first time , this appendix necrotizing lesion at the level of small arteries and arterioles , as a specific and focal manifestation. From then until now , several authors have presented their contribution in this regard, sometimes describing the injury, individual personality , and others , relating ...

  14. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  15. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemann, S; Glockshuber, R

    1998-09-18

    Scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) belong to a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals. Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the brain. The infectious agent, the 'prion,' is believed to be devoid of informational nucleic acid and to consist largely, if not entirely, of PrPSc. The PrP isoforms contain identical amino acid sequences yet differ in their overall secondary structure with the PrPSc isoform possessing a higher beta-sheet and lower alpha-helix content than PrPC. Elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of PrPC has provided important clues on the molecular basis of inherited human TSEs and on the species barrier phenomenon of TSEs. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of the conformational rearrangement of PrPC into PrPSc is still unknown, mainly due to the lack of detailed structural information on PrPSc. Within the framework of the 'protein only' hypothesis, two plausible models for the self-replication of prions have been suggested, the conformational model and the nucleation-dependent polymerization model.

  16. [Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis: clinical-pathophysiological correlation, diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolap, Iu P; Damulin, I V

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis are severe unfavorable forms of alcoholic brain damage with poor prognosis. Thiamine deficiency represents a common cause of both diseases. In many cases, Korsakoff's psychosis develops in the outcome of Wernicke's encephalopathy, which, along with the general etiology, lets talk about a single disease - Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, acute (usually reversible) stage of which is Wernicke's encephalopathy and a chronic one (often irreversible) is Korsakoff psychosis. The dramatic paradox of Wernicke's encephalopathy is that in most cases it is difficult to detect, but early diagnosed cases are quite easy to cure. Unrecognized and therefore go untreated Wernicke's encephalopathy is a serious threat to the health and lives of patients, worsens the processes of brain aging and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. The basic approach to the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is long-term parenteral administration of thiamine, often in high doses. As an adjuvant means of therapy memantine is considered.

  17. Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaffar Pour

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesHashimoto's encephalopathy (HE known as Steroid Responsive Encephalopathy associated with Autoimmune Thyroditis (SREAT is a rare nervous system disease. HE was originally described by Brain, et. al. in 1966, however its cause still remains unknown after about 40 years. Autoimmune vasculitis of CNS, brain edema, and anti-thyroid antibodies are considered some of the etiologies for HE. It is certain that HE is an autoimmune disease and not a thyroid system disease. HE patients may or may not have goiter. Some of the most common neurological manifestations of HE include: Confusion with altered consciousness, seizures, myoloclonus, and cognitive problems. Presence of high titers of anti-thyroid antibodies in blood serum and CSF of HE patients is considered the most common laboratory test for diagnosis of HE. EEG abnormalities such as diffuse slowing and atypical tri-phasic brain waves are the most common findings in about ¾ HE patients. Brain CT-Scan is normal in majority of HE patients. Global or local hypo perfusion may be seen in SPECT scanning of the brain. MRI findings are abnormal in about 40% of HE patients.Patients with sub acute or acute onset of confusion, seizure, myoloclonus, stroke-like episodes and amnesia whose laboratory serum and CSF tests indicate presence of high titers of anti- thyroid antibodies should be considered for having HE. Vascular myelopathies, CJD, HSP, Myelinoclastic disease like PML, SSPE, ADE, MS and DNL are some of the differential diagnosis of HE.Adrenal corticosteroids are the first line treatment for HE. Recurrent or steroid resistant HE cases may be treated by addition of other immunosuppressant drugs such as Azathioprine, Cyclophosphamide, or Methotrexate to the 1st line therapy.Keywords: Hashimoto Diseases; Encephalopathy; Thyroiditis, Autoimmune; Thyroiditis, Autoimmune, Diagnosis; Thyroiditis, Autoimmune, Therapy.

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Kadikoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by acute onset of headache, nausea, focal neurological deficits or seizures along with radiological findings of white matter defects in the parietal and occipital lobes. Causes of PRES include uremia, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia and immunosuppressive medications. Usually, the treat-ment of choice involves correcting the underlying abnormality. We describe an unusual case of recurrent PRES caused by uremia during a lupus flare in a patient with biopsy-proven Class IV Lupus Nephritis (LN with vasculitis. PRES in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE is a rare clin-ical phenomenon and, when reported, it is associated with hypertensive encephalopathy. Our patient did not have hypertensive crisis, but had uremic encephalopathy. The patient′s PRES-related symptoms resolved after initiation of hemodialysis. The temporal correlation of the correc-tion of the uremia and the resolution of the symptoms of PRES show the etiology to be uremic encephalopathy, making this the first reported case of uremia-induced PRES in Class IV LN with vasculitis.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p < 0.05), improved cognition (t = 6.532, p < 0.001), and inhibited C/EBP homology protein activation (t = 5.631, p < 0.01). Additionally the data showed, for the first time, that endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in the pathophysiology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  20. Potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Romain; de Montmollin, Etienne; Poujade, Julien; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Souweine, Bertrand; Darmon, Michael; Mariotte, Eric; Argaud, Laurent; Barbier, François; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Marcotte, Guillaume; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Jamali, Samir; Lacave, Guillaume; Ruckly, Stéphane; Mourvillier, Bruno; Timsit, Jean-François

    2017-08-01

    Identifying modifiable factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy may help improve patient care and outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective multicenter database. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) was defined by a score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) sepsis at ICU admission, of whom 1341 (53%) had sepsis-associated encephalopathy. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, site of infection, and type of admission, the following factors remained independently associated with sepsis-associated encephalopathy: acute renal failure [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.67], hypoglycemia 10 mmol/l (aOR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.72), hypercapnia >45 mmHg (aOR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.53-2.38), hypernatremia >145 mmol/l (aOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.48-3.57), and S. aureus (aOR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.25). Sepsis-associated encephalopathy was associated with higher mortality, higher use of ICU resources, and longer hospital stay. After adjusting for age, comorbidities, year of admission, and non-neurological SOFA score, even mild alteration of mental status (i.e., a score on the GCS of 13-14) remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% CI 1.09-1.76). Acute renal failure and common metabolic disturbances represent potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy. However, a true causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Our study confirms the prognostic significance of mild alteration of mental status in patients with sepsis.

  1. Necrotizing soft tissue infections - a multicentre, prospective observational study (INFECT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Skrede, S.; Bruun, T.

    2018-01-01

    Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC) score and 90-day mortality; 90-day mortality in patients with and without acute kidney injury (AKI) and LRINEC score of six and above or below six; and association between affected body part at arrival and microbiological findings. Exploratory outcomes include......Background: The INFECT project aims to advance our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs). The INFECT observational study is part of the INFECT project with the aim of studying the clinical profile of patients with NSTIs and correlating...... univariate analyses of baseline characteristics associations with 90-day mortality. The statistical analyses will be conducted in accordance with the predefined statistical analysis plan. Conclusion: Necrotizing soft tissue infections result in severe morbidity and mortality. The INFECT study...

  2. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D W; Boerma, D; van Santvoort, H C; Horvath, K D; Werner, J; Carter, C R; Bollen, T L; Gooszen, H G; Besselink, M G; Bakker, O J

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General management strategies for the treatment of complications are discussed in relation to the stage of the disease. Frequent clinical evaluation of the patient's condition remains paramount in the first 24-72 h of the disease. Liberal goal-directed fluid resuscitation and early enteral nutrition should be provided. Urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is indicated when cholangitis is suspected, but it is unclear whether this is appropriate in patients with predicted severe biliary pancreatitis without cholangitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis does not prevent infection of necrosis and antibiotics are not indicated as part of initial management. Bacteriologically confirmed infections should receive targeted antibiotics. With the more conservative approach to necrotizing pancreatitis currently advocated, fine-needle aspiration culture of pancreatic or extrapancreatic necrosis will less often lead to a change in management and is therefore indicated less frequently. Optimal treatment of infected necrotizing pancreatitis consists of a staged multidisciplinary 'step-up' approach. The initial step is drainage, either percutaneous or transluminal, followed by surgical or endoscopic transluminal debridement only if needed. Debridement is delayed until the acute necrotic collection has become 'walled-off'. Outcome following necrotizing pancreatitis has improved substantially in recent years as a result of a shift from early surgical debridement to a staged, minimally invasive, multidisciplinary, step-up approach. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy (PRES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron E, Fanny E; Diaz Marchan, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinical Syndrome composed of cephalea, alteration in vision and convulsions, usually observed in patients with sudden elevation of arterial pressure. The imagenologic evidence shows reversible vasogenic brain edema without stroke. Its location is predominantly posterior; it affects the cortex and the subcortical white matter of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. The treatment with antihypertensive drugs and the removing of immunosupressor medication are generally associated with complete neurological recovery; this is reflected also in the images which return to their basal condition. The untreated hypertension, on the other side, can result in a progressive defect of the autoregulation system of the central nervous system with cerebral hemorrhage, irreversible brain stroke, coma and death

  5. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the

  6. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  7. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikari, Madura; Priyangika, Dilani; Marasingha, Indika; Thamotheram, Sharmila; Premawansa, Gayani

    2014-09-13

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical radiographic syndrome of heterogeneous etiologies. Developing hypertensive encephalopathy following post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis is a known but uncommon manifestation and developing posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in such a situation is very rare. We report a case with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the background of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. A thirteen-year-old Sri Lankan boy presented with a focal fit by way of secondary generalization with duration of 10 minutes, and developed 2 similar fits subsequently following admission. He later developed severe hypertension with evidence of glomerulonephritis, which was diagnosed as acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging of brain done on day-3 revealed non-enhancing low-attenuating areas in fronto-parietal regions. A T2 weighted film of magnetic resonance imaging was done on day-10 of the admission and found to have linier sub-cortical hyper intensities in both parietal regions which were compatible with the radiological diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis is an important cause of acute nephritic syndrome especially in children. This case report illustrates a rare association of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis.

  8. [Current possibilities in the therapy of hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P J; Bansky, G

    1990-04-14

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute or chronic liver disease. It is generally considered a metabolic and potentially reversible syndrome. An important component of HE is increased neuro-inhibition caused by reduced hepatic metabolism of gut-derived nitrogenous substances and by activation of the postsynaptic GABAA-receptor complex in the central nervous system. Effective conventional therapy of HE includes prevention of precipitating factors, restriction of dietary protein an administration of lactulose (or lactitol) and possibly also of antibiotics. In addition, animal studies and uncontrolled clinical studies indicate that the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil effectively diminishes the increased neuroinhibition in certain patients with HE. However, these favourable flumazenil effects must be confirmed in larger randomized and placebo-controlled multicenter studies before flumazenil can be regarded as a useful new addition to current management of patients with acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy.

  9. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover VPB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vijay PB Grover, Joshua M Tognarelli, Nicolas Massie, Mary ME Crossey, Nicola A Cook, Simon D Taylor-Robinson Liver Unit, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhosis, ammonia, pathology, treatment, rifaximin, lactulose

  10. Hashimoto Encephalopathy in Case of Progressive Cognitive Impairment; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tafakhori

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE is a rare condition characterized by atypical psychiatric and heterogeneous neurological manifestations such as acute cerebral ischemia, seizure, tremors, myoclonus, psychosis, depression, cognitive disorders, and fluctuating loss of consciousness. Here, a case of 28 year-old man was reported who referred to the emergency department (ED with different acute neurologic disorders and final diagnose of HE.

  11. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in five Chihuahua dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R J; Dickinson, P J; Kube, S A; Moore, P F; Couto, S S; Vernau, K M; Sturges, B K; Lecouteur, R A

    2008-05-01

    An acute to chronic idiopathic necrotizing meningoencephalitis was diagnosed in 5 Chihuahua dogs aged between 1.5 and 10 years. Presenting neurologic signs included seizures, blindness, mentation changes, and postural deficits occurring from 5 days to 5.5 months prior to presentation. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses from 2 of 3 dogs sampled were consistent with an inflammatory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 2 dogs demonstrated multifocal loss or collapse of cortical gray/white matter demarcation hypointense on T1-weighted images, with T2-weighted hyperintensity and slight postcontrast enhancement. Multifocal asymmetrical areas of necrosis or collapse in both gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres was seen grossly in 4 brains. Microscopically in all dogs, there was a severe, asymmetrical, intensely cellular, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis usually with cystic necrosis in subcortical white matter. There were no lesions in the mesencephalon or metencephalon except in 1 dog. Immunophenotyping defined populations of CD3, CD11d, CD18, CD20, CD45, CD45 RA, and CD79a immunoreactive inflammatory cells varying in density and location but common to acute and chronic lesions. In fresh frozen lesions, both CD1b,c and CD11c immunoreactive dendritic antigen-presenting cells were also identified. Immunoreactivity for canine distemper viral (CDV) antigen was negative in all dogs. The clinical signs, distribution pattern, and histologic type of lesions bear close similarities to necrotizing meningoencephalitis as described in series of both Pug and Maltese breed dogs and less commonly in other breeds.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research.

  13. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neera Chaudhry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  14. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis following Episiotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Almarzouqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon condition in general practice but one that provokes serious morbidity. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis with relative sparing of skin and underlying muscle. Herein, we report a fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis in a young healthy woman after episiotomy. Case Report. A 17-year-old primigravida underwent a vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy. Necrotizing fasciitis was diagnosed on the 5th postpartum day, when the patient was referred to our tertiary care medical center. Surgical debridement was initiated together with antibiotics and followed by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The patient died due to septic shock after 16 hours from the referral. Conclusion. Delay of diagnosis and consequently the surgical debridement were most likely the reasons for maternal death. In puerperal period, a physician must consider necrotizing fasciitis as a possible diagnosis in any local sings of infection especially when accompanied by fever and/or tenderness. Early diagnosis is the key for low mortality and morbidity.

  15. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome presenting as Balint syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Abhayambika, Archana; Sundaram, Arun N E; Sharpe, James A

    2011-09-01

    Balint syndrome is a disorder of inaccurate visually guided saccades, optic ataxia, and simultanagnosia that typically results from bilateral parieto-occipital lesions. Visual perception disturbances in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) include hemianopia, visual neglect, and cerebral blindness, but Balint syndrome had not been recognized. We report Balint syndrome associated with PRES in a 37-year-old woman with acute hypertension and systemic lupus erythematosus. Balint syndrome can be an initial presentation of PRES.

  17. An Unusual Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Zemple

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old pregnant female with no significant past medical history presented with acute onset headache and nausea as well as tonic-clonic seizures, then rapidly decompensated into a coma with complete absence of brainstem reflexes. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome and subsequent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES with brainstem involvement. Emergent delivery and blood pressure control resulted in rapid and complete neurologic recovery.

  18. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the emergency service. ... The most common etiologies of PRES are hypertension and renal failure, and the most frequent pathophysiology is hyperperfusion. PRES is ... Keywords: Emergency service, hyperperfusion, posterior reversible encephalopathy, vasogenic edema ...

  19. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  20. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, Guillaume; Châtel, Paul; Alves, Arnaud; Hammel, Pascal; Luton, Dominique

    2009-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a severe disease with a high materno-fetal mortality, which recently decreased because of earlier diagnosis and improvement in maternal and neonatal intensive care. We describe a 19-year-old woman who presented at 37 weeks gestation with acute abdominal pain and attacks of vomiting. Obstetrical and fetal examinations were normal. Biochemical investigations and magnetic resonance imaging showed a gallstone migration with necrotizing pancreatitis (Balthazar 5 points). Our multidisciplinary team decided on nonsurgical conservative treatment including morphine administration and enteral feeding, and vaginal delivery which was possible 30 h after induction of labor. Follow up was uneventful with a resolution of pain and signs of pancreatitis on imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging can be useful and safe to estimate the severity of acute and necrotizing pancreatitis in the third trimester of pregnancy. In case of sterile necrotizing pancreatitis, nonsurgical conservative treatment and a vaginal delivery should be performed when possible in these patients to reduce the risk of maternal infection.

  1. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  2. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26331018

  3. Comparative Neuroprotective Effects of Dexamethasone and Minocycline during Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Maha; Abdel Wahab, Zainab; Eshra, Mohamed; Rashed, Laila; Sharawy, Nivin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Encephalopathy and brain edema are serious complications of acute liver injury and may lead to rapid death of patients. The present study was designed to investigate the role of the inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the cytotoxic brain oedema and the neuroprotective effects of both minocycline and dexamethasone. Methods. 48 male albino rats were divided into 4 groups: control group, acute liver injury (ALI) group, minocycline pretreated ALI group, and dexamethasone pretreated ALI group. 24 hours after acute liver injury serum ammonia, liver enzymes, brain levels of heme oxygenase-1 gene, iNOS gene expression, nitrite/nitrate, and cytokines were measured. In addition, the grades of encephalopathy and brain water content were assessed. Results. ALI was associated with significant increases in all measured inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, iNOS gene expression, and nitrite/nitrate. Both minocycline and dexamethasone significantly modulated the inflammatory changes and the oxidative/nitrosative stress associated with ALI. However, only minocycline but not dexamethasone significantly reduced the cytotoxic brain oedema. Conclusion. Both minocycline and dexamethasone could modulate inflammatory and oxidative changes observed in brain after ALI and could be novel preventative therapy for hepatic encephalopathy episodes. PMID:24693424

  4. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: results and prognostic factors in patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Yong Joo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS) in the management of gastroesophageal variceal bleeding and predictive factors for long-term survival in patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis. A total of 49 patients with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis underwent TIPS over a recent three-year period. Forty-five had a history of hepatitis B viral infection, and four, of hepatitis C viral infection. In all patients, the indication for the procedure was variceal bleeding. Child-Pugh class was A in seven patients, B in 16 and C in 26 patients at the time of the last bleeding. The effectiveness of portal decompression and bleeding control was evaluated. Long-term survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and predictive factors were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. The procedure was technically successful in all cases. The portosystemic pressure gradient decreased significantly from 21.4 ± 6.4 mmHg to 12.0 ± 5.1 mmHg(N=45). Active variceal bleeding was controlled in 34 of the 37 emergency patients. The total length of follow-up was from one day to three and a half years(mean : 383 ± 357 days). Rebleeding developed in 17 patients (35%). Hepatic encephalopathy, either newly developed or aggravated, occurred in 16 (32.7%). The thirty-day mortality rate was 20.4%, and the one-year survival rate was 63.8%. The significant predictive factors for poor prognosis were Child-Pugh class C and post-TIPS hepatic encephalopathy. TIPS is effective in portal decompression in the patients with variceal bleeding due to post-necrotic liver cirrhosis. The Child-Pugh classification and hepatic encephalopathy after TIPS are considered to be significant predictive factors for long-term survival

  5. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  6. HHV-6 symptoms in central nervous system. Encephalitis and encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinari, Satoshi; Hamano, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Described is the present knowledge of central nervous symptoms, mainly encephalitis and encephalopathy, caused by the primary infection of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) in the pediatric field. Discovery of HHV-6 is in 1986, the virus, normally latent, has a high nervous affinity, and most infants are infected until the age of 3 years. Encephalitis and encephalopathy caused by the primary infection can be derived from direct viral invasion in nervous system or secondary like that through angitis. Most of early clinical symptoms are febrile convulsion. Imaging of the head by MRI particularly with diffusion weighted imaging and by cerebral blood flow SPECT with 123 I-infetamine (IMP) is important for classification of encephalitis and encephalopathy by HHV-6: Four types of them are defined according to the area of lesion observed in abnormal images, the basal nuclei-diencephalon-brainstem, frontal lobe-dominant one, cerebral hemisphere and diffusive one. Further reviewed are the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis together with other HHV-6 related problems like infection in neonate, temporal lobe epilepsy and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Current topics are related with activation of latent HHV-6. Despite numerous findings, many remain to be elucidated in acute encephalitis and encephalopathy which are most important in pediatrics. (R.T.)

  7. Celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Nadia M; Bracken, Julia M; Chandratre, Sonal R

    2014-12-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening presentation of celiac disease which is described in the context of classic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of diarrhea, leading to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Neurologic manifestations are atypical symptoms of celiac crisis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published report on seizure or encephalopathy as the presenting manifestation of celiac crisis. We describe a 2-year-old boy presenting with acute status epilepticus and lethargy. Prior to presentation, he had mild abdominal distention and intermittent diarrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hyponatremia, anemia, hypocalcemia, transaminitis, and hyperglycemia. Electroencephalography revealed severe diffuse encephalopathy, and complete infectious work-up was negative. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal; however, repeat imaging showed osmotic demyelination syndrome. Given the history of GI symptoms and hyperglycemia, celiac serology was obtained revealing elevated tissue transglutaminase, and a diagnosis was confirmed by Marsh 3c lesions in the duodenum. He significantly improved with steroid therapy in addition to adequate nutrition, fluids, and initiation of a gluten-free diet. We report herein on the first case of celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy in the absence of profound GI symptoms. Our case suggests that celiac crisis should be considered in the differential of seizures and encephalopathy in children.

  8. Pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema in a cat associated with necrotizing bronchopneumonia caused by feline herpesvirus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Sofie; Van Goethem, Bart; Saunders, Jimmy; Binst, Dominique; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard

    2011-10-01

    This report describes a 1-year-old cat with acute dyspnea. Thoracic radiography revealed a pneumomediastinum and severe subcutaneous emphysema. Lower airway surgical exploration was unable to determine the cause. At postmortem examination, acute necrotizing bronchopneumonia and fibrinonecrotic tracheitis due to feline herpesvirus-1 were diagnosed.

  9. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy | van der Watt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encephalopathy may be a presenting sign in a wide range of medical conditions. This review focuses only on the diagnosis and initial management of those inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) prevalent in South Africa that may present with encephalopathy in childhood. Metabolic encephalopathy is a medical emergency, ...

  10. Nonodontogenic Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Sialadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Yenigun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infectious disease of the soft tissue with high mortality and morbidity rates. Necrotizing fasciitis is occasionally located in the head and neck region and develops after odontogenic infections. Factors affecting treatment success rates are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment, and surgical debridement. We present a necrotizing fasciitis case located in the neck region that developed after sialoadenitis. It is important to emphasize that necrotizing fasciitis to be seen in the neck region is very rare. Nonodontogenic necrotizing fasciitis is even more rare.

  11. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflammation in epileptic encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EE) that manifests with infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants) and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12–15%) or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment [adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and high dose steroids], the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate pro-inflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of West syndrome? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? PMID:28427564

  13. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgraj Oskar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  14. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgraj, Oskar; Paran, Sri; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Quinn, Feargal

    2011-12-12

    Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  15. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, Oskar

    2011-12-12

    Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  16. Hashimoto’s Encephalopathy (A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghaffar Pour

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE known as Steroid Responsive Encephalopathy associated with Autoimmune Thyroditis (SREAT is a rare nervous system disease. HE was originally described by Brain, et. al. in 1966, however its cause still remains unknown after about 40 years. Autoimmune vasculitis of CNS, brain edema, and anti-thyroid antibodies are considered some of the etiologies for HE. It is certain that HE is an autoimmune disease and not a thyroid system disease. HE patients may or may not have goiter.

    Some of the most common neurological manifestations of HE include: Confusion with altered consciousness, seizures, myoloclonus, and cognitive problems. Presence of high titers of anti-thyroid antibodies in blood serum and CSF of HE patients is considered the most common laboratory test for diagnosis of HE. EEG abnormalities such as diffuse slowing and atypical tri-phasic brain waves are the most common findings in about ¾ HE patients. Brain CT-Scan is normal in majority of HE patients. Global or local hypo perfusion may be seen in SPECT scanning of the brain. MRI findings are abnormal in about 40% of HE patients.

    Patients with sub acute or acute onset of confusion, seizure, myoloclonus, stroke-like episodes and amnesia whose laboratory serum and CSF tests indicate presence of high titers of anti- thyroid antibodies should be considered for having HE. Vascular myelopathies, CJD, HSP, Myelinoclastic disease like PML, SSPE, ADE, MS and DNL are some of the differential diagnosis of HE.

    Adrenal corticosteroids are the first line treatment for HE. Recurrent or steroid resistant HE cases may be treated by addition of other immunosuppressant drugs such as  Azathioprine, Cyclophosphamide, or Methotrexate to the 1st line therapy.

  17. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used asa home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to causea variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagicencephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers ofbaking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. [West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(5)619...

  18. Thiamine in the treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy in patients with alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latt, N; Dore, G

    2014-09-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is an acute, reversible neuropsychiatric emergency due to thiamine deficiency. Urgent and adequate thiamine replacement is necessary to avoid death or progression to Korsakoff syndrome with largely irreversible brain damage. Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome refers to a condition where features of Wernicke encephalopathy are mixed with those of Korsakoff syndrome. Although thiamine is the cornerstone of treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy, there are no universally accepted guidelines with regard to its optimal dose, mode of administration, frequency of administration or duration of treatment. Currently, different dose recommendations are being made. We present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of Wernicke encephalopathy based on literature review and our clinical experience. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  19. Wernicke’s encephalopathy associated with liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Garg, Vipul

    2017-07-31

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, characterised by ocular motor dysfunction, ataxia and impairment in consciousness. It predominantly affects brain regions with a high metabolic rate such as mammillary bodies, medial thalamic nuclei, the tectal region and the cerebellum. Although chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, various other conditions not related to alcohol consumption such as bariatric surgery, acute pancreatitis, hyperemesis gravidarum, prolonged fasting and gastrointestinal surgery have been implicated in its aetiology. We report the case of a patient who underwent surgery for liver abscess and subsequently developed Wernicke's encephalopathy; he showed a positive response to thiamine supplementation. This is the first report describing liver abscess as the cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Anil C.; Garg, Hitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture. PMID:26041951

  1. Infant with MRSA necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panglao Rajan M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria Panglao Rajan,1 Pinkal Patel,1 Lori Cash,1 Anjali Parish,2 Scott Darby,1 Jack Yu,3 Jatinder Bhatia11Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Medical Center of Central Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USAAbstract: This is an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in this premature infant, which highlights severity, rapid progression of this disease and shows outcome if intervention is initiated at an early stage. This case also highlights one of the possible serious complications of percutaneous inserted central catheter (PICC line, which can be life threatening.Keywords: necrotizing fasciitis, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, PICC, premature infant

  2. Survival from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gausepohl, Jeniffer S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an uncommon, yet clinically significant infection that rapidly progresses to involve the deep neck spaces. Early recognition and aggressive surgical intervention and debridement are important, as this disease is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we present a case of CNF and descending mediastinitis from a non-odontogenic source in a patient presenting with neck swelling and odynophagia. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:172–174.

  3. Inflammatory polyps after necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iofel, E; Kahn, E; Lee, T K; Chawla, A

    2000-08-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in the neonatal period. NEC causes ulceration of the intestinal mucosa and may lead to perforation or a stricture. To the best of the authors' knowledge intestinal inflammatory polyps after NEC have not been described previously. The authors report on a 17-week-old boy with pseudopolyps at the site of a colonic stricture after NEC.

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis: an urgent diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Maya, Silvia; Dualde Beltran, Delfina [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Lemercier, Pierre; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos [Hospital Politecnico y Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare, life-threatening soft-tissue infection and a medical and surgical emergency, with increasing incidence in the last few years. It is characterized by a rapidly spreading, progressive necrosis of the deep fascia and subcutaneous tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is often underestimated because of the lack of specific clinical findings in the initial stages of the disease. Many adjuncts such as laboratory findings, bedside tests - e.g., the ''finger test'' or biopsy - and imaging tests have been described as being helpful in the early recognition of the disease. Imaging is very useful to confirm the diagnosis, but also to assess the extent of the disorder, the potential surgical planning, and the detection of underlying etiologies. The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic, but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, best seen on magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  5. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  6. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain. Glycine encephalopathy is caused by the shortage of an enzyme that normally breaks down glycine in the body. A lack of this enzyme allows excess glycine to build up in tissues and organs, particularly the brain, leading to serious medical problems. ...

  8. Medical image of the week: necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60-year-old man with a past medical history significant for coronary artery disease status post percutaneous coronary intervention was admitted to Banner University Medical Center for acute pancreatitis complicated by a pericardial effusion requiring pericardiocentesis. The following day, the patient developed severe shortness of breath requiring increasing amounts of supplemental oxygen. The patient was emergently transferred to ICU for noninvasive bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation, but he subsequently required intubation. Throughout his worsening condition, he denied any abdominal pain, only relaying ongoing substernal chest pain. His troponins, however, remained negative and echocardiography failed to show any reaccumulation of the pericardial effusion. CT scan of the chest failed to show any pulmonary embolism. But, CT abdomen displayed acute pancreatitis complicated by peripancreatic gas consistent with necrotizing pancreatitis (Figure 1. Emergent laparotomy was completed. There were no signs of stomach or duodenal perforation. Purulent fluid was removed from the lesser sac and ...

  9. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  10. Neuroimmunomodulators in neuroborreliosis and Lyme encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Pacheco-Quinto, Javier; Herdt, Aimee R; Halperin, John J

    2018-01-11

    Lyme encephalopathy, characterized by non-specific neurobehavioral symptoms including mild cognitive difficulties, may occur in patients with systemic Lyme disease and is often mistakenly attributed to CNS infection. Identical symptoms occur in innumerable other inflammatory states and may reflect the effect of systemic immune mediators on the CNS. Multiplex immunoassays were used to characterize the inflammatory profile in serum and CSF from Lyme and non-Lyme patients with a range of symptoms to determine if there are specific markers of active CNS infection (neuroborreliosis), or systemic inflammatory mediators associated with neurobehavioral syndromes. CSF CXCL13 was elevated dramatically in confirmed neuroborreliosis (n=8) and to a lesser extent in possible neuroborreliosis (n=11) and other neuroinflammatory conditions (n=44). Patients with Lyme (n=63) or non-Lyme (n=8) encephalopathy had normal CSF findings, but had elevated serum levels of IL-7, TSLP, IL-17A, IL-17F, and MIP-1α/CCL3. CSF CXCL13 is a sensitive and specific marker of neuroborreliosis in individuals with Borrelia-specific intrathecal antibody (ITAb) production. However, CXCL13 does not distinguish individuals strongly suspected of having neuroborreliosis, but lacking confirmatory ITAb, from those with other neuroinflammatory conditions. Patients with mild cognitive symptoms occurring during acute Lyme disease, and/or following appropriate treatment, have normal CSF but elevated serum levels of T-helper 17 markers and T-cell growth factors. These markers are also elevated in non-Lyme disease patients experiencing similar symptoms. Our results support that in the absence of CSF abnormalities, neurobehavioral symptoms are associated with systemic inflammation, not CNS infection or inflammation, and are not specific to Lyme disease. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy), ...

  13. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  14. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  15. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suvasini; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  16. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    OpenAIRE

    J. Meenupriya

    2013-01-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc) spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc) when people consume...

  17. Haematoma in the transverse mesocolon secondary to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of acute haematoma of the transverse mesocolon secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis is presented. with a brief discussion of the pathogenesis and computed tomographic findings. The value of computed tomography in acute complicated pancreatitis is emphasized.

  18. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but very severe infection that affects the soft‑tissues of the cephalic extremity. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis most frequently occurs secondarily to inflammatory odontogenic disorders and represents the most severe infection of maxillofacial spaces, with a high lethal potential.

  19. Multifocal necrotizing fasciitis following Hirshsprung's disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multifocal necrotizing fasciitis following Hirshsprung's disease surgery away from the surgical wound site. Ahmed A. Haseeb, Shadi Okasha and Atef Elbarawi. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infection with rapidly progressive necrosis. Escherichia coli is rarely reported as causative agent of type 2 NF.

  20. Expression of glutamine transporter isoforms in cerebral cortex of rats with chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Escobar, Thayssa D.C.; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that occurs due to acute and chronic liver diseases, the hallmark of which is the increased levels of ammonia and subsequent alterations in glutamine synthesis, i.e. conditions associated with the pathophysiology of HE. Under physiological...

  1. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  2. Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft tissue infection that results in rapid local tissue destruction. Type 1 necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by polymicrobial, synergistic infections that are caused by non-Group A streptococci, aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Type 2 necrotizing fasciitis involves Group A Streptococcus (GAS with or without a coexisting staphylococcal infection. Here we provide the first report of necrotizing fasciitis jointly associated with the microbes Group B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. S. lugdunensis is a commensal human skin bacterium known to cause often painful and prolonged skin and soft tissue infections. To our knowledge, however, this is the first case of Staph. lugdunensis-associated necrotizing fasciitis to be reported in the literature.

  3. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  4. Current trends in the management of infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Lappas, Christos; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Delis, Spiros G; Safioleas, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with an aggravated prognosis, while superimposed infection is almost always lethal without surgery. Bacterial translocation mainly from the gut is the most widely accepted mechanism in the pathogenesis of infected pancreatic necrosis. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be suspected in the presence of the usual markers of systemic inflammation (i.e., fever and leukocytosis), organ failure, or a protracted severe clinical course. The diagnostic method of choice to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis is contrast-enhanced computed tomography, where necrotic areas are evidenced as regions without enhancement. The presence of pancreatic necrotic infection should be based on a combination of clinical manifestations, results of laboratory investigation (mainly increased levels of CRP and / or procalcitonin), and can be confirmed by image-guided fine-needle aspiration and gram stain /culture of the aspirates. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for the management of infected pancreatic necrosis and involves open necrosectomy (debridement) and wide drainage of the peripancreatic areas, often in association with continuous irrigation. Planned reoperations may be required to achieve complete removal of the necrotic / infected material. The timing of surgery is of paramount importance; ideally, surgery should be performed after 2 or 3 weeks from the onset of pancreatitis. Recently, various minimally invasive approaches have been described, but they have not been compared in prospective trials with the classical open surgery. Antibiotic therapy is routinely used in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, in conjunction with surgical debridement; its role, however, in the management of patients with sterile necrosis is recently questioned. Nutritional support should be taken into consideration in these patients; enteral nutrition should be preferred over

  5. A Less Known Stroke Mimic: Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keneilwe Malomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-neuro-radiological diagnosis, which can complicate a wide range of conditions. Clinical features include generalised and/or focal neurological deficits. These features are also present in neurovascular disorders, such as stroke. Currently, emphasis in the management of hyperacute stroke is thrombolysis, and it is important to bear in mind stroke mimics as a possible cause of clinical features. The Authors present the case of a 66-year-old man, who presented with acute focal neurological deficit. His brain imaging and history were consistent with PRES.

  6. Candida albicans-associated necrotizing vasculitis producing life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sargent, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Patients undergoing treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at risk for fungal infections including disseminated candidiasis. We describe a case of systemic Candida albicans infection associated with life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to unusual necrotizing vasculitis involving the gastrointestinal tract. We explore the association between Candida and such vasculopathy.

  7. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANNALS

    irreversible Korsakoff psychosis, with confabulation and anterograde memory deficits, and with 17% mortality.9. Clinically, we most often associate. Wernicke's encephalopathy with alcohol consumption.1-5. Wernicke's encephalopathy producing an altered state may occur in malnourished psychiatric patients even in the ...

  8. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  9. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  10. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  11. Autoimmune encephalopathy associated with thyroid autoantibodies as the cause of reversible cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dobbin Chow

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We herewith describe a patient with acute confusion, expressive aphasia and generalized seizures. A through workup excluded most causes of encephalopathy. He was, however, found to have TSH = 18.6 MIU/ml, T3reverse = 0.44nmol/L, T4 = 0.8ng/dl and Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB titer >1000 IU/ml. Based on the above findings the patient was diagnosed with Hashimoto's encephalopathy and his mental status showed dramatic improvement (MMS 30/30 with high dose prednisone. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rare disorder of presumed autoimmune origin characterized by cognitive decline, seizures, neuro-psychiatric symptoms, high titers of Anti-Thyroid-Peroxidase AB, and a positive response to steroids.

  12. Palatal-Myoclonus as a Presentation of Hashimoto Encephalopathy: an Interesting case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeel Ghoreishi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE is known as a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis or nonvascular inflammation-related autoimmune meningoencephalitis. The average age of onset of HE is approximately 50 years; and it is more common in women. The onset of HE may be acute or subacute. The course of most HE cases is relapsing and remitting, which is similar to that of vasculitis and stroke.Methods: In this article, we present a previously healthy 32 years old; veterinarian male with palatal myoclonus, as a rare presentation of this disorder, and review the neurologic aspects of hashimoto encephalitis . Results:The clinical presentation of HE is characterized by progressive cognitive decline tremor, transient aphasia, seizures, abnormal gait, sleep disorder and stroke-like episodes .Myoclonus, either generalized or multifocal, and tremor, often of the bilateral upper extremities, is the most frequently observed involuntary movements in HE.Conclusion:The rapidly progressive cognitive dysfunction and encephalopathies observed.

  13. Wernicke's encephalopathy: new clinical settings and recent advances in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechi, Gianpietro; Serra, Alessandro

    2007-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency, which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. According to autopsy-based studies, the disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed in both adults and children. In this review, we provide an update on the factors and clinical settings that predispose to Wernicke's encephalopathy, and discuss the most recent insights into epidemiology, pathophysiology, genetics, diagnosis, and treatment. To facilitate the diagnosis, we classify the common and rare symptoms at presentation and the late-stage symptoms. We emphasise the optimum dose of parenteral thiamine required for prophylaxis and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy and prevention of Korsakoff's syndrome associated with alcohol misuse. A systematic approach helps to ensure that patients receive a prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  14. RECENT THEORIES OF PATHOGENESIS OF HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN HEPATITIS C VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Popović Dragonjić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is potentially reversible, or progressive neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior and personality changes, and transient neurologic symptoms and characteristic electroencephalographic patterns associated with acute and chronic liver failure. For some time, there has been controversy regarding the origin of toxins responsible for the change of mental state. It was found that the occurrence of hepatic encephalopathy is responsible for multiple organ peripheral changes (intestinal changes, abnormalities of portal-systemic circulation, liver failure, loss of muscle tissue, changes in brain intracellular communication (osmotic changes, astrocytes and axonal abnormalities in communication, changes in cerebral perfusion and ammonia, endogenous benzodiazepines, gamma amino butyric acid, derivatives of methionine and false neurotransmitters. The aforementioned metabolic factors that contribute to the development of hepatic encephalopathy are not mutually exclusive and multiple factors may be present at the same time.

  15. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  16. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung

    1991-01-01

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study

  17. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung [Young-Deung-Po City Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-07-15

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study.

  18. Wernicke encephalopathy: MR findings and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidauer, Stefan; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E.; Nichtweiss, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. The aim of the study was to analyse MRI findings typical for this disease and to evaluate the significance of their correlations with clinical symptoms. Magnetic resonance images and clinical features of 12 patients with WE were analysed. The patients underwent MR imaging within 3-14 days after onset of clinical symptoms. In 7 of 12 patients MR imaging showed symmetrical diencephalic and midbrain lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images from 5 of 9 patients examined during the initial 6 days of acute WE showed a subtle enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the tectal plate, the periaqueductal area and the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei. In addition, T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images revealed hyperintense signals in these regions (except for 2 patients where the mamillary bodies were normal). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images without any enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images were detected in 2 patients by MR imaging performed 11 or 14 days after onset of WE. Patients with hyperintensities on T2-weighted images of the periventricular region of the third ventricle and the paramedian thalamic nuclei had poor recovery from their mental dysfunction. The MR examination in case of WE shows a typical pattern of lesions in 58% of cases. Enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei, and the periaqueductal area on postcontrast T1-weighted images can be observed in the initial period after clinical onset of symptoms and are characteristic signs of the acute stage of WE. Hyperintense lesions in the periventricular region and the paramedian thalamic nuclei on T2-weighted and FLAIR images in the subacute stage of WE and enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images of the mamillary bodies and the

  19. Surgical intervention in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, MG; de Bruijn, MT; Rutten, JP; Boermeester, MA; Hofker, HS; Gooszen, HG

    Background: This study evaluated the various surgical strategies for treatment of (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis (INP) and patient referrals for this condition in the Netherlands. Methods: This retrospective study included all 106 consecutive patients who had surgical treatment for

  20. Necrotizing enterocolitis - review of 34 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, E.G.; Abbud, E.A.; Duarte, F.B.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-four cases of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis are reviewed. The authors took into consideration the actual criteria of classification, and demonstrated the pre-disposal factors and the correlation between clinical and roentgenographics findings in this condition. (author)

  1. Current understanding and neurobiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvin, Stéphane; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2016-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a group of diseases in which epileptic activity itself contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone. These impairments can worsen over time. This concept has been continually redefined since its introduction. A few syndromes are considered epileptic encephalopathies: early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome or infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome during infancy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-and-waves during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner syndrome during childhood. The inappropriate use of this term to refer to all severe epilepsy syndromes with intractable seizures and severe cognitive dysfunction has led to confusion regarding the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we review our current understanding of those epilepsy syndromes considered to be epileptic encephalopathies. Genetic studies have provided a better knowledge of neonatal and infantile epilepsy syndromes, while neuroimaging studies have shed light on the underlying causes of childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Apart from infantile spasm models, we lack animal models to explain the neurobiological mechanisms at work in these conditions. Experimental studies suggest that neuroinflammation may be a common neurobiological pathway that contributes to seizure refractoriness and cognitive involvement in the developing brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The external otitis necrotizing about 45 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chnitri, Sana

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing external otitis is a serious infection of the ear canal, it can develop life-threatening. It occurs primarily in elderly diabetic or immunocompromised. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common germ involved. This is a retrospective study of 45 cases of necrotizing otitis externa collected in ENT and CMF from the military hospital in Tunis and ENT and CMF of Rabta over a period of 10 years from 1994 to 2003 .

  3. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis: surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, E; Rena, O; Oliaro, A; Cavallo, A; Giobbe, R; Casadio, C; Maggi, G; Mancuso, M

    2001-10-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a primary complication of cervical or odontogenical infections that can spread to the mediastinum through the anatomic cervical spaces. Between April 1994 and April 2000, 13 patients, mean age 39.23+/-18.47 (median 38, range 16-67) years, with DNM were submitted to surgical treatment. Primary odontogenic abscess occurred in six, peritonsillar abscess in five and post-traumatic cervical abscess in two patients. Diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) of the neck and chest. All patients underwent surgical drainage of the cervico-mediastinal regions by a bilateral collar incision associated with right thoracotomy in ten cases. Six patients out of 13 required reoperation. Two patients previously submitted only to cervical drainage required thoracotomy; four patients, which have been submitted to cervico-thoracic drainage, underwent contralateral thoracotomy in two cases and ipsilateral reoperation in two cases. Ten patients evolved well and were discharged without major sequelae; three patients died of multiorgan failure related to septic shock. Mortality rate was 23%. Early diagnosis by CT of the neck and chest suggest a rapid indication of surgical approach to DNM. Ample cervicotomy associated with mediastinal drainage via large thoracotomic incision is essential in managing these critically ill patients and can significantly reduce the mortality rate for this condition, often affecting young people, to acceptable values.

  4. The research of melatonin in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Bin; Feng Xing; Qian Zhihong; Shi Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the function of melatonin in the pathogenesis and the prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and provide the pathophysiology basis for therapying HIE with melatonin. Methods: The level of plasma melatonin of twenty normal term infants and twenty modest HIE and twenty middle-severity HIE in their acute phase and recovery phase were assayed respectively with radioimmunoassay (RIA). Then compare the difference of the melatonin level among these neonates. Results: (1) For modest HIE, the melatonin level was higher than that in the normal in the acute phase and there was no difference to the normal in the recovery phase. (2) There was no difference between the melatonin level in middle-severity HIE in the acute phase and that in the normal, but in the recovery phase it was higher than that in the normal. (3) For modest HIE, the melatonin level in acute phase was higher than that in the recovery phase, but for middle-severity HIE, it was adverse. (4) In the acute phase, the level in modest HIE was higher than that in the middle-severity HIE, but on the contrary in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Melatonin have protection action on HIE. The prognosis of modest HIE neonates with rising melatonin level in the acute phase is better than that with lower melatonin level of middle-severity HIE. (authors)

  5. Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research is being done? The NINDS supports and conducts research on brain diseases. Much of this research is aimed at characterizing the agents that cause these disorders, clarifying the mechanisms underlying them, and, ...

  6. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships.

  7. Functional neuroimaging in epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniatchkin, Michael; Capovilla, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) represent a group of severe epileptic disorders associated with cognitive and behavioral disturbances. The mechanisms of cognitive disability in EEs remain unclear. This review summarized neuroimaging studies that have tried to describe specific fingerprints of brain activation in EE. Although the epileptic activity can be generated individually in different brain regions, it seems likely that the activity propagates in a syndrome-specific way. In some EEs, the epileptiform discharges were associated with an interruption of activity in the default mode network. In another EE, other mechanisms seem to underlie cognitive disability associated with epileptic activity, for example, abnormal connectivity pattern or interfering activity in the thalamocortical network. Further neuroimaging studies are needed to investigate the short-term and long-term impact of epileptic activity on cognition and development. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. Methods: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international networ......, and the degree of ID. Accordingly, we hypothesize that seizure severity and ID present 2 independent dimensions of the STXBP1-E phenotype. STXBP1-E may be conceptualized as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder rather than a primary epileptic encephalopathy....

  10. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  11. [Etiopathogenesis of necrotizing arteritis (leukocytoclastic vasculitis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Yus, E; Iglesias Díez, L

    1976-01-01

    The small vessel's necrotizing angiitis (necrotizing microangiitis (NMA), leucocytoclastic angiitis) form a continuous spectrum from the exclusively cutaneous forms of Gougreot, to those which seriously affect the viscera, as the very acute and fatal cases of Zeek, passing through a series of intermediate phases, in which Schönlein-Henoch's purpura is found. In all of these clinical forms, the existence of an allergic mechanism has been suggested from their origin itself and in 1964 Alarcón-Segovia and Brown grouped them under the common denominator of allergic angiitis. Later investigations are far from completely confirming this hypothesis. In isolated cases, the clinical sequence corroborates the hypothesis of a bacterian aetiology (local septic focus), but in the Schónlein-Henoch purpura it has not been proven that there is a greater streptococcus beta-haemolytic frequency is the throat nor a greater number of antibodies in the serum than in normal children or those affected by illnesses not related to rheumatic fever. The aetiologic role of drugs and food is very difficult to prove. The anatomopathologic similarity between the Arthus reaction, the serum sickness and the spontaneous human NMA have led to the hypothesis that the NMA are immunocomplex (IC) diseases. In order to try to prove this, basically three techniques have been used: Direct immunofluorescence to show the IC tissue deposits, and mixed cryoglobulinemia and the serum's anti-complementary activity for the circulating IC. Direct immunofluorescence shows, in approximately 50% of the cases, the presence of IgG and C3 in the damaged vessels (also IgM with frequency). But, are these found combined as complexes? Parish, in some cases of presumably post-bacterial angiitis, has shown the simultaneous presence of the bacterian antigen and the Ig. The direct immunofluorescence negativity can be due to: (1) The IC being rapidly eliminated by the neutrophils; (2) the fact that these are nonimmunologic

  12. Acute esophageal necrosis: a case report and review | Lahbabi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute esophageal necrosis, commonly referred to as "black esophagus" or "acute necrotizing esophagitis", is a rare clinical disorder with an unclear etiology. The definition excludes patients with a history of recent caustic ingestion. Oesophageal necrosis can be diagnosed at endoscopy by the presence of black necroting ...

  13. Magnetic resonance reflects the pathological evolution of Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S H; Kim, M; Na, D L; Jeon, B S

    2001-10-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute phase of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Pathologic findings change between acute and chronic phases. Only a few magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have been done to date. To correlate the MRI findings in acute and chronic stages of WE with the known pathologic information, 15 consecutive patients with WE were examined with MRI: 3 before thiamine treatment, 7 within 24 hours of thiamine treatment, 4 between the second and sixth day after thiamine treatment, and 1 fifty-five days after thiamine treatment. Nine of the patients had follow-up MRI between 2 days and 33 months. T1-weighted, proton, and T2-weighted axial images were obtained with additional 5-mm-thick T1-weighted sagittal and coronal images to better visualize the mammillary bodies. In the acute WE, MRI showed high signal intensityon T2-weighted images in periaqueduct and medial thalamic regions. In a few patients with alcoholism, vermian and mammillary body atrophies and third ventricular enlargements were noted. In the chronic phase of WE, T2 hyperintensity disappeared but mammillary bodies and cerebellar vermis became atrophic and third ventricular enlargements were evident. High signal intensity on T2-weighted images disappeared as early as 2 days, and atrophic changes appeared as early as 1 week. MRI is useful for in vivo monitoring and reflects the pathological evolution in acute and chronic phases of WE.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis in nephritic syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, I.; Pasaribu, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an infection of any layer of tissue compartment; it can be in the dermis, subcutaneous tissue, superficial fascia, deep fascia, or even muscle. Usually, necrotizing fasciitis is associated with necrotizing process caused by the single bacterial organism. The most common pathogen is group A Streptococcus. Delayed in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of necrotizing fasciitis will lead to increased tissue loss and high mortality risk. Here we report a case of necrotizing fasciitis which has a great outcome since the surgical exploration of tissue and debridement was done as soon as the patient is suspected of necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF LIMB: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, rare, potentially lethal, soft tissue infection that tends to develop in scrotum, perineum, abdominal wall or the extremities. It is a medical emergency that threatens both patient’s limb and life. Necrotizing fasciitis has the potential to become quite severe - in such cases a radical debridement amounting to amputation of the limb may be required to save the patient’s life. Early diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. We describe a case of a 49-year-old obese woman who developed necrotizing fasciitis in her left lower limb for which she underwent multiple radical surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting for reconstruction of the limb defects. Our main focus was to salvage the limb with the help of antibiotics and multiple debridements. This report emphasizes the need to have a relook at the use of Parenteral Crystalline Penicillin and diligent management of wounds resulting from repeated debridements.

  16. Treatment of necrotizing fasciitis with quinolones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.T.; Tahmeedullah; Obaidullah

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of high dose quinolones therapy in patients with necrotizing fasciitis. Subjects and Methods: Twenty consecutive patients, diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis, were treated with intravenous quinolones, (400 mg 8 hourly). The response was evaluated in terms of subsidence of fever and C-reactive proteins levels. Results: Majority of the patients was male (60%). Lower limb involvement was most commonly involved (70%). The most common initiating cause was injection abscess (45%). Majority of the cultures showed polymicrobial infection (90%). The most common isolate was streptococcus pyogenes (65%). Majority of the patients showed excellent response with intravenous quinolones (Ciprofloxacin) in high doses in 24-48 hours. Only two patients (10%) failed to respond to therapy due to severe infection and delay in seeking treatment. Conclusion: intravenous quinolones (Ciprofloxacin) in high doses are effective in controlling necrotizing soft tissue infections. (author)

  17. [Abdominal necrotizing fasciitis after caesarean delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barant, S; Radbata, D; Oberweis, D; Jacobs, D; Marecaux, G; Zielonka, E; Maréchal, M

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare infection (0,2 to 0,4/100,000 adults) of the dermis and hypodermis extending along muscular fascia1. The absence of pathognomonic symptoms makes its diagnosis difficult. Rapidly progressive, it is a life-threatening emergency whose prognosis is letal in 30 % of cases. Treatment of necrotizing fasciitis is mixed and involves aggressive surgical debridement and medical treatment with antibiotics and supportive agents. This article is presenting the case of a young woman who developed abdominal necrotizing fasciitis following a caesarean section. In forty-eight hours, the patient developed septic shock with an extensive and rapid destruction of her abdominal wall. After hysterectomy and multiple surgical debridements, evolution was favorable. After one month, a reconstruction of the abdominal wall could be performed.

  18. Minimally invasive 'step-up approach' versus maximal necrosectomy in patients with acute necrotising pancreatitis (PANTER trial) : Design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial [ISRCTN38327949

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Besselink (Marc); H.C. van Santvoort (Hjalmar); V.B. Nieuwenhuijs (Vincent); M.A. Boermeester (Marja); T.L. Bollen (Thomas); E. Buskens (Erik); C.H. Dejong (Cees); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); H. van Goor (Harry); S. Hofker (Sijbrand); J.S. Laméris (Johan ); M.S. Leeuwen (Maarten); R.J. Ploeg (Rutger); B. van Ramshorst (Bert); A.F.M. Schaapherder (Alexander); M.A. Cuesta (Miguel); E.C. Consten (Esther); D.J. Gouma (Dirk); E. van der Harst (Erwin); E.J. Hesselink (Eric); L.P.J. Houdijk (Lex P.); T.M. Karsten (Thomas); C.J. van Laarhoven (Cees); J.-P.E.N. Pierie (Jean-Pierre); C. Rosman (Camiel); E.J.S. Bilgen; R. Timmer (Robin); I. van der Tweel (Ingeborg); R.J. de Wit (Ralph ); B.J.M. Witteman (Ben); H.G. Gooszen (Hein)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The initial treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis is conservative. Intervention is indicated in patients with (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the Netherlands, the standard intervention is necrosectomy by laparotomy followed by continuous postoperative

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  20. Delayed Encephalopathy of Carbon Monoxide Intoxication and Treatment with Hyperbaric Oxygen: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Polat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Delayed encephalopathy (DE is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that can arise generally within 20 days of acute carbon monoxide (CO intoxication after apparent recovery and involves variable degrees of cognitive deficits, personality changes, movement disorders and focal neurologic deficits. We report a 35-year-old female patient with delayed encephalopathy due to CO intoxication, presenting with cognitive impairment and mild parkinsonism despite receiving hyberbaric oxigen therapy (HBO. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal signal intensity and decreased diffusivity at both caudate nuclei and globus pallidus. She continued to receive additional HBO therapy and complete recovery was reached within six months. The positive effect of early HBO therapy of selected patients in reversing the acute effects of CO intoxication is appearant. We here also review the beneficial effect of HBO in preventing or limitating the late neurocognitive deficits associated with severe CO intoxication

  1. Delayed diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy with irreversible neural damage after subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer: A case of medical liability?

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzo, Pamela; Caenazzo, Luciana; Rodriguez, Daniele; Bolcato, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE) is a neurological syndrome caused by thiamine deficiency, and clinically characterized by ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and acute confusion. In developed countries, most cases of WE have been seen in alcohol misusers. Other reported causes are gastrointestinal tract surgery, hyperemesis gravidarum, chronic malnutrition, prolonged total parenteral nutrition without thiamine supplementation, and increased nutrient requirements as in trauma or septic shock....

  2. A case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Uk Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after successful kidney transplantation. An 11-year-old girl presented with sudden onset of neurologic symptoms, hypertension, and psychiatric symptoms, with normal kidney function, after kidney transplantation. The symptoms improved after cessation of tacrolimus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory in the right frontal lobe. Three days later, she had normal mental function and maintained normal blood pressure with left hemiparesis. Follow-up MRI was performed on D19, showing new infarct lesions at both cerebral hemispheres. Ten days later, MRI showed further improvement, but brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed mild reduction of uptake in both the anterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. One month after onset of symptoms, angiography showed complete resolution of stenosis. However, presenting as a mild fine motor disability of both hands and mild dysarthria, what had been atrophy at both centrum semiovale at 4 months now showed progression to encephalomalacia. There are two points of interest in this case. First, encephalopathy occurred after administration of tacrolimus and improved after discontinuation of the drug. Second, the development of right-side hemiplegia could not be explained by conventional MRI; but through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT of white matter tract, visualization was possible.

  3. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  5. Therapeutic approach to epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigevano, Federico; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Plouin, Perrine; Specchio, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) are electroclinical entities with a peculiar course of disease; seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptiform abnormalities, ictal and interictal, contribute to progressive disturbance of cerebral functions. Frequently EEs are drug resistant, and consequences may be catastrophic. The main goal of treatment is to stop the peculiar course of epilepsy, operating on three parameters: seizure control, reduction of EEG abnormalities, and developmental outcome. For a correct therapeutic approach it is mandatory to have an as accurate as possible syndromic and etiologic diagnosis. Given the poor efficacy of conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the use of specific drugs for EEs, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosteroids or stiripentol is suggested. In some cases the choice of treatment is strictly related to the etiology: vigabatrin in tuberous sclerosis, ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency, and pyridoxine in pyridoxine deficiency. Some AEDs combinations, such as sodium valproate with lamotrigine, have also provided interesting results, for example, in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, although controlled studies are lacking. Finally, early surgery can be an option in children with focal structural abnormalities responsible for EEs preferably before irreversible damage on developmental outcome. Multispecialist support is recommended in EE. Management should be global from the onset, integrating not only seizure control but also all issues related to comorbidities, particularly neuropsychological and psychiatric. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis after internal fixation of fracture of femoral trochanteric ? ??

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Leandro Em?lio Nascimento; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Figueiredo, Leonardo Brand?o; Soares, Eduardo Augusto Marques

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and potentially lethal soft tissue infection. We report a case of trochanteric femur fracture in a patient who underwent fracture fixation and developed necrotizing fasciitis. A literature review on the topic will be addressed.

  7. Dialysis disequilibrium leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Pratim; Biswas, Sumanta

    2016-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a neurological adverse effect of acute hemodialysis in advanced uremic patients. Dialysis disequilibrium has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations starting from subtle uneasiness, confusion, to florid and complex life threatening neurological deficit. In this case study, we present a patient who developed sudden cortical blindness following hemodialysis due to posterior reversible encephalopathy, which is a rare presentation of dialysis disequilibrium ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FENIB Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies ( FENIB ) is a disorder that causes progressive ...

  9. Wernicke's encephalopathy as a complication of gastroparesis after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a common complication of malnutrition, alcohol abuse and gastric outlet obstruction. We describe a patient who developed Wernicke's encephalopathy secondary to gastroparesis, with no significant evidence of malnutrition, alcohol abuse, or gastric outlet obstruction.

  10. Hypertensive encephalopathy in a patient with neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, MWH; Zweens, MJ; Bink, MTE; Odink, RJ

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism may give rise to serious cardiovascular complications. A girl with severe thyrotoxicosis in whom hypertensive encephalopathy developed is described. Conclusion Neonatal thyrotoxicosis can give rise to hypertension and may lead to hypertensive encephalopathy.

  11. Cortical blindness in a boy with acute glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Hsien; Sheu, Ji-Nan; Wang, Shuoh-Jyh

    2003-01-01

    Post-infectious acute glomerulonephritis with hypertensive encephalopathy is characterized by episodic hypertension with headache, vomiting, and hematuria. The association between hypertensive encephalopathy and cortical blindness in children with acute glomerulonephritis is extremely rare. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with acute glomerulonephritis who presented with gross hematuria, headache, vomiting, and oliguria, and developed transient cortical blindness as a complication of hypertensive encephalopathy. No occurrence of seizure was observed during the clinical course. T2-weighted cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity signal over cortical and subcortical areas of bilateral occipital regions. His vision recovered fully, 2 days after receiving antihypertensive therapy. The patient was well without complaint at 1-year follow-up. This case highlights the possibility that cortical blindness may develop as a complication of acute glomerulonephritis in children. Prevention of the occurrence of neurological deficits in children with acute glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy requires careful evaluation and appropriate management of hypertension.

  12. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Koretz, R L; Kjaergard, L L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  13. Neurological aspects of acute radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torubarov, F.S.; Bushmanov, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the most important clinical studies of human nervous system reactions to acute radiation, carried out at Neurology Clinic of the State Research Center of Russia - Institute of Biophysics are presented. Clinical picture of changes in the nervous system in acute radiation disease caused by homologous and heterologous external irradiation is described. Main neurological syndrome of extremely severe acute radiation disease: acute radiation encephalopathy, radiation toxic encephalopathy, and hemorrhagic syndrome of the central nervous system is distinguished. Relationship between neurological disorders and the geometry of exposure are considered [ru

  14. Disseminated mucormycosis and necrotizing fasciitis in immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laparotomy revealed extensive abdominal wall necrosis, bowel, liver, kidney and subsequent retroperitoneal, posterior diaphragm and inferior vena cava involvement. Second, a 3-year-old on chemotherapy for Burkitt's lymphoma presented with pancytopenia, sepsis, abdominal wall-necrotizing fasciitis and left lower limb ...

  15. Protein synthesis persists during necrotic cell death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saelens, X.; Festjens, N.; Parthoens, E.; Overberghe, I. van; Kalai, M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Vandenabeele, P.

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is an intrinsic part of metazoan development and mammalian immune regulation. Whereas the molecular events orchestrating apoptosis have been characterized extensively, little is known about the biochemistry of necrotic cell death. Here, we show that, in contrast to apoptosis, the

  16. Multifocal necrotizing fasciitis following Hirshsprung's disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infection with rapidly progressive necrosis. Escherichia coli is rarely reported as causative agent of type 2 NF. NF typically arises in a single area usually secondary to penetrating injury. NF was only reported as a postoperative complication of Hirshsprung's disease in one report, ...

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  18. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in infant: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiavetto, Renata Rennó

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial infection characterized by extensive necrosis of tissues, and may include skin and muscles. It's more frequent in adults than in children and generally involves the trunk and extremities. Head and neck area is less commonly affected. The most frequently isolated pathogens are the Streptococcus pyogenes (group A and Staphylococcus aureus. The anatomopathological exam is the best diagnostic method, which early identifies the disease. The clinical support, surgical debridement, and the intravenous antibiotic therapy, are fundamental for the treatment. Objective: To report a case of an infant who suffered from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis. Case Report: Infant, male sex, white, 2 months old, previously healthy, with Necrotizing Fasciitis involving the frontal and right lateral cervical regions. After adequate treatment the patient obtained excellent recovery without presenting important aesthetic or functional alterations. Conclusion: The Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis is uncommon in children. The early surgical debridement is necessary to control the infection, even if it may result in great and deep injuries. The wide spectrum antibiotic therapy and hemodynamic support are also basic for the therapeutic success.

  19. Necrotizing pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia in a hemodialysis patient with pica

    OpenAIRE

    Brener, Zachary Z.; Bergman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pica refers to the persistent, compulsive craving for and ingestion of nonfood items and certain food items. Pica is quite common among dialysis patients. The nutrient composition of some of the substances ingested may contribute to severe metabolic and mineral disturbances and other serious medical complications. We report the first case of a hemodialysis patient with chalk pica associated hypercalcemia who developed acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Hydration, nutritional support and hemodial...

  20. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis: A case report with images and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Lemos Moura

    Full Text Available Summary Necrotizing pancreatitis with fluid collections can occur as a complication of acute pancreatitis. The management of these patients depends on the severity and involves multiple medical treatment modalities, as clinical intensive care and surgical intervention. In this article, we show a severe case of walled-off pancreatic necrosis that was conducted by endoscopic drainage with great clinical outcome.

  1. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncar, M; Bran, S; Juncar, R I; Baciut, M F; Baciut, G; Onisor-Gligor, F

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but very severe infection that affects the soft-tissues of the cephalic extremity. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis most frequently occurs secondarily to inflammatory odontogenic disorders and represents the most severe infection of maxillofacial spaces, with a high lethal potential. In this study, we selected 55 patients with confirmed cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin, treated in the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Cluj-Napoca during January 1996-December 2012. In the majority of cases, the disease evolved without the presence of associated systemic disorders (60% [45.49-72.69]), the rest of the patients having 1-4 types of systemic disorders; type 2 diabetes mellitus was the most frequent type of underlying systemic disorder. From the appearance of the first symptoms until the presentation for treatment, a time interval of 2-30 days elapsed. During this time period, 78.18% (95% confidence interval [CI] [65.49-89.06]) of the patients received antibiotic treatment, but without results. Mandibular molars were the most frequent starting point of the disease, and the submandibular space was the first affected by the disease, 47.27% (95% CI [32.76-61.79]). Bacteriological exams showed that facultatively aerobic/anaerobic G + bacteria were the most frequently identified (72.22% [58.21-83.60]). The odontogenic lesions of the lower molars, complicated by submandibular space infections, are the most frequent starting point of odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. Delayed surgical treatment and strict antibiotic therapy play an important role in favoring the development of odontogenic necrotizing fasciitis.

  2. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen. Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  3. [Wernicke encephalopathy after subtotal gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaudan, C; La-Folie, T; Sagui, E; Soulier, B; Dion, A-M; Richez, P; Brosset, C

    2008-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is one of the potential complications of obesity surgery. It is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency often associated with repeated vomiting. The classic triad is frequently reported in these patients (optic neuropathy, ataxia and confusion), associated with uncommon features. Cerebral impairment affects the dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus and the periaqueductal grey area, appearing on MRI, as hyperintense signals on T2, Flair and Diffusion weighted imaging. Early diagnosis and parenteral thiamine are required to decrease morbidity and mortality. We report a case of WE and Korsakoff's syndrome in a young obese patient after subtotal gastrectomy, who still has substantial sequelae. The contribution of MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging is illustrated. The interest of nutritional supervision in the first weeks and preventive thiamine supplementation in case of repeated vomiting are of particular importance in these risky situations.

  4. [Hypertensive crisis and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Olaf

    2018-02-28

    The urgency and intensity of therapeutic response to a hypertensive crisis are governed by the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage, which define hypertensive emergency and hypertensive urgency, respectively. In case of hypertensive urgency a slow and moderate lowering of blood pressure by oral antihypertensive agents seems adequate, while the approach to hypertensive emergency has to be tailored to the specific type of organ failure. Optimal blood pressure management in the context of neurovascular emergencies is made difficult by contradictory data from observational and interventional studies. It might prove advantageous to individualize treatment according to characteristics such as the location of persistent vessel occlusion or the presence of collaterals. Reversible posterior encephalopathy may present with atypical features that might make diagnosis difficult. Clevidipine might be a welcome supplement to current intravenous antihypertensive agents in neurological disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Sushree Sangita; Swain, Sarada Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion), oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia). Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration) as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning), which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs (global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings), the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases. Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but the severity level varies from person to person. Like the

  6. [Wernicke encephalopathy: Guiding thiamine prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, A S; Paquette, I; Létourneau, G; Richard-Devantoy, S

    2017-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency. The objective of this paper is to systematically review the literature published over the past 15 years pertaining to prophylactic and curative treatment of WE with thiamine. A systematic literature search was performed using Medline to include all studies published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2015. Of the 316 abstracts identified, 20 met the final inclusion criteria. The evidence on the use of prophylactic thiamine was quite heterogeneous. The use of thiamine in this context largely depended on the evaluation of an individual's risk of developing WE. Use of prophylactic thiamine in low-risk patients is not universally indicated. When prescribed in this sub-population, the oral route is suggested but may be insufficient owing to its limited intestinal absorption and the high risk of non-compliance. High-risk patients need parenteral treatment with a recommended posology of 250 mg daily for 3 to 5 days. Intramuscular route is preferred in the outpatient setting, whereas intravenous route is suggested for inpatients. In cases where the diagnosis of WE is suspected or confirmed, a curative treatment with high-dose IV thiamine is justified. The evidence widely accepted in the literature is much clearer in this condition, with treatment regimens consisting of 500 mg IV 3 times daily for 3 to 5 days, followed by 250 mg IV daily for a minimum of 3 to 5 additional days. The literature does indicate that thiamine should be prescribed at high dosages, with the parenteral routes indicated in hospital settings and in high-risk patients. Based on the current literature review, we suggest treatment algorithms guiding thiamine prescription for WE. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Porphyria Presenting as Diffuse Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old female presenting with seizures, myalgias, abdominal pain, headache and vomiting had multiple large contrast-enhancing white matter lesions on MRI and was diagnosed with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, in a report from the Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

  9. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  10. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis and myositis in a captive common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) associated with Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappulli, Valentina; Mazzariol, Sandro; Cavicchioli, Laura; Petterino, Claudio; Bargelloni, Luca; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2005-11-01

    A common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) was presented for necropsy after acute onset of gastrointestinal signs and cutaneous lesions that rapidly progressed to death. Gross and microscopic findings were characterized by locally extensive severe necrohemorrhagic fasciitis and cellulitis, and severe necrotizing myositis in the head and dorsocranial thorax, with numerous disseminated gram-positive cocci. Streptococcus agalactiae was isolated from the lesions and from visceral organs (liver and lung), and it was identified by standard microbiology techniques. This communication is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis in a marine mammal associated with S. agalactiae.

  11. Hyperammonemia Is Associated with Increasing Severity of Both Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperammonemia resulting from chronic liver disease (CLD can potentially challenge and damage any organ system of the body, particularly the brain. However, there is still some controversy regarding the diagnostic or prognostic values of serum ammonia in patients with over hepatic encephalopathy, especially in the setting of acute-on-chronic or chronic liver failure. Moreover, the association of serum ammonia with worsening Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis has not been studied. Objective. This study was conducted to solve the controversy regarding the association between hyperammonemia and cirrhosis, especially hepatic encephalopathy in chronically failed liver. Material and Methods. In this study, 171 cirrhotic patients had their serum ammonia measured and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-squared test and one-way ANOVA were applied. Results. The study had 110 male and 61 female participants. The mean age of all the participants in years was 42.33±7.60. The mean duration (years of CLD was 10.15±3.53 while the mean Child-Pugh (CP score was 8.84±3.30. Chronic viral hepatitis alone was responsible for 71.3% of the cases. Moreover, 86.5% of participants had hepatic encephalopathy (HE. The frequency of hyperammonemia was 67.3%, more frequent in males (N=81, z-score = 2.4, and P<0.05 than in females (N=34, z-score = 2.4, and P<0.05, and had a statistically significant relationship with increasing CP grade of cirrhosis (χ2(2 = 27.46, P<0.001, Phi = 0.40, and P<0.001. Furthermore, serum ammonia level was higher in patients with hepatic encephalopathy than in those without it; P<0.001. Conclusion. Hyperammonemia is associated with both increasing Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Mad Cow Disease-Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 4. Mad Cow Disease - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy. Ashutosh ... HP Agricultural University, Palampur 176 662, India. DES (Vety. Sei.) KVK (P A U) Old Gurunanak College Building Hardochhani Road Gurdaspur Punjab 143 521 India.

  13. Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy among Asphyxiated Nigeran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare the clinical presentation and immediate outcome of Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy among hospitalized asphyxiated newborns. Babies hospitalised with birth asphyxia in a Nigerian tertiary hospital were prospectively studied uding bivariate analysis. of 114 babies hospitalized with birth asphyxia, ...

  14. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a well-characterized syndrome in alcoholism and malnutrition, little is written of its prevalence or presentation in patients with psychiatric illness. We present a case of a 37-year-old Nigerian male with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium and ophthalmoplegia ...

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases occurred following cerebral anoxia due to accidental strangulation and near-drowning, respectively. The third patient, a child known to have E-β thalassaemia, presented with transient encephalopathy following blood transfusion but involving the anterior brain rather than the posterior part classically described in ...

  16. Wernicke encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallas, Matt; Desai, Jay

    2014-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. It is generally considered to be a disease of adult alcoholics. However, it is known to occur in the pediatric population and in non-alcoholic conditions. We searched PubMed with the key words Wernicke, thiamine, pediatric, children and adolescents and selected publications that were deemed appropriate. The global prevalence rates of hunger, poverty and resultant nutrient deprivation have decreased in the 21st century. However, several scenarios which may predispose to Wernicke encephalopathy may be increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents such as malignancies, intensive care unit stays and surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity. Other predisposing conditions include magnesium deficiency and defects in the SLC19A3 gene causing thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. The classic triad consists of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction and gait ataxia but is not seen in a majority of patients. Treatment should be instituted immediately when the diagnosis is suspected clinically without waiting for laboratory confirmation. Common magnetic resonance findings include symmetric T2 hyperintensities in dorsal medial thalamus, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal gray matter, and tectal plate. Wernicke encephalopathy is a medical emergency. Delay in its recognition and treatment may lead to significant morbidity, irreversible neurological damage or even death. This article aims to raise the awareness of this condition among pediatricians.

  17. CT diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Ma Jiwei; Wu Lide

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT characteristics of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to improve the accuracy of CT diagnosis. Methods: 50 cases of neonatal asphyxia in perinatal period diagnosed as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy by CT was analyzed. Results: The main manifestation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Focal or diffuse hypo-dense lesion and hyper-dense area in various location and morphology were seen on CT images. (1) Localized diffuse hypo-dense area in 1 or 2 cerebral lobe were found in 17 cases, and the lesions were localized in frontal lobe (n=6), in frontotemporal lobe (n=5), and in temporo-occipital lobe (n=6). (2) Hypo-density region involving more than three cerebral lobes were found in 18 cases, and abnormalities were found in frontotemporal and parietal lobe (n=8), accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=2); in frontal, temporal and occipital lobe (n=6), in which cerebral hemorrhage was complicated (n=1); and in other cerebral lobe (n=4). (3) Diffuse low-density region in all cerebral lobe were found in 15 cases, in which subarachnoid hemorrhage was complicated in 4 cases, and ventricular hemorrhage was found in 2 case. Conclusion: CT imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and has shown its clinical value

  18. Post-infectious encephalopathy simulating functional psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spihtle, B J; Fliegner, J; Faed, J A; Hannah, J B; James, B

    1977-03-09

    Three cases of post-infectious encephalopathy are presented in which behaviour changes occurred in the absence of neurological abnormality during convalescence from an influenza-like illness. The symptoms included aggresive behaviour, sleep reversal, sexual disinbition and a catatonic schizophrenia-like state. The prognosis was good.

  19. Diverse Neurological Manifestations of Lead Encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with lead encephalopathy due to industrial poisoning are presented. They all showed a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations, which mimic other neurological presentations. It is emphasised that lead poisoning still occurs in industry, despite efforts at prevention. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1721 (1974) ...

  20. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was

  1. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, A; Weinberger, M; Fishman, M; Samra, Z; Pitlik, S D

    1998-02-01

    Two patients with rapidly progressive necrotizing fasciitis of a lower extremity due to Staphylococcus aureus as a single pathogen are described. In both patients the portal of entry was attributed to needle puncture (intra-articular injection and intravenous catheter, respectively), followed by bacteremia. Necrotizing fasciitis occurred in a site remote from the needle puncture, suggesting metastatic infection. One patient developed toxic shock syndrome and the other a sunburn-like rash and erythematous mucosae with strawberry tongue. One patient died, and the other required above-knee amputation due to secondary infectious complications. Staphylococcus aureus may mimic the presentation of invasive group A streptococcal infections. A history of needle puncture should alert the physician to the possibility of Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  2. The predictive value of MR diffusion weighted imaging on the delayed encephalopathy after carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xinlan; Fu Lihui; Xi Weimin; Yin Jianhua; Gong Liangeng; Yuan Aimei; Yang Xinyue; Liu Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)in predicting delayed encephalopathy of the rabbits brain after carbon monoxide (CO)poisoning. Methods: Sixty healthy rabbits were put into self-made poisoning cabinet and were poisoned by inhalation of CO. Aeration of CO was stopped when the rabbits became comatous, and the cabinet was kept airpoof for 6 h. The rabbits underwent MRI before poisoning , at 1 h, 3 d, 5 d, 7 d, 15 d, 30 d ,45 d, and 60 d after poisoning respectively. Axial and sagittal T 2 WI, axial T 1 WI and DWI were performed. In the rabbits that did not show symptoms of delayed encephalopathy, the observation was discontinued on the 60th day. In the rabbit that showed the symptoms, the observation was discontinued on the 30th-45th day. The changing pattern of cortical ADC values before and after CO poisoning was observed and its relationship with delayed encephalopathy was investigated. Results: In the group without delayed encephalopathy (15 rabbits), the ADC value at 1 h after poisoning [(7.58±0.36) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s] decreased significantly compared with the pre- poisoning value [(8.02±0.35) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s] (q=0.4441, P -4 mm 2 /s], and maintained at the same level as pre- poisoning at 60 d after poisoning (P >0.05). In the group with delayed encephalopathy (15 rabbits), the ADC value at 1 h after poisoning [(7.40±0.32) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s] decreased significantly compared with the pre- poisoning value [(8.08± 0.32) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s] (q=0.6728, P -4 mm 2 /s], secondly significantly decreased at 15 d [(7.29±0.93) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s] without further recovery. The ADC value decrease at 15d alter poisoning [(7.29±0.93) x 10 -4 mm 2 /s] was significant compared with the prepoisoning ADC value (q=0.7850, P<0.01). Conclusions: There is a correlation between the decrease of the ADC value and the degree of tissue damage. The decrease of the ADC value in acute stage can predict the delayed encephalopathy. The second significant decrease

  3. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  4. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  5. Sialometaplasia necrotizing in dog - Case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen Ramos Barboza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Barboza S.R., Braga L.S.F., Maestri L.F. de P., Monteiro B.S., Rassele A.C., Santos R.V., Vicente G. de C. & Gava M.G. [Sialometaplasia necrotizing in dog - Case report.] Sialometaplasia necrotizante em cão - Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(3:214-216, 2016. Setor de Clínica Médica de Animais de Pequeno Porte e Patologia Animal, Universidade Vila Velha, Avenida Comissário José Dantas de Melo, 21, Boa Vista, Vila Velha, ES 29102-920, Brasil. E-mail: suellenramosvet@hotmail.com The sialometaplasia is a rare disease of unknown cause in dogs and cats, which usually affects the submandibular salivary gland, caused by trauma, physical-chemical or biological attack in blood vessels that can produce ischemic changes, causing necrosis, scaly inflammation and metaplasia of glandular epithelium and ducts. Animals affected by sialometaplasia necrotizing show pain, an increase in salivary glands and regional lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography associated with biopsy of the affected tissue are effective in diagnosing the disease. The treatment is surgical and symptomatic. In this study, we tried to report the case of a half-breed dog, 6 years old, who presented the symptoms and histopathological diagnosis of necrotizing sialometaplasia.

  6. [Cutaneous necrotic loxoscelism. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Olivas, Manuel Anastacio; Valencia-Zavala, Martha Patricia; Sánchez-Olivas, Jesús Alberto; Sepulveda-Velázquez, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Brown recluse (Loxosceles spp.) spiders are arachnid species known to cause necrotic arachnidism. The envenomation, described as loxoscelism, is associated with localized pain, erythema, and edema followed by the development of necrosis. However, the specific pathophysiological mechanisms by which Loxosceles venom exerts these noxious symptoms are multifactorial and not fully understood. The causative factor for production of necrotic lesions is generally considered to be the enzyme sphingomyelinase D (SMD), which cleaves sphingomyelin to form choline and ceramide 1-phosphate. Four active forms of SMD with molecular weight of 32 000 are found in L recluse. Sphingomyelinases of comparable size are also described in the venoms of Loxosceles intermedia, gaucho and laeta. Here we describe the case of a young male adult who suffered a spider bite on his left forearm which evolved into a necrotic lesion, and after a few days the injury healed completely. One week later the patient developed two similar lesions on his left leg. The diagnosis was established by clinical data and by biopsy findings. The patient did not developed systemic complications.

  7. Meningoencefalite necrotizante de cão Maltês Necrotizing meningoencephalitis of Maltese dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalan Bastos Violin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A Meningoencefalite Necrotizante (MEN é uma encefalopatia causada por uma disfunção inflamatória de característica necrotizante. O objetivo deste relato é descrever os aspectos clínicos e anatomopatológicos da Meningoencefalite Necrotizante (MEN em um cão Maltês. A doença tem um caráter necrótico único e está relacionada intimamente à Encefalite do Cão Pug (ECP devido a suas semelhanças, bem como à Leucoencefalite Necrotizante (LEN. Embora o primeiro relato de caso de ECP tenha mais de 15 anos e o primeiro relato de caso de MEN em Maltês tenha 11 anos, há muito a ser revelado sobre a etiologia e os mecanismos imunopatológicos da doença. Neste trabalho, relata-se o caso de um cão Maltês com sinais que foram compatíveis com a MEN. Foram detectadas nas imagens macroscópicas, cavitação cerebral, e na microscopia, perda de células do parênquima em certas regiões do córtex cerebral. A partir dessas descobertas descreve-se o primeiro caso de MEN em cão Maltês no Brasil.The Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis (NME is an encephalopathy caused by an inflammatory dysfunction with necrotic characterization. The aim of this report is to describe the anatomopathological features of the NME in a Maltese dog. The disease has a unique necrotic pattern and is closely related to Pug Dog Encephalitis (PDE because of their similarity as well as to Necrotizing Leukoencephalitis (NLE. Although the first PDE report has more than 15 years and the first Maltese NME report has 11 years there is a lot to be unveiled about the etiologic and the immunopathologic mechanisms of the disease. Here we report one case of a Maltese dog with signs that were compatible with NME. The gross morphology pictures with the cerebral cavitation and the histological loss of parenchymal cells in some regions of the cerebral cortex were detected. Based on these findings, we describe the first case of NME in Maltese dog in Brazil.

  8. Tacrolimus Associated Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome – A Case Series and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmitha Apuri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive drug mainly used to lower the risk of transplant rejection in individuals who are post solid organ or hematopoietic transplantation. It is a macrolide which reduces peptidyl-propyl isomerase activity and inhibits calcineurin, thus inhibiting T-lymphocyte signal transduction and interleukin-2 (IL-2 transcription. It has been associated with Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES, a disease of sudden onset that can present as a host of different symptoms, depending on the affected area of the brain. While infectious causes of encephalopathy must always be entertained, the differential diagnosis should also include PRES in the appropriate context. We report three cases of PRES in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML placed on tacrolimus after receiving a bone marrow transplant (BMT. The focus of this review is to enhance clinical recognition of PRES as it is related to an adverse effect of Tacrolimus in the setting of hematopoietic transplantation.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome complicating diabetic ketoacidosis; an important treatable complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Redler, Kasey; Witherick, Jonathan; Fuller, Geraint; Mahajan, Tripti; Wakerley, Benjamin R

    2017-03-01

    Development of acute neurological symptoms secondary to cerebral oedema is well described in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and often has a poor prognosis. We present the clinical and radiological data of a 17-yr-old girl who developed cortical blindness, progressive encephalopathy, and seizures caused by posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed after her DKA had resolved. Vasogenic oedema in PRES resolves if the underlying trigger is identified and eliminated. In this case, hypertension was identified as the likely precipitating factor and following treatment her vision and neurological symptoms rapidly improved. We suggest how recent DKA may have contributed to the development of PRES in this patient. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Infections of the neck leading to descending necrotizing mediastinitis: Role of multi-detector row computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano; Scuderi, Maria Giuseppina; Tortora, Giovanni; Daniele, Stefania; Romano, Luigia

    2008-01-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis is an acute, polymicrobial infection of the mediastinum, originating from odontogenic, oropharyngeal and cervical infections. Anatomical continuity of the fascial spaces between the neck and the mediastinum leads to an occasional mediastinal extension of deep neck infection as a serious sequela. An understanding of the anatomy of the deep spaces of the neck and familiarity with the imaging findings in descending necrotizing mediastinitis may allow rapid diagnosis and treatment of this rare and life-threatening complication of deep neck space infection. In this article, we discuss the current role of radiology in diagnosing descending necrotizing mediastinitis, in determining the level of infection and the pathways of spread of infections from the neck to the mediastinum and in planning a successful treatment

  11. Infections of the neck leading to descending necrotizing mediastinitis: Role of multi-detector row computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Antonio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, A. Cardarelli Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: antopin1968@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano; Scuderi, Maria Giuseppina; Tortora, Giovanni; Daniele, Stefania; Romano, Luigia [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, A. Cardarelli Hospital, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis is an acute, polymicrobial infection of the mediastinum, originating from odontogenic, oropharyngeal and cervical infections. Anatomical continuity of the fascial spaces between the neck and the mediastinum leads to an occasional mediastinal extension of deep neck infection as a serious sequela. An understanding of the anatomy of the deep spaces of the neck and familiarity with the imaging findings in descending necrotizing mediastinitis may allow rapid diagnosis and treatment of this rare and life-threatening complication of deep neck space infection. In this article, we discuss the current role of radiology in diagnosing descending necrotizing mediastinitis, in determining the level of infection and the pathways of spread of infections from the neck to the mediastinum and in planning a successful treatment.

  12. Autism spectrum disorder and epileptic encephalopathy: common causes, many questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Siddharth; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a particularly severe form of epilepsy, associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, including impaired social-communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors that are the hallmarks of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the genetic landscape of epileptic encephalopathies is growing and demonstrates overlap with genes separately implicated in ASD. However, many questions remain about this connection, including whether epileptiform activity itself contributes to the development of ASD symptomatology. In this review, we compiled a database of genes associated with both epileptic encephalopathy and ASD, limiting our purview to Mendelian disorders not including inborn errors of metabolism, and we focused on the connection between ASD and epileptic encephalopathy rather than epilepsy broadly. Our review has four goals: to (1) discuss the overlapping presentations of ASD and monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (2) examine the impact of the epilepsy itself on neurocognitive features, including ASD, in monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (3) outline many of the genetic causes responsible for both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy; (4) provide an illustrative example of a final common pathway that may be implicated in both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate that autistic features are a common association with monogenic epileptic encephalopathies. Certain epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, like infantile spasms, are especially linked to the development of ASD. The connection between seizures themselves and neurobehavioral deficits in these monogenic encephalopathies remains open to debate. Finally, advances in genetics have revealed many genes that overlap in ties to both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy and that play a role in diverse central nervous system processes. Increased attention to the autistic features of monogenic epileptic encephalopathies is warranted for

  13. Periodic Paralysis and Encephalopathy as Initial Manifestations of Graves' Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsironis, Theocharis; Tychalas, Athanasios; Kiourtidis, Dimitrios; Kountouras, Jannis; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Rudolf, Jobst; Deretzi, Georgia

    2017-07-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an uncommon complication of Graves' disease, characterized by the triad of acute hypokalemia without total body potassium deficit, episodic muscle paralysis, and thyrotoxicosis. Graves' encephalopathy is an extremely rare form of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD), characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased antithyroid antibodies and cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, nonspecific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and cortico-responsiveness. Coexistence of both these complications in the same patient has not been reported before. We herein present a 48-year-old white male patient with TPP and encephalopathy as initial presentations of Graves' disease. Flaccid tetraparesis was reversed a few hours after potassium level correction and the patient did not suffer any relapse with the successful pharmaceutical management of the thyroid function. One month later, the patient presented with dizziness and behavioral symptoms, such as inappropriate laughter and anger. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed meningeal enhancement and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a mild protein increase, with a blood-brain barrier disruption. With the suspicion of EAATD, the patient was treated with high doses of corticosteroids and improved dramatically. To our knowledge this is the first reported coexistence of potentially treatable TPP and EAATD as initial neurological manifestations of Graves' disease, thereby underscoring the necessity of suspicion of possible underlying Graves' disease in patients with acute paralysis and encephalopathy of unclear origin.

  14. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis: Microbial and Immunologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-05

    Clostridium beiierinckie Lactobacillus fermentum and Actinomyces israelii. Veillonella parvula was the only -12- identified Gram negative coccus isolated from...2.10 B. Facultative Anaerobes 0.70 1. Identified 1.70 1. Identified 0.00 Clostridium beilerinckie 0.60 Lactobacillus fermentum 0.30 Actinomyces israe lii...glucose, D- galactose, D- lactose or D-raffinose. Duplicate samples were tested in the standard hemolysis assay. Prepwation of ceU wall LPS extracts F

  15. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S. [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2006-09-15

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  16. Solitary necrotic nodule of the liver: parasitic origin?

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, W. M.; Yuen, R. W.; Chow, L. T.; Tse, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To report further cases of solitary necrotic nodule of the liver and to study its nature. METHODS: Seven nodules were retrieved from 4000 necropsy and surgical liver specimens coming to light over the past five years. All of them satisfied the diagnostic criteria of solitary necrotic nodule: a solid lesion with a central necrotic core and a hyalinised fibrotic capsule containing elastic fibres. Their clinicopathological features were reviewed. RESULTS: The nodules were incidental findin...

  17. Necrotizing Fasciitis of vulva: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal A

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar necrotizing fascitis is an uncommon infectious disorder. Since the first reported cases almost 100 years, ago, necrotizing fasciitis continues to present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. What usually begins as a subtle infection can become life-threatening. We report two cases of vulvar necrotizing fasciitis, one after posterior colporrhaphy in a woman with four risk factors and the other in a young woman without any risk factor.

  18. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau protein levels in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Sachio; Miyakawa, Tomohiro; Maesato, Hitoshi; Matsui, Toshifumi; Yokoyama, Akira; Arai, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Susumu; Kashima, Haruo

    2008-06-01

    Limited neuronal cell loss is seen in the neuropathology of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE), but the extent of neuronal damage has not been well studied. Moreover, there is still a debate as to whether alcohol itself causes brain damage in humans. Although, it is difficult to examine the extent of neuronal damage in living patients, recent studies have revealed that total tau protein levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect the rate of neuronal degeneration. Therefore, we hypothesized that the elevated CSF total tau in patients with WE was due to neuronal damage and thus we examined CSF total tau protein in patients with WE, as well as in those with alcohol withdrawal delirium (WD) and Korsakoff syndrome (KS). We also examined CSF total tau in nonalcohol dependent patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a disease control. CSF samples were obtained from 13 acute WE patients with alcohol dependence, 9 WD patients with alcohol dependence and 16 KS patients with alcohol dependence, and from 20 nonalcohol dependent AD patients. CSF was also obtained from 10 of the WE patients after their disease had progressed to the chronic stage. CSF tau protein levels in all samples were determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau(181)) and amyloid beta-protein ending at amino acid 42 (A beta 42) in CSF were also determined for comparison between acute WE with AD. Total tau was significantly elevated in acute WE and decreased on long-term follow-up, but was not elevated in WD or KS. The patterns of p-tau(181) and A beta 42 differed between acute WE and AD. Intense neuronal cell death occurs transiently in WE, and the mechanism differs from that in AD. Neuronal damage is generally unaccompanied in WD. These results suggest that CSF total tau is a useful biological marker for WE.

  19. A case of Hashimoto`s encephalopathy presenting with seizures and psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Joo Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE is a rare, poorly understood, autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased anti-thyroid antibody levels. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HE and briefly review the literature. The patient presented with acute mental changes and seizures, but no evidence of infectious encephalitis. In the acute stage, the seizures did not respond to conventional antiepileptic drugs, including valproic acid, phenytoin, and topiramate. The clinical course was complicated by the development of acute psychosis, including bipolar mood, insomnia, agitation, and hallucinations. The diagnosis of HE was supported by positive results for antithyroperoxidase and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Treatment with methylprednisolone was effective; her psychosis improved and the number of seizures decreased. HE is a serious but curable, condition, which might be underdiagnosed if not suspected. Anti-thyroid antibodies must be measured for the diagnosis. HE should be considered in patients with diverse neuropsychiatric manifestations.

  20. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C.; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L. M.; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H.; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P.; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H.; de Haan, Timo R.

    2016-01-01

    The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson encephalopathy score

  1. [Update on transmissible spongiform subacute encephalopathies (TSSE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugère-Picoux, Jeanne; Adjou, Karim; Brugère, Henri

    2005-02-01

    This update concerns human and ruminant transmissible spongiform subacute encephalopathies (TSSE). The latest data on variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease confirm that new cases are less frequent than feared some years ago, but subclinical carriers could be a source of iatrogenic infection. The macaque is a good model of human oral transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The latest data on BSE in Europe confirm the effectiveness of precautionary measures taken in 1996 and 2000. Concerns in other ruminants include a chronic wasting disease of Cervidae in North America, the discovery of a BSE-like agent associated with natural scrapie in a French goat, maternal transmission of natural scrapie in sheep, with an exceptionally short incubation period (6.5 months), and doubts over the efficacy of genetic selection for combating ovine scrapie (atypical cases in " resistant " sheep, especially with the scrapie strain Nor 98 in Europe). These data demonstrate the value of active European surveillance of scrapie in small ruminants.

  2. Epileptic encephalopathy as models of system epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capovilla, Giuseppe; Moshé, Solomon L; Wolf, Peter; Avanzini, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of epileptic encephalopathies has long been debated. Recently, some authors proposed the new concept of so-called system epilepsies. This hypothesis postulates that system epilepsies are produced by the enduring propensity to generate seizures in different cerebral areas that, alone, are unable to create a specific electroclinical phenotype. This goes beyond the classical dichotomy between focal and generalized epilepsy. Epileptic encephalopathies, in general, have the ideal profile to be considered as system epilepsies, and West syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome are two of the best examples. Apart from the conventional neurophysiologic methods for studying brain activities and the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying epileptic syndromes, other new methods of neuroimaging support this hypothesis. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A

    2016-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables......, liver-related mortality and morbidity. Patients will only benefit in this way if they can be effectively diagnosed. Corporate efforts and consensus agreements are needed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms....

  4. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by hyperemesis gravidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Delgado-García, Silvia; Martín-Bayón, Tina; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a reversible neurological emergency caused by thiamine deficiency. Prolonged vomiting in pregnancy results in thiamine depletion. The early recognition of its clinical signs and symptoms is essential to establish the suspected diagnosis and can be confirmed by MRI. Prompt administration of thiamine is important for preventing the occurrence of sequelae in the mother and for improving the fetal prognostic. We report a case of WE induced by hyperemesis gravidarum with a good maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:22684836

  5. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bagci, S; Zschocke, J; Hoffmann, G F; Bast, T; Klepper, J; Müller, A; Heep, A; Bartmann, P; Franz, A R

    2009-01-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unrespons...

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviloglu, Korhan; Yanar, Hakan

    2007-08-07

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy.

  7. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis in the elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzella Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Descending Necrotizing Mediastinitis (DNM is a polymicrobic, dangerous and often fatal process, arising from head or neck infections and spreading along the deep fascial cervical planes, descending into the mediastinum. It can rapidly progress to sepsis and can frequently lead to death. It has a high mortality rate, up to 40% in the different series, as described in the literature. Surgical and therapeutic management has been discussed for long time especially in an elderly patient population. The literature has been reviewed in order to evaluate different pathogenesis and evolution and to recognise a correct therapeutic management.

  8. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanar Hakan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy.

  9. Necrotizing fasciitis - Report of two unusual cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamulegeya, Adriane

    2008-01-01

    Cervico-facial necrotizing fasciitis is a potential complication of odontogenic infection that can lead to mediastinitis and septic shock. A delay or inappropriate treatment of simple infections and immunocompromise increase the risk of developing the disease and in turn increase the morbidity and mortality of the disease. We present two cases one of which we believe developed due to delayed treatment and the other due to immunocompromise. Both cases were successfully treated with surgical debridement and broad spectrum antibiotics. There is need to rethink certain clinical judgments such as treatment during pregnancy and the usefulness of an informative medical history from patients. (author)

  10. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to necrotic toxin-producing Escherichia coli strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gallois

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a fatal case of necrotizing soft tissues infection caused by an Escherichia coli strain belonging to phylogenetic group C and harbouring numerous virulence factors reported to be part of a pathogenicity island (PAI such as PAI IIJ96 and conserved virulence plasmidic region.

  11. Valproate-Induced Encephalopathy in Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Polat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid-induced encephalopathy is a serious complication of valproate, rarely observed, and can lead to death if early diagnosis is not made. It is clinically presented as mental status changes that range from drowsiness to lethargy and coma, focal or bilateral neurological deficits, seizure, vomiting, and marked electroencephalography (EEG background slowing, with or without hyperammonemia. It can also be properly managed by discontinuation of the drug. We present three cases who developed vomiting, disturbance in consciousness, EEG-slowing, and elevated serum ammonia levels. In all cases, symptoms resolved after termination of valproate. Most notably, these side effects occurred in the presence of normal liver enzymes and normal valproate concentrations. Development of unconsciousness and associated EEG slow waves are observed rarely in VPA-induced encephalopathy, and this is discussed together with a review of the literature. Serum ammonia level is an important parameter in the early diagnosis of this rare adverse event. The clinical symptomatology and EEG findings have significant importance in the differential diagnosis when encephalopathy occurs without hyperammonemia and with normal or slight increase in serum ammonia level

  12. Valproate-Induced Encephalopathy in Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Polat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid-induced encephalopathy is a serious complication of valproate, rarely observed, and can lead to death if early diagnosis is not made. It is clinically presented as mental status changes that range from drowsiness to lethargy and coma, focal or bilateral neurological deficits, seizure, vomiting, and marked electroencephalography (EEG background slowing, with or without hyperammonemia. It can also be properly managed by discontinuation of the drug. We present three cases who developed vomiting, disturbance in consciousness, EEG-slowing, and elevated serum ammonia levels. In all cases, symptoms resolved after termination of valproate. Most notably, these side effects occurred in the presence of normal liver enzymes and normal valproate concentrations. Development of unconsciousness and associated EEG slow waves are observed rarely in VPA-induced encephalopathy, and this is discussed together with a review of the literature. Serum ammonia level is an important parameter in the early diagnosis of this rare adverse event. The clinical symptomatology and EEG findings have significant importance in the differential diagnosis when encephalopathy occurs without hyperammonemia and with normal or slight increase in serum ammonia level.

  13. BLOOD BIOMARKERS FOR EVALUATION OF PERINATAL ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Marshall Graham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the liquid brain biopsy. A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment.

  14. Epileptic encephalopathies (including severe epilepsy syndromes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covanis, Athanasios

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that appear early in life and are characterized by pharmacoresistant generalized or focal seizures, persistent severe electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. The ictal and interictal epileptic discharges are age-specific and are the main etiologic factors causing cognitive deterioration. This is most obvious in the idiopathic group. In the symptomatic group, the most common causes are structural, congenital, or acquired and rarely some metabolic disorders. In certain cases, clinical and EEG abnormalities persist and may evolve from one type to another as the child grows older. Various factors trigger and sustain the underlying pathophysiologic process and the ongoing epileptic and epileptiform activity during the most critical periods of brain maturation, perpetuating their deleterious effect on the brain. Immune-mediated mechanisms may have a role, suggested by certain encephalopathies responding to immune-modulating treatments and by the finding of various autoimmune antibodies. The chance of a better cognitive outcome improves with early diagnosis and treatment that is appropriate and effective. Current antiepileptic drugs are, in general, not effective: we urgently need new trials in this very special epileptic category. This article briefly reviews the most common epileptic encephalopathies and analyzes the most important clinical issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy.

  16. Intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-yi; Wang, Fang; Feng, Jie-xiong

    2013-01-01

    Based on the observation that coagulation necrosis occurs in the majority of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) patients, it is clear that intestinal ischemia is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of NEC. However, the published studies regarding the role of intestinal ischemia in NEC are controversial. The aim of this paper is to review the current studies regarding intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and NEC, and try to elucidate the exact role of intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction in NEC. The studies cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed. The search terms used were "intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction" and "neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis". Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators in the field were selected. Immature regulatory control of mesentery circulation makes the neonatal intestinal microvasculature vulnerable. When neonates are subjected to stress, endothelial cell dysfunction occurs and results in vasoconstriction of arterioles, inflammatory cell infiltration and activation in venules, and endothelial barrier disruption in capillaries. The compromised vasculature increases circulation resistance and therefore decreases intestinal perfusion, and may eventually progress to intestinal necrosis. Intestinal ischemia plays an important role through the whole course of NEC. New therapeutic agents targeting intestinal ischemia, like HB-EGF, are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of NEC.

  17. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis of oropharyngeal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sokouti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM is a rare and life-threatening infection. Management of this condition is very difficult and before 1990s, DNM had a mortality rate of 40% despite the use of antibiotics. One of the etiologies of this condition is rapid downward spread of oropharyngeal infection along the cervical fascia planes into the mediastinum. Materials and methods. Patients with DNM from odontogenic, peritonsillar and retropharyngeal origins, who underwent surgical treatment from 1990 to 2007, were reviewed. Data extracted from medical records of the patients included age, gender, origin of the infection, surgical approaches, and the cause of mortality. Descriptive data were expressed as a Mean ± SE. Results. Thirteen patients aged 15 to 56 (mean, 34.5 years old; 8 males and 5 females were studied. The origins of infection included odontogenic abscess in 10 cases and peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscess in 3 patients. The mean duration from onset of symptoms to the surgery was 12.18 ± 0.98 days (range 3 to 24 days and the mean duration from initial surgery to discharges was 28.51 ± 3.25 days (range 5 to 92 days. Post-operative mortality was seen in three patients. Conclusion. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis can arise from odontogenic abscesses and must be detected as early as possible, as it is a life-threatening infection.

  18. Hypoxic encephalopathy after heart valve replacement: etiology and pathogenesis, diagnostic criteria and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Г. Постнов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed in this paper are modern approaches in the intensive therapy of acute hypoxic encephalopathy developing in a number of occasions after the heart valve replacement surgery. The study is based on the results of neurological, neuropsychological and neurophysiological (EEG examinations of 240 patients who underwent heart valve replacement surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass conditions complicated later by the development of hypoxic encephalopathies of varying severity and who received complex intensive care. Relying on many years of experience in the treatment of heart surgery patients in whom manifestations of encephalopathy developed in the early postoperative period, or were delayed, we have formulated the following algorithms of therapy. (1 Maintenance of normal blood gas: Hb>100 g/L, pH 7.45, PaCO2 35 mmHg. (2 Maintenance of hemodynamics: ABPsystolic>90 mmHg. (3 Supplying fluids and electrolytes: isoosmolar infusion solutions, adding of KCl and MgSO4 to the infusion. (4 Antiedemic therapy: 15% mannitol or 40% glycerol solution. (5 If necessary (in case of psychomotor agitation, seizures, short-acting barbiturates (sodium thiopental, neuroleptics (haloperidol, propofol. No benzodiazepines in case of psychoses (6 Cerebral metabolism stimulation (not earlier than 48 hours after surgery with cholinomimetics, nootropics, cerebral blood flow protectors. Cholinomimetics are allowed on the first day after surgery. This algorithm and the above-mentioned groups of drugs, especially central cholinomimetics, allow for correcting the neurocognitive impairment in the discussed group of patients quickly and effectively.

  19. Management of concomitant metabolic encephalopathy and meningioma with vasogenic edema and impending herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Ramsis F; Haroutunian, Armen; Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2018-01-01

    Altered mental status describes impaired mental functioning ranging from confusion to coma and indicates an illness, either metabolic or structural in nature. Metabolic causes include hypothyroidism, hyperuremia, hypo/hyperglycemia, hypo/hypernatremia, and encephalopathy. The structural causes include tumors, brain hemorrhage, infection, and stroke. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which a patient presented with altered mental status from both metabolic (myxedema coma) and structural diseases (frontal meningioma) with vasogenic edema and midline shift. A 55-year-old female presented with progressive coma. The clinical features included bradycardia and hypothermia. The imaging demonstrated a large frontal meningioma with a significant midline shift with laboratory findings suggestive of severe hypothyroidism and myxedema coma. Hypothyroidism was treated aggressively with intravenous T3 and T4 with close neurosurgical observation. Osmodiuretics and steroids were administered as temporizing agents prior to craniotomy. Craniotomy was successfully undertaken after using these appropriate pre-emptive measures. Management of concomitant metabolic encephalopathy and meningioma with vasogenic edema and impending herniation can be challenging. Correction of the encephalopathy is crucial to minimize perioperative morbidity and mortality. Awareness of metabolic causes of acute decompensation is critical for perioperative management, so a high index of clinical suspicion can make an important timely diagnosis for treatment initiation. Severely hypothyroid patients are sensitive to anesthetic agents and are at a high risk for perioperative complications. Prompt treatment prior to surgical intervention can help minimize perioperative complications.

  20. Management of necrotizing enterocolitis: experience at a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of necrotizing enterocolitis: experience at a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Kirtikumar J. Rathod a. , Asfaq A. Khan b. , Mathew Kripail b. , Muhammad Fazallulah b. ,. Zainab Al Balushi a and Mohamed Abdellatif b. Introduction Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common surgical emergency in the ...

  1. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: A potentially fatal disease with varied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis was recognized centuries ago by physicians. It is a rapidly progressive and potentially fatal soft‑tissue infection that is typified by soft‑tissue necrosis, especially affecting the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. Cervico‑facial necrotizing fasciitis is said to be uncommon, but when it occurs, it is often of ...

  2. Review of 58 patients with necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, S.F. van; Vries, J. de; Bijker, J.B.; Mollen, R.M.; Hekma, E.J.; Lemson, S.M.; Tan, E.C.T.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life threatening soft tissue infection, primarily involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissue. In a large cohort of patients presenting with Necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands we analysed all available data to determine the causative pathogens and

  3. Biofilm in group A streptococcal necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Shambat, Srikanth Mairpady

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with foreign...

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis of breast | Salati | East and Central African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon and rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infection. Necrotizing fasciitis of breast is even rarely encountered. We managed one such 32 years old nondiabetic, obese lady who developed necrotising fascitis of right breast after lumpectomy. Management involved wide ...

  5. Necrotizing myositis causes restrictive hypoventilation in a mouse model for human enterovirus 71 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Jing-hui; Zhu, Hao; Xu, Yan-feng; Liu, Jiang-ning; Xia, Xian-zhu; Zhang, Lian-feng

    2013-06-28

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections are associated with a high prevalence of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children and occasionally cause lethal complications. Most infections are self-limiting. However, resulting complications, including aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, poliomyelitis-like acute flaccid paralysis, and neurological pulmonary edema or hemorrhage, are responsible for the lethal symptoms of EV71 infection, the pathogenesis of which remain to be clarified. In the present study, 2-week-old Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were infected with a mouse-adapted EV71 strain. These infected mice demonstrated progressive paralysis and died within 12 days post infection (d.p.i.). EV71, which mainly replicates in skeletal muscle tissues, caused severe necrotizing myositis. Lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) and other tissues were not observed. Necrotizing myositis of respiratory-related muscles caused severe restrictive hypoventilation and subsequent hypoxia, which could explain the fatality of EV71-infected mice. This finding suggests that, in addition to CNS injury, necrotic myositis may also be responsible for the paralysis and death observed in EV71-infected mice.

  6. Proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Gross

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Case Summary A 5-year-old cat was examined for vomiting and anorexia of 2 days’ duration. Azotemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypoalbuminemia were the main biochemical findings. Serial analyses of the urine revealed isosthenuria, proteinuria and eventual glucosuria. Hyperechoic perirenal fat was detected surrounding the right kidney by ultrasonography. Histopathologic evaluation of ante-mortem ultrasound-guided needle biopsies of the right kidney was consistent with proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with fibrin thrombi, proteinaceous and red blood cell casts, and moderate multifocal chronic-active interstitial nephritis. Owing to a lack of clinical improvement, the cat was eventually euthanized. Post-mortem renal biopsies were processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence. This revealed severe focal proliferative and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with cellular crescent formation, podocyte injury and secondary segmental sclerosis. Ultrastructural analysis revealed scattered electron-dense deposits in the mesangium, and immunofluorescence demonstrated positive granular staining for λ light chains, consistent with immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Severe diffuse acute tubular epithelial injury and numerous red blood cell casts were also seen. Relevance and novel information To our knowledge, this is the first report of naturally occurring proliferative, necrotizing and crescentic immune complex glomerulonephritis in a cat.

  7. Colonic stenosis post-necrotizing enterocolitis in term newborn with acquired cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, L; Manti, S; D'Angelo, G; Lima, M; Impellizzeri, P; Romeo, C; Gitto, E

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is a gastrointestinal emergency typical of premature infants. Intestinal strictures infrequently complicate medical or surgical treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis. Postnatal cytomegalovirus infection with gastrointestinal linvolvement has occasionally been described in subjects with necrotizing enterocolitis. We report the case of a full term infant presenting necrotizing enterocolitis, acquired cytomegalovirus infection and post necrotizing enterocolitis colonic stricture.List of abbreviations: necrotizing enterocolitis = NEC,cytomegalovirus = CMV. Celsius.

  8. Magnesium deficiency: a possible cause of thiamine refractoriness in Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviesa, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The determination of blood transketolase before and serially after thiamine administration, and the response of clinical symptomatology after thiamine are reported in two normomagnesaemic patients and one hypomagnesaemic patient with acute Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy. The response of the depressed blood transketolase and the clinical symptoms was retarded in the hypomagnesaemic patient. Correction of hypomagnesaemia was accompanied by the recovery of blood transketolase activity and total clearing of the ophthalmoplegia in this patient, suggesting that hypomagnesaemia may be a cause of the occasional thiamine refractoriness of these patients. PMID:4420329

  9. Early onset epileptic encephalopathy or genetically determined encephalopathy with early onset epilepsy? Lessons learned from TSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, Paolo; Aronica, Eleonora; Jansen, Anna; Jansen, Floor; Kotulska, Katarzyna; Lagae, Lieven; Moavero, Romina; Jozwiak, Sergiusz

    2016-03-01

    In tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) a relationship has been shown between early and refractory seizures and intellectual disability. However, it is uncertain whether epilepsy in TSC is simply a marker in infants who are destined to develop an encephalopathic process or if seizures play a causal role in developing an encephalopathy. This paper summarizes the key points discussed during a European TSC workshop held in Rome, and reviews the experimental and clinical evidence in support of the two theories. There are many factors that influence the appearance of both early seizure onset and the encephalopathy resulting in neurodevelopmental deficits. Experimental studies show that as a consequence of the TSC genes mutation, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) overactivation determines an alteration in cellular morphology with cytomegalic neurons, altered synaptogenesis and an imbalance between excitation/inhibition, thus providing a likely neuroanatomical substrate for the early appearance of refractory seizures and for the encephalopathic process. At the clinical level, early signs of altered developmental trajectories are often unrecognized before 12 months of age. Evidence from experimental research shows that encephalopathy in TSC might have a genetic cause, and mTOR activation caused by TSC gene mutation can be directly responsible for the early appearance of seizures and encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Necrotizing pneumonia: CT findings and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hong Suk; Im, Jung Gi; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1995-01-01

    To analyze CT and follow-up chest radiographic findings in patients with necrotizing pneumonia and to evaluate clinical significance of the extent of necrosis. We reviewed medical records and retrospectively analysed CT scans and follow-up chest radiographs of 22 patients with necrotizing pneumonia, confirmed by biopsy (n = 7) and culture (n = 15). Inclusion criteria for necrotizing pneumonia was necrotic low attenuation, with or without cavitation on postcontrast enhanced CT scan. The study group included 15 men and seven women, aged 11-66 years (average: 47 years). The pathogens of necrotizing pneumonia were Klebsiella spp (n = 7), Enterobacter spp (n = 5), Actinomyces spp (n = 4), Pseudomonas spp (n = 4), Nocardia spp (n = 4), and others (n = 5). Average duration of pneumonia was 4.1 months. On CT scan, pneumonic consolidations were well-marginated in 14 patients and there were cavities on initial CT scan in 16 cases. Margins of the necrotic portion on CT scan were well-demarcated in majority of the patients (16/22). Low attenuation areas on initial CT scan resulted in cavitation, fibrosis and volume loss as shown on follow-up chest radiographs. The larger the necrotic areas on CT, the more the volume loss was. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia were well-marginated air-space consolidation with low attenuation area, with or without cavity. The extent of necrotic area was closely related with the degree of fibrotic change later on. CT is important tool for diagnosis and prediction of parenchymal damage in necrotizing pneumonia

  11. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: An Unusual Consequence of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome—Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Larsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a well-described syndrome characterized by the classic triad of confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy results from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency. Common causes include alcoholism and gastric disorders. Wernicke’s has been described in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS; however, given these patients’ immunosuppressed state, the diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy is not apparent. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old previously healthy male presented to the ER complaining of progressive dyspnea. Workup revealed HIV/AIDS and PCP pneumonia. He was treated and improved. On day 14 he became confused and developed nystagmus and ataxia. Considering his immunocompromised state, infectious and neoplastic etiologies topped the differential diagnosis. CT head was negative. Lumbar puncture was unremarkable. Brain MRI revealed increased T2 signal in the medial thalamus bilaterally. Intravenous thiamine was administered resulting in resolution of symptoms. Discussion. The classic triad of Wernicke’s encephalopathy occurs in 10% of cases. When immunosuppressed patients develop acute neurologic symptoms infectious or neoplastic etiologies must be excluded. However, given the relative safety of thiamine supplementation, there should be a low threshold for initiating therapy in order to reverse the symptoms and prevent progression to Korsakoff dementia, which is permanent.

  12. Normalization of the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To construct normal values for the tests of the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and evaluate the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) among Turkish patients with liver cirrhosis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-five healthy subjects and sixty patients with liver ...

  13. Fatores associados à enterocolite necrosante Factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Campos Vieira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as formas de apresentação clínica da enterocolite necrosante neonatal e os fatores associados à doença. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo dos casos de enterocolite necrosante neonatal (ECN (n = 56 ocorridos na UTI Neonatal Lagoa, entre dezembro de 1986 e julho de 1992. O diagnóstico e estadiamento da doença seguiram o critério de Bell modificado. Foram avaliados o diagnóstico e a evolução de todos os casos. Posteriormente, foram selecionados os casos de enterocolite grau II e III (n =44 e comparados com um grupo controle (n = 44, selecionado pelo peso de nascimento (± 250g e época de internação (± 2 semanas. Para a análise estatística, foi considerado significante p OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the features of clinical presentation of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis and its associated factors. METHODS: retrospective study of the cases of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 56 diagnosed at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Lagoa (NICU, between December 1986 and July 1992. Diagnosis and stages of the disease followed the modified Bell's criteria. Diagnosis and follow-up of all cases were evaluated. The cases of enterocolitis - degrees II and III (n = 44 - were subsequently selected and compared to a case-control group (n = 44, selected according to birthweight ( 250 g and hospitalization period ( 2 weeks. The statistically significant analysis was considered as p < 0.05. RESULTS: out of 2,447 newborns admitted to the NICU, 56 (2.3% presented enterocolitis. Mean weight was 1908.5 g; mean gestational age was 35 weeks and 1 day; mean period for diagnosis was 10.7 days; 51 (91.1% patients were fed before diagnosis; 18 (32.1% needed urgent surgery; nine (16.9% hemocultures were positive; 10 (17.8% patients died. Four clinical standards were observed: fulminant, acute with pneumatosis, insidious and suspect. Comparatively to the case-control group, three factors were significantly associated with enterocolitis: apnea (p = 0

  14. Some aspects of morphogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the literary data and conducted large-scale research it was ascertained that diabetes mellitus raises the risk of cerebral stroke in 2-6 times, the risk of transitional ischemic attacks in 3 times in comparison with the same risk in the general population [3]. Diabetic encephalopathy in its pure form can be found in 80.7% of patients with diabetes mellitus of the 1st type, its development is caused mainly by ineffective metabolic control of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow [4]. Mixed encephalopathy is prevailed among patients with diabetes mellitus of the 2nd type; lacunar heart attack is more often developed among this category of patients [5], multiple focus of ischemic affection of white substance – leukoaraiosis regarded as the areas of increased level of water, gliosis, and demyelination of white substance is often registered [6]. Pathogeny of diabetic encephalopathy hasn’t been studied properly. It is known that it is a multifactor effect in the development of which the main role is led by the vascular dysfunction with the reduction of blood supply and ischemia of brain tissue, as well as direct toxic influence of hyperglycemia and disorder of trophism of nerve tissue [7]. Microangiopathy and macroangiopathy acquire the special meaning in encephalopathy development among patients with diabetes mellitus. The evidence of microangiopathy and macroangiopathy is identified by the disease course and prognosis. On the ultrastructural level the changes of vessel microcircular movement are registered on the 1st month of the experimental alloxan diabetes. During electronic microscopy the thickening of basal membrane of capillaries as well as their dissection is observed. In micro vessels such phenomena as precipitation of lipoproteids, raising of the synthesis of collagen (the second type, dystrophic changes of endotheliocytes, and lowering of micropinocytosis can be found [11,12,13,14]. As the severity of diabetes mellitus

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI in a juvenile miniature schnauzer dog with concurrent hypertriglyceridemia, necrotizing pancreatitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Mayrim L; Kridel, Heather A; Gallagher, Alex; Sheppard, Barbara J; Reese, Shona; Kondo, Hirotaka; Alleman, Rick; Giger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    A 7-month-old, neutered male miniature schnauzer dog with a history of cryptorchidism and umbilical hernia was referred for diabetic ketoacidosis. Clinical evaluation revealed stunted growth, skeletal abnormalities, hypertriglyceridemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Further testing was diagnostic for mucopolysaccharidosis type VI causing the stunted growth and skeletal deformities, but no connection between mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, hypertriglyceridemia, and pancreatic diseases was found.

  16. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  17. Surgical management of necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NSM is a rare benign, inflammatory disease of both major and minor salivary glands, although more commonly reported in the minor glands of the palate. The characteristic clinical presentation can perplex the clinician and may be mistaken for a malignant neoplasm, such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, as well as invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical and histological similarity between this entity and a malignant lesion may result in unnecessary or mis-treatment. Though clinically mimics malignancy, NSM is considered to be a self-limiting disease, and takes about 3-12 weeks to resolve. Majority of the case resolves itself or by supportive and symptomatic treatment. Surgical intervention is rarely required in NSM except the diagnostic biopsy. Herein we report the clinical, histopathological feature and surgical management of a case of NSM of hard palate in a young adult male.

  18. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, Sowmya [V.S Dental College and Hospital, Karnataka (India); Ramnarayan BK [Dayanada Sagar College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Karnataka (India)

    2011-03-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  19. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Sowmya; Ramnarayan BK

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  20. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...... and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood...

  2. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  3. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  4. MODELING CHRONIC TRAUMATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY: THE WAY FORWARD FOR FUTURE DISCOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Turner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the extensive media coverage associated with the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE, our fundamental understanding of the disease pathophysiology remains in its infancy. Only recently have scientific laboratories and personnel begun to explore CTE pathophysiology through the use of preclinical models of neurotrauma. Some studies have shown the ability to recapitulate some aspects of CTE in rodent models, through the use of various neuropathologic, biochemical, and/or behavioral assays. Many questions related to CTE development however remain unanswered. These include the role of impact severity, the time interval between impacts, the age at which impacts occur, and the total number of impacts sustained. Other important variables such as the location of impacts, character of impacts, and effect of environment/lifestyle and genetics also warrant further study. In this work we attempt to address some of these questions by exploring work previously completed using single and repetitive injury paradigms. Despite some models producing some deficits similar to CTE symptoms, it is clear that further studies are required to understand the development of neuropathological and neurobehavioral features consistent with CTE-like features in rodents. Specifically, acute and chronic studies are needed that characterize the development of tau-based pathology.

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in children with kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Gera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinic-radiographic entity of heterogeneous etiologies that are grouped together because of similar findings on neuro-imaging and associated symptom complex of headache, vision loss, altered mentation, and seizures. Although usually considered benign and reversible, characteristics of this syndrome in pediatric patients remain obscure. This case series included 11 patients (8 males, 3 females, age 3-15 years of PRES during September 2010 to February 2012 out of a total 660 renal pediatric patients (1.66%. We studied their clinical profile, contributory factors, and outcome. Presenting symptoms were headache in 73%, dimness of vision or cortical blindness in 36%, seizures in 91%, and altered mentation in 55%. The associated renal diseases were acute renal failure (55%, chronic renal failure (9%, and 36% had normal renal function. The contributory factors were uncontrolled hypertension (100%, severe hypoproteinemia (9%, persistent hypocalcemia (9%, hemolytic uremic syndrome (36%, cyclosporine toxicity (9%, lupus nephritis (9%, high hematocrit (9%, and pulse methylprednisolone (9%. Brain imaging showed involvement of occipito-parietal area (100% and other brain areas (63%. All but one patient of hemolytic uremic syndrome had complete clinical neurological recovery in a week, and all had normal neurological imaging after 4-5 weeks. PRES is an underdiagnosed entity in pediatric renal disease patients. Associated hypertension, renal disease, and immunosuppressive treatment are important triggers. Early diagnosis and treatment of comorbid conditions is of prime importance for early reversal of syndrome.

  6. Recurrent Wernicke's encephalopathy in pregnancy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Angela; Patel, Khilen; Rao, Ashwin; Browne, Paul; Raley, Susanna; Street, Linda

    2017-12-22

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurologic syndrome resulting from a deficiency in thiamine, also known as Vitamin B1. Thiamine stores can be depleted rapidly in patients with severe hyperemesis. Treatment with thiamine typically results in complete resolution of the neurological abnormalities. A 15-year-old G2P0010 at 13.2 weeks gestation presented with altered mental status and transaminitis. She had a medical termination in her previous pregnancy following an admission for a similar clinical scenario. She was initially thought to have a postoperative surgical complication due to recent cholecystectomy, but further evaluation revealed thiamine depletion. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of WE. Repletion of thiamine and folic acid resulted in rapid clinical improvement. WE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pregnant patients with hyperemesis and altered mental status. A prior history of WE increases the risk of recurrence during pregnancy. Severe hyperemesis during pregnancy increases the risk of thiamine deficiency and WE. Early thiamine supplementation may reduce the risk of WE in patients with a prior clinical history or in patients with severe hyperemesis gravidarum.

  7. The role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE represents a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by acute or chronic liver failure. Hyperammonemia plays a pivotal role in the development of HE through modulation of neurotransmission, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficit. Neurosteroids contribute significantly to increased GABAergic tone in HE. Ammonia, in combination with manganese and proinflammatory cytokines, stimulate neurosteroid synthesis by up-regulation of translocator protein, a component of multiprotein complex that stimulate cholesterol transport into astrocytic mitochondria. Cholesterol serves as a substrate for the synthesis of neurosteroids allopregnanolone and tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone. After release from astrocytes, allopregnanolone and tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone potentiate GABAergic transmission by positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptor, thus contributing to cognitive deficit and alterations in sleep-wake cycle. Additional potential mechanisms of neurosteroid action in HE include modulation of serotoninergic, cholinergic, glutamatergic, glycinergic, and opioid receptor activities, as well as modulation of gene expression. This review aimed to summarize current knowledge of the role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of HE.

  8. Sudden onset unexplained encephalopathy in infants: think of cannabis intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Eran; Rekhtman, David; Berkun, Yackov; Wexler, Isaiah

    2016-03-01

    The use of cannabis as both a therapeutic agent and recreational drug is common, and its availability is increasing as a result of legalization in many countries. Among older children, the manifestations of cannabis intoxication are numerous and include both neurological and systemic manifestations that are frequently non-specific. There have been only a few reports detailing cannabis intoxication in infants and toddlers. We describe three infants who presented to the emergency department with encephalopathic signs without prominent systemic manifestations. During the initial interview of caregivers, no history of exposure to neurotoxic agents was obtained. All three patients were subsequently diagnosed with cannabis intoxication based on urine toxic screens for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The infants recovered with supportive care that included fluids and monitoring. The non-specific symptomatology of cannabis intoxication in infants together with the wide differential for unexplained acute onset encephalopathy may delay diagnosis and lead to inappropriate procedures and interventions such as antimicrobial treatments and imaging studies. Healthcare personnel of emergency rooms, urgent care centers, and general clinics should be aware of the potential risk of cannabis ingestion in young infants. A thorough medical history and toxic screen are warranted in all infants with unexplained decreased sensorium.

  9. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C.

    2010-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children. (orig.)

  10. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children. (orig.)

  11. Acute cortical blindness caused by pre-eclampsia in the antepartum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case report of a patient presenting posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), a rare acute neurological condition associated with pre-eclampsia. A possible common aetiology and successful clinical management approach is reported.

  12. Extended retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis with genital involvement, resembling fournier gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Matsuura, Kenji; Takayama, Hiroshi; Kayo, Munefumi; Ie, Tomotsugu

    2010-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious infection that originates in the subcutaneous tissues. Although many reports have been published about necrotizing infections of other anatomical sites, retroperitoneal necrotizing soft tissue infection is a rare entity that has been described in only a few case reports. The etiology and clinical course of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis can be variable and it is often difficult to identify the etiology of the infective process. We report a 58-year-old man with rapidly progressive, gas-producing, necrotizing inflammation in the retroperitoneum, complicated with genital involvement resembling Fournier gangrene. The patient was managed successfully by aggressive drainage, debridement, and sequential laparotomies to track and control the extensive necrosis of the retroperitoneum and perineum, in addition to systemic care to control sepsis. After his general condition stabilized, early rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma was identified and resected curatively. He remained well at follow up, six months after discharge. In retrospect, the trigger of the disease process was unclear. Although it was believed possibly to be due to the colon lesion, adenocarcinoma of the rectosigmoid colon was identified and the patient was managed successfully. Similar to necrotizing infections at other anatomical sites, early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention and systemic antimicrobial therapy are mandatory for treating patients with retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis.

  13. Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Catherine D

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (ALF) is a complex and rapidly progressive syndrome that results from a variety of age-dependent etiologies. It is defined by the acute onset of liver disease with no evidence of chronic liver disease. There must be biochemical or clinical evidence of severe liver dysfunction as defined by an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥2. If hepatic encephalopathy is present, INR should be ≥1.5. Unfortunately, due to the rarity of ALF in pediatric patients, there is a paucity of diagnostic and management algorithms and each patient must have an individualized approach. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(12):e433-e438.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Prions and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntes Polona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are a unique group of neurodegenerative diseases of animals and humans, which always have a fatal outcome and are transmissible among animals of the same or different species. Scope and Approach. The aim of this work is to review some recent data about animal TSEs, with the emphasis on their causative agents and zoonotic potential, and to discuss why the surveillance and control measures over animal TSEs should remain in force. Key Findings and Conclusions. We still have incomplete knowledge of prions and prion diseases. Scrapie has been present for a very long time and controlled with varied success. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged unnoticed, and spread within a few years to epidemic proportions, entailing enormous economic consequences and public concerns. Currently, the classical BSE epidemic is under control, but atypical cases do, and probably will, persist in bovine populations. The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD of the cervids has been spreading in North America and has recently been detected in Europe. Preventive measures for the control of classical BSE remain in force, including the feed ban and removal of specified risk materials. However, active BSE surveillance has considerably decreased. In the absence of such preventive and control measures, atypical BSE cases in healthy slaughtered bovines might persist in the human food chain, and BSE prions might resurface. Moreover, other prion strains might emerge and spread undetected if the appropriate preventive and surveillance measures were to cease, leaving behind inestimable consequences.

  15. Probiotics in management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Singh, Jatinderpal

    2016-12-01

    Gut microflora leads to production of ammonia and endotoxins which play important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). There is relationship between HE and absorption of nitrogenous substances from the intestines. Probiotics play a role in treatment of HE by causing alterations in gut flora by decreasing the counts of pathogen bacteria, intestinal mucosal acidification, decrease in production and absorption of ammonia, alterations in permeability of gut, decreased endotoxin levels and changes in production of short chain fatty acids. Role of gut microbiota using prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics have been evaluated in the management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), overt HE and prevention of HE. Many studies have shown efficacy of probiotics in reduction of blood ammonia levels, treatment of MHE and prevention of HE. However these trials have problems like inclusion of small number of patients, short treatment durations, variability in HE/MHE related outcomes utilized and high bias risk, errors of systematic and random types. Systematic reviews also have shown different results with one systematic review showing clinical benefits whereas another concluded that probiotics do not have any role in treatment of MHE or HE. Also practical questions on optimal dose, ideal combination of organisms, and duration of treatment and persistence of benefits on long term follow-up are still to be clarified. At present, there are no recommendations for use of probiotics in patients with HE.

  16. [Clinical Features and Treatment of Hashimoto Encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yoshimitsu; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is characterized by heterogeneous neurological symptoms. HE is diagnosed based on three criteria-the presence of antithyroid antibodies, neurological symptoms from the cerebrum and/or cerebellum, and a positive response to immunotherapy. We clinically analyzed 18 patients (3 men, 15 women; age range, 38-81years) diagnosed with HE in our hospital from May 2013 to January 2016. Eleven patients showed sensory abnormalities such as strong pain, deep muscle pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia, or neuralgia. Surprisingly, the majority of the pain was distributed in a manner that was not explainable anatomically. Seventeen patients showed motor disturbances, such as weakness, paresis of extremities, or dexterity movement disorder, and eight patients showed give-way weakness, which is disruption of continuous muscle contraction. Other symptoms indicative of brain-related anomalies such as tremor, dystonia, involuntary movements, cerebellar ataxia, parkinsonism, memory loss, and chronic fatigue were also seen. In most patients, such motor, sensory, or higher brain functions were markedly improved with immunosuppressive therapies such as prednisolone, azathioprine, or immunoadsorption therapy. Although give-way weakness and anatomically unexplainable pain are typically considered as being psychogenic in origin, the presence of these symptoms is indicative of HE. HE exhibits diffuse involvement of the entire brain and thus, these symptoms are explainable. We propose that physicians should not diagnose somatoform disorders without first excluding autoimmune encephalopathy.

  17. Contributory factors and potentially avoidable neonatal encephalopathy associated with perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Lynn C; Farquhar, Cynthia M; Masson, Vicki L; Battin, Malcolm R

    2016-06-01

    The recently published monograph, Neonatal encephalopathy and neurologic outcome, from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls for a root cause analysis to identify components of care that contributed to cases of neonatal encephalopathy to design better practices, surveillance mechanisms, and systems. All cases of infants born in New Zealand with moderate and severe neonatal encephalopathy were reported to the New Zealand Perinatal and Maternal Mortality Review Committee from 2010. A national clinical review of these individual cases has not previously been undertaken. The objective of the study was to undertake a multidisciplinary structured review of all cases of neonatal encephalopathy that arose following the onset of labor in the absence of acute peripartum events in 2010-2011 to determine the frequency of contributory factors, the proportion of potentially avoidable morbidity and mortality and to identify themes for quality improvement. National identification of, and collection of clinical records on, cases of moderate or severe neonatal encephalopathy occurring after the onset of labor in the absence of an acute peripartum event, excluding those with normal gases and Apgar scores at 1 minute, among all cases of moderate and severe neonatal encephalopathy at term in New Zealand in 2010-2011 was undertaken. Cases were included if they had abnormal gases as defined by any of pH of ≤ 7.2, base excess of ≤ -10, or lactate of ≥ 6 or if there were no cord gases, an Apgar score at 1 minute of ≤ 7. A clinical case review was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team using a structured tool to record contributory factors (organization and/or management, personnel, and barriers to access and/or engagement with care), potentially avoidable morbidity and mortality and to identify themes to guide quality improvement. Eighty-three babies fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the review, 56 moderate (67%) and 27 severe (33%), 21 (25%) of whom were

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  19. Three-dimensional brain metabolic imaging in patients with toxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callender, T.J.; Duhon, D.; Ristovv, M.; Morrow, L.; Subramanian, K.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-three workers, ages 24 to 63, developed clinical toxic encephalopathy after exposure to neurotoxins and were studied by SPECT brain scans. Five were exposed to pesticides, 13 were acutely exposed to mixtures of solvents, 8 were chronically exposed to mixtures of hazardous wastes that contained organic solvents, 2 were acutely exposed to phosgene and other toxins, and 5 had exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Twenty-nine had neuropsychological testing and all had a medical history and physical. Of the workers who had a clinical diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy, 31 (93.9%) had abnormal SPECT brain scans with the most frequent areas of abnormality being temporal lobes (67.7%), frontal lobes (61.3%), basal ganglia (45.2%), thalamus (29.0%), parietal lobes (12.9%), motorstrip (9.68%), cerebral hemisphere (6.45%), occipital lobes (3.23%), and caudate nucleus (3.23%). Twenty-three out of 29 (79.3%) neuropsychological evaluations were abnormal. Other modalities when performed included the following percentages of abnormals: NCV, 33.3%; CPT sensory nerve testing, 91.3%, vestibular function testing, 71.4%; olfactory testing, 89.2%; sleep EEG analysis, 85.7%; EEG, 8.33%; CT, 7.14%; and MRI brain scans, 28.6%. The complex of symptoms seen in toxic encephalopathy implies dysfunction involving several CNS regions. This series of patients adds to the previous experience of brain metabolic imaging and demonstrates that certain areas of the brain are typically affected despite differences in toxin structure, that these lesions can be globally defined by SPECT/PET brain scans, that these lesions correlate well with clinical and neuropsychological testing, and that such testing is a useful adjunct to previous methods. EEG and structural brain imaging such as CT and MRI are observed to have poor sensitivity in this type of patient. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  20. Efficacy of serum nitric oxide level estimation in assessing the severity of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas Reddy; Wig, Jai Dev; Khullar, Madhu; Singh, Gurpreet; Gupta, Rajesh

    2003-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of necrotizing pancreatitis is unclear. In a prospective study, the clinical course of 40 patients diagnosed as having acute necrotizing pancreatitis was followed using computed tomography severity score (CTSS) and serial APACHE II scoring. The serum nitric oxide levels in the form of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) were estimated on admission and on day 3. Occurrence of complications, need for intervention, incidence of organ failure, and outcome were noted. The efficacy of CTSS, APACHE II scores, and RNI levels in predicting morbidity and mortality was assessed. The correlation between CTSS, APACHE II scores, and RNI levels was studied. The study group showed significantly higher levels of RNI as compared with the control group (159.1 vs. 106.0 nmol/ml, p RNI levels were not affected by the occurrence of local complications or distant-organ failure. The RNI levels on admission were significantly higher in the subset of patients who developed bacterial sepsis (195.5 vs. 134.7 nmol/ml, p RNI levels on admission in the non-survivors were higher as compared with those of the survivors (216.0 vs. 140.1 nmol/ml, p RNI levels and the CTSS in these patients (p RNI levels and APACHE II scores. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is associated with raised serum nitric oxide levels at its early stage. Patients with higher serum nitric oxide levels are at a significantly higher risk of sepsis and mortality. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP

  1. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  2. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  3. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  4. Methotrexate encephalopathy: Two cases in adult cancer patients, who recovered with pathophysiologically based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodeinde A Coker

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Neurotoxicity is a serious and sometimes fatal adverse effect that can occur following methotrexate treatment. We describe two adult patients with hematological malignancies with methotrexate encephalopathy who recovered with dextromethorphan therapy. Results: Case 1: A 24-year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed the acute onset of bilateral facial weakness and slurred speech after his first treatment with high-dose intravenous methotrexate. The clinical scenario and a head magnetic resonance imaging supported a diagnosis of methotrexate encephalopathy. Treatment with dextromethorphan was coincident with recovery. Case 2: A 65-year-old female with recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was treated with high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Two weeks after a cycle, she developed hypoactive delirium, marked lethargy, ocular ataxia, and a right-sided facial weakness. Within 2 days of starting dextromethorphan, there was improvement with clinical recovery. Conclusions: These two cases suggest that N-methyl d-aspartate receptor activation by homocysteine may play an important role in the pathogenesis of methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  5. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...... results. The CRT method is a 10-minute computerized test of a patient's motor reaction time stability (CRTindex) to 150 auditory stimuli. The PSE test is a 20-minute paper-pencil test evaluating psychomotor speed. Both tests were performed at the same occasion in 129 patients. Both tests were normal......Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a frequent complication to liver cirrhosis that causes poor quality of life, a great burden to caregivers, and can be treated. For diagnosis and grading the international guidelines recommend the use of psychometric tests of different modalities (computer...

  6. Severe early onset ethylmalonic encephalopathy with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Laura; Garone, Giacomo; Schettini, Livia; Giordano, Carla; Nicita, Francesco; Papoff, Paola; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset encephalopathy, chronic diarrhoea, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis and defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain. High levels of lactic, ethylmalonic and methylsuccinic acids are detected in body fluids. EE is caused by mutations in ETHE1 gene, a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase. Neurologic signs and symptoms include progressively delayed development, hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal movements. We report on the clinical, electroencephalographic and MRI findings of a baby with a severe early onset encephalopathy associated with novel ETHE1 gene mutation. This is the first case described in literature with an early pure epileptic onset, presenting with West syndrome.

  7. The history of the concept of epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capovilla, Giuseppe; Wolf, Peter; Beccaria, Francesca; Avanzini, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The first description of epileptic encephalopathies dates back to Dr. West who, in 1857, described the syndrome that took his name. In addition to West syndrome, in the last century other epileptic syndromes entered into the chapter of epileptic encephalopathies. Henry Gastaut has the virtue of having created the modern concept of epileptic encephalopathy and entering it into the official terminology of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). After the first proposal, it was further defined and refined over time. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Exploratory laparotomy in the management of confirmed necrotizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a serious gastrointestinal emergency in newborn infants. Surgical management includes primary peritoneal drainage and/or exploratory laparotomy with bowel resection. This study describes obstetric complications, postnatal comorbidities, surgical care and intermediate ...

  9. Exploratory laparotomy in the management of confirmed necrotizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a serious gastrointestinal emergency in newborn infants. Surgical management includes primary peritoneal drainage and/or exploratory laparotomy with bowel resection. This study describes obstetric complications, postnatal comorbidities, surgical care and intermediate ...

  10. Tube Thoracostomy-Related Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Pin Hsu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious complication of pulmonary tuberculosis that requires immediate treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious, rapidly progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia, most related to trauma or surgery. Here, we report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis with spontaneous pneumothorax. A standard procedure of tube thoracostomy was performed for lung re-expansion. Two days after the tube was removed, necrotizing fasciitis developed from the puncture site. Computed tomography of the chest showed focal thickness with gas formation and loss of the fat plane over the chest wall, which is compatible with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. Aggressive treatment was given, including emergency fasciectomy and adequate systemic antibiotic and antituberculous treatment. The necrotizing fasciitis was successfully treated. The patient was discharged and sent home with maintenance antituberculous therapy.

  11. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  12. Microbiology and management of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2008-02-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a clinical syndrome of ischemic necrosis of the bowel of multiple etiological factors that include the presence of intestinal ischemia, abnormal bacterial flora, and intestinal mucosal immaturity. Numerous reports have implied that the fecal microflora may contribute to the pathogenesis of NEC. A broad range of organisms generally found in the distal gastrointestinal tract have been recovered from the peritoneal cavity and blood of infants with NEC. The predominant organisms include Enterobacteriaceae (i.e., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) , Clostridium spp., enteric pathogens (salmonellae, Coxsackie B2 virus, coronavirus, rotavirus), and potential pathogens (Bacteroides fragilis). The goals of the initial management is preventing ongoing damage, restoring hemostasis, and minimizing complications. Medical management includes withholding oral feeding, placement of nasogastric tube, abdominal decompression, paracentesis, vigorous intravenous hydration containing electrolytes and calories, support of the circulation, administration of antibiotics, and surveillance for deterioration or complications that require surgical intervention. Indications for surgery include clinical deterioration, perforation, peritonitis, obstruction, and abdominal mass. Prevention remains crucial to decrease the incidence of NEC. Preventive methods include cautious feeding regimens, the use of maternal breast milk, and the use of probiotics.

  13. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman A. Babaeer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC was 29.5 × 103/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 103/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy.

  14. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 10(3)/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 10(3)/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy.

  15. Necrotizing enterocolitis: the mystery goes on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) has largely been present in neonatal intensive care units for the past 60 years. NEC prevalence has corresponded with the continued development and sophistication of neonatal intensive care. Despite major efforts towards its eradication, NEC has persisted and appears to be increasing in some centers. The pathophysiology of this disease remains poorly understood. Several issues have hampered our quest to develop a better understanding of this disease. These include the fact that what we have historically termed 'NEC' appears to be several different diseases. Animal models that are commonly used to study NEC pathophysiology and treatment do not directly reflect the most common form of the disease seen in human infants. The pathophysiology appears to be multifactorial, reflecting several different pathways to intestinal necrosis with different inciting factors. Spontaneous intestinal perforations, ischemic bowel disease secondary to cardiac anomalies as well as other entities that are clearly different from the most common form of NEC seen in preterm infants have been put into the same database. Here I describe some of the different forms of what has been called NEC and make some comments on its pathophysiology, where available studies suggest involvement of genetic factors, intestinal immaturity, hemodynamic instability, inflammation and a dysbiotic microbial ecology. Currently utilized approaches for the diagnosis of NEC are presented and innovative technologies for the development of diagnostic and predictive biomarkers are described. Predictions for future strategies are also discussed.

  16. Case Report: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in two Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report two children from the South-western part of Nigeria with blood culture proven typhoid fever who developed encephalopathy and acute cerebellar syndrome due to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). In this report, we discussed the symptomatology and management of post-Salmonella disseminated ...

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy is associated with decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow, not increased ammonia uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2013-01-01

    tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Ten patients with cirrhosis were studied during an acute episode of HE; nine were reexamined after recovery. Nine patients with cirrhosis with no history of HE served as controls. Mean CMRO(2) increased from 0.73 µmol oxygen/mL brain tissue/min during HE to 0......Studies have shown decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) and blood flow (CBF) in patients with cirrhosis with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). It remains unclear, however, whether these disturbances are associated with HE or with cirrhosis itself and how they may relate to arterial blood...... ammonia concentration and cerebral metabolic rate of blood ammonia (CMRA). We addressed these questions in a paired study design by investigating patients with cirrhosis during and after recovery from an acute episode of HE type C. CMRO(2), CBF, and CMRA were measured by dynamic positron emission...

  18. A case of chronic Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: a neuropsychological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eOudman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE. She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After five days without treatment she was diagnosed with WE in a general hospital. During the course of the disease minimal change to the acute situation occurred, with chronic confusion, attention deficits and incoherent behavior symptoms most notable unlike classical Korsakoff's Syndrome (KS. Neuropsychological assessment after four and sixteen months after admission to the hospital revealed global cognitive decline, with striking impairments in attentional, executive and memory functions. The present case study suggests that the state of confusion and the neuropsychological symptoms in WE can become chronic in case of very late treatment. We therefore recommend that confused alcoholics should receive appropriate parenteral thiamine according to the current clinical standards.

  19. No oxygen delivery limitation in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of reduced brain functioning in which both blood flow and brain energy metabolism declined. It is not known whether blood flow or metabolism is the primary limiting factor of brain function in this condition. We used calculations of mitochondrial oxygen tension...... declined in all gray matter regions of the brain in patients with HE but not significantly in patients with CL. Analysis of flow-metabolism coupling indicated that blood flow declined in HE as a consequence of reduced brain energy metabolism implied by the calculation of increased mitochondrial oxygen...... tensions that patients with HE were unable to utilize. We ascribe the inability to use the delivered oxygen of patients with HE to a specific inhibition associated with oxidative metabolism in mitochondria....

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy: expanding the diagnostic toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a life threatening neurological disorder that results from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Clinical signs include mental status changes, ataxia, occulomotor changes and nutritional deficiency. The conundrum is that the clinical presentation is highly variable. WE clinical signs, brain imaging, and thiamine blood levels, are reviewed in 53 published case reports from 2001 to 2011; 81 % (43/53) were non-alcohol related. Korsakoff Syndrome or long-term cognitive neurological changes occurred in 28 % (15/53). Seven WE cases (13 %) had a normal magnetic resonance image (MRI). Four WE cases (8 %) had normal or high thiamine blood levels. Neither diagnostic tool can be relied upon exclusively to confirm a diagnosis of WE.

  1. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-01-01

    A primed continuous infusion of [ 15 N, 1- 13 C]leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet [0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)]. An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO 2 enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy

  2. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  3. Neurological and Vascular Manifestations of Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavasoli, Ali Reza; Rostami, Parastoo; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Karimzadeh, Parvaneh

    2017-01-01

    Objective Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a severe mitochondrial disease of early infancy clinically characterized by a combination of developmental delay, progressive pyramidal signs, and vascular lesions including petechial purpura, orthostatic acrocyanosis, and chronic hemorrhagic diarrhea. Biochemical hallmarks of the disease are persistently high level of lactate, and C4-C5-acylcarnitines in blood, markedly elevated urinary excretion of methylsuccinic and ethylmalonic (EMA) acids. Here we report two patients with EE as a 16-months-old male infant and a 2-yr-old boy referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinic in Children's Medical Center, Tehran-Iran that in one patient genetic analysis revealed a homozygous mutation of the ETHE1 gene in favor of ethylmalonic acidemia.

  4. Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy a real disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has received widespread media attention and is treated in the lay press as an established disease, characterized by suicidality and progressive dementia. The extant literature on CTE is reviewed here. There currently are no controlled epidemiological data to suggest that retired athletes are at increased risk for dementia or that they exhibit any type of unique neuropathology. There remain no established clinical or pathological criteria for diagnosing CTE. Despite claims that CTE occurs frequently in retired National Football League (NFL) players, recent studies of NFL retirees report that they have an all-cause mortality rate that is approximately half of the expected rate, and even lower suicide rates. In addition, recent clinical studies of samples of cognitively impaired NFL retirees have failed to identify any unique clinical syndrome. Until further controlled studies are completed, it appears to be premature to consider CTE a verifiable disease.

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-related cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis in a girl heterozygous for factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Cristina; Moretta, Gaia; Bersani, Giulia; Valentini, Piero; Gatto, Antonio; Rigante, Donato

    2017-12-01

    Necrotizing vasculitides are basically characterized by vessel wall neutrophil infiltration and necrosis and they can occur as a primary process or secondary to an underlying disease. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSp) is the more frequent primary vasculitis in childhood, sometimes it has to be distinguished from other secondary vasculitides induced by infections, drugs, vaccines, or immune-mediated disorders. We report a case of a 14-year-old girl with cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis, appearing in the course of acute Epstein-Barr virus infection. Physical examination revealed highly aching erythematous-purple lesions with reticular edges localized on the back of feet. Pain was non-responsive to ibuprofen and required administration of tapentadol and pregabalin. The patient was also heterozygous for factor V Leiden that might have contributed to the development of cutaneous painful lesions. To our knowledge this is the first documented pediatric case of necrotizing vasculitis associated with acute EBV infection in a girl heterozygous for factor V Leiden. In this patient the severity of skin manifestations might have been influenced by the concomitant factor V Leiden, which gave rise to hypercoagulability and occlusive vasculopathy with markedly severe pain, a symptom rather infrequent in other childhood vasculitides.

  7. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  8. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2009-09-01

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  9. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2012-01-31

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  10. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Lise L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production of ...... and safety of long-term treatment with rifaximin and evaluate effects of combination therapy with lactulose and branched-chain amino acids for patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy....... of ammonia by gut bacteria and, to some extent, other toxic derivatives from the gut. Clinical trials show that these effects improve episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. A large randomized trial found that rifaximin prevents recurrent episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. Most patients were treated...

  11. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  12. Childhood Acute Glomerulonepbritis in Benin City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2000-12-31

    Dec 31, 2000 ... Haematuria and proteinuria of varying degrees occurred in all the patients, while antecedent infections were noted in 49.2 percent. Complications included congestive cardiac failure (39.7 percent), urinary tract infection (20.6 percent), acute renal failure (12.7 percent), and hypertensive encephalopathy.

  13. Role of diffusion weighted MR in the discrimination diagnosis of the cystic and/or necrotic head and neck lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, Osman [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya 42080 (Turkey); Paksoy, Yahya [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya 42080 (Turkey)]. E-mail: yahyapaksoy@yahoo.com; Erayman, Ibrahim [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Infectious Disease, Konya (Turkey); Kivrak, Ali Sami [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Konya 42080 (Turkey); Arbag, Hamdi [Selcuk University, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Konya (Turkey)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose was to determine whether the diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) was able to differentiate necrotic tumor or metastatic lesions from infected necrotic lesions such as abscesses and necrotic lymphadenitis in the neck. Materials and methods: DWI was performed on 37 consecutive patients with 85 head and neck necrotic and cystic lesions. The lesions were classified into four categories: metastatic lymph node involvement including lymphoma, necrotic tumor, abscesses and necrotic lymphadenitis. Each lesion was histopathologically studied and proved. Results: In 12 patients, there were 35 necrotic lymphadenitis (necrotic tuberculosis lymphadenitis, n = 18; necrotic nonspecific suppurative lymphadenitis, n = 17). Of the 15 necrotic metastatic nodes, 11 lesions were lymphomatous involvement and 4 lesions were other tumor involvement. Other 11 patients have abscesses. Thirteen primary tumoral necrotic lesions arose in the neck of nine patients. All of the abscesses and necrotic lympadenitis showed hyperintensity on DWI, in contrast to necrotic tumor and necrotic nodal metastasis that showed hypointensity on DWI. DWI successfully differentiated metastatic nodes and necrotic tumors from necrotic lymphadenitis and abscesses. Conclusion: DWI may be supportive for differentiating necrotic tumor lesions such as necrotic tumor and metastatic necrotic nodes from the infective necrotic lesions such as necrotic lymphadenitis and abscesses in the head and neck.

  14. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  15. Lead encephalopathy treated by versenate (CA-EDTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radwan, H.; Braun, H.; Kott, E.; Bar-Sela, S.

    1982-01-01

    A patient with generalised epileptic seizures, mental and psychotic signs was diagnosed as suffering from lead encephalopathy. He was a big consumer of home-made arrack, illicit alcohol prepared at home in secrecy, in tools containing copper and lead. Basophilic stippling increased the possibility of lead encephalopathy, which was soon proved. He was successfully treated with low doses of Versenate, a chelating factor, and totally recovered.

  16. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    OpenAIRE

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave) activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clini...

  17. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. Objectives: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. Search methods: We identified trials through...... included randomised clinical trials, irrespective of the bias control, language, or publication status. Data collection and analysis: The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update...

  18. Necrotizing soft tissue infection in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestorović Milica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI is a life-threatening condition, characterized by widely spread necrosis of skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia and muscles. Treatment involves surgical debridement and broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Mortality is still high due to diagnostic delays. NSTI is rare in general population, there are even less literature data of this condition in pregnancy. Timely diagnosis and therapy is crucial for outcome of these patients. Clinicians should have in mind NSTI in patients with perianal infections, especially in cases where immunosuppressive role of pregnancy is present. Case outline. We present a case of a 21-year-old pregnant woman with NSTI spreading from perianal region. The patient was admitted to hospital in the 31st week of otherwise healthy twin pregnancy one day after incision of perianal abscess. At admission she was examined by a gynecologist; vital signs were stable, laboratory results showed the presence of infection. She was referred for another surgical procedure and broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. The next morning the patient complained of intense abdominal pain. Clinical exam revealed only discrete redness of the skin tender on palpation, crepitating. She was immediately referred to surgery. Intraoperative findings revealed massive soft tissue infection spreading up to the chest wall. Wide skin incisions and debridement were performed. The patient developed septic shock and after initial resuscitation gynecologist confirmed intrauterine death of twins and indicated labor induction. Over the next few days the patient’s general condition improved. On several occasions the wounds were aggressively debrided under general anesthesia, which left the patient with large abdominal wall defect. Twenty-three days after the initial operation, the defect was reconstructed with partial-thickness skin grafts, providing satisfactory results. Conclusion. Diagnosis and outcome of

  19. Glutaric aciduria type I: a common cause of episodic encephalopathy and spastic paralysis in the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D H; Bennett, M J; Seargeant, L E; Nichter, C A; Kelley, R I

    1991-10-01

    We have diagnosed type I glutaric aciduria (GA-I) in 14 children from 7 Old Order Amish families in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. An otherwise rare disorder, GA-I appears to be a common cause of acute encephalopathy and cerebral palsy among the Amish. The natural history of the disease, which was previously unrecognized in this population, is remarkably variable and ranges from acute infantile encephalopathy and sudden death to static extrapyramidal cerebral palsy to normal adult. Ten patients first manifested the disease between 3 and 18 months at the time of an acute infectious illness. Four of these children died in early childhood, also during acute illnesses. However, there has been little progression of the neurological disease after age 5 years in the surviving children and intellect usually has been preserved, even in children with severe spastic paralysis. When well, patients have plasma glutaric acid concentrations ranging from 4.8 to 14.2 mumol/liter (nl 0-5.6 mumol/liter) and urinary glutaric acid concentrations from 12.5 to 196 mg/g creatinine (nl 0.5-8.4 mg/g creatinine). We have found that GA-I can be diagnosed in the Amish by measurement of urinary glutaric acid concentrations using isotope-dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, whereas the diagnosis can easily be missed by routine urine organic acid gas chromatography.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Subcutaneous Emphysema in Non-Necrotizing Soft Tissue Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ehsani-Nia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: 63-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis who was sent to the emergency department by his primary care provider for further evaluation of left upper extremity crepitus. The patient fell onto his left elbow two days prior to presentation resulting in immediate swelling and a small laceration. He complained of minimal pain and denied fevers or chills. His medications included metformin, tocilizumab, methotrexate and prednisone. In the ED, the patient was well-appearing, afebrile, with a normal heart rate and in no acute distress. Examination of the left upper extremity revealed no tenderness to palpation but marked crepitus with a scabbed laceration over his olecranon process and was neurovascularly intact. White blood cell count (WBC, sodium, glucose, inflammatory markers and lactate were all within normal limits. Significant findings: X-Rays of the elbow revealed diffuse striated lucencies throughout the soft tissue, consistent with extensive subcutaneous air throughout the superficial and deep tissues. There was no evidence of a fracture. Discussion: The initiating mechanism for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs is a disruption of the fascial planes, most commonly by trauma. The inoculated bacteria rapidly spread and surgical debridement is necessary.1-3 Early recognition and disposition to the operating room in 51 are correlated with increased morbidity and mortality.5 Additionally, it has been found that immunocompromised patients exhibit atypical presentations of NSTIs.6 The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC score is often used to risk stratify patients when there is suspicion for an NSTI.7 The patient discussed here had a LRINEC score of 0. However, the physical exam finding of crepitus, coupled with his history of immunocompromised status and subcutaneous air on X-ray made the diagnosis of NSTI seem likely. However, upon surgical exploration

  1. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: 11-year retrospective case review in South Auckland.

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    Kulasegaran, Suheelan; Cribb, Benjamin; Vandal, Alain C; McBride, Stephen; Holland, David; MacCormick, Andrew D

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this paper were to review our experience with necrotizing fasciitis at Middlemore Hospital and to define the trends in incidence, inpatient mortality and microbiological profile. A computerized search of the electronic medical records was undertaken to identify adult patients with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis between January 2000 and December 2010. A retrospective review of the clinical records was performed. Of the 138 patients with necrotizing fasciitis identified, 129 had their diagnosis confirmed at operation. The mortality at 30 days was 20.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.9%-28.0%). There was a significant reduction in hospital mortality in each successive year of the study period with an odds ratio of 0.84 (95% CI 0.71-0.98, P = 0.03). A pattern of increasing incidence was noted until February 2004 (95% CI September 2002-July 2005). This was followed by a significant decrease in incidence. The empirical antibiotic regime of clindamycin, gentamicin and penicillin provides satisfactory cover against 95% of the causative pathogens. This represents the largest single-centre published case series in New Zealand. Despite concerns of increasing incidence and mortality associated with necrotizing fasciitis in New Zealand, the experience in South Auckland shows a decrease in incidence of necrotizing fasciitis since 2004 and a statistically significant decreasing trend in hospital mortality. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Bacterial translocation and intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, I; Ozdemir, M; Aktan, M; Aslan, K

    2012-01-01

    To study the occurrence of bacterial translocation and to assess the impact of breastfeeding on bacterial translocation in the animal model of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of 20 neonate Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study. Rats were randomly allocated into either control or study group just after birth. Ten newborn rats in the control group were left with their mother to be breast-fed. In contrary, necrotizing enterocolitis group consisted of neonates that were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator and were gavaged with a special rodent formula three times daily. Survival rates, weight changes, and morphologic scoring obtained after microscopic evaluation were determined as microbiologic evaluation criteria. All the rats in the control group survived, while 1 (10 %) rat died in the necrotizing enterocolitis group. Mortality rates of the two groups were similar. All the formula-fed animals in the necrotizing enterocolitis group had significant weight loss compared to the breast milk-fed rats in the control group (pmicrorganisms in the bowel pass through the intestinal barrier and reach the liver and the spleen via the hematogenous route. This condition is closely related to the impairment of physiological and functional features of the intestinal barrier and is independent from the degree of intestinal injury. Bacterial translocation should be remembered in cases suspected of necrotizing enterocolitis, and a rapid and effective treatment algorithm should be applied in such circumstances (Tab. 3, Fig. 3, Ref. 21). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  4. Diagnostic yield of genetic testing in epileptic encephalopathy in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Patel, Jaina; Cordeiro, Dawn; Hewson, Stacy; Callen, David; Donner, Elizabeth J; Hahn, Cecil D; Kannu, Peter; Kobayashi, Jeff; Minassian, Berge A; Moharir, Mahendranath; Siriwardena, Komudi; Weiss, Shelly K; Weksberg, Rosanna; Snead, O Carter

    2015-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder of childhood. To determine the genetic diagnostic yield in epileptic encephalopathy, we performed a retrospective cohort study in a single epilepsy genetics clinic. We included all patients with intractable epilepsy, global developmental delay, and cognitive dysfunction seen between January 2012 and June 2014 in the Epilepsy Genetics Clinic. Electronic patient charts were reviewed for clinical features, neuroimaging, biochemical investigations, and molecular genetic investigations including targeted next-generation sequencing of epileptic encephalopathy genes. Genetic causes were identified in 28% of the 110 patients: 7% had inherited metabolic disorders including pyridoxine dependent epilepsy caused by ALDH7A1 mutation, Menkes disease, pyridox(am)ine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency, cobalamin G deficiency, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency, glucose transporter 1 deficiency, glycine encephalopathy, and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency; 21% had other genetic causes including genetic syndromes, pathogenic copy number variants on array comparative genomic hybridization, and epileptic encephalopathy related to mutations in the SCN1A, SCN2A, SCN8A, KCNQ2, STXBP1, PCDH19, and SLC9A6 genes. Forty-five percent of patients obtained a genetic diagnosis by targeted next-generation sequencing epileptic encephalopathy panels. It is notable that 4.5% of patients had a treatable inherited metabolic disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to combine inherited metabolic disorders and other genetic causes of epileptic encephalopathy. Targeted next-generation sequencing panels increased the genetic diagnostic yield from 25% in patients with epileptic encephalopathy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis with toxic shock syndrome and rapid fatal outcome

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    Kojić Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a serious soft tissue infection with rapid progression of inflammatory process among superficial or deep fascia, systemic host response to infection leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS, and multiple organ failure. Lethality is high. Case Outline. A 46-year-old male without co-morbidities was admitted to the Emergency Department with redness, swelling and pain on his right lower leg. He became sick two day s ea rlier with m alaise, chills and shivering. On admission he was hypotensive, anuric, with erythematous rash on his face, neck and chest, with acute ren al failure and elevated creatine phosphokinase level. During the next several hours, the changes on his right lower leg rapidly spread to the whole leg, followed by skin destruction and subcutaneo us bleeding, indicating NF. Aggressive antimicrobial, supportive and symptom atic therapy was initiated immediately and on the same evening surgical intervention was performed. Despite these measures, a rapid development of severe TSS, with lethal outcome, occurred in less than 40 hours after the admission. Stre ptococcus pyogenes (group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from the throat, skin and tissue obtained duri ng the surgery. Conclusion. Necrotizing fasciitis is a very serious disease with unpre dictable course. For that reason doctors must devote a great deal of a ttention to early, i.e. timely diagnosis of this disease, whose treatment with a multid isciplinary approach is very important.

  6. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  7. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

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    Hiroki Masuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions: A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  8. Restoration of mammillothalamic functional connectivity through thiamine replacement therapy in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eosu; Ku, Jeonghun; Jung, Young-Chul; Lee, Hyeongrae; Kim, Sun I; Kim, Jae-Jin; Namkoong, Kee; Song, Dong-Ho

    2010-08-02

    Resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) is now providing further understanding of neuropsychiatric illnesses. However, its practical applicability in the clinical realms is still questionable. Here we report three consecutive followed-up resting-state fMRI data in a single case with Wernicke encephalopathy before and after high-dose thiamine replacement therapy ranging over 20 months. We measured the mammillothalamic functional connectivity strength between the first ROI (mammillary body) and a voxel which showed the highest co-activation among voxels within the anterior thalamus (the second ROI) to enhance the specificity of the functional connectivity data. We found that the time-series changes in the mammillothalamic functional connectivity generally paralleled to the changes in delayed verbal and nonverbal recall memory scores in the left and right hemisphere, respectively. Among these, the left-side connectivity and delayed verbal recall score seemed to be related to the overall clinical status change. Modified directed transfer function (dDTF) analysis also identified significant information flows with mammillary-to-thalamic direction except at the acute illness state. Our findings, though preliminary in nature, suggest the practical applicability of resting-state fMRI to trace an effect of thiamine replacement therapy on the memory tract function in Wernicke encephalopathy at single-patient level. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in childhood: report of four cases and review of the literature.

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    Endo, Ayumi; Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Hasegawa, Maki; Hashimoto, Koji; Fujita, Yukihiko; Inamo, Yasuji; Mugishima, Hideo

    2012-02-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a recently described disorder with typical radiological findings of bilateral gray and white matter abnormalities in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. Its clinical symptoms include headache, decreased alertness, mental abnormalities such as confusion, diminished spontaneity of speech, and changed behavior ranging from drowsiness to stupor, seizures, vomiting, and abnormalities of visual perception such as cortical blindness. In this study, the clinical and radiological findings of 4 children with this syndrome due to a variety of conditions are reported. The records of 4 children with a diagnosis of PRES were retrospectively analyzed. PRES is associated with a disorder of cerebrovascular autoregulation of multiple etiologies. Four patients with PRES who had primary diagnoses of severe aplastic anemia, nephritic syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis are presented. This syndrome has been described in numerous medical conditions, including hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, and with the use of immunosuppressive drugs. Early recognition of PRES as a complication during different diseases and therapies in childhood may facilitate precise diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  10. CT and MR in non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: radiological findings with pathophysiological correlations

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    Gutierrez, Leonardo Guilhermino; Portela, Luiz Antonio Pezzi [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rovira, Alex [University Hospital Vall d' Hebron, MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Costa Leite, Claudia da [Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lucato, Leandro Tavares [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    Non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a clinical condition often related to cardiopulmonary arrest that demands critical management and treatment decisions. Management depends mainly on the degree of neurological impairment and prognostic considerations. Computed tomography (CT) is often used to exclude associated or mimicking pathology. If any, only nonspecific signs such as cerebral edema, sulci effacement, and decreased gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) differentiation are evident. Pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage, a GM/WM attenuation ratio <1.18, and inverted GM attenuation are associated with a poor prognosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is more sensitive than CT in assessing brain damage in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Some MR findings have similarities to those seen pathologically, based on spatial distribution and time scale, such as lesions distributed in watershed regions and selective injury to GM structures. In the acute phase, lesions are better depicted using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) because of the presence of cytotoxic edema, which, on T2-weighted images, only become apparent later in the early subacute phase. In the late subacute phase, postanoxic leukoencephalopathy and contrast enhancement could be observed. In the chronic phase, atrophic changes predominate over tissue signal changes. MR can be useful for estimating prognosis when other tests are inconclusive. Some findings, such as the extent of lesions on DWI and presence of a lactate peak and depleted N-acetyl aspartate peak on MR spectroscopy, seem to have prognostic value. (orig.)

  11. CT and MR in non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: radiological findings with pathophysiological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Leonardo Guilhermino; Portela, Luiz Antonio Pezzi; Rovira, Alex; Costa Leite, Claudia da; Lucato, Leandro Tavares

    2010-01-01

    Non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a clinical condition often related to cardiopulmonary arrest that demands critical management and treatment decisions. Management depends mainly on the degree of neurological impairment and prognostic considerations. Computed tomography (CT) is often used to exclude associated or mimicking pathology. If any, only nonspecific signs such as cerebral edema, sulci effacement, and decreased gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) differentiation are evident. Pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage, a GM/WM attenuation ratio <1.18, and inverted GM attenuation are associated with a poor prognosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is more sensitive than CT in assessing brain damage in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Some MR findings have similarities to those seen pathologically, based on spatial distribution and time scale, such as lesions distributed in watershed regions and selective injury to GM structures. In the acute phase, lesions are better depicted using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) because of the presence of cytotoxic edema, which, on T2-weighted images, only become apparent later in the early subacute phase. In the late subacute phase, postanoxic leukoencephalopathy and contrast enhancement could be observed. In the chronic phase, atrophic changes predominate over tissue signal changes. MR can be useful for estimating prognosis when other tests are inconclusive. Some findings, such as the extent of lesions on DWI and presence of a lactate peak and depleted N-acetyl aspartate peak on MR spectroscopy, seem to have prognostic value. (orig.)

  12. Unexpected Maternal Convulsion: An Idiopathic Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome after Delivery

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    Jila Agah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is associated with various clinical manifestations such as headache, blurred vision, confusion and tonic-clonic convulsion. Some of the predisposing factors for PRES include hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia and eclampsia, lupus erythematosus, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs. This condition rarely occurs after normotensive and uneventful pregnancies. Several theories have been proposed on the etiology of PRES. For instance, endothelial injury and brain edema have been reported as possible causes of PRES. Although PRES is a temporary condition, proper and timely management of the disorder in the acute phase is critical for the prevention of permanent neurological complications. During pregnancy, PRES is normally accompanied with hypertension. In this paper, we present a rare case of PRES in a normotensive pregnancy in a 25-year-old parturient woman (Gravida 2, Ab 1. The patient unexpectedly manifested symptoms of tonic-clonic convulsion one hour after an uneventful vaginal delivery, which were successfully managed. According to our observations, PRES has various clinical manifestations with unexpected occurrence in some cases. Therefore, it is recommended that maternity centers be well-equipped with resuscitation tools, emergency drugs and expert staff so as to manage unforeseen PRES efficiently and prevent permanent maternal neurological complications and mortality.

  13. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion. PMID:24932178

  14. A reversible lesion of the corpus callosum splenium with adult influenza-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy: a case report

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    Kimura En

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ABstract Introduction Influenza virus-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy is a severe childhood illness with a poor prognosis. Adult case reports are rare and, to date, there have been no reports of adults with a mild subcortical encephalopathy with reversible lesions of the corpus callosum splenium. Case presentation A previously healthy 35-year-old man presented with acute progressive tetraplegia, transcortical motor aphasia and a mild decrease in his consciousness during his recovery after receiving oseltamivir phosphate treatment, and influenza type A antiviral medication. The initial magnetic resonance imaging study at day 1 showed symmetrical diffuse lesions in the white matter and a lesion on the central portion of the corpus callosum splenium. These findings had resolved on follow-up studies at day 8 and day 146. His neurological deficits mostly recovered within 12 hours following methylprednisolone pulse therapy. The levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 in his blood and cerebrospinal fluid were initially elevated, but rapidly decreased to normal levels by day 8. Conclusion It is important for clinicians to recognize that even in adulthood, the subcortical encephalopathy observed during the therapeutic treatment for influenza type A infection can occur in conjunction with a reversible lesion of the corpus callosum, which may recover quickly. In addition, the cytokine storm in the blood system and the corticospinal cavity may play an important role in the etiology of the disease process.

  15. [Fournier gangrene (necrotizing fasciitis) in a woman with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamper, Lars; Piroth, W; Haage, P

    2009-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman with insuline-dependent diabetes mellitus and chronic alcohol abuse was admitted with impaired consciousness and fever. Physical examination showed a livid induration of the perineal and vaginal soft tissues with crepitations. Laboratory tests showed greatly elevated infection parameters. Abdominal computed tomography revealed perineal and vaginal subcutaneous gas accumulation extending into the ventral abdominal wall. The combination of an obscure infection and subcutaneous genital gas accumulation suggested the diagnosis of Fournier gangrene, a necrotizing fasciitis. In spite of administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and repeated surgical removal of necrotic tissue the patient died of multiple organ failure. Successful treatment of Fournier gangrene critically depends on immediate treatment. Administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics and aggressive surgical resection of the necrotic tissue may prevent continuing spreading of the infection. Computed tomography provides an early diagnosis and guides the presurgical evaluation of the subcutaneous spread. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart * New York.

  16. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

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    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  17. Pathogenetic aspects of alcoholic encephalopathy treatment

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    Shchetinin S.G.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered to be the most common exogenous toxins, causing encephalopathy. The defeat of almost all parts of the nervous system should be assigned to the special features of ethanol. Neurophysiological mechanisms of development of substance dependence are based in the stem and limbic structures of the brain that are involved in ensuring the regulation of emotional state, mood, motivation sphere, psychophysical tone of human behavior in general and its adaptation to the environment. Stress or disruption of the normal functioning of these structures can lead to the formation of abstinence syndrome, affective disorders in remission and craving for alcohol. Dopaminergic and opioid (endorphin system play an important role in the genesis of various mental and motor disorders. In some way alcohol dependence can be regarded as an endorfinodefitsitnoe disease with a pathogenetic point of view. Activating of opioidereal system by trans-cranial electrical stimulation promotes the restoration of disturbed emotional, cognitive and autonomic functions, reduces craving for alcohol and in that way increases the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatment

  18. Resveratrol in Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE is characterized by an impairment of social interaction, emotional behavior, sleep disorders, physical and mental symptoms, and diminished Quality of Life (QoL. The aim of our study is evaluating the potential liver health promoting a perspective of Resveratrol (RV activities and evaluate whether RV treatment may improve health related quality of life (HRQL and reduce depression and anxiety in patients with MHE. Methods: We evaluated depression using the Beck Depression Inventory test, anxiety with State-trait anxiety inventory test, quality of life through SF-36 test, and ammonia serum levels in 70 MHE patients that were randomized into two groups. Results: In the comparison between RV group and placebo group we observed a decrease in Back Depression Inventory (BDI (p < 0.001, in State-trait anxiety inventory (STAI (p < 0.001, and improve in physical function (p < 0.001, in role physical (p < 0.05, in body pain (p < 0.05, in general health (p < 0.001, in vitality (p < 0.05, and in social function (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Resveratrol showed efficacy in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and ammonia serum levels, and improved the quality of life Of MHE patients.

  19. Acute Hemorrhagic Encephalitis Responding to Combined Decompressive Craniectomy, Intravenous Immunoglobulin, and Corticosteroid Therapies: Association with Novel RANBP2 Variant

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    Abdulla Alawadhi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute hemorrhagic encephalomyelitis (AHEM is considered as a rare form of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis characterized by fulminant encephalopathy with hemorrhagic necrosis and most often fatal outcome.ObjectiveTo report the association with Ran Binding Protein (RANBP2 gene variant and the response to decompressive craniectomy and high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP in life-threatening AHEM.DesignSingle case study.Case reportA 6-year-old girl known to have sickle cell disease (SCD presented an acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS with diplopia due to sudden unilateral fourth nerve palsy. She received five pulses of IVMP (30 mg/kg/day. Two weeks after steroid weaning, she developed right hemiplegia and coma. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a left frontal necrotico-hemorrhagic lesion and new multifocal areas of demyelination. She underwent decompressive craniotomy and evacuation of an ongoing left frontoparietal hemorrhage. Comprehensive investigations ruled out vascular and infectious process. The neurological deterioration stopped concomitantly with combined neurosurgical drainage of the hematoma, decompressive craniotomy, IVMP, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG. She developed during the following months Crohn disease and sclerosing cholangitis. After 2-year follow-up, there was no new neurological manifestation. The patient still suffered right hemiplegia and aphasia, but was able to walk. Cognitive/behavioral abilities significantly recovered. A heterozygous novel rare missense variant (c.4993A>G, p.Lys1665Glu was identified in RANBP2, a gene associated with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. RANBP2 is a protein playing an important role in the energy homeostasis of neuronal cells.ConclusionIn any ADS occurring in the context of SCD and/or autoimmune condition, we recommend to slowly wean steroids and to closely monitor the patient after weaning to quickly treat any recurrence of neurological symptom

  20. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  1. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L M; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H; de Haan, Timo R

    BACKGROUND: The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson

  2. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the upper limb. Apropos of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, R; el Yazidi, A; Ameziane, L; Berrada, M S; el Bardouni, A; el Yaacoubi, M; el Manouar, M

    1999-01-01

    This article is based on the retrospective study of 4 cases of necrotic fasciitis of the upper extremity, in adult patients with a mean age of 57 years (range: 36 to 78 years) and with a male predominance (3 M/1 F). Presenting signs were variable: pain, febrile and inflammatory oedema, ecchymoses with inflammatory masses containing clear or haemorrhagic fluid. Treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs did not prevent progression to painless, necrotic ulcers. Rapid medical and surgical treatment constitutes an element essential of the prognosis and must include wide large debridement, antibiotics and intensive care.

  3. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum

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    Shivani S. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery.

  4. Clostridium sordellii necrotizing omphalitis: A case report and literature review

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    Eric J. Rellinger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Omphalitis is an infrequent neonatal infection of the umbilicus. Necrotizing infections are a rare complication of omphalitis that requires prompt antibiotic therapy, surgical debridement, and supportive care. Here, we present a rare case of Clostridium sordellii necrotizing omphalitis that progressed to severe toxemia characterized by refractory hypotension, massive capillary leak, leukemoid reaction, and absence of fever. These clinical features are common in C. sordellii infections and harbor a poor prognosis with only one reported survivor (out of 12 of C. sordellii omphalitis reported in the literature. Early antibiotic and surgical intervention remain the mainstay of care as no early detection assays or antitoxins are commercially available.

  5. Cutaneous necrotic ulceration due to BCG re-vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyldenløve, Mette; Andersen, Ase Bengård; Halkjær, Liselotte Brydensholt

    2012-01-01

    The case report describes a severe local reaction with large cutaneous necrotic ulcer following bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) re-vaccination. This is a very rare adverse event, and only a few reports have been described in the literature.......The case report describes a severe local reaction with large cutaneous necrotic ulcer following bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) re-vaccination. This is a very rare adverse event, and only a few reports have been described in the literature....

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Apophysomyces variabilis in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Y. Rodríguez

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis caused by Apophysomyces variabilis is rarely reported in humans. A case of A. variabilis infection in an immunocompetent men after friction burns in a car accident is described. The infection presented as a rapidly progressive necrotizing infection of the skin and soft tissue, which required extensive surgical debridement and total colonic defunctioning colostomy associated with prolonged antifungal therapy. A. variabilis infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive necrotizing skin and soft tissue infections in immunocompetent individuals. Keywords: Mucormycosis, Zygomycetes, Apophysomyces variabilis, Amphotericin B

  7. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: Manifestation of a localized unclassified vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagatika Senapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a rare benign and self-limiting disease, which commonly affects the minor salivary glands. Typically, it involves the seromucinous glands located at palate, buccal mucosa, tongue, tonsil, nasal cavity, trachea, larynx, maxillary sinus, and retromolar trigone. We report two such cases of necrotizing sialometaplasia to create awareness among the pathologists and surgeons because of its close morphological and clinical resemblance to squamous cell carcinoma. We have also documented that, the ischemic necrosis of salivary gland is the result of a vasculitic process.

  8. Concanavalin A/IFN-gamma triggers autophagy-related necrotic hepatocyte death through IRGM1-mediated lysosomal membrane disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, a potent Th1 cytokine with multiple biological functions, can induce autophagy to enhance the clearance of the invading microorganism or cause cell death. We have reported that Concanavalin A (Con A can cause autophagic cell death in hepatocytes and induce both T cell-dependent and -independent acute hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, respectively. Although IFN-γ is known to enhance liver injury in Con A-induced hepatitis, its role in autophagy-related hepatocyte death is not clear. In this study we report that IFN-γ can enhance Con A-induced autophagic flux and cell death in hepatoma cell lines. A necrotic cell death with increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP is observed in Con A-treated hepatoma cells in the presence of IFN-γ. Cathepsin B and L were released from lysosomes to cause cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ induces immunity related GTPase family M member 1(IRGM1 translocation to lysosomes and prolongs its activity in Con A-treated hepatoma cells. Knockdown of IRGM1 inhibits the IFN-γ/Con A-induced LMP change and cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ(-/- mice are resistant to Con A-induced autophagy-associated necrotic hepatocyte death. We conclude that IFN-γ enhances Con A-induced autophagic flux and causes an IRGM1-dependent lysosome-mediated necrotic cell death in hepatocytes.

  9. Descending Necrotizing Mediastinitis Treated with Tooth Extractions following Mediastinal and Cervical Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Fukuchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM is a rare condition in which oropharyngeal infection spreads to the mediastinum via the cervical fascia. Delayed diagnosis and surgery result in a high mortality rate among patients with DNM. We present a case of DNM resulting from odontogenic infection treated successfully with tooth extraction following mediastinal and cervical drainage. A 43-year-old, previously healthy Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for treatment of acute mediastinitis. Computed tomography revealed gas collection around the mid-thoracic esophagus and bilateral pleural effusion. We performed mediastinal drainage via right thoracotomy. Cervicotomy was performed on postoperative day 14 to drain a residual cervical abscess. The patient required the extraction of ten teeth over three procedures to address primary odontogenic infection before his fever resolved on postoperative day 40. Prompt diagnosis, aggressive drainage and removal of the source of infection can improve survival among patients with this life-threatening disease.

  10. Necrotizing Fasciitis: Diagnostic Challenges in a Mute Bedridden Patient with Atypical Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghan-Shyam Lohiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old mute bedridden patient required parenteral corticosteroids and antibiotics, and hospitalization for an acute respiratory illness. After 2 days, staff noted a ~0.3 cm blister on the patient’s right heel. Within 19 hours, blistering increased and the foot became partly gangrenous. The patient developed high fever (40.3°C, and leukocytosis (count: 13×109/L; was 6.5×109/L ten days earlier. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF was diagnosed and treated with emergency leg amputation. Histopathology revealed necrosis of fascia, muscle, subcutaneous tissue, and skin. In bedridden patients, corticosteroids may particularly facilitate serious infections, and initial NF blistering may be mistaken for pressure ulcers. Vigilant and frequent whole body monitoring is necessary for all patients incapable of verbalizing their symptoms.

  11. Percutaneous transgastric irrigation drainage in combination with endoscopic necrosectomy in necrotizing pancreatitis (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczynski, Susanne; Teich, Niels; Borte, Gudrun; Wittenburg, Henning; Mössner, Joachim; Caca, Karel

    2006-09-01

    Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic acute and chronic pseudocysts and pancreatic necrosectomy have been shown to be beneficial for critically ill patients, with complete endoscopic resolution rates of around 80%. Our purpose was to describe an improved endoscopic technique used to treat pancreatic necrosis. Case report. University hospital. Two patients with large retroperitoneal necroses were treated with percutaneous transgastric retroperitoneal flushing tubes and a percutaneous transgastric jejunal feeding tube by standard percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy access in addition to endoscopic necrosectomy. Intensive percutaneous transgastric flushing in combination with percutaneous normocaloric enteral nutrition and repeated endoscopic necrosectomy led to excellent outcomes in both patients. Small number of patients. The "double percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy" approach for simultaneous transgastric drainage and normocaloric enteral nutrition in severe cases of pancreatic necroses is safe and effective. It could be a promising improvement to endoscopic transgastric treatment options in necrotizing pancreatitis.

  12. Electroencephalogram of Age-Dependent Epileptic Encephalopathies in Infancy and Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Wong-Kisiel, Lily C.; Nickels, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy syndromes are disorders in which the epileptiform abnormalities are thought to contribute to a progressive cerebral dysfunction. Characteristic electroencephalogram findings have an important diagnostic value in classification of epileptic encephalopathy syndromes. In this paper, we focus on electroencephalogram findings of childhood epileptic encephalopathy syndromes and provide sample illustrations.

  13. Clinical characteristics and prognosis in patients with hyponatremic encephalopathy

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    Jorge Cestari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyponatremic encephalopathy mortality rate reaches about 50% in some special groups of patients (pediatric, child-bearing age women, etc.. However, morbimortality seems to be much lower in men and elderly population. Methods: A retrospective and observational study on patients with hyponatremic encephalopathy diagnosis was carried out. Results: 47 patients with hyponatremic encephalopathy diagnosis were identified. It was an elderly population (age 69±15 years with women prevalence. In-hospital mortality was 19.1% and neurological aftermaths in the survivors were 27%. Charlson score and delay to initiate treatment were associated to larger in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: mortality rate observed in our population is less than the one observed in other cohorts, probably due to the fact of being a low risk population. In a logistic regression model, delay in initiating an adequate treatment is associated to larger mortality rate in the studied population.

  14. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

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    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  15. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

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    Mohamed Adnane Berdai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate.

  16. A Critical Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Induced by Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Ju Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible but potentially critical disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Most patients complain of symptoms such as ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and confusion. Heavy alcohol drinking is commonly associated with the disease, but other clinical conditions also can provoke it. In pregnant women, hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to the depletion of body thiamine due to poor oral intake and a high metabolic demand. We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum in a 36-year-old female at 20 weeks of pregnancy, who visited our hospital because of shock with vaginal bleeding. This case suggests that although the initial presentation may include atypical symptoms (e.g., shock or bleeding, Wernicke’s encephalopathy should be considered, and thiamine replacement should be performed in pregnant women with neurologic symptoms and poor oral intake.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnan, L.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Berlot, G.

    1998-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an uncommon disorder caused by a thiamine deficiency which is clinically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and disturbances of consciousness, each finding being variably present. The disease is caused by malnutrition or malabsorption, and is often associated with prolonged alcohol intake, neoplasm and extensive inflammatory processes of the digestive tract and parenteral hyperalimentation-induced gastrointestinal mucosal atrophy. Clinical diagnosis can be elusive and MRI may be the only imaging technique able to detect the cerebral lesions, whose type and distribution are characteristic of the Wernicke's encephalopathy, whereas CT is positive only in exceptional cases. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a Wernicke's encephalopathy 1 month after a colonic resection with signal intensity changes located in the mammillary bodies and in the medial thalamic nuclei. (orig.)

  18. Clinical and radiological features of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qiu LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. Methods  The clinical and imaging data of 3 cases of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy were summarized and analyzed for the purpose of improving the acumen in diagnosis and treatment. Results All the 3 patients showed relatively mild clinical symptoms, and they were misdiagnosed in different degrees during the treatment, but their clinical symptoms were improved by rapid and effective antihypertensive therapy. Cerebral CT and MRI scans revealed extensive abnormal signals in brain stem, with or without supratentorial lesions and brain stem hemorrhage. The lesions as revealed by imaging were improved significantly after treatment. Conclusions Clinical-radiographic dissociation is the classic feature of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. The clinical symptoms and lesions as shown by imaging could be improved after active treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.03

  19. Intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy for children with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Maria Carmela; Randazzo, Giovanna; Masnada, Silvia; Dontin, Serena Donetti; De Giorgis, Valentina; Balottin, Umberto; Veggiotti, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study of children affected by epileptic encephalopathy was to evaluate seizure frequency, electroencephalographic pattern and neuropsychological status, before and after intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Eleven children with epileptic encephalopathy were administered one cycle of intravenous methylprednisolone (15-30 mg/kg/day for three consecutive days, once a month for four months) in addition to constant dosages of their regular antiepileptic drugs. The treatment resulted in statistically significant reductions of generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges (ptreatment regimen did not cause significant or persistent adverse effects. We suggest that children with epileptic encephalopathy without an underlying structural lesion could be the best candidates for intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  20. Hippocampal sclerosis and chronic epilepsy following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapina, Viktoria; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Vulliemoz, Serge; Fluss, Joel; Seeck, Margitta

    2013-12-01

    Chronic epilepsy has rarely been reported after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and the association with hippocampal sclerosis has been suggested only once before. We report the case of a girl admitted at the age of 8 years with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. On the second day of admission, she presented with focal complex seizures and cerebral MRI showed posterior encephalopathy and no hippocampal sclerosis. MRI after one month confirmed the diagnosis of PRES. The seizures recurred and the girl developed pharmacoresistant epilepsy and was admitted to our hospital for further investigation. Cerebral MRI three years after the diagnosis of PRES showed hippocampal sclerosis which was not present on the initial MRI. We conclude that there is a triggering role of PRES in the development of hippocampal sclerosis. Hippocampal sclerosis may have resulted from seizure-associated damage, alternatively, hypertensive encephalopathy may have led to hippocampal damage via a vascular mechanism.